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Sample records for fhc exhibits tumorigenic

  1. Rat embryo fibroblast cells expressing human papillomavirus 1a genes exhibit altered growth properties and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Loewenstein, P M

    1986-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 1a (HPV1a) induces benign tumors (papillomas or warts) in humans under natural conditions of infection but has not been found to replicate significantly in cell culture or in experimental animals. To establish model systems to study the oncogenic properties and expression of HPV genes, we established cell lines by cotransfecting the 3Y1 rat fibroblast cell line with HPV1a DNA constructs containing an intact early gene region and the Tn5 neomycin resistance gene. Most cell lines selected for expression of the neomycin resistance gene by treatment with the antibiotic G-418 contained viral DNA in a high-molecular-weight form. The growth characteristics of several cell lines containing high copy numbers of HPV1a DNA were studied further. They were shown to differ from the parental cell line and from G-418-resistant cell lines that did not incorporate viral DNA in the following properties: morphological alteration, increased cell density at confluence, growth in 0.5% serum, efficient anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, and rapid formation of tumors in nude mice. Those cell lines that possessed altered growth properties and tumorigenicity were found to express abundant quantities of polyadenylated virus-specific RNA species in the cytoplasm. Images PMID:3023676

  2. Everolimus exhibits anti-tumorigenic activity in obesity-induced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui; Zhong, Yan; Jackson, Amanda L.; Clark, Leslie H.; Kilgore, Josh; Zhang, Lu; Han, Jianjun; Sheng, Xiugui; Gilliam, Timothy P.; Gehrig, Paola A.; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Everolimus inhibits mTOR kinase activity and its downstream targets by acting on mTORC1 and has anti-tumorigenic activity in ovarian cancer. Clinical and epidemiologic data find that obesity is associated with worse outcomes in ovarian cancer. In addition, obesity leads to hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway in epithelial tissues, suggesting that mTOR inhibitors may be a logical choice for treatment in obesity-driven cancers. However, it remains unclear if obesity impacts the effect of everolimus on tumor growth in ovarian cancer. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of everolimus on cytotoxicity, cell metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle, cell stress and invasion in human ovarian cancer cells. A genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer fed a high fat diet or low fat diet allowed further investigation into the inter-relationship between everolimus and obesity in vivo. Everolimus significantly inhibited cellular proliferation, induced cell cycle G1 arrest and apoptosis, reduced invasion and caused cellular stress via inhibition of mTOR pathways in vitro. Hypoglycemic conditions enhanced the sensitivity of cells to everolimus through the disruption of glycolysis. Moreover, everolimus was found to inhibit ovarian tumor growth in both obese and lean mice. This reduction coincided with a decrease in expression of Ki-67 and phosphorylated-S6, as well as an increase in cleaved caspase 3 and phosphorylated-AKT. Metabolite profiling revealed that everolimus was able to alter tumor metabolism through different metabolic pathways in the obese and lean mice. Our findings support that everolimus may be a promising therapeutic agent for obesity-driven ovarian cancers. PMID:26959121

  3. Family health climate scale (FHC-scale): development and validation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The family environment is important for explaining individual health behaviour. While previous research mostly focused on influences among family members and dyadic interactions (parent-child), the purpose of this study was to develop a new measure, the Family Health Climate Scale (FHC-Scale), using a family-based approach. The FHC is an attribute of the whole family and describes an aspect of the family environment that is related to health and health behaviour. Specifically, a questionnaire measuring the FHC (a) for nutrition (FHC-NU) and (b) for activity behaviour (FHC-PA) was developed and validated. Methods In Study 1 (N = 787) the FHC scales were refined and validated. The sample was randomly divided into two subsamples. With random sample I exploratory factor analyses were conducted and items were selected according to their psychometric quality. In a second step, confirmatory factor analyses were conducted using the random sample II. In Study 2 (N = 210 parental couples) the construct validity was tested by correlating the FHC to self-determined motivation of healthy eating and physical activity as well as the families’ food environment and joint physical activities. Results Exploratory factor analyses with random sample I (Study 1) revealed a four (FHC-NU) and a three (FHC-PA) factor model. These models were cross-validated with random sample II and demonstrated an acceptable fit [FHC-PA: χ2 = 222.69, df = 74, p < .01; χ2/df = 3.01; CFI = .96; SRMR = .04; RMSEA = .07, CI .06/.08; FHC-NU: χ2 = 278.30, df = 113, p < .01, χ2/df = 2.46, CFI = .96; SRMR = .04; RMSEA = .06, CI .05/.07]. The perception of FHC correlated (p < .01) with the intrinsic motivation of healthy eating (r = .42) and physical activity (r = .56). Moreover, parental perceptions of FHC-NU correlated with household soft drink availability (r = -.31) and perceptions of FHC-PA with the frequency of

  4. Human Schwann cells exhibit long-term cell survival, are not tumorigenic and promote repair when transplanted into the contused spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Bastidas, Johana; Athauda, Gagani; De La Cruz, Gabriela; Chan, Wai-Man; Golshani, Roozbeh; Berrocal, Yerko; Henao, Martha; Lalwani, Anil; Mannoji, Chikato; Assi, Mazen; Otero, P Anthony; Khan, Aisha; Marcillo, Alexander E; Norenberg, Michael; Levi, Allan D; Wood, Patrick M; Guest, James D; Dietrich, W Dalton; Bartlett Bunge, Mary; Pearse, Damien D

    2017-08-01

    The transplantation of rodent Schwann cells (SCs) provides anatomical and functional restitution in a variety of spinal cord injury (SCI) models, supporting the recent translation of SCs to phase 1 clinical trials for human SCI. Whereas human (Hu)SCs have been examined experimentally in a complete SCI transection paradigm, to date the reported behavior of SCs when transplanted after a clinically relevant contusive SCI has been restricted to the use of rodent SCs. Here, in a xenotransplant, contusive SCI paradigm, the survival, biodistribution, proliferation and tumorgenicity as well as host responses to HuSCs, cultured according to a protocol analogous to that developed for clinical application, were investigated. HuSCs persisted within the contused nude rat spinal cord through 6 months after transplantation (longest time examined), exhibited low cell proliferation, displayed no evidence of tumorigenicity and showed a restricted biodistribution to the lesion. Neuropathological examination of the CNS revealed no adverse effects of HuSCs. Animals exhibiting higher numbers of surviving HuSCs within the lesion showed greater volumes of preserved white matter and host rat SC and astrocyte ingress as well as axon ingrowth and myelination. These results demonstrate the safety of HuSCs when employed in a clinically relevant experimental SCI paradigm. Further, signs of a potentially positive influence of HuSC transplants on host tissue pathology were observed. These findings show that HuSCs exhibit a favorable toxicity profile for up to 6 months after transplantation into the contused rat spinal cord, an important outcome for FDA consideration of their use in human clinical trials. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Functional effects of a tropomyosin mutation linked to FHC contribute to maladaptation during acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheehan, Katherine A.; Arteaga, Grace M.; Hinken, Aaron C.; Dias, Fernando A.; Ribeiro, Cibele; Wieczorek, David F.; Solaro, R. John; Wolska, Beata M.

    2010-01-01

    Familial Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy (FHC) is a leading cause of sudden cardiac death among young athletes but the functional effects of the myofilament mutations during FHC-associated ischemia and acidosis, due in part to increased extravascular compressive forces and microvascular dysfunction, are not well characterized. We tested the hypothesis that the FHC-linked tropomyosin (Tm) mutation Tm-E180G alters the contractile response to acidosis via increased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity. Intact papillary muscles from transgenic (TG) mice expressing Tm-E180G and exposed to acidic conditions (pH 6.9) exhibited a significantly smaller decrease in normalized isometric tension compared to non-transgenic (NTG) preparations. Times to peak tension and to 90% of twitch force relaxation in TG papillary muscles were significantly prolonged. Intact single ventricular TG myocytes demonstrated significantly less inhibition of unloaded shortening during moderate acidosis (pH 7.1) than NTG myocytes. The peak Ca2+ transients were not different for TG or NTG at any pH tested. The time constant of re-lengthening was slower in TG myocytes, but not the rate of Ca2+ decline. TG detergent-extracted fibers demonstrated increased Ca2+ sensitivity of force and maximal tension compared to NTG at both normal and acidic pH (pH 6.5). Tm phosphorylation was not different between TG and NTG muscles at either pH. Our data indicate that acidic pH diminished developed force in hearts of TG mice less than in NTG due to their inherently increased myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity, thus potentially contributing to altered energy demands and increased propensity for contractile dysfunction. PMID:21047515

  6. Analysis of fae and fhcD genes in Mono Lake, California.

    PubMed

    Nercessian, Olivier; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G; Joye, Samantha B; Lidstrom, Mary E; Chistoserdova, Ludmila

    2005-12-01

    Genes for two enzymes of the tetrahydromethanopterin-linked C(1) transfer pathway (fae and fhcD) were detected in hypersaline, hyperalkaline Mono Lake (California), via PCR amplification and analysis. Low diversity for fae and fhcD was noted, in contrast to the diversity previously detected in a freshwater lake, Lake Washington (Washington).

  7. Fluorescence Lifetime of Actin in the FHC Transgenic Heart1

    PubMed Central

    Mettikolla, P.; Luchowski, R.; Gryczynski, I.; Gryczynski, Z.; Szczesna-Cordary, D.; Borejdo, J.

    2009-01-01

    Clinical studies have revealed that the D166V mutation in the ventricular myosin regulatory light chain (RLC) can cause a malignant phenotype of familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC). It has been proposed that RLC induced FHC in the heart originates at the level of the myosin cross-bridge due to alterations in the rates of cross-bridge cycling. In this report we examine whether the environment of an active cross-bridge in cardiac myofibrils from transgenic (Tg) mice is altered by the D166V mutation in RLC. The cross-bridge environment was monitored by tracking the fluorescence lifetime (τ) of Alexa488-phalloidin labeled actin. The fluorescence lifetime is the averaged rate of decay of a fluorescent species from the excited state, which strongly depends on various environmental factors. We observed that the lifetime was high when cross-bridges were bound to actin and low when they were dissociated from it. The lifetime was measured every 50 msec from the center half of the I-band during 60 sec of rigor, relaxation and contraction of muscle. We found no differences between lifetimes of Tg-WT and Tg-D166V muscle during rigor, relaxation and contraction. The duty ratio expressed as a fraction of time that cross-bridges spend attached to the thin filaments during isometric contraction was similar in Tg-WT and Tg-D166V muscles. Since independent measurements showed a large decrease in the cross-bridge turnover rate in Tg-D166V muscle compared to Tg-WT, the fact that the duty cycle remains constant suggests that the D166V mutation of RLC causes a decrease in the rate of cross-bridge attachment to actin. PMID:19159226

  8. Protein from intestinal Eimeria protozoan stimulates IL-12 release from dendritic cells, exhibits antitumor properties in vivo and is correlated with low intestinal tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Barnett; Juckett, David A; Aylsworth, Charles F; Dimitrov, Nikolay V; Ho, Siu-Cheong; Judge, John W; Kessel, Sarah; Quensen, Janet; Wong, Kwai-Pheng Ho; Zlatkin, Igor; Zlatkin, Tanya

    2005-05-01

    The small intestine (SI) of vertebrates exhibits low tumorigenesis and rarely supports metastatic growth from distant tumors. Many theories have been proposed to address this phenomenon, but none has been consistently supported. One candidate mechanism is that the vast immunologic compartment of the SI provides a heightened level of tumor immunosurveillance. Consistent with this, we have identified a molecule of low abundance from bovine SI that has the hallmarks of a potent immunostimulant and may be associated with the natural suppression of cancer in the intestinal tract. The protein originates from an endemic gut protozoan, Eimeria spp., and is homologous to the antigen 3-1E previously isolated from the avian apicomplexan E. acervulina. We show here that it is a very potent stimulator of IL-12 release from dendritic cells, upregulates inflammatory modulators in vivo (IL-12, MCP-1, IL-6, TNF-alpha and INF-gamma) and has antitumor properties in mice. In addition, it is synergistic in vitro with anti-CD40 antibody, IFN-gamma, IL-4 and GM-CSF; is active across species barriers in vivo; and has no observable toxicity. Based on these activities, we speculate that it is an inducer of protozoan-targeted innate immunity, which may explain its potential benefit to the intestinal tract and potency as an agent in cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Simvastatin, an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, exhibits anti-metastatic and anti-tumorigenic effects in endometrial cancer1

    PubMed Central

    Schointuch, Monica N.; Gilliam, Timothy P.; Stine, Jessica E.; Han, Xiaoyun; Zhou, Chunxiao; Gehrig, Paola A.; Kim, Kenneth; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Our goal was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on endometrial cancer cell lines and primary cultures of endometrial cancer cells. METHODS Cell proliferation in the ECC-1 and Ishikawa endometrial cancer cell lines and primary cultures of endometrial cancer cells was assessed by MTT assay. Apoptosis and cell cycle were detected by Annexin V assay and propidium iodide staining, respectively. Reactive oxygen species and cell adhesion were assessed using ELISA assays. Invasion was analyzed using a transwell invasion assay. Mitochondrial DNA damage was confirmed using qPCR. The effects of simvastatin on the AKT/mTOR and MAPK pathways were determined by Western blotting. RESULTS Simvastatin inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner in both endometrial cancer cell lines and 5/8 primary cultures of endometrial cancer cells. Simvastatin treatment resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest, a reduction in the enzymatic activity of HMG-CoA, induction of apoptosis as well as DNA damage and cellular stress. Treatment with simvastatin resulted in inhibition of the MAPK pathway and exhibited differential effects on the AKT/mTOR pathway in the ECC-1 and Ishikawa cells. Minimal change in AKT phosphorylation was seen in both cell lines. An increase in phosphorylated S6 was seen in ECC-1 and a decrease was seen in Ishikawa. Treatment with simvastatin reduced cell adhesion and invasion (p<0.01) in both cell lines. CONCLUSION Simvastatin had significant anti-proliferative and anti-metastatic effects in endometrial cancer cells, possibly through modulation of the MAPK and AKT/mTOR pathways, suggesting that statins may be a promising treatment strategy for endometrial cancer. PMID:24880141

  10. Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: functional variance among individual cardiomyocytes as a trigger of FHC-phenotype development

    PubMed Central

    Brenner, Bernhard; Seebohm, Benjamin; Tripathi, Snigdha; Montag, Judith; Kraft, Theresia

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (FHC) is the most frequent inherited cardiac disease. It has been related to numerous mutations in many sarcomeric and even some non-sarcomeric proteins. So far, however, no common mechanism has been identified by which the many different mutations in different sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric proteins trigger development of the FHC phenotype. Here we show for different MYH7 mutations variance in force pCa-relations from normal to highly abnormal as a feature common to all mutations we studied, while direct functional effects of the different FHC-mutations, e.g., on force generation, ATPase or calcium sensitivity of the contractile system, can be quite different. The functional variation among individual M. soleus fibers of FHC-patients is accompanied by large variation in mutant vs. wildtype β-MyHC-mRNA. Preliminary results show a similar variation in mutant vs. wildtype β-MyHC-mRNA among individual cardiomyocytes. We discuss our previously proposed concept as to how different mutations in the β-MyHC and possibly other sarcomeric and non-sarcomeric proteins may initiate an FHC-phenotype by functional variation among individual cardiomyocytes that results in structural distortions within the myocardium, leading to cellular and myofibrillar disarray. In addition, distortions can activate stretch-sensitive signaling in cardiomyocytes and non-myocyte cells which is known to induce cardiac remodeling with interstitial fibrosis and hypertrophy. Such a mechanism will have major implications for therapeutic strategies to prevent FHC-development, e.g., by reducing functional imbalances among individual cardiomyocytes or by inhibition of their triggering of signaling paths initiating remodeling. Targeting increased or decreased contractile function would require selective targeting of mutant or wildtype protein to reduce functional imbalances. PMID:25346696

  11. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  12. Social protection in Brazil: universalism and targeting in the FHC and Lula administrations.

    PubMed

    Costa, Nilson do Rosário

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes the organization of Brazil's social protection system after the Federal Constitution of 1998 (CF 1988). It also demonstrates that 1988 Federal Constitution favored the institutionalization of universalist public policies. This institutionalization took place amidst conflict with the stabilization goals of the Real Plan. The paper argues that such an institutionalization protected public spending in the social area of the macroeconomic management's minimalist project. It also identifies the implementation of social programs targeting the poor during the 1980's decade. Targeting is an innovation directly associated with the adjustment agenda. It reveals that under the FHC and Lula administrations there was an identical adoption of targeted social programs. The targeting of social protection did not possess power of veto over the universalist proposals arising from the democratization in the 1980's. It demonstrates that the Bolsa Família Program (Family Grant Program - PBF), the main mark of the Lula administration, is a large scale adaptation of the targeted programs of direct transfer of income in the FHC administration. The combination of universalism and targeting expanded the scope of social policy. However, the significant growth in social public spending has not been producing broad social results, although the poor in Brazil have benefited from the PBF's targeting.

  13. Enhanced tumorigenicity by mitochondrial DNA mild mutations.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vallejo, Carmen G; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J; Gallardo, María Esther; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Quintanilla, Miguel; Garesse, Rafael

    2015-05-30

    To understand how mitochondria are involved in malignant transformation we have generated a collection of transmitochondrial cybrid cell lines on the same nuclear background (143B) but with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants with different degrees of pathogenicity. These include the severe mutation in the tRNALys gene, m.8363G>A, and the three milder yet prevalent Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutations in the MT-ND1 (m.3460G>A), MT-ND4 (m.11778G>A) and MT-ND6 (m.14484T>C) mitochondrial genes. We found that 143B ρ0 cells devoid of mtDNA and cybrids harboring wild type mtDNA or that causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction do not produce tumors when injected in nude mice. By contrast cybrids containing mild mutant mtDNAs exhibit different tumorigenic capacities, depending on OXPHOS dysfunction.The differences in tumorigenicity correlate with an enhanced resistance to apoptosis and high levels of NOX expression. However, the final capacity of the different cybrid cell lines to generate tumors is most likely a consequence of a complex array of pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction.Our results demonstrate the essential role of mtDNA in tumorigenesis and explain the numerous and varied mtDNA mutations found in human tumors, most of which give rise to mild mitochondrial dysfunction.

  14. Enhanced tumorigenicity by mitochondrial DNA mild mutations

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Bermúdez, Alberto; Vallejo, Carmen G.; Vicente-Blanco, Ramiro J.; Gallardo, María Esther; Fernández-Moreno, Miguel Ángel; Quintanilla, Miguel; Garesse, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    To understand how mitochondria are involved in malignant transformation we have generated a collection of transmitochondrial cybrid cell lines on the same nuclear background (143B) but with mutant mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variants with different degrees of pathogenicity. These include the severe mutation in the tRNALys gene, m.8363G>A, and the three milder yet prevalent Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) mutations in the MT-ND1 (m.3460G>A), MT-ND4 (m.11778G>A) and MT-ND6 (m.14484T>C) mitochondrial genes. We found that 143B ρ0 cells devoid of mtDNA and cybrids harboring wild type mtDNA or that causing severe mitochondrial dysfunction do not produce tumors when injected in nude mice. By contrast cybrids containing mild mutant mtDNAs exhibit different tumorigenic capacities, depending on OXPHOS dysfunction. The differences in tumorigenicity correlate with an enhanced resistance to apoptosis and high levels of NOX expression. However, the final capacity of the different cybrid cell lines to generate tumors is most likely a consequence of a complex array of pro-oncogenic and anti-oncogenic factors associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Our results demonstrate the essential role of mtDNA in tumorigenesis and explain the numerous and varied mtDNA mutations found in human tumors, most of which give rise to mild mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:25909222

  15. MicroRNAs as potential biomarkers for VERO cell tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Teferedegne, Belete; Macauley, Juliete; Foseh, Gideon; Dragunsky, Eugenia; Chumakov, Konstantin; Murata, Haruhiko; Peden, Keith; Lewis, Andrew M

    2014-08-20

    MicroRNA expression appears to capture the process of neoplastic development in vitro in the VERO line of African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells (Teferedegne et al. PLoS One 2010;5(12):e14416). In that study, specific miRNA signatures were correlated with the transition, during serial tissue-culture passage, of low-density passaged 10-87 VERO cells from a non-tumorigenic phenotype at passage (p) 148 to a tumorigenic phenotype at p256. In the present study, six miRNAs (miR-376a, miR-654-3p, miR-543, miR-299-3p, miR-134 and miR-369-3p) were chosen from the identified signature miRNAs for evaluation of their use as potential biomarkers to track the progression of neoplastic development in VERO cells. Cells from the 10-87 VERO cell line at passage levels from p148 to p256 were inoculated into newborn and adult athymic nude mice. No tumors were observed in animals inoculated with cells from p148 to p186. In contrast, tumor incidences of 20% developed only in newborn mice that received 10-87 VERO cells at p194, p234 and p256. By qPCR profiling of the signature miRNAs of 10-87 VERO cells from these cell banks, we identified p194 as the level at which signature miRNAs elevated concurrently with the acquisition of tumorigenic phenotype with similar levels expressed beyond this passage. In wound-healing assays at 10-passage intervals between p150 to p250, the cells displayed a progressive increase in migration from p165 to p186; beginning at p194 and higher passages thereafter, the cells exhibited the highest rates of migration. By qPCR analysis, the same signature miRNAs were overexpressed with concomitant acquisition of the tumorigenic phenotype in another lineage of 10-87 VERO cells passaged independently at high density. Correlation between the passages at which the cells expressed a tumorigenic phenotype and the passages representing peaks in expression levels of signature miRNAs indicates that these miRNAs are potential biomarkers for the expression of the VERO cell

  16. Test Series 2: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Exide FHC-19 battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D. A.; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

    1985-03-01

    The seismic-fragility of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and their thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the ''end-of-life'' of a battery if subjected to a seismic event. This report, the second in a test series of an extensive seismic research program, covers the testing of 10-year old lead-calcium Exide FHC-19 cells from the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station operated by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. The Exide cells were tested in two configurations using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, both rigidly and loosely mounted; and multicell (three-cell) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack. A total of six electrically active cells was used in the two different cell configurations.

  17. Dynamic epigenetic regulation of glioblastoma tumorigenicity through LSD1 modulation of MYC expression

    PubMed Central

    Kozono, David; Li, Jie; Nitta, Masayuki; Sampetrean, Oltea; Gonda, David; Kushwaha, Deepa S.; Merzon, Dmitry; Ramakrishnan, Valya; Zhu, Shan; Zhu, Kaya; Matsui, Hiroko; Harismendy, Olivier; Hua, Wei; Mao, Ying; Kwon, Chang-Hyuk; Saya, Hideyuki; Nakano, Ichiro; Pizzo, Donald P.; VandenBerg, Scott R.; Chen, Clark C.

    2015-01-01

    The available evidence suggests that the lethality of glioblastoma is driven by small subpopulations of cells that self-renew and exhibit tumorigenicity. It remains unclear whether tumorigenicity exists as a static property of a few cells or as a dynamically acquired property. We used tumor-sphere and xenograft formation as assays for tumorigenicity and examined subclones isolated from established and primary glioblastoma lines. Our results indicate that glioblastoma tumorigenicity is largely deterministic, yet the property can be acquired spontaneously at low frequencies. Further, these dynamic transitions are governed by epigenetic reprogramming through the lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1). LSD depletion increases trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 4 at the avian myelocytomatosis viral oncogene homolog (MYC) locus, which elevates MYC expression. MYC, in turn, regulates oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2), SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 2 (SOX2), and POU class 3 homeobox 2 (POU3F2), a core set of transcription factors required for reprogramming glioblastoma cells into stem-like states. Our model suggests epigenetic regulation of key transcription factors governs transitions between tumorigenic states and provides a framework for glioblastoma therapeutic development. PMID:26159421

  18. Isolation of tumorigenic circulating melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jie; Lin, Jennifer Y.; Alloo, Allireza; Wilson, Brian J.; Schatton, Tobias; Zhan, Qian; Murphy, George F.; Waaga-Gasser, Ana-Maria; Gasser, Martin; Hodi, F. Stephen; Frank, Natasha Y.; Frank, Markus H.

    2010-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) have been identified in several human malignancies, including malignant melanoma. However, whether melanoma CTC are tumorigenic and cause metastatic progression is currently unknown. Here we isolate for the first time viable tumorigenic melanoma CTC and demonstrate that this cell population is capable of metastasis formation in human-to-mouse xenotransplantation experiments. The presence of CTC among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of murine recipients of subcutaneous (s.c.) human melanoma xenografts could be detected based on mRNA expression for human GAPDH and/or ATP-binding cassette subfamily B member 5 (ABCB5), a marker of malignant melanoma-initiating cells previously shown to be associated with metastatic disease progression in human patients. ABCB5 expression could also be detected in PBMC preparations from human stage IV melanoma patients but not healthy controls. The detection of melanoma CTC in human-to-mouse s.c. tumor xenotransplantation models correlated significantly with pulmonary metastasis formation. Moreover, prospectively isolated CTC from murine recipients of s.c. melanoma xenografts were capable of primary tumor initiation and caused metastasis formation upon xenotransplantation to secondary murine NOD-scid IL2Rγnull recipients. Our results provide initial evidence that melanoma CTC are tumorigenic and demonstrate that CTC are capable of causing metastatic tumor progression. These findings suggest a need for CTC eradication to inhibit metastatic progression and provide a rationale for assessment of therapeutic responses of this tumorigenic cell population to promising emerging melanoma treatment modalities. PMID:20977885

  19. Hypoxia-Regulated Delta-like 1 Homologue Enhances Cancer Cell Stemness and Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuri; Lin, Qun; Zelterman, Daniel; Yun, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Reduced oxygenation, or hypoxia, inhibits differentiation and facilitates stem cell maintenance. Hypoxia commonly occurs in solid tumors and promotes malignant progression. Hypoxic tumors are aggressive and exhibit stem cell–like characteristics. It remains unclear, however, whether and how hypoxia regulates cancer cell differentiation and maintains cancer cell stemness. Here, we show that hypoxia increases the expression of the stem cell gene DLK1, or delta-like 1 homologue (Drosophila), in neuronal tumor cells. Inhibition of DLK1 enhances spontaneous differentiation, decreases clonogenicity, and reduces in vivo tumor growth. Overexpression of DLK1 inhibits differentiation and enhances tumorigenic potentials. We further show that the DLK1 cytoplasmic domain, especially Tyrosine339 and Serine355, is required for maintaining both clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. Because elevated DLK1 expression is found in many tumor types, our observations suggest that hypoxia and DLK1 may constitute an important stem cell pathway for the regulation of cancer stem cell–like functionality and tumorigenicity. PMID:19934310

  20. An in vivo screening system to identify tumorigenic genes.

    PubMed

    Ihara, T; Hosokawa, Y; Kumazawa, K; Ishikawa, K; Fujimoto, J; Yamamoto, M; Muramkami, T; Goshima, N; Ito, E; Watanabe, S; Semba, K

    2017-04-06

    Screening for oncogenes has mostly been performed by in vitro transformation assays. However, some oncogenes might not exhibit their transforming activities in vitro unless putative essential factors from in vivo microenvironments are adequately supplied. Here, we have developed an in vivo screening system that evaluates the tumorigenicity of target genes. This system uses a retroviral high-efficiency gene transfer technique, a large collection of human cDNA clones corresponding to ~70% of human genes and a luciferase-expressing immortalized mouse mammary epithelial cell line (NMuMG-luc). From 845 genes that were highly expressed in human breast cancer cell lines, we focused on 205 genes encoding membrane proteins and/or kinases as that had the greater possibility of being oncogenes or drug targets. The 205 genes were divided into five subgroups, each containing 34-43 genes, and then introduced them into NMuMG-luc cells. These cells were subcutaneously injected into nude mice and monitored for tumor development by in vivo imaging. Tumors were observed in three subgroups. Using DNA microarray analyses and individual tumorigenic assays, we found that three genes, ADORA2B, PRKACB and LPAR3, were tumorigenic. ADORA2B and LPAR3 encode G-protein-coupled receptors and PRKACB encodes a protein kinase A catalytic subunit. Cells overexpressing ADORA2B, LPAR3 or PRKACB did not show transforming phenotypes in vitro, suggesting that transformation by these genes requires in vivo microenvironments. In addition, several clinical data sets, including one for breast cancer, showed that the expression of these genes correlated with lower overall survival rate.

  1. SV40-IMMORTALIZED NON-TUMORIGENIC AND TUMORIGENIC CELL LINES DIFFER IN EXPRESSION OF HALLMARK VIRAL RESPONSE MRNAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SV40-Immortalized Non-Tumorigenic and Tumorigenic Cell Lines Differ in Expression of Hallmark Viral Response mRNAs.

    Prior to the use of an in vitra/in viva transformation system to examine the tumorigenic activity of environmental contaminants, in vitra gene expression pa...

  2. SV40-IMMORTALIZED NON-TUMORIGENIC AND TUMORIGENIC CELL LINES DIFFER IN EXPRESSION OF HALLMARK VIRAL RESPONSE MRNAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SV40-Immortalized Non-Tumorigenic and Tumorigenic Cell Lines Differ in Expression of Hallmark Viral Response mRNAs.

    Prior to the use of an in vitra/in viva transformation system to examine the tumorigenic activity of environmental contaminants, in vitra gene expression pa...

  3. Skin tumorigenic potential of benzanthrone: prevention by ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Neelam; Kumar, Sandeep; Ansari, Kausar M; Khanna, S K; Das, Mukul

    2013-09-01

    Benzanthrone (BA) exposed occupational workers have been found to exhibit toxicological manifestations in the skin, thus it is quite likely that long term exposure may lead to skin tumorigenicity. Thus, attempts were made to elucidate the tumor initiating and promoting potentials of pure (PBA) and commercial benzanthrone (CBA). Additionally, the preventive role of ascorbic acid (AsA) was also assessed. PBA showed tumor initiating activity while CBA demonstrated tumor initiating as well as promoting activities in two-stage mouse skin tumor protocol. Further, prior treatment of AsA to PBA and CBA followed by twice weekly application of 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbal myristate acetate (TPA) resulted into delayed onset of tumor formation and similarly single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz [α] anthracene (DMBA) followed by twice weekly application of AsA and CBA showed an increase in the latency period. Thus, AsA showed a protective effect against CBA promoted skin tumor. Furthermore, the topical application of CBA significantly increased the levels of xenobiotic enzymes. The animals topically treated with AsA along with topical application of CBA, restored all the impairment observed in enzyme activities. Thus, this study suggested that AsA can be useful in preventing PBA and CBA induced skin tumorigenicity.

  4. Folate levels modulate oncogene-induced replication stress and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Noa; Maoz, Karin; Bester, Assaf C; Im, Michael M; Shewach, Donna S; Karni, Rotem; Kerem, Batsheva

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal instability in early cancer stages is caused by replication stress. One mechanism by which oncogene expression induces replication stress is to drive cell proliferation with insufficient nucleotide levels. Cancer development is driven by alterations in both genetic and environmental factors. Here, we investigated whether replication stress can be modulated by both genetic and non-genetic factors and whether the extent of replication stress affects the probability of neoplastic transformation. To do so, we studied the effect of folate, a micronutrient that is essential for nucleotide biosynthesis, on oncogene-induced tumorigenicity. We show that folate deficiency by itself leads to replication stress in a concentration-dependent manner. Folate deficiency significantly enhances oncogene-induced replication stress, leading to increased DNA damage and tumorigenicity in vitro. Importantly, oncogene-expressing cells, when grown under folate deficiency, exhibit a significantly increased frequency of tumor development in mice. These findings suggest that replication stress is a quantitative trait affected by both genetic and non-genetic factors and that the extent of replication stress plays an important role in cancer development. PMID:26197802

  5. Tumorigenic Potential of Extracellular Matrix Metalloproteinase Inducer

    PubMed Central

    Zucker, Stanley; Hymowitz, Michelle; Rollo, Ellen E.; Mann, Richard; Conner, Cathleen E.; Cao, Jian; Foda, Hussein D.; Tompkins, David C.; Toole, Bryan P.

    2001-01-01

    Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN), a glycoprotein present on the cancer cell plasma membrane, enhances fibroblast synthesis of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). The demonstration that peritumoral fibroblasts synthesize most of the MMPs in human tumors rather than the cancer cells themselves has ignited interest in the role of EMMPRIN in tumor dissemination. In this report we have demonstrated a role for EMMPRIN in cancer progression. Human MDA-MB-436 breast cancer cells, which are tumorigenic but slow growing in vivo, were transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA and injected orthotopically into mammary tissue of female NCr nu/nu mice. Green fluorescent protein was used to visualize metastases. In three experiments, breast cancer cell clones transfected with EMMPRIN cDNA were considerably more tumorigenic and invasive than plasmid-transfected cancer cells. Increased gelatinase A and gelatinase B expression (demonstrated by in situ hybridization and gelatin substrate zymography) was demonstrated in EMMPRIN-enhanced tumors. In contrast to de novo breast cancers in humans, human tumors transplanted into mice elicited minimal stromal or inflammatory cell reactions. Based on these experimental studies and our previous demonstration that EMMPRIN is prominently displayed in human cancer tissue, we propose that EMMPRIN plays an important role in cancer progression by increasing synthesis of MMPs. PMID:11395366

  6. [The Fernando Henrique Cardoso (FHC) and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (Lula) governments and the policy for the civil servant workforce of the Brazilian government].

    PubMed

    Costa, Nilson do Rosario; Lamarca, Isabel

    2013-06-01

    This article analyzes the configuration of the active civil servant workforce of the Brazilian government during Fernando Henrique Cardoso - FHC - (1995-2002) and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva - Lula - (2003-2010) mandates. The article associates the condition of the workforce of the Brazilian government with the changes in the government coalition. The residual participation of the Ministry of Health (MOH) in the direct provision of public services influenced the downward trend of the federal workforce.The implementation of the Unified Health System (SUS) was strongly affected by the structural adjustment of the workforce at the federal level during the decades of 1990 and 2000.

  7. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  8. In vivo mutagenicity of conazole fungicides correlates with tumorigenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity te...

  9. In vivo mutagenicity of conazole fungicides correlates with tumorigenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity te...

  10. Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Bladder Cancer Growth And Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Fei, Dennis Liang; Sanchez-Mejias, Avencia; Wang, Zhiqiang; Flaveny, Colin; Long, Jun; Singh, Samer; Rodriguez-Blanco, Jezabel; Tokhunts, Robert; Giambelli, Camilla; Briegel, Karoline J.; Schulz, Wolfgang A.; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Karagas, Margaret; Zimmers, Teresa A.; Jorda, Merce; Bejarano, Pablo; Capobianco, Anthony J.; Robbins, David J.

    2012-01-01

    The role of HEDGEHOG (HH) signaling in bladder cancer remains controversial. The gene encoding the HH receptor and negative regulator PATCHED1 (PTCH1) resides on a region of chromosome 9q, one copy of which is frequently lost in bladder cancer. Inconsistent with PTCH1 functioning as a classic tumor suppressor gene, loss-of-function mutations in the remaining copy of PTCH1 are not commonly found. Here, we provide direct evidence for a critical role of HH signaling in bladder carcinogenesis. We show that transformed human urothelial cells and many urothelial carcinoma (UC) cell lines exhibit constitutive HH signaling, which is required for their growth and tumorigenic properties. Surprisingly, rather than originating from loss of PTCH1, the constitutive HH activity observed in UC cell lines was HH ligand-dependent. Consistent with this finding, increased levels of HH and the HH target gene product GLI1 were found in resected human primary bladder tumors. Furthermore, based on the difference in intrinsic HH dependence of UC cell lines, a gene expression signature was identified that correlated with bladder cancer progression. Our findings therefore indicate that therapeutic targeting of the HH signaling pathway may be beneficial in the clinical management of bladder cancer. PMID:22815529

  11. Coordination of signalling networks and tumorigenic properties by ABL in glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Arechederra, Maria; Baeza, Nathalie; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Helmbacher, Françoise; Maina, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic tyrosine kinase ABL exerts positive or negative effects in solid tumours according to the cellular context, thus functioning as a “switch modulator”. The therapeutic effects of drugs targeting a set of signals encompassing ABL have been explored in several solid tumours. However, the net contribution of ABL inhibition by these agents remains elusive as these drugs also act on other signalling components. Here, using glioblastoma (GBM) as a cellular paradigm, we report that ABL inhibition exacerbates mesenchymal features as highlighted by down-regulation of epithelial markers and up-regulation of mesenchymal markers. Cells with permanent ABL inhibition exhibit enhanced motility and invasive capabilities, while proliferation and tumorigenic properties are reduced. Intriguingly, permanent ABL inhibition also interferes with GBM neurosphere formation and with expression of stemness markers in sphere-cultured GBM cells. Furthermore, we show that the molecular and biological characteristics of GBM cells with impaired ABL are reversible by restoring ABL levels, thus uncovering a remarkable plasticity of GBM cells to ABL threshold. A phospho-signalling screen revealed that loss of tumorigenic and self-renewal properties in GBM cells under permanent ABL inhibition coincide with drastic changes in the expression and/or phosphorylation levels of multiple signalling components. Our findings identify ABL as a crucial player for migration, invasion, proliferation, tumorigenic, and stem-cell like properties of GBM cells. Taken together, this work supports the notion that the oncogenic role of ABL in GBM cells is associated with its capability to coordinate a signalling setting that determines tumorigenic and stem-cell like properties. PMID:27732969

  12. Tumorigenicity studies for human pluripotent stem cell-derived products.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Takuya; Yasuda, Satoshi; Sato, Yoji

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), i.e. human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells, are able to self-renew and differentiate into multiple cell types. Because of these abilities, numerous attempts have been made to utilize hPSCs in regenerative medicine/cell therapy. hPSCs are, however, also tumorigenic, that is, they can give rise to the progressive growth of tumor nodules in immunologically unresponsive animals. Therefore, assessing and managing the tumorigenicity of all final products is essential in order to prevent ectopic tissue formation, tumor development, and/or malignant transformation elicited by residual pluripotent stem cells after implantation. No detailed guideline for the tumorigenicity testing of hPSC-derived products has yet been issued for regenerative medicine/cell therapy, despite the urgent necessity. Here, we describe the current situations and issues related to the tumorigenicity testing of hPSC-derived products and we review the advantages and disadvantages of several types of tumorigenicity-associated tests. We also refer to important considerations in the execution and design of specific studies to monitor the tumorigenicity of hPSC-derived products.

  13. Vibrational spectroscopy of viable paired tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mourant, Judith R.; Yamada, Yujiro R.; Carpenter, Susan; Guerra, Anabel; Schoonover, Jon R.; Freyer, James P.

    2002-03-01

    Infrared absorption of two pairs of non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic cells suspended in phosphate buffered saline have been measured. Suspensions of cells with several different growth cycle distributions were measured. The effect of both growth cycle and tumorigenity on the infrared absorption spectrum will be presented. For example, changes in absorption in the phosphate absorption region were observed for suspensions with different cell cycle distributions. We will discuss the biochemistry which may cause these changes. We have found that spectra of isolated nuclei allow the DNA spectra to be studied, without the confounding influence of RNA. Therefore, the measurement of isolated nuclei may represent a method of detecting changes in DNA architecture with cell cycle. As part of this exploratory study we have also examined the variation in spectra with cell type and compared epithelial cells with fibroblast cells. Very little change was observed. Similarly we saw very little change in the spectra of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells harvested with similar cell cycle distributions. Changes in the spectra were observed when rapidly growing tumorigenic cells were compared to slowly replicating nontumorigenic cells.

  14. Identification of Coordinately Regulated Functional Modules in Thyroid Tissues from Rats Exposed to a Tumorigenic and a Non-Tumorigenic Conazole Fungicide Using Oncomine®

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are triazole- or imidazole-containing fungicides used in agriculture and medicine. Using transcriptomic analysis of rat thyroid tissues exposed to either tumorigenic or non-tumorigenic structurally related conazoles, we identified new findings on thyroid gene expressio...

  15. Identification of Coordinately Regulated Functional Modules in Thyroid Tissues from Rats Exposed to a Tumorigenic and a Non-Tumorigenic Conazole Fungicide Using Oncomine®

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are triazole- or imidazole-containing fungicides used in agriculture and medicine. Using transcriptomic analysis of rat thyroid tissues exposed to either tumorigenic or non-tumorigenic structurally related conazoles, we identified new findings on thyroid gene expressio...

  16. Neonatal mouse assay for tumorigenicity: alternative to the chronic rodent bioassay.

    PubMed

    Flammang, T J; Tungeln, L S; Kadlubar, F F; Fu, P P

    1997-10-01

    The chronic rodent bioassay for tumors has been utilized systematically for 25 years to identify chemicals with carcinogenic potential in man. In general, those chemicals exhibiting tumorigenicity at multiple sites in both mice and rats have been regarded as possessing strong carcinogenic potential in humans. In comparison, the value of data collected for those test chemicals exhibiting more sporadic tumorigenicity results (e.g., single species/single sex or dose-independent) has been questioned. As knowledge of the carcinogenic process has increased, several alternative test systems, usually faster and less expensive than the 2-year bioassay, have been suggested for identification of the strongly acting, transspecies carcinogens. The International Conference on Harmonization for Technical Requirements for the Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use has proposed an international standard that allows for the use of one long-term rodent carcinogenicity study, plus one supplementary study to identify potential human pharmaceutical carcinogens. The neonatal mouse assay for tumorigenicity has been used since 1959; however, relative to other alternate tests, little has been written about this system. It is clear that this assay system successfully identifies transspecies carcinogens from numerous chemical classes, thus recommending itself as a strong candidate for a supplementary study to identify potential human carcinogens. In contrast, there are decidedly less data available from this assay in response to pharmaceuticals shown to exhibit weak and/or conflicting results in the 2-year bioassay, knowledge invaluable to the regulatory process. This paper reviews the historical development and our experience with the neonatal mouse assay and includes suggestions for a standardized protocol and strategies to document its response to "weak" and/or "nongenotoxic" carcinogens.

  17. Phenotypic heterogeneity among tumorigenic melanoma cells from patients that is reversible and not hierarchically organized

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, Elsa; Shackleton, Mark; Foster, Hannah R.; Fullen, Douglas R.; Sabel, Michael S.; Johnson, Timothy M.; Morrison, Sean J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary We investigated whether melanoma is hierarchically organized into phenotypically distinct subpopulations of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells, or whether most melanoma cells retain tumorigenic capacity, irrespective of their phenotype. We found 28% of single melanoma cells obtained directly from patients formed tumors in NOD/SCID IL2Rγnull mice. All stage II, III, and IV melanomas obtained directly from patients had common tumorigenic cells. All tumorigenic cells appeared to have unlimited tumorigenic capacity upon serial transplantation. We were unable to find any large subpopulation of melanoma cells that lacked tumorigenic potential. None of 22 heterogeneously-expressed markers, including CD271 and ABCB5, enriched tumorigenic cells. Some melanomas metastasized in mice, irrespective of whether they arose from CD271- or CD271+ cells. Many markers appeared to be reversibly expressed by tumorigenic melanoma cells. Significance In cancers that follow a stem cell model, phenotypically distinct tumorigenic cells form abundant and phenotypically diverse non-tumorigenic progeny in a hierarchical manner that resembles normal stem cell differentiation. In contrast to this model, our results indicate that primary cutaneous or metastatic melanomas from patients have common and phenotypically diverse tumorigenic cells that undergo reversible phenotypic changes in vivo. Most of the phenotypic heterogeneity in melanoma is therefore not associated with a loss of tumorigenic potential or organized in stable hierarchies. These data suggest a phenotypic plasticity model in which phenotypic heterogeneity is driven largely by reversible changes within lineages of tumorigenic cells rather than by irreversible epigenetic or genetic changes. PMID:21075313

  18. Exhibiting Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Deborah; Elbaz-Luwisch, Freema

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines some of the dilemmas that accompany the emergence of the personal voice in scholarly work, by taking a close, grounded look at the way in which these unfolded in a specific academic course. As part of the course, entitled "A cultural approach to the life cycle", students were asked to participate in a group exhibition in which…

  19. Exhibiting Lives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golden, Deborah; Elbaz-Luwisch, Freema

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines some of the dilemmas that accompany the emergence of the personal voice in scholarly work, by taking a close, grounded look at the way in which these unfolded in a specific academic course. As part of the course, entitled "A cultural approach to the life cycle", students were asked to participate in a group exhibition in which…

  20. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA damage correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazolefungicides triadimefon and propiconazole have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazole myclobutanil w...

  1. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA damage correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazolefungicides triadimefon and propiconazole have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazole myclobutanil w...

  2. Phenotypic heterogeneity among tumorigenic melanoma cells from patients that is reversible and not hierarchically organized.

    PubMed

    Quintana, Elsa; Shackleton, Mark; Foster, Hannah R; Fullen, Douglas R; Sabel, Michael S; Johnson, Timothy M; Morrison, Sean J

    2010-11-16

    We investigated whether melanoma is hierarchically organized into phenotypically distinct subpopulations of tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells or whether most melanoma cells retain tumorigenic capacity, irrespective of their phenotype. We found 28% of single melanoma cells obtained directly from patients formed tumors in NOD/SCID IL2Rγ(null) mice. All stage II, III, and IV melanomas obtained directly from patients had common tumorigenic cells. All tumorigenic cells appeared to have unlimited tumorigenic capacity on serial transplantation. We were unable to find any large subpopulation of melanoma cells that lacked tumorigenic potential. None of 22 heterogeneously expressed markers, including CD271 and ABCB5, enriched tumorigenic cells. Some melanomas metastasized in mice, irrespective of whether they arose from CD271(-) or CD271(+) cells. Many markers appeared to be reversibly expressed by tumorigenic melanoma cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Transcriptional responses in thyroid tissues from rats treated with a tumorigenic and a non-tumorigenic triazole conazole fungicide

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, Susan D. Nesnow, Stephen

    2008-03-15

    Conazoles are azole-containing fungicides that are used in agriculture and medicine. Conazoles can induce follicular cell adenomas of the thyroid in rats after chronic bioassay. The goal of this study was to identify pathways and networks of genes that were associated with thyroid tumorigenesis through transcriptional analyses. To this end, we compared transcriptional profiles from tissues of rats treated with a tumorigenic and a non-tumorigenic conazole. Triadimefon, a rat thyroid tumorigen, and myclobutanil, which was not tumorigenic in rats after a 2-year bioassay, were administered in the feed to male Wistar/Han rats for 30 or 90 days similar to the treatment conditions previously used in their chronic bioassays. Thyroid gene expression was determined using high density Affymetrix GeneChips (Rat 230{sub 2}). Gene expression was analyzed by the Gene Set Expression Analyses method which clearly separated the tumorigenic treatments (tumorigenic response group (TRG)) from the non-tumorigenic treatments (non-tumorigenic response group (NRG)). Core genes from these gene sets were mapped to canonical, metabolic, and GeneGo processes and these processes compared across group and treatment time. Extensive analyses were performed on the 30-day gene sets as they represented the major perturbations. Gene sets in the 30-day TRG group had over representation of fatty acid metabolism, oxidation, and degradation processes (including PPAR{gamma} and CYP involvement), and of cell proliferation responses. Core genes from these gene sets were combined into networks and found to possess signaling interactions. In addition, the core genes in each gene set were compared with genes known to be associated with human thyroid cancer. Among the genes that appeared in both rat and human data sets were: Acaca, Asns, Cebpg, Crem, Ddit3, Gja1, Grn, Jun, Junb, and Vegf. These genes were major contributors in the previously developed network from triadimefon-treated rat thyroids. It is

  4. Museum Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A TSP from NASA Tech Briefs provided the solution to an electrical problem at a Florida museum. When a model train would not start without a jerk, a Marshall Space Flight Center development called pulse width control was adapted. The new circuit enables the train to start smoothly and reduces construction and maintenance costs. The same technology is also used in another hands-on exhibit. Applications of other TSPs are anticipated.

  5. Tumorigenic effects of dichloroacetic acid in female F344 rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a halogenated organic acid produced during oxidant disinfection of drinking water. Prior studies indicate that DCA may increase liver tumors in mice. Here we evaluated the hepatic tumorigenicity of DCA in female rats when given alone ...

  6. Tumorigenic effects of dichloroacetic acid in female F344 rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a halogenated organic acid produced during oxidant disinfection of drinking water. Prior studies indicate that DCA may increase liver tumors in mice. Here we evaluated the hepatic tumorigenicity of DCA in female rats when given alone ...

  7. Outdoor Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) at the John C. Stennis Space Center has exhibits located in front of the Visitors Center. These boat-shaped buoys are moored in areas of the ocean that experience hostile environmental conditions. The instruments installed gather information and relay it to the National Weather Service by satellite. Nomad buoys are 20 feet long and weigh 13,900 pounds. They provide information on wind speed and direction, humidity levels, air and sea surface temperature and air pressure. U.S. Coast Guard ships transport buoys to their mooring sites.

  8. Outdoor Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) at the John C. Stennis Space Center has exhibits located in front of the Visitors Center. These boat-shaped buoys are moored in areas of the ocean that experience hostile environmental conditions. The instruments installed gather information and relay it to the National Weather Service by satellite. Nomad buoys are 20 feet long and weigh 13,900 pounds. They provide information on wind speed and direction, humidity levels, air and sea surface temperature and air pressure. U.S. Coast Guard ships transport buoys to their mooring sites.

  9. ASCL1 Reorganizes Chromatin to Direct Neuronal Fate and Suppress Tumorigenicity of Glioblastoma Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Nicole I; Guilhamon, Paul; Desai, Kinjal; McAdam, Rochelle F; Langille, Ellen; O'Connor, Madlen; Lan, Xiaoyang; Whetstone, Heather; Coutinho, Fiona J; Vanner, Robert J; Ling, Erick; Prinos, Panagiotis; Lee, Lilian; Selvadurai, Hayden; Atwal, Gurnit; Kushida, Michelle; Clarke, Ian D; Voisin, Veronique; Cusimano, Michael D; Bernstein, Mark; Das, Sunit; Bader, Gary; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Angers, Stephane; Huang, Xi; Lupien, Mathieu; Dirks, Peter B

    2017-08-03

    Glioblastomas exhibit a hierarchical cellular organization, suggesting that they are driven by neoplastic stem cells that retain partial yet abnormal differentiation potential. Here, we show that a large subset of patient-derived glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) express high levels of Achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1), a proneural transcription factor involved in normal neurogenesis. ASCL1(hi) GSCs exhibit a latent capacity for terminal neuronal differentiation in response to inhibition of Notch signaling, whereas ASCL1(lo) GSCs do not. Increasing ASCL1 levels in ASCL1(lo) GSCs restores neuronal lineage potential, promotes terminal differentiation, and attenuates tumorigenicity. ASCL1 mediates these effects by functioning as a pioneer factor at closed chromatin, opening new sites to activate a neurogenic gene expression program. Directing GSCs toward terminal differentiation may provide therapeutic applications for a subset of GBM patients and strongly supports efforts to restore differentiation potential in GBM and other cancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. ATM kinase sustains HER2 tumorigenicity in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stagni, Venturina; Manni, Isabella; Oropallo, Veronica; Mottolese, Marcella; Di Benedetto, Anna; Piaggio, Giulia; Falcioni, Rita; Giaccari, Danilo; Di Carlo, Selene; Sperati, Francesca; Cencioni, Maria Teresa; Barilà, Daniela

    2015-04-16

    ATM kinase preserves genomic stability by acting as a tumour suppressor. However, its identification as a component of several signalling networks suggests a dualism for ATM in cancer. Here we report that ATM expression and activity promotes HER2-dependent tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. We reveal a correlation between ATM activation and the reduced time to recurrence in patients diagnosed with invasive HER2-positive breast cancer. Furthermore, we identify ATM as a novel modulator of HER2 protein stability that acts by promoting a complex of HER2 with the chaperone HSP90, therefore preventing HER2 ubiquitination and degradation. As a consequence, ATM sustains AKT activation downstream of HER2 and may modulate the response to therapeutic approaches, suggesting that the status of ATM activity may be informative for the treatment and prognosis of HER2-positive tumours. Our findings provide evidence for ATM's tumorigenic potential revising the canonical role of ATM as a pure tumour suppressor.

  11. Tumorigenic properties of alternative osteopontin isoforms in mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Sergey V.; Ivanova, Alla V.; Goparaju, Chandra M.V.; Chen, Yuanbin; Beck, Amanda; Pass, Harvey I.

    2009-05-08

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is an inflammatory cytokine that we previously characterized as a diagnostic marker in patients with asbestos-induced malignant mesothelioma (MM). While SPP1 shows both pro- and anti-tumorigenic biological effects, little is known about the molecular basis of these activities. In this study, we demonstrate that while healthy pleura possesses all three differentially spliced SPP1 isoforms (A-C), in clinical MM specimens isoform A is markedly up-regulated and predominant. To provide a clue to possible functions of the SPP1 isoforms we next performed their functional evaluation via transient expression in MM cell lines. As a result, we report that isoforms A-C demonstrate different activities in cell proliferation, wound closure, and invasion assays. These findings suggest different functions for SPP1 isoforms and underline pro-tumorigenic properties of isoforms A and B.

  12. NFAT Signaling and the Tumorigenic Microenvironment of the Prostate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    the development of non -invasive clinical tests. Second, the illustration of the main cellular and molecular components in the tumorigenic...that NFATc1 promotes PCa by regulating oncogenic proteins in the prostatic epithelium and by non -cell autonomous effects on other cells through...features (Fig. 1A-B). However, the distinct nuclear AR staining seen in the prostate of non -castrated mice was replaced by a weaker and more

  13. [Effects of α1-PDX, a furin inhibitor, on growth, invasion, and tumorigenicity of cervical cancer HeLa cells].

    PubMed

    Shi, Chong; Zhang, Guobin; Han, Baosheng; Yang, Junhong; Liu, Heng; Xi, Jinkun

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the effects of the furin inhibitor α1-PDX on the growth, invasion, and tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells and explore the mechanisms. The changes in the growth, migration and invasion of α1-PDX-transfected HeLa cells were observed using MTT assay, Boyden migration and invasion assay. The protein levels of furin and MT1-MMP were measured using Western blotting and furin activity was detected by enzyme activity assay in the transfected cells. HeLa cells were seeded subcutaneously in nude mice and the tumor volume changes were recorded. Compared with the control cells, α1-PDX-treated cells showed a significant growth inhibition by 18.4% at 24 h (P<0.01) with obviously lowered migration ability and cell invasiveness (P<0.01). Treatment with α1-PDX significantly reduced furin enzyme activity and MTI-MMP protein levels in HeLa cells. In nude mice, α1-PDX-treated HeLa cells exhibited a delayed and lowered tumorigenicity with reduced size of the tumors. α1-PDX can inhibit the growth, metastasis and tumorigenicity of HeLa cells, the mechanism of which may involve a decreased furin activity and MTI-MMP expression.

  14. Pouterin, a novel potential cytotoxic lectin-like protein with apoptosis-inducing activity in tumorigenic mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Boleti, Ana Paula de A; Ventura, Cláudio A; Justo, Giselle Z; Silva, Rodrigo A; de Sousa, Ana Carolina T; Ferreira, Carmen V; Yano, Tomomasa; Macedo, Maria Lígia R

    2008-06-15

    In this study, the cytotoxicity of pouterin in tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mammalian cell lines was investigated. We found that HeLa, Hep-2 and HT-29 tumor cells were highly sensitive to pouterin cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner, whereas non-tumorigenic Vero cells and human lymphocytes were relatively resistant to the protein. Among the tumor cell lines, HeLa cells showed the highest susceptibility to pouterin cytotoxicity, exhibiting a time-dependent increase in LDH leakage and an IC(50) value of 5mug/mL. Morphological alterations such as rounding, cell shrinkage and chromatin condensation, consistent with apoptotic cell death were observed. Apoptosis induction was demonstrated by DNA fragmentation as detected by terminal dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL). Furthermore, HeLa cells incubated with pouterin showed disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Western blot analysis revealed that pouterin caused increased expression of p21, thus indicating cell cycle arrest. Subsequent studies provided evidence that apoptosis may be partially explained in the activation of the tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1) signaling. Interestingly, a time-dependent decrease of the expression of p65 nuclear factor kappa B (NFkappaB) subunit, concomitant with a downregulation of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (IAP1) was observed, suggesting that TNFR-mediated apoptosis is the predominant pathway induced by pouterin in HeLa cells.

  15. ALG2 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation, migration and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dunke; Wang, Feng; Pang, Yi; Zhao, Erhu; Zhu, Sunqin; Chen, Fei; Cui, Hongjuan

    2017-04-29

    Apoptosis-linked gene-2 (ALG-2), also known as programmed cell death 6 (PDCD6), has recently been reported to be aberrantly expressed in various tumors and required for tumor cell viability. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether ALG-2 plays a crucial role in tumor cell proliferation, migration and tumorigenicity. In this study, we examined the expression of PDCD6 in glioblastoma cell lines and found that ALG-2 was generally expressed in glioblastoma cell lines. We also performed an analysis of an online database and found that high expression of ALG-2 was associated with poor prognosis (p = 0.039). We found that over-expression of ALG2 in glioblastoma could inhibit cell proliferation and, conversely, that down-regulation of ALG2 could promote cell proliferation. Further studies showed that over-expression of ALG2 inhibited the migration of tumor cells, whereas down-regulation of ALG2 promoted tumor cell migration. Finally, in vitro and in vivo studies showed that over-expression of ALG2 inhibited the tumorigenic ability of tumor cells, while down-regulation of ALG2 promoted tumor cell tumorigenic ability. In conclusion, ALG2 has a tumor suppressive role in glioblastoma and might be a potential target for the treatment of glioblastoma. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Altered tumor cell growth and tumorigenicity in models of microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, K.; Taga, M.; Furian, L.; Odle, J.; Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N.; Andrassy, R.; Kulkarni, A.

    Spaceflight environment and microgravity (MG) causes immune dysfunction and is a major health risk to humans, especially during long-term space missions. The effects of microgravity environment on tumor growth and carcinogenesis are yet unknown. Hence, we investigated the effects of simulated MG (SMG) on tumor growth and tumorigenicity using in vivo and in vitro models. B16 melanoma cells were cultured in static flask (FL) and rotating wall vessel bioreactors (BIO) to measure growth and properties, melanin production and apoptosis. BIO cultures had 50% decreased growth (p<0.01), increased doubling time and a 150% increase in melanin production (p<0.05). Flow cytometric analysis showed increased apoptosis in BIO. When BIO cultured melanoma cells were inoculated sc in mice there was a significant increase in tumorigenicity as compared to FL cells. Thus SMG may have supported &selected highly tumorigenic cells and it is pos sible that in addition to decreased immune function MG may alter tumor cell characteristics and invasiveness. Thus it is important to study effects of microgravity environment and its stressors using experimental tumors and SMG to understand and evaluate carcinogenic responses to true microgravity. Further studies on carcinogenic events and their mechanisms will allow us develop and formulate countermeasures and protect space travelers. Additional results will be presented. (Supported by NASA NCC8-168 grant, ADK)

  17. Overexpression of SLURP-1 and -2 alleviates the tumorigenic action of tobacco-derived nitrosamine on immortalized oral epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Juan; Chernyavsky, Alex I; Grando, Sergei A

    2007-10-15

    Recent research has demonstrated that mucocutaneous epithelial cells express functional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and that tobacco-derived carcinogenic nitrosamines, such as 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK), and SLURP (secreted mammalian Ly-6/urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-related protein)-1 and -2 can act as non-canonical ligands of these receptors. It was found that recombinant SLURP-1 and -2 can lessen tumorigenic activity of nitrosamines. The immortalized esophageal keratinocytes (Het-1A cells) exhibit low SLURP-1 and -2 mRNA levels that decrease further after treatment with NNK. Based on these observations, we hypothesized that overexpression of full length SLURP proteins may protect Het-1A cells from malignant transformation by NNK. The Het-1A cells transfected with either SLURP-1 or -2 vector produced the highest amounts of respective proteins between 24 and 48 h, at which point they were exposed to 1 microM NNK for 24 h and their tumorigenic activities were subsequently evaluated by plating in soft agar and injecting subcutaneously to Nu/Nu mice. Transfection with either SLURP-1 or -2 cDNA in both cases significantly (p<0.05) diminished the number of colonies produced by NNK exposed cells. SLURP-1 was more efficient than SLURP-2 in abolishing the tumorigenic effect in nude mice. Thus, the anti-tumorigenic activities of SLURP-1 and -2 were demonstrated both in vitro and in vivo. The obtained results suggest that SLURP-like proteins may become useful for developing novel anti-cancer therapies.

  18. Triple negative breast cancers comprise a highly tumorigenic cell subpopulation detectable by its high responsiveness to a Sox2 regulatory region 2 (SRR2) reporter

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Karen; Gupta, Nidhi; Wang, Peng; Lewis, Jamie T.; Gopal, Keshav; Wu, Fang; Ye, Xiaoxia; Alshareef, Abdulraheem; Abdulkarim, Bassam S.; Douglas, Donna N.; Kneteman, Norman M.; Lai, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    We have recently described a novel phenotypic dichotomy within estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer cells; the cell subset responsive to a Sox2 regulatory region (SRR2) reporter (RR cells) are significantly more tumorigenic than the reporter unresponsive (RU) cells. Here, we report that a similar phenomenon also exists in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), with RR cells more tumorigenic than RU cells. First, examination of all 3 TNBC cell lines stably infected with the SRR2 reporter revealed the presence of a cell subset exhibiting reporter activity. Second, RU and RR cells purified by flow cytometry showed that RR cells expressed higher levels of CD44, generated more spheres in a limiting dilution mammosphere formation assay, and formed larger and more complex structures in Matrigel. Third, within the CD44High/CD24− tumor-initiating cell population derived from MDA-MB-231, RR cells were significantly more tumorigenic than RU cells in an in vivo SCID/Beige xenograft mouse model. Examination of 4 TNBC tumors from patients also revealed the presence of a RR cell subset, ranging from 1.1-3.8%. To conclude, we described a novel phenotypic heterogeneity within TNBC, and the SRR2 reporter responsiveness is a useful marker for identifying a highly tumorigenic cell subset within the CD44High/CD24−tumor-initiating cell population. PMID:25868977

  19. Effect of MUC1/β-catenin interaction on the tumorigenic capacity of pancreatic CD133(+) cells.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Andreia Mota; Rei, Margarida; Freitas, Rita; Ricardo, Sara; Caffrey, Thomas; David, Leonor; Almeida, Raquel; Hollingsworth, Michael Anthony; Santos-Silva, Filipe

    2016-09-01

    Despite the fact that the biological function of cluster of differentiation (CD)133 remains unclear, this glycoprotein is currently used in the identification and isolation of tumor-initiating cells from certain malignant tumors, including pancreatic cancer. In the present study, the involvement of mucin 1 (MUC1) in the signaling pathways of a highly tumorigenic CD133+ cellular subpopulation sorted from the pancreatic cancer cell line HPAF-II was evaluated. The expression of MUC1-cytoplasmic domain (MUC1-CD) and oncogenic signaling transducers (epidermal growth factor receptor, protein kinase C delta, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and growth factor receptor-bound protein 2), as well as the association between MUC1 and β-catenin, were characterized in HPAF-II CD133+ and CD133low cell subpopulations and in tumor xenografts generated from these cells. Compared with HPAF CD133(low) cells, HPAF-II CD133+ cancer cells exhibited increased tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice, which was associated with overexpression of MUC1 and with the accordingly altered expression profile of MUC1-associated signaling partners. Additionally, MUC1-CD/β-catenin interactions were increased both in the HPAF-II CD133+ cell subpopulation and derived tumor xenografts compared with HPAF CD133(low) cells. These results suggest that, in comparison with HPAF CD133(low) cells, CD133+ cells exhibit higher expression of MUC1, which contributes to their tumorigenic phenotype through increased interaction between MUC1-CD and β-catenin, which in turn modulates oncogenic signaling cascades.

  20. The in-vitro spheroid culture induces a more highly differentiated but tumorigenic population from melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mo, Jing; Sun, Baocun; Zhao, Xiulan; Gu, Qiang; Dong, Xueyi; Liu, Zhiyong; Ma, Yuemei; Zhao, Nan; Liu, Yanrong; Chi, Jiadong; Sun, Ran

    2013-08-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been identified in various malignancies, and different properties have been examined to characterize CSCs: tumorigenicity in immunocompromised mice, stem cell surface markers, label-retaining properties, and proliferation as nonadherent spheres. This study explored the consistency and efficiency among these methods. Among the melanoma cell lines examined (A375, A875, MUM-2b, and MUM-2c), only A375 and MUM-2c grew as nonadherent spheres and continuously propagated in a defined serum-free medium in vitro. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence analysis indicated that sphere-derived cells contained a smaller proportion of cells expressing the candidate surface markers of melanoma stem cells such as ABCB5, CD133, CD20 and CD271, and a larger proportion of cells expressing melanocytic differentiation markers such as HMB45 and S100 protein, compared with adherent cells. Surprisingly, the more highly differentiated sphere-derived melanoma cells exhibited increased tumorigenic potential in vivo, as indicated by shorter tumor incubation (A375) and smaller number of cells required to initiate tumor formation (A375 and MUM-2c) compared with those of parental cells. Despite the similarity in histopathological characteristics, the expression profile indicated that xenografts derived from sphere-derived melanoma cells exhibited a more tumorigenic phenotype with respect to the stem or the differentiation markers detected by immunohistochemical analysis. Therefore, sphere formation in nonadherent cultures may not be a preferred surrogate in-vitro method for enriching melanoma stem cells according to candidate markers but may be a favorable condition for activating potential CSCs.

  1. Shed syndecan-2 enhances tumorigenic activities of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sojoong; Choi, Youngsil; Jun, Eunsung; Kim, In-San; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Because earlier studies showed the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-2, sheds from colon cancer cells in culture, the functional roles of shed syndecan-2 were assessed. A non-cleavable mutant of syndecan-2 in which the Asn148-Leu149 residues were replaced with Asn148-Ile149, had decreased shedding, less cancer-associated activities of syndecan-2 in vitro, and less syndecan-2-mediated metastasis of mouse melanoma cells in vivo, suggesting the importance of shedding on syndecan-2-mediated pro-tumorigenic functions. Indeed, shed syndecan-2 from cancer-conditioned media and recombinant shed syndecan-2 enhanced cancer-associated activities, and depletion of shed syndecan-2 abolished these effects. Similarly, shed syndecan-2 was detected from sera of patients from advanced carcinoma (625.9 ng/ml) and promoted cancer-associated activities. Furthermore, a series of syndecan-2 deletion mutants showed that the tumorigenic activity of shed syndecan-2 resided in the C-terminus of the extracellular domain and a shed syndecan-2 synthetic peptide (16 residues) was sufficient to establish subcutaneous primary growth of HT29 colon cancer cells, pulmonary metastases (B16F10 cells), and primary intrasplenic tumor growth and liver metastases (4T1 cells). Taken together, these results demonstrate that shed syndecan-2 directly enhances colon cancer progression and may be a promising therapeutic target for controlling colon cancer development. PMID:25686828

  2. PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Echizen, Kanae; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Hayashi, Tomoatsu; Sabit, Hemragul; Furuta, Takuya; Nakai, Miyuki; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Nishimura, Yukiko; Taniue, Kenzui; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Hirano, Shinji; Terai, Kenta; Todo, Tomoki; Ino, Yasushi; Mukasa, Akitake; Takayanagi, Shunsaku; Ohtani, Ryohei; Saito, Nobuhito; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • PCDH10 is required for the proliferation, survival and self-renewal of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 is required for glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Abstract: Protocadherin10 (PCDH10)/OL-protocadherin is a cadherin-related transmembrane protein that has multiple roles in the brain, including facilitating specific cell–cell connections, cell migration and axon guidance. It has recently been reported that PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor and that its overexpression inhibits proliferation or invasion of multiple tumor cells. However, the function of PCDH10 in glioblastoma cells has not been elucidated. In contrast to previous reports on other tumors, we show here that suppression of the expression of PCDH10 by RNA interference (RNAi) induces the growth arrest and apoptosis of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that knockdown of PCDH10 inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice. These results suggest that PCDH10 is required for the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma.

  3. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.**

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  4. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  5. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  6. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.**

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  7. Differential In Vivo Tumorigenicity of Distinct Subpopulations from a Luminal-Like Breast Cancer Xenograft

    PubMed Central

    Skrbo, Nirma; Hjortland, Geir-Olav; Kristian, Alexandr; Holm, Ruth; Nord, Silje; Prasmickaite, Lina; Engebraaten, Olav; Mælandsmo, Gunhild M.; Sørlie, Therese; Andersen, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Intratumor heterogeneity caused by genetic, phenotypic or functional differences between cancer cell subpopulations is a considerable clinical challenge. Understanding subpopulation dynamics is therefore central for both optimization of existing therapy and for development of new treatment. The aim of this study was to isolate subpopulations from a primary tumor and by comparing molecular characteristics of these subpopulations, find explanations to their differing tumorigenicity. Cell subpopulations from two patient derived in vivo models of primary breast cancer, ER+ and ER-, were identified. EpCAM+ cells from the ER+ model gave rise to tumors independently of stroma cell support. The tumorigenic fraction was further divided based on SSEA-4 and CD24 expression. Both markers were expressed in ER+ breast cancer biopsies. FAC-sorted cells based on EpCAM, SSEA-4 and CD24 expression were subsequently tested for differences in functionality by in vivo tumorigenicity assay. Three out of four subpopulations of cells were tumorigenic and showed variable ability to recapitulate the marker expression of the original tumor. Whole genome expression analysis of the sorted populations disclosed high similarity in the transcriptional profiles between the tumorigenic populations. Comparing the non-tumorigenic vs the tumorigenic populations, 44 transcripts were, however, significantly differentially expressed. A subset of these, 26 identified and named genes, highly expressed in the non-tumorigenic population, predicted longer overall survival (N = 737, p<0.0001) and distant metastasis free survival (DMFS) (N = 1379, p<0.0001) when performing Kaplan-Meier survival analysis using the GOBO online database. The 26 gene set correlated with longer DMFS in multiple breast cancer subgroups. Copy number profiling revealed no aberrations that could explain the observed differences in tumorigenicity. This study emphasizes the functional variability among cell populations that are

  8. Nonylphenol effects on human prostate non tumorigenic cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Di Lorenzo, Mariana; Carrizzo, Albino; Valiante, Salvatore; Vecchione, Carmine; Laforgia, Vincenza; De Falco, Maria

    2016-05-16

    Nonylphenol (NP) is an industrial chemical with estrogenic activity both in vivo and in vitro; estrogens play a critical role in the development of prostate and may be the cause of some pathological states, including cancer. In this study we examined the effects of NP on human prostate non tumorigenic epithelial cells (PNT1A) investigating on cell proliferation, interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) and gene expression of genes involved in prostate diseases. We found that NP affects cell proliferation at 10(-6)M, promoting a cytoplasm-nucleus translocation of ERα and not ERβ, like the natural estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2). Moreover, we showed that NP enhances gene expression of key regulators of cell cycle. Estrogen selective antagonist ICI182780 in part reverted the observed effects of NP. These results confirm the estrogenic activity of NP and suggest that other transduction pathways may be involved in NP action on prostate.

  9. Loss of giant obscurins from breast epithelium promotes epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, tumorigenicity and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Shriver, M; Stroka, KM; Vitolo, MI; Martin, S; Huso, DL; Konstantopoulos, K; Kontrogianni-Konstantopoulos, A

    2015-01-01

    Obscurins, encoded by the single OBSCN gene, are giant cytoskeletal proteins with structural and regulatory roles. The OBSCN gene is highly mutated in different types of cancers. Loss of giant obscurins from breast epithelial cells confers them with a survival and growth advantage, following exposure to DNA-damaging agents. Here we demonstrate that the expression levels and subcellular distribution of giant obscurins are altered in human breast cancer biopsies compared with matched normal samples. Stable clones of non-tumorigenic MCF10A cells lacking giant obscurins fail to form adhesion junctions, undergo epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and generate >100-μm mammospheres bearing markers of cancer-initiating cells. Obscurin-knockdown MCF10A cells display markedly increased motility as a sheet in 2-dimensional (2D) substrata and individually in confined spaces and invasion in 3D matrices. In line with these observations, actin filaments redistribute to extending filopodia where they exhibit increased dynamics. MCF10A cells that stably express the K-Ras oncogene and obscurin short hairpin RNA (shRNA), but not scramble control shRNA, exhibit increased primary tumor formation and lung colonization after subcutaneous and tail vein injections, respectively. Collectively, our findings reveal that loss of giant obscurins from breast epithelium results in disruption of the cell–cell contacts and acquisition of a mesenchymal phenotype that leads to enhanced tumorigenesis, migration and invasiveness in vitro and in vivo. PMID:25381817

  10. Arginyltransferase ATE1 suppresses cell tumorigenic potential and inversely correlates with metastases in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Zhang, Fangliang; Colavita, Kristen; Leu, Nicolae Adrian; Kurosaka, Satoshi; Kumar, Akhilesh; Birnbaum, Michael D.; Győrffy, Balázs; Dong, Dawei W.; Shtutman, Michael; Kashina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Arginylation is an emerging posttranslational modification mediated by arginyltransferase (ATE1) that is essential for mammalian embryogenesis and regulation of the cytoskeleton. Here, we discovered that Ate1 knockout embryonic fibroblasts exhibit tumorigenic properties, including abnormally rapid contact-independent growth, reduced ability to form cell-cell contacts, and chromosomal aberrations. Ate1 knockout fibroblasts can form large colonies in Matrigel and exhibit invasive behavior, unlike wild type fibroblasts. Furthermore, Ate1 knockout cells form tumors in subcutaneous xenograft assays in immunocompromised mice. Abnormal growth in these cells can be partially rescued by reintroduction of stably expressed specific Ate1 isoforms, which also reduce the ability of these cells to form tumors. Tumor array studies and bioinformatics analysis show that Ate1 is down-regulated in several types of human cancer samples at the protein level, and that its transcription level inversely correlates with metastatic progression and patient survival. We conclude that Ate1 knockout results in carcinogenic transformation of cultured fibroblasts, suggesting that in addition to its previously known activities Ate1 gene is essential for tumor suppression and also likely participates in suppression of metastatic growth. PMID:26686093

  11. IN VIVO MUTAGENICITY OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES CORRELATES WITH TUMORIGENICITY-JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity t...

  12. Altered microRNA expression induced by tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants ...

  13. IN VIVO MUTAGENICITY OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES CORRELATES WITH TUMORIGENICITY-JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity t...

  14. A microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants o...

  15. Altered microRNA expression induced by tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants ...

  16. A potential microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants of conazole tumor...

  17. Drinking water disinfection byproduct iodoacetic acid induces tumorigenic transformation of NIH3T3 cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiao; Wang, Shu; Zheng, Weiwei; Wang, Xia; Liu, Xiaolin; Jiang, Songhui; Pi, Jingbo; Zheng, Yuxin; He, Gengsheng; Qu, Weidong

    2013-06-04

    Iodoacetic acid (IAA) and iodoform (IF) are unregulated iodinated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) found in drinking water. Their presence in the drinking water of China has not been documented. Recently, the carcinogenic potential of IAA and IF has been a concern because of their mutagenicity in bacteria and genotoxicity in mammalian cells. Therefore, we measured their concentrations in Shanghai drinking water and assessed their cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, and ability to transform NIH3T3 cells to tumorigenic lines. The concentrations of IAA and IF in Shanghai drinking water varied between summer and winter with maximum winter levels of 2.18 μg/L IAA and 0.86 μg/L IF. IAA with a lethal concentration 50 (LC50) of 2.77 μM exhibited more potent cytotoxicity in NIH3T3 cells than IF (LC50 = 83.37 μM). IAA, but not IF, induced a concentration-dependent DNA damage measured by γ-H2AX staining and increased tail moment in single-cell gel electrophoresis. Neither IAA nor IF increased micronucleus frequency. Prolonged exposure of NIH3T3 cells to IAA increased the frequencies of transformed cells with anchorage-independent growth and agglutination with concanavalin A. IAA-transformed cells formed aggressive fibrosarcomas after inoculation into Balb/c nude mice. This study demonstrated that IAA has a biological activity that is consistent with a carcinogen and human exposure should be of concern.

  18. Glycolipid GD3 and GD3 synthase are key drivers for glioblastoma stem cells and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Shih-Chi; Wang, Pao-Yuan; Lou, Yi-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Hsiao, Michael; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2016-01-01

    The cancer stem cells (CSCs) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a grade IV astrocytoma, have been enriched by the expressed marker CD133. However, recent studies have shown that CD133− cells also possess tumor-initiating potential. By analysis of gangliosides on various cells, we show that ganglioside D3 (GD3) is overexpressed on eight neurospheres and tumor cells; in combination with CD133, the sorted cells exhibit a higher expression of stemness genes and self-renewal potential; and as few as six cells will form neurospheres and 20–30 cells will grow tumor in mice. Furthermore, GD3 synthase (GD3S) is increased in neurospheres and human GBM tissues, but not in normal brain tissues, and suppression of GD3S results in decreased GBM stem cell (GSC)-associated properties. In addition, a GD3 antibody is shown to induce complement-dependent cytotoxicity against cells expressing GD3 and inhibition of GBM tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrate that GD3 and GD3S are highly expressed in GSCs, play a key role in glioblastoma tumorigenicity, and are potential therapeutic targets against GBM. PMID:27143722

  19. Glycolipid GD3 and GD3 synthase are key drivers for glioblastoma stem cells and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Shih-Chi; Wang, Pao-Yuan; Lou, Yi-Wei; Khoo, Kay-Hooi; Hsiao, Michael; Hsu, Tsui-Ling; Wong, Chi-Huey

    2016-05-17

    The cancer stem cells (CSCs) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a grade IV astrocytoma, have been enriched by the expressed marker CD133. However, recent studies have shown that CD133(-) cells also possess tumor-initiating potential. By analysis of gangliosides on various cells, we show that ganglioside D3 (GD3) is overexpressed on eight neurospheres and tumor cells; in combination with CD133, the sorted cells exhibit a higher expression of stemness genes and self-renewal potential; and as few as six cells will form neurospheres and 20-30 cells will grow tumor in mice. Furthermore, GD3 synthase (GD3S) is increased in neurospheres and human GBM tissues, but not in normal brain tissues, and suppression of GD3S results in decreased GBM stem cell (GSC)-associated properties. In addition, a GD3 antibody is shown to induce complement-dependent cytotoxicity against cells expressing GD3 and inhibition of GBM tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrate that GD3 and GD3S are highly expressed in GSCs, play a key role in glioblastoma tumorigenicity, and are potential therapeutic targets against GBM.

  20. Syndecan-1 alterations during the tumorigenic progression of human colonic Caco-2 cells induced by human Ha-ras or polyoma middle T oncogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Levy, P.; Munier, A.; Baron-Delage, S.; Di Gioia, Y.; Gespach, C.; Capeau, J.; Cherqui, G.

    1996-01-01

    The products of ras and src proto-oncogenes are frequently activated in a constitutive state in human colorectal cancer. In this study we attempted to establish whether the tumorigenic progression induced by oncogenic activation of p21ras and pp60c-src in human colonic Caco-2 cells is associated with specific alterations of syndecan-1, a membrane-anchored proteoglycan playing a role in cell-matrix interaction and neoplastic growth control. To this end, we used Caco-2 cells made highly tumorigenic by transfection with an activated (Val 12) human Ha-ras gene or with the polyoma middle T (Py-MT) oncogene, a constitutive activator of pp60c-src tyrosine kinase activity. Compared with control vector-transfected Caco-2 cells, both oncogene-transfected cell lines (1) contained smaller amounts of membrane-anchored PGs; (2) exhibited decreased syndecan-1 expression at the protein but not the mRNA level; (3) synthesized 35S-labelled syndecan-1 with decreased specific activity; (4) produced a syndecan-1 ectodomain with a lower molecular mass and reduced GAG chain size and sulphation; and (5) expressed heparanase degradative activity. These results show that the dramatic activation of the tumorigenic potential induced by oncogenic p21ras or Py-MT/pp60c-src in Caco-2 cells is associated with marked alterations of syndecan-1 expression at the translational and post-translational levels. Images Figure 2 PMID:8695359

  1. Slit-Robo Repulsive Signaling Extrudes Tumorigenic Cells from Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Vaughen, John; Igaki, Tatsushi

    2016-12-19

    Cells dynamically interact throughout animal development to coordinate growth and deter disease. For example, cell-cell competition weeds out aberrant cells to enforce homeostasis. In Drosophila, tumorigenic cells mutant for the cell polarity gene scribble (scrib) are actively eliminated from epithelia when surrounded by wild-type cells. While scrib cell elimination depends critically on JNK signaling, JNK-dependent cell death cannot sufficiently explain scrib cell extirpation. Thus, how JNK executed cell elimination remained elusive. Here, we show that repulsive Slit-Robo2-Ena signaling exerts an extrusive force downstream of JNK to eliminate scrib cells from epithelia by disrupting E-cadherin. While loss of Slit-Robo2-Ena in scrib cells potentiates scrib tumor formation within the epithelium, Robo2-Ena hyperactivation surprisingly triggers luminal scrib tumor growth following excess extrusion. This extrusive signaling is amplified by a positive feedback loop between Slit-Robo2-Ena and JNK. Our observations provide a potential causal mechanism for Slit-Robo dysregulation in numerous human cancers.

  2. Notch activation drives adipocyte dedifferentiation and tumorigenic transformation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Feng; Karki, Anju; Castro, Beatriz; Wirbisky, Sara E.; Bidwell, Christopher A.; Freeman, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Liposarcomas (LPSs) are the most common soft-tissue cancer. Because of the lack of animal models, the cellular origin and molecular regulation of LPS remain unclear. Here, we report that mice with adipocyte-specific activation of Notch signaling (Ad/N1ICD) develop LPS with complete penetrance. Lineage tracing confirms the adipocyte origin of Ad/N1ICD LPS. The Ad/N1ICD LPS resembles human dedifferentiated LPS in histological appearance, anatomical localization, and gene expression signature. Before transformation, Ad/N1ICD adipocytes undergo dedifferentiation that leads to lipodystrophy and metabolic dysfunction. Although concomitant Pten deletion normalizes the glucose metabolism of Ad/N1ICD mice, it dramatically accelerates the LPS prognosis and malignancy. Transcriptomes and lipidomics analyses indicate that Notch activation suppresses lipid metabolism pathways that supply ligands to Pparγ, the master regulator of adipocyte homeostasis. Accordingly, synthetic Pparγ ligand supplementation induces redifferentiation of Ad/N1ICD adipocytes and tumor cells, and prevents LPS development in Ad/N1ICD mice. Importantly, the Notch target HES1 is abundantly expressed in human LPS, and Notch inhibition suppresses the growth of human dedifferentiated LPS xenografts. Collectively, ectopic Notch activation is sufficient to induce dedifferentiation and tumorigenic transformation of mature adipocytes in mouse. PMID:27573812

  3. LKB1 expression reverses the tumorigenicity of L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Ge; Gao, Qing; Tao, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    The tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein kinase, plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we revealed that human hepatic L02 cells had severely impaired endogenous LKB1 expression as gauged by western blot, northern blot and RT-PCR analyses. Stable ectopic expression of LKB1 in L02 cells resulted in decreased cell growth, hypophosphorylation of Rb, and marked attenuation of colony formation on soft agar. Inoculation of L02 cells into immunocompromised mice resulted in the development of subcutaneous tumors, which could be completely abrogated by ectopic LKB1 expression. The tumors that formed in the mouse model recapitulated the histopathological features of hepatocellular carcinoma under the microscope. Our results jointly suggest that severely compromised endogenous LKB1 expression in the L02 cell line may confer to L02 cells tumor-initiating capacities in vivo and in vitro, and ectopic LKB1 expression antagonizes the tumorigenic properties of L02 cells. Our findings imply that caution may be needed to interpret the results obtained on the widely used human hepatic L02 cell line. The L02 cell line may be a new model to define the cellular mechanisms of liver transformation, and to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth suppressive effect of LKB1.

  4. Soluble Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 and Echocardiography in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Hur, Mina; Kim, Hanah; Magrini, Laura; Marino, Rossella; Di Somma, Salvatore

    2016-11-01

    Soluble suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) has emerged as a biomarker of cardiac stretch or remodeling, and has demonstrated a role in acutely decompensated heart failure. However, its role in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction is still unknown. We explored whether sST2 serum concentration reflects either systolic or diastolic dysfunction as measured by Doppler echocardiography. In a total of 127 patients with sepsis, correlations between sST2 and blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV diastolic filling (ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic mitral annulus velocity), and resting pulmonary arterial pressure were evaluated. Correlations between sST2 and other sepsis biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP] and procalcitonin) were also examined. sST2 showed a moderate correlation with mean arterial pressure (r=-0.3499) but no correlation with LV ejection fraction, diastolic filling, or resting pulmonary hypertension. It showed moderate correlations with hs-CRP and procalcitonin (r=0.2608 and r=0.3829, respectively). sST2 might have a role as a biomarker of shock or inflammation, but it cannot reflect echocardiographic findings of LV ejection fraction or diastolic filling in sepsis.

  5. Secretion of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 confers tumorigenic properties

    PubMed Central

    Fessart, Delphine; Domblides, Charlotte; Avril, Tony; Eriksson, Leif A; Begueret, Hugues; Pineau, Raphael; Malrieux, Camille; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Lucchesi, Carlo; Chevet, Eric; Delom, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an instrumental role in determining the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and the formation of lumens in glandular tissues during morphogenesis. Here, we show that the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-resident protein anterior gradient-2 (AGR2), a soluble protein-disulfide isomerase involved in ER protein folding and quality control, is secreted and interacts with the ECM. Extracellular AGR2 (eAGR2) is a microenvironmental regulator of epithelial tissue architecture, which plays a role in the preneoplastic phenotype and contributes to epithelial tumorigenicity. Indeed, eAGR2, is secreted as a functionally active protein independently of its thioredoxin-like domain (CXXS) and of its ER-retention domain (KTEL), and is sufficient, by itself, to promote the acquisition of invasive and metastatic features. Therefore, we conclude that eAGR2 plays an extracellular role independent of its ER function and we elucidate this gain-of-function as a novel and unexpected critical ECM microenvironmental pro-oncogenic regulator of epithelial morphogenesis and tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13887.001 PMID:27240165

  6. Secretion of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 confers tumorigenic properties.

    PubMed

    Fessart, Delphine; Domblides, Charlotte; Avril, Tony; Eriksson, Leif A; Begueret, Hugues; Pineau, Raphael; Malrieux, Camille; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Lucchesi, Carlo; Chevet, Eric; Delom, Frederic

    2016-05-30

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an instrumental role in determining the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and the formation of lumens in glandular tissues during morphogenesis. Here, we show that the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-resident protein anterior gradient-2 (AGR2), a soluble protein-disulfide isomerase involved in ER protein folding and quality control, is secreted and interacts with the ECM. Extracellular AGR2 (eAGR2) is a microenvironmental regulator of epithelial tissue architecture, which plays a role in the preneoplastic phenotype and contributes to epithelial tumorigenicity. Indeed, eAGR2, is secreted as a functionally active protein independently of its thioredoxin-like domain (CXXS) and of its ER-retention domain (KTEL), and is sufficient, by itself, to promote the acquisition of invasive and metastatic features. Therefore, we conclude that eAGR2 plays an extracellular role independent of its ER function and we elucidate this gain-of-function as a novel and unexpected critical ECM microenvironmental pro-oncogenic regulator of epithelial morphogenesis and tumorigenesis.

  7. Soft fibrin gels promote selection and growth of tumorigenic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Tan, Youhua; Zhang, Huafeng; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Pingwei; Chen, Junwei; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Tang, Ke; Wang, Ning; Huang, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The identification of stem-cell-like cancer cells through conventional methods that depend on stem cell markers is often unreliable. We developed a mechanical method for selecting tumorigenic cells by culturing single cancer cells in fibrin matrices of ~100 Pa in stiffness. When cultured within these gels, primary human cancer cells or single cancer cells from mouse or human cancer cell lines grew within a few days into individual round colonies that resembled embryonic stem cell colonies. Subcutaneous or intravenous injection of 10 or 100 fibrin-cultured cells in syngeneic or severe combined immunodeficiency mice led to the formation of solid tumours at the site of injection or at the distant lung organ much more efficiently than control cancer cells selected using conventional surface marker methods or cultured on conventional rigid dishes or on soft gels. Remarkably, as few as ten such cells were able to survive and form tumours in the lungs of wild-type non-syngeneic mice.

  8. Psoralen-containing sunscreen is tumorigenic in hairless mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, L.E.; Walter, J.F.

    1983-06-01

    Sunscreens containing 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) are currently being marketed to promote tanning by inducing psoralen-mediated ultraviolet (UV) A (320-400 nm) melanogenesis. The rationale is that this may prevent UVB (290-320 nm) radiation-induced skin damage. However, mouse studies have shown that 5-MOP has the same cutaneous photocarcinogenic potential as 8-methoxypsoralen. In addition, the 5-MOP--containing sunscreen Sun System III (SS III), when combined with UVA, induces epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity, an enzyme associated with tumor promotion. Therefore, we investigated whether SS III had sufficient psoralen concentration to be tumorigenic in hairless mice exposed to chronic, intermittent UVA radiation. SS III was applied to hairless mice 5 days per week for 20 weeks. After each application the mice were exposed to 2.5 to 10 joules/cm2 UVA radiation. All test groups developed atypical squamous papillomas in direct proportion to the dosage of UVA radiation received. A shorter latency period for tumor development was seen with larger UVA doses. Test animals followed up to 1 year developed invasive squamous cell tumors. Control groups (SS III without UVA and UVA without SS III) remained free of tumors. Animals receiving SS III plus UVA developed persistent skin thickening and increased dermal cyst formation similar to that reported with chronic exposure to UVB, a known carcinogenic wavelength.

  9. Soluble Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 and Echocardiography in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Kim, Hanah; Magrini, Laura; Marino, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Soluble suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) has emerged as a biomarker of cardiac stretch or remodeling, and has demonstrated a role in acutely decompensated heart failure. However, its role in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction is still unknown. We explored whether sST2 serum concentration reflects either systolic or diastolic dysfunction as measured by Doppler echocardiography. In a total of 127 patients with sepsis, correlations between sST2 and blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV diastolic filling (ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic mitral annulus velocity), and resting pulmonary arterial pressure were evaluated. Correlations between sST2 and other sepsis biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP] and procalcitonin) were also examined. sST2 showed a moderate correlation with mean arterial pressure (r=-0.3499) but no correlation with LV ejection fraction, diastolic filling, or resting pulmonary hypertension. It showed moderate correlations with hs-CRP and procalcitonin (r=0.2608 and r=0.3829, respectively). sST2 might have a role as a biomarker of shock or inflammation, but it cannot reflect echocardiographic findings of LV ejection fraction or diastolic filling in sepsis. PMID:27578513

  10. Tumorigenicity assays in nude mice: analysis of an implanted gelatin-sponge method

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, P.M.; Travis, G.L.; Saunders, G.C.; Ray, F.A.; Stevenson, A.P.; Bame, K.; Cram, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    Gelatin sponges, preimplanted in nude mice for 10 days, were used for an improved assay for tumorigenicity of cultured cells. Cells inoculated through the skin into such sponges yielded tumors more rapidly and with greater frequency than with newly implanted sponges or into subcutaneous tissue. However, an unexpected loss of cells occurred in the first few days after implantation. This loss may be an important aspect of tumorigenicity assays of all kinds, and is readily studied with the sponge methods described.

  11. Patchouli alcohol, an essential oil of Pogostemon cablin, exhibits anti-tumorigenic activity in human colorectal cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jin Boo; Choi, Jieun; Lou, Zhiyuan; Jiang, Xiaojing; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2013-06-01

    Patchouli alcohol (PA) is one of the important compounds isolated from the essential oil of Pogostemon cablin (patchouli). PA has neuroprotective, anti-influenza and anti-inflammatory activities. However, anti-cancer activity of PA has not been studied so far. We performed in vitro study to investigate whether PA affects proliferation and apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells, and to define potential molecular mechanisms. PA suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116, SW480). In addition, PA decreased cell growth in MCF7, BxPC3, PC3, and HUVEC cells. Exposure of PA to HCT116 and SW480 cells activated p21 expression and suppressed the expressions of cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, PA attenuated the expressions of HDAC2 (histone deacetylase 2) and c-myc, and HDAC enzyme activity. We also observed that PA induced the transcriptional activity of NF-κB through an increase of nuclear translocation of p65. These findings suggest that PA exerts an anti-cancer activity by decreasing cell growth and increasing apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. The proposed mechanisms include the inhibition of HDAC2 expression and HDAC enzyme activity, and subsequent downregulation of c-myc and activation of NF-κB pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling promotes tumorigenicity and stemness via activation of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Islam, S S; Mokhtari, R B; Noman, A S; Uddin, M; Rahman, M Z; Azadi, M A; Zlotta, A; van der Kwast, T; Yeger, H; Farhat, W A

    2016-05-01

    Activation of the sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway controls tumorigenesis in a variety of cancers. Here, we show a role for Shh signaling in the promotion of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), tumorigenicity, and stemness in the bladder cancer. EMT induction was assessed by the decreased expression of E-cadherin and ZO-1 and increased expression of N-cadherin. The induced EMT was associated with increased cell motility, invasiveness, and clonogenicity. These progression relevant behaviors were attenuated by treatment with Hh inhibitors cyclopamine and GDC-0449, and after knockdown by Shh-siRNA, and led to reversal of the EMT phenotype. The results with HTB-9 were confirmed using a second bladder cancer cell line, BFTC905 (DM). In a xenograft mouse model TGF-β1 treated HTB-9 cells exhibited enhanced tumor growth. Although normal bladder epithelial cells could also undergo EMT and upregulate Shh with TGF-β1 they did not exhibit tumorigenicity. The TGF-β1 treated HTB-9 xenografts showed strong evidence for a switch to a more stem cell like phenotype, with functional activation of CD133, Sox2, Nanog, and Oct4. The bladder cancer specific stem cell markers CK5 and CK14 were upregulated in the TGF-β1 treated xenograft tumor samples, while CD44 remained unchanged in both treated and untreated tumors. Immunohistochemical analysis of 22 primary human bladder tumors indicated that Shh expression was positively correlated with tumor grade and stage. Elevated expression of Ki-67, Shh, Gli2, and N-cadherin were observed in the high grade and stage human bladder tumor samples, and conversely, the downregulation of these genes were observed in the low grade and stage tumor samples. Collectively, this study indicates that TGF-β1-induced Shh may regulate EMT and tumorigenicity in bladder cancer. Our studies reveal that the TGF-β1 induction of EMT and Shh is cell type context dependent. Thus, targeting the Shh pathway could be clinically beneficial in the

  13. Deguelin, a novel anti-tumorigenic agent targeting apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and anti-angiogenesis for cancer chemoprevention

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YING; MA, WENLI; ZHENG, WENLING

    2013-01-01

    Deguelin is a natural compound of the flavonoid family products isolated from Derris trifoliata Lour. or Mundulea sericea (Leguminosae). It exhibited significant anti-tumorigenesis and anti-proliferative activity in various types of cancer both in vitro and in vivo. Deguelin induced cell apoptosis by blocking anti-apoptotic pathways, such as PI3K-Akt, IKK-IκBα-NF-κB and AMPK-mTOR-survivin, while inhibiting tumor cell propagation and malignant transformation through p27-cyclinE-pRb-E2F1 cell cycle control and HIF-1α-VEGF anti-angiogenic pathways. In pre-clinical trials, deguelin markedly decreased the tumor incidence. These biological findings identified deguelin as a novel anti-tumorigenic agent targeting apoptosis, cell cycle arrest and anti-angiogenesis for cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy. PMID:24649149

  14. CdSe magic-sized quantum dots incorporated in biomembrane models at the air-water interface composed of components of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Thiago E; Lopes, Carla C; Nader, Helena B; Silva, Anielle C A; Dantas, Noelio O; Siqueira, José R; Caseli, Luciano

    2016-07-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) magic-sized quantum dots (MSQDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with stable luminescence that are feasible for biomedical applications, especially for in vivo and in vitro imaging of tumor cells. In this work, we investigated the specific interaction of CdSe MSQDs with tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells using Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of lipids as membrane models for diagnosis of cancerous cells. Surface pressure-area isotherms and polarization modulation reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) showed an intrinsic interaction between the quantum dots, inserted in the aqueous subphase, and Langmuir monolayers constituted either of selected lipids or of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cell extracts. The films were transferred to solid supports to obtain microscopic images, providing information on their morphology. Similarity between films with different compositions representing cell membranes, with or without the quantum dots, was evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal microscopy. This study demonstrates that the affinity of quantum dots for models representing cancer cells permits the use of these systems as devices for cancer diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of protein marker expression, tumorigenicity, and doxorubicin chemoresistance in two new canine mammary tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Yen-Ling; Hsieh, Tai-Zu; Liou, Chian-Jiun; Cheng, Yeong-Hsiang; Lin, Chung-Tien; Chang, Chi-Yao; Lai, Yu-Shen

    2014-09-30

    Canine mammary tumors (CMTs) are the most common type of cancer found in female dogs. Establishment and evaluation of tumor cell lines can facilitate investigations of the biological mechanisms of cancer. Different cell models are used to investigate genetic, epigenetic, and cellular pathways, cancer progression, and cancer therapeutics. Establishment of new cell models will greatly facilitate research in this field. In the present study, we established and characterized two new CMT cell lines derived from a single CMT. We established two cell lines from a single malignant CMT specimen: DTK-E and DTK-SME. Morphologically, the DTK-E cells were large, flat, and epithelial-like, whereas DTK-SME cells were round and epithelial-like. Doubling times were 24 h for DTK-E and 18 h for DTK-SME. On western blots, both cell lines expressed cytokeratin AE1, vimentin, cytokeratin 7 (CK7), and heat shock protein 27 (HSP27). Moreover, investigation of chemoresistance revealed that DTK-SME was more resistant to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis than DTK-E was. After xenotransplantation, both DTK-E and DTK-SME tumors appeared within 14 days, but the average size of DTK-SME tumors was greater than that of DTK-E tumors after 56 days. We established two new cell lines from a single CMT, which exhibit significant diversity in cell morphology, protein marker expression, tumorigenicity, and chemoresistance. The results of this study revealed that the DTK-SME cell line was more resistant to doxorubicin-induced apoptosis and exhibited higher tumorigenicity in vivo than the DTK-E cell line. We anticipate that the two novel CMT cell lines established in this study will be useful for investigating the tumorigenesis of mammary carcinomas and for screening anticancer drugs.

  16. Tumorigenic Polyploid Cells Contain Elevated ROS and are Selectively Targeted by Antioxidant Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Meejeon; van der Meer, Riet; Abdulkadir, Sarki A.

    2011-01-01

    Polyploidy has been linked to tumorigenicity mainly due to the chromosomal aberrations. Elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, on the other hand, has also been associated with oncogenic transformation in most cancer cells. However, a possible link between ploidy and ROS is largely unexplored. Here we have exemined the role of ROS in the tumorigenicity of polyploid cells. We show that polyploid prostate and mammary epithelial cells contain higher levels of ROS due to their higher mitochondrial contents. ROS levels and mitochondrial mass are also higher in dihydrocytochalasin B (DCB)-induced polyploid cells, suggesting that higher levels of ROS observed in polyploid cell can occur due to cytokinesis failure. Interestingly, polyploid cells were more sensitive to the inhibitory effect of the antioxidant, N-Acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), than control diploid cells. Treatment of polyploid/diploid cells with NAC led to the selective elimination of polyploid cells over time and abrogated the tumorigenicity of polyploid cells. This effect was partially mediated via the Akt signaling pathway. We next explored a possible role for ROS in promoting chromosomal instability by analyzing the effects of ROS on the mitotic stage of the cell cycle. Enhancing ROS levels by treating cells with hydrogen peroxide delayed not only entry into and but also exit from mitosis. Furthermore, increasing ROS levels significantly increased taxol resistance. Our results indicated that increased ROS in polyploid cells can contribute to tumorigenicity and highlight the therapeutic potential of antioxidants by selectively targeting the tumorigenic polyploid cells and by reversing taxol resistance. PMID:21503880

  17. Molecular alterations in tumorigenic human bronchial and breast epithelial cells induced by high let radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Zhao, Y. L.; Roy, D.; Piao, C. Q.; Calaf, G.; Hall, E. J.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequence of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) and breast (MCF-10F) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 150 keV/μm alpha particles or 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Cell fusion studies indicated that radiation-induced tumorigenic phenotype in BEP2D cells could be completely suppressed by fusion with non-tumorigenic BEP2D cells. The differential expressions of known genes between tumorigenic bronchial and breast cells induced by alpha particles and their respective control cultures were compared using cDNA expression array. Among the 11 genes identified to be differentially expressed in BEP2D cells, three ( DCC, DNA-PK and p21 CIPI) were shown to be consistently down-regulated by 2 to 4 fold in all the 5 tumor cell lines examined. In contrast, their expressions in the fusion cell lines were comparable to control BEP2D cells. Similarly, expression levels of a series of genes were found to be altered in a step-wise manner among tumorigenic MCF-10F cells. The results are highly suggestive that functional alterations of these genes may be causally related to the carcinogenic process.

  18. SOX9-mediated upregulation of LGR5 is important for glioblastoma tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraoka, Koji; Hayashi, Tomoatsu; Kaneko, Ryusuke; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2015-05-01

    LGR5 plays an important role in the self-renewal of stem cells and is used as a marker identifying self-renewing stem cells in small intestine and hair follicles. Moreover, LGR5 has been reported to be overexpressed in several cancers. SOX9 is a transcription factor that plays a key role in development, differentiation and lineage commitment in various tissues. It has also been reported that SOX9 is overexpressed in a variety of cancers and contributes to their malignant phenotype. Here we show that LGR5 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We further show that SOX9 is upregulated in glioblastoma cells and directly enhances the expression of LGR5. We also demonstrate that knockdown of SOX9 suppresses the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. These results suggest that SOX9-mediated transcriptional regulation of LGR5 is critical for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that the SOX9-LGR5 pathway could be a potentially promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Highlights: • LGR5 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • SOX9 directly enhances the expression of LGR5. • SOX9 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells.

  19. Nitric oxide-releasing nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity to tumorigenic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelegrino, Milena T.; Silva, Letícia C.; Watashi, Carolina M.; Haddad, Paula S.; Rodrigues, Tiago; Seabra, Amedea B.

    2017-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is involved in several biological processes, including toxicity against tumor cells. The aim of this study was to synthesize, characterize, and evaluate the cytotoxicity of NO-releasing chitosan nanoparticles. A thiol-containing molecule, mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA), was encapsulated (encapsulation efficiency of 99%) in chitosan/sodium tripolyphosphate nanoparticles (CS NPs). The obtained nanoparticles showed an average hydrodynamic size of 108.40 ± 0.96 nm and polydispersity index of 0.26 ± 0.01. MSA-CS NPs were nitrosated leading to S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs, which act as NO donor. The cytotoxicity of CS NPs, MSA-CS NPs, and S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs were evaluated in several tumor cells, including human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2), mouse melanoma (B16F10), and human chronic myeloid leukemia (K562) cell lines and Lucena-1, a vincristine-resistant K562 cell line. Both CS NPs and MSA-CS NPs did not cause toxic effects in these cells, whereas S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs caused potent cytotoxic effects in all the tested tumor cell lines. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs were 19.7, 10.5, 22.8, and 27.8 μg·mL-1 for HepG2, B16F10, K562, and Lucena-1 cells, respectively. In contrast, S-nitroso-MSA-CS NPs exhibited lower cytotoxic to non-tumorigenic melanocytes (Melan-A) when compared with melanoma B16F10. Therefore, the results highlight the potential use of NO-releasing CS NPs in antitumor chemotherapy.

  20. Transformation and Tumorigenicity Testing of Simian Cell Lines and Evaluation of Poliovirus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Dotti, Silvia; Lombardo, Tina; Villa, Riccardo; Cacciamali, Andrea; Zanotti, Cinzia; Andreani, Nadia Andrea; Cinotti, Stefano; Ferrari, Maura

    2017-01-01

    The key role of cell cultures in different scientific fields is worldwide recognized, both as in vitro research models alternative to laboratory animals and substrates for biological production. However, many safety concerns rise from the use of animal/human cell lines that may be tumorigenic, leading to potential adverse contaminations in cell-derived biologicals. In order to evaluate the suitability of 13 different cell lines for Poliovirus vaccine production, safety and quality, in vitro/in vivo tumorigenicity and Poliovirus propagation properties were evaluated. Our results revealed that non-human primate cell lines CYNOM-K1, FRhK-4, 4MBr-5 and 4647 are free of tumorigenic features and represent highly susceptible substrates for attenuated Sabin Poliovirus strains. In particular, FRhK-4 and 4647 cell lines are characterized by a higher in vitro replication, resulting indicated for the use in large-scale production field. PMID:28046048

  1. Induction of TTF-1 or PAX-8 expression on proliferation and tumorigenicity in thyroid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Dupain, Célia; Ali, Hafiz M; Mouhoub, Tarik Ait; Urbinati, Giorgia; Massaad-Massade, Liliane

    2016-09-01

    TTF-1 and PAX-8 are responsible for thyroid organogenesis and for maintenance of differentiation in thyrocytes. Thus, we hypothesized that the induction of these two transcription factors could affect proliferation and tumorigenicity. Moreover, the ability of various pharmacological agents to modulate expression of the TTF-1 and PAX-8 and their effects on apoptosis were also analysed. For this purpose, cell lines derived from papillary (TPC-1 and BHP 10-3) and anaplastic (ARO) thyroid carcinomas were stably transfected with expression vectors containing TTF-1 or PAX-8 genes. Subsequently, the effects on expression at gene and protein levels, as well as on cell growth, cell cycle, migration and in vivo tumorigenicity were studied. Our results showed that: i) TTF-1 reciprocally induces PAX-8 expression; ii) the basal state of TTF-1 or PAX-8 influences proliferation, migration and tumorigenicity; iii) the induction of TTF-1 acts on cell proliferation more than PAX-8 and mainly affects tumorigenicity; and iv) TTF-1 was found to be more sensitive to epigenetic modulators than PAX-8. Therefore, we postulated that both TTF-1 and PAX-8 when co-expressed have anti-proliferative and anti-tumorigenic properties up to a threshold expression level and beyond that, are able to induce pro-tumorigenic effects. Hence in future, it will be quite interesting to systematically take into account the basal state of expression of TTF-1 and PAX-8. It will also be important to study the two thyroid transcription factors as part of a duo. This could open in the long-term, new therapeutic perspectives for thyroid carcinomas.

  2. Ethics on Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  3. Ethics on Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  4. An Exhibit for Touching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Susan

    1979-01-01

    An exhibit designed for visually handicapped persons presented by the Kalamazoo (Michigan) Institute of Art included bronze sculptures and oil paintings from the institute's permanent collection. (CL)

  5. An Exhibit for Touching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Susan

    1979-01-01

    An exhibit designed for visually handicapped persons presented by the Kalamazoo (Michigan) Institute of Art included bronze sculptures and oil paintings from the institute's permanent collection. (CL)

  6. Effect of plasma-activated medium on the decrease of tumorigenic population in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Wada, Naoki; Ikeda, Jun-Ichiro; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Sakakita, Hajime; Hori, Masaru; Ikehara, Yuzuru; Morii, Eiichi

    2017-07-01

    Nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) is a novel approach for blood coagulation, wound healing, and tumor elimination. NEAPP not only directly but also indirectly affects living cells via the medium exposed to NEAPP-yielding devises, called plasma-activated medium (PAM). The conservable and portable PAM serves as an alternative and advantageous approach over direct NEAPP. Here we examined the effect of PAM on lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL) cell lines. We found that PAM induced plasma cell differentiation and reduced tumorigenic population. PAM increased the expression level of PRDM1α, which is a transcription factor promoting plasma cell differentiation, suggesting that plasma cell differentiation of LPL might be mediated by PRDM1α. We previously reported that plasma cell component of LPL is vulnerable to apoptosis and less tumorigenic. These findings suggested that PAM treatment might become a novel therapy against LPL by inducing the transition from tumorigenic to non-tumorigenic population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Decreased tumorigenicity correlates with expression of altered cell surface carbohydrates in Lec9 CHO cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ripka, J; Shin, S; Stanley, P

    1986-01-01

    To investigate a role for surface carbohydrates in cellular malignancy, 15 different glycosylation-defective CHO cell mutants were examined for their tumorigenic and metastatic capacities after subcutaneous injection into nude mice. Most of the glycosylation mutants displayed similar or slightly decreased tumorigenicity compared with parental CHO cells. Neither parental CHO cells nor any of the mutants were observed to metastasize. However, independent isolates of one mutant type, Lec9, showed a dramatic reduction in tumor formation. The altered carbohydrates expressed at the surface of Lec9 cells appeared to be responsible for their loss of tumorigenicity, because revertants for lectin resistance were able to form tumors, and a double mutant (Lec9.Lec1) that expressed a Lec1 glycosylation phenotype also formed tumors. Finally, Lec9 cells were able to form tumors in gamma-irradiated nude mice, suggesting that recognition by an irradiation-sensitive host cell(s) was responsible for their reduced tumorigenicity in untreated nude mice. PMID:3785164

  8. Pim1 promotes human prostate cancer cell tumorigenicity and c-MYC transcriptional activity

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The serine/threonine kinase PIM1 has been implicated as an oncogene in various human cancers including lymphomas, gastric, colorectal and prostate carcinomas. In mouse models, Pim1 is known to cooperate with c-Myc to promote tumorigenicity. However, there has been limited analysis of the tumorigenic potential of Pim1 overexpression in benign and malignant human prostate cancer cells in vivo. Methods We overexpressed Pim1 in three human prostate cell lines representing different disease stages including benign (RWPE1), androgen-dependent cancer (LNCaP) and androgen-independent cancer (DU145). We then analyzed in vitro and in vivo tumorigenicity as well as the effect of Pim1 overexpression on c-MYC transcriptional activity by reporter assays and gene expression profiling using an inducible MYC-ER system. To validate that Pim1 induces tumorigenicity and target gene expression by modulating c-MYC transcriptional activity, we inhibited c-MYC using a small molecule inhibitor (10058-F4) or RNA interference. Results Overexpression of Pim1 alone was not sufficient to convert the benign RWPE1 cell to malignancy although it enhanced their proliferation rates when grown as xenografts in vivo. However, Pim1 expression enhanced the in vitro and in vivo tumorigenic potentials of the human prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP and DU145. Reporter assays revealed increased c-MYC transcriptional activity in Pim1-expressing cells and mRNA expression profiling demonstrated that a large fraction of c-MYC target genes were also regulated by Pim1 expression. The c-MYC inhibitor 10058-F4 suppressed the tumorigenicity of Pim1-expressing prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, 10058-F4 treatment also led to a reduction of Pim1 protein but not mRNA. Knocking-down c-MYC using short hairpin RNA reversed the effects of Pim1 on Pim1/MYC target genes. Conclusion Our results suggest an in vivo role of Pim1 in promoting prostate tumorigenesis although it displayed distinct oncogenic activities

  9. A Teaching Aids Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahanja, Salah

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exhibition for the benefit of teachers of English in Arab Primary Schools, which was prepared by third-year students at the Teachers College for Arab Teachers. The exhibition included games, songs, audiovisual aids, crossword puzzles, vocabulary, spelling booklets, preposition aids, and worksheet and lesson planning aids. (SED)

  10. A Tumorigenic Factor Interactome Connected Through Tumor Suppressor MicroRNA-198 in Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Muller, Christian; Li, Dali; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Li, Min; Chen, Changyi; Hodges, Sally E.; Fisher, William E.; Mo, Qianxing; Hung, Mien-Chie; Yao, Qizhi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The majority of pancreatic cancers (PCs) overexpress mesothelin (MSLN), which contributes to enhanced proliferation, invasion and migration. However, the MSLN regulatory network is still unclear. Here, we investigated the regulation of a panel of tumorigenic factors, and explored the potential of MSLN regulated miR-198 treatment in vivo. Experimental Design The expression and functional regulation of the tumorigenic factors MSLN, NF-κB, and the homeobox transcription factors (TFs) POU2F2 (OCT-2), Pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox factor 1 (PBX-1), valosin-containing protein (VCP), and miR-198 were studied in PC cell lines, patient tumor samples and in xenograft PC mouse models. Results We found that miR-198 is downregulated in PC and is involved in an intricate reciprocal regulatory loop with MSLN, which represses miR-198 through NF-κB-mediated OCT-2 induction. Furthermore, miR-198 repression leads to overexpression of PBX-1 and VCP. The dysregulated PBX-1/VCP axis leads to increased tumorigenicity. Reconstitution of miR-198 in PC cells results in reduced tumor growth, metastasis, and increased survival through direct targeting MSLN, PBX-1, and VCP. Most interestingly, reduced levels of miR-198 in human tissue samples are associated with upregulation of these tumorigenic factors (MSLN, OCT-2, PBX-1, VCP) and predict poor survival. Reduced miR-198 expression links this tumor network signature and prognosticates poor patient outcome. High miR-198 disrupts the network and predicts better prognosis and increased survival. Conclusions MiR-198 acts as a central tumor suppressor and modulates the molecular makeup of a critical interactome in PC, indicating a potential prognostic marker signature and the therapeutic potential of attacking this tumorigenic network through a central vantage point. PMID:23989979

  11. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Harold, J.; Morrow, C.

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. There are many ways for scientists to help develop science exhibitions. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). Two of its exhibitions, Space Weather Center and MarsQuest, are currently on tour. Another exhibition, Alien Earths, is in development. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot traveling exhibition. The exhibit's second 3-year tour began this January at the Detroit Science Center. It is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. The 3,000 square-foot traveling exhibition, called Alien Earths, will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. Alien Earths has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Besides the exhibits, SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous

  12. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  13. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-08-29

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  14. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  15. Serum CEA levels in patients with gastric carcinoma correlate with the tumorigenicity of their xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kiyama, T; Onda, M; Tokunaga, A; Okuda, T; Mizutani, T; Yoshiyuki, T; Shimizu, Y; Nishi, K; Matsukura, N; Tanaka, N

    1991-01-01

    We examined the correlation among preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels, staining properties of the tumors by CEA immunohistochemistry and the tumorigenicity of their xenografts in nude mice, in 28 patients with gastric cancer. Eleven (40 per cent) of them were positive for serum CEA (greater than or equal to 2.5 ng/ml) and seven (25 per cent) of the xenografts were tumorigenic in nude mice. All the tumorigenic cases were positive for serum CEA (p less than 0.001) and the mean value of the serum CEA level in the patients with tumorigenic neoplasms was 20.8 ng/ml, being significantly higher than that (1.4 ng/ml) in the patients with non-tumorigenic neoplasms (p less than 0.001). Twenty-five of the 28 carcinomas (89 per cent) were positive for CEA staining in their cancer cells by the ABC method and CEA localization correlated with tumorigenicity (p less than 0.05). These results suggest that the serum CEA level in patients is correlated with the tumorigenicity of their gastric carcinoma xenografts in nude mice and may account for the poor prognosis of patients with high serum CEA.

  16. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    2005-04-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. Science exhibitions also provide a marvelous opportunity for scientists to become engaged in the exhibit development process. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on two of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (on tour for four years) and Alien Earths (its tour began early in 2005). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, Planet Quest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous potential for informal education and inquiry-based investigations. This talk will focus on the role informal science projects play in effectively communicating science to a broad, public audience.

  17. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  18. Tumor-mast cell interactions: induction of pro-tumorigenic genes and anti-tumorigenic 4-1BB in MCs in response to Lewis Lung Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wensman, Helena; Kamgari, Nona; Johansson, Anna; Grujic, Mirjana; Calounova, Gabriela; Lundequist, Anders; Rönnberg, Elin; Pejler, Gunnar

    2012-04-01

    Mast cells (MCs) can have either detrimental or beneficial effects on malignant processes but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here we addressed this issue by examining the interaction between Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LLC) cells and MCs. In vivo, LLC tumors caused a profound accumulation of MCs, suggesting that LLC tumors have the capacity to attract MCs. Indeed, transwell migration assays showed that LLC-conditioned medium had chemotactic activity towards MCs, which was blocked by an antibody towards stem cell factor. In order to gain insight into the molecular mechanisms operative in tumor-MC interactions, the effect of LLC on the MC gene expression pattern was examined. As judged by gene array analysis, conditioned medium from LLC cells caused significant upregulation of numerous cell surface receptors and a pro-angiogenic Runx2/VEGF/Dusp5 axis in MCs, the latter in line with a role for MCs in promoting tumor angiogenesis. Among the genes showing the highest extent of upregulation was Tnfrsf9, encoding the anti-tumorigenic protein 4-1BB, suggesting that also anti-tumorigenic factors are induced. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that 4-1BB was upregulated in a transient manner, and it was also shown that tumor cells induce 4-1BB in human MCs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that LLC-conditioned medium induced 4-1BB also at the protein level. Together, this study provides novel insight into the molecular events associated with MC-tumor interactions and suggests that tumor cells induce both pro- and anti-tumorigenic responses in MCs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression of the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin is specifically correlated with tumorigenic expression in human cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Stanbridge, E J; Rosen, S W; Sussman, H H

    1982-01-01

    The expression of HeLa parent phenotype protein markers, the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin and placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes, has been evaluated in paired tumorigenic and nontumorigenic HeLa-fibroblast human cell hybrids. Both of these proteins have been used clinically as markers of malignancy. The results showed that both are expressed in the hybrids. Expression of the gonadotropin subunit in the hybrids is specifically correlated with tumorigenicity; the placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme showed no such correlation and was expressed in both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic hybrids. PMID:6959112

  20. An Atlas of Human Regulatory T Helper-like Cells Reveals Features of Th2-like Tregs that Support a Tumorigenic Environment.

    PubMed

    Halim, Leena; Romano, Marco; McGregor, Reuben; Correa, Isabel; Pavlidis, Polychronis; Grageda, Nathali; Hoong, Sec-Julie; Yuksel, Muhammed; Jassem, Wayel; Hannen, Rosalind F; Ong, Mark; Mckinney, Olivia; Hayee, Bu'Hussain; Karagiannis, Sophia N; Powell, Nicholas; Lechler, Robert I; Nova-Lamperti, Estefania; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2017-07-18

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a pivotal role in maintaining immunological tolerance, but they can also play a detrimental role by preventing antitumor responses. Here, we characterized T helper (Th)-like Treg subsets to further delineate their biological function and tissue distribution, focusing on their possible contribution to disease states. RNA sequencing and functional assays revealed that Th2-like Tregs displayed higher viability and autocrine interleukin-2 (IL-2)-mediated activation than other subsets. Th2-like Tregs were preferentially found in tissues rather than circulation and exhibited the highest migratory capacity toward chemokines enriched at tumor sites. These cellular responses led us to hypothesize that this subset could play a role in maintaining a tumorigenic environment. Concurrently, Th2-like Tregs were enriched specifically in malignant tissues from patients with melanoma and colorectal cancer compared to healthy tissue. Overall, our results suggest that Th2-like Tregs may contribute to a tumorigenic environment due to their increased cell survival, higher migratory capacity, and selective T-effector suppressive ability. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Co-expression of perforin and granzyme B genes induces apoptosis and inhibits the tumorigenicity of laryngeal cancer cell line Hep-2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiu-Ying; Li, Zhi; An, Gui-Jie; Liu, Sha; Lai, Yan-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Granzyme B and perforin, two of the most important components, have shown anticancer properties in various cancers, but their effects in laryngeal cancer remain unexplored. Here we decided to examine the effects of Granzyme B and perforin in Hep-2 cells and clarify the role of perforin and granzyme B in the tumorigenicity of laryngeal cancer cell line. Hep-2 cells were transfected with pVAX1-PIG co-expression vector (comprising perforin and granzyme B genes), and then the growth and apoptosis of these Hep-2 cells were evaluated. The tumorigenicity of Hep-2 cell line co-expressing perforin and granzyme B genes was tested in BALB/c nu/nu mice. We found that the co-expression of perforin and granzyme B genes could obviously inhibit cell focus formation and induce cell apoptosis in Hep-2 cells. Furthermore, after subcutaneous injection of Hep-2 cells transfected with pVAX1-PIG, an extensive delay in tumor growth was observed in BALB/c-nu/nu mice. Moreover, our studies demonstrated that the anticancer activity of perforin and granzyme B was sustainable in vivo as tumor development by inducing cell apoptosis. Taken together, our data indicate that the co-expression of perforin and granzyme B genes exhibits anticancer potential, and hopefully provide potential therapeutic applications in laryngeal cancer. PMID:24696715

  2. Co-expression of perforin and granzyme B genes induces apoptosis and inhibits the tumorigenicity of laryngeal cancer cell line Hep-2.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiu-Ying; Li, Zhi; An, Gui-Jie; Liu, Sha; Lai, Yan-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Granzyme B and perforin, two of the most important components, have shown anticancer properties in various cancers, but their effects in laryngeal cancer remain unexplored. Here we decided to examine the effects of Granzyme B and perforin in Hep-2 cells and clarify the role of perforin and granzyme B in the tumorigenicity of laryngeal cancer cell line. Hep-2 cells were transfected with pVAX1-PIG co-expression vector (comprising perforin and granzyme B genes), and then the growth and apoptosis of these Hep-2 cells were evaluated. The tumorigenicity of Hep-2 cell line co-expressing perforin and granzyme B genes was tested in BALB/c nu/nu mice. We found that the co-expression of perforin and granzyme B genes could obviously inhibit cell focus formation and induce cell apoptosis in Hep-2 cells. Furthermore, after subcutaneous injection of Hep-2 cells transfected with pVAX1-PIG, an extensive delay in tumor growth was observed in BALB/c-nu/nu mice. Moreover, our studies demonstrated that the anticancer activity of perforin and granzyme B was sustainable in vivo as tumor development by inducing cell apoptosis. Taken together, our data indicate that the co-expression of perforin and granzyme B genes exhibits anticancer potential, and hopefully provide potential therapeutic applications in laryngeal cancer.

  3. Swamp to Space exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The menacing-looking alligator is really harmless. It is one of the realistic props to help convince visitors that the feel of the swamp is real in StenniSphere's Swamp to Space exhibit at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss. The historical section of the Swamp to Space exhibit tells the story of why and how Stennis Space Center came to be. It also pays tribute to the families who moved their homes to make way for the space age in Mississippi.

  4. Effects of maple (Acer) plant part extracts on proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of human tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic colon cells.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Li, Liya; Seeram, Navindra P

    2012-07-01

    Phenolic-enriched extracts of maple sap and syrup, obtained from the sugar and red maple species (Acer saccharum Marsh, A. rubrum L., respectively), are reported to show anticancer effects. Despite traditional medicinal uses of various other parts of these plants by Native Americans, they have not been investigated for anticancer activity. Here leaves, stems/twigs, barks and sapwoods of both maple species were evaluated for antiproliferative effects against human colon tumorigenic (HCT-116, HT-29, Caco-2) and non-tumorigenic (CCD-18Co) cells. Extracts were standardized to total phenolic and ginnalin-A (isolated in our laboratory) levels. Overall, the extracts inhibited the growth of the colon cancer more than normal cells (over two-fold), their activities increased with their ginnalin-A levels, with red > sugar maple extracts. The red maple leaf extract, which contained the highest ginnalin-A content, was the most active extract (IC₅₀  = 35 and 16 µg/mL for extract and ginnalin-A, respectively). The extracts were not cytotoxic nor did they induce apoptosis of the colon cancer cells. However, cell cycle analyses revealed that the antiproliferative effects of the extracts were mediated through cell cycle arrest in the S-phase. The results from the current study suggest that these maple plant part extracts may have potential anticolon cancer effects. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  6. "Rocket Park" - exhibits

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-12-20

    Overall view at JSC lookin west from atop of Bldg. 1 showing rockets, parking lot and all threee stages of Saturn V. first stage of Saturn V exhibit in "Rocket Park" on west side of center little joe and mercury models are seen 1. JSC- Aerials

  7. 1989 Architectural Exhibition Winners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Business Affairs, 1990

    1990-01-01

    Winners of the 1989 Architectural Exhibition sponsored annually by the ASBO International's School Facilities Research Committee include the Brevard Performing Arts Center (Melbourne, Florida), the Capital High School (Santa Fe, New Mexico), Gage Elementary School (Rochester, Minnesota), the Lakewood (Ohio) High School Natatorium, and three other…

  8. Exhibitions in Sight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Early in the eighteenth century, Pompeii was discovered, a city that had been hidden for sixteen centuries by volcanic lava. There is a traveling exhibition of the sculptures, friezes, mosaics, and paintings being shown around the United States. Described is the history and contents of "Pompeii--A.D. 79." (RK)

  9. Exhibitions in Sight.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Early in the eighteenth century, Pompeii was discovered, a city that had been hidden for sixteen centuries by volcanic lava. There is a traveling exhibition of the sculptures, friezes, mosaics, and paintings being shown around the United States. Described is the history and contents of "Pompeii--A.D. 79." (RK)

  10. Exhibitions in Sight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1977-01-01

    Today, few artists make serving vessels on a monumental scale. Here artists compete in this unique area of specialization prompted by the Campbell Museum in Camden, New Jersey, which is dedicated to collecting and exhibiting the very best in soup tureens. (Author/RK)

  11. Pictures at an Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunz, Walter S., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the Youth Art Month exhibit in Howard County (Maryland) where students submitted their art focusing on school buildings and their interiors. Their art reveals concerns and desires about overcrowding, space utilization, school building height, outside lighting, solitude needs, and visual stimulation. The artwork is discussed in terms of…

  12. Alan Bean Art Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    Former NASA Astronaut and U.S. Senator John Glenn is seen at the opening of the exhibit "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Carla Cioffi)

  13. Alan Bean Art Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-07-19

    NASA Apollo 12 Astronaut and Artist Alan Bean gives remarks at the opening of the exhibit "Alan Bean: Painting Apollo, First Artist on Another World" at the National Air and Space Museum, Monday, July 20, 2009 in Washington. The show opening coincided with the 40th anniversary celebration of Apollo. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Exhibition in Sight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Ludwig Mies van der Rohe is known primarily as an architect. However, he also designed chairs and tables. Discusses an exhibit held in New York City a few months ago which showed how well the famous architect achieved his goals in the area of furniture design. (Author/RK)

  15. Silencing of carboxypeptidase E inhibits cell proliferation, tumorigenicity, and metastasis of osteosarcoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Shuli; Li, Xu; Li, Leiming; Wang, Liguo; Du, Zhangzhen; Yang, Yan; Zhao, Jiansong; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Carboxypeptidase E (CPE), a prohormone processing enzyme, has been implicated in the progression of multiple malignancies. However, the biological role and molecular mechanisms of CPE in osteosarcoma remain elusive. In this study, we assessed the effects of CPE on cell proliferation, tumorigenicity, migration, and invasion in osteosarcoma. Our results showed that silencing of CPE significantly inhibited cell proliferation, caused cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase, decreased the expression levels of cell cycle protein, cyclin D1, and inhibited tumorigenicity in vivo. Additionally, CPE downregulation repressed the migratory and invasive capacities of osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of CPE-ΔN (a splice variant of CPE) enhanced the cell growth, migration, and invasion of osteosarcoma cells. It is possible that both CPE forms are involved in the tumorigenesis and development of osteosarcoma, and therefore CPE may provide a promising biological target for osteosarcoma therapy. PMID:27274275

  16. A tumorigenic MLL-homeobox network in human glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Marco; Ho, Jenny; Coutinho, Fiona J; Vanner, Robert; Lee, Lilian; Head, Renee; Ling, Erick K M; Clarke, Ian D; Dirks, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma growth is driven by cancer cells that have stem cell properties, but molecular determinants of their tumorigenic behavior are poorly defined. In cancer, altered activity of the epigenetic modifiers Polycomb and Trithorax complexes may contribute to the neoplastic phenotype. Here, we provide the first mechanistic insights into the role of the Trithorax protein mixed lineage leukemia (MLL) in maintaining cancer stem cell characteristics in human glioblastoma. We found that MLL directly activates the Homeobox gene HOXA10. In turn, HOXA10 activates a downstream Homeobox network and other genes previously characterized for their role in tumorigenesis. The MLL-Homeobox axis we identified significantly contributes to the tumorigenic potential of glioblastoma stem cells. Our studies suggest a role for MLL in contributing to the epigenetic heterogeneity between tumor-initiating and non-tumor-initiating cells in glioblastoma.

  17. Cells shed from tumours show reduced clonogenicity, resistance to apoptosis, and in vivo tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, M A; Kristensen, C A; Melder, R J; Roberge, S; Calautti, E; Fukumura, D; Jain, R K

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare growth characteristics of cells shed from a tumour with the native tumour cells. The human colon adenocarcinoma LS174T and its highly metastatic subline LS LiM 6 were grown as tissue-isolated tumours in nude mice and perfused to collect shed cells. The tumours were then excised and prepared into single-cell suspensions. Clonogenicity in 0.3–0.9% agarose, apoptotic fraction, and in vivo tumorigenicity were determined for each population. In both tumour lines, shed cells were less clonogenic, more apoptotic and less tumorigenic than cells isolated directly from their native tissue. These findings suggest that shed cells have a low metastatic potential compared to native tumour cells, most likely because they represent an apoptotic population. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10555742

  18. Goodness-of-fit methods for additive-risk models in tumorigenicity experiments.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debashis

    2003-09-01

    In tumorigenicity experiments, a complication is that the time to event is generally not observed, so that the time to tumor is subject to interval censoring. One of the goals in these studies is to properly model the effect of dose on risk. Thus, it is important to have goodness of fit procedures available for assessing the model fit. While several estimation procedures have been developed for current-status data, relatively little work has been done on model-checking techniques. In this article, we propose numerical and graphical methods for the analysis of current-status data using the additive-risk model, primarily focusing on the situation where the monitoring times are dependent. The finite-sample properties of the proposed methodology are examined through numerical studies. The methods are then illustrated with data from a tumorigenicity experiment.

  19. Tumorigenic Xenopus cells express several maternal and early embryonic mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, J.J.; Pelle, R.; Schonne, E.; Dworkin-Rastl, E.; Dworkin, M.B.

    1986-11-01

    Recombinant cDNA libraries were constructed from poly (A)/sup +/ RNA isolated from different stages of oogenesis and embryogenesis from the clawed toad Xenopus laevis. Hybridization analyses were used to describe the accumulation of specific RNAs represented by these cDNA clones in oocytes, embryos, adult liver, a cell line derived from Xenopus borealis embryos (Xb693), and a tumorigenic substrain of that cell line (Xb693T). It was found that from 550 cDNA clones analyses, six sequences accumulate to higher titers in poly(A)/sup +/ RNA isolated from the tumorigenic cell line compared with the nontumorigenic cell line. All six sequences were expressed at high levels during oogenesis. DNA sequencing of these three sequences followed by a computer search of protein data banks has identified them as coding for the glycolytic enzyme enolase, the ATP-ADP carrier protein, and a-tubulin.

  20. Inhibition of heregulin expression blocks tumorigenicity and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Shamon-Taylor, Lisa A.; Mehmi, Inderjit; Tang, Careen K.; Cardillo, Marina; Lupu, Ruth

    2001-12-20

    The growth factor Heregulin (HRG) is expressed in 30% of breast cancer tumors. HRG induces tumorigenicity and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Our investigation into whether blockage of HRG reduces the aggressiveness of breast cancer cells demonstrated that transfection of MDA-MB-231 with an HRG antisense cDNA suppressed proliferation, tumorigenicity, and metastasis. Blockage of the aggressive phenotype is mediated possibly through inactivation of the erbB signaling pathways and a decrease in MMP-9 activity. Our study is the first to report that HRG is a key promoter of breast cancer progression and should be deemed as a potential target in developing therapies for the treatment of breast carcinomas.

  1. Frequent attenuation of the WWOX tumor suppressor in osteosarcoma is associated with increased tumorigenicity and aberrant RUNX2 expression.

    PubMed

    Kurek, Kyle C; Del Mare, Sara; Salah, Zaidoun; Abdeen, Suhaib; Sadiq, Hussain; Lee, Suk-Hee; Gaudio, Eugenio; Zanesi, Nicola; Jones, Kevin B; DeYoung, Barry; Amir, Gail; Gebhardt, Mark; Warman, Matthew; Stein, Gary S; Stein, Janet L; Lian, Jane B; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2010-07-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) is a tumor suppressor that is deleted or attenuated in most human tumors. Wwox-deficient mice develop osteosarcoma (OS), an aggressive bone tumor with poor prognosis that often metastasizes to lung. On the basis of these observations, we examined the status of WWOX in human OS specimens and cell lines. In human OS clinical samples, WWOX expression was absent or reduced in 58% of tumors examined (P < 0.0001). Compared with the primary tumors, WWOX levels frequently increased in tumors resected following chemotherapy. In contrast, tumor metastases to lung often exhibited reduced WWOX levels relative to the primary tumor. In human OS cell lines having reduced WWOX expression, ectopic expression of WWOX inhibited proliferation and attenuated invasion in vitro, and suppressed tumorigenicity in nude mice. Expression of WWOX was associated with reduced RUNX2 expression in OS cell lines, whereas RUNX2 levels were elevated in femurs of Wwox-deficient mice. Furthermore, WWOX reconstitution in HOS cells was associated with downregulation of RUNX2 levels and RUNX2 target genes, consistent with the ability of WWOX to suppress RUNX2 transactivation activity. In clinical samples, RUNX2 was expressed in the majority of primary tumors and undetectable in most tumors resected following chemotherapy, whereas most metastases were RUNX2 positive. Our results deepen the evidence of a tumor suppressor role for WWOX in OS, furthering its prognostic and therapeutic significance in this disease.

  2. Tumorigenicity of Ewing sarcoma is critically dependent on the trithorax proteins MLL1 and menin

    PubMed Central

    Svoboda, Laurie K.; Bailey, Natashay; Van Noord, Raelene A.; Krook, Melanie A.; Harris, Ashley; Cramer, Cassondra; Jasman, Brooke; Patel, Rajiv M.; Thomas, Dafydd; Borkin, Dmitry; Cierpicki, Tomasz; Grembecka, Jolanta; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.

    2017-01-01

    Developmental transcription programs are epigenetically regulated by the competing actions of polycomb and trithorax (TrxG) protein complexes, which repress and activate genes, respectively. Ewing sarcoma is a developmental tumor that is associated with widespread de-regulation of developmental transcription programs, including HOX programs. Posterior HOXD genes are abnormally over-expressed by Ewing sarcoma and HOXD13, in particular, contributes to the tumorigenic phenotype. In MLL1 fusion-driven leukemia, aberrant activation of HOXA genes is epigenetically mediated by the TrxG complex and HOXA gene expression and leukemogenesis are critically dependent on the protein-protein interaction between the TrxG proteins MLL1 and menin. Based on these data, we investigated whether posterior HOXD gene activation and Ewing sarcoma tumorigenicity are similarly mediated by and dependent on MLL1 and/or menin. Our findings demonstrate that Ewing sarcomas express high levels of both MLL1 and menin and that continued expression of both proteins is required for maintenance of tumorigenicity. In addition, exposure of Ewing sarcoma cells to MI-503, an inhibitor of the MLL1-menin protein-protein interaction developed for MLL1-fusion driven leukemia, leads to loss of tumorigenicity and down-regulated expression of the posterior HOXD gene cluster. Together these data demonstrate an essential role for MLL1 and menin in mediating tumor maintenance and posterior HOXD gene activation in Ewing sarcoma. A critical dependency of these tumors on the MLL1-menin interaction presents a potentially novel therapeutic target. PMID:27888797

  3. System-Wide Analysis Reveals a Complex Network of Tumor-Fibroblast Interactions Involved in Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Rajaram, Megha; Li, Jinyu; Egeblad, Mikala; Powers, R. Scott

    2013-01-01

    Many fibroblast-secreted proteins promote tumorigenicity, and several factors secreted by cancer cells have in turn been proposed to induce these proteins. It is not clear whether there are single dominant pathways underlying these interactions or whether they involve multiple pathways acting in parallel. Here, we identified 42 fibroblast-secreted factors induced by breast cancer cells using comparative genomic analysis. To determine what fraction was active in promoting tumorigenicity, we chose five representative fibroblast-secreted factors for in vivo analysis. We found that the majority (three out of five) played equally major roles in promoting tumorigenicity, and intriguingly, each one had distinct effects on the tumor microenvironment. Specifically, fibroblast-secreted amphiregulin promoted breast cancer cell survival, whereas the chemokine CCL7 stimulated tumor cell proliferation while CCL2 promoted innate immune cell infiltration and angiogenesis. The other two factors tested had minor (CCL8) or minimally (STC1) significant effects on the ability of fibroblasts to promote tumor growth. The importance of parallel interactions between fibroblasts and cancer cells was tested by simultaneously targeting fibroblast-secreted amphiregulin and the CCL7 receptor on cancer cells, and this was significantly more efficacious than blocking either pathway alone. We further explored the concept of parallel interactions by testing the extent to which induction of critical fibroblast-secreted proteins could be achieved by single, previously identified, factors produced by breast cancer cells. We found that although single factors could induce a subset of genes, even combinations of factors failed to induce the full repertoire of functionally important fibroblast-secreted proteins. Together, these results delineate a complex network of tumor-fibroblast interactions that act in parallel to promote tumorigenicity and suggest that effective anti-stromal therapeutic strategies

  4. Isolation of stem-like cells from spontaneous feline mammary carcinomas: Phenotypic characterization and tumorigenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, Federica; Wurth, Roberto; Ratto, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Vito, Guendalina; Thellung, Stefano; Daga, Antonio; Cilli, Michele; Ferrari, Angelo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-04-15

    Current carcinogenesis theory states that only a small subset of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells (TICs), are responsible for tumor formation and progression. Human breast cancer-initiating cells have been identified as CD44-expressing cells, which retain tumorigenic activity and display stem cell-like properties. Spontaneous feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is an aggressive cancer, which shows biological similarities to the human tumor counterpart. We report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of FMC-derived stem/progenitor cells, showing in vitro self-renewal, long-lasting proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity. Twenty-one FMC samples were collected, histologically classified and characterized for the expression of Ki67, EGFR, ER-{alpha} and CD44, by immunohistochemistry. By culture in stem cell permissive conditions, we isolated, from 13 FMCs, a CD44-positive subpopulation able to survive and proliferate in vitro as mammospheres of different sizes and morphologies. When injected in NOD/SCID mice, FMC stem-like cells initiate tumors, generating cell heterogeneity and recapitulating the original histotype. In serum-containing medium, spheroid cells showed differentiation properties as shown by morphological changes, the loss of CD44 expression and tumorigenic potential. These data show that stem-defined culture of FMC enriches for TICs and validate the use of these cells as a suitable model for comparative oncology studies of mammary biology and testing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating TICs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Feline mammary carcinoma contain a sub-population of stem-like cells expressing CD44 Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These grow as spheres in serum-free medium and self-renew Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated stem-like cancer cells initiate tumor in immunodeficient mice Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xenografted tumors are phenotypically similar to the original tumor Black

  5. REST Controls Self-Renewal and Tumorigenic Competence of Human Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Luciano; Crisafulli, Laura; Brilli, Elisa; Conforti, Paola; Zunino, Franco; Magrassi, Lorenzo; Schiffer, Davide; Cattaneo, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST/NRSF) is a master repressor of neuronal programs in non-neuronal lineages shown to function as a central regulator of developmental programs and stem cell physiology. Aberrant REST function has been associated with a number of pathological conditions. In cancer biology, REST has been shown to play a tumor suppressor activity in epithelial cancers but an oncogenic role in brain childhood malignancies such as neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. Here we examined REST expression in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) specimens and its role in GBM cells carrying self-renewal and tumorigenic competence. We found REST to be expressed in GBM specimens, its presence being particularly enriched in tumor cells in the perivascular compartment. Significantly, REST is highly expressed in self-renewing tumorigenic-competent GBM cells and its knock down strongly reduces their self-renewal in vitro and tumor-initiating capacity in vivo and affects levels of miR-124 and its downstream targets. These results indicate that REST contributes to GBM maintenance by affecting its self-renewing and tumorigenic cellular component and that, hence, a better understanding of these circuitries in these cells might lead to new exploitable therapeutic targets. PMID:22701651

  6. Genomic instability and tumorigenic induction in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Wu, L. J.; Willey, J. C.; Hall, E. J.

    1998-11-01

    Carcinogenesis is postulated to be a progressive multistage process characterized by an increase in genomic instability and clonal selection with each mutational event endowing a selective growth advantage. Genomic instability as manifested by the amplification of specific gene fragments is common among tumor and transformed cells. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 1GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions or 150 keV/μm alpha particles. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Tumorigenic cells showed neither ras mutations nor deletion in the p16 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, they harbored mutations in the p53 gene and over-expressed cyclin D1. Genomic instability among transformed cells at various stage of the carcinogenic process was examined based on frequencies of PALA resistance. Incidence of genomic instability was highest among established tumor cell lines relative to transformed, non-tumorigenic and control cell lines. Treatment of BEP2D cells with a 4 mM dose of the aminothiol WR-1065 significantly reduced their neoplastic transforming response to 56Fe particles. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of human epithelial cells by heavy ions.

  7. MIF Maintains the Tumorigenic Capacity of Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells by Directly Inhibiting p53.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Raita; Ohta, Shigeki; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Sugihara, Eiji; Okano, Hideyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari; Toda, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-initiating cells thought to drive brain cancer are embedded in a complex heterogeneous histology. In this study, we isolated primary cells from 21 human brain tumor specimens to establish cell lines with high tumorigenic potential and to identify the molecules enabling this capability. The morphology, sphere-forming ability upon expansion, and differentiation potential of all cell lines were indistinguishable in vitro However, testing for tumorigenicity revealed two distinct cell types, brain tumor-initiating cells (BTIC) and non-BTIC. We found that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was highly expressed in BTIC compared with non-BTIC. MIF bound directly to both wild-type and mutant p53 but regulated p53-dependent cell growth by different mechanisms, depending on glioma cell line and p53 status. MIF physically interacted with wild-type p53 in the nucleus and inhibited its transcription-dependent functions. In contrast, MIF bound to mutant p53 in the cytoplasm and abrogated transcription-independent induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, MIF knockdown inhibited BTIC-induced tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model, leading to increased overall survival. Collectively, our findings suggest that MIF regulates BTIC function through direct, intracellular inhibition of p53, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumorigenicity of certain malignant brain cells. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2813-23. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. REST controls self-renewal and tumorigenic competence of human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luciano; Crisafulli, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Tortoreto, Monica; Brilli, Elisa; Conforti, Paola; Zunino, Franco; Magrassi, Lorenzo; Schiffer, Davide; Cattaneo, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST/NRSF) is a master repressor of neuronal programs in non-neuronal lineages shown to function as a central regulator of developmental programs and stem cell physiology. Aberrant REST function has been associated with a number of pathological conditions. In cancer biology, REST has been shown to play a tumor suppressor activity in epithelial cancers but an oncogenic role in brain childhood malignancies such as neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. Here we examined REST expression in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) specimens and its role in GBM cells carrying self-renewal and tumorigenic competence. We found REST to be expressed in GBM specimens, its presence being particularly enriched in tumor cells in the perivascular compartment. Significantly, REST is highly expressed in self-renewing tumorigenic-competent GBM cells and its knock down strongly reduces their self-renewal in vitro and tumor-initiating capacity in vivo and affects levels of miR-124 and its downstream targets. These results indicate that REST contributes to GBM maintenance by affecting its self-renewing and tumorigenic cellular component and that, hence, a better understanding of these circuitries in these cells might lead to new exploitable therapeutic targets.

  9. Pharmacologic disruption of Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 inhibits tumorigenicity and tumor progression in prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) mediates gene silencing through histone H3K27 methylation. PRC2 components are over-expressed in metastatic prostate cancer (PC), and are required for cancer stem cell (CSC) self-renewal. 3-Dezaneplanocin-A (DZNeP) is an inhibitor of PRC2 with broad anticancer activity. Method we investigated the effects of DZNeP on cell proliferation, tumorigenicity and invasive potential of PC cell lines (LNCaP and DU145). Results Exploring GEO and Oncomine databases, we found that specific PRC2 genes (EED, EZH2, SUZ12) predict poor prognosis in PC. Non-toxic DZNeP concentrations completely eradicated LNCaP and DU145 prostatosphere formation, and significantly reduced the expression of CSC markers. At comparable doses, other epigenetic drugs were not able to eradicate CSCs. DZNeP was also able to reduce PC cell invasion. Cells pre-treated with DZNeP were significantly less tumorigenic (LNCaP) and formed smaller tumors (DU145) in immunocompromised mice. Conclusion DZNeP is effective both in vitro and in vivo against PC cells. DZNeP antitumor activity is in part mediated by inhibition of CSC tumorigenic potential. PMID:21501485

  10. HIPK2 deficiency causes chromosomal instability by cytokinesis failure and increases tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Valente, Davide; Bossi, Gianluca; Moncada, Alice; Tornincasa, Mara; Indelicato, Stefania; Piscuoglio, Salvatore; Karamitopoulou, Eva Diamantis; Bartolazzi, Armando; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Fusco, Alfredo; Soddu, Silvia; Rinaldo, Cinzia

    2015-04-30

    HIPK2, a cell fate decision kinase inactivated in several human cancers, is thought to exert its oncosuppressing activity through its p53-dependent and -independent apoptotic function. However, a HIPK2 role in cell proliferation has also been described. In particular, HIPK2 is required to complete cytokinesis and impaired HIPK2 expression results in cytokinesis failure and tetraploidization. Since tetraploidy may yield to aneuploidy and chromosomal instability (CIN), we asked whether unscheduled tetraploidy caused by loss of HIPK2 might contribute to tumorigenicity. Here, we show that, compared to Hipk2+/+ mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), hipk2-null MEFs accumulate subtetraploid karyotypes and develop CIN. Accumulation of these defects inhibits proliferation and spontaneous immortalization of primary MEFs whereas increases tumorigenicity when MEFs are transformed by E1A and Harvey-Ras oncogenes. Upon mouse injection, E1A/Ras-transformed hipk2-null MEFs generate tumors with genetic alterations resembling those of human cancers derived by initial tetraploidization events, such as pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Thus, we evaluated HIPK2 expression in different stages of pancreatic transformation. Importantly, we found a significant correlation among reduced HIPK2 expression, high grade of malignancy, and high nuclear size, a marker of increased ploidy. Overall, these results indicate that HIPK2 acts as a caretaker gene, whose inactivation increases tumorigenicity and causes CIN by cytokinesis failure.

  11. Focal adhesion kinase regulates syndecan-2-mediated tumorigenic activity of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Haein; Han, Innoc; Kwon, Ho Jeong; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2005-11-01

    Expression of syndecan-2, a transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan, is crucial for the tumorigenic activity in colon carcinoma cells. However, despite the high-level expression of syndecan-2 in mesenchymal cells, few studies have addressed the function of syndecan-2 in sarcoma cells. In HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells, we found that syndecan-2 regulated migration, invasion into Matrigel, and anchorage-independent growth but not cell-extracellular matrix adhesion or proliferation, suggesting that syndecan-2 plays different functional roles in fibrosarcoma and colon carcinoma cells. Consistent with the increased cell migration/invasion of syndecan-2-overexpressing HT1080 cells, syndecan-2 overexpression increased phosphorylation and interaction of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), membrane localization of T-lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene-1 (Tiam-1), and activation of Rac. Syndecan-2-mediated cell migration/invasion of HT1080 cells was diminished when (a) cells were cotransfected with nonphosphorylatable mutant FAK Y397F or with other FAK mutants lacking PI3K interactions, (b) cells were treated with a specific PI3K inhibitor, or (c) levels of Tiam-1 were knocked down with small interfering RNAs. Furthermore, expression of several FAK mutants inhibited syndecan-2-mediated enhancement of anchorage-independent growth in HT1080 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that syndecan-2 regulates the tumorigenic activities of HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and that FAK is a key regulator of syndecan-2-mediated tumorigenic activities.

  12. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 leaving the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the exhibit site. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at MSFC, the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit, automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids and emergency and safety systems, are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  13. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows onlookers viewing displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  14. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows Justin Varnadore, son of a Marshall TV employee, at the controls of one of the many displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  15. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows onlookers viewing displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  16. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows Justin Varnadore, son of a Marshall TV employee, at the controls of one of the many displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  17. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  18. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  19. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  20. Repairing Hubble Exhibit Reception

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-04-23

    Individuals in attendance who had a hand in the development or servicing of the Hubble Space Telescope pose for a group photo at an event unveiling a new exhibit featuring Hubble's Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR) and the WFPC2 on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC. COSTAR and WFPC2 were installed in Hubble during the first space shuttle servicing mission in 1993 and returned to Earth on the fifth and final servicing mission in 2009. Photo Credit: (NASA/Joel Kowsky)

  1. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  2. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  3. Heroes and Legends Exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-11-07

    Inside the Heroes and Legends attraction at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex, the Sigma 7 Mercury spacecraft in this exhibit was piloted by astronaut Wally Schirra during his six-orbit mission on Oct. 3, 1962. For display purposes, it is shown here attached to a Redstone launch vehicle like the one that boosted astronauts Alan Shepard and Gus Grissom on sub-orbital flights in 1961. Schirra's capsule was actually launched by the more powerful Atlas rocket in order to reach orbit. The new facility looks back to the pioneering efforts of Mercury, Gemini and Apollo. It sets the stage by providing the background and context for space exploration and the legendary men and women who pioneered the nation's journey into space.

  4. MicroRNAs define distinct human neuroblastoma cell phenotypes and regulate their differentiation and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. NB tumors and derived cell lines are phenotypically heterogeneous. Cell lines are classified by phenotype, each having distinct differentiation and tumorigenic properties. The neuroblastic phenotype is tumorigenic, has neuronal features and includes stem cells (I-cells) and neuronal cells (N-cells). The non-neuronal phenotype (S-cell) comprises cells that are non-tumorigenic with features of glial/smooth muscle precursor cells. This study identified miRNAs associated with each distinct cell phenotypes and investigated their role in regulating associated differentiation and tumorigenic properties. Methods A miRNA microarray was performed on the three cell phenotypes and expression verified by qRT-PCR. miRNAs specific for certain cell phenotypes were modulated using miRNA inhibitors or stable transfection. Neuronal differentiation was induced by RA; non-neuronal differentiation by BrdU. Changes in tumorigenicity were assayed by soft agar colony forming ability. N-myc binding to miR-375 promoter was assayed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation. Results Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of miRNA microarray data segregated neuroblastic and non-neuronal cell lines and showed that specific miRNAs define each phenotype. qRT-PCR validation confirmed that increased levels of miR-21, miR-221 and miR-335 are associated with the non-neuronal phenotype, whereas increased levels of miR-124 and miR-375 are exclusive to neuroblastic cells. Downregulation of miR-335 in non-neuronal cells modulates expression levels of HAND1 and JAG1, known modulators of neuronal differentiation. Overexpression of miR-124 in stem cells induces terminal neuronal differentiation with reduced malignancy. Expression of miR-375 is exclusive for N-myc-expressing neuroblastic cells and is regulated by N-myc. Moreover, miR-375 downregulates expression of the neuronal-specific RNA binding protein HuD. Conclusions Thus, mi

  5. Baculovirus-Mediated miRNA Regulation to Suppress Hepatocellular Carcinoma Tumorigenicity and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chiu-Ling; Wu, Jaw-Ching; Chen, Guan-Yu; Yuan, Pei-Hsiang; Tseng, Yen-Wen; Li, Kuei-Chang; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA 122 (miR-122) is a tumor suppressor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but is lowly expressed in HCC cells. MiR-151 is aberrantly overexpressed in HCC cells and promotes HCC metastasis yet its roles on HCC tumorigenicity are unknown. To combat HCC tumorigenicity/metastasis, we developed Sleeping Beauty (SB)-based hybrid baculovirus (BV) vectors that expressed (i) miR-122 precursors (pre-miR-122), (ii) miR-151 sponges, or (iii) pre-miR-122 and miR-151 sponges. Transduction of aggressive HCC cells (Mahlavu) with the pre-miR-122-expressing BV tremendously enhanced miR-122 levels for >6 weeks, suppressed the levels of downstream effectors (e.g., ADAM10 and Bcl-w), proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, motility and migration/invasion in vitro. Intratumoral injection of the pre-miR-122-expressing BV attenuated the HCC growth/metastasis. The miR-151 sponges-expressing BV diminished the miR-151 levels for 6 weeks, enhanced RhoGDIA expression, suppressed RhoGTPases, as well as motility and migration/invasion of Mahlavu cells. Intratumoral injection of the miR-151 sponge-expressing BV impeded not only HCC metastasis but also cell proliferation, MMP expression and tumor growth in vivo. The BV co-expressing pre-miR-122 and miR-151 sponges also simultaneously enhanced miR-122 expression and inhibited miR-151, and conferred antitumor/anti-metastasis effects albeit lack of synergism. These data implicate the potentials of the SB-based hybrid BV for persistently modulating miRNA and suppressing HCC tumorigenicity/metastasis. PMID:25023326

  6. Utility of the mouse dermal promotion assay in comparing the tumorigenic potential of cigarette mainstream smoke.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carr J; Perfetti, Thomas A; Garg, Rajni; Hansch, Corwin

    2006-10-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified a number of the chemical constituents reported in cigarette mainstream smoke (MS) as carcinogens. In the international literature, 81 IARC classified carcinogens have been reported historically in MS. Cigarette smoke is a complex aerosol of minute liquid droplets (termed the particulate phase) suspended within a mixture of gases (CO(2), CO, NO(x), etc.) and semi-volatile compounds. The gases and semi-volatiles are termed the vapor phase. Due to early difficulties in inducing carcinomas in laboratory animals following inhalation exposure to MS, the mouse dermal promotion assay became the standard method of comparing the tumorigenic potential of cigarette smoke condensates (the particulate phase of MS nearly devoid of MS gases and having a significant reduction of the semi-volatile components of the vapor phase). Of the 81 IARC carcinogens reported in MS, 48 are found exclusively in the particulate phase, 29 in the vapor phase only, and four IARC carcinogens in both phases. A general comparison of the quantity and potency of the individual carcinogenic constituents of the MS vapor and particulate phases illustrates that the potential carcinogenic contribution from the vapor phase might be significant. Therefore, the mouse dermal promotion assay may not be a sensitive comparator of the tumorigenic potential of different MSs displaying a diversity of vapor phase components. However, when used in a weight-of-the-evidence approach that includes smoke chemistry, in vitro studies using whole smoke and human exposure studies evaluating both vapor and particulate phase smoke constituents, the mouse dermal promotion assay remains an important risk assessment tool as the only test that reproducibly measures the tumorigenic potential of cigarette smoke condensate.

  7. CD271 Expression on Patient Melanoma Cells Is Unstable and Unlinked to Tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Samantha E; Fedele, Clare G; Corbin, Vincent; Wybacz, Elisha; Szeto, Pacman; Lewin, Jeremy; Young, Richard J; Wong, Annie; Fuller, Robert; Spillane, John; Speakman, David; Donahoe, Simon; Pohl, Miklos; Gyorki, David; Henderson, Michael A; Johnstone, Ricky W; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Shackleton, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The stability of markers that identify cancer cells that propagate disease is important to the outcomes of targeted therapy strategies. In human melanoma, conflicting data exist as to whether hierarchical expression of CD271/p75/NGFR (nerve growth factor receptor) marks cells with enriched tumorigenicity, which would compel their specific targeting in therapy. To test whether these discrepancies relate to differences among groups in assay approaches, we undertook side-by-side testing of published methods of patient-derived melanoma xenografting (PDX), including comparisons of tissue digestion procedures or coinjected Matrigel formulations. We found that CD271(-) and CD271(+) melanoma cells from each of seven patients were similarly tumorigenic, regardless of assay variations. Surprisingly variable CD271 expression patterns were observed in the analyses of sibling PDX tumors (n = 68) grown in the same experiments from either CD271(-) or CD271(+) cells obtained from patients. This indicates unstable intratumoral lineage relationships between CD271(-) and CD271(+) melanoma cells that are inconsistent with classical, epigenetically based theories of disease progression, such as the cancer stem cell and plasticity models. SNP genotyping of pairs of sibling PDX tumors grown from phenotypically identical CD271(-) or CD271(+) cells showed large pairwise differences in copy number (28%-48%). Differences were also apparent in the copy number profiles of CD271(-) and CD271(+) cells purified directly from each of the four melanomas (1.4%-23%). Thus, CD271 expression in patient melanomas is unstable, not consistently linked to increased tumorigenicity and associated with genetic heterogeneity, undermining its use as a marker in clinical studies. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3965-77. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. The pleiotrophin-ALK axis is required for tumorigenicity of glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Koyama-Nasu, R; Haruta, R; Nasu-Nishimura, Y; Taniue, K; Katou, Y; Shirahige, K; Todo, T; Ino, Y; Mukasa, A; Saito, N; Matsui, M; Takahashi, R; Hoshino-Okubo, A; Sugano, H; Manabe, E; Funato, K; Akiyama, T

    2014-04-24

    Increasing evidence suggests that brain tumors arise from the transformation of neural stem/precursor/progenitor cells. Much current research on human brain tumors is focused on the stem-like properties of glioblastoma. Here we show that anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and its ligand pleiotrophin are required for the self-renewal and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs). Furthermore, we demonstrate that pleiotrophin is transactivated directly by SOX2, a transcription factor essential for the maintenance of both neural stem cells and GSCs. We speculate that the pleiotrophin-ALK axis may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma.

  9. miR-150 Suppresses the Proliferation and Tumorigenicity of Leukemia Stem Cells by Targeting the Nanog Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dan-dan; Zhou, Peng-jun; Wang, Ying; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Li; Chen, Su-hong; Fu, Wu-yu; Ruan, Bi-bo; Xu, Hai-peng; Hu, Chao-zhi; Tian, Lu; Qin, Jin-hong; Wang, Sheng; Wang, Xiao; Liu, Qiu-ying; Ren, Zhe; Gu, Xue-kui; Li, Yao-he; Liu, Zhong; Wang, Yi-fei

    2016-01-01

    Proliferation, a key feature of cancer cells, accounts for the majority of cancer-related diseases resulting in mortality. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) plays important post-transcriptional modulation roles by acting on multiple signaling pathways, but the underlying mechanism in proliferation and tumorigenicity is unclear. Here, we identified the role of miR-150 in proliferation and tumorigenicity in leukemia stem cells (LSCs; CD34+CD38- cells). miR-150 expression was significantly down-regulated in LSCs from leukemia cell lines and clinical samples. Functional assays demonstrated that increased miR-150 expression inhibited proliferation and clonal and clonogenic growth, enhanced chemosensitivity, and attenuated tumorigenic activity of LSCs in vitro. Transplantation animal studies revealed that miR-150 overexpression progressively abrogates tumor growth. Immunohistochemistry assays demonstrated that miR-150 overexpression enhanced caspase-3 level and reduced Ki-67 level. Moreover, luciferase reporter assays indicated Nanog is a direct and functional target of miR-150. Nanog silencing using small interfering RNA recapitulated anti-proliferation and tumorigenicity inhibition effects. Furthermore, miR-150 directly down-regulated the expression of other cancer stem cell factors including Notch2 and CTNNB1. These results provide insights into the specific biological behavior of miR-150 in regulating LSC proliferation and tumorigenicity. Targeting this miR-150/Nanog axis would be a helpful therapeutic strategy to treat acute myeloid leukemia. PMID:27917123

  10. miR-199a-3p targets stemness-related and mitogenic signaling pathways to suppress the expansion and tumorigenic capabilities of prostate cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruifang; Liu, Can; Liu, Bigang; Jeter, Collene; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Li, Yandong; Yang, Tao; Wang, Junchen; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers exhibit significant cellular heterogeneity featuring tumorigenic cancer stem cells (CSCs) in addition to more differentiated progeny with limited tumor-initiating capabilities. Recent studies suggest that microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate CSCs and tumor development. A previous library screening for differential miRNA expression in CD44+ (and other) prostate CSC vs. non-CSC populations identified miR-199a-3p to be among the most highly under-expressed miRNAs in CSCs. In this study, we characterized the biological functions of miR-199a-3p in CD44+ prostate cancer (PCa) cells and in tumor regeneration. Overexpression of miR-199a-3p in purified CD44+ or bulk PCa cells, including primary PCa, inhibited proliferation and clonal expansion without inducing apoptosis. miR-199a-3p overexpression also diminished tumor-initiating capacities of CD44+ PCa cells as well as tumor regeneration from bulk PCa cells. Importantly, inducible miR-199a-3p expression in pre-established prostate tumors in NOD/SCID mice inhibited tumor growth. Using target prediction program and luciferase assays, we show mechanistically that CD44 is a direct functional target of miR-199a-3p in PCa cells. Moreover, miR-199a-3p also directly or indirectly targeted several additional mitogenic molecules, including c-MYC, cyclin D1 (CCND1) and EGFR. Taken together, our results demonstrate how the aberrant loss of a miRNA-mediated mechanism can lead to the expansion and tumorigenic activity of prostate CSCs, further supporting the development and implementation of miRNA mimics for cancer treatment. PMID:27447749

  11. Evaluation of human fetal neural stem/progenitor cells as a source for cell replacement therapy for neurological disorders: properties and tumorigenicity after long-term in vitro maintenance.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Daisuke; Okada, Yohei; Nakamura, Masaya; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Okano, Hirotaka James; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Shimazaki, Takuya; Ito, Mamoru; Ikeda, Eiji; Tamiya, Takashi; Nagao, Seigo; Okano, Hideyuki

    2009-02-01

    It is expected that human neural stem/progenitor cells (hNS/PCs) will some day be used in cell replacement therapies. However, their availability is limited because of ethical issues, so they have to be expanded to obtain sufficient amounts for clinical application. Moreover, in-vitro-maintained hNS/PCs may have a potential for tumorigenicity that could be manifested after transplantation in vivo. In the present study, we demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo properties of long-term-expanded hNS/PCs, including a 6-month bioluminescence imaging (BLI) study of their in vivo tumorigenicity. hNS/PCs cultured for approximately 250 days in vitro (hNS/PCs-250) exhibited a higher growth rate and greater neurogenic potential than those cultured for approximately 500 days in vitro (hNS/PCs-500), which showed greater gliogenic potential. In vivo, both hNS/PCs-250 and -500 differentiated into neurons and astrocytes 4 weeks after being transplanted into the striatum of immunodeficient mice, and hNS/PCs-250 exhibited better survival than hNS/PCs-500 at this time point. We also found that the grafted hNS/PCs-250 survived stably and differentiated properly into neurons and astrocytes even 6 months after the surgery. Moreover, during the 6-month observation period by BLI, we did not detect any evidence of rapid tumorigenic growth of the grafted hNS/PCs, and neither PCNA/Ki67-positive proliferating cells nor significant malignant invasive features were detected histologically. These findings support the idea that hNS/PCs may represent a nontumorigenic, safe, and appropriate cell source for regenerative therapies for neurological disorders. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Tumorigenic transformation of murine keratinocytes by the E5 genes of bovine papillomavirus type 1 and human papillomavirus type 16.

    PubMed Central

    Leptak, C; Ramon y Cajal, S; Kulke, R; Horwitz, B H; Riese, D J; Dotto, G P; DiMaio, D

    1991-01-01

    To examine the biological properties of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV) and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E5 genes, each was cloned separately into a retroviral expression vector and helper-free recombinant viruses were generated in packaging cell lines. The BPV E5 retroviruses efficiently caused morphologic and tumorigenic transformation of cultured lines of murine fibroblasts, whereas the HPV16 E5 viruses were inactive in these assays. In contrast, infection of the p117 established line of murine epidermal keratinocytes with either the BPV or the HPV16 E5 retrovirus resulted in the generation of tumorigenic cells. Pam212 murine keratinocytes were also transformed to tumorigenicity by the HPV16 E5 gene but not by the gene carrying a frameshift mutation. These results establish that the HPV16 E5 gene is a transforming gene in cells related to its normal host epithelial cells. Images PMID:1658398

  13. Sequential development of an angiogenic phenotype by human fibroblasts progressing to tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Volpert, O V; Dameron, K M; Bouck, N

    1997-03-27

    As normal cells progress to malignancy they must acquire an angiogenic phenotype that will enable them to attract the blood vessels necessary to support their progressive growth. Here we define the mechanism by which human fibroblasts cultured from Li Fraumeni patients and progressing to tumorigenicity in vitro become angiogenic. Initially cells were anti-angiogenic due to the secretion of high levels of inhibitory thrombospondin that overrode the modest amounts of the major inducer, vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), that were also produced. Cells became fully angiogenic in two steps, the first dependent on the loss of both alleles of wild-type p53 which caused a drop of at least 20-fold in secreted thrombospondin and a fourfold increase in secreted VEGF. Angiogenic activity increased again upon transformation by activated ras due to a further twofold increase in VEGF. Changes in relative levels of VEGF mRNA were sufficient to account for changes in secreted protein levels and in overall angiogenic activity. These studies demonstrate that an angiogenic phenotype able to support tumorigenicity can arise in a step-wise fashion in response to both oncogene activation and tumor suppressor gene loss and involve both a decrease in the secretion of inhibitors and the sequential ratcheting up of the secretion of inducers of angiogenesis.

  14. BMI-1 promotes Ewing sarcoma tumorigenicity independent of CDKN2A-repression

    PubMed Central

    Douglas, Dorothea; Hsu, Jessie Hao-Ru; Hung, Long; Cooper, Aaron; Abdueva, Diana; van Doorninck, John; Peng, Grace; Shimada, Hiro; Triche, Timothy J.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.

    2008-01-01

    Deregulation of the polycomb group gene BMI-1 is implicated in the pathogenesis of many human cancers. In this study, we have investigated if the Ewing's Sarcoma Family of Tumors (ESFT) express BMI-1 and whether it functions as an oncogene in this highly aggressive group of bone and soft tissue tumors. Our data show that BMI-1 is highly expressed by ESFT cells and that, although it does not significantly affect proliferation or survival, BMI-1 actively promotes anchorage independent growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Moreover, we find that BMI-1 promotes the tumorigenicity of both p16-wild type and p16-null cell lines demonstrating that the mechanism of BMI-1 oncogenic function in ESFT is, at least in part, independent of CDKN2A repression. Expression profiling studies of ESFT cells following BMI-1 knockdown reveal that BMI-1 regulates the expression of hundreds of downstream target genes including, in particular, genes involved in both differentiation and development as well as cell:cell and cell:matrix adhesion. Gain and loss of function assays confirm that BMI-1 represses expression of the adhesion-associated basement membrane protein nidogen 1. In addition, while BMI-1 promotes ESFT adhesion, nidogen 1 inhibits cellular adhesion in vitro. Together these data support a pivotal role for BMI-1 ESFT pathogenesis and suggest that its oncogenic function in these tumors is in part mediated through modulation of adhesion pathways. PMID:18701473

  15. Combination of azacitidine and trichostatin A decreased the tumorigenic potential of lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang; Yin, Wei; Wu, Fengying; Fan, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose This study aims to investigate the possibility of using epigenetic inhibitors against lung cancer. Methods The changes in the proliferation of human lung cancer cells, NCI-H1975 and NCI-H1299 cells, treated with various doses of inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase (azacitidine [5-AZA]) or histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A [TSA]) were determined by cell counting. The cell viability of NCI-H1975 and NCI-H1299 cells treated with 5-AZA and/or TSA was measured by the MTT assay. The changes in expression of the AKT signaling pathway molecules caused by the application of 5-AZA and TSA were analyzed through their protein and mRNA levels. A xenograft model was used to observe the effects of 5-AZA and TSA on tumor growth in vivo. Results 5-AZA and TSA inhibited the proliferation and viability of NCI-H1975 and NCI-H1299 cells. Their joint application significantly influenced the expression of key molecules in AKT signaling pathway in vitro, and inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors in vivo. Furthermore, TSA and 5-AZA decreased the tumorigenic ability of NCI-H1975 cells in vivo. Conclusion The decreased cell viability and tumorigenic ability, as well as increased anti-oncogene expression following the joint application of 5-AZA and TSA, make these epigenetic inhibitors prospective therapeutic agents for lung cancer. PMID:28652781

  16. Combination of azacitidine and trichostatin A decreased the tumorigenic potential of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Yin, Wei; Wu, Fengying; Fan, Jiang

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the possibility of using epigenetic inhibitors against lung cancer. The changes in the proliferation of human lung cancer cells, NCI-H1975 and NCI-H1299 cells, treated with various doses of inhibitors of DNA methyltransferase (azacitidine [5-AZA]) or histone deacetylase inhibitors (trichostatin A [TSA]) were determined by cell counting. The cell viability of NCI-H1975 and NCI-H1299 cells treated with 5-AZA and/or TSA was measured by the MTT assay. The changes in expression of the AKT signaling pathway molecules caused by the application of 5-AZA and TSA were analyzed through their protein and mRNA levels. A xenograft model was used to observe the effects of 5-AZA and TSA on tumor growth in vivo. 5-AZA and TSA inhibited the proliferation and viability of NCI-H1975 and NCI-H1299 cells. Their joint application significantly influenced the expression of key molecules in AKT signaling pathway in vitro, and inhibited the growth of xenograft tumors in vivo. Furthermore, TSA and 5-AZA decreased the tumorigenic ability of NCI-H1975 cells in vivo. The decreased cell viability and tumorigenic ability, as well as increased anti-oncogene expression following the joint application of 5-AZA and TSA, make these epigenetic inhibitors prospective therapeutic agents for lung cancer.

  17. Tumorigenic potential of mononucleated small cells of Hodgkin lymphoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Jun-ichiro; Mamat, Suhana; Tian, Tian; Wang, Yi; Rahadiani, Nur; Aozasa, Katsuyuki; Morii, Eiichi

    2010-12-01

    Tumor cells with tumorigenic potential are limited to a small cell population known as cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs yield both CSCs and non-CSCs, whereas non-CSCs do not yield CSCs. CSCs have not been identified in any malignant lymphomas. Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a mostly B-cell neoplasm that can be diagnosed by the presence of multinucleated (Reed-Sternberg; RS) cells admixed with Hodgkin cells with distinct nucleoli and various inflammatory cells. Here, the tumorigenic potential of cells with a single nucleus (S) and cells with multiple nuclei (M), which may be equivalent to Hodgkin and RS cells, respectively, was examined in HL cell lines L1236 and L428. Cultures of single S cells yielded both S and M cells, whereas M cell cultures yielded only M cells. When either cultured in methylcellulose or inoculated into NOD/SCID mice, the colony number and tumor size were both larger in S than in M cells. Concentrations of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) were at low levels in a portion of S cells that abundantly expressed FoxO3a, a transcription factor that regulates ROS-degrading enzymes. In clinical samples of HL, FoxO3a was expressed in mononuclear Hodgkin cells but not in multinucleated RS cells. These findings suggest that smaller cells or Hodgkin cells that show low-ROS concentrations and high FoxO3a expression levels might be candidates for HL CSCs.

  18. Hemidesmosomal linker proteins regulate cell motility, invasion and tumorigenicity in oral squamous cell carcinoma derived cells.

    PubMed

    Rajeev Chaudhari, Pratik; Emlit Charles, Silvania; D'Souza, Zinia Charlotte; Murlidhar Vaidya, Milind

    2017-08-31

    BPAG1e and Plectin are hemidesmosomal linker proteins which anchor intermediate filament proteins to the cell surface through β4 integrin. Recent reports indicate that these proteins play a role in various cellular processes apart from their known anchoring function. However, the available literature is inconsistent. Further, the previous study from our laboratory suggested that Keratin8/18 pair promotes cell motility and tumor progression by deregulating β4 integrin signaling in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) derived cells. Based on these findings, we hypothesized that linker proteins may have a role in neoplastic progression of OSCC. Downregulation of hemidesmosomal linker proteins in OSCC derived cells resulted in reduced cell migration accompanied by alterations in actin organization. Further, decreased MMP9 activity led to reduced cell invasion in linker proteins knockdown cells. Moreover, loss of these proteins resulted in reduced tumorigenic potential. SWATH analysis demonstrated upregulation of N-Myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) in linker proteins downregulated cells as compared to vector control cells. Further, the defects in phenotype upon linker proteins ablation were rescued upon loss of NDRG1 in linker proteins knockdown background. These data together indicate that hemidesmosomal linker proteins regulate cell motility, invasion and tumorigenicity possibly through NDRG1 in OSCC derived cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Induction of cancer-associated fibroblast-like cells by carbon nanotubes dictates its tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Wang, Liying; Castranova, Vincent; Dinu, Cerasela Zoica; Issaragrisil, Surapol; Chen, Yi Charlie; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2016-01-01

    Tumor microenvironment has been recognized as a key determinant of tumor formation and metastasis, but how tumor microenvironment is affected by nanomaterials is essentially unknown. Here, we investigated whether carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a widely used nanomaterial with known carcinogenic potential, can affect cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), which are a key component of tumor microenvironment that provides necessary support for tumor growth. We show for the first time that single-walled CNT and to a lesser extent multi-walled and its COOH-functionalized form induced CAF-like cells, which are non-tumorigenic in animals, but promote tumor growth of human lung carcinoma and CNT-transformed lung epithelial cells. The mechanism by which CNT-induced CAF-like cells promote tumor growth involved the acquisition of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in cancer population. Gene knockdown experiments showed that an expression of podoplanin on CAF-like cells is essential for their effects, indicating the functional role of CAF-like cells and podoplanin in CNT tumorigenic process. Our findings unveil a novel mechanism of CNT-induced carcinogenesis through the induction of CAF-like cells that support CSCs and drive tumor formation. Our results also suggest the potential utility of podoplanin as a mechanism-based biomarker for rapid screening of carcinogenicity of CNTs and related nanomaterials for their safer design. PMID:27996035

  20. Transcriptional Repressor DAXX Promotes Prostate Cancer Tumorigenicity via Suppression of Autophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Puto, Lorena A.; Brognard, John; Hunter, Tony

    2015-01-01

    The DAXX transcriptional repressor was originally associated with apoptotic cell death. However, recent evidence that DAXX represses several tumor suppressor genes, including the DAPK1 and DAPK3 protein kinases, and is up-regulated in many cancers argues that a pro-survival role may predominate in a cancer context. Here, we report that DAXX has potent growth-enhancing effects on primary prostatic malignancy through inhibition of autophagy. Through stable gene knockdown and mouse subcutaneous xenograft studies, we demonstrate that DAXX promotes tumorigenicity of human ALVA-31 and PC3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells in vivo. Importantly, DAXX represses expression of essential autophagy modulators DAPK3 and ULK1 in vivo, revealing autophagy suppression as a mechanism through which DAXX promotes PCa tumorigenicity. Furthermore, DAXX knockdown increases autophagic flux in cultured PCa cells. Finally, interrogation of the OncomineTM database suggests that DAXX overexpression is associated with malignant transformation in several human cancers, including prostate and pancreatic cancers. Thus, DAXX may represent a new cancer biomarker for the detection of aggressive disease, whose tissue-specific down-regulation can serve as an improved therapeutic modality. Our results establish DAXX as a pro-survival protein in PCa and reveal that, in the early stages of tumorigenesis, autophagy suppresses prostate tumor formation. PMID:25903140

  1. Crucial role of carbonic anhydrase IX in tumorigenicity of xenotransplanted adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Kentaro; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takanashi, Tomoka; Tamai, Keiichi; Sato, Ikuro; Ine, Shoji; Sasaki, Osamu; Satoh, Kennichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fukushima, Takuya; Harigae, Hideo; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2017-03-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9) is a membrane-associated carbonic anhydrase that regulates cellular pH, is upregulated in various solid tumors, and is considered to be a therapeutic target. Here, we describe the essential role of CA9 in the tumorigenicity of cells derived from human adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL). We previously established the highly tumorigenic ST1-N6 subline from the ATL-derived ST1 cell line by serial xenotransplantation in NOG mice. In the present study, we first show that CA9 expression is strongly enhanced in ST1-N6 cells. We then sorted ST1 cells by high or low CA9 expression and established ST1-CA9(high) and ST1-CA9(low) sublines. ST1-CA9(high) cells, like ST1-N6 cells, were more strongly tumorigenic than ST1-CA9(low) or parental ST1 cells when injected into NOG mice. Knockdown of CA9 with shRNAs suppressed the ability of ST1-CA9(high) cells to initiate tumors, and the tumorigenicity of ST1 cells was significantly enhanced by introducing wild-type CA9 or a CA9 mutant with deletion of an intracytoplasmic domain. However, a CA9 with point mutations in the catalytic site did not increase the tumorigenicity of ST1 cells. Furthermore, we detected a small population of CA9(+) CD25(+) cells in lymph nodes of ATL patients. These findings suggest that CA9, and particularly its carbonic anhydrase activity, promotes the tumorigenicity of ATL-derived cells and may be involved in malignant development of lymphoma-type ATL. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  2. Highly tumorigenic hepatocellular carcinoma cell line with cancer stem cell-like properties

    PubMed Central

    Cassim, Shamir; Lapierre, Pascal; Bilodeau, Marc

    2017-01-01

    There are limited numbers of models to study hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vivo in immunocompetent hosts. In an effort to develop a cell line with improved tumorigenicity, we derived a new cell line from Hepa1-6 cells through an in vivo passage in C57BL/6 mice. The resulting Dt81Hepa1-6 cell line showed enhanced tumorigenicity compared to Hepa1-6 with more frequent (28±12 vs. 0±0 lesions at 21 days) and more rapid tumor development (21 (100%) vs. 70 days (10%)) in C57BL/6 mice. The minimal Dt81Hepa1-6 cell number required to obtain visible tumors was 100,000 cells. The Dt81Hepa1-6 cell line showed high hepatotropism with subcutaneous injection leading to liver tumors without development of tumors in lungs or spleen. In vitro, Dt81Hepa1-6 cells showed increased anchorage-independent growth (34.7±6.8 vs. 12.3±3.3 colonies; P<0.05) and increased EpCAM (8.7±1.1 folds; P<0.01) and β-catenin (5.4±1.0 folds; P<0.01) expression. A significant proportion of Dt81Hepa1-6 cells expressed EpCAM compared to Hepa1-6 (34.8±1.1% vs 0.9±0.13%; P<0.001). Enriched EpCAM+ Dt81Hepa1-6 cells led to higher tumor load than EpCAM- Dt81Hepa1-6 cells (1093±74 vs 473±100 tumors; P<0.01). The in vivo selected Dt81Hepa1-6 cell line shows high liver specificity and increased tumorigenicity compared to Hepa1-6 cells. These properties are associated with increased expression of EpCAM and β-catenin confirming that EpCAM+ HCC cells comprise a subset with characteristics of tumor-initiating cells with stem/progenitor cell features. The Dt81Hepa1-6 cell line with its cancer stem cell-like properties will be a useful tool for the study of hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo. PMID:28152020

  3. Silencing of Kv4.1 potassium channels inhibits cell proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Choi, Changsun; Hong, Seong-Geun; Yarishkin, Oleg V.; Bae, Young Min; Kim, Jae Gon; O'Grady, Scott M.; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2009-06-26

    Potassium channel activity has been shown to facilitate cell proliferation in cancer cells. In the present study, the role of Kv4.1 channels in immortal and tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells was investigated. Kv4.1 protein expression was positively correlated with tumorigenicity. Moreover, transfection with siRNAs targeting Kv4.1 mRNA suppressed proliferation of tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells. Experiments using mRNA isolated from human breast cancer tissues revealed that the level of Kv4.1 mRNA expression varied depending on the stage of the tumor. Kv4.1 protein expression increased during stages T2 and T3 compared to normal tissue. These results demonstrated that Kv4.1 plays a role in proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells. In addition, elevated Kv4.1 expression may be useful as a diagnostic marker for staging mammary tumors and selective blockers of Kv4.1 may serve to suppress tumor cell proliferation.

  4. The transcriptional regulators TAZ and YAP direct transforming growth factor β-induced tumorigenic phenotypes in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hiemer, Samantha E; Szymaniak, Aleksander D; Varelas, Xaralabos

    2014-05-09

    Uncontrolled transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signaling promotes aggressive metastatic properties in late-stage breast cancers. However, how TGFβ-mediated cues are directed to induce tumorigenic events is poorly understood, particularly given that TGFβ has clear tumor suppressing activity in other contexts. Here, we demonstrate that the transcriptional regulators TAZ and YAP (TAZ/YAP), key effectors of the Hippo pathway, are necessary to promote and maintain TGFβ-induced tumorigenic phenotypes in breast cancer cells. Interactions between TAZ/YAP, TGFβ-activated SMAD2/3, and TEAD transcription factors reveal convergent roles for these factors in the nucleus. Genome-wide expression analyses indicate that TAZ/YAP, TEADs, and TGFβ-induced signals coordinate a specific pro-tumorigenic transcriptional program. Importantly, genes cooperatively regulated by TAZ/YAP, TEAD, and TGFβ, such as the novel targets NEGR1 and UCA1, are necessary for maintaining tumorigenic activity in metastatic breast cancer cells. Nuclear TAZ/YAP also cooperate with TGFβ signaling to promote phenotypic and transcriptional changes in nontumorigenic cells to overcome TGFβ-repressive effects. Our work thus identifies cross-talk between nuclear TAZ/YAP and TGFβ signaling in breast cancer cells, revealing novel insight into late-stage disease-driving mechanisms.

  5. Effects of space flight exposure on cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Yuehui; Zhang, Zhijie; Luo, Chen; Tong, Yongqing; Zhou, Guohua; Xie, Pingli; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Guancheng

    2008-12-01

    It is well recognized that harsh outer space environment, consisting of microgravity and radiation, poses significant health risks for human cells. To investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on cancer cells we examined the biological changes in Caski cells carried by the "Shen Zhou IV" spaceship. After exposure for 7 days in spaceflight, 1440 survival subclonal cell lines were established and 4 cell lines were screened. 44F10 and 17E3 were selected because of their increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, while 48A9 and 31F2 had slower cytological events. Experiments with cell proliferation assay, flow cytometry, soft agar assay, tumorigenesis assay and DNA microarray analysis have shown that selected cell lines presented multiple biological changes in cell morphology, cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression. These results suggest that space environment exposure can make significant biological impact on cancer cells and provide an entry point to find the immunological target of tumorigenesis.

  6. A physical sciences network characterization of non-tumorigenic and metastatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Agus, David B.; Alexander, Jenolyn F.; Arap, Wadih; Ashili, Shashanka; Aslan, Joseph E.; Austin, Robert H.; Backman, Vadim; Bethel, Kelly J.; Bonneau, Richard; Chen, Wei-Chiang; Chen-Tanyolac, Chira; Choi, Nathan C.; Curley, Steven A.; Dallas, Matthew; Damania, Dhwanil; Davies, Paul C. W.; Decuzzi, Paolo; Dickinson, Laura; Estevez-Salmeron, Luis; Estrella, Veronica; Ferrari, Mauro; Fischbach, Claudia; Foo, Jasmine; Fraley, Stephanie I.; Frantz, Christian; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Gascard, Philippe; Gatenby, Robert A.; Geng, Yue; Gerecht, Sharon; Gillies, Robert J.; Godin, Biana; Grady, William M.; Greenfield, Alex; Hemphill, Courtney; Hempstead, Barbara L.; Hielscher, Abigail; Hillis, W. Daniel; Holland, Eric C.; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Jacks, Tyler; Johnson, Roger H.; Joo, Ahyoung; Katz, Jonathan E.; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Kesselman, Carl; King, Michael R.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Kuhn, Peter; Kung, Kevin; Kwee, Brian; Lakins, Johnathon N.; Lambert, Guillaume; Liao, David; Licht, Jonathan D.; Liphardt, Jan T.; Liu, Liyu; Lloyd, Mark C.; Lyubimova, Anna; Mallick, Parag; Marko, John; McCarty, Owen J. T.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Michor, Franziska; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; Nandakumar, Vivek; O’Halloran, Thomas V.; Oh, Steve; Pasqualini, Renata; Paszek, Matthew J.; Philips, Kevin G.; Poultney, Christopher S.; Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.; Ros, Robert; Semenza, Gregg L.; Senechal, Patti; Shuler, Michael L.; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Staunton, Jack R.; Stypula, Yolanda; Subramanian, Hariharan; Tlsty, Thea D.; Tormoen, Garth W.; Tseng, Yiider; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Verbridge, Scott S.; Wan, Jenny C.; Weaver, Valerie M.; Widom, Jonathan; Will, Christine; Wirtz, Denis; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan; Wu, Pei-Hsun

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the transition from non-cancerous to metastatic from a physical sciences perspective, the Physical Sciences–Oncology Centers (PS-OC) Network performed molecular and biophysical comparative studies of the non-tumorigenic MCF-10A and metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast epithelial cell lines, commonly used as models of cancer metastasis. Experiments were performed in 20 laboratories from 12 PS-OCs. Each laboratory was supplied with identical aliquots and common reagents and culture protocols. Analyses of these measurements revealed dramatic differences in their mechanics, migration, adhesion, oxygen response, and proteomic profiles. Model-based multi-omics approaches identified key differences between these cells' regulatory networks involved in morphology and survival. These results provide a multifaceted description of cellular parameters of two widely used cell lines and demonstrate the value of the PS-OC Network approach for integration of diverse experimental observations to elucidate the phenotypes associated with cancer metastasis. PMID:23618955

  7. Tumorigenicity and genetic profiling of circulating tumor cells in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Cassandra L; Morrow, Christopher J; Li, Yaoyong; Metcalf, Robert L; Rothwell, Dominic G; Trapani, Francesca; Polanski, Radoslaw; Burt, Deborah J; Simpson, Kathryn L; Morris, Karen; Pepper, Stuart D; Nonaka, Daisuke; Greystoke, Alastair; Kelly, Paul; Bola, Becky; Krebs, Matthew G; Antonello, Jenny; Ayub, Mahmood; Faulkner, Suzanne; Priest, Lynsey; Carter, Louise; Tate, Catriona; Miller, Crispin J; Blackhall, Fiona; Brady, Ged; Dive, Caroline

    2014-08-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor with early dissemination and dismal prognosis, accounts for 15-20% of lung cancer cases and ∼200,000 deaths each year. Most cases are inoperable, and biopsies to investigate SCLC biology are rarely obtainable. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), which are prevalent in SCLC, present a readily accessible 'liquid biopsy'. Here we show that CTCs from patients with either chemosensitive or chemorefractory SCLC are tumorigenic in immune-compromised mice, and the resultant CTC-derived explants (CDXs) mirror the donor patient's response to platinum and etoposide chemotherapy. Genomic analysis of isolated CTCs revealed considerable similarity to the corresponding CDX. Most marked differences were observed between CDXs from patients with different clinical outcomes. These data demonstrate that CTC molecular analysis via serial blood sampling could facilitate delivery of personalized medicine for SCLC. CDXs are readily passaged, and these unique mouse models provide tractable systems for therapy testing and understanding drug resistance mechanisms.

  8. Suppression of tumorigenicity in transformed cells after transfection with vinculin cDNA

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Transfection of chicken vinculin cDNA into two tumor cell lines expressing diminished levels of the endogenous protein, brought about a drastic suppression of their tumorigenic ability. The SV-40-transformed Balb/c 3T3 line (SVT2) contains four times less vinculin than the parental 3T3 cells, and the rat adenocarcinoma BSp73ASML has no detectable vinculin. Restoration of vinculin in these cells, up to the levels found in 3T3 cells, resulted in an apparent increase in substrate adhesiveness, a decrease in the ability to grow in soft agar, and suppression of their capacity to develop tumors after injection into syngeneic hosts or nude mice. These results suggest that vinculin, a cytoplasmic component of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesions, may have a major suppressive effect on the transformed phenotype. PMID:1400584

  9. CDO, an Hh-coreceptor, mediates lung cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenicity through Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Leem, Young-Eun; Ha, Hye-Lim; Bae, Ju-Hyeon; Baek, Kwan-Hyuck; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2014-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays essential roles in various developmental processes, and its aberrant regulation results in genetic disorders or malignancies in various tissues. Hyperactivation of Hh signaling is associated with lung cancer development, and there have been extensive efforts to investigate how to control Hh signaling pathway and regulate cancer cell proliferation. In this study we investigated a role of CDO, an Hh co-receptor, in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Inhibition of Hh signaling by SANT-1 or siCDO in lung cancer cells reduced proliferation and tumorigenicity, along with the decrease in the expression of the Hh components. Histological analysis with NSCLC mouse tissue demonstrated that CDO was expressed in advanced grade of the cancer, and precisely co-localized with GLI1. These data suggest that CDO is required for proliferation and survival of lung cancer cells via Hh signaling.

  10. Carcinogens show comedogenic activity: a potential animal screen for tumorigenic substances.

    PubMed

    Kligman, A M; Kligman, L H

    1994-12-09

    Formation of a comedo, an impaction of horny cells in sebaceous follicles, entails a metaplastic change in the differentiation patterns of the follicular epithelium. Since metaplasia is a requisite early stage in carcinogenesis, we postulated that carcinogens might be comedogenic. The rabbit ear was used to assay the comedogenic potentialities of an array of known tumorigens. Complete carcinogens and some tumor promotors were invariably strongly comedogenic at concentrations of 1.0% and below. Comedogenic chemicals commonly found in skin care products usually required concentrations of 40% and greater to induce comedones which were small in comparison to carcinogen induced comedones. We suggest that the rabbit ear model might be an easy and reliable way to screen for carcinogenicity.

  11. RNA-interference-mediated downregulation of Pin1 suppresses tumorigenicity of malignant melanoma A375 cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, J; Zhang, Y; Li, Y; Zhang, H; Li, H; Yuan, X; Li, X; Zhou, W; Xu, B; Zhang, C; Zhang, Z; Zhu, L; Chen, X

    2013-01-01

    The peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 is overexpressed in many human cancers, including melanoma. To investigate its possible role in oncogenesis of melanoma and as a therapeutic target, we suppressed Pin1 expression in the human melanoma cell line A375 by microRNA (miRNA) interference technology. Two stable clones with suppressed Pin1 were established by stable transfection of miRNA plasmid targeting Pin1 into A375 cells. Both clones showed reduced proliferation and invasion in vitro and suppressed tumorigenic potential in athymic mice. Furthermore, Pin1 inhibition also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of Akt and repressed expression of C-Jun N-terminal kinase and pro-matrix metalloproteinase 2, which were associated closely with the development of melanoma. These findings indicate that Pin1 plays an important role in the tumorigenesis of melanoma and might serve as a promising therapeutic target.

  12. Tumorigenic agents in unburned processed tobacco: N-nitrosodiethanolamine and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine.

    PubMed

    Schmeltz, I; Abidi, S; Hoffmann, D

    1977-01-01

    Two tumorigenic agents, N-nitrosodiethanolamine and 1,1-dimethylhydrazine, have been isolated from tobacco for the first time. The former, a reportedly weak hepatic carcinogen in rats, varied in amounts from a low of 0.1 ppb in flue-cured tobacco not treated with the herbicide MH-30, to a high of 173 ppb in Burley tobacco to which the herbicide had been applied prior to harvesting. MH-30 (maleic hydrazide) used by farmers to remove 'suckers' from tobacco plants, is commonly formulated as the diethanolamine salt. 1,1-Dimethylhydrazine, reported to induce tumors in mice, ranged in amounts from 60 to 147 ppb, except in the case of Burley tobacco where none was detected (detection limit: 0.1 ng). The source of the nitrosamine in the tobacco appears to be the MH-30, whereas that of dimethylhydrazine has not been determined.

  13. Tumorigenicity of acrylamide and its metabolite glycidamide in the neonatal mouse bioassay

    PubMed Central

    Von Tungeln, Linda S.; Doerge, Daniel R.; da Costa, Gonçalo Gamboa; Marques, M. Matilde; Witt, William M.; Koturbash, Igor; Pogribny, Igor P.; Beland, Frederick A.

    2012-01-01

    Acrylamide is a high-volume industrial chemical, a component of cigarette smoke, and a product formed in certain foods prepared at high temperatures. Previously, we compared the extent of DNA adduct formation and mutations in B6C3F1/Tk mice treated neonatally with acrylamide or glycidamide to obtain information concerning the mechanism of acrylamide genotoxicity. We have now examined the tumorigenicity of acrylamide and glycidamide in mice treated neonatally. Male B6C3F1 mice were injected intraperitoneally on postnatal days 1, 8, and 15 with 0.0, 0.14, or 0.70 mmol acrylamide or glycidamide per kg body weight per day and the tumorigenicity was assessed after one year. Survival in each of the groups was >87%, there were no differences in body weights among the groups, and the only treatment-related neoplasms involved the liver. The incidence of combined hepatocellular adenoma or carcinoma was 3.8% in the control group, 8.3% in the 0.14 mmol acrylamide and glycidamide per kg body weight groups, 4.2% in the 0.70 mmol acrylamide per kg body weight group, and 71.4% in the 0.70 mmol glycidamide per kg body weight group. Analysis of the hepatocellular tumors indicated that the increased incidence observed in mice administered 0.70 mmol glycidamide per kg body weight was associated with A→ G and A → T mutations at codon 61 of H-ras. These results, combined with our previous data on DNA adduct formation and mutation induction, suggest that the carcinogenicity of acrylamide is dependent upon its metabolism to glycidamide, a pathway that is deficient in neonatal mice. PMID:22336951

  14. Deletion of TGF-β signaling in myeloid cells enhances their anti-tumorigenic properties

    PubMed Central

    Novitskiy, Sergey V.; Pickup, Michael W.; Chytil, Anna; Polosukhina, Dina; Owens, Philip; Moses, Harold L.

    2012-01-01

    By crossing LysM-Cre and TGF-β type II receptor (Tgfbr2) floxed mice we achieved specific deletion of Tgfbr2 in myeloid cells (Tgfbr2MyeKO mice). S.c.-injected (LLC, EL4-OVA) and implanted (MMTV-PyMT) carcinoma cells grow slower in Tgfbr2MyeKO mice. The number of CD45+ cells in the tumor tissue was the same in both genotypes of mice, but upon analysis, the percentage of T cells (CD45+CD3+) in the KO mice was increased. By flow cytometry analysis, we did not detect any differences in the number and phenotype of TAMs, CD11b+Gr1+, and DCs in Tgfbr2MyeKO compared with Tgfbr2MyeWT mice. ELISA and qRT-PCR data showed differences in myeloid cell functions. In Tgfbr2MyeKO TAMs, TNF-α secretion was increased, basal IL-6 secretion was down-regulated, TGF-β did not induce any VEGF response, and there was decreased MMP9 and increased MMP2 and iNOS expression. TGF-β did not have any effect on CD11b+Gr1+ cells isolated from Tgfbr2MyeKO mice in the regulation of Arg, iNOS, VEGF, and CXCR4, and moreover, these cells have decreased suppressive activity relative to T cell proliferation. Also, we found that DCs from tumor tissue of Tgfbr2MyeKO mice have increased antigen-presented properties and an enhanced ability to stimulate antigen-specific T cell proliferation. We conclude that Tgfbr2 in myeloid cells has a negative role in the regulation of anti-tumorigenic functions of these cells, and deletion of this receptor decreases the suppressive function of CD11b+Gr1+ cells and increases antigen-presenting properties of DCs and anti-tumorigenic properties of TAMs. PMID:22685318

  15. AS30D Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Tumorigenicity and Preliminary Characterization by Imaging, Histopathology, and Immunohistochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Scott M.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Knudsen, Bruce; Anderson, Jill L.; Butters, Kim A.; Grande, Joseph P.; Roberts, Lewis R.; Woodrum, David A.

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to determine the tumorigenicity of the AS30D HCC cell line following orthotopic injection into rat liver and preliminarily characterize the tumor model by both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) as well as histopathology and immunohistochemistry.MaterialsAS30D cell line in vitro proliferation was assessed by using MTT assay. Female rats (N = 5) underwent injection of the AS30D cell line into one site in the liver. Rats subsequently underwent MR imaging at days 7 and 14 to assess tumor establishment and volume. One rat underwent US of the liver at day 7. Rats were euthanized at day 7 or 14 and livers were subjected to gross, histopathologic (H and E), and immunohistochemical (CD31) analysis to assess for tumor growth and neovascularization. AS30D cell line demonstrated an in vitro doubling time of 33.2 {+-} 5.3 h. MR imaging demonstrated hyperintense T2-weighted and hypointense T1-weighted lesions with tumor induction in five of five and three of three sites at days 7 and 14, respectively. The mean (SD) tumor volume was 126.1 {+-} 36.2 mm{sup 3} at day 7 (N = 5). US of the liver demonstrated a well-circumscribed, hypoechoic mass and comparison of tumor dimensions agreed well with MRI. Analysis of H and E- and CD31-stained sections demonstrated moderate-high grade epithelial tumors with minimal tumor necrosis and evidence of diffuse intratumoral and peritumoral neovascularization by day 7. AS30D HCC cell line is tumorigenic following orthotopic injection into rat liver and can be used to generate an early vascularizing, slower-growing rat HCC tumor model.

  16. Tumorigenicity of IL-1α- and IL-1β-Deficient Fibrosarcoma Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Nazarenko, Irina; Marhaba, Rachid; Reich, Eli; Voronov, Elena; Vitacolonna, Mario; Hildebrand, Dagmar; Elter, Elena; Rajasagi, Mohini; Apte, Ron N; Zöller, Margot

    2008-01-01

    Analyzing the growth of fibrosarcoma lines derived from IL-1α-, IL-1β- , or IL-1αβ-knockout (-/-) mice in the immunocompetent host revealed that tumor-derived IL-1α and IL-1β exert strong and opposing effects on immune response induction, which prohibited the evaluation of a potential impact on tumorigenicity. Therefore, in vivo growth of IL-1-deficient tumor lines was evaluated in nu/nu mice and was compared with in vitro growth characteristics. All IL-1-deficient fibrosarcoma lines grow in immunocompromised mice. However, IL-1α-/-β-competent (comp) lines grow more aggressively, efficiently induce angiogenesis, and recruit inflammatory cells. Despite stronger tumorigenicity of IL-1βcomp lines, IL-1α strengthens anchorage-independent growth, but both IL-1α and IL-1β support drug resistance. Corresponding to the aggressive growth, IL-1βcomp cells display increased matrix adhesion, motility, and cable formation on matrigel, likely supported by elevated αv/β3 and matrix metalloroteinase expression. Recruitment of myeloid cells requires IL-1β but is regulated by IL-1α, because inflammatory chemokine and cytokine expression is stronger in IL-1α-/-βcomp than in IL-1wt lines. This regulatory effect of tumor-derived IL-1α is restricted to the tumor environment and does not affect systemic inflammatory response induction by tumor-derived IL-1β. Both sarcoma cell-derived IL-1α and IL-1β promote tumor growth. However, IL-1α exerts regulatory activity on the tumor cell-matrix cross-talk, and only IL-1β initiates systemic inflammation. PMID:18516292

  17. Persistent ERK/MAPK Activation Promotes Lactotrope Differentiation and Diminishes Tumorigenic Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Booth, Allyson; Trudeau, Tammy; Gomez, Crystal; Lucia, M. Scott

    2014-01-01

    The signaling pathways that govern the lactotrope-specific differentiated phenotype, and those that control lactotrope proliferation in both physiological and pathological lactotrope expansion, are poorly understood. Moreover, the specific role of MAPK signaling in lactotrope proliferation vs differentiation, whether activated phosphorylated MAPK is sufficient for prolactinoma tumor formation remain unknown. Given that oncogenic Ras mutations and persistently activated phosphorylated MAPK are found in human tumors, including prolactinomas and other pituitary tumors, a better understanding of the role of MAPK in lactotrope biology is required. Here we directly examined the role of persistent Ras/MAPK signaling in differentiation, proliferation, and tumorigenesis of rat pituitary somatolactotrope GH4 cells. We stimulated Ras/MAPK signaling in a persistent, long-term manner (over 6 d) in GH4 cells using two distinct approaches: 1) a doxycycline-inducible, oncogenic V12Ras expression system; and 2) continuous addition of exogenous epidermal growth factor. We find that long-term activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway over 6 days promotes differentiation of the bihormonal somatolactotrope GH4 precursor cell into a prolactin-secreting, lactotrope cell phenotype in vitro and in vivo with GH4 cell xenograft tumors. Furthermore, we show that persistent activation of the Ras/MAPK pathway not only fails to promote cell proliferation, but also diminishes tumorigenic characteristics in GH4 cells in vitro and in vivo. These data demonstrate that activated MAPK promotes differentiation and is not sufficient to drive tumorigenesis, suggesting that pituitary lactotrope tumor cells have the ability to evade the tumorigenic fate that is often associated with Ras/MAPK activation. PMID:25361391

  18. Telomerase inhibition abolishes the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Barszczyk, Mark; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Castelo-Branco, Pedro; Mack, Stephen C; Ramaswamy, Vijay; Mangerel, Joshua; Agnihotri, Sameer; Remke, Marc; Golbourn, Brian; Pajovic, Sanja; Elizabeth, Cynthia; Yu, Man; Luu, Betty; Morrison, Andrew; Adamski, Jennifer; Nethery-Brokx, Kathleen; Li, Xiao-Nan; Van Meter, Timothy; Dirks, Peter B; Rutka, James T; Taylor, Michael D; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2014-12-01

    Pediatric ependymomas are highly recurrent tumors resistant to conventional chemotherapy. Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein critical in permitting limitless replication, has been found to be critically important for the maintenance of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). These TICs are chemoresistant, repopulate the tumor from which they are identified, and are drivers of recurrence in numerous cancers. In this study, telomerase enzymatic activity was directly measured and inhibited to assess the therapeutic potential of targeting telomerase. Telomerase repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) (n = 36) and C-circle assay/telomere FISH/ATRX staining (n = 76) were performed on primary ependymomas to determine the prevalence and prognostic potential of telomerase activity or alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) as telomere maintenance mechanisms, respectively. Imetelstat, a phase 2 telomerase inhibitor, was used to elucidate the effect of telomerase inhibition on proliferation and tumorigenicity in established cell lines (BXD-1425EPN, R254), a primary TIC line (E520) and xenograft models of pediatric ependymoma. Over 60 % of pediatric ependymomas were found to rely on telomerase activity to maintain telomeres, while no ependymomas showed evidence of ALT. Children with telomerase-active tumors had reduced 5-year progression-free survival (29 ± 11 vs 64 ± 18 %; p = 0.03) and overall survival (58 ± 12 vs 83 ± 15 %; p = 0.05) rates compared to those with tumors lacking telomerase activity. Imetelstat inhibited proliferation and self-renewal by shortening telomeres and inducing senescence in vitro. In vivo, Imetelstat significantly reduced subcutaneous xenograft growth by 40 % (p = 0.03) and completely abolished the tumorigenicity of pediatric ependymoma TICs in an orthotopic xenograft model. Telomerase inhibition represents a promising therapeutic approach for telomerase-active pediatric ependymomas found to characterize high-risk ependymomas.

  19. Downregulation of glypican-3 expression increases migration, invasion, and tumorigenicity of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Zheng, Dongping; Liu, Mingming; Bai, Jiao; Zhou, Xi; Gong, Baolan; Lü, Jieyu; Zhang, Yi; Huang, Hui; Luo, Wenying; Huang, Guangrong

    2015-09-01

    Glypican-3 (GPC3) is a membrane of heparan sulfate proteoglycan family involved in cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, invasion, and differentiation during the development of the majority of mesodermal tissues and organs. GPC3 is explored as a potential biomarker for hepatocellular carcinoma screening. However, as a tumor-associated antigen, its role in ovarian cancer remains elusive. In this report, the expression levels of GPC3 in the various ovarian cancer cells were determined with quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and GPC3 expression in ovarian cancer UCI 101 and A2780 cells was knocked down by siRNA transfection, and the effects of GPC3 knockdown on in vitro cell proliferation, migration, and invasion were respectively analyzed by 3-[4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and Transwell migration assay. Additionally, the effect of GPC3 knockdown on in vivo tumorigenesis were investigated in athymic nude mice. The results indicated that GPC3 knockdown significantly promoted cell proliferation and increased cell migration and invasion by upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 expression and downregulation of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 expression. Additionally, GPC3 knockdown also increased in vivo tumorigenicity of UCI 101 and A2780 cells and final tumor weights and volumes after subcutaneous cell injection in the nude mice. The results of immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting both demonstrated a lower expression of GPC3 antigen in the tumors of GPC3 knockdown groups than that of negative control groups. Moreover, transforming growth factor-β2 protein expression in the tumors of GPC3 knockdown groups was significantly increased, which at least contributed to tumor growth in the nude mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that GPC3 knockdown promotes the progression of human ovarian cancer cells by increasing their migration, invasion

  20. Multiple Breast Cancer Cell-Lines Derived from a Single Tumor Differ in Their Molecular Characteristics and Tumorigenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Mosoyan, Goar; Nagi, Chandandeep; Marukian, Svetlana; Teixeira, Avelino; Simonian, Anait; Resnick-Silverman, Lois; DiFeo, Analisa; Johnston, Dean; Reynolds, Sandra R.; Roses, Daniel F.; Mosoian, Arevik

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer cell lines are widely used tools to investigate breast cancer biology and to develop new therapies. Breast cancer tissue contains molecularly heterogeneous cell populations. Thus, it is important to understand which cell lines best represent the primary tumor and have similarly diverse phenotype. Here, we describe the development of five breast cancer cell lines from a single patient’s breast cancer tissue. We characterize the molecular profiles, tumorigenicity and metastatic ability in vivo of all five cell lines and compare their responsiveness to 4-hydroxytamoxifen (4-OHT) treatment. Methods Five breast cancer cell lines were derived from a single patient’s primary breast cancer tissue. Expression of different antigens including HER2, estrogen receptor (ER), CK8/18, CD44 and CD24 was determined by flow cytometry, western blotting and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In addition, a Fuorescent In Situ Hybridization (FISH) assay for HER2 gene amplification and p53 genotyping was performed on all cell lines. A xenograft model in nude mice was utilized to assess the tumorigenic and metastatic abilities of the breast cancer cells. Results We have isolated, cloned and established five new breast cancer cell lines with different tumorigenicity and metastatic abilities from a single primary breast cancer. Although all the cell lines expressed low levels of ER, their growth was estrogen-independent and all had high-levels of expression of mutated non-functional p53. The HER2 gene was rearranged in all cell lines. Low doses of 4-OHT induced proliferation of these breast cancer cell lines. Conclusions All five breast cancer cell lines have different antigenic expression profiles, tumorigenicity and organ specific metastatic abilities although they derive from a single tumor. None of the studied markers correlated with tumorigenic potential. These new cell lines could serve as a model for detailed genomic and proteomic analyses to identify mechanisms

  1. Sensitive Tumorigenic Potential Evaluation of Adult Human Multipotent Neural Cells Immortalized by hTERT Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da Eun; Kim, Sung Soo; Song, Hye Jin; Pyeon, Hee Jang; Kang, Kyeongjin; Hong, Seung-Cheol; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and therapeutic genes are emerging as a new therapeutic approach to treat various neurodegenerative diseases with few effective treatment options. However, potential formation of tumors by stem cells has hampered their clinical application. Moreover, adequate preclinical platforms to precisely test tumorigenic potential of stem cells are controversial. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of various animal models for in vivo stem cell tumorigenicity testing to identify the most sensitive platform. Then, tumorigenic potential of adult human multipotent neural cells (ahMNCs) immortalized by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene was examined as a stem cell model with therapeutic genes. When human glioblastoma (GBM) cells were injected into adult (4–6-week-old) Balb/c-nu, adult NOD/SCID, adult NOG, or neonate (1–2-week-old) NOG mice, the neonate NOG mice showed significantly faster tumorigenesis than that of the other groups regardless of intracranial or subcutaneous injection route. Two kinds of ahMNCs (682TL and 779TL) were primary cultured from surgical samples of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Although the ahMNCs were immortalized by lentiviral hTERT gene delivery (hTERT-682TL and hTERT-779TL), they did not form any detectable masses, even in the most sensitive neonate NOG mouse platform. Moreover, the hTERT-ahMNCs had no gross chromosomal abnormalities on a karyotype analysis. Taken together, our data suggest that neonate NOG mice could be a sensitive animal platform to test tumorigenic potential of stem cell therapeutics and that ahMNCs could be a genetically stable stem cell source with little tumorigenic activity to develop regenerative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27391353

  2. Traveling Exhibitions: translating current science into effective science exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Morrow, C.; Harold, J.

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop two other exhibitions called Cosmic Origins and InterActive Earth. Museum exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of earth and space outreach programs. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The focus of the presentation will be on the Institute's MarsQuest exhibition. This project is a 5000 square-foot, 2.5M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's 3-year tour is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient host museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents). The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibitions interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. SSI is also developing an interactive web site called MarsQuest On-line. The linkage between the web site, education program and exhibit will be discussed. MarsQuest and SSI's other exhibitions are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education.

  3. Investigating the expression, effect and tumorigenic pathway of PADI2 in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Wei; Zheng, Yabing; Xu, Bing; Ma, Fang; Li, Chang; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Wang, Yao; Chang, Xiaotian

    2017-01-01

    Background Peptidylarginine deiminase (PAD) catalyzes the conversion of arginine residues to citrulline residues, termed citrullination. Recent studies have suggested that PAD isoform 2 (PADI2) plays an important role in tumors, although its tumorigenic effect and mechanism are largely unknown. Materials and methods Immunohistochemistry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to investigate the expression level of PADI2 in various tumor tissues and patient blood samples, respectively. MNK-45 and Bel-7402 tumor cell lines originating from gastric and liver tumors, respectively, were treated with anti-PADI2 siRNA, and the subsequent cell proliferation, apoptosis and migration were observed. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) arrays, including Cancer PathwayFinder, Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes, p53 Signaling Pathway, Signal Transduction Pathway and Tumor Metastasis PCR arrays, were used to investigate the tumorigenic pathway of PADI2 in the siRNA-treated tumor cells. This analysis was verified by real-time PCR. Results Immunohistochemistry detected significantly increased expression of PADI2 in invasive breast ductal carcinoma, cervical squamous cell carcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, liver hepatocellular carcinoma, lung cancer, ovarian serous papillary adenocarcinoma and papillary thyroid carcinoma samples. ELISA detected a twofold increase in PADI2 expression in the blood of 48.3% of patients with liver cancer, 38% of patients with cervical carcinoma and 32% of patients with gastric carcinoma. Increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation and migration were observed in the anti-PADI2 siRNA-treated MNK-45 cells, and increased cell proliferation and migration and decreased apoptosis were observed in the treated Bel-7402 cells with suppressed PADI2 expression. PCR arrays and real-time PCR detected significantly decreased CXCR2 and EPO expression in the MNK-45 cells and Bel-7402 cells, respectively, with the anti-PADI2 siRNA treatments

  4. Concise Review: LIN28/let-7 Signaling, a Critical Double-Negative Feedback Loop During Pluripotency, Reprogramming, and Tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Farzaneh, Maryam; Attari, Farnoosh; Khoshnam, Seyed Esmaeil

    2017-08-28

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) with 20-30 nucleotides have recently emerged as the multidimensional regulators of cell fate decisions. Recent improvement in high-throughput sequencing has highlighted the potential role of LIN28/let-7 regulatory network in several developmental events. It was proposed that this pathway might represent a functional signature in cell proliferation, transition between commitment and pluripotency, and regulation of cancer and tumorigenicity. LIN28/let-7 regulatory pathway is one of the excellent examples of the relationship between an miRNA and mRNAs. This review article highlights the potentials of LIN28/let-7 signaling in gene regulatory pathways during pluripotency, reprogramming, and tumorigenicity.

  5. ATOH1 Can Regulate the Tumorigenicity of Gastric Cancer Cells by Inducing the Differentiation of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Myoung-Eun; Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Seon-Young; Kang, Chi-Dug; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been shown to mediate tumorigenicity, chemo-resistance, radio-resistance and metastasis, which suggest they be considered therapeutic targets. Because their differentiated daughter cells are no longer tumorigenic, to induce the differentiation of CSCs can be one of strategies which can eradicate CSCs. Here we show that ATOH1 can induce the differentiation of gastric cancer stem cells (GCSCs). Real time PCR and western blot analysis showed that ATOH1 was induced during the differentiation of GCSCs. Furthermore, the lentivirus-induced overexpression of ATOH1 in GCSCs and in gastric cancer cell lines significantly induced differentiation, reduced proliferation and sphere formation, and reduced in vivo tumor formation in the subcutaneous injection and liver metastasis xenograft models. These results suggest ATOH1 be considered for the development of a differentiation therapy for gastric cancer. PMID:25950549

  6. Ewing's sarcoma cells with CD57-associated increase of tumorigenicity and with neural crest-like differentiation capacity.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Joachim; Bogatyreva, Liubov; Boukamp, Petra; Rojewski, Markus; van Valen, Frans; Fiedler, Jörg; Hipp, Nora; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2010-09-01

    The Ewing family of tumors (EFT) is an important group of pediatric malignancies with a guarded prognosis. Little is known about the heterogeneity of EFT cells, and the cellular origin of EFT is disputed. We now add evidence that EFT are heterogeneous by showing that EFT cells from spheres growing in serum-free medium are markedly more tumorigenic than adherently growing EFT cells. Furthermore, EFT cells strongly expressing CD57 (HNK-1), a surface marker for migrating and proliferating neural crest cells, are more tumorigenic than cells with low expression of CD57, possibly mediated in part by enhanced adhesion and invasion. We contribute to the controversy about the cellular origin of EFT by clonal analysis, showing that EFT cells can differentiate similar to neural crest cells. These data increase our knowledge about the pathogenesis and heterogeneity of EFT.

  7. Highly selective CD44-specific gold nanorods for photothermal ablation of tumorigenic subpopulations generated in MCF7 mammospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eugene; Hong, Yoochan; Choi, Jihye; Haam, Seungjoo; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Yang, Jaemoon

    2012-11-01

    Heterogeneous stem-like populations within tumor tissues are the primary suspects in causing cancer recurrence and malignancy. It is essential to selectively kill these tumorigenic populations. We created a novel system for photothermally ablating specific cells from three-dimensional mammospheres. A CD44-positive subpopulation, with tumorigenic and self-renewal potential, spontaneously arises in MCF7 breast cancer cell-engineered mammospheres. Using anti-CD44 antibody-linked gold nanorods, which strongly absorb near infrared light and increase local temperature, we effectively targeted and photo-ablated atypical cells. This biomarker-specific photothermal ablation model, using a smart nanoplatform, is a promising new strategy for selectively killing cancer cells, while sparing normal tissues.

  8. Risk of tumorigenicity in mesenchymal stromal cell-based therapies--bridging scientific observations and regulatory viewpoints.

    PubMed

    Barkholt, Lisbeth; Flory, Egbert; Jekerle, Veronika; Lucas-Samuel, Sophie; Ahnert, Peter; Bisset, Louise; Büscher, Dirk; Fibbe, Willem; Foussat, Arnaud; Kwa, Marcel; Lantz, Olivier; Mačiulaitis, Romaldas; Palomäki, Tiina; Schneider, Christian K; Sensebé, Luc; Tachdjian, Gérard; Tarte, Karin; Tosca, Lucie; Salmikangas, Paula

    2013-07-01

    In the past decade, the therapeutic value of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been studied in various indications, thereby taking advantage of their immunosuppressive properties. Easy procurement from bone marrow, adipose tissue or other sources and conventional in vitro expansion culture have made their clinical use attractive. Bridging the gap between current scientific knowledge and regulatory prospects on the transformation potential and possible tumorigenicity of MSCs, the Cell Products Working Party and the Committee for Advanced Therapies organized a meeting with leading European experts in the field of MSCs. This meeting elucidated the risk of potential tumorigenicity related to MSC-based therapies from two angles: the scientific perspective and the regulatory point of view. The conclusions of this meeting, including the current regulatory thinking on quality, nonclinical and clinical aspects for MSCs, are presented in this review, leading to a clearer way forward for the development of such products. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. All rights reserved.

  9. A highly invasive subpopulation of MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells shows accelerated growth, differential chemoresistance, features of apocrine tumors and reduced tumorigenicity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mirisola, Valentina; Esposito, Alessia Isabella; Reverberi, Daniele; Matis, Serena; Maffei, Massimo; Giaretti, Walter; Viale, Maurizio; Gangemi, Rosaria; Emionite, Laura; Astigiano, Simonetta; Cilli, Michele; Bachmeier, Beatrice E.; Killian, Peter H.; Albini, Adriana; Pfeffer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The acquisition of an invasive phenotype is a prerequisite for metastasization, yet it is not clear whether or to which extent the invasive phenotype is linked to other features characteristic of metastatic cells. We selected an invasive subpopulation from the triple negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, performing repeated cycles of preparative assays of invasion through Matrigel covered membranes. The invasive sub-population of MDA-MB-231 cells exhibits stronger migratory capacity as compared to parental cells confirming the highly invasive potential of the selected cell line. Prolonged cultivation of these cells did not abolish the invasive phenotype. ArrayCGH, DNA index quantification and karyotype analyses confirmed a common genetic origin of the parental and invasive subpopulations and revealed discrete structural differences of the invasive subpopulation including increased ploidy and the absence of a characteristic amplification of chromosome 5p14.1-15.33. Gene expression analyses showed a drastically altered expression profile including features of apocrine breast cancers and of invasion related matrix-metalloproteases and cytokines. The invasive cells showed accelerated proliferation, increased apoptosis, and an altered pattern of chemo-sensitivity with lower IC50 values for drugs affecting the mitotic apparatus. However, the invasive cell population is significantly less tumorigenic in orthotopic mouse xenografts suggesting that the acquisition of the invasive capacity and the achievement of metastatic growth potential are distinct events. PMID:27626697

  10. Evaluation of tumorigenic potential of CeO2 and Fe2O3 engineered nanoparticles by a human cell in vitro screening model.

    PubMed

    Stueckle, Todd A; Davidson, Donna C; Derk, Raymond; Kornberg, Tiffany G; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Pirela, Sandra V; Deloid, Glen; Demokritou, Philip; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Rojanasakul, Yon; Wang, Liying

    2017-04-01

    With rapid development of novel nanotechnologies that incorporate engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) into manufactured products, long-term, low dose ENM exposures in occupational settings is forecasted to occur with potential adverse outcomes to human health. Few ENM human health risk assessment efforts have evaluated tumorigenic potential of ENMs. Two widely used nano-scaled metal oxides (NMOs), cerium oxide (nCeO2) and ferric oxide (nFe2O3) were screened in the current study using a sub-chronic exposure to human primary small airway epithelial cells (pSAECs). Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT), a known ENM tumor promoter, was used as a positive control. Advanced dosimetry modeling was employed to ascertain delivered vs. administered dose in all experimental conditions. Cells were continuously exposed in vitro to deposited doses of 0.18 μg/cm(2) or 0.06 μg/cm(2) of each NMO or MWCNT, respectively, over 6 and 10 weeks, while saline- and dispersant-only exposed cells served as passage controls. Cells were evaluated for changes in several cancer hallmarks, as evidence for neoplastic transformation. At 10 weeks, nFe2O3- and MWCNT-exposed cells displayed a neoplastic-like transformation phenotype with significant increased proliferation, invasion and soft agar colony formation ability compared to controls. nCeO2-exposed cells showed increased proliferative capacity only. Isolated nFe2O3 and MWCNT clones from soft agar colonies retained their respective neoplastic-like phenotypes. Interestingly, nFe2O3-exposed cells, but not MWCNT cells, exhibited immortalization and retention of the neoplastic phenotype after repeated passaging (12 - 30 passages) and after cryofreeze and thawing. High content screening and protein expression analyses in acute exposure ENM studies vs. immortalized nFe2O3 cells, and isolated ENM clones, suggested that long-term exposure to the tested ENMs resulted in iron homeostasis disruption, an increased labile ferrous iron pool, and subsequent

  11. BC047440 antisense eukaryotic expression vectors inhibited HepG2 cell proliferation and suppressed xenograft tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lu; Liang, Ping; Zhou, JianBo; Huang, XiaoBing; Wen, Yu; Wang, Zheng; Li, Jing

    2012-02-01

    The biological functions of the BC047440 gene highly expressed by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are unknown. The objective of this study was to reconstruct antisense eukaryotic expression vectors of the gene for inhibiting HepG(2) cell proliferation and suppressing their xenograft tumorigenicity. The full-length BC047440 cDNA was cloned from human primary HCC by RT-PCR. BC047440 gene fragments were ligated with pMD18-T simple vectors and subsequent pcDNA3.1(+) plasmids to construct the recombinant antisense eukaryotic vector pcDNA3.1(+)BC047440AS. The endogenous BC047440 mRNA abundance in target gene-transfected, vector-transfected and naive HepG(2) cells was semiquantitatively analyzed by RT-PCR and cell proliferation was measured by the MTT assay. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were profiled by flow cytometry. The in vivo xenograft experiment was performed on nude mice to examine the effects of antisense vector on tumorigenicity. BC047440 cDNA fragments were reversely inserted into pcDNA3.1(+) plasmids. The antisense vector significantly reduced the endogenous BC047440 mRNA abundance by 41% in HepG(2) cells and inhibited their proliferation in vitro (P < 0.01). More cells were arrested by the antisense vector at the G(1) phase in an apoptosis-independent manner (P = 0.014). Additionally, transfection with pcDNA3.1(+)BC047440AS significantly reduced the xenograft tumorigenicity in nude mice. As a novel cell cycle regulator associated with HCC, the BC047440 gene was involved in cell proliferation in vitro and xenograft tumorigenicity in vivo through apoptosis-independent mechanisms.

  12. Effect of Doxorubicin/Pluronic SP1049C on Tumorigenicity, Aggressiveness, DNA Methylation and Stem Cell Markers in Murine Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Pluronic block copolymers are potent sensitizers of multidrug resistant cancers. SP1049C, a Pluronic-based micellar formulation of doxorubicin (Dox) has completed Phase II clinical trial and demonstrated safety and efficacy in patients with advanced adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastroesophageal junction. This study elucidates the ability of SP1049C to deplete cancer stem cells (CSC) and decrease tumorigenicity of cancer cells in vivo. Experimental Design P388 murine leukemia ascitic tumor was grown in BDF1 mice. The animals were treated with: (a) saline, (b) Pluronics alone, (c) Dox or (d) SP1049C. The ascitic cancer cells were isolated at different passages and examined for 1) in vitro colony formation potential, 2) in vivo tumorigenicity and aggressiveness, 3) development of drug resistance and Wnt signaling activation 4) global DNA methylation profiles, and 5) expression of CSC markers. Results SP1049C treatment reduced tumor aggressiveness, in vivo tumor formation frequency and in vitro clonogenic potential of the ascitic cells compared to drug, saline and polymer controls. SP1049C also prevented overexpression of BCRP and activation of Wnt-β-catenin signaling observed with Dox alone. Moreover, SP1049C significantly altered the DNA methylation profiles of the cells. Finally, SP1049C decreased CD133+ P388 cells populations, which displayed CSC-like properties and were more tumorigenic compared to CD133− cells. Conclusions SP1049C therapy effectively suppresses the tumorigenicity and aggressiveness of P388 cells in a mouse model. This may be due to enhanced activity of SP1049C against CSC and/or altered epigenetic regulation restricting appearance of malignant cancer cell phenotype. PMID:23977261

  13. Elasticity and tumorigenic characteristics of cells in a monolayer after nanosecond pulsed electric field exposure.

    PubMed

    Steuer, A; Wende, K; Babica, P; Kolb, J F

    2017-09-01

    Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) applied to cells can induce different biological effects depending on pulse duration and field strength. One known process is the induction of apoptosis whereby nsPEFs are currently investigated as a novel cancer therapy. Another and probably related change is the breakdown of the cytoskeleton. We investigated the elasticity of rat liver epithelial cells WB-F344 in a monolayer using atomic force microscopy (AFM) with respect to the potential of cells to undergo malignant transformation or to develop a potential to metastasize. We found that the elastic modulus of the cells decreased significantly within the first 8 min after treatment with 20 pulses of 100 ns and with a field strength of 20 kV/cm but was still higher than the elasticity of their tumorigenic counterpart WB-ras. AFM measurements and immunofluorescent staining showed that the cellular actin cytoskeleton became reorganized within 5 min. However, both a colony formation assay and a cell migration assay revealed no significant changes after nsPEF treatment, implying that cells seem not to adopt malignant characteristics associated with metastasis formation despite the induced transient changes to elasticity and cytoskeleton that can be observed for up to 1 h.

  14. Suppression of laminin-5 expression leads to increased motility, tumorigenicity, and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen Hengwai; Ziober, Amy F.; Gopal, Pallavi; Nasrallah, Ilya; Falls, Erica M.; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Ang, Hwee-Quan; Ziober, Barry L. . E-mail: bziober@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2005-09-10

    Laminin-5 (Ln-5) is expressed in several human carcinomas and hypothesized to contribute to tumor invasion. To understand the role of Ln-5 in human cancers, we stably delivered small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directed against the Ln-5 {gamma}2 chain into JHU-022-SCC cells (022), a non-invasive oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell line which secretes Ln-5. Lysates from {gamma}2 siRNA cells (022-si{gamma}2) had nearly undetectable levels of the {gamma}2 chain while the {alpha}3 and {beta}3 subunits of Ln-5 remained unchanged compared to parental and control. In conditioned medium from 022-si{gamma}2 cells, the {gamma}2 chain and the Ln-5 heterotrimer were barely detectable, similar to an invasive OSCC cell line. Conditioned medium from 022-si{gamma}2 cells contained less {alpha}3 and {beta}3 subunits than both parental and control. Although the proliferation and adhesive properties of the 022-si{gamma}2 cells remained similar to parental and control cells, 022-si{gamma}2 cells showed increased detachment and a fibroblastic morphology similar to invasive cells. Moreover, migration, in vitro invasion, and in vivo tumorigenicity were enhanced in 022-si{gamma}2 cells. Our results suggest that the Ln-5 {gamma}2 chain regulates the secretion of the {alpha}3 and {beta}3 subunits. More importantly, suppression of Ln-5 results in a phenotype that is representative of invasive tumor cells.

  15. Chemical and toxicological characterization of residential oil burner emissions: II. Mutagenic, tumorigenic, and potential teratogenic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, A G; Busby, W F; Liber, H L; Thilly, W G

    1987-01-01

    Extracts of effluents from a modern residential oil burner have been evaluated in several toxicological assay systems. Bacterial mutagens were detected in extracts from both the particulate and vapor phase emissions. Effluents from continuous operation were an order of magnitude less mutagenic than those from cyclic (5 min on, 10 min off) operations. No difference in the yield of bacterial mutagens per gram of fuel burned was found between cyclic operation under low and moderate sooting conditions. On the basis of elution behavior from alumina it appeared that the bacterial mutagens collected from high sooting effluents were more polar than those from low sooting effluent. An extract that was mutagenic in bacteria did not induce a significant increase in mutation frequency to human lymphoblasts. No evidence of tumorigenicity was observed in a limited number of newborn mice after IP injection of effluent extract when compared to historical control data. Putative nonmutagenic teratogens were detected in effluent using an attachment inhibition assay. The level of these agents was reduced in effluents from continuous oil burner operation. PMID:3665866

  16. ASBEL, an ANA/BTG3 antisense transcript required for tumorigenicity of ovarian carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Satoshi; Taniue, Kenzui; Sugimasa, Hironobu; Nasu, Emiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kobayashi, Mana; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Okamoto, Aikou; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2013-01-01

    Mammalian genomes encode numerous antisense non-coding RNAs, which are assumed to be involved in the regulation of the sense gene expression. However, the mechanisms of their action and involvement in the development of diseases have not been well elucidated. The ANA/BTG3 protein is an antiproliferative protein whose expression is downregulated in prostate and lung cancers. Here we show that an antisense transcript of the ANA/BTG3 gene, termed ASBEL, negatively regulates the levels of ANA/BTG3 protein, but not of ANA/BTG3 mRNA and is required for proliferation and tumorigenicity of ovarian clear cell carcinoma. We further show that knockdown of ANA/BTG3 rescues growth inhibition caused by ASBEL knockdown. Moreover, we demonstrate that ASBEL forms duplexes with ANA/BTG3 mRNA in the nucleus and suppresses its cytoplasmic transportation. Our findings illustrate a novel function for an antisense transcript that critically promotes tumorigenesis by suppressing translation of the sense gene by inhibiting its cytoplasmic transportation.

  17. Tumorigenic activity of Merkel cell polyomavirus T antigens expressed in the stratified epithelium of mice

    PubMed Central

    Spurgeon, Megan E.; Cheng, Jingwei; Bronson, Roderick T.; Lambert, Paul F.; DeCaprio, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is frequently associated with Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC), a highly aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. Most MCC tumors contain integrated copies of the viral genome with persistent expression of the MCPyV large T (LT) and small T (ST) antigen. MCPyV isolated from MCC typically contain wild type ST but truncated forms of LT that retain the N-terminus but delete the C-terminus and render LT incapable of supporting virus replication. To determine the oncogenic activity of MCC tumor-derived T antigens in vivo, a conditional, tissue-specific mouse model was developed. Keratin 14-mediated Cre recombinase expression induced expression of MCPyV T antigens in stratified squamous epithelial cells and Merkel cells of the skin epidermis. Mice expressing MCPyV T antigens developed hyperplasia, hyperkeratosis, and acanthosis of the skin with additional abnormalities in whisker pads, footpads and eyes. Nearly half of the mice also developed cutaneous papillomas. Evidence for neoplastic progression within stratified epithelia included increased cellular proliferation, unscheduled DNA synthesis, increased E2F-responsive genes levels, disrupted differentiation, and presence of a DNA damage response. These results indicate that MCPyV T antigens are tumorigenic in vivo, consistent with their suspected etiological role in human cancer. PMID:25596282

  18. A tumorigenic murine Sertoli cell line that is temperature-sensitive for differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Boekelheide, K.; Lee, J. W.; Hall, S. J.; Rhind, N. R.; Zaret, K. S.

    1993-01-01

    The Sertoli cell is the epithelial cell within the seminiferous tubule responsible for supporting germ cells. Most current in vitro studies of Sertoli cell function use primary cultures because of the limited number of available Sertoli cell lines. In addition, few in vivo models of Sertoli cell malignancy have been described. In this study, a tumorigenic Sertoli cell line was developed by infection of isolated murine Sertoli cells by simian virus 40 tsA255; the ts mutation causes the inactivation of the large T antigen at elevated temperatures. A cloned Sertoli cell line, called S14-1, demonstrated temperature-dependent growth in soft agar and formed tumors in nude mice. Electron microscopy of the S14-1-derived tumor revealed extensive basal intercellular junctions and tubulobulbarlike processes supporting its Sertoli cell origin. Cytogenetic analysis showed that S14-1 cells were aneuploid with an average of 70 chromosomes per cell. At the nonpermissive (40 C) temperature, S14-1 cells in vitro demonstrated a reduced growth rate, enhanced secretion of transferrin, and increased expression of sulfated glycoprotein-2 messenger RNA, indicating the cells manifested increased differentiation following large T antigen inactivation. The murine S14-1 Sertoli cell line should be useful for both in vitro studies of Sertoli cell function and in vivo studies of Sertoli cell malignancy. Images Figure 1 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8214009

  19. mTORC1 maintains the tumorigenicity of SSEA-4(+) high-grade osteosarcoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu; Ding, Meng-Lei; Zhang, Jia-Nian; Qiu, Jian-Ru; Shen, Yu-Hui; Ding, Xiao-Yi; Deng, Lian-Fu; Zhang, Wei-Bin; Zhu, Jiang

    2015-04-08

    Inactivation of p53 and/or Rb pathways restrains osteoblasts from cell-cycle exit and terminal differentiation, which underpins osteosarcoma formation coupled with dedifferentiation. Recently, the level of p-S6K was shown to independently predict the prognosis for osteosarcomas, while the reason behind this is not understood. Here we show that in certain high-grade osteosarcomas, immature SSEA-4(+) tumor cells represent a subset of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) whose pool size is maintained by mTORC1 activity. mTORC1 supports not only SSEA-4(+) cell self-renewal through S6K but also the regeneration of SSEA-4(+) TICs by SSEA-4(-) osteosarcoma cell dedifferentiation. Mechanistically, active mTORC1 is required to prevent a likely upregulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27 independently of p53 or Rb activation, which otherwise effectively drives the terminal differentiation of SSEA-4(-) osteosarcoma cells at the expense of dedifferentiation. Thus, mTORC1 is shown to critically regulate the retention of tumorigenicity versus differentiation in discrete differentiation phases in SSEA-4(+) TICs and their progeny.

  20. Colon cancer mesenchymal stem cells modulate the tumorigenicity of colon cancer through interleukin 6.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jen-Tsun; Wang, Jeng-Yi; Chen, Mu-Kuan; Chen, Hong-Chang; Chang, Tung-Hao; Su, Bi-Wen; Chang, Pey-Jium

    2013-08-15

    Multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from several tumors and are implicated to play critical roles to increase malignant cell growth, invasion and metastasis. Here, we show that the MSC-like cells were isolated from human colon cancer tissues. These isolated hCC-MSCs (human colon cancer-derived mesenchymal stem cells) shared similar characteristic features with bone marrow-derived MSCs, which include cell morphology, surface antigens and specific gene expression. Additionally, the hCC-MSCs could differentiate into osteocytes or adipocytes under appropriate culture conditions. The conditioned medium collected from the cultured hCC-MSCs was shown to enhance the migration and invasive activity of HCT-116 colon cancer cells in vitro. Besides, transplantation of HCT-116 cells along with hCC-MSCs in nude mice increased the tumor growth and metastasis. Further study revealed that IL-6 present in the hCC-MSC-conditioned medium sufficiently induced the levels of Notch-1 and CD44 in HCT-116 and HT-29 cells, which contribute to enhance tumorigenic activity of HCT-116 and HT-29 cells. By using immunohistochemical staining, the intense co-expression of IL-6, Notch-1 and CD44 was predominantly detected in human colon cancer tissues. Taken together, our findings suggest the importance of the IL-6/Notch-1/CD44 signaling axis in the interaction between hCC-MSCs and colon cancer cells. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. BCLAF1 and its splicing regulator SRSF10 regulate the tumorigenic potential of colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuexia; Li, Xuebing; Cheng, Yuanming; Wu, Wenwu; Xie, Zhiqin; Xi, Qiulei; Han, Jun; Wu, Guohao; Fang, Jing; Feng, Ying

    2014-08-05

    Bcl-2-associated transcription factor 1 (BCLAF1) is known to be involved in multiple biological processes. Although several splice variants of BCLAF1 have been identified, little is known about how BCLAF1 splicing is regulated or the contribution of alternative splicing to its developmental functions. Here we find that inclusion of alternative exon5a was significantly increased in colorectal cancer (CRC) samples. Knockdown of the BCLAF1 protein isoform resulting from exon5a inclusion inhibited growth and that its overexpression increased tumorigenic potential. We also found that the splicing factor SRSF10 stimulates inclusion of exon5a and has growth-inducing activity. Importantly, the upregulation of SRSF10 expression observed in clinical CRC samples parallels the increased inclusion of BCLAF1 exon5a, both of which are associated with higher tumour grade. These findings identify SRSF10 as a key regulator of BCLAF1 pre-mRNA splicing and the maintenance of oncogenic features in human colon cancer cells.

  2. Tafazzin (TAZ) promotes the tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells and inhibits apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mei; Zhang, Yuan; Zheng, Peng-Sheng

    2017-01-01

    Tafazzin (TAZ) is often aberrantly expressed in some cancers, including rectal cancer and thyroid neoplasms. However, the function of TAZ in cervical cancer cells remains unknown. This study aims to explore the expression and function of TAZ in cervical cancer cells. Here, we determined the expression of TAZ protein in normal cervical tissue (NC, n = 27), high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL, n = 26) and squamous cervical carcinoma (SCC, n = 41) by immunohistochemistry, the expression of TAZ protein gradually increased from NC to HSIL to SCC. TAZ was overexpressed or down-regulated in cervical cancer cells by stably transfecting a TAZ-expressing plasmid or a shRNA plasmid targeting TAZ. In vitro, the cell growth curves and MTT assays showed that TAZ may promote the growth and viability of cervical cancer cells. In vivo, xenografts experiment showed that TAZ may increase tumor-forming ability. The percentage of apoptosis cells analyzed by FACS and TUNEL assays consistently showed that TAZ inhibits apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. Furthermore, the Cleaved Caspase 9 and Cleaved Caspase 3 were down-regulated by TAZ in cervical cancer cells. Taken together, this study demonstrated that TAZ is overexpressed in cervical cancer and may promote tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells and inhibit apoptosis. PMID:28489874

  3. Alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells correlate with metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Willey, J. C.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced lung cancer are not known. In the present study, alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human papillomavirus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by a single low dose of either alpha-particles or 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe were analyzed by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) coupled with sequencing analysis and immunoprecipitation assay. A total of nine primary and four secondary tumor cell lines, three of which were metastatic, together with the parental BEP2D and primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were studied. The immunoprecipitation assay showed overexpression of mutant p53 proteins in all the tumor lines but not in NHBE and BEP2D cells. PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis found band shifts and gene mutations in all four of the secondary tumors. A G-->T transversion in codon 139 in exon 5 that replaced Lys with Asn was detected in two tumor lines. One mutation each, involving a G-->T transversion in codon 215 in exon 6 (Ser-->lle) and a G-->A transition in codon 373 in exon 8 (Arg-->His), was identified in the remaining two secondary tumors. These results suggest that p53 alterations correlate with tumorigenesis in the BEP2D cell model and that mutations in the p53 gene may be indicative of metastatic potential.

  4. mTORC1 Maintains the Tumorigenicity of SSEA-4+ High-Grade Osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wu; Ding, Meng-Lei; Zhang, Jia-Nian; Qiu, Jian-Ru; Shen, Yu-Hui; Ding, Xiao-Yi; Deng, Lian-Fu; Zhang, Wei-Bin; Zhu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of p53 and/or Rb pathways restrains osteoblasts from cell-cycle exit and terminal differentiation, which underpins osteosarcoma formation coupled with dedifferentiation. Recently, the level of p-S6K was shown to independently predict the prognosis for osteosarcomas, while the reason behind this is not understood. Here we show that in certain high-grade osteosarcomas, immature SSEA-4+ tumor cells represent a subset of tumor-initiating cells (TICs) whose pool size is maintained by mTORC1 activity. mTORC1 supports not only SSEA-4+ cell self-renewal through S6K but also the regeneration of SSEA-4+ TICs by SSEA-4− osteosarcoma cell dedifferentiation. Mechanistically, active mTORC1 is required to prevent a likely upregulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p27 independently of p53 or Rb activation, which otherwise effectively drives the terminal differentiation of SSEA-4− osteosarcoma cells at the expense of dedifferentiation. Thus, mTORC1 is shown to critically regulate the retention of tumorigenicity versus differentiation in discrete differentiation phases in SSEA-4+ TICs and their progeny. PMID:25853231

  5. Phenotypic differentiation does not affect tumorigenicity of primary human colon cancer initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Dubash, Taronish D; Hoffmann, Christopher M; Oppel, Felix; Giessler, Klara M; Weber, Sarah; Dieter, Sebastian M; Hüllein, Jennifer; Zenz, Thorsten; Herbst, Friederike; Scholl, Claudia; Weichert, Wilko; Werft, Wiebke; Benner, Axel; Schmidt, Manfred; Schneider, Martin; Glimm, Hanno; Ball, Claudia R

    2016-02-28

    Within primary colorectal cancer (CRC) a subfraction of all tumor-initiating cells (TIC) drives long-term progression in serial xenotransplantation. It has been postulated that efficient maintenance of TIC activity in vitro requires serum-free spheroid culture conditions that support a stem-like state of CRC cells. To address whether tumorigenicity is indeed tightly linked to such a stem-like state in spheroids, we transferred TIC-enriched spheroid cultures to serum-containing adherent conditions that should favor their differentiation. Under these conditions, primary CRC cells did no longer grow as spheroids but formed an adherent cell layer, up-regulated colon epithelial differentiation markers, and down-regulated TIC-associated markers. Strikingly, upon xenotransplantation cells cultured under either condition equally efficient formed serially transplantable tumors. Clonal analyses of individual lentivirally marked TIC clones cultured under either culture condition revealed no systematic differences in contributing clone numbers, indicating that phenotypic differentiation does not select for few individual clones adapted to unfavorable culture conditions. Our results reveal that CRC TIC can be propagated under conditions previously thought to induce their elimination. This phenotypic plasticity allows addressing primary human CRC TIC properties in experimental settings based on adherent cell growth.

  6. Spontaneously formed tumorigenic hybrids of Meth A sarcoma cells and macrophages in vivo.

    PubMed

    Busund, Lill-Tove R; Killie, Mette K; Bartnes, Kristian; Seljelid, Rolf

    2003-08-20

    We have recently demonstrated that malignant cells can hybridize with tissue macrophages in vitro, giving rise to tumorigenic hybrids. We now demonstrate that this can occur spontaneously in vivo as a result of fusion between inoculated Meth A sarcoma cells and host cells, presumably macrophages. Thus, from tumor cell suspensions prepared by collagenase perfusion and density centrifugation, hybrid cells could be isolated that were neoplastic but in contrast to Meth A expressed macrophage markers and had phagocytic capacity. Their morphologic features were intermediate between Meth A and macrophages. By taking advantage of a semiallogeneic experimental system by inoculation of Meth A cells from BALB/c (H-2 K(d)) into (BALB.K x BALB/c) F(1) (H-2(k/d)), hybrid cells from these tumors could be shown to express MHC antigens of both the Meth A and the host haplotypes. Hybrid cells grew faster than Meth A cells in vivo, indicating acquisition of growth-promoting properties through heterotypic cell fusion.

  7. Static and animated molecular views of a tumorigenic chemical bound to DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Broyde, S.; Xu, Rong ); Hingerty, B.E. ); O'Handley, S.F.; Krugh, T.R. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    Static and dynamic molecular views of a short segment of DNA modified by the tumorigenic aromatic amine 2-acetylaminofluorene (AAF) have been realized by a combination of high resolution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies in solution and molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations carried out on supercomputers. Thus, the effect of AAF on the structure of the Watson-Crick B-DNA double helix has been elucidated, after two decades of intense interest, via a powerful synergy between state-of-the-art supercomputing NMR investigations. The AAF is situated in the minor groove of a B-DNA double helix which flexes and bends, and the carcinogen moves between positions where it is stacked with adjacent DNA base and positions where it protrudes further into the groove. The AAF modified DNA base, guanine, is displaced from its normal situation paired with partner cytosine. Also, a base pair adjacent to the modification becomes more mobile. These molecular views offer some possible insight on the early molecular events that may implicate AAF in tumor initiation. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  8. hsa-miR-4485 regulates mitochondrial functions and inhibits the tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Sripada, Lakshmi; Singh, Kritarth; Lipatova, Anastasiya V; Singh, Aru; Prajapati, Paresh; Tomar, Dhanendra; Bhatelia, Khyati; Roy, Milton; Singh, Rochika; Godbole, Madan M; Chumakov, Peter M; Singh, Rajesh

    2017-02-20

    The modulation of mitochondrial functions is important for maintaining cellular homeostasis. Mitochondria essentially depend on the import of RNAs and proteins encoded by the nuclear genome. MicroRNAs encoded in the nucleus can translocate to mitochondria and target the genome, affecting mitochondrial function. Here, we analyzed the role of miR-4485 in the regulation of mitochondrial functions. We showed that miR-4485 translocated to mitochondria where its levels varied in response to different stress conditions. A direct binding of miR-4485 to mitochondrial 16S rRNA was demonstrated. MiR-4485 regulated the processing of pre-rRNA at the 16S rRNA-ND1 junction and the translation of downstream transcripts. MiR-4485 modulated mitochondrial complex I activity, the production of ATP, ROS levels, caspase-3/7 activation, and apoptosis. Transfection of a miR-4485 mimic downregulated the expression of regulatory glycolytic pathway genes and reduced the clonogenic ability of breast cancer cells. Ectopic expression of miR-4485 in MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells decreased the tumorigenicity in a nude mouse xenograft model. Furthermore, levels of both precursor and mature miR-4485 are decreased in tumor tissue of breast cancer patients. We conclude that the mitochondria-targeted miR-4485 may act as a tumor suppressor in breast carcinoma cells by negatively regulating mitochondrial RNA processing and mitochondrial functions.

  9. Alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells correlate with metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Willey, J. C.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced lung cancer are not known. In the present study, alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human papillomavirus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by a single low dose of either alpha-particles or 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe were analyzed by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) coupled with sequencing analysis and immunoprecipitation assay. A total of nine primary and four secondary tumor cell lines, three of which were metastatic, together with the parental BEP2D and primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were studied. The immunoprecipitation assay showed overexpression of mutant p53 proteins in all the tumor lines but not in NHBE and BEP2D cells. PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis found band shifts and gene mutations in all four of the secondary tumors. A G-->T transversion in codon 139 in exon 5 that replaced Lys with Asn was detected in two tumor lines. One mutation each, involving a G-->T transversion in codon 215 in exon 6 (Ser-->lle) and a G-->A transition in codon 373 in exon 8 (Arg-->His), was identified in the remaining two secondary tumors. These results suggest that p53 alterations correlate with tumorigenesis in the BEP2D cell model and that mutations in the p53 gene may be indicative of metastatic potential.

  10. β-Catenin Does Not Confer Tumorigenicity When Introduced into Partially Transformed Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Piperdi, Sajida; Austin-Page, Lukas; Geller, David; Ahluwalia, Manpreet; Gorlick, Sarah; Gill, Jonathan; Park, Amy; Zhang, Wendong; Li, Nan; Chung, So Hak; Gorlick, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Although osteosarcoma is the most common primary malignant bone tumor in children and adolescents, its cell of origin and the genetic alterations are unclear. Previous studies have shown that serially introducing hTERT, SV40 large TAg, and H-Ras transforms human mesenchymal stem cells into two distinct sarcomas cell populations, but they do not form osteoid. In this study, β-catenin was introduced into mesenchymal stem cells already containing hTERT and SV40 large TAg to analyze if this resulted in a model which more closely recapitulated osteosarcoma. Results. Regardless of the level of induced β-catenin expression in the stable transfectants, there were no marked differences induced in their phenotype or invasion and migration capacity. Perhaps more importantly, none of them formed tumors when injected into immunocompromised mice. Moreover, the resulting transformed cells could be induced to osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation but not to adipogenic differentiation. Conclusions. β-catenin, although fostering osteogenic differentiation, does not induce the malignant features and tumorigenicity conveyed by oncogenic H-RAS when introduced into partly transformed mesenchymal stem cells. This may have implications for the role of β-catenin in osteosarcoma pathogenesis. It also may suggest that adipogenesis is an earlier branch point than osteogenesis and chondrogenesis in normal mesenchymal differentiation.

  11. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    MedlinePlus

    ... LA and Vox Populi organizations. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson At the exhibition, HIV and AIDS were topics addressed by Dr. Victoria Cargill (right), Director of Clinical Studies and Director of Minority ...

  12. Low-Dose Pesticide Mixture Induces Senescence in Normal Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) and Promotes Tumorigenic Phenotype in Premalignant MSC.

    PubMed

    Hochane, Mazene; Trichet, Valerie; Pecqueur, Claire; Avril, Pierre; Oliver, Lisa; Denis, Jerome; Brion, Regis; Amiaud, Jerome; Pineau, Alain; Naveilhan, Philippe; Heymann, Dominique; Vallette, François M; Olivier, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    Humans are chronically exposed to multiple environmental pollutants such as pesticides with no significant evidence about the safety of such poly-exposures. We exposed mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) to very low doses of mixture of seven pesticides frequently detected in food samples for 21 days in vitro. We observed a permanent phenotype modification with a specific induction of an oxidative stress-related senescence. Pesticide mixture also induced a shift in MSC differentiation towards adipogenesis but did not initiate a tumorigenic transformation. In modified MSC in which a premalignant phenotype was induced, the exposure to pesticide mixture promoted tumorigenic phenotype both in vitro and in vivo after cell implantation, in all nude mice. Our results suggest that a common combination of pesticides can induce a premature ageing of adult MSC, and as such could accelerate age-related diseases. Exposure to pesticide mixture may also promote the tumorigenic transformation in a predisposed stromal environment. Abstract Video Link: https://youtu.be/mfSVPTol-Gk Stem Cells 2017;35:800-811. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  13. Tumorigenicity and Validity of Fluorescence Labelled Mesenchymal and Epithelial Human Oral Cancer Cell Lines in Nude Mice.

    PubMed

    Cai, Wei Xin; Zheng, Li Wu; Ma, Li; Huang, Hong Zhang; Yu, Ru Qing; Zwahlen, Roger A

    2016-01-01

    Tumorigenicity and metastatic activity can be visually monitored in cancer cells that were labelled with stable fluorescence. The aim was to establish and validate local and distant spread of subcutaneously previously injected fluorescence transduced human tongue cancer cell lines of epithelial and mesenchymal phenotype in nude mice. A total of 32 four-week-old male athymic Balb/c nude mice were randomly allocated into 4 groups (n = 8). A single dose of 0.3 mL PBS containing 1 × 107 of four different cancer cell-lines (UM1, UM1-GFP, UM2, and UM2-RFP) was injected subcutaneously into the right side of their posterolateral back. Validity assessment of the labelled cancer cells' tumorigenicity was assessed by physical examination, imaging, and histology four weeks after the injection. The tumor take rate of cancer cells was similar in animals injected with either parental or transduced cancer cells. Transduced cancer cells in mice were easily detectable in vivo and after cryosection using fluorescent imaging. UM1 cells showed increased tumor take rate and mean tumor volume, presenting with disorganized histopathological patterns. Fluorescence labelled epithelial and mesenchymal human tongue cancer cell lines do not change in tumorigenicity or cell phenotype after injection in vivo.

  14. Cancer stem-like cells derived from chemoresistant tumors have a unique capacity to prime tumorigenic myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashina, Tsunaki; Baghdadi, Muhammad; Yoneda, Akihiro; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Suzu, Shinya; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2014-05-15

    Resistance to anticancer therapeutics greatly affects the phenotypic and functional properties of tumor cells, but how chemoresistance contributes to the tumorigenic activities of cancer stem-like cells remains unclear. In this study, we found that a characteristic of cancer stem-like cells from chemoresistant tumors (CSC-R) is the ability to produce a variety of proinflammatory cytokines and to generate M2-like immunoregulatory myeloid cells from CD14(+) monocytes. Furthermore, we identified the IFN-regulated transcription factor IRF5 as a CSC-R-specific factor critical for promoting M-CSF production and generating tumorigenic myeloid cells. Importantly, myeloid cells primed with IRF5(+) CSC-R facilitate the tumorigenic and stem cell activities of bulk tumors. Importantly, the activation of IRF5/M-CSF pathways in tumor cells were correlated with the number of tumor-associated CSF1 receptor(+) M2 macrophages in patients with non-small lung cancer. Collectively, our findings show how chemoresistance affects the properties of CSCs in their niche microenvironments.

  15. Antagonistic Cross-Regulation between Sox9 and Sox10 Controls an Anti-tumorigenic Program in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shakhova, Olga; Cheng, Phil; Mishra, Pravin J.; Zingg, Daniel; Schaefer, Simon M.; Debbache, Julien; Häusel, Jessica; Matter, Claudia; Guo, Theresa; Davis, Sean; Meltzer, Paul; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Moch, Holger; Wegner, Michael; Merlino, Glenn; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Dummer, Reinhard; Santoro, Raffaella; Cinelli, Paolo; Sommer, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is the most fatal skin cancer, but the etiology of this devastating disease is still poorly understood. Recently, the transcription factor Sox10 has been shown to promote both melanoma initiation and progression. Reducing SOX10 expression levels in human melanoma cells and in a genetic melanoma mouse model, efficiently abolishes tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle exit and apoptosis. Here, we show that this anti-tumorigenic effect functionally involves SOX9, a factor related to SOX10 and upregulated in melanoma cells upon loss of SOX10. Unlike SOX10, SOX9 is not required for normal melanocyte stem cell function, the formation of hyperplastic lesions, and melanoma initiation. To the contrary, SOX9 overexpression results in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and a gene expression profile shared by melanoma cells with reduced SOX10 expression. Moreover, SOX9 binds to the SOX10 promoter and induces downregulation of SOX10 expression, revealing a feedback loop reinforcing the SOX10 low/SOX9 high ant,m/ii-tumorigenic program. Finally, SOX9 is required in vitro and in vivo for the anti-tumorigenic effect achieved by reducing SOX10 expression. Thus, SOX10 and SOX9 are functionally antagonistic regulators of melanoma development. PMID:25629959

  16. Neural Stem Cell Tumorigenicity and Biodistribution Assessment for Phase I Clinical Trial in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garitaonandia, Ibon; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Christiansen-Weber, Trudy; Abramihina, Tatiana; Poustovoitov, Maxim; Noskov, Alexander; Sherman, Glenn; Semechkin, Andrey; Snyder, Evan; Kern, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) have the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. However undifferentiated PSC can form tumors and strict quality control measures and safety studies must be conducted before clinical translation. Here we describe preclinical tumorigenicity and biodistribution safety studies that were required by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) prior to conducting a Phase I clinical trial evaluating the safety and tolerability of human parthenogenetic stem cell derived neural stem cells ISC-hpNSC for treating Parkinson’s disease (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02452723). To mitigate the risk of having residual PSC in the final ISC-hpNSC population, we conducted sensitive in vitro assays using flow cytometry and qRT-PCR analyses and in vivo assays to determine acute toxicity, tumorigenicity and biodistribution. The results from these safety studies show the lack of residual undifferentiated PSC, negligible tumorigenic potential by ISC-hpNSC and provide additional assurance to their clinical application. PMID:27686862

  17. Usp9x regulates Ets-1 ubiquitination and stability to control NRAS expression and tumorigenicity in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Potu, Harish; Peterson, Luke F; Kandarpa, Malathi; Pal, Anupama; Sun, Hanshi; Durham, Alison; Harms, Paul W; Hollenhorst, Peter C; Eskiocak, Ugur; Talpaz, Moshe; Donato, Nicholas J

    2017-02-15

    ETS transcription factors are commonly deregulated in cancer by chromosomal translocation, overexpression or post-translational modification to induce gene expression programs essential in tumorigenicity. Targeted destruction of these proteins may have therapeutic impact. Here we report that Ets-1 destruction is regulated by the deubiquitinating enzyme, Usp9x, and has major impact on the tumorigenic program of metastatic melanoma. Ets-1 deubiquitination blocks its proteasomal destruction and enhances tumorigenicity, which could be reversed by Usp9x knockdown or inhibition. Usp9x and Ets-1 levels are coincidently elevated in melanoma with highest levels detected in metastatic tumours versus normal skin or benign skin lesions. Notably, Ets-1 is induced by BRAF or MEK kinase inhibition, resulting in increased NRAS expression, which could be blocked by inactivation of Usp9x and therapeutic combination of Usp9x and MEK inhibitor fully suppressed melanoma growth. Thus, Usp9x modulates the Ets-1/NRAS regulatory network and may have biologic and therapeutic implications.

  18. Human chromosome 11 suppresses the tumorigenicity of adenovirus transformed baby rat kidney cells: involvement of the Wilms' tumor 1 gene.

    PubMed

    Menke, A L; van Ham, R C; Sonneveld, E; Shvarts, A; Stanbridge, E J; Miyagawa, K; van der Eb, A J; Jochemsen, A G

    1995-09-27

    Human chromosome 11 was introduced into adenovirus-transformed baby rat kidney (BRK) cells by microcell-mediated chromosome transfer. The resulting microcell hybrids (MCHs) showed a reduced ability to form tumors upon s.c. injection into athymic mice. Further analysis, with the use of defined deletion chromosomes of 11p, indicated that the presence of region 11p13-p12 is necessary for the suppression of tumorigenicity. In contrast, the presence of region 11p15-14.1 appeared to increase the rate of tumor growth. Expression studies on the human Wilms' tumor I (WTI) and the insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) genes, which lie in regions 11p13 and 11p15, respectively, suggested the involvement of both genes in determining the degree of suppression of tumorigenicity. Finally, stable expression of a murine WTI protein in the adenovirus-transformed cells resulted in almost complete suppression of tumorigenicity, establishing the WTI protein as a tumor suppressor in this cell system.

  19. Usp9x regulates Ets-1 ubiquitination and stability to control NRAS expression and tumorigenicity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Potu, Harish; Peterson, Luke F.; Kandarpa, Malathi; Pal, Anupama; Sun, Hanshi; Durham, Alison; Harms, Paul W.; Hollenhorst, Peter C.; Eskiocak, Ugur; Talpaz, Moshe; Donato, Nicholas J.

    2017-01-01

    ETS transcription factors are commonly deregulated in cancer by chromosomal translocation, overexpression or post-translational modification to induce gene expression programs essential in tumorigenicity. Targeted destruction of these proteins may have therapeutic impact. Here we report that Ets-1 destruction is regulated by the deubiquitinating enzyme, Usp9x, and has major impact on the tumorigenic program of metastatic melanoma. Ets-1 deubiquitination blocks its proteasomal destruction and enhances tumorigenicity, which could be reversed by Usp9x knockdown or inhibition. Usp9x and Ets-1 levels are coincidently elevated in melanoma with highest levels detected in metastatic tumours versus normal skin or benign skin lesions. Notably, Ets-1 is induced by BRAF or MEK kinase inhibition, resulting in increased NRAS expression, which could be blocked by inactivation of Usp9x and therapeutic combination of Usp9x and MEK inhibitor fully suppressed melanoma growth. Thus, Usp9x modulates the Ets-1/NRAS regulatory network and may have biologic and therapeutic implications. PMID:28198367

  20. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

  1. Id-1 promotes tumorigenicity and metastasis of human esophageal cancer cells through activation of PI3K/AKT signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Tsao, Sai Wah; Li, Yuk Yin; Wang, Xianghong; Ling, Ming Tat; Wong, Yong Chuan; He, Qing Yu; Cheung, Annie L M

    2009-12-01

    Id-1 (inhibitor of differentiation or DNA binding) is a helix-loop-helix protein that is overexpressed in many types of cancer including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We previously reported that ectopic Id-1 expression activates the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (AKT) signaling pathway in human esophageal cancer cells. In this study, we confirmed a positive correlation between Id-1 and phospho-AKT (Ser473) expressions in ESCC cell lines, as well as in ESCC on a tissue microarray. To investigate the significance of Id-1 in esophageal cancer progression, ESCC cells with stable ectopic Id-1 expression were inoculated subcutaneously into the flank of nude mice and were found to form larger tumors that showed elevated Ki-67 proliferation index and increased angiogenesis, as well as reduced apoptosis, compared with control cells expressing the empty vector.The Id-1-overexpressing cells also exhibited enhanced metastatic potential in the experimental metastasis assay. Treatment with the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 attenuated the tumor promotion effects of Id-1, indicating that the effects were mediated by the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. In addition, our in vitro experiments showed that ectopic Id-1 expression altered the expression levels of markers associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition and enhanced the migration ability of esophageal cancer cells. The Id-1-overexpressing ESCC cells also exhibited increased invasive potential, which was in part due to PI3K/AKT-dependent modulation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. In conclusion, our results provide the first evidence that Id-1 promotes tumorigenicity and metastasis of human esophageal cancer in vivo and that the PI3K inhibitor LY294002 can attenuate these effects.

  2. Microarray proteomic analysis discriminates tumorigenic mouse ovarian surface epithelial cells of divergent aggressive potential.

    PubMed

    Urzúa, Ulises; Best, Lionel; Munroe, David J

    2010-12-01

    Cancer is an intrinsically heterogeneous disease. Tumors classified under the same etiology and histological type may display divergent growth and invasion properties, resulting in different progression rates and clinical outcomes. Here, we approached this subject in a syngeneic mouse model of ovarian cancer. Antibody microarrays were applied to obtain the proteomic profiles of IF5 and IG10, two spontaneously transformed mouse ovarian surface epithelial (MOSE) cell lines of cognate clonal origin but different tumorigenic behavior in vivo. Repeated dye-swap allowed filter out about 40% of inconsistent signals from a total of 224 arrayed antibodies. Two-class comparison tests resulted in 31 differentially expressed proteins (adjusted p < 0.05). Proteins of the ErbB and focal adhesion signaling pathways showed higher levels in IG10, the most aggressive cell. In contrast, the less aggressive IF5 cell was enriched in proteins related to nuclear chromatin organization and cell-cycle. Additionally, comparison between protein levels and mRNA levels of MOSE cells resulted in a positive rank correlation for 50-60% of protein-mRNA pairs (p < 1.7 × 10(-5)). Importantly, the protein profile of IG10 is linked to invasion and chemotherapy response in human ovarian tumors while the IF5 profile is associated to growth control. The minimal IG10 network contained the proteins Jun, Smad4, Myc, Atf2, and Pak1 as major nodes while Chek2, Mdm2 and Ccna2 were the predominant nodes of the IF5 network. The molecular basis accounting for a high aggressive potential not necessarily related to an increased tumor growth capacity is discussed on a pathway-network basis.

  3. Epigenetic modulation of endogenous tumor suppressor expression in lung cancer xenografts suppresses tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Joshua P; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Rao, Atul S; Druck, Teresa; Semba, Shuho; Han, Shuang-Yin; McCorkell, Kelly A; Lakshman, Thiru V; Collins, Joshua E; Wachsberger, Phyllis; Friedberg, Joseph S; Huebner, Kay

    2007-01-01

    Epigenetic changes involved in cancer development, unlike genetic changes, are reversible. DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase inhibitors show antiproliferative effects in vitro, through tumor suppressor reactivation and induction of apoptosis. Such inhibitors have shown activity in the treatment of hematologic disorders but there is little data concerning their effectiveness in treatment of solid tumors. FHIT, WWOX and other tumor suppressor genes are frequently epigenetically inactivated in lung cancers. Lung cancer cell clones carrying conditional FHIT or WWOX transgenes showed significant suppression of xenograft tumor growth after induction of expression of the FHIT or WWOX transgene, suggesting that treatments to restore endogenous Fhit and Wwox expression in lung cancers would result in decreased tumorigenicity. H1299 lung cancer cells, lacking Fhit, Wwox, p16(INK4a) and Rassf1a expression due to epigenetic modifications, were used to assess efficacy of epigenetically targeted protocols in suppressing growth of lung tumors, by injection of 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine (AZA) and trichostatin A (TSA) in nude mice with established H1299 tumors. High doses of intraperitoneal AZA/TSA suppressed growth of small tumors but did not affect large tumors (200 mm(3)); lower AZA doses, administered intraperitoneally or intratumorally, suppressed growth of small tumors without apparent toxicity. Responding tumors showed restoration of Fhit, Wwox, p16(INKa), Rassf1a expression, low mitotic activity, high apoptotic fraction and activation of caspase 3. These preclinical studies show the therapeutic potential of restoration of tumor suppressor expression through epigenetic modulation and the promise of re-expressed tumor suppressors as markers and effectors of the responses.

  4. Mechanical induction of the tumorigenic β-catenin pathway by tumour growth pressure.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Sánchez, María Elena; Barbier, Sandrine; Whitehead, Joanne; Béalle, Gaëlle; Michel, Aude; Latorre-Ossa, Heldmuth; Rey, Colette; Fouassier, Laura; Claperon, Audrey; Brullé, Laura; Girard, Elodie; Servant, Nicolas; Rio-Frio, Thomas; Marie, Hélène; Lesieur, Sylviane; Housset, Chantal; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Tanter, Mickaël; Ménager, Christine; Fre, Silvia; Robine, Sylvie; Farge, Emmanuel

    2015-07-02

    The tumour microenvironment may contribute to tumorigenesis owing to mechanical forces such as fibrotic stiffness or mechanical pressure caused by the expansion of hyper-proliferative cells. Here we explore the contribution of the mechanical pressure exerted by tumour growth onto non-tumorous adjacent epithelium. In the early stage of mouse colon tumour development in the Notch(+)Apc(+/1638N) mouse model, we observed mechanistic pressure stress in the non-tumorous epithelial cells caused by hyper-proliferative adjacent crypts overexpressing active Notch, which is associated with increased Ret and β-catenin signalling. We thus developed a method that allows the delivery of a defined mechanical pressure in vivo, by subcutaneously inserting a magnet close to the mouse colon. The implanted magnet generated a magnetic force on ultra-magnetic liposomes, stabilized in the mesenchymal cells of the connective tissue surrounding colonic crypts after intravenous injection. The magnetically induced pressure quantitatively mimicked the endogenous early tumour growth stress in the order of 1,200 Pa, without affecting tissue stiffness, as monitored by ultrasound strain imaging and shear wave elastography. The exertion of pressure mimicking that of tumour growth led to rapid Ret activation and downstream phosphorylation of β-catenin on Tyr654, imparing its interaction with the E-cadherin in adherens junctions, and which was followed by β-catenin nuclear translocation after 15 days. As a consequence, increased expression of β-catenin-target genes was observed at 1 month, together with crypt enlargement accompanying the formation of early tumorous aberrant crypt foci. Mechanical activation of the tumorigenic β-catenin pathway suggests unexplored modes of tumour propagation based on mechanical signalling pathways in healthy epithelial cells surrounding the tumour, which may contribute to tumour heterogeneity.

  5. Role of mitogen activated protein kinases in skin tumorigenicity of Patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Neha; Ansari, Kausar M.; Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhari, Bhushan P.; Dwivedi, Premendra D.; Das, Mukul

    2011-12-15

    WHO has highlighted the need to evaluate dermal toxicity of mycotoxins including Patulin (PAT), detected in several fruits. In this study the skin carcinogenic potential of topically applied PAT was investigated. Single topical application of PAT (400 nmol) showed enhanced cell proliferation ({approx} 2 fold), along with increased generation of ROS and activation of ERK, p38 and JNK MAPKs, in mouse skin. PAT exposure also showed activation of downstream target proteins, c-fos, c-Jun and NF-{kappa}B transcription factors. Further, single topical application of PAT (400 nmol) followed by twice weekly application of TPA resulted in tumor formation after 14 weeks, indicating the tumor initiating activity of PAT. However no tumors were observed when PAT was used either as a complete carcinogen (80 nmol) or as a tumor promoter (20 nmol and 40 nmol) for 25 weeks. Histopathological findings of tumors found in PAT/TPA treated mice showed that these tumors were of squamous cell carcinoma type and similar to those found in the positive control group (DMBA/TPA) along with significant increase of lipid peroxidation and decrease in free sulfydryls, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase activities. The results suggest the possible role of free radicals in PAT mediated dermal tumorigenicity involving MAPKs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single topical application of Patulin showed enhanced cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Patulin activate MAPKs, c-fos, c-Jun and NF-{kappa}B transcription factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Patulin showed skin tumor initiating potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We could not detect skin tumor promoting potential of Patulin at the tested dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer However prolonged exposure of Patulin at a higher dose may promote tumor.

  6. Transformation of human osteoblast cells to the tumorigenic phenotype by depleted uranium-uranyl chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A C; Blakely, W F; Livengood, D; Whittaker, T; Xu, J; Ejnik, J W; Hamilton, M M; Parlette, E; John, T S; Gerstenberg, H M; Hsu, H

    1998-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Although the health effects of occupational uranium exposure are well known, limited data exist regarding the long-term health effects of internalized DU in humans. We established an in vitro cellular model to study DU exposure. Microdosimetric assessment, determined using a Monte Carlo computer simulation based on measured intracellular and extracellular uranium levels, showed that few (0.0014%) cell nuclei were hit by alpha particles. We report the ability of DU-uranyl chloride to transform immortalized human osteoblastic cells (HOS) to the tumorigenic phenotype. DU-uranyl chloride-transformants are characterized by anchorage-independent growth, tumor formation in nude mice, expression of high levels of the k-ras oncogene, reduced production of the Rb tumor-suppressor protein, and elevated levels of sister chromatid exchanges per cell. DU-uranyl chloride treatment resulted in a 9.6 (+/- 2.8)-fold increase in transformation frequency compared to untreated cells. In comparison, nickel sulfate resulted in a 7.1 (+/- 2.1)-fold increase in transformation frequency. This is the first report showing that a DU compound caused human cell transformation to the neoplastic phenotype. Although additional studies are needed to determine if protracted DU exposure produces tumors in vivo, the implication from these in vitro results is that the risk of cancer induction from internalized DU exposure may be comparable to other biologically reactive and carcinogenic heavy-metal compounds (e.g., nickel). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681973

  7. Constitutive expression of lymphoma-associated NFKB-2/Lyt-10 proteins is tumorigenic in murine fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ciana, P; Neri, A; Cappellini, C; Cavallo, F; Pomati, M; Chang, C C; Maiolo, A T; Lombardi, L

    1997-04-17

    The NFKB-2 (Lyt-10) gene codes for an NF-kappaB-related transcription factor containing rel-polyG-ankyrin domains. Rearrangements of the NFKB-2 locus leading to the production of 3' truncated NFKB-2 proteins are recurrently found in lymphoid neoplasms, particularly cutaneous lymphomas. Such mutant NFKB-2 proteins have lost the ability to repress transcription that is typical of NFKB-2 subunit p52, and function as constitutive transcriptional activators. To verify whether the expression of abnormal NFKB-2 proteins can lead to malignant transformations in mammalian cells, we transfected human lymphoblastoid cell lines and murine fibroblasts (Balb/3T3) with expression vectors carrying the cDNAs coding for normal NFKB-2p52, Lyt-10C alpha or LB40 proteins, which are representative of the abnormal types found in lymphoma cases. The expression of both normal and mutant NFKB-2 proteins has a lethal effect on lymphoblastoid cells and a cytotoxic effect was also observed in murine fibroblasts. The fibroblast cell lines expressing Lyt-10C alpha or LB40, but not those expressing normal NFKB-2p52, were capable of forming colonies in soft agar. The analysis of individual clones revealed that cloning efficiency correlated with the expression levels of the abnormal proteins. Injection of the Lyt-10C alpha-transfected Balb cells in SCID mice led to tumor formation in all of the animals, whereas no tumors were observed in the mice injected with control or NFKB-2p52-transfected cells, thus indicating that abnormal NFKB-2 protein expression is tumorigenic in vivo. Our results show that mutant NFKB-2 proteins can lead to the transformed phenotype, and support the hypothesis that alterations in NFKB-2 genes may play a role in lymphomagenesis.

  8. Tumorigenic transformation of human breast epithelial cells induced by mitochondrial DNA depletion.

    PubMed

    Kulawiec, Mariola; Safina, Alfiya; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Still, Ivan; Matsui, Sei-Ichi; Bakin, Andrei; Singh, Keshav K

    2008-11-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) encodes 13 proteins involved in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). In order to investigate the role of mitochondrial OXPHOS genes in breast tumorigenesis, we have developed a breast epithelial cell line devoid of mtDNA (rho(0) cells). Our analysis revealed that depletion of mtDNA in breast epithelial cells results in in vitro tumorigenic phenotype as well as breast tumorigenesis in a xenograft model. We identified two major gene networks which were differentially regulated between parental and rho(0) epithelial cells. The focal proteins in these networks include (i) FN1 (fibronectin) and (ii) p53. Bioinformatic analyses of FN1 network identified laminin, integrin and 3 of 6 members of peroxiredoxin whose expression were altered in rho(0) epithelial cells. In the p53 network, we identified SMC4 and WRN whose changes in expression suggest that this network may affect chromosomal stability. Consistent with above finding our study revealed an increase in DNA double strand breaks and unique chromosomal rearrangements in rho(0) breast epithelial cells. Additionally, we identified tight junction proteins claudin-1 and claudin-7 in p53 network. To determine the functional relevance of altered gene expression, we focused on detailed analyses of claudin-1 and -7 proteins in breast tumorigenesis. Our study determined that (i) claudin-1 and 7 were indeed downregulated in rho(0) breast epithelial cells, (ii) downregulation of claudin-1 or -7 led to neoplastic transformation of breast epithelial cells, and (iii) claudin-1 and -7 were also downregulated in primary breast tumors. Together, our study suggest that mtDNA encoded OXPHOS genes play a key role in transformation of breast epithelial cells and that multiple pathway involved in mitochondria-to-nucleus retrograde regulation contribute to transformation of breast epithelial cells.

  9. Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase POLG1 Disease Mutations and Germline Variants Promote Tumorigenic Properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Owens, Kjerstin M; Bajpai, Prachi; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Tiwari, Hemant K; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG1) induce mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, depletion, and decrease oxidative phosphorylation. Earlier, we identified somatic mutations in POLG1 and the contribution of these mutations in human cancer. However, a role for germline variations in POLG1 in human cancers is unknown. In this study, we examined a role for disease associated germline variants of POLG1, POLG1 gene expression, copy number variation and regulation in human cancers. We analyzed the mutations, expression and copy number variation in POLG1 in several cancer databases and validated the analyses in primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. We discovered 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine led epigenetic regulation of POLG1, mtDNA-encoded genes and increased mitochondrial respiration. We conducted comprehensive race based bioinformatics analyses of POLG1 gene in more than 33,000 European-Americans and 5,000 African-Americans. We identified a mitochondrial disease causing missense variation in polymerase domain of POLG1 protein at amino acid 1143 (E1143G) to be 25 times more prevalent in European-Americans (allele frequency 0.03777) when compared to African-American (allele frequency 0.00151) population. We identified T251I and P587L missense variations in exonuclease and linker region of POLG1 also to be more prevalent in European-Americans. Expression of these variants increased glucose consumption, decreased ATP production and increased matrigel invasion. Interestingly, conditional expression of these variants revealed that matrigel invasion properties conferred by these germline variants were reversible suggesting a role of epigenetic regulators. Indeed, we identified a set of miRNA whose expression was reversible after variant expression was turned off. Together, our studies demonstrate altered genetic and epigenetic regulation of POLG1 in human cancers and suggest a role for POLG1 germline variants in promoting tumorigenic

  10. β-Catenin is required for the tumorigenic behavior of triple-negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinhua; Prosperi, Jenifer R; Choudhury, Noura; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I; Goss, Kathleen H

    2015-01-01

    Our previous data illustrated that activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway was enriched in triple-negative breast cancer and associated with reduced overall survival in all patients. To determine whether Wnt signaling may be a promising therapeutic target for triple-negative breast cancer, we investigated whether β-catenin was necessary for tumorigenic behaviors in vivo and in vitro. β-catenin expression level was significantly reduced in two human triple-negative breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and HCC38, using lentiviral delivery of β-catenin-specific small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs). Upon implantation of the cells in the mammary fat pad of immunocompromised mice, we found that β-catenin shRNA HCC38 cells formed markedly smaller tumors than control cells and grew much more slowly. In in vitro assays, β-catenin silencing significantly reduced the percentage of Aldefluor-positive cells, a read-out of the stem-like cell population, as well as the expression of stem cell-related target genes including Bmi-1 and c-Myc. β-catenin-knockdown cells were also significantly impaired in their ability to migrate in wound-filling assays and form anchorage-independent colonies in soft agar. β-catenin-knockdown cells were more sensitive to chemotherapeutic agents doxorubicin and cisplatin. Collectively, these data suggest that β-catenin is required for triple-negative breast cancer development by controlling numerous tumor-associated properties, such as migration, stemness, anchorage-independent growth and chemosensitivity.

  11. Overexpression of 14-3-3σ counteracts tumorigenicity by positively regulating p73 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    GENG, CUIZHI; SANG, MEIXIANG; YANG, RUILING; GAO, WEI; ZHOU, TAO; WANG, SHIJIE

    2011-01-01

    14-3-3σ, one of the 14-3-3 family members, was initially identified as a human mammary epithelium-specific marker 1. The expression of 14-3-3σ is directly regulated by p53. It has been demonstrated that 14-3-3σ stabilizes p53 and enhances its transcriptional activity through the interaction with p53, suggesting that 14-3-3σ has a positive feedback effect on p53. Our previous study showed that 14-3-3σ is a direct transcriptional target of p73 and enhances the p73-mediated transcriptional as well as pro-apoptotic activity in vitro. In the present study, we explored the tumor-suppressive effect of 14-3-3σ by establishing a breast cancer xenograft nude mouse model with an inducible expression of 14-3-3σ or with an inducible expression of p53/p73 plus 14-3-3σ with ADR treatment. Tumor formation was then assayed. Moreover, 66 primary breast cancer specimens and paired tumor-free breast specimens obtained from the female patients were examined. Results showed that the expression of p73 and 14-3-3σ in breast cancer specimens was significantly lower than the tumor-free breast specimens and that 14-3-3σ expression was positively correlated with the expression of p73. Furthermore, overexpression of 14-3-3σ counteracts tumorigenicity by positively regulating p73 in p53-mutated or -deficient cancers in vivo. Therefore, our results may lead to the use of 14-3-3σ in the therapeutic application for the p53-mutated and p73-expressed breast cancer patients. PMID:22848285

  12. Neogenin expression may be inversely correlated to the tumorigenicity of human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Eon; Kim, Hee Joung; Bae, Ji Yeon; Kim, Seok Won; Park, Joon-Suk; Shin, Hyuk Jai; Han, Wonshik; Kim, Sung-Won; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Noh, Dong-Young

    2005-01-01

    Background Neogenin is expressed in cap cells that have been suggested to be mammary stem or precursor cells. Neogenin is known to play an important role in mammary morphogenesis; however its relationship to tumorigenesis remains to be elucidated. Methods To compare the expression levels of neogenin in cells with different tumorigenicity, the expression levels in M13SV1, M13SV1R2 and M13SV1R2N1 cells, which are immortalized derivatives of type I human breast epithelial cells, were evaluated. Then we measured the expression level of neogenin in paired normal and cancer tissues from eight breast cancer patients. Tissue array analysis was performed for 54 human breast tissue samples with different histology, and the results were divided into four categories (none, weak, moderate, strong) by a single well-trained blinded pathologist and statistically analyzed. Results The nontumorigenic M13SV1 cells and normal tissues showed stronger expression of neogenin than the M13SV1R2N1 cells and the paired cancer tissues. In the tissue array, all (8/8) of the normal breast tissues showed strong neogenin expression, while 93.5% (43/46) of breast cancer tissues had either no expression or only moderate levels of neogenin expression. There was a significant difference, in the expression level of neogenin, in comparisons between normal and infiltrating ductal carcinoma (p < 0.001). Conclusion Neogenin may play a role in mammary carcinogenesis as well as morphogenesis, and the expression may be inversely correlated with mammary carcinogenicity. The value of neogenin as a potential prognostic factor needs further evaluation. PMID:16324219

  13. Loss of HSulf-1 expression enhances tumorigenicity by inhibiting Bim expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoping; Khurana, Ashwani; Roy, Debarshi; Kaufmann, Scott; Shridhar, Viji

    2014-10-15

    The expression of human Sulfatase1 (HSulf-1) is downregulated in the majority of primary ovarian cancer tumors, but the functional consequence of this downregulation remains unclear. Using two different shRNAs (Sh1 and Sh2), HSulf-1 expression was stably downregulated in ovarian cancer OV202 cells. We found that HSulf-1-deficient OV202 Sh1 and Sh2 cells formed colonies in soft agar. In contrast, nontargeting control (NTC) shRNA-transduced OV202 cells did not form any colonies. Moreover, subcutaneous injection of OV202 HSulf-1-deficient cells resulted in tumor formation in nude mice, whereas OV202 NTC cells did not. Also, ectopic expression of HSulf-1 in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells significantly suppressed tumor growth in nude mice. Here, we show that HSulf-1-deficient OV202 cells have markedly decreased expression of proapoptotic Bim protein, which can be rescued by restoring HSulf-1 expression in OV202 Sh1 cells. Enhanced expression of HSulf-1 in HSulf-1-deficient SKOV3 cells resulted in increased Bim expression. Decreased Bim levels after loss of HSulf-1 were due to increased p-ERK, because inhibition of ERK activity with PD98059 resulted in increased Bim expression. However, treatment with a PI3 kinase/AKT inhibitor, LY294002, failed to show any change in Bim protein level. Importantly, rescuing Bim expression in HSulf-1 knockdown cells significantly retarded tumor growth in nude mice. Collectively, these results suggest that loss of HSulf-1 expression promotes tumorigenicity in ovarian cancer through regulating Bim expression.

  14. The role of transforming growth factor alpha production and ErbB-2 overexpression in induction of tumorigenicity of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hamburger, A. W.; Fernandes, A.; Murakami, M.; Gerwin, B. I.

    1998-01-01

    Over-expression of erbB-2 is associated with shortened survival of patients with lung adenocarcinomas. We demonstrated that human lung epithelial cells, overexpressing erbB-2, formed tumours in nude mice only when high levels of transforming growth factor (TGF)-alpha were produced (E6T cells). To define the role that TGF-alpha production played in induction of tumorigenicity, a non-tumorigenic TGF-alpha-negative clone of ErbB-2 overexpressing cells (E2 cells) was transfected with an expression vector for TGF-alpha (E2alpha cells). Transfected clones produced TGF-alpha at 11-25% of the level produced by the E6T cell line. Tumorigenic E6T cells transfected with a TGF-alpha antisense vector (E6TA cells) expressed only 6% of the TGF-alpha level of the parental cells. Clones of E6T, E6TA, E2 and E2alpha were inoculated into athymic nude mice to measure tumorigenic potential. E6T cells formed tumours with a 70% efficiency. E2, E6TA and E2alpha cells failed to form tumours. The levels of EGFR were similar in non-tumorigenic E2 and tumorigenic E6T cells but higher in E2alpha and E6TA cells, and ErbB-2 were greatly overexpressed in an E2alpha clone. In vitro, ErbB-2 co-immunoprecipitated with EGFR in lysates of unstimulated E6T and E2alpha TGF-alpha-producing cells, indicating that the lower TGF-alpha levels were sufficient to induce in vitro heterodimerization. These studies suggest that induction of the tumorigenic phenotype depends on achieving a threshold level of TGF-alpha sufficient to activate downstream signalling by ErbB-2 containing active heterodimers. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9569041

  15. Science on a Sphere exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Students from Xavier University Preparatory School in New Orleans view the newest exhibit at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center - Science on a Sphere, a 68-inch global presentation of planetary data. StenniSphere is only the third NASA visitor center to offer the computer system, which uses four projectors to display data on a globe and present a dynamic, revolving, animated view of Earth and other planets.

  16. Science on a Sphere exhibit

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-03-31

    Students from Xavier University Preparatory School in New Orleans view the newest exhibit at StenniSphere, the visitor center at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center - Science on a Sphere, a 68-inch global presentation of planetary data. StenniSphere is only the third NASA visitor center to offer the computer system, which uses four projectors to display data on a globe and present a dynamic, revolving, animated view of Earth and other planets.

  17. PlGF Knockdown Decreases Tumorigenicity and Stemness Properties of Spheroid Body Cells Derived from Gastric Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Mahmoodi, Fatemeh; Akrami, Hassan

    2017-04-01

    Placental growth factor (PlGF) a member of the vascular endothelial growth factor family regulates some cell processes such as survival, growth of vascular endothelial cells, invasiveness, and also involves in pathological angiogenesis and metastasis in most cancers. Cancer stem cells are believed to be the main reason for the tumor relapse and resistance to therapy. These cells have various characteristics as same as normal tissue-specific adult stem cells including self-renewability and potent to differentiate into various cell types. However, the function of PlGF in gastric cancer stem cells is not well understood. We have investigated the effect of PlGF knockdown on the tumorigenicity and stem cell properties of spheroid body cells derived from two human gastric cancer cell lines. In this study, we isolated spheroid body cells which have stemness properties from MKN-45 and AGS without using growth factors. Validation of spheroid body cells was confirmed by various methods. Then the effects of PlGF knockdown were investigated on in vitro tumorigenicity, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis, and transcription levels of stemness markers of spheroid body cells. Our findings indicated that isolation of spheroid body cells from MKN-45 and AGS cells without using growth factors is an easy and inexpensive method to isolate cancer stem cells and knockdown of PlGF in spheroid body cells reduced in vitro tumorigenicity and stemness properties of spheroid body cells such as Self-renewal ability, colony forming, migratory, and MMPs activities and decreased ability to differentiation and angiogenesis. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 851-859, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. HEK293 in cell biology and cancer research: phenotype, karyotype, tumorigenicity, and stress-induced genome-phenotype evolution.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, A A; Dmitrenko, V V

    2015-09-15

    293 cell line (widely known as the Human Embryonic Kidney 293 cells) and its derivatives were the most used cells after HeLa in cell biology studies and after CHO in biotechnology as a vehicle for the production of adenoviral vaccines and recombinant proteins, for analysis of the neuronal synapse formation, in electrophysiology and neuropharmacology. Despite the historically long-term productive exploitation, the origin, phenotype, karyotype, and tumorigenicity of 293 cells are still debated. 293 cells were considered the kidney epithelial cells or even fibroblasts. However, 293 cells demonstrate no evident tissue-specific gene expression signature and express the markers of renal progenitor cells, neuronal cells and adrenal gland. This complicates efforts to reveal the authentic cell type/tissue of origin. On the other hand, the potential to propagate the highly neurotropic viruses, inducible synaptogenesis, functionality of the endogenous neuron-specific voltage-gated channels, and response to the diverse agonists implicated in neuronal signaling give credibility to consider 293 cells of neuronal lineage phenotype. The compound phenotype of 293 cells can be due to heterogeneous, unstable karyotype. The mean chromosome number and chromosome aberrations differ between 293 cells and derivatives as well as between 293 cells from the different cell banks/labs. 293 cells are tumorigenic, whereas acute changes of expression of the cancer-associated genes aggravate tumorigenicity by promoting chromosome instability. Importantly, the procedure of a stable empty vector transfection can also impact karyotype and phenotype. The discussed issues caution against misinterpretations and pitfalls during the different experimental manipulations with 293 cells.

  19. Culture conditions tailored to the cell of origin are critical for maintaining native properties and tumorigenicity of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Ledur, Pítia F; Liu, Chong; He, Hua; Harris, Alexandra R; Minussi, Darlan C; Zhou, Hai-Yan; Shaffrey, Mark E; Asthagiri, Ashok; Lopes, Maria Beatriz S; Schiff, David; Lu, Yi-Cheng; Mandell, James W; Lenz, Guido; Zong, Hui

    2016-10-01

    Cell culture plays a pivotal role in cancer research. However, culture-induced changes in biological properties of tumor cells profoundly affect research reproducibility and translational potential. Establishing culture conditions tailored to the cancer cell of origin could resolve this problem. For glioma research, it has been previously shown that replacing serum with defined growth factors for neural stem cells (NSCs) greatly improved the retention of gene expression profile and tumorigenicity. However, among all molecular subtypes of glioma, our laboratory and others have previously shown that the oligodendrocyte precursor cell (OPC) rather than the NSC serves as the cell of origin for the proneural subtype, raising questions regarding the suitability of NSC-tailored media for culturing proneural glioma cells. OPC-originated mouse glioma cells were cultured in conditions for normal OPCs or NSCs, respectively, for multiple passages. Gene expression profiles, morphologies, tumorigenicity, and drug responsiveness of cultured cells were examined in comparison with freshly isolated tumor cells. OPC media-cultured glioma cells maintained tumorigenicity, gene expression profiles, and morphologies similar to freshly isolated tumor cells. In contrast, NSC-media cultured glioma cells gradually lost their OPC features and most tumor-initiating ability and acquired heightened sensitivity to temozolomide. To improve experimental reproducibility and translational potential of glioma research, it is important to identify the cell of origin, and subsequently apply this knowledge to establish culture conditions that allow the retention of native properties of tumor cells. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Berberine suppresses tumorigenicity and growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells by inhibiting STAT3 activation induced by tumor associated fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cortidis rhizoma (Huanglian) and its major therapeutic component, berberine, have drawn extensive attention in recent years for their anti-cancer properties. Growth inhibitory effects of berberine on multiple types of human cancer cells have been reported. Berberine inhibits invasion, induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human cancer cells. The anti-inflammatory property of berberine, involving inhibition of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) activation, has also been documented. Methods In this study, we have examined the effects of berberine on tumorigenicity and growth of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) cells and their relationship to STAT3 signaling using both in vivo and in vitro models. Results Berberine effectively inhibited the tumorigenicity and growth of an EBV-positive NPC cell line (C666-1) in athymic nude mice. Inhibition of tumorigenic growth of NPC cells in vivo was correlated with effective inhibition of STAT3 activation in NPC cells inside the tumor xenografts grown in nude mice. In vitro, berberine inhibited both constitutive and IL-6-induced STAT3 activation in NPC cells. Inhibition of STAT3 activation by berberine induced growth inhibition and apoptotic response in NPC cells. Tumor-associated fibroblasts were found to secret IL-6 and the conditioned medium harvested from the fibroblasts also induced STAT3 activation in NPC cells. Furthermore, STAT3 activation by conditioned medium of tumor-associated fibroblasts could be blocked by berberine or antibodies against IL-6 and IL-6R. Conclusions Our observation that berberine effectively inhibited activation of STAT3 induced by tumor-associated fibroblasts suggests a role of berberine in modulating the effects of tumor stroma on the growth of NPC cells. The effective inhibition of STAT3 activation in NPC cells by berberine supports its potential use in the treatment of NPC. PMID:24380387

  1. Role of TGF-β signaling in curcumin-mediated inhibition of tumorigenicity of human lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Raktima; Halder, Sunil K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Curcumin has been shown to have potent anti-cancer activities like inhibition of cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and suppression of angiogenesis. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling plays a complex role in tumor suppression and promotion depending on the tumor type and stage. However, the effect of curcumin on TGF-β signaling in cancer cells and the role of TGF-β signaling in curcumin-induced anticancer activities have not been determined. Here, we investigate the role of curcumin on TGF-β signaling, and whether TGF-β signaling is involved in the antitumor activities of curcumin. Methods Human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines, ACC-LC-176 (without TGF-β signaling), H358, and A549 (with TGF-β signaling) were treated with curcumin to determine cell growth, apoptosis, and tumorigenicity. Antitumor activities of curcumin were determined using these cell lines and an in vivo mouse model. We also tested the effect of curcumin on TGF-β/Smad signaling by western blotting and by luciferase assays. Results Curcumin inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis of all three NSCLC cell lines in vitro and in vivo. It significantly reduced subcutaneous tumor growth by these three cell lines irrespective of TGF-β signaling status. Curcumin inhibited TGF-β-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation and transcription in H358 and A549 cells, but not in ACC-LC-176 cells. Conclusions Curcumin reduces tumorigenicity of human lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo by inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. These results suggest that TGF-β signaling is not directly involved in curcumin-mediated growth inhibition, induction of apoptosis, and inhibition of tumorigenicity. PMID:23224523

  2. Histological Characterization of the Tumorigenic “Peri-Necrotic Niche” Harboring Quiescent Stem-Like Tumor Cells in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Aya; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Kawano, Hiroo; Takubo, Keiyo; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Ikeda, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterization of the niches for stem-like tumor cells is important to understand and control the behavior of glioblastomas. Cell-cycle quiescence might be a common mechanism underlying the long-term maintenance of stem-cell function in normal and neoplastic stem cells, and our previous study demonstrated that quiescence induced by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α is associated with a high long-term repopulation capacity of hematopoietic stem cells. Based on this, we examined human astrocytoma tissues for HIF-1α-regulated quiescent stem-like tumor cells as a candidate for long-term tumorigenic cells and characterized their niche histologically. Methods Multi-color immunohistochemistry was used to visualize HIF-1α-expressing (HIF-1α+) quiescent stem-like tumor cells and their niche in astrocytoma (WHO grade II–IV) tissues. This niche was modeled using spheroids of cultured glioblastoma cells and its contribution to tumorigenicity was evaluated by sphere formation assay. Results A small subpopulation of HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like tumor cells was found in glioblastomas but not in lower-grade astrocytomas. These cells were concentrated in the zone between large ischemic necroses and blood vessels and were closer to the necrotic tissues than to the blood vessels, which suggested that a moderately hypoxic microenvironment is their niche. We successfully modeled this niche containing cells of HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like phenotype by incubating glioblastoma cell spheroids under an appropriately hypoxic condition, and the emergence of HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like cells was shown to be associated with an enhanced sphere-forming activity. Conclusions These data suggest that the “peri-necrotic niche” harboring HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like cells confers a higher tumorigenic potential on glioblastoma cells and therefore may be a therapeutic target to control the behavior of glioblastomas. PMID:26799577

  3. Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-derived DNA adducts as a common biological biomarker of pyrrolizidine alkaloid-induced tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Xia, Qingsu; Zhao, Yuewei; Von Tungeln, Linda S; Doerge, Daniel R; Lin, Ge; Cai, Lining; Fu, Peter P

    2013-09-16

    Pyrrolizidine alkaloid-containing plants are the most common poisonous plants affecting livestock, wildlife, and humans. The U.S. National Toxicology Program (NTP) classified riddelliine, a tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen" in the NTP 12th Report on Carcinogens in 2011. We previously determined that four DNA adducts were formed in rats dosed with riddelliine. The structures of the four DNA adducts were elucidated as (i) a pair of epimers of 7-hydroxy-9-(deoxyguanosin-N(2)-yl)dehydrosupinidine adducts (termed as DHP-dG-3 and DHP-dG-4) as the predominant adducts; and (ii) a pair of epimers of 7-hydroxy-9-(deoxyadenosin-N(6)-yl)dehydrosupinidine adducts (termed as DHP-dA-3 and DHP-dA-4 adducts). In this study, we selected a nontumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, platyphylliine, a pyrrolizidine alkaloid N-oxide, riddelliine N-oxide, and nine tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids (riddelliine, retrorsine, monocrotaline, lycopsamine, retronecine, lasiocarpine, heliotrine, clivorine, and senkirkine) for study in animals. Seven of the nine tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids, with the exception of lycopsamine and retronecine, are liver carcinogens. At 8-10 weeks of age, female F344 rats were orally gavaged for 3 consecutive days with 4.5 and 24 μmol/kg body weight test article in 0.5 mL of 10% DMSO in water. Twenty-four hours after the last dose, the rats were sacrificed, livers were removed, and liver DNA was isolated for DNA adduct analysis. DHP-dG-3, DHP-dG-4, DHP-dA-3, and DHP-dA-4 adducts were formed in the liver of rats treated with the individual seven hepatocarcinogenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids and riddelliine N-oxide. These DNA adducts were not formed in the liver of rats administered retronecine, the nontumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloid, platyphylliine, or vehicle control. These results indicate that this set of DNA adducts, DHP-dG-3, DHP-dG-4, DHP-dA-3, and DHP-dA-4, is a common biological biomarker of

  4. Nontumorigenic squamous cell carcinoma line converted to tumorigenicity with methyl methanesulfonate without activation of HRAS or MYC.

    PubMed

    Milo, G E; Shuler, C; Kurian, P; French, B T; Mannix, D G; Noyes, I; Hollering, J; Sital, N; Schuller, D; Trewyn, R W

    1990-02-01

    Plasticity of human tumor populations could account for the reason why many tumorigenic human cell lines lose this feature when grown in culture. Methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) was used to convert premalignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cell line SCC-83-01-82 to a malignant phenotype. The MMS-treated SCC-83-01-82 cells (MMS-SCC-83-01-82) produced progressively growing tumors in 5 of 11 splenectomized BALB/c nude mice within 3-5 months. A cell line, designated SCC-83-01-82 CA, was established in vitro from one of the mouse tumors and was repassaged successively. This SCC-83-01-82 CA cell line was aggressively tumorigenic. A tumor greater than or equal to 2.0 cm in size was present within a month, as opposed to the 3-5 months required for the tumors produced by the MMS-SCC-83-01-82 cells. Examination of frozen cross sections by in situ hybridization revealed that focal areas of the tumor produced by the MMS-SCC-83-01-82 cells expressed MYC and HRAS mRNA. However, by the third passage in vivo, the levels of expression of the corresponding genes in the mouse tumors were undetectable. Blot-hybridization analysis of the RNA from the MMS-SCC-83-01-82 cells and the subsequently derived tumors and cells did not indicate any consistent overexpression of MYC, HRAS, or KRAS. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of both MYC and HRAS genes revealed neither rearrangement nor amplification of MYC nor point mutation in the 11th or 12th codon of HRAS. The data suggest that alterations in MYC and HRAS were not directly involved in either the initial transformation or MMS-induced tumorigenic conversion of the SCC-83-01-82 cell line. Persistence of tumorigenicity after reisolation of the MMS-converted premalignant SCC-83-01-82 cells did not disappear immediately following the treatment with MMS.

  5. 12-O-Tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) is anti-tumorigenic in liver cancer cells via inhibiting YAP through AMOT

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Guoqing; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Xiao; Wu, Qi; Zhao, Yinghui; Chen, Yuxin; Sun, Fenyong; Qiao, Yongxia; Wang, Jiayi

    2017-01-01

    TPA stimulates carcinogenesis in various types of cancers. However, we found that TPA inhibits transformative phenotypes in liver cancer cells via the translocation of YAP from the nucleus, where it functions as a transcriptional co-factor, to the cytoplasm. Such effects led to a separation of YAP from its dependent transcription factors. The inhibitory effects of TPA on YAP were AMOT dependent. Without AMOT, TPA was unable to alter YAP activity. Importantly, the depletion of YAP and AMOT blocked the TPA-reduced transformative phenotypes. In sum, TPA has been established as an anti-tumorigenic drug in liver cancer cells via YAP and AMOT. PMID:28322318

  6. Lung tumorigenic interactions in strain A/J mice of five environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Nesnow, S; Mass, M J; Ross, J A; Galati, A J; Lambert, G R; Gennings, C; Carter, W H; Stoner, G D

    1998-12-01

    The binary, ternary, quaternary, and quintary interactions of a five-component mixture of carcinogenic environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using response surface analyses are described. Initially, lung tumor dose-response curves in strain A/J mice for each of the individual PAHs benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F), dibenz[a,h]anthracene (DBA), 5-methylchrysene (5MC), and cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP) were obtained. From these data, doses were selected for the quintary mixture study based on toxicity, survival, range of response, and predicted tumor yields. The ratios of doses among PAHs were designed to simulate PAH ratios found in environmental air and combustion samples. Quintary mixtures of B[a]P, B[b]F, DBA, 5MC, and CPP were administered to male strain A/J mice in a 2(5) factorial 32-dose group dosing scheme (combinations of five PAHs each at either high or low doses) and lung adenomas were scored. Comparison of observed lung adenoma formation with that expected from additivity identified both greater than additive and less than additive interactions that were dose related i.e., greater than additive at lower doses and less than additive at higher doses. To identify specific interactions, a response surface analysis using response addition was applied to the tumor data. This response surface model contained five dose, ten binary, ten ternary, five quaternary, and one quintary parameter. This analysis produced statistically significant values of 16 parameters. The model and model parameters were evaluated by estimating the dose-response relationships for each of the five PAHs. The predicted dose-response curves for all five PAHs indicated a good estimation. The binary interaction functions were dominated for the most part by DBA and were inhibitory. The response surface model predicted, to a significant degree, the observed lung tumorigenic responses of the quintary mixtures. These data suggest that although interactions between

  7. Lung tumorigenic interactions in strain A/J mice of five environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed Central

    Nesnow, S; Mass, M J; Ross, J A; Galati, A J; Lambert, G R; Gennings, C; Carter, W H; Stoner, G D

    1998-01-01

    The binary, ternary, quaternary, and quintary interactions of a five-component mixture of carcinogenic environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using response surface analyses are described. Initially, lung tumor dose-response curves in strain A/J mice for each of the individual PAHs benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F), dibenz[a,h]anthracene (DBA), 5-methylchrysene (5MC), and cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP) were obtained. From these data, doses were selected for the quintary mixture study based on toxicity, survival, range of response, and predicted tumor yields. The ratios of doses among PAHs were designed to simulate PAH ratios found in environmental air and combustion samples. Quintary mixtures of B[a]P, B[b]F, DBA, 5MC, and CPP were administered to male strain A/J mice in a 2(5) factorial 32-dose group dosing scheme (combinations of five PAHs each at either high or low doses) and lung adenomas were scored. Comparison of observed lung adenoma formation with that expected from additivity identified both greater than additive and less than additive interactions that were dose related i.e., greater than additive at lower doses and less than additive at higher doses. To identify specific interactions, a response surface analysis using response addition was applied to the tumor data. This response surface model contained five dose, ten binary, ten ternary, five quaternary, and one quintary parameter. This analysis produced statistically significant values of 16 parameters. The model and model parameters were evaluated by estimating the dose-response relationships for each of the five PAHs. The predicted dose-response curves for all five PAHs indicated a good estimation. The binary interaction functions were dominated for the most part by DBA and were inhibitory. The response surface model predicted, to a significant degree, the observed lung tumorigenic responses of the quintary mixtures. These data suggest that although interactions between

  8. Toxicity profiles in rats treated with tumorigenic and nontumorigenic triazole conazole fungicides: Propiconazole, triadimefon, and myclobutanil.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Douglas C; Allen, James W; George, Michael H; Hester, Susan D; Sun, Guobin; Moore, Tanya; Thai, Sheau-Fung; Delker, Don; Winkfield, Ernest; Leavitt, Sharon; Nelson, Gail; Roop, Barbara C; Jones, Carlton; Thibodeaux, Julie; Nesnow, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Conazoles are a class of azole based fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. They have a common mode of antifungal action through inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Some members of this class have been shown to be hepatotoxic and will induce mouse hepatocellular tumors and/or rat thyroid follicular cell tumors. The particular mode of toxic and tumorigenic action for these compounds is not known, however it has been proposed that triadimefon-induced rat thyroid tumors arise through the specific mechanism of increased TSH. The present study was designed to identify commonalities of effects across the different conazoles and to determine unique features of the tissue responses that suggest a toxicity pathway and a mode of action for the observed thyroid response for triadimefon. Male Wistar/Han rats were treated with triadimefon (100, 500, 1800 ppm), propiconazole (100, 500, 2500 ppm), or myclobutanil (100, 500, 2000 ppm) in feed for 4, 30, or 90 days. The rats were evaluated for clinical signs, body and liver weight, histopathology of thyroid and liver, hepatic metabolizing enzyme activity, and serum T3, T4, TSH, and cholesterol levels. There was a dose-dependent increase in liver weight but not body weight for all treatments. The indication of cytochrome induction, pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (PROD) activity, had a dose-related increase at all time points for all conazoles. Uridine diphopho-glucuronosyl transferase (UDPGT), the T4 metabolizing enzyme measured as glucuronidation of 1-naphthol, was induced to the same extent after 30 and 90 days for all three conazoles. Livers from all high dose treated rats had centrilobular hepatocyte hypertrophy after 4 days, while only triadimefon and propiconazole treated rats had hepatocyte hypertrophy after 30 days, and only triadimefon treated rats had hepatocyte hypertrophy after 90 days. Thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy, increased follicular cell proliferation, and colloid depletion were

  9. Failure of catalase to protect against aflatoxin B{sub 1}-induced mouse lung tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Guindon, Katherine A.; Foley, Julie F.; Maronpot, Robert R.; Massey, Thomas E.

    2008-03-01

    The carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) induces 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in mouse lung, an effect that can be prevented by treatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT). G {yields} T transversion mutation in K-ras, an early event in AFB{sub 1}-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis, is thought to result from AFB{sub 1}-8,9-exo-epoxide binding to DNA to form AFB{sub 1}-N{sup 7}-guanine, but may also result from formation of 8-OHdG. Therefore, oxidative DNA damage may be important in AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity. The objective of this study was to determine whether PEG-CAT would prevent AFB{sub 1} tumorigenicity. Mouse lung tumorigenesis was assessed following treatment of female A/J mice with 300 kU/kg PEG-CAT ip and/or 50 mg/kg AFB{sub 1}. Mice were killed 7 months post-treatment and tumors greater than 1 mm in diameter were excised. Unexpectedly, the mean number of tumors per mouse in the PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} group (8.81 {+-} 3.64, n = 47) was greater than that of the group treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (7.05 {+-} 3.45, n = 42) (P < 0.05). The tumors obtained from mice treated with PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} were larger than those from mice treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (P < 0.05). There was no difference in K-ras exon 1 mutation spectrum or in the histological diagnosis of tumors between AFB{sub 1} and PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} groups (P > 0.05). In vitro incubation with mouse liver catalase (CAT) resulted in conversion of [{sup 3}H]AFB{sub 1} into a DNA-binding species, a possible explanation for the results observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that PEG-CAT is not protective against AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity in mouse lung despite preventing DNA oxidation.

  10. Tumor-associated MUC5AC stimulates in vivo tumorigenicity of human pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Hirotaka; Sawada, Tetsuji; Uchida, Motoyuki; Saito, Hikaru; Iijima, Hiroko; Toda-Agetsuma, Mikako; Wada, Tsutomu; Yamazoe, Sadaaki; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Kimura, Kenjiro; Kakehashi, Anna; Wei, Min; Hirakawa, Kosei; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2011-03-01

    MUC5AC, a high molecular weight glycoprotein, is overexpressed in the ductal region of human pancreatic cancer but is not detectable in the normal pancreas, suggesting its association with disease development. In the present study, we investigated the in vitro and in vivo effects of MUC5AC knockdown by short interfering RNA (siRNA) in the MUC5AC-overexpressing SW1990 and BxPC3 human pancreatic cancer cell lines in order to clarify its function. Significant decreases in the expression levels of MUC5AC mRNA and protein were observed in SW1990 and BxPC3 cells that had been stably transfected with a MUC5AC siRNA expression vector (SW1990/si-MUC5AC and BxPC3/si-MUC5AC cells) compared to those in cells transfected with an si-mock vector (SW1990/si-mock and BxPC3/si-mock cells). In in vitro studies, neither type of MUC5AC-knockdown cell showed any difference in cell survival, proliferation, or morphology from the si-mock cells or parental cells. However, in vivo xenograft studies demonstrated that MUC5AC knockdown significantly reduced the tumorigenicity and suppressed the tumor growth of si-MUC5AC cells compared to those of the si-mock cells. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CD45R/B220+ and Gr-1+ cells had infiltrated into the tumor tissue of the SW1990/si-MUC5AC cells. Furthermore, cancer-associated antigen specific antibodies were detected at high levels in the sera from the SW1990/si-MUC5AC cell-bearing mice. These results suggest that tumor-associated MUC5AC expressed on the surface of pancreatic cancer cells supports the escape of pancreatic cancer cells from immunosurveillance. The present findings highlight a new dimension of MUC5AC as a functional immunosuppressive agent and its important role in pancreatic cancer progression.

  11. Large holograms in traveling exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christakis, Anne-Marie

    1994-01-01

    The presentation of large holograms in travelling exhibitions has always posed problems, mainly due to lack of space. The Museum of Holography was consequently required to develop, with Jean-Francois Moreau, display consoles which are light, affordable and completely detachable. In a permanent exposition at the Forum des Halles in Paris, the Museum displays a room with 22 holograms, each measuring 1 m X 1 m, in a structure designed by the architect Fabien Vienne. The different systems used by the Museum are presented here.

  12. Thermoelectric device exhibiting decreased stress

    SciTech Connect

    Heath, D.L.; Chou, D.J.

    1985-02-05

    A thermoelectric device exhibiting both structural integrity and decreased stress across the device notwithstanding the application of thermally cycled temperature differentials thereacross includes, electrically interconnected thermoelectric elements and a rigidly affixed substrate. Thermal stress is relieved by using flexible conductors to interconnect the thermoelectric elements, and by the use of a flexile joint to attach a second substrate to the remainder of the device. Complete elimination of the second substrate may also be used to eliminate stress. Presence of the rigidly affixed substrate gives the device sufficient structural integrity to enable it to withstand rugged conditions.

  13. Collaborative virtual environments art exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinsky, Margaret; Anstey, Josephine; Pape, Dave E.; Aguilera, Julieta C.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Tsoupikova, Daria

    2005-03-01

    This panel presentation will exhibit artwork developed in CAVEs and discuss how art methodologies enhance the science of VR through collaboration, interaction and aesthetics. Artists and scientists work alongside one another to expand scientific research and artistic expression and are motivated by exhibiting collaborative virtual environments. Looking towards the arts, such as painting and sculpture, computer graphics captures a visual tradition. Virtual reality expands this tradition to not only what we face, but to what surrounds us and even what responds to our body and its gestures. Art making that once was isolated to the static frame and an optimal point of view is now out and about, in fully immersive mode within CAVEs. Art knowledge is a guide to how the aesthetics of 2D and 3D worlds affect, transform, and influence the social, intellectual and physical condition of the human body through attention to psychology, spiritual thinking, education, and cognition. The psychological interacts with the physical in the virtual in such a way that each facilitates, enhances and extends the other, culminating in a "go together" world. Attention to sharing art experience across high-speed networks introduces a dimension of liveliness and aliveness when we "become virtual" in real time with others.

  14. PR55α subunit of protein phosphatase 2A supports the tumorigenic and metastatic potential of pancreatic cancer cells by sustaining hyperactive oncogenic signaling

    PubMed Central

    Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Sheinin, Yuri M.; Ouellette, Michel M.; Ponnusamy, Moorthy P.; Mumby, Marc C.; Batra, Surinder K.; Yan, Ying

    2016-01-01

    The protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) holoenzyme consists of a catalytic subunit, a scaffold subunit, and a regulatory subunit. Based on loss of function analysis using PP2A catalytic inhibitors or inhibition via tumor viral antigens, limited studies suggest that PP2A is a putative tumor suppressor. However, PP2A has also been shown to facilitate the activation of oncogenic signaling pathways when associated with specific regulatory subunits. In this study, we investigated the possible oncogenic role of PP2A in pancreatic cancer. We found a striking increase in the expression of PR55α (PPP2R2A), a PP2A regulatory subunit, in pancreatic cancer cells compared to normal pancreatic epithelial cells. Consistently, PR55α expression was markedly elevated in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma tissues compared to adjacent normal pancreatic tissues (P<0.0001) and correlated with poor survival of pancreatic cancer patients (P<0.0003). RNAi-mediated depletion of PR55α in pancreatic cancer cell lines resulted in diminished phosphorylation of both AKT and ERK1/2 (MAPK3/1) and decreased protein levels of β-catenin (CTNNB1). Accordingly, pancreatic cancer cells with reduced PR55α expression exhibited significantly impaired properties of transformation, including attenuated cell growth, clonogenicity, mobility, and anchorage-independent growth. Moreover, orthotopic implantation of PR55α-depleted pancreatic cancer cells into nude mice resulted in markedly reduced tumorigenicity (P<0.001) and distant metastases. Together, these results suggest that PR55α promotes pancreatic cancer development by sustaining hyperactivity of multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, including AKT, ERK, and Wnt. These studies also provide a basis for exploring PR55α as a diagnostic or therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. PMID:26893480

  15. Complementation of non-tumorigenicity of HPV18-positive cervical carcinoma cells involves differential mRNA expression of cellular genes including potential tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 11q13.

    PubMed

    Kehrmann, Angela; Truong, Ha; Repenning, Antje; Boger, Regina; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Pascheberg, Ulrich; Beckmann, Alf; Opalka, Bertram; Kleine-Lowinski, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The fusion between human tumorigenic cells and normal human diploid fibroblasts results in non-tumorigenic hybrid cells, suggesting a dominant role for tumor suppressor genes in the generated hybrid cells. After long-term cultivation in vitro, tumorigenic segregants may arise. The loss of tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 11q13 has been postulated to be involved in the induction of the tumorigenic phenotype of human papillomavirus (HPV)18-positive cervical carcinoma cells and their derived tumorigenic hybrid cells after subcutaneous injection in immunocompromised mice. The aim of this study was the identification of novel cellular genes that may contribute to the suppression of the tumorigenic phenotype of non-tumorigenic hybrid cells in vivo. We used cDNA microarray technology to identify differentially expressed cellular genes in tumorigenic HPV18-positive hybrid and parental HeLa cells compared to non-tumorigenic HPV18-positive hybrid cells. We detected several as yet unknown cellular genes that play a role in cell differentiation, cell cycle progression, cell-cell communication, metastasis formation, angiogenesis, antigen presentation, and immune response. Apart from the known differentially expressed genes on 11q13 (e.g., phosphofurin acidic cluster sorting protein 1 (PACS1) and FOS ligand 1 (FOSL1 or Fra-1)), we detected novel differentially expressed cellular genes located within the tumor suppressor gene region (e.g., EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 2 (EFEMP2) and leucine rich repeat containing 32 (LRRC32) (also known as glycoprotein-A repetitions predominant (GARP)) that may have potential tumor suppressor functions in this model system of non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic HeLa x fibroblast hybrid cells.

  16. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Xenotransplantation elicits salient tumorigenicity of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells via aberrant AKT activation.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Takanashi, Tomoka; Nasu, Kentaro; Tamai, Keiichi; Mochizuki, Mai; Satoh, Ikuro; Ine, Shoji; Sasaki, Osamu; Satoh, Kennichi; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Sugamura, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    The transplantation of human cancer cells into immunodeficient NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc(null) (NOG) mice often causes highly malignant cell populations like cancer stem cells to emerge. Here, by serial transplantation in NOG mice, we established two highly tumorigenic adult T-cell leukemia-derived cell lines, ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8. When transplanted s.c., these cells formed tumors significantly earlier and from fewer initial cells than their parental lines ST1 and TL-Om1. We found that protein kinase B (AKT) signaling was upregulated in ST1-N6 and TL-Om1-N8 cells, and that this upregulation was due to the decreased expression of a negative regulator, INPP5D. Furthermore, the introduction of a constitutively active AKT mutant expression vector into ST1 cells augmented the tumorigenicity of the cells, whereas treatment with the AKT inhibitor MK-2206 attenuated the progression of tumors induced by ST1-N6 cells. Collectively, our results reveal that the AKT signaling pathway plays a critical role in the malignancy of adult T-cell leukemia-derived cells.

  18. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 promotes gastric cancer tumorigenicity and metastasis by regulating vasculogenic mimicry and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Wu, Zhenzhen; Yuan, Jia; Sun, Li; Lin, Li; Huang, Na; Bin, Jianping; Liao, Yulin; Liao, Wangjun

    2017-06-01

    MALAT1 is an oncogenic long non-coding RNA that has been found to promote the proliferation of many malignant cell types and non-malignant human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). However, the functions of MALAT1 in vasculogenic mimicry (VM) and angiogenesis and the potential mechanisms responsible have not yet been investigated in any malignancy. Here, in situ hybridization and CD31/periodic acid-Schiff double staining of 150 gastric cancer (GC) clinical specimens revealed that MALAT1 expression was tightly associated with densities of VM and endothelial vessels. MALAT1 knockdown markedly reduced GC cell migration, invasion, tumorigenicity, metastasis, and VM, while restricting HUVEC angiogenesis and increasing vascular permeability. Moreover, MALAT1 was found to regulate expression of VE-cadherin, β-catenin, MMPs 2 and 9, MT1-MMP, p-ERK, p-FAK, and p-paxillin, which have been established as classical markers of VM and angiogenesis and components of associated signaling pathways. Consistent with this, the p-ERK inhibitors U0126 and PD98059 both effectively blocked GC cell VM. In conclusion, MALAT1 can promote tumorigenicity and metastasis in GC by facilitating VM and angiogenesis via the VE-cadherin/β-catenin complex and ERK/MMP and FAK/paxillin signaling pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Expression and regulation of COP1 in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells for promotion of cell proliferation and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chunling; Gong, Yanqing; Shi, Xuanxuan; Shi, Hengliang; Wan, Yan; Wu, Qingyun; Xu, Kailin

    2016-03-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is the most common leukemia in Western countries, and mainly originates from an accumulation of abnormal B cells caused by the dysregulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. The aberration of proliferation-related gene in CLL cells induces cell arrest at G0/G1 phase, or a small section shows rapid cell growth, which further complicates the pathogenesis of CLL. The constitutively photomorphogenic 1 (COP1), as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, is involved in many biological processes in mammalian cells, but its role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) progression remains unclear. In the present study, we analyzed the expression of COP1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 23 CLL patients and 3 healthy donors. The observed upregulated expression of COP1 in CLL patients was positively correlated with CLL clinical stage and ZAP-70 expression, but not del(13q14) and del(17q-). Overexpression of COP1 significantly promoted cell colony formation and proliferation, especially contributing to the accumulation of cells in S-phase by inhibition of FoxO1 and p21. Moreover, overexpression of COP1 accelerated tumorigenicity of HG3 cells and promoted xenograft growth. Therefore, the present study revealed that COP1 plays an important role in CLL cell proliferation and tumorigenicity, and may be a useful indicator of the chronic lymphocytic leukemia processes.

  20. Aberrant over-expression of COX-1 intersects multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Fadare, Oluwole; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Son, Deok-Soo; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Shilin; Saskowski, Jeanette; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Daniel, Cristina; Crews, Brenda; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Crispens, Marta A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Khabele, Dineo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is implicated in ovarian cancer. However, patterns of COX expression and function have been unclear and controversial. In this report, patterns of COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression were obtained from RNA-seq data through The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our analysis revealed markedly higher COX-1 mRNA expression than COX-2 in high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) and higher COX-1 expression in HGSOC tumors than 10 other tumor types. High expression of COX-1 in HGSOC tumors was confirmed in an independent tissue microarray. In contrast, lower or similar expression of COX-1 compared to COX-2 was observed in endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell tumors. Stable COX-1 knockdown in HGSOC-representative OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells reduced gene expression in multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways. Functional cell viability, clonogenicity, and migration/invasion assays were consistent with transcriptomic changes. These effects were reversed by stable over-expression of COX-1 in SKOV-3 cells. Our results demonstrate a distinct pattern of COX-1 over-expression in HGSOC tumors and strong association of COX-1 with multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in ovarian cancer cells. These findings provide additional insight into the role of COX-1 in human ovarian cancer and support further development of methods to selectively target COX-1 in the management of HGSOC tumors. PMID:25972361

  1. Expression of murine interleukin 7 in a murine glioma cell line results in reduced tumorigenicity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, T; Tashiro, K; Miyatake, S; Kinashi, T; Nakano, T; Oda, Y; Kikuchi, H; Honjo, T

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the immunoregulatory effect of local and continuous secretion of interleukin 7 (IL-7) from murine glioma cells (203-glioma) engineered by murine IL-7 gene transfection. Secretion of IL-7 from glioma cells did not result in morphology or growth rate changes but did reduce tumorigenicity in vivo in proportion to the amount of IL-7 produced. This reduction in tumorigenicity could be reversed in a dose-dependent fashion by injection of anti-IL-7 neutralizing monoclonal antibody at the tumor site. Mice immunized with IL-7-producing glioma cells showed a specific immune response to 203-glioma but not to two other syngeneic cell lines (B-16, a melanoma, and YM-12, a fibrosarcoma). IL-7-producing glioma cells were not rejected in mice depleted of CD8+ cells but were rejected in mice depleted of CD4+ or NK1.1+ cells. These results suggest that CD8+ T cells may play an important role in tumor rejection. Images PMID:1570303

  2. Preliminary whole-exome sequencing reveals mutations that imply common tumorigenicity pathways in multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 patients

    PubMed Central

    Arenas, Minerva Angélica Romero; Fowler, Richard G.; Lucas, F. Anthony San; Shen, Jie; Rich, Thereasa A.; Grubbs, Elizabeth G.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Scheet, Paul; Perrier, Nancy D.; Zhao, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Background Whole-exome sequencing studies have not established definitive somatic mutation patterns among patients with sporadic hyperparathyroidism (HPT). No sequencing has evaluated multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1)-related HPT. We sought to perform whole-exome sequencing in HPT patients to identify somatic mutations and associated biological pathways and tumorigenic networks. Methods Whole-exome sequencing was performed on blood and tissue from HPT patients (MEN1 and sporadic) and somatic single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were identified. Stop-gain and stop-loss SNVs were analyzed with Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA). Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) was also assessed. Results Sequencing was performed on 4 MEN1 and 10 sporadic cases. Eighteen stop-gain/stop-loss SNV mutations were identified in 3 MEN1 patients. One complex network was identified on IPA: Cellular function and maintenance, tumor morphology, and cardiovascular disease (IPA score = 49). A nonsynonymous SNV of TP53 (lysine-to-glutamic acid change at codon 81) identified in a MEN1 patient was suggested to be a driver mutation (Cancer-specific High-throughput Annotation of Somatic Mutations; P = .002). All MEN1 and 3/10 sporadic specimens demonstrated LOH of chromosome 11. Conclusion Whole-exome sequencing revealed somatic mutations in MEN1 associated with a single tumorigenic network, whereas sporadic pathogenesis seemed to be more diverse. A somatic TP53 mutation was also identified. LOH of chromosome 11 was seen in all MEN1 and 3 of 10 sporadic patients. PMID:25456907

  3. Aberrant over-expression of COX-1 intersects multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in high-grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Andrew J; Fadare, Oluwole; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Son, Deok-Soo; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Shilin; Saskowski, Jeanette; Uddin, Md Jashim; Daniel, Cristina; Crews, Brenda; Lehmann, Brian D; Pietenpol, Jennifer A; Crispens, Marta A; Marnett, Lawrence J; Khabele, Dineo

    2015-08-28

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is implicated in ovarian cancer. However, patterns of COX expression and function have been unclear and controversial. In this report, patterns of COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression were obtained from RNA-seq data through The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our analysis revealed markedly higher COX-1 mRNA expression than COX-2 in high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) and higher COX-1 expression in HGSOC tumors than 10 other tumor types. High expression of COX-1 in HGSOC tumors was confirmed in an independent tissue microarray. In contrast, lower or similar expression of COX-1 compared to COX-2 was observed in endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell tumors. Stable COX-1 knockdown in HGSOC-representative OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells reduced gene expression in multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways. Functional cell viability, clonogenicity, and migration/invasion assays were consistent with transcriptomic changes. These effects were reversed by stable over-expression of COX-1 in SKOV-3 cells. Our results demonstrate a distinct pattern of COX-1 over-expression in HGSOC tumors and strong association of COX-1 with multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in ovarian cancer cells. These findings provide additional insight into the role of COX-1 in human ovarian cancer and support further development of methods to selectively target COX-1 in the management of HGSOC tumors.

  4. Nucleolin-binding by ErbB2 enhances tumorigenicity of ErbB2-positive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wolfson, Eya; Goldenberg, Maria; Solomon, Shira; Frishberg, Amit; Pinkas-Kramarski, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    ErbB2 is an important member of the ErbB family, which activates growth and proliferation signaling pathways. ErbB2 is often overexpressed in various malignancies, especially in breast cancer, and is a common target for anti-cancer drugs. Breast cancer is currently one of the leading mortality causes in women, and acquired resistance to ErbB2-targeted therapies is a major obstacle in its treatment. Thus, understanding ErbB2-mediated signaling is crucial for further development of anti-cancer therapeutics and disease treatment. Previously, we have reported that the ErbB receptors interact with the major nucleolar protein nucleolin. In addition to its function in the nucleoli of cells, nucleolin participates in various cellular processes at the cytoplasm and cell-surface. Deregulated nucleolin is frequently overexpressed on the membrane of cancer cells. Here, we show that nucleolin increases colony formation and anchorage-independent growth of ErbB2-overexpressing cells. Importantly, this enhanced tumorigenicity also occurs in human ErbB2-positive breast cancer patients; namely, nucleolin overexpression in these patients is associated with reduced patient survival rates and increased disease-risk. ErbB2-nucleolin complexes are formed endogenously in both normal and cancer cells, and their effect on tumorigenicity is mediated through activation of ErbB2 signaling. Accordingly, nucleolin inhibition reduces cell viability and ErbB2 activation in ErbB2-positive cancer cells. PMID:27542246

  5. The effects and mechanisms of SLC34A2 on tumorigenicity in human non-small cell lung cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhanxin; Hao, Yanhong; Ding, Xiaoquan; Zhang, Zhibin; Liu, Peng; Wei, Xueqiang; Xi, Junfeng

    2016-08-01

    A novel paradigm in tumor biology suggests that non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth is driven by lung cancer stem cell-like cells (LCSCs), but molecular mechanisms regulating tumorigenic and self-renewal potential of LCSCs are still unclear. Here, we aim to investigate biological function of SLC34A2 in regulating tumorigenicity of LCSCs and its underlying mechanisms. Our findings testified that CD166(+) cells which were derived from fresh primary NSCLC samples displayed stem cell-like features. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis showed the presence of a variable fraction of CD166 cells in 15 out of 15 NSCLC samples. Significantly, CD166(+) LCSCs from primary NSCLC tumors expressed high level of SLC34A2 which was required for CD166(+) LCSCs tumorigenic and self-renewal potential. In NSCLC patient cohort, increased SLC34A2 expression correlated with histology, which suggests a potential role of SLC34A2 in CD166(+) LCSCs. Furthermore, Wnt/β-catenin pathway and Bmi1 were found necessary for tumorigenicity and self-renewal capacity of CD166(+) LCSCs by a series in vitro and in vivo experiments. Then, our study indicated that SLC34A2 regulated Bmi1 to promote tumorigenic and self-renewal potential of CD166(+) LCSCs through Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In this study, the characterization of molecular basis of SLC34A2 in CD166(+) LCSCs not only allows for better understanding of the mechanisms regulating tumorigenicity of this specific population of NSCLC cells but also provides insight into the gradual improvement of more effective cancer therapies against this disease.

  6. A Tetrameric Peptide Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibits Specific Cytotoxic Effects against Oral Squamous-Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Solarte, Víctor A; Rosas, Jaiver E; Rivera, Zuly J; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L; García, Javier E; Vernot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Several short linear peptides derived from cyclic bovine lactoferricin were synthesized and tested for their cytotoxic effect against the oral cavity squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines CAL27 and SCC15. As a control, an immortalized and nontumorigenic cell line, Het-1A, was used. Linear peptides based on the RRWQWR core sequence showed a moderate cytotoxic effect and specificity towards tumorigenic cells. A tetrameric peptide, LfcinB(20-25)4, containing the RRWQWR motif, exhibited greater cytotoxic activity (>90%) in both OSCC cell lines compared to the linear lactoferricin peptide or the lactoferrin protein. Additionally, this tetrameric peptide showed the highest specificity towards tumorigenic cells among the tested peptides. Interestingly, this effect was very fast, with cell shrinkage, severe damage to cell membrane permeability, and lysis within one hour of treatment. Our results are consistent with a necrotic effect rather than an apoptotic one and suggest that this tetrameric peptide could be considered as a new candidate for the therapeutic treatment of OSCC.

  7. A Tetrameric Peptide Derived from Bovine Lactoferricin Exhibits Specific Cytotoxic Effects against Oral Squamous-Cell Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Solarte, Víctor A.; Rosas, Jaiver E.; Rivera, Zuly J.; Arango-Rodríguez, Martha L.; García, Javier E.; Vernot, Jean-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Several short linear peptides derived from cyclic bovine lactoferricin were synthesized and tested for their cytotoxic effect against the oral cavity squamous-cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines CAL27 and SCC15. As a control, an immortalized and nontumorigenic cell line, Het-1A, was used. Linear peptides based on the RRWQWR core sequence showed a moderate cytotoxic effect and specificity towards tumorigenic cells. A tetrameric peptide, LfcinB(20–25)4, containing the RRWQWR motif, exhibited greater cytotoxic activity (>90%) in both OSCC cell lines compared to the linear lactoferricin peptide or the lactoferrin protein. Additionally, this tetrameric peptide showed the highest specificity towards tumorigenic cells among the tested peptides. Interestingly, this effect was very fast, with cell shrinkage, severe damage to cell membrane permeability, and lysis within one hour of treatment. Our results are consistent with a necrotic effect rather than an apoptotic one and suggest that this tetrameric peptide could be considered as a new candidate for the therapeutic treatment of OSCC. PMID:26609531

  8. Using gene expression profiling to evaluate cellular responses in mouse lungs exposed to V2O5 and a group of other mouse lung tumorigens and non-tumorigens.

    PubMed

    Black, Michael B; Dodd, Darol E; McMullen, Patrick D; Pendse, Salil; MacGregor, Judith A; Gollapudi, B Bhaskar; Andersen, Melvin E

    2015-10-01

    Many compounds test positive for lung tumors in two-year NTP carcinogenicity bioassays in B6C3F1 mice. V2O5 was identified as a lung carcinogen in this assay, leading to its IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) classification as group 2b or a "possible" human carcinogen. To assess potential tumorigenic mode of action of V2O5, we compared gene expression and gene ontology enrichment in lung tissue of female B6C3F1 mice exposed for 13 weeks to a V2O5 particulate aerosol at a tumorigenic level (2.0 mg/m(3)). Relative to 12 other compounds also tested for carcinogenicity in 2-year bioassays in mice, there were 1026 differentially expressed genes with V2O5, of which 483 were unique to V2O5. Ontology analysis of the 1026 V2O5 differentially expressed genes showed enrichment for hyaluronan and sphingolipid metabolism, adenylate cyclase functions, c-AMP signaling and PKA activation/signaling. Enrichment of lipids/lipoprotein metabolism and inflammatory pathways were consistent with previously reported clinical findings. Enrichment of c-AMP and PKA signaling pathways may arise due to inhibition of phosphatases, a known biological action of vanadate. We saw no enrichment for DNA-damage, oxidative stress, cell cycle, or apoptosis pathway signaling in mouse lungs exposed to V2O5 which is in contrast with past studies evaluating in vivo gene expression in target tissues of other carcinogens (arsenic, formaldehyde, naphthalene and chloroprene). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Benzo[b]fluoranthene: tumorigenicity in strain A/J mouse lungs, DNA adducts and mutations in the Ki-ras oncogene.

    PubMed

    Mass, M J; Abu-Shakra, A; Roop, B C; Nelson, G; Galati, A J; Stoner, G D; Nesnow, S; Ross, J A

    1996-08-01

    The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F) is a pervasive constituent of environmental combustion products. We sought to examine the lung tumorigenic activity of B[b]F in strain A/J mice, to study the relationship between formation and decay of B[b]F-DNA adducts and to examine mutations in the Ki-ras proto-oncogene in DNA from B[b]F-induced tumors. Mice were given i.p. injections of 0, 10, 50, 100 or 200 mg/kg body wt and lung adenomas were scored after 8 months. B[b]F induced significant numbers of mouse lung adenomas in a dose-related fashion, with the highest dose (200 mg/kg) yielding 6.95 adenomas/ mouse, with 100% of the mice exhibiting an adenoma. In mice given tricaprylin, the vehicle control, there were 0.60 adenomas/mouse, with 55% of the mice exhibiting an adenoma. Based on dose, B[b]F was less active than benzo[a]pyrene. DNA adducts were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by 32P-post-labeling in lungs of strain A/J mice 1, 3, 5, 7, 14 and 21 days after i.p. injection. Maximal levels of adduction occurred 5 days after treatment with the 200 mg/kg dose group, producing 1230 amol B[b]F-DNA adducts/microgram DNA. The major B[b]F-DNA adduct was identified by co-chromatography as trans-9, 10-dihydroxy-anti-11, 12-epoxy-5-hydroxy-9, 10, 11, 12-tetra-hydro-B[b]F-deoxyguanosine. Approximately 86% of the tumors had a mutation in codon 12 of the Ki-ras oncogene, as determined by direct DNA sequencing of PCR-amplified exon 1 and single-stranded conformation polymorphism analysis. Analysis of the Ki-ras mutation spectrum in 25 of 29 B[b]F-induced tumors revealed the predominant mutation to be a G-->T transversion in the first or second base of codon 12, congruous with the DNA adduct data. Our data are consistent with previous reports in mouse skin implicating a phenolic diol epoxide as the proximate carcinogenic form of B[b]F that binds to guanine.

  10. Expression of the MyoD1 muscle determination gene defines differentiation capability but not tumorigenicity of human rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hiti, A L; Bogenmann, E; Gonzales, F; Jones, P A

    1989-01-01

    Several human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, cultured primary tumor explants, and biopsies of tumor and normal skeletal muscle tissue expressed a 2.0-kilobase transcript that hybridized to the mouse muscle determination gene MyoD1. This transcript was found in tumor cell lines and primary explants that developed multinucleated myotubes but was absent in Wilms' tumors or cell lines and primary explants that developed multinucleated myotubes but was absent in Wilms' tumors or cell lines derived from other mesenchymal tumor cell types. Expression of the human homolog of MyoD1 therefore can define a tumor as a rhabdomyosarcoma. Transfection of the mouse MyoD1 gene into the human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line RD increased the ability of the tumor cells to differentiate into multinucleated myotubes and enhanced myosin heavy-chain gene expression but did not decrease tumorigenicity in nude mice. Images PMID:2601695

  11. Specific cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region of Ras increase tumorigenicity by nanocluster augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Šolman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Blaževitš, Olga; Jaiswal, Alok; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Lectez, Benoit; Kopra, Kari; Guzmán, Camilo; Härmä, Harri; Hancock, John F; Aittokallio, Tero; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hotspot mutations of Ras drive cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Less frequent mutations in Ras are poorly characterized for their oncogenic potential. Yet insight into their mechanism of action may point to novel opportunities to target Ras. Here, we show that several cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region moderately increase Ras activity in all isoforms. Mutants are biochemically inconspicuous, while their clustering into nanoscale signaling complexes on the plasma membrane, termed nanocluster, is augmented. Nanoclustering dictates downstream effector recruitment, MAPK-activity, and tumorigenic cell proliferation. Our results describe an unprecedented mechanism of signaling protein activation in cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08905.001 PMID:26274561

  12. Introduction of a normal human chromosome 11 into a Wilm's tumor cell line controls its tumorigenic expression

    SciTech Connect

    Weissman, B.E.; Saxon, P.J.; Pasquale, S.R.; Jones, G.R.; Geiser, A.G.; Stanbridge, E.J.

    1987-04-10

    The development of Wilm's tumor, a pediatric nephroblastoma, has been associated with a deletion in the p13 region of chromosome 11. The structure and function or functions of this deleted genetic material are unknown. The role of this deletion in the process of malignant transformation was investigated by introducing a normal human chromosome 11 into a Wilms' tumor cell line by means of the microcell transfer technique. These variant cells, derived by microcell hybridization, expressed similar transformed traits in culture as the parental cell line. Furthermore, expression of several proto-oncogenes by the parental cells was unaffected by the introduction of this chromosome. However, the ability of these cells to form tumors in nude mice was completely suppressed. Transfer of other chromosomes, namely X and 13, had no effect on the tumorigenicity of the Wilms' tumor cells. These studies provide support for the existence of genetic information on chromosome 11 which can control the malignant expression of Wilm's tumor cells.

  13. Chronic toxicity and tumorigenicity study of aluminum potassium sulfate in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Oneda, S; Takasaki, T; Kuriwaki, K; Ohi, Y; Umekita, Y; Hatanaka, S; Fujiyoshi, T; Yoshida, A; Yoshida, H

    1994-01-01

    The tumorigenic potential of aluminum potassium sulfate [A1K (SO4)2 12H2O, APS], a compound which exists widely in the environment, was investigated in B6C3F1 mice. APS was administered in the diet for 20 months at dose levels of 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0% (w/w). One group receiving the basal diet served as the control. Body weight gain in both sexes was decreased in the 10.0% APS treated group, and increased in the 1.0 and 2.5% APS treated groups. The survival rates at the end of the dosing period were 73.3% (male) and 78.3% (female) in the control group, and 86.7-95.0% (male) and 86.7-91.7% (female) in the APS treated groups. The survival rate showed a tendency to increase in both sexes in all the APS treated groups. In the tumor pathology, the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma was significantly decreased in the males in the 10% APS treated group. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma was significantly decreased in females in all groups including the control group. As regards the nontumorous pathology, the incidence of myocardial eosinophilic cytoplasm showed a significant dose-dependent decrease in males in the APS treated groups. A comparison between the sexes revealed a significant decrease in the incidence of hepatocytic anisonucleosis, myocardial eosinophilic cytoplasm and acinar cell vacuolation of the submandibular gland in the females; and lymphocyte infiltration in renal cortex and pelvis, and vacuolation of cerebellar white matter were noted in the males. The results of the present study indicate that long-term administration of APS does not exert tumorigenic or any other toxic actions in B6C3F1 mice.

  14. Fatty acid synthase inhibitors induce apoptosis in non-tumorigenic melan-a cells associated with inhibition of mitochondrial respiration.

    PubMed

    Rossato, Franco A; Zecchin, Karina G; La Guardia, Paolo G; Ortega, Rose M; Alberici, Luciane C; Costa, Rute A P; Catharino, Rodrigo R; Graner, Edgard; Castilho, Roger F; Vercesi, Aníbal E

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FASN) is responsible for the endogenous synthesis of palmitate, a saturated long-chain fatty acid. In contrast to most normal tissues, a variety of human cancers overexpress FASN. One such cancer is cutaneous melanoma, in which the level of FASN expression is associated with tumor invasion and poor prognosis. We previously reported that two FASN inhibitors, cerulenin and orlistat, induce apoptosis in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of these inhibitors on non-tumorigenic melan-a cells. Cerulenin and orlistat treatments were found to induce apoptosis and decrease cell proliferation, in addition to inducing the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and activating caspases-9 and -3. Transfection with FASN siRNA did not result in apoptosis. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that treatment with the FASN inhibitors did not alter either the mitochondrial free fatty acid content or composition. This result suggests that cerulenin- and orlistat-induced apoptosis events are independent of FASN inhibition. Analysis of the energy-linked functions of melan-a mitochondria demonstrated the inhibition of respiration, followed by a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and the stimulation of superoxide anion generation. The inhibition of NADH-linked substrate oxidation was approximately 40% and 61% for cerulenin and orlistat treatments, respectively, and the inhibition of succinate oxidation was approximately 46% and 52%, respectively. In contrast, no significant inhibition occurred when respiration was supported by the complex IV substrate N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD). The protection conferred by the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine indicates that the FASN inhibitors induced apoptosis through an oxidative stress-associated mechanism. In combination, the present results demonstrate that cerulenin and orlistat induce

  15. Fatty Acid Synthase Inhibitors Induce Apoptosis in Non-Tumorigenic Melan-A Cells Associated with Inhibition of Mitochondrial Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Rossato, Franco A.; Zecchin, Karina G.; La Guardia, Paolo G.; Ortega, Rose M.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Costa, Rute A. P.; Catharino, Rodrigo R.; Graner, Edgard; Castilho, Roger F.; Vercesi, Aníbal E.

    2014-01-01

    The metabolic enzyme fatty acid synthase (FASN) is responsible for the endogenous synthesis of palmitate, a saturated long-chain fatty acid. In contrast to most normal tissues, a variety of human cancers overexpress FASN. One such cancer is cutaneous melanoma, in which the level of FASN expression is associated with tumor invasion and poor prognosis. We previously reported that two FASN inhibitors, cerulenin and orlistat, induce apoptosis in B16-F10 mouse melanoma cells via the intrinsic apoptosis pathway. Here, we investigated the effects of these inhibitors on non-tumorigenic melan-a cells. Cerulenin and orlistat treatments were found to induce apoptosis and decrease cell proliferation, in addition to inducing the release of mitochondrial cytochrome c and activating caspases-9 and -3. Transfection with FASN siRNA did not result in apoptosis. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrated that treatment with the FASN inhibitors did not alter either the mitochondrial free fatty acid content or composition. This result suggests that cerulenin- and orlistat-induced apoptosis events are independent of FASN inhibition. Analysis of the energy-linked functions of melan-a mitochondria demonstrated the inhibition of respiration, followed by a significant decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and the stimulation of superoxide anion generation. The inhibition of NADH-linked substrate oxidation was approximately 40% and 61% for cerulenin and orlistat treatments, respectively, and the inhibition of succinate oxidation was approximately 46% and 52%, respectively. In contrast, no significant inhibition occurred when respiration was supported by the complex IV substrate N,N,N′,N′-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine (TMPD). The protection conferred by the free radical scavenger N-acetyl-cysteine indicates that the FASN inhibitors induced apoptosis through an oxidative stress-associated mechanism. In combination, the present results demonstrate that cerulenin and orlistat

  16. The Transmembrane Domain of CEACAM1-4S Is a Determinant of Anchorage Independent Growth and Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, Erica L.; Mills, David R.; Brilliant, Kate E.; Hixson, Douglas C.

    2012-01-01

    CEACAM1 is a multifunctional Ig-like cell adhesion molecule expressed by epithelial cells in many organs. CEACAM1-4L and CEACAM1-4S, two isoforms produced by differential splicing, are predominant in rat liver. Previous work has shown that downregulation of both isoforms occurs in rat hepatocellular carcinomas. Here, we have isolated an anchorage dependent clone, designated 253T-NT that does not express detectable levels of CEACAM1. Stable transfection of 253-NT cells with a wild type CEACAM1-4S expression vector induced an anchorage independent growth in vitro and a tumorigenic phenotype in vivo. These phenotypes were used as quantifiable end points to examine the functionality of the CEACAM1-4S transmembrane domain. Examination of the CEACAM1 transmembrane domain showed N-terminal GXXXG dimerization sequences and C-terminal tyrosine residues shown in related studies to stabilize transmembrane domain helix-helix interactions. To examine the effects of transmembrane domain mutations, 253-NT cells were transfected with transmembrane domain mutants carrying glycine to leucine or tyrosine to valine substitutions. Results showed that mutation of transmembrane tyrosine residues greatly enhanced growth in vitro and in vivo. Mutation of transmembrane dimerization motifs, in contrast, significantly reduced anchorage independent growth and tumorigenicity. 253-NT cells expressing CEACAM1-4S with both glycine to leucine and tyrosine to valine mutations displayed the growth-enhanced phenotype of tyrosine mutants. The dramatic effect of transmembrane domain mutations constitutes strong evidence that the transmembrane domain is an important determinant of CEACAM1-4S functionality and most likely by other proteins with transmembrane domains containing dimerization sequences and/or C-terminal tyrosine residues. PMID:22235309

  17. Role of diaxial versus diequatorial hydroxyl groups in the tumorigenic activity of a benzo[a]pyrene bay-region diol epoxide.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, R L; Wood, A W; Conney, A H; Yagi, H; Sayer, J M; Thakker, D R; Jerina, D M; Levin, W

    1987-01-01

    Tumorigenic activities of the (7R,8S,9S,10R)-7,8-dihydroxy-9,10-epoxy-7,8,9,10-tetrahydro derivatives of benzo[a]pyrene [(+)-B[a]P diol epoxide-2] and 6-fluorobenzo[a]pyrene (6-FB[a]P diol epoxide-2) were evaluated in newborn CD-1 mice. A total dose of 14 nmol of either diol epoxide was administered to preweanling mice, and tumorigenic activity was determined when the mice were 32 to 36 weeks old. At the termination of the study, 13% of solvent-treated control mice had developed lung tumors with an average of 0.19 tumor per mouse. No other tumors were observed in control animals. (+)-B[a]P diol epoxide-2 induced pulmonary tumors in 60% of the mice with an average of 1.9 tumors per mouse, and 14% of the male mice developed hepatic tumors with an average of 0.18 tumor per mouse. In contrast, 6-FB[a]P diol epoxide-2 had no significant tumorigenic activity at the 14-nmol dose. Although both bay-region diol epoxides have the same absolute configuration, (7R,8S,9S,10R), the hydroxyl groups of (+)-B[a]P diol epoxide-2 prefer the pseudoequatorial conformation whereas the hydroxyl groups of 6-FB[a]P diol epoxide-2 prefer the pseudoaxial conformation. The tumorigenicity results reported here are the first direct demonstration that conformation of the hydroxyl groups in a bay-region diol epoxide, in addition to the documented effect of absolute configuration, is an important determinant in the tumorigenic activity of these ultimate carcinogens. PMID:3479808

  18. Exhibits Enhanced by Stand-Alone Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rennes, Eve C.

    Both the development and evaluation of one of a set of computer programs designed for use by visitors as adjuncts to museum exhibits are described. Museum displays used were (1) a static, behind-glass exhibit on evolution; (2) a hands-on primitive stone age tools exhibit; and (3) a Foucault pendulum. A computer placed next to each exhibit served…

  19. Exhibits Enhanced by Stand-Alone Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rennes, Eve C.

    Both the development and evaluation of one of a set of computer programs designed for use by visitors as adjuncts to museum exhibits are described. Museum displays used were (1) a static, behind-glass exhibit on evolution; (2) a hands-on primitive stone age tools exhibit; and (3) a Foucault pendulum. A computer placed next to each exhibit served…

  20. Tumorigenic effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals are alleviated by licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root extract through suppression of AhR expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiao Ting; de la Cruz, Joseph; Hwang, Seong Gu; Hong, Heeok

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been reported to interfere with estrogen signaling. Exposure to these chemicals decreases the immune response and causes a wide range of diseases in animals and humans. Recently, many studies showed that licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root extract (LRE) commonly called "gamcho" in Korea exhibits antioxidative, chemoprotective, and detoxifying properties. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of action of LRE and to determine if and how LRE can alleviate the toxicity of EDCs. LRE was prepared by vacuum evaporation and freeze-drying after homogenization of licorice root powder that was soaked in 80% ethanol for 72 h. We used 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as a representative EDC, which is known to induce tumors or cancers; MCF-7 breast cancer cells, used as a tumor model, were treated with TCDD and various concentrations of LRE (0, 50, 100, 200, 400 μg/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 h. As a result, TCDD stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation, but LRE significantly inhibited TCDD-induced MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The expression of TCDD toxicity-related genes, i.e., aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), AhR nuclear translocator, and cytochrome P450 1A1, was also down-regulated by LRE in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of cell cycle distribution after treatment of MCF-7 cells with TCDD showed that LRE inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells via G2/M phase arrest. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis also revealed that LRE dose-dependently increased the expression of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and p27 and down-regulated the expression of cell cycle-related genes. These data suggest that LRE can mitigate the tumorigenic effects of TCDD in breast cancer cells by suppression of AhR expression and cell cycle arrest. Thus, LRE can be used as a potential toxicity-alleviating agent against EDC-mediated diseases.

  1. Genetic disruption of PPARδ decreases the tumorigenicity of human colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ben Ho; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    2001-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear hormone receptors that have been implicated in a variety of biologic processes. The PPARδ isotype was recently proposed as a downstream target of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/β-catenin pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis. To evaluate its role in tumorigenesis, a PPARδ null cell line was created by targeted homologous recombination. When inoculated as xenografts in nude mice, PPARδ −/− cells exhibited a decreased ability to form tumors compared with PPARδ +/− and wild-type controls. These data suggest that suppression of PPARδ expression contributes to the growth-inhibitory effects of the APC tumor suppressor. PMID:11226285

  2. Systematically experimental investigation on carcinogenesis or tumorigenicity of VERO cell lines of different karyotypes in nude mice in vivo used for viral vaccine manufacture.

    PubMed

    Zhang, De-Li; Ji, Liang; Li, Liu-Jin; Huang, Gao-Sheng

    2004-07-01

    Many cell lines used for vaccine production have a potentially strong tumorigenic character. Some of those routinely used need to be checked at different passage numbers for this characteristic. Using HeLa cell cultures as positive controls, and primary canine kidney cell (CKC) or feline kidney cell (FKC) cultures purified in vitro on passage three as negative controls, the tumorigenicity of VERO cell sublines was tested in 219 nude mice. The master cell stocks (MCS) and working cell banks (WCB) of eight strains of VERO African green monkey kidney cell (AGMKC) line used for canine, feline and mink vaccine preparation were established in China. The hypo-tetra-ploid JA or hyper-diploid KA strain of VERO line was highly tumorigenic. These data showed a variable chromosome karyotype of VERO line, and contraindicated the use of JA or KA strain of VERO line for the preparation of attenuated viral vaccines. JA or KA strain of VERO line could be a substitute for HeLa line as a positive-control malignant tumor (MT) cell model. The non-carcinogenic YB, JC, M and JB strains of VERO line were therefore selected for the preparation of modified live rabies viral vaccine in place of BHK-21. The cell sub-lines are comparatively stable in terms of their heritable characters, and show little significant changes between passages. In summary, we have found that: 1) the tumorigenicity of cell line is different among different-karyotypic cells; 2) it is the genetic characteristics of chromosomes of cell lines that determines their tumorigenicity, but with species-specific carcinogenicity; 3) the chromosome number variation of cell lines has positive relationship with their carcinogenesis; 4) highly variable strains of tumor cell line can be selected quickly and successfully in nude mice by alternate cultivation in vitro and in vivo. Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) was evolved in nude mice inoculated with violently variable HeLa or VERO cells. The importance of assessing the

  3. Learning by Doing, Creating a Museum Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Sarah; Kallquist, Dierdre

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exhibit called Kid's Kitchen, built within a major exhibit called Biodiversity: Life Supporting Life, in order to discuss environmental prompts hidden within the kitchen designed to surprise students and get them thinking. (ASK)

  4. Learning by Doing, Creating a Museum Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Sarah; Kallquist, Dierdre

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exhibit called Kid's Kitchen, built within a major exhibit called Biodiversity: Life Supporting Life, in order to discuss environmental prompts hidden within the kitchen designed to surprise students and get them thinking. (ASK)

  5. Science Education Through a Museum Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaparian, Azad; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Describes the polywater exhibit at the Worcester Science Center in Massachusetts. Curiosity and interest are stimulated in young people by allowing them to handle the materials in the exhibit and by providing them with instructions for making polywater. (JR)

  6. Science Education Through a Museum Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaparian, Azad; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Describes the polywater exhibit at the Worcester Science Center in Massachusetts. Curiosity and interest are stimulated in young people by allowing them to handle the materials in the exhibit and by providing them with instructions for making polywater. (JR)

  7. SRC-2-mediated coactivation of anti-tumorigenic target genes suppresses MYC-induced liver cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaorong; Comerford, Sarah A.; York, Brian; O’Donnell, Kathryn A.

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the fifth most common solid tumor in the world and the third leading cause of cancer-associated deaths. A Sleeping Beauty-mediated transposon mutagenesis screen previously identified mutations that cooperate with MYC to accelerate liver tumorigenesis. This revealed a tumor suppressor role for Steroid Receptor Coactivator 2/Nuclear Receptor Coactivator 2 (Src-2/Ncoa2) in liver cancer. In contrast, SRC-2 promotes survival and metastasis in prostate cancer cells, suggesting a tissue-specific and context-dependent role for SRC-2 in tumorigenesis. To determine if genetic loss of SRC-2 is sufficient to accelerate MYC-mediated liver tumorigenesis, we bred Src-2-/- mice with a MYC-induced liver tumor model and observed a significant increase in liver tumor burden. RNA sequencing of liver tumors and in vivo chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed a set of direct target genes that are bound by SRC-2 and exhibit downregulated expression in Src-2-/- liver tumors. We demonstrate that activation of SHP (Small Heterodimer Partner), DKK4 (Dickkopf-4), and CADM4 (Cell Adhesion Molecule 4) by SRC-2 suppresses tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo. These studies suggest that SRC-2 may exhibit oncogenic or tumor suppressor activity depending on the target genes and nuclear receptors that are expressed in distinct tissues and illuminate the mechanisms of tumor suppression by SRC-2 in liver. PMID:28273073

  8. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Hearings... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition...

  9. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Hearings... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition...

  10. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Hearings... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a petition...

  11. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... elements or matters contained in the exhibit. (a) Exhibit A—Articles of incorporation and bylaws. If the...

  12. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... elements or matters contained in the exhibit. (a) Exhibit A—Articles of incorporation and bylaws. If the...

  13. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... elements or matters contained in the exhibit. (a) Exhibit A—Articles of incorporation and bylaws. If the...

  14. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... elements or matters contained in the exhibit. (a) Exhibit A—Articles of incorporation and bylaws. If the...

  15. The Nerve Growth Factor Receptor CD271 Is Crucial to Maintain Tumorigenicity and Stem-Like Properties of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Diana; Fichtner, Iduna; Przybilla, Dorothea; Wruck, Wasco; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Lehrach, Hans; Schäfer, Reinhold; Regenbrecht, Christian R. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Large-scale genomic analyses of patient cohorts have revealed extensive heterogeneity between individual tumors, contributing to treatment failure and drug resistance. In malignant melanoma, heterogeneity is thought to arise as a consequence of the differentiation of melanoma-initiating cells that are defined by cell-surface markers like CD271 or CD133. Results Here we confirmed that the nerve growth factor receptor (CD271) is a crucial determinant of tumorigenicity, stem-like properties, heterogeneity and plasticity in melanoma cells. Stable shRNA mediated knock-down of CD271 in patient-derived melanoma cells abrogated their tumor-initiating and colony-forming capacity. A genome-wide expression profiling and gene-set enrichment analysis revealed novel connections of CD271 with melanoma-associated genes like CD133 and points to a neural crest stem cell (NCSC) signature lost upon CD271 knock-down. In a meta-analysis we have determined a shared set of 271 differentially regulated genes, linking CD271 to SOX10, a marker that specifies the neural crest. To dissect the connection of CD271 and CD133 we have analyzed 10 patient-derived melanoma-cell strains for cell-surface expression of both markers compared to established cell lines MeWo and A375. We found CD271+ cells in the majority of cell strains analyzed as well as in a set of 16 different patient-derived melanoma metastases. Strikingly, only 2/12 cell strains harbored a CD133+ sub-set that in addition comprised a fraction of cells of a CD271+/CD133+ phenotype. Those cells were found in the label-retaining fraction and in vitro deduced from CD271+ but not CD271 knock-down cells. Conclusions Our present study provides a deeper insight into the regulation of melanoma cell properties and points CD271 out as a regulator of several melanoma-associated genes. Further, our data strongly suggest that CD271 is a crucial determinant of stem-like properties of melanoma cells like colony-formation and tumorigenicity

  16. The nerve growth factor receptor CD271 is crucial to maintain tumorigenicity and stem-like properties of melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Redmer, Torben; Welte, Yvonne; Behrens, Diana; Fichtner, Iduna; Przybilla, Dorothea; Wruck, Wasco; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Lehrach, Hans; Schäfer, Reinhold; Regenbrecht, Christian R A

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale genomic analyses of patient cohorts have revealed extensive heterogeneity between individual tumors, contributing to treatment failure and drug resistance. In malignant melanoma, heterogeneity is thought to arise as a consequence of the differentiation of melanoma-initiating cells that are defined by cell-surface markers like CD271 or CD133. Here we confirmed that the nerve growth factor receptor (CD271) is a crucial determinant of tumorigenicity, stem-like properties, heterogeneity and plasticity in melanoma cells. Stable shRNA mediated knock-down of CD271 in patient-derived melanoma cells abrogated their tumor-initiating and colony-forming capacity. A genome-wide expression profiling and gene-set enrichment analysis revealed novel connections of CD271 with melanoma-associated genes like CD133 and points to a neural crest stem cell (NCSC) signature lost upon CD271 knock-down. In a meta-analysis we have determined a shared set of 271 differentially regulated genes, linking CD271 to SOX10, a marker that specifies the neural crest. To dissect the connection of CD271 and CD133 we have analyzed 10 patient-derived melanoma-cell strains for cell-surface expression of both markers compared to established cell lines MeWo and A375. We found CD271+ cells in the majority of cell strains analyzed as well as in a set of 16 different patient-derived melanoma metastases. Strikingly, only 2/12 cell strains harbored a CD133+ sub-set that in addition comprised a fraction of cells of a CD271+/CD133+ phenotype. Those cells were found in the label-retaining fraction and in vitro deduced from CD271+ but not CD271 knock-down cells. Our present study provides a deeper insight into the regulation of melanoma cell properties and points CD271 out as a regulator of several melanoma-associated genes. Further, our data strongly suggest that CD271 is a crucial determinant of stem-like properties of melanoma cells like colony-formation and tumorigenicity.

  17. Mitochondrial genome acquisition restores respiratory function and tumorigenic potential of cancer cells without mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Tan, An S; Baty, James W; Dong, Lan-Feng; Bezawork-Geleta, Ayenachew; Endaya, Berwini; Goodwin, Jacob; Bajzikova, Martina; Kovarova, Jaromira; Peterka, Martin; Yan, Bing; Pesdar, Elham Alizadeh; Sobol, Margarita; Filimonenko, Anatolyj; Stuart, Shani; Vondrusova, Magdalena; Kluckova, Katarina; Sachaphibulkij, Karishma; Rohlena, Jakub; Hozak, Pavel; Truksa, Jaroslav; Eccles, David; Haupt, Larisa M; Griffiths, Lyn R; Neuzil, Jiri; Berridge, Michael V

    2015-01-06

    We report that tumor cells without mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) show delayed tumor growth, and that tumor formation is associated with acquisition of mtDNA from host cells. This leads to partial recovery of mitochondrial function in cells derived from primary tumors grown from cells without mtDNA and a shorter lag in tumor growth. Cell lines from circulating tumor cells showed further recovery of mitochondrial respiration and an intermediate lag to tumor growth, while cells from lung metastases exhibited full restoration of respiratory function and no lag in tumor growth. Stepwise assembly of mitochondrial respiratory (super)complexes was correlated with acquisition of respiratory function. Our findings indicate horizontal transfer of mtDNA from host cells in the tumor microenvironment to tumor cells with compromised respiratory function to re-establish respiration and tumor-initiating efficacy. These results suggest pathophysiological processes for overcoming mtDNA damage and support the notion of high plasticity of malignant cells.

  18. Reduced tumorigenicity of rodent tumour cells and tumour explants following infection with wild type and mutant herpes simplex virus, bovine mammillitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus.

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, G. R.; Cowan, M.; Davies, J.; Brookes, K.; Billstrom, M.; Buchan, A.

    1988-01-01

    The tumorigenicity of neoplastic hamster and mouse cell lines and tumour explants was reduced by infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), a thymidine-kinaseless mutant of herpes simplex virus, namely 'MDK', encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC) and bovine mammillitis virus (BMV). There was an approximate relationship between duration of virus infection in vitro and reduction in incidence and/or rate of tumour development. The rate of tumour development was also reduced by 'site inoculation' of virus (HSV-1) at various time intervals following inoculation of tumorigenic BHK 21 cells indicating that virus was capable of reducing the rate of tumour development in a situation where the neoplastic cells were already transplanted into the susceptible host species. It is suggested that the therapeutic role of wild type, mutant or recombinant viruses merits further exploration towards prevention and treatment of human cancer. PMID:2846027

  19. Reduced tumorigenicity of rodent tumour cells and tumour explants following infection with wild type and mutant herpes simplex virus, bovine mammillitis virus and encephalomyocarditis virus.

    PubMed

    Skinner, G R; Cowan, M; Davies, J; Brookes, K; Billstrom, M; Buchan, A

    1988-08-01

    The tumorigenicity of neoplastic hamster and mouse cell lines and tumour explants was reduced by infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV-1), a thymidine-kinaseless mutant of herpes simplex virus, namely 'MDK', encephalomyocarditis virus (EMC) and bovine mammillitis virus (BMV). There was an approximate relationship between duration of virus infection in vitro and reduction in incidence and/or rate of tumour development. The rate of tumour development was also reduced by 'site inoculation' of virus (HSV-1) at various time intervals following inoculation of tumorigenic BHK 21 cells indicating that virus was capable of reducing the rate of tumour development in a situation where the neoplastic cells were already transplanted into the susceptible host species. It is suggested that the therapeutic role of wild type, mutant or recombinant viruses merits further exploration towards prevention and treatment of human cancer.

  20. Changes in the expression of proteins associated with aerobic glycolysis and cell migration are involved in tumorigenic ability of two glioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The most frequent and malignant brain cancer is glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). In gliomas, tumor progression and poor prognosis are associated with the tumorigenic ability of the cells. U87MG cells (wild-type p53) are known to be tumorigenic in nude mice, but T98G cells (mutant p53) are not tumorigenic. We investigated the proteomic profiling of these two cell lines in order to gain new insights into the mechanisms that may be involved in tumorigenesis. Results We found 24 differentially expressed proteins between T98G and U87MG cells. Gene Ontology supports the notion that over-representation of differentially expressed proteins is involved in glycolysis, cell migration and stress oxidative response. Among those associated with the glycolysis pathway, TPIS and LDHB are up-regulated in U87MG cells. Measurement of glucose consumption and lactate production suggests that glycolysis is more effective in U87MG cells. On the other hand, G6PD expression was 3-fold higher in T98G cells and this may indicate a shift to the pentose-phosphate pathway. Moreover, GRP78 expression was also three-fold higher in T98G than in U87MG cells. Under thapsigargin treatment both cell lines showed increased GRP78 expression and the effect of this agent was inversely correlated to cell migration. Quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry of GRP78 in patient samples indicated a higher level of expression of GRP78 in grade IV tumors compared to grade I and non-neoplastic tissues, respectively. Conclusions Taken together, these results suggest an important role of proteins involved in key functions such as glycolysis and cell migration that may explain the difference in tumorigenic ability between these two glioma cell lines and that may be extrapolated to the differential aggressiveness of glioma tumors. PMID:22943417

  1. The Coordinated Actions of TIM-3 on Cancer and Myeloid Cells in the Regulation of Tumorigenicity and Clinical Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Morita, Tomoko; Annan, Dorcas A; Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Kitada, Shohei; Suzu, Shinya; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Takeya, Motohiro; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2015-09-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of most common cancers in urogenital organs. Although recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the immunogenic properties of ccRCC as illustrated by the clinical sensitivities to various immunotherapies, the detailed immunoregulatory machineries governing the tumorigenicity of human ccRCC remain largely obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the clinical significance and functional relevance of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) expressed on tumor cells and myeloid cells in patients with ccRCC. TIM-3 expression was detected on cancer cells and CD204(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and higher expression level of TIM-3 was positively correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with ccRCC. We found that TIM-3 expression was detected on a large number of tumors, and there was significant correlation between an increased number of TAMs and high expression level of TIM-3 in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, TIM-3 rendered RCC cells with the ability to induce resistance to sunitinib and mTOR inhibitors, the standard regimen for patients with ccRCC, as well as stem cell activities. TIM-3 expression was induced on CD14(+) monocytes upon long-term stimulation with RCC cells, and TIM-3-expressing myeloid cells play a critical role in augmenting tumorigenic activities of TIM-3-negative RCC cells. More importantly, treatment with anti-TIM-3 mAb suppressed its tumorigenic effects in in vitro and in vivo settings. These findings indicate the coordinated action of TIM-3 in cancer cells and in myeloid cells regulates the tumorigenicity of human RCC.

  2. Cellular tumorigenicity in nude mice. Test of associations among loss of cell-surface fibronectin, anchorage independence, and tumor-forming ability

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN; also called large external transformation-sensitive [LETS] protein or cell-surface protein [CSP]) is a large cell-surface glycoprotein that is frequently observed to be either absent or greatly reduced on the surfaces of malignant cells grown in vitro. Because FN may be a useful molecular marker of cellular malignancy, we have carried out an extensive screening to test the specific association among the degree of expression of FN, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity in the athymic nude mouse. A variety of diploid cell strains and established cell lines were tested for the expression of surface FN by indirect immunofluorescence using rabbit antisera against human cold insoluble globulin, rodent plasma FN, or chicken cell- surface FN. Concomitantly, the cells were assayed for tumor formation in nude mice and for the ability to form colonies in methylcellulose. Tumorigenic cells often showed very low surface fluorescence, confirming earlier reports. However, many highly tumorigenic fibroblast lines from several species stained strongly with all three antisera. In contrast, the anchorage-independent phenotype was nearly always associated with tumorigenicity in approximately 35 cell lines examined in this study. In another series of experiments, FN-positive but anchorage-independent cells were grown as tumors in nude mice and then reintroduced into culture. In five of the six tumor-derived cell lines, cell-surface FN was not significantly reduced; one such cell line showed very little surface FN. Our data thus indicate that the loss of cell-surface FN is not a necessary step in the process of malignant transformation and that the growth of FN-positive cells as tumors does not require a prior selection in vivo for FN-negative subpopulations. PMID:383723

  3. Space exhibitions: the science encounters the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coliolo, F.; Menendez, M.

    The widespread dissemination of science has always been one pillar of the development of human knowledge. There are several methods to structure interaction with the public: media, conferences, various written genres, and exhibitions. But: how to attract the public? How to arouse interest among future generation, insatiable for knowledge? In this paper we focus on space exhibitions, whose content combines mystery, discovery and science. The preparation of an exhibition is based on guidelines discussed between an interdisciplinary team and the exhibition project manager, the purpose of which is to find a coherent "strategy" to select information and to choose a concise, efficient, smart and original way to "visualize" the messages. Exhibition visitors are "privileged" because the interactivity is first emotive, then mental and cultural; the audience is universal. The goal of an exhibition is not to explain the content, but to stimulate the audience's curiosity in an attractive environment. We show some photos of ESA exhibitions, and try to understand if the visual impact is the first step towards a "multi-sensory" approach to communication. "A good exhibition can never be replaced by a book, a film or a lecture. A good exhibition creates a thirst for books, film, lectures. A good exhibition changes the visitors"(J. Wagensberg, Modern scientific museology")

  4. Antisense oligonucleotides adsorbed to polyalkylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles specifically inhibit mutated Ha-ras-mediated cell proliferation and tumorigenicity in nude mice.

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, G; Chavany, C; Duroux, I; Goubin, G; Lebeau, J; Hélène, C; Saison-Behmoaras, T

    1994-01-01

    Ras oncogenes owe their transforming properties to single point mutations in the sequence coding for the active site of the p21 protein. These mutations lead to changes in cellular proliferation and induce tumorigenic properties. Point mutations represent a well-defined target for antisense oligonucleotides that can specifically suppress the translation of the targeted mutant mRNA. We show that the stability and cellular disponibility of antisense oligonucleotides can be markedly improved by adsorption to polyalkylcyanoacrylate nanoparticles. Nanoparticle-adsorbed antisense oligonucleotides directed to a point mutation (G-->U) in codon 12 of the Ha-ras mRNA selectively inhibited the proliferation of cells expressing the point-mutated Ha-ras gene at a concentration 100 times lower than free oligonucleotides. In addition they markedly inhibited Ha-ras-dependent tumor growth in nude mice after subcutaneous injection. These experiments show that inhibition of ras oncogenes by antisense oligonucleotides can block tumor development even though ras oncogenic activation might be an early event in tumor progression. Images PMID:7937975

  5. Myc oncogene expression and nude mouse tumorigenicity and metastasis formation are higher in alveolar than embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kouraklis, G; Triche, T J; Wesley, R; Tsokos, M

    1999-04-01

    Accumulated clinical evidence suggests that alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma (ARMS) is more aggressive than embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (ERMS). Here, we study six childhood rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, three ERMS and three ARMS. We have assayed the ability of the tumor cells to grow in culture and in nude mice as well as their propensity for pulmonary metastasis formation by tail vein injection. We also compared levels of c- and N-myc oncogene expression and DNA copy number. We find no correlation of histologic tumor type (i.e. ERMS versus ARMS) with growth rate in culture, but we do find suggestive correlations of histologic type with tumorigenicity (mean tumor diameter in millimeters at 6 wk: ARMS 30, ERMS 10; p1 = 0.1) and metastasis formation (ARMS 12, ERMS 0; p1 = 0.1). These properties also correlate with uniform greater overexpression of c-myc in ARMS (mean 39.3-fold, range 16-83) compared with ERMS (mean 5.3, range 4-8) (p1 = 0.05, control fibroblasts = 1). Although c-myc was often amplified in vitro (four of six lines), there was no correlation with histologic type (2/3 ARMS, 2/3 ERMS). These data on rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines derived from verified ERMS and ARMS tumors support the impression from previous clinicopathologic observations that ARMS is a more malignant form of rhabdomyosarcoma than ERMS.

  6. miR-142 regulates the tumorigenicity of human breast cancer stem cells through the canonical WNT signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Isobe, Taichi; Hisamori, Shigeo; Hogan, Daniel J; Zabala, Maider; Hendrickson, David G; Dalerba, Piero; Cai, Shang; Scheeren, Ferenc; Kuo, Angera H; Sikandar, Shaheen S; Lam, Jessica S; Qian, Dalong; Dirbas, Frederick M; Somlo, George; Lao, Kaiqin; Brown, Patrick O; Clarke, Michael F; Shimono, Yohei

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are important regulators of stem and progenitor cell functions. We previously reported that miR-142 and miR-150 are upregulated in human breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) as compared to the non-tumorigenic breast cancer cells. In this study, we report that miR-142 efficiently recruits the APC mRNA to an RNA-induced silencing complex, activates the canonical WNT signaling pathway in an APC-suppression dependent manner, and activates the expression of miR-150. Enforced expression of miR-142 or miR-150 in normal mouse mammary stem cells resulted in the regeneration of hyperproliferative mammary glands in vivo. Knockdown of endogenous miR-142 effectively suppressed organoid formation by BCSCs and slowed tumor growth initiated by human BCSCs in vivo. These results suggest that in some tumors, miR-142 regulates the properties of BCSCs at least in part by activating the WNT signaling pathway and miR-150 expression. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01977.001 PMID:25406066

  7. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding transformation-sensitive tropomyosin isoform 3 from tumorigenic human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.S.; Leavitt, J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone from the tumorigenic human fibroblast cell line HuT-14 that contains the entire protein coding region of tropomyosin isoform 3 (Tm3) and 781 base pairs of 5'- and 3'-untranslated sequences. Tm3, despite its apparent smaller molecular weight than Tm1 in two-dimensional gels, has the same peptide length as Tm1 (284 amino acids) and shares 83% homology with Tm1. Tm3 cDNA hybridized to an abundant mRNA of 1.3 kilobases in fetal muscle and cardiac muscle, suggesting that Tm3 is related to an ..cap alpha../sub fast/-tropomyosin. The first 188 amino acids of Tm3 are identical to those of rat or rabbit skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin, and the last 71 amino acids differ from those of rat smooth muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin by only 1 residue. Tm3 therefore appears to be encoded by the same gene that encodes the fast skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin and the smooth muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin via an alternative RNA-splicing mechanism. In contrast to Tm4 and Tm5, Tm3 has a small gene family, with, at best, only one pseudogene.

  8. Binding and distribution studies in the SENCAR mouse of compounds demonstrating a route-dependent tumorigenic effect

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, G.P.; Fossa, A.A.; Morse, M.A.; Weaver, P.M.

    1986-09-01

    Previous investigators have determined that benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) was much more effective in causing skin papillomas if applied topically than when administered orally in the initiation-promotion assay in SENCAR mouse. Conversely, urethane and acrylamide caused a higher percentage of mice to develop papillomas and induced more tumors per mouse when given orally. In an attempt to understand the reason for this discrepancy in route dependency, /sup 3/H-benzo(a)pyrene, /sup 14/C-acrylamide were administered as single doses orally or topically to male SENCAR mice. Distribution in skin, stomach, liver, and lung was determined for time periods up to 48 hr. The binding of these compounds to DNA, RNA, and protein in these tissues was determined 6 and 48 hr after administration. For all three compounds, high concentrations were found in the skin following topical application, but very little material reached this target organ following oral administration. In contrast, the internal organs generally contained more material after oral administration. The binding of label compounds to DNA, RNA, and protein generally reflected the distribution data, thus more compound was bound in the stomach, liver, and lung after oral administration compared to topical application, whereas the opposite was true for the skin. This finding was particularly evident for B(a)P. The results suggest that differences in distribution to the skin and binding to macromolecules following oral or topical administration cannot explain the greater tumorigenicity of urethane and acrylamide after oral administration in the SENCAR mouse.

  9. Deubiquitinating enzyme USP22 positively regulates c-Myc stability and tumorigenic activity in mammalian and breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dongyeon; Hong, Ahyoung; Park, Hye In; Shin, Woo Hyun; Yoo, Lang; Jeon, Seo Jeong; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2017-02-04

    The proto-oncogene c-Myc has a pivotal function in growth control, differentiation and apoptosis and is frequently affected in human cancer, including breast cancer. Ubiquitin-specific protease 22 (USP22), a member of the USP family of deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs), mediates deubiquitination of target proteins, including histone H2B and H2A, telomeric repeat binding factor 1, and cyclin B1. USP22 is also a component of the mammalian SAGA transcriptional co-activating complex. In this study, we explored the functional role of USP22 in modulating c-Myc stability and its physiological relevance in breast cancer progression. We found that USP22 promotes deubiquitination of c-Myc in several breast cancer cell lines, resulting in increased levels of c-Myc. Consistent with this, USP22 knockdown reduces c-Myc levels. Furthermore, overexpression of USP22 stimulates breast cancer cell growth and colony formation, and increases c-Myc tumorigenic activity. In conclusion, the present study reveals that USP22 in breast cancer cell lines increases c-Myc stability through c-Myc deubiquitination, which is closely correlated with breast cancer progression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Embryonic stem cells are redirected to non-tumorigenic epithelial cell fate by interaction with the mammary microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Boulanger, Corinne A; Bruno, Robert D; Mack, David L; Gonzales, Monica; Castro, Nadia P; Salomon, David S; Smith, Gilbert H

    2013-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to redirect mouse Embryonic Stem (ES) cells from a tumorigenic phenotype to a normal mammary epithelial phenotype in vivo. Mixing LacZ-labeled ES cells with normal mouse mammary epithelial cells at ratios of 1:5 and 1:50 in phosphate buffered saline and immediately inoculating them into epithelium-divested mammary fat pads of immune-compromised mice accomplished this. Our results indicate that tumorigenesis occurs only when normal mammary ductal growth is not achieved in the inoculated fat pads. When normal mammary gland growth occurs, we find ES cells (LacZ+) progeny interspersed with normal mammary cell progeny in the mammary epithelial structures. We demonstrate that these progeny, marked by LacZ expression, differentiate into multiple epithelial subtypes including steroid receptor positive luminal cells and myoepithelial cells indicating that the ES cells are capable of epithelial multipotency in this context but do not form teratomas. In addition, in secondary transplants, ES cell progeny proliferate, contribute apparently normal mammary progeny, maintain their multipotency and do not produce teratomas.

  11. Negative regulation of the Hippo pathway by E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH is sufficient to promote tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Melino, Gerry; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2011-03-01

    The Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, originally defined in fruit flies, regulates cellular proliferation and survival and exerts profound effects on normal mammalian cell fate and tumorigenesis. The present understanding of Hippo pathway components and mechanisms remains incomplete in cancer. WW domain-containing proteins regulate diverse biological processes through interaction with proline-tyrosine (PPxY)-containing targets. In this study, we report that the E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH regulates stability of LATS1, a serine/threonine kinase in the Hippo pathway, through protein-protein interaction of the PPxY motifs of LATS1 with the WW domains of ITCH. Ubiquitination of LATS1 catalyzed by ITCH stimulated the proteasomal degradation of LATS1. Furthermore, ITCH-mediated degradation of LATS1 was associated with enhanced cell growth, induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and increased tumorigenicity. Conversely, ITCH depletion increased LATS1 levels, enhancing FAS-induced apoptosis and reducing proliferation, survival, and migration. These phenotypes were rescued when both ITCH and LATS1 were depleted. Together, our results reveal a novel functional link between ITCH and the Hippo pathway, deepening their critical roles in tumorigenesis.

  12. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  13. The tumorigenic FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion escapes miR-99a regulation in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Brittany C.; Annala, Matti J.; Cogdell, David E.; Granberg, Kirsi J.; Sun, Yan; Ji, Ping; Li, Xia; Gumin, Joy; Zheng, Hong; Hu, Limei; Yli-Harja, Olli; Haapasalo, Hannu; Visakorpi, Tapio; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-gong; Sawaya, Raymond; Fuller, Gregory N.; Chen, Kexin; Lang, Frederick F.; Nykter, Matti; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fusion genes are chromosomal aberrations that are found in many cancers and can be used as prognostic markers and drug targets in clinical practice. Fusions can lead to production of oncogenic fusion proteins or to enhanced expression of oncogenes. Several recent studies have reported that some fusion genes can escape microRNA regulation via 3′–untranslated region (3′-UTR) deletion. We performed whole transcriptome sequencing to identify fusion genes in glioma and discovered FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in 4 of 48 glioblastoma samples from patients both of mixed European and of Asian descent, but not in any of 43 low-grade glioma samples tested. The fusion, caused by tandem duplication on 4p16.3, led to the loss of the 3′-UTR of FGFR3, blocking gene regulation of miR-99a and enhancing expression of the fusion gene. The fusion gene was mutually exclusive with EGFR, PDGFR, or MET amplification. Using cultured glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model, we found that fusion protein expression promoted cell proliferation and tumor progression, while WT FGFR3 protein was not tumorigenic, even under forced overexpression. These results demonstrated that the FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion is expressed in human cancer and generates an oncogenic protein that promotes tumorigenesis in glioblastoma. PMID:23298836

  14. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  15. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:27626280

  16. Aptamer to ErbB-2/HER2 enhances degradation of the target and inhibits tumorigenic growth

    PubMed Central

    Mahlknecht, Georg; Maron, Ruth; Mancini, Maicol; Schechter, Bilha; Sela, Michael; Yarden, Yosef

    2013-01-01

    Aptamers, oligonucleotides able to avidly bind cellular targets, are emerging as promising therapeutic agents, analogous to monoclonal antibodies. We selected from a DNA library an aptamer specifically recognizing human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (ErbB-2/HER2), a receptor tyrosine kinase, which is overexpressed in a variety of human cancers, including breast and gastric tumors. Treatment of human gastric cancer cells with a trimeric version (42 nucleotides) of the selected aptamer (14 nucleotides) resulted in reduced cell growth in vitro, but a monomeric version was ineffective. Likewise, when treated with the trimeric aptamer, animals bearing tumor xenografts of human gastric origin reflected reduced rates of tumor growth. The antitumor effect of the aptamer was nearly twofold stronger than that of a monoclonal anti–ErbB-2/HER2 antibody. Consistent with aptamer-induced intracellular degradation of ErbB-2/HER2, incubation of gastric cancer cells with the trimeric aptamer promoted translocation of ErbB-2/HER2 from the cell surface to cytoplasmic puncta. This translocation was associated with a lysosomal hydrolase-dependent clearance of the ErbB-2/HER2 protein from cell extracts. We conclude that targeting ErbB-2/HER2 with DNA aptamers might retard the tumorigenic growth of gastric cancer by means of accelerating lysosomal degradation of the oncoprotein. This work exemplifies the potential pharmacological utility of aptamers directed at cell surface proteins, and it highlights an endocytosis-mediated mechanism of tumor inhibition. PMID:23630281

  17. Transcriptional co-activator TAZ sustains proliferation and tumorigenicity of neuroblastoma by targeting CTGF and PDGF-β.

    PubMed

    Wang, Mei; Liu, Yang; Zou, Jiahua; Yang, Rui; Xuan, Fan; Wang, Yi; Gao, Ning; Cui, Hongjuan

    2015-04-20

    Neuroblastoma is a common childhood malignant tumor originated from the neural crest-derived sympathetic nervous system. A crucial event in the pathogenesis of neuroblastoma is to promote proliferation of neuroblasts, which is closely related to poor survival. However, mechanisms for regulation of cell proliferation and tumorigenicity in neuroblastoma are not well understood. Here, we report that overexpression of TAZ in neuroblastoma BE(2)-C cells causes increases in cell proliferation, self renewal and colony formation, which was restored back to its original levels by knockdown of TAZ in TAZ-overexpression cells. Inhibition of endogenous TAZ attenuated cell proliferation, colony formation and tumor development in neuroblastoma SK-N-AS cell, which could be rescued by re-introduction of TAZ into TAZ-knockdown cells. In addition, we found that overexpressing TAZ-mediated induction of CTGF and PDGF-β expression, cell proliferation and colony formation were inhibited by knocking down CTGF and PDGF-β with siRNA in TAZ-overexpressing cell. Overall, our findings suggested that TAZ plays an essential role in regulating cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in neuroblastoma cells. Thus, TAZ seems to be a novel and promising target for the treatment of neuroblastoma.

  18. Spontaneous formation of tumorigenic hybrids between breast cancer and multipotent stromal cells is a source of tumor heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2012-06-01

    Breast cancer progression involves cancer cell heterogeneity, with generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells within populations of nonmetastatic cells of the primary tumor. Sequential genetic mutations, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interaction with local stroma, and formation of hybrids between cancer cells and normal bone marrow-derived cells have been advocated as tumor progression mechanisms. We report herein the spontaneous in vitro formation of heterotypic hybrids between human bone marrow-derived multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and two different breast carcinoma cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (MDA) and MA11. Hybrids showed predominantly mesenchymal morphological characteristics, mixed gene expression profiles, and increased DNA ploidy. Both MA11 and MDA hybrids were tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice, and some MDA hybrids had an increased metastatic capacity. Both in culture and as xenografts, hybrids underwent DNA ploidy reduction and morphological reversal to breast carcinoma-like morphological characteristics, while maintaining a mixed breast cancer-mesenchymal expression profile. Analysis of coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms by RNA sequencing revealed genetic contributions from both parental partners to hybrid tumors and metastasis. Because MSCs migrate and localize to breast carcinoma, our findings indicate that formation of MSC-breast cancer cell hybrids is a potential mechanism of the generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells. Our findings reconcile the fusion theory of cancer progression with the common observation that breast cancer metastases are generally aneuploid, but not tetraploid, and are histopathologically similar to the primary neoplasm.

  19. Overexpression of PHRF1 attenuates the proliferation and tumorigenicity of non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yadong; Wang, Haiyu; Pan, Teng; Li, Li; Li, Jiangmin; Yang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential role of PHRF1 in lung tumorigenesis. Western blot analysis was used to detect the expression of proteins. Quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, immunohistochemistry, soft agar assay and tumor formation assay in nude mice were applied. Cell cycle distribution was analyzed by flow cytometry. The lower level of PHRF1 mRNA was observed in human lung cancer tissues than that in paracancerous tissues. The decreased expression of PHRF1 protein was observed in H1299 and H1650 cell lines than that in 16HBE and BEAS-2B cell lines. The decreased expression of PHRF1 protein was observed in malignant 16HBE cells compared to control cells. The reduced expression of PHRF1 protein was observed in mice lung tissues treated with BaP than that in control group. Overexpression of PHRF1 inhibited H1299 cell proliferation, colony formation in vitro and growth of tumor xenograft in vivo, and arrested cell cycle in G1 phase. The decreased expression of TGIF and c-Myc proteins and the increased expression of p21 protein were observed in H1299-PHRF1 cells compared with H1299-pvoid cells. In conclusion, our findings suggest that overexpression of PHRF1 attenuated the proliferation and tumorigenicity of non-small cell lung cancer cell line of H1299. PMID:27608840

  20. Epigenetic silencing of miR-181b contributes to tumorigenicity in colorectal cancer by targeting RASSF1A.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lun-De; Zheng, Wei-Wei; Wang, Gao-Xiang; Kang, Xiao-Chun; Qin, Lei; Ji, Juan-Juan; Hao, Sha

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant microRNA expression is common in colorectal cancer and DNA methylation is believed to be responsible for this alteration. In this study, we performed evaluation in vivo and in vitro to determine the role of miR-181b as a potential diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in colorectal cancer. Ninety-seven pairs of colorectal cancer tissues and adjacent normal tissues were collected. The expression level and methylation status of miR-181b was determined in tissue samples and multiple colorectal cancer cell lines. RASSF1A, a predicted target gene of miR-181b, was investigated in vitro. Further mechanistic explorations were conducted. It was found that miR-181b expression was frequently downregulated in cancer samples. This lower expression level resulted from higher hypermethylation in cancer tissue and was closely related to TNM stage. Following artificial synthesis of miR-181b stimulation, colorectal cancer cell proliferation was greatly inhibited in CRC cells while apoptosis percentage markedly increased. miR-181b achieved the tumor suppressive effects via direct targeting of the RASSF1A gene. This study indicated the clinical significance of miR-181b and the influence of miR-181b promoter region in epigenetic silencing of tumorigenicity in colorectal cancer, and implied the possible usage of miR-181b as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in colorectal cancer.

  1. Subcellular Raman Microspectroscopy Imaging of Nucleic Acids and Tryptophan for Distinction of Normal Human Skin Cells and Tumorigenic Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piredda, Paola; Berning, Manuel; Boukamp, Petra; Volkmer, Andreas

    2015-07-07

    At present, tumor diagnostic imaging is commonly based on hematoxylin and eosin or immunohistochemical staining of biopsies, which requires tissue excision, fixation, and staining with exogenous marker molecules. Here, we report on label-free tumor imaging using confocal spontaneous Raman scattering microspectroscopy, which exploits the intrinsic vibrational contrast of endogenous biomolecular species. We present a chemically specific and quantitative approach to monitoring normal human skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts) as well as the human HaCaT in vitro skin carcinogenesis model and the tumor-derived MET in vivo skin cancer progression model. Mapping the amplitudes of two spectrally well isolated Raman bands at 752 and 785 cm(-1) allowed for direct visualization of the distributions representative of tryptophan-rich proteins and nucleic acids, respectively, with subcellular spatial resolution. Using these Raman markers, it was feasible to discriminate between normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) and to confine all tumorigenic cells from both the NHEK and NHDF. First evidence for the successful application of the proposed intracellular nucleic acid and tryptophan Raman signatures for skin cancer diagnosis was further demonstrated in an organotypic cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas model, allowing for the identification of tumor cells and their surrounding stroma in the tissue context.

  2. STK31 Is a Cell-Cycle Regulated Protein That Contributes to the Tumorigenicity of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Pao-Lin; Huang, Yung-Ling; Hsieh, Christine Chin-Jung; Lee, Jenq-Chang; Lin, Bo-Wen; Hung, Liang-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Serine/threonine kinase 31 (STK31) is one of the novel cancer/testis antigens for which its biological functions remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that STK31 is overexpressed in many human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. STK31 co-localizes with pericentrin in the centrosomal region throughout all phases of the cell cycle. Interestingly, when cells undergo mitosis, STK31 also localizes to the centromeres, central spindle, and midbody. This localization behavior is similar to that of chromosomal passenger proteins, which are known to be the important players of the spindle assembly checkpoint. The expression of STK31 is cell cycle-dependent through the regulation of a putative D-box near its C-terminal region. Ectopically-expressed STK31-GFP increases cell migration and invasive ability without altering the proliferation rate of cancer cells, whereas the knockdown expression of endogenous STK31 by lentivirus-derived shRNA results in microtubule assembly defects that prolong the duration of mitosis and lead to apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that the aberrant expression of STK31 contributes to tumorigenicity in somatic cancer cells. STK31 might therefore act as a potential therapeutic target in human somatic cancers. PMID:24667656

  3. Spontaneous Formation of Tumorigenic Hybrids between Breast Cancer and Multipotent Stromal Cells Is a Source of Tumor Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Rappa, Germana; Mercapide, Javier; Lorico, Aurelio

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer progression involves cancer cell heterogeneity, with generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells within populations of nonmetastatic cells of the primary tumor. Sequential genetic mutations, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, interaction with local stroma, and formation of hybrids between cancer cells and normal bone marrow–derived cells have been advocated as tumor progression mechanisms. We report herein the spontaneous in vitro formation of heterotypic hybrids between human bone marrow–derived multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) and two different breast carcinoma cell lines, MDA-MB-231 (MDA) and MA11. Hybrids showed predominantly mesenchymal morphological characteristics, mixed gene expression profiles, and increased DNA ploidy. Both MA11 and MDA hybrids were tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice, and some MDA hybrids had an increased metastatic capacity. Both in culture and as xenografts, hybrids underwent DNA ploidy reduction and morphological reversal to breast carcinoma–like morphological characteristics, while maintaining a mixed breast cancer–mesenchymal expression profile. Analysis of coding single-nucleotide polymorphisms by RNA sequencing revealed genetic contributions from both parental partners to hybrid tumors and metastasis. Because MSCs migrate and localize to breast carcinoma, our findings indicate that formation of MSC–breast cancer cell hybrids is a potential mechanism of the generation of invasive/metastatic breast cancer cells. Our findings reconcile the fusion theory of cancer progression with the common observation that breast cancer metastases are generally aneuploid, but not tetraploid, and are histopathologically similar to the primary neoplasm. PMID:22542847

  4. Suppression of growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo of human carcinoma cell lines by transfected p16INK4.

    PubMed

    Spillare, E A; Okamoto, A; Hagiwara, K; Demetrick, D J; Serrano, M; Beach, D; Harris, C C

    1996-05-01

    The function of p16INK4 as a putative tumor suppressor gene was examined by investigating its ability to inhibit the growth of cancer cell lines in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. A p16INK4 cDNA expression vector was transfected into five human cancer cell lines that varied in their p16INK4 and retinoblastoma (Rb) status. Suppression of colony-forming efficiency was seen in four cell lines. Of two cell lines wild type for p16INK4 but null for Rb protein expression, one (Hep 3B) showed inhibition of colony formation, whereas the other (Saos-2) did not. This observation may demonstrate involvement of p16INK4 independent of Rb. The transfected p16INK4 gene was frequently selected against and lost during continued growth in vitro. When compared to the colon carcinoma cell line (DLD-1),p16INK4-transfected DLD-1 clone 1 cells were less tumorigenic in athymic nude mice. Tumors arising from p16INK4-transfected DLD-1 clones, which were growth suppressed in vitro, either lost the integrated exogenous p16INK4 or expressed reduced amounts of p16INK4 protein. Therefore, p16INK4 was also selected against during tumor formation in vivo. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that p16INK4 is a tumor suppressor gene.

  5. Graviola: A Novel Promising Natural-Derived Drug That Inhibits Tumorigenicity and Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo Through Altering Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, María P.; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Purohit, Vinee; Pandey, Poomy; Joshi, Suhasini; Moore, Erik D.; Johansson, Sonny L.; Singh, Pankaj K.; Ganti, Apar K.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are resistant to conventional chemotherapies. The present study was aimed at evaluating the potential of a novel plant-derived product as a therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer (PC). The effects of an extract from the tropical tree Annona Muricata, commonly known as Graviola, was evaluated for cytotoxicity, cell metabolism, cancer-associated protein/gene expression, tumorigenicity, and metastatic properties of PC cells. Our experiments revealed that Graviola induced necrosis of PC cells by inhibiting cellular metabolism. The expression of molecules related to hypoxia and glycolysis in PC cells (i.e. HIF-1α, NF-κB, GLUT1, GLUT4, HKII, and LDHA) were downregulated in the presence of the extract. In vitro functional assays further confirmed the inhibition of tumorigenic properties of PC cells. Overall, the compounds that are naturally present in a Graviola extract inhibited multiple signaling pathways that regulate metabolism, cell cycle, survival, and metastatic properties in PC cells. Collectively, alterations in these parameters led to a decrease in tumorigenicity and metastasis of orthotopically implanted pancreatic tumors, indicating promising characteristics of the natural product against this lethal disease. PMID:22475682

  6. Graviola: a novel promising natural-derived drug that inhibits tumorigenicity and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo through altering cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Torres, María P; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Purohit, Vinee; Pandey, Poomy; Joshi, Suhasini; Moore, Erik D; Johansson, Sonny L; Singh, Pankaj K; Ganti, Apar K; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-10-01

    Pancreatic tumors are resistant to conventional chemotherapies. The present study was aimed at evaluating the potential of a novel plant-derived product as a therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer (PC). The effects of an extract from the tropical tree Annona Muricata, commonly known as Graviola, was evaluated for cytotoxicity, cell metabolism, cancer-associated protein/gene expression, tumorigenicity, and metastatic properties of PC cells. Our experiments revealed that Graviola induced necrosis of PC cells by inhibiting cellular metabolism. The expression of molecules related to hypoxia and glycolysis in PC cells (i.e. HIF-1α, NF-κB, GLUT1, GLUT4, HKII, and LDHA) were downregulated in the presence of the extract. In vitro functional assays further confirmed the inhibition of tumorigenic properties of PC cells. Overall, the compounds that are naturally present in a Graviola extract inhibited multiple signaling pathways that regulate metabolism, cell cycle, survival, and metastatic properties in PC cells. Collectively, alterations in these parameters led to a decrease in tumorigenicity and metastasis of orthotopically implanted pancreatic tumors, indicating promising characteristics of the natural product against this lethal disease.

  7. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis in breast cancer cells by 4-methylumbelliferone suppresses tumorigenicity in vitro and metastatic lesions of bone in vivo.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Hiroshi; Nishida, Yoshihiro; Wasa, Junji; Arai, Eisuke; Zhuo, Lisheng; Kimata, Koji; Kozawa, Eiji; Futamura, Naohisa; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2012-01-15

    Hyaluronan (HA) has been shown to play crucial roles in the tumorigenicity of malignant tumors. Previous studies demonstrated that inhibition of HA suppressed the tumorigenicity of various malignant tumors including breast cancer. 4-methylumbelliferone (MU) has been reported to inhibit HA synthesis in several cell types. However, few studies have focused on the effects of HA inhibition in breast cancer cells by MU, nor the effects on bone metastasis. We hypothesized that MU would suppress the progression of bone metastasis via inhibition of HA synthesis. Here, we investigated the effects of MU on HA expression in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line in addition to their tumorigenicity in vitro and in vivo. HAS2 mRNA expression was downregulated after 6 and 24 hr treatment with MU. Quantitative analysis of HA revealed that MU significantly inhibited the intracellular and cell surface HA. MU significantly inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis as determined by cell proliferation and TUNEL assays, respectively. Phosphorylation of Akt was suppressed after 12 and 24 hr treatment with MU. MU treatment also inhibited cell motility as well as cell invasiveness. MU also inhibited cell growth and motility in murine fibroblast cell line NIH3T3. In vivo, administration of MU inhibited the expansion of osteolytic lesions on soft X-rays in mouse breast cancer xenograft models. HA accumulation in bone metastatic lesions was perturbed peripherally. These data suggest that MU might be a therapeutic candidate for bone metastasis of breast cancer via suppression of HA synthesis and accumulation.

  8. Effects of Simulated Human Gastrointestinal Digestion of Two Purple-Fleshed Potato Cultivars on Anthocyanin Composition and Cytotoxicity in Colonic Cancer and Non-Tumorigenic Cells.

    PubMed

    Kubow, Stan; Iskandar, Michèle M; Melgar-Bermudez, Emiliano; Sleno, Lekha; Sabally, Kebba; Azadi, Behnam; How, Emily; Prakash, Satya; Burgos, Gabriela; Felde, Thomas Zum

    2017-08-29

    A dynamic human gastrointestinal (GI) model was used to digest cooked tubers from purple-fleshed Amachi and Leona potato cultivars to study anthocyanin biotransformation in the stomach, small intestine and colonic vessels. Colonic Caco-2 cancer cells and non-tumorigenic colonic CCD-112CoN cells were tested for cytotoxicity and cell viability after 24 h exposure to colonic fecal water (FW) digests (0%, 10%, 25%, 75% and 100% FW in culture media). After 24 h digestion, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry identified 36 and 15 anthocyanin species throughout the GI vessels for Amachi and Leona, respectively. The total anthocyanin concentration was over thirty-fold higher in Amachi compared to Leona digests but seven-fold higher anthocyanin concentrations were noted for Leona versus Amachi in descending colon digests. Leona FW showed greater potency to induce cytotoxicity and decrease viability of Caco-2 cells than observed with FW from Amachi. Amachi FW at 100% caused cytotoxicity in non-tumorigenic cells while FW from Leona showed no effect. The present findings indicate major variations in the pattern of anthocyanin breakdown and release during digestion of purple-fleshed cultivars. The differing microbial anthocyanin metabolite profiles in colonic vessels between cultivars could play a significant role in the impact of FW toxicity on tumor and non-tumorigenic cells.

  9. Tumorigenicity and adenovirus-transformed cells: Collagen interaction and cell surface laminin are controlled by the serotype origin of the E1A and E1B genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bober, F.J.; Birk, D.E.; Raska, K. Jr. ); Shenk, T. )

    1988-02-01

    A library of cells transformed with recombinant adenoviruses was used to study tumorigenicity and interaction with extracellular matrix. Cells expressing the complete E1 region of highly oncogenic adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) are tumorigenic, adhere preferentially to type IV collagen, and express cell surface laminin. Weakly tumorigenic cells, which express the E1A oncogene of Ad12 and the E1B genes of Ad5, also attach preferentially to type IV collagen but do not contain laminin on their surface. Cells which express the E1A oncogene of Ad5 and the E1B genes of Ad12 are nontumorigenic and do not preferentially attach to type IV versus type I collagen but have laminin on their surface. There is no significant difference in the amounts of laminin secreted into the culture medium among cells expressing the E1B genes of Ad5 or Ad12. In vitro assays show that cells which express the E1B genes of Ad12, irrespective of the origin of the E1A genes, can bind three times more exogenously added {sup 125}I-laminin than cells expressing the E1B genes of nononcogenic Ad5. The interaction of adenovirus-transformed cells with collagen is controlled by the serotype origin of the E1A oncogene, whereas cell surface laminin is controlled by the serotype origin of the E1B genes.

  10. Hop bitter acids inhibit tumorigenicity of hepatocellular carcinoma cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Saugspier, Michael; Dorn, Christoph; Czech, Barbara; Gehrig, Manfred; Heilmann, Jörg; Hellerbrand, Claus

    2012-10-01

    Bitter acids (BAs) from the hop plant Humulus lupulus L. exhibit multiple beneficial biological properties with promising effects in cancer therapy and prevention, but information regarding the effects on hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is missing. Here, we used two different hop bitter acid extracts enriched for either α-acids or β-acids to obtain insight into whether biological activity varies between these two groups of BAs. At a concentration of 25 µg/ml, only the β-acid rich started to induce aspartate transaminase (AST) release, and a significant increase was detected with 50 µg/ml of both extracts. Already at lower concentrations both extracts led to a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation, and migration was suppressed at a concentration as low as 5 µg/ml in HCC cells. The focus on different signaling pathways revealed an inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation, downregulation of AP-1 activity and an alleviation of nuclear factor κB (NFκB) activity in HepG2 cells incubated with 5 µg/ml of both extracts, whereby the β-acid rich extract showed more pronounced effects. In conclusion, we identified ERK1/2, AP-1 and NFκB, which are important factors in tumor development and progression, as targets of hop BAs. Thus, these data suggest the potential use of BAs as functional nutrients for both prevention and treatment of HCC.

  11. Superconductive microstrip exhibiting negative differential resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Huebener, R.P.; Gallus, D.E.

    1975-10-28

    A device capable of exhibiting negative differential electrical resistivity over a range of values of current and voltage is formed by vapor- depositing a thin layer of a material capable of exhibiting superconductivity on an insulating substrate, establishing electrical connections at opposite ends of the deposited strip, and cooling the alloy into its superconducting range. The device will exhibit negative differential resistivity when biased in the current- induced resistive state.

  12. The Cardioprotective Protein Apolipoprotein A1 Promotes Potent Anti-tumorigenic Effects*♦

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian-Daryoush, Maryam; Lindner, Daniel; Tallant, Thomas C.; Wang, Zeneng; Buffa, Jennifer; Klipfell, Elizabeth; Parker, Yvonne; Hatala, Denise; Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia; Rayman, Pat; Yusufishaq, Mohamed Sharif S.; Fisher, Edward A.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Finke, Jim; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Hazen, Stanley L.

    2013-01-01

    Here, we show that apolipoprotein A1 (apoA1), the major protein component of high density lipoprotein (HDL), through both innate and adaptive immune processes, potently suppresses tumor growth and metastasis in multiple animal tumor models, including the aggressive B16F10L murine malignant melanoma model. Mice expressing the human apoA1 transgene (A1Tg) exhibited increased infiltration of CD11b+ F4/80+ macrophages with M1, anti-tumor phenotype, reduced tumor burden and metastasis, and enhanced survival. In contrast, apoA1-deficient (A1KO) mice showed markedly heightened tumor growth and reduced survival. Injection of human apoA1 into A1KO mice inoculated with tumor cells remarkably reduced both tumor growth and metastasis, enhanced survival, and promoted regression of both tumor and metastasis burden when administered following palpable tumor formation and metastasis development. Studies with apolipoprotein A2 revealed the anti-cancer therapeutic effect was specific to apoA1. In vitro studies ruled out substantial direct suppressive effects by apoA1 or HDL on tumor cells. Animal models defective in different aspects of immunity revealed both innate and adaptive arms of immunity contribute to complete apoA1 anti-tumor activity. This study reveals a potent immunomodulatory role for apoA1 in the tumor microenvironment, altering tumor-associated macrophages from a pro-tumor M2 to an anti-tumor M1 phenotype. Use of apoA1 to redirect in vivo elicited tumor-infiltrating macrophages toward tumor rejection may hold benefit as a potential cancer therapeutic. PMID:23720750

  13. Reelin protects from colon pathology by maintaining the intestinal barrier integrity and repressing tumorigenic genes.

    PubMed

    Carvajal, Ana E; Serrano-Morales, José M; Vázquez-Carretero, María D; García-Miranda, Pablo; Calonge, María L; Peral, María J; Ilundain, Anunciación A

    2017-09-01

    We previously reported that reelin, an extracellular matrix protein first known for its key role in neuronal migration, reduces the susceptibility to dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-colitis. The aim of the current study was to determine whether reelin protects from colorectal cancer and how reelin defends from colon pathology. In the colon of wild-type and of mice lacking reelin (reeler mice) we have analysed the: i) epithelium cell renewal processes, ii) morphology, iii) Sox9, Cdx2, Smad5, Cyclin D1, IL-6 and IFNγ mRNA abundance in DSS-treated and untreated mice, and iv) development of azoxymethane/DSS-induced colorectal cancer, using histological and real time-PCR methodologies. The reeler mutation increases colitis-associated tumorigenesis, with increased tumours number and size. It also impairs the intestinal barrier because it reduces cell proliferation, migration, differentiation and apoptosis; decreases the number and maturation of goblet cells, and expands the intercellular space of the desmosomes. The intestinal barrier impairment might explain the increased susceptibility to colon pathology exhibited by the reeler mice and is at least mediated by the down-regulation of Sox9 and Cdx2. In response to DSS-colitis, the reeler colon increases the mRNA abundance of IL-6, Smad5 and Cyclin D1 and decreases that of IFNγ, conditions that might result in the increased colitis-associated tumorigenesis found in the reeler mice. In conclusion, the results highlight a role for reelin in maintaining intestinal epithelial cell homeostasis and providing resistance against colon pathology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Knockdown of NAT12/NAA30 reduces tumorigenic features of glioblastoma-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Mughal, Awais A; Grieg, Zanina; Skjellegrind, Håvard; Fayzullin, Artem; Lamkhannat, Mustapha; Joel, Mrinal; Ahmed, M Shakil; Murrell, Wayne; Vik-Mo, Einar O; Langmoen, Iver A; Stangeland, Biljana

    2015-08-21

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common primary brain malignancy and confers a dismal prognosis. GBMs harbor glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) that drive tumorigenesis and contribute to therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence. Consequently, there is a strong rationale to target this cell population in order to develop new molecular therapies against GBM. Accumulating evidence indicates that Nα-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs), that are dysregulated in numerous human cancers, can serve as therapeutic targets. Microarrays were used to study the expression of several NATs including NAT12/NAA30 in clinical samples and stem cell cultures. The expression of NAT12/NAA30 was analyzed using qPCR, immunolabeling and western blot. We conducted shRNA-mediated knockdown of NAT12/NAA30 gene in GICs and studied the effects on cell viability, sphere-formation and hypoxia sensitivity. Intracranial transplantation to SCID mice enabled us to investigate the effects of NAT12/NAA30 depletion in vivo. Using microarrays we identified genes and biochemical pathways whose expression was altered upon NAT12/NAA30 down-regulation. While decreased expression of the distal 3'UTR of NAT12/NAA30 was generally observed in GICs and GBMs, this gene was strongly up-regulated at the protein level in GBM and GICs. The increased protein levels were not caused by increased levels of the steady state mRNA but rather by other mechanisms. Also, shorter 3'UTR of NAT12/NAA30 correlated with poor survival in glioma patients. As well, we observed previously not described nuclear localization of this typically cytoplasmic protein. When compared to non-silencing controls, cells featuring NAT12/NAA30 knockdown exhibited reduced cell viability, sphere-forming ability, and mitochondrial hypoxia tolerance. Intracranial transplantation showed that knockdown of NAT12/NAA30 resulted in prolonged animal survival. Microarray analysis of the knockdown cultures showed reduced levels of HIF1α and altered expression

  15. 49 CFR 1331.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... organization chart; and (3) As Exhibit 4, a schedule of its charges to members or a statement showing how the... agreement pertains to a conference, bureau, committee, or other organization: (1) As Exhibit 2, a copy of the constitution, bylaws, or other documents or writings specifying the organization's powers, duties...

  16. 49 CFR 1331.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... organization chart; and (3) As Exhibit 4, a schedule of its charges to members or a statement showing how the... agreement pertains to a conference, bureau, committee, or other organization: (1) As Exhibit 2, a copy of the constitution, bylaws, or other documents or writings specifying the organization's powers, duties...

  17. Encountering Nanotechnology in an Interactive Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murriello, Sandra E.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This article offers findings from a learning sciences-informed evaluation of a nanoscience and nanotechnology exhibition called Nano-Aventura (NanoAdventure), based on four interactive-collaborative games and two narrated videos. This traveling exhibition was developed in Brazil by the Museu Exploratorio de Ciencias for children and teenagers…

  18. Science Fiction Exhibits as STEM Gateways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robie, Samantha

    Women continue to hold less than a quarter of all STEM jobs in the United States, prompting many museums to develop programs and exhibits with the express goal of interesting young girls in scientific fields. At the same time, a number of recent museum exhibits have harnessed the popularity of pop culture and science fiction in order to interest general audiences in STEM subject matter, as well as using the exhibits as springboards to expand or shift mission goals and focus. Because science fiction appears to be successful at raising interest in STEM fields, it may be an effective way to garner the interest of young girls in STEM in particular. This research seeks to describe the ways in which museums are currently using science fiction exhibits to interest young girls in STEM fields and careers. Research focused on four institutions across the country hosting three separate exhibits, and included staff interviews and content analysis of exhibit descriptions, promotional materials, a summative evaluation and supplementary exhibit productions. In some ways, science fiction exhibits do serve young girls, primarily through the inclusion of female role models, staff awareness, and prototype testing to ensure interactives are attractive to girls as well as to boys. However, STEM appears to be underutilized, which may be partly due to a concern within the field that the outcome of targeting a specific gender could be construed as "stereotyping".

  19. Memory and Mourning: An Exhibit History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Scott G.

    2005-01-01

    Mounted by the Strong Museum in Rochester, New York, in 1993, and traveling nationally thereafter, the exhibit Memory and Mourning provided historical and contemporary perspectives to help museum guests explore their own reactions to loss and grief. In the process the exhibit's development team encountered a range of philosophical, historical,…

  20. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.24 Exhibits. (a) Navy exhibits are representations or collections of... concerned, via the chain of command. (3) The official OASD(PA) Request Form for Armed Forces Participation will be used. See Armed Forces Request Form, § 705.36. (4) Requests for exceptions to policy...

  1. Learning4Life on the Exhibit Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The exhibit floor is a wealth of knowledge. One can read, view, and listen to information presented in many formats. Somewhere on the exhibit floor there are experts on every topic, ready and waiting for one's questions. But like any research topic, frequently a structured search is required to find the best answers. This article discusses how to…

  2. Evaluation of Clientele Impact of Science Exhibits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talisayon, Vivien M.

    1998-01-01

    Explores the use of an impact evaluation model across time and clientele groups that is used to evaluate exhibits from two science centers in Manila. Questionnaire and interview data indicate that students prefer exhibits that produce sound, light, and motion. (DDR)

  3. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the statement of corporate purposes from its articles of incorporation. (b) Exhibit B. A copy of all... stockholders has been obtained. (c) Exhibit C. The Balance Sheet and attached notes for the most recent 12... for the most recent 12-month period for which financial statements have been published, provided that...

  4. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the statement of corporate purposes from its articles of incorporation. (b) Exhibit B. A copy of all... stockholders has been obtained. (c) Exhibit C. The Balance Sheet and attached notes for the most recent 12... for the most recent 12-month period for which financial statements have been published, provided that...

  5. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the statement of corporate purposes from its articles of incorporation. (b) Exhibit B. A copy of all... stockholders has been obtained. (c) Exhibit C. The Balance Sheet and attached notes for the most recent 12... for the most recent 12-month period for which financial statements have been published, provided that...

  6. Encountering Nanotechnology in an Interactive Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murriello, Sandra E.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This article offers findings from a learning sciences-informed evaluation of a nanoscience and nanotechnology exhibition called Nano-Aventura (NanoAdventure), based on four interactive-collaborative games and two narrated videos. This traveling exhibition was developed in Brazil by the Museu Exploratorio de Ciencias for children and teenagers…

  7. An Attention Model for Museum Exhibits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightner, John W.

    A qualitative study determined which factors in the museum exhibit environment or within the museum visitor may influence the visitor to attend an exhibit. Observations and interviews were conducted of 14 groups that visited a Chesapeake & Ohio steam locomotive at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. An inductive or grounded theory…

  8. Strategies for Determining Exhibit Effectiveness. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shettel, Harris H.; And Others

    This project was designed to develop research strategies and hypotheses for evaluating the effectiveness of exhibits. An exhibit on the role of the Federal Government in science and technology was used as the subject matter. Two basic groups of viewers were used, casual viewers and paid experimental viewers. Both were tested on knowledge gained…

  9. The side population of ovarian cancer cells defines a heterogeneous compartment exhibiting stem cell characteristics.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G; Reimer, Daniel; Schmidt, Stefan; Gastl, Guenther; Parson, Walther; Spoeck, Franziska; Hatina, Jiri; Wolf, Dominik; Sopper, Sieghart

    2014-08-30

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to be involved in tumor evasion of classical antitumor therapies and have thus become an attractive target for further improvement of anticancer strategies. However, the existence and identity of CSC are still a matter of controversy. In a systematic screen of 13 ovarian cancer cell lines we show that cells with stem cell properties are reliably detectable as a minor population, characterized by ABC transporter expression resulting in the side population (SP) phenotype. In different cell lines, either ABCG2 or ABCB1 was found to be responsible for this effect. Purified SP cells featured virtually all characteristics of bona fide CSC, including clonogenicity, asymmetric division and high tumorigenicity in vivo. Using in-depth phenotyping by multicolor flow cytometry, we found that among the investigated ovarian cancer cell lines the SP compartment exhibits tremendous heterogeneity and is composed of multiple phenotypically distinct subpopulations. Thus, our study confirms previous results showing that CSC are contained within the SP. However, the exact identity of the CSC is still disguised by the high complexity of the CSC-containing compartment. Further functional studies are needed to determine whether a single cellular subset can unambiguously be defined as CSC or whether multiple stem cell-like cells with different properties coexist. Moreover, the observed heterogeneity may reflect a high level of plasticity and likely influences tumor progression, escape from immune-surveillance and development of resistance to anticancer therapies and should therefore be considered in the development of new treatment strategies.

  10. Hepatitis B virus X protein mutants exhibit distinct biological activities in hepatoma Huh7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaohong; Zhang Shuhui; Lin Jing; Zhang Shunmin; Feitelson, Mark A.; Gao Hengjun; Zhu Minghua

    2008-09-05

    The role of the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the biological impact of hepatitis B virus x gene (HBx) mutation on hepatoma cells, plasmids expressing the full-length HBx or HBx deletion mutants were constructed. The biological activities in these transfectants were analyzed by a series of assays. Results showed that HBx3'-20 and HBx3'-40 amino acid deletion mutants exhibited an increase in cellular proliferation, focus formation, tumorigenicity, and invasive growth and metastasis through promotion of the cell cycle from G0/G1 to the S phase, when compared with the full-length HBx. In contrast, HBx3'-30 amino acid deletion mutant repressed cell proliferation by blocking in G1 phase. The expression of P53, p21{sup WAF1}, p14{sup ARF}, and MDM2 proteins was regulated by expression of HBx mutants. In conclusions, HBx variants showed different effects and functions on cell proliferation and invasion by regulation of the cell cycle progression and its associated proteins expression.

  11. The side population of ovarian cancer cells defines a heterogeneous compartment exhibiting stem cell characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Reimer, Daniel; Schmidt, Stefan; Gastl, Guenther; Parson, Walther; Spoeck, Franziska; Hatina, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSC) are believed to be involved in tumor evasion of classical antitumor therapies and have thus become an attractive target for further improvement of anticancer strategies. However, the existence and identity of CSC are still a matter of controversy. In a systematic screen of 13 ovarian cancer cell lines we show that cells with stem cell properties are reliably detectable as a minor population, characterized by ABC transporter expression resulting in the side population (SP) phenotype. In different cell lines, either ABCG2 or ABCB1 was found to be responsible for this effect. Purified SP cells featured virtually all characteristics of bona fide CSC, including clonogenicity, asymmetric division and high tumorigenicity in vivo. Using in-depth phenotyping by multicolor flow cytometry, we found that among the investigated ovarian cancer cell lines the SP compartment exhibits tremendous heterogeneity and is composed of multiple phenotypically distinct subpopulations. Thus, our study confirms previous results showing that CSC are contained within the SP. However, the exact identity of the CSC is still disguised by the high complexity of the CSC-containing compartment. Further functional studies are needed to determine whether a single cellular subset can unambiguously be defined as CSC or whether multiple stem cell-like cells with different properties coexist. Moreover, the observed heterogeneity may reflect a high level of plasticity and likely influences tumor progression, escape from immune-surveillance and development of resistance to anticancer therapies and should therefore be considered in the development of new treatment strategies. PMID:25216521

  12. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not published...

  13. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not published...

  14. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not published...

  15. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Program Pt. 1980, Subpt. E, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Note: The Exhibit is not published...

  16. Museum Exhibitions: Optimizing Development Using Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.

    2002-12-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado, has recently developed two museum exhibits called the Space Weather Center and MarsQuest. It is currently planning to develop a third exhibit called InterActive Earth. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The development of these exhibitions included a comprehensive evaluation plan. I will report on the important role evaluation plays in exhibit design and development using MarsQuest and InterActive Earth as models. The centerpiece of SSI's Mars Education Program is the 5,000-square-foot traveling exhibition, MarsQuest: Exploring the Red Planet, which was developed with support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), NASA, and several corporate donors. The MarsQuest exhibit is nearing the end of a highly successful, fully-booked three-year tour. The Institute plans to send an enhanced and updated MarsQuest on a second three-year tour and is also developing Destination: Mars, a mini-version of MarsQuest designed for smaller venues. They are designed to inspire and empower participants to extend the excitement and science content of the exhibitions into classrooms and museum-based education programs in an ongoing fashion. The centerpiece of the InterActive Earth project is a traveling exhibit that will cover about 4,000 square feet. The major goal of the proposed exhibit is to introduce students and the public to the complexity of the interconnections in the Earth system, and thereby, to inspire them to better understand planet Earth. Evaluation must be an integral part of the exhibition development process. For MarsQuest, a 3-phase evaluation (front end, formative and summative) was conducted by Randi Korn and Associates in close association with the development team. Sampling procedures for all three evaluation phases ensured the participation of all audiences, including family groups, students, and adults. Each phase of

  17. Inhibition of STAT3 with the Generation 2.5 Antisense Oligonucleotide, AZD9150, Decreases Neuroblastoma Tumorigenicity and Increases Chemosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Odate, Seiichi; Veschi, Veronica; Yan, Shuang; Lam, Norris; Woessner, Richard; Thiele, Carol J

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: Neuroblastoma is a pediatric tumor of peripheral sympathoadrenal neuroblasts. The long-term event-free survival of children with high-risk neuroblastoma is still poor despite the improvements with current multimodality treatment protocols. Activated JAK/STAT3 pathway plays an important role in many human cancers, suggesting that targeting STAT3 is a promising strategy for treating high-risk neuroblastoma.Experimental Design: To evaluate the biologic consequences of specific targeting of STAT3 in neuroblastoma, we assessed the effect of tetracycline (Tet)-inducible STAT3 shRNA and the generation 2.5 antisense oligonucleotide AZD9150 which targets STAT3 in three representative neuroblastoma cell line models (AS, NGP, and IMR32).Results: Our data indicated that Tet-inducible STAT3 shRNA and AZD9150 inhibited endogenous STAT3 and STAT3 target genes. Tet-inducible STAT3 shRNA and AZD9150 decreased cell growth and tumorigenicity. In vivo, STAT3 inhibition by Tet-inducible STAT3 shRNA or AZD9150 alone had little effect on growth of established tumors. However, when treated xenograft tumor cells were reimplanted into mice, there was a significant decrease in secondary tumors in the mice receiving AZD9150-treated tumor cells compared with the mice receiving ntASO-treated tumor cells. This indicates that inhibition of STAT3 decreases the tumor-initiating potential of neuroblastoma cells. Furthermore, inhibition of STAT3 significantly increased neuroblastoma cell sensitivity to cisplatin and decreased tumor growth and increased the survival of tumor-bearing mice in vivoConclusions: Our study supports the development of strategies targeting STAT3 inhibition in combination with conventional chemotherapy for patients with high-risk neuroblastoma. Clin Cancer Res; 23(7); 1771-84. ©2016 AACR.

  18. Persistent Exposure to Porphyromonas gingivalis Promotes Proliferative and Invasion Capabilities, and Tumorigenic Properties of Human Immortalized Oral Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Fengxue; Liu, Junchao; Guo, Yan; Li, Chen; Wang, Hongyang; Wang, Hongyan; Zhao, Haijiao; Pan, Yaping

    2017-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies revealed a significant association between oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and Porphyromonas gingivalis, a major pathogen of periodontal disease. As a keystone pathogen of periodontitis, P. gingivalis is known not only to damage local periodontal tissues, but also to evade the host immune system and eventually affect systemic health. However, its role in OSCC has yet to be defined. To explore the underlying effect of chronic P. gingivalis infection on OSCC and to identify relevant biomarkers as promising targets for therapy and prevention, we established a novel model by exposing human immortalized oral epithelial cells (HIOECs) to P. gingivalis at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) for 5–23 weeks. The P. gingivalis infected HIOECs were monitored for tumor biological alteration by proliferation, wound healing, transwell invasion, and gelatin zymography assays. Microarray and proteomic analyses were performed on HIOECs infected with P. gingivalis for 15 weeks, and some selected data were validated by quantitative real-time PCR and (or) western blot on cells infected for 15 and 23 weeks. Persistent exposure to P. gingivalis caused cell morphological changes, increased proliferation ability with higher S phase fraction in the cell cycle, and promoted cell migratory and invasive properties. In combining results of bioinformatics analyses and validation assays, tumor-related genes such as NNMT, FLI1, GAS6, lncRNA CCAT1, PDCD1LG2, and CD274 may be considered as the key regulators in tumor-like transformation in response to long-time exposure of P. gingivalis. In addition, some useful clinical biomarkers and novel proteins were also presented. In conclusion, P. gingivalis could promote tumorigenic properties of HIOECs, indicating that chronic P. gingivalis infection may be considered as a potential risk factor for oral cancer. The key regulators detected from the present model might be used in monitoring the development of OSCC with

  19. Tumorigenic WAP-T Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells: A Model for a Self-Reproducing Homeostatic Cancer Cell System

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Benjamin; Gruner, Katharina; Heinlein, Christina; Kühl, Marion; Warnecke, Gabriele; Schumacher, Udo; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V.

    2010-01-01

    Background In analogy to normal stem cell differentiation, the current cancer stem cell (CSC) model presumes a hierarchical organization and an irreversible differentiation in tumor tissue. Accordingly, CSCs should comprise only a small subset of the tumor cells, which feeds tumor growth. However, some recent findings raised doubts on the general applicability of the CSC model and asked for its refinement. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we analyzed the CSC properties of mammary carcinoma cells derived from transgenic (WAP-T) mice. We established a highly tumorigenic WAP-T cell line (G-2 cells) that displays stem-like traits. G-2 cells, as well as their clonal derivates, are closely related to primary tumors regarding histology and gene expression profiles, and reflect heterogeneity regarding their differentiation states. G-2 cultures comprise cell populations in distinct differentiation states identified by co-expression of cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratins and vimentin), a combination of cell surface markers and a set of transcription factors. Cellular subsets sorted according to expression of CD24a, CD49f, CD61, Epcam, Sca1, and Thy1 cell surface proteins, or metabolic markers (e.g. ALDH activity) are competent to reconstitute the initial cellular composition. Repopulation efficiency greatly varies between individual subsets and is influenced by interactions with the respective complementary G-2 cellular subset. The balance between differentiation states is regulated in part by the transcription factor Sox10, as depletion of Sox10 led to up-regulation of Twist2 and increased the proportion of Thy1-expressing cells representing cells in a self-renewable, reversible, quasi-mesenchymal differentiation state. Conclusions/Significance G-2 cells constitute a self-reproducing cancer cell system, maintained by bi- and unidirectional conversion of complementary cellular subsets. Our work contributes to the current controversial discussion on the existence

  20. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui; Kurimoto, Akiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2015-03-27

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  1. LDH-A silencing suppresses breast cancer tumorigenicity through induction of oxidative stress mediated mitochondrial pathway apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Yu; Loo, Tjing Yung; Shen, Jian-Gang; Wang, Neng; Wang, Dong-Mei; Yang, De-Po; Mo, Sui-Lin; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Ping

    2012-02-01

    LDH-A, as the critical enzyme accounting for the transformation from pyruvate into lactate, has been demonstrated to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and its silencing has also been approved relating to increased apoptosis in lymphoma cells. In this study, we intend to investigate the correlation between LDH-A and other clinicopathological factors of breast cancer and whether LDH-A silencing could suppress breast cancer growth, and if so the potential mechanisms. 46 breast cancer specimens were collected to study the relation between LDH-A expression and clinicopathological characteristics including menopause, tumor size, node involvement, differentiation, and pathological subtypes classified by ER, PR, and Her-2. shRNAs were designed and applied to silence LDH-A expression in breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231. The effects of LDH-A reduction on cancer cells were studied by a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments, including cell growth assay, apoptosis evaluation, oxidative stress detection, transmission electron microscopy observation, and tumor formation assay on nude mice. LDH-A expression was found to correlate significantly with tumor size and to be independent for other clinicopathological factors. LDH-A reduction resulted in an inhibited cancer cell proliferation, elevated intracellular oxidative stress, and induction of mitochondrial pathway apoptosis. Meanwhile, the tumorigenic ability of LDH-A deficient cancer cells was significantly limited in both breast cancer xenografts. The Ki67 positive cancer cells were significantly reduced in LDH-A deficiency tumor samples, while the apoptosis ratio was enhanced. Our results suggested that LDH-A inhibition might offer a promising therapeutic strategy for breast cancer.

  2. Tumorigenic risk of human induced pluripotent stem cell explants cultured on mouse SNL76/7 feeder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Mizuna; Mitsui, Youji Kumazaki, Tsutomu; Kawahara, Yuta; Matsuo, Taira; Takahashi, Tomoko

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • hiPS cell explants formed malignant tumors when SNL76/7 feeder cells were used. • Multi type tumors developed by interaction of SNL76/7 feeder cells with hiPS cells. • Tumorigenic risk occurs by co-culture of hiPS cells with SNL76/7 feeder cells. - Abstract: The potential for tumor formation from transplanted human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derivatives represents a high risk in their application to regenerative medicine. We examined the genetic origin and characteristics of tumors, that were formed when 13 hiPSC lines, established by ourselves, and 201B7 hiPSC from Kyoto University were transplanted into severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice. Though teratomas formed in 58% of mice, five angiosarcomas, one malignant solitary fibrous tumor and one undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma formed in the remaining mice. Three malignant cell lines were established from the tumors, which were derived from mitomycin C (MMC)-treated SNL76/7 (MMC-SNL) feeder cells, as tumor development from fusion cells between MMC-SNL and hiPSCs was negative by genetic analysis. While parent SNL76/7 cells produced malignant tumors, neither MMC-SNL nor MMC-treated mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) produced malignant tumors. When MMC-SNL feeder cells were co-cultured with hiPSCs, growing cell lines were generated, that expressed genes similar to the parent SNL76/7 cells. Thus, hiPSCs grown on MMC-SNL feeder cells have a high risk of generating feeder-derived malignant tumors. The possible mechanism(s) of growth restoration and the formation of multiple tumor types are discussed with respect of the interactions between MMC-SNL and hiPSC.

  3. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-tumorigenic Effects of Açai Berry in Helicobacter felis-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yup; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Lee, Seonmin; Ham, Min Hee; Suh, Ji Hyung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic effect of açai berry after chronic Helicobacter felis colonization in the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice. Methods: A total of 57 four-week-old female C57BL/6 mice (18 control mice and 39 experimental mice) were used. The mice were administered orogastrically with vehicle only or vehicle containing H. felis, 5 times every other day. After inoculation of H. felis, mice were fed either a standard or an açai-containing diet and then sacrificed at 4, 24, and 52 weeks. The infection status and degree of inflammation were determined by culture and histopathology. The level of gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO), TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured by ELISA. Results: At 24 weeks after inoculation, mucosal atrophy and mucous metaplasia appeared in all infected mice. At 52 weeks after inoculation, dysplastic change was noted in 10%, 25%, and 50% of mice in the H. felis-control, H. felis-açai 5%, and H. felis-açai 10% groups, respectively. The neutrophil, monocyte, atrophy, and metaplasia grades of infected mice showed no significant difference among the H. felis-infected groups. H. felis-infected mice fed with açai berry showed no significant difference compared with H. felis-infected control mice in gastric mucosal MPO, TNF-α, and IL-1β levels. Conclusions: H. felis that colonized the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice provoked inflammation, and induced mucosal atrophy, metaplasia, and dysplasia. However, açai berry did not effectively prohibit the gastric carcinogenesis which was induced by chronic H. felis infection. PMID:27051649

  4. Alterations in tumorigenicity of embryonal carcinoma cells by IGF-I triple-helix induced changes in immunogenicity and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ly, A; Francois, J C; Upegui-Gonzalez, L C; Swiercz, B; Bedel, C; Duc, H T; Bout, D; Trojan, J

    2000-12-08

    IGF-I antisense gene therapy has been applied successfully to animal models of glioma, hepatoma and teratocarcinoma. The antisense strategy has shown that tumor cells transfected with vectors encoding IGF-I antisense RNA lose tumorigenicity, become immunogenic and are associated with tumor specific immune response involving CD8+ lymphocytes. An IGF-I triple helix approach to gene therapy for glioma was recently described. The approach we have taken is to establish parameters of change using the IGF-I triple helix strategy. PCC-3 embryonal carcinoma cells derived from murine teratocarcinoma which express IGF-I were used as a model. The cells were transfected with vector which encodes an oligoribonucleotide that forms RNA-IGF-I DNA triple-helix structure. The triple-helix stops the production of IGF-I. Cells transfected in this manner underwent changes in phenotype and an increase in MHC-I and B-7 cell surface molecules. They also showed enhancement in the production of apoptotic cells (60-70%). The "triple helix" transfected cells lost the ability to induce tumor when injected subcutaneously in syngeneic 129 Sv mice. When co-transfected in vitro with expression vectors encoding both MHC-I and B-7 cDNA in antisense orientation, the "triple-helix" transfected cells were down-regulated in expression of MHC-I and B-7 and the number of apoptotic cells was significantly decreased. Injection of the doubly co-transfected cells into 129 Sv mice was associated with induction of teratocarcinoma. Comparison between antisense and triple-helix transfected cells strategies showed similar immunogenic and apoptotic changes. The findings suggest that triple-helix technology may offer a new clinical approach to treatement of tumors expressing IGF-I.

  5. Lung cancer tumorigenicity and drug resistance are maintained through ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Xiao, Zhijie; Wong, Sunny Kit-Man; Tin, Vicky Pui-Chi; Ho, Ka-Yan; Wang, Junwen; Sham, Mai-Har; Wong, Maria Pik

    2013-10-01

    Limited improvement in long term survival of lung cancer patients has been achieved by conventional chemotherapy or targeted therapy. To explore the potentials of tumor initiating cells (TIC)-directed therapy, it is essential to identify the cell targets and understand their maintenance mechanisms. We have analyzed the performance of ALDH/CD44 co-expression as TIC markers and treatment targets of lung cancer using well-validated in vitro and in vivo analyses in multiple established and patient-derived lung cancer cells. The ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset showed the highest enhancement of stem cell phenotypic properties compared to ALDH(hi)CD44(lo), ALDH(lo)CD44(hi), ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) cells and unsorted controls. They showed higher invasion capacities, pluripotency genes and epithelial-mesenchymal transition transcription factors expression, lower intercellular adhesion protein expression and higher G2/M phase cell cycle fraction. In immunosuppressed mice, the ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)xenografts showed the highest tumor induction frequency, serial transplantability, shortest latency, largest volume and highest growth rates. Inhibition of sonic Hedgehog and Notch developmental pathways reduced ALDH+CD44+ compartment. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy resulted in higher AALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset viability and ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) subset apoptosis fraction. ALDH inhibition and CD44 knockdown led to reduced stemness gene expression and sensitization to drug treatment. In accordance, clinical lung cancers containing a higher abundance of ALDH and CD44-coexpressing cells was associated with lower recurrence-free survival. Together, results suggested theALDH(hi)CD44(hi)compartment was the cellular mediator of tumorigenicity and drug resistance. Further investigation of the regulatory mechanisms underlying ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)TIC maintenance would be beneficial for the development of long term lung cancer control.

  6. Profound impact of gut homeostasis on chemically-induced pro-tumorigenic inflammation and hepatocarcinogenesis in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui-Lu; Yu, Le-Xing; Yang, Wen; Tang, Liang; Lin, Yan; Wu, Han; Zhai, Bo; Tan, Ye-Xiong; Shan, Lei; Liu, Qiong; Chen, Hai-Yang; Dai, Rong-Yang; Qiu, Bi-Jun; He, Ya-Qin; Wang, Chao; Zheng, Long-Yi; Li, Yu-Qiong; Wu, Fu-Quan; Li, Zhong; Yan, He-Xin; Wang, Hong-Yang

    2012-10-01

    Due to its anatomic connection, the liver is constantly exposed to gut-derived bacterial products or metabolites. Disruption of gut homeostasis is associated with many human diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the role of gut homeostasis in initiation and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Disruption of intestinal homeostasis by penicillin or dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) and its restoration by probiotics were applied in a diethylnitrosamine (DEN) model of rat hepatocarcinogenesis. Patients with liver cirrhosis and HCC had significantly increased serum endotoxin levels. Chronic DEN treatment of rats was associated with an imbalance of subpopulations of the gut microflora including a significant suppression of Lactobacillus species, Bifidobacterium species and Enterococcus species as well as intestinal inflammation. Induction of enteric dysbacteriosis or intestinal inflammation by penicillin or DSS, respectively, significantly promoted tumor formation. Administration of probiotics dramatically mitigated enteric dysbacteriosis, ameliorated intestinal inflammation, and most importantly, decreased liver tumor growth and multiplicity. Interestingly, probiotics not only inhibited the translocation of endotoxin, which bears pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) but also the activation of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). As a result, the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines was skewed in favor of a reduced tumorigenic inflammation in the liver. The data highlights the importance of gut homeostasis in the pathogenesis of HCC. Modulation of the gut microbiota by probiotics may represent a new avenue for therapeutic intervention to treat or prevent HCC development. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Differential expression of centrosome regulators in Her2+ breast cancer cells versus non-tumorigenic MCF10A cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Centrosome amplification (CA) amongst particular breast cancer subtypes (Her2+ subtype) is associated with genomic instability and aggressive tumor phenotypes. However, changes in signaling pathways associated with centrosome biology have not been fully explored in subtype specific models. Novel centrosome regulatory genes that are selectively altered in Her2+ breast cancer cells are of interest in discerning why CA is more prevalent in this subtype. To determine centrosome/cell cycle genes that are altered in Her2+ cells that display CA (HCC1954) versus non-tumorigenic cells (MCF10A), we carried out a gene microarray. Expression differences were validated by real-time PCR and Western blotting. After the microarray validation, we pursued a panel of upregulated and downregulated genes based on novelty/relevance to centrosome duplication. Functional experiments measuring CA and BrdU incorporation were completed after genetic manipulation of targets (TTK, SGOL1, MDM2 and SFRP1). Amongst genes that were downregulated in HCC1954 cells, knockdown of MDM2 and SFRP1 in MCF10A cells did not consistently induce CA or impaired BrdU incorporation. Conversely, amongst upregulated genes in HCC1954 cells, knockdown of SGOL1 and TTK decreased CA in breast cancer cells, while BrdU incorporation was only altered by SGOL1 knockdown. We also explored the Kaplan Meier Plot resource and noted that MDM2 and SFRP1 are positively associated with relapse free survival in all breast cancer subtypes, while TTK is negatively correlated with overall survival of Luminal A patients. Based on this functional screen, we conclude that SGOL1 and TTK are important modulators of centrosome function in a breast cancer specific model. PMID:25278993

  8. Tumorigenic Potential of Olfactory Bulb-Derived Human Adult Neural Stem Cells Associates with Activation of TERT and NOTCH1

    PubMed Central

    Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Cenciarelli, Carlo; Petrucci, Giovanna; Milazzo, Luisa; Montano, Nicola; Tabolacci, Elisabetta; Maira, Giulio; Larocca, Luigi M.; Pallini, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    Background Multipotent neural stem cells (NSCs) have been isolated from neurogenic regions of the adult brain. Reportedly, these cells can be expanded in vitro under prolonged mitogen stimulation without propensity to transform. However, the constitutive activation of the cellular machinery required to bypass apoptosis and senescence places these cells at risk for malignant transformation. Methodology/Principal Findings Using serum-free medium supplemented with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), we established clonally derived NS/progenitor cell (NS/PC) cultures from the olfactory bulb (OB) of five adult patients. The NS/PC cultures obtained from one OB specimen lost growth factor dependence and neuronal differentiation at early passage. These cells developed glioblastoma tumors upon xenografting in immunosuppressed mice. The remaining NS/PC cultures were propagated either as floating neurospheres or as adherent monolayers with mainteinance of growth factor dependence and multipotentiality at late passage. These cells were engrafted onto the CNS of immunosuppressed rodents. Overall, the grafted NS/PCs homed in the host parenchyma showing ramified morphology and neuronal marker expression. However, a group of animals transplanted with NS/PCs obtained from an adherent culture developed fast growing tumors histologically resembling neuroesthesioblastoma. Cytogenetic and molecular analyses showed that the NS/PC undergo chromosomal changes with repeated in vitro passages under mitogen stimulation, and that up-regulation of hTERT and NOTCH1 associates with in vivo tumorigenicity. Conclusions/Significance Using culturing techniques described in current literature, NS/PCs arise from the OB of adult patients which in vivo either integrate in the CNS parenchyma showing neuron-like features or initiate tumor formation. Extensive xenografting studies on each human derived NS cell line appear mandatory before any use of these cells in the

  9. Sox9 regulates self-renewal and tumorigenicity by promoting symmetrical cell division of cancer stem cells in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chungang; Liu, Limei; Chen, Xuejiao; Cheng, Jiamin; Zhang, Heng; Shen, Junjie; Shan, Juanjuan; Xu, Yanmin; Yang, Zhi; Lai, Maode; Qian, Cheng

    2016-07-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a highly aggressive liver tumor containing cancer stem cells (CSCs) that participate in tumor propagation, resistance to conventional therapy, and promotion of tumor recurrence, causing poor patient outcomes. The protein SRY (sex determining region Y)-box 9 (Sox9) is a transcription factor expressed in some solid tumors, including HCC. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying Sox9 function in liver CSCs remain unclear. Here, we show that Sox9 is highly expressed in liver CSCs and that high levels of Sox9 predict a decreased probability of survival in HCC patients. We demonstrate that Sox9 is required for maintaining proliferation, self-renewal, and tumorigenicity in liver CSCs. Overexpression of exogenous Sox9 in liver non-CSCs restored self-renewal capacity. Additionally, a reduction in the asymmetrical cell division of spheroid-cultured liver CSCs was observed when compared with differentiated cancer cells or liver CSCs with inhibited Notch signaling. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Sox9 is responsible for the asymmetrical-to-symmetrical cell division switch in liver CSCs. Sox9 also negatively regulates Numb expression, contributing to a feedback circuit that maintains Notch activity and directs symmetrical cell division. Clinical analyses revealed that the Sox9(High) Numb(Low) profile is associated with poor prognosis in human HCC patients. We demonstrate that Sox9 plays a critical role in self-renewal and tumor propagation of liver CSCs and identify the molecular mechanisms regulated by Sox9 that link tumor initiation and cell division. (Hepatology 2016;64:117-129). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  10. Restoration of miR-30a expression inhibits growth, tumorigenicity of medulloblastoma cells accompanied by autophagy inhibition.

    PubMed

    Singh, Satishkumar Vishram; Dakhole, Aditi Nigam; Deogharkar, Akash; Kazi, Sadaf; Kshirsagar, Rohan; Goel, Atul; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Jalali, Rakesh; Sridhar, Epari; Gupta, Tejpal; Shetty, Prakash; Gadewal, Nikhil; Shirsat, Neelam Vishwanath

    2017-09-30

    Medulloblastoma is a highly malignant pediatric brain tumor. About 30% patients have metastasis at diagnosis and respond poorly to treatment. Those that survive, suffer long term neurocognitive, endocrine and developmental defects due to the cytotoxic treatment to developing child brain. It is therefore necessary to develop targeted treatment strategies based on underlying biology for effective treatment of medulloblastoma with minimal side effects. Medulloblastomas are believed to be the result of deregulated nervous system development as evident from the role of WNT and SHH developmental signaling pathways in pathogenesis of medulloblastomas. MicroRNAs are known to play vital roles in nervous system development as well as in cancer. MicroRNA profiling of medulloblastomas identified miR-30 family members' expression to be downregulated in medulloblastomas belonging to the four known molecular subgroups viz. WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4 as compared to that in normal brain tissues. Furthermore, established medulloblastoma cell lines Daoy, D283 and D425 were also found to underexpress miR-30a. Restoration of miR-30a expression using inducible lentiviral vector inhibited proliferation, clonogenic potential and tumorigenicity of medulloblastoma cells. MiR-30a is known to target Beclin1, a mediator of autophagy. MiR-30a expression was found to downregulate Beclin1 expression and inhibit autophagy in the medulloblastoma cell lines as judged by downregulation of LC3B expression and its turnover upon chloroquine treatment and starvation induced autophagy induction. MiR-30a therefore could serve as a novel therapeutic agent for the effective treatment of medulloblastoma by inhibiting autophagy that is known to play important role in cancer cell growth, survival and malignant behavior. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolism of anandamide by COX-2 is necessary for endocannabinoid-induced cell death in tumorigenic keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Van Dross, Rukiyah T

    2009-08-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancer is the most prevalent cancer in the United States with approximately 1.25 million new cases diagnosed each year. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is commonly elevated in these and other epithelial tumors. Cyclooxygenases metabolize arachidonic acid to prostaglandins, which promote growth and survival of tumor cells. COX-2 also metabolizes endocannabinoids forming prostaglandin-ethanolamides (PG-EA); however, the role of these lipid molecules in tumor cell survival is unclear. The goal of this research is to determine if the metabolic products of COX-2 contribute to endocannabinoid-induced cell death. Anandamide [also known as arachidonyl ethanolamide (AEA)] induced cell death in the COX-2 overexpressing squamous carcinoma cell line JWF2. In contrast, AEA did not initiate cell death in HaCaT keratinocytes, which express low basal levels of COX-2. Resistance to AEA-mediated cell death in HaCaT cells was reversed by overexpressing COX-2 in these cells. Next, ELISA assays were carried out to identify prostaglandins involved in AEA-mediated cell death. D-type prostaglandins were predominantly formed in AEA-exposed JWF2 cells although significant increases in E- and F-type prostaglandins were also seen. Cells were then treated with various prostaglandins or PG-EA to determine the contribution of each to AEA-induced cell death. PGD(2) and PGD(2)-EA were found to be cytotoxic to JWF2 keratinocytes and the PGD(2) dehydration products, PGJ(2) and 15-deoxy Delta(12,14) PGJ(2), were also potent inducers of cell death. These results suggest that AEA selectively induces cell death in tumorigenic keratinocytes due to COX-2 overexpression and the resulting metabolism of AEA to cytotoxic prostaglandins.

  12. Therapeutic dosages of aspirin counteract the IL-6 induced pro-tumorigenic effects by slowing down the ribosome biogenesis rate

    PubMed Central

    Brighenti, Elisa; Giannone, Ferdinando Antonino; Fornari, Francesca; Onofrillo, Carmine; Govoni, Marzia; Montanaro, Lorenzo; Treré, Davide; Derenzini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation is a risk factor for the onset of cancer and the regular use of aspirin reduces the risk of cancer development. Here we showed that therapeutic dosages of aspirin counteract the pro-tumorigenic effects of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin(IL)-6 in cancer and non-cancer cell lines, and in mouse liver in vivo. We found that therapeutic dosages of aspirin prevented IL-6 from inducing the down-regulation of p53 expression and the acquisition of the epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenotypic changes in the cell lines. This was the result of a reduction in c-Myc mRNA transcription which was responsible for a down-regulation of the ribosomal protein S6 expression which, in turn, slowed down the rRNA maturation process, thus reducing the ribosome biogenesis rate. The perturbation of ribosome biogenesis hindered the Mdm2-mediated proteasomal degradation of p53, throughout the ribosomal protein-Mdm2-p53 pathway. P53 stabilization hindered the IL-6 induction of the EMT changes. The same effects were observed in livers from mice stimulated with IL-6 and treated with aspirin. It is worth noting that aspirin down-regulated ribosome biogenesis, stabilized p53 and up-regulated E-cadherin expression in unstimulated control cells also. In conclusion, these data showed that therapeutic dosages of aspirin increase the p53-mediated tumor-suppressor activity of the cells thus being in this way able to reduce the risk of cancer onset, either or not linked to chronic inflammatory processes. PMID:27557515

  13. Assessment of the Tumorigenic Potential of Spontaneously Immortalized and hTERT-Immortalized Cultured Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ryan; Urraca, Nora; Skobowiat, Cezary; Hope, Kevin A.; Miravalle, Leticia; Chamberlin, Reed; Donaldson, Martin; Seagroves, Tiffany N.

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) provide an exciting new avenue to study neurogenetic disorders. DPSCs are neural crest-derived cells with the ability to differentiate into numerous tissues including neurons. The therapeutic potential of stem cell-derived lines exposed to culturing ex vivo before reintroduction into patients could be limited if the cultured cells acquired tumorigenic potential. We tested whether DPSCs that spontaneously immortalized in culture acquired features of transformed cells. We analyzed immortalized DPSCs for anchorage-independent growth, genomic instability, and ability to differentiate into neurons. Finally, we tested both spontaneously immortalized and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized DPSC lines for the ability to form tumors in immunocompromised animals. Although we observed increased colony-forming potential in soft agar for the spontaneously immortalized and hTERT-immortalized DPSC lines relative to low-passage DPSC, no tumors were detected from any of the DPSC lines tested. We noticed some genomic instability in hTERT-immortalized DPSCs but not in the spontaneously immortalized lines tested. We determined that immortalized DPSC lines generated in our laboratory, whether spontaneously or induced, have not acquired the potential to form tumors in mice. These data suggest cultured DPSC lines that can be differentiated into neurons may be safe for future in vivo therapy for neurobiological diseases. Significance This study demonstrated that immortalized dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) do not form tumors in animals and that immortalized DPSCs can be differentiated into neurons in culture. These results lend support to the use of primary and immortalized DPSCs for future therapeutic approaches to treatment of neurobiological diseases. PMID:26032749

  14. The Making of a Museum Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleecker, Samuel E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the preparation of the Reptile and Amphibian exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History. Various steps involved in developing the ten showcases in a six-year period are presented. (SA)

  15. The Making of a Museum Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleecker, Samuel E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the preparation of the Reptile and Amphibian exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History. Various steps involved in developing the ten showcases in a six-year period are presented. (SA)

  16. 43 CFR 4.824 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Procedural Rules Applicable to Practice and Procedure for Hearings, Decisions, and Administrative Review... Interior-Effectuation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 Procedures § 4.824 Exhibits....

  17. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of operating such facilities. Exhibit B. A general or key map on a scale not greater than 20 miles to... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the...

  18. 18 CFR 153.8 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Exhibit D. If the proposal is for a pipeline interconnection to import or export natural gas, a copy of... authority, that will issue each required authorization; the date each request for authorization...

  19. Communicating Complex Sciences by Means of Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S.

    2011-12-01

    Earth Sciences will have to take over the leading role in global sustainable policy and in discussions about climate change. Efforts to raise attention within the politically responsible communities as well as in the public are getting more and more support by executive and advisory boards all over the world. But how can you successfully communicate complex sciences? For example, to start communication about climate change, the first step is to encourage people to be concerned about climate change. After that, one has to start thinking about how to present data and how to include the presented data into an unprejudiced context. Therefore, the communication toolbox offers various methods to reach diverse audiences. The R&D programme GEOTECHNOLOGIEN conducts roving exhibitions as one of its most successful communication tools. With roving exhibitions GEOTECHNOLOGIEN is able to get in touch with different audiences at once. The main purpose and theme of these exhibitions is to convey the everyday means of climate change to the visitors. It is within the responsibility of science to communicate the effects of a phenomenon like climate change as well as the impact of research results to the everyday life of people. Currently, a GEOTECHNOLOGIEN roving exhibition on remote sensing with satellites deals with various issues of environmental research, including a chapter on climate change. By following the 3M-concept (Meaning - Memorable - Moving), exhibitions allow to connect the visitors daily environment and personal experiences with the presented issues and objects. Therefore, hands-on exhibits, exciting multimedia effects and high-tech artefacts have to be combined with interpretive text elements to highlight the daily significance of the scientific topics and the exhibition theme respectively. To create such an exhibition, strong conceptual planning has to be conducted. This includes the specification of stern financial as well as time wise milestones. In addition

  20. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  1. An Astrobiology Microbes Exhibit and Education Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Allen, Jaclyn S.; Stocco, Karen; Tobola, Kay; Olendzenski, Lorraine

    2001-01-01

    Telling the story of NASA-sponsored scientific research to the public in exhibits is best done by partnerships of scientists and museum professionals. Likewise, preparing classroom activities and training teachers to use them should be done by teams of teachers and scientists. Here we describe how we used such partnerships to develop a new astrobiology augmentation to the Microbes! traveling exhibit and a companion education module. "Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract."

  2. Reaching the Public through Traveling Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-11-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called Alien Earths and MarsQuest. It has just started to develop another exhibit called Giant Planets. These exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of these major outreach programs. Alien Earths was developed in partnership with various research missions. The focus of the presentation will be on MarsQuest and Giant Planets. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot, \\$3M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's second 3-year tour will enable millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents) and workshops for master educators near host museums and science centers. The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibition's interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. These exhibit programs are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education. The presentation will also discuss how Giant Planets, a proposed 3500 square-foot traveling exhibition on the mysteries and discoveries of the outer planets, will be able to take advantage of the connections and resources that have been developed by the MarsQuest project.

  3. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  4. An Astrobiology Microbes Exhibit and Education Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Allen, Jaclyn S.; Stocco, Karen; Tobola, Kay; Olendzenski, Lorraine

    2001-01-01

    Telling the story of NASA-sponsored scientific research to the public in exhibits is best done by partnerships of scientists and museum professionals. Likewise, preparing classroom activities and training teachers to use them should be done by teams of teachers and scientists. Here we describe how we used such partnerships to develop a new astrobiology augmentation to the Microbes! traveling exhibit and a companion education module. "Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract."

  5. Sex differences in science museum exhibit attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arámbula Greenfield, Teresa

    This study examines the relative attraction of hands-on, interactive science museum exhibits for females and males. Studies have demonstrated that such exhibits can be effective learning experiences for children, with both academic and affective benefits. Other studies have shown that girls and boys do not always experience the same science-related educational opportunities and that, even when they do, they do not necessarily receive the same benefits from them. These early differences can lead to more serious educational and professional disparities later in life. As interactive museum exhibits represent a science experience that is-readily available to both girls and boys, the question arose as to whether they were being used similarly by the two groups as well as by adult women and men. It was found that both girls and boys used all types of exhibits, but that girls were more likely than boys to use puzzles and exhibits focusing on the human body; boys were more likely than girls to use computers and exhibits illustrating physical science principles. However, this was less true of children accompanied by adults (parents) than it was of unaccompanied children on school field trips who roamed the museum more freely.Received: 16 February 1994; Revised: 3 February 1995;

  6. Using Comparative Planetology in Exhibit Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on three of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (currently on tour), Alien Earths (in fabrication), and Giant Planets (in development). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in "habitable zones" around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Giant Planets: Exploring the Outer Solar System will take advantage of the excitement generated by the Cassini mission and bring planetary and origins research and discoveries to students and the public. It will be organized around four thematic areas: Our Solar System; Colossal Worlds; Moons, Rings, and Fields; and Make Space for Kids. Giant Planets will open in 2007. This talk will focus on the importance of making Earth comparisons in the conceptual design of each exhibit and will show several examples of how these comparisons were manifested in

  7. Montivipera bornmuelleri venom selectively exhibits high cytotoxic effects on keratinocytes cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sawan, Saly; Yaacoub, Tania; Hraoui-Bloquet, Souad; Sadek, Riyad; Hleihel, Walid; Fajloun, Ziad; Karam, Marc

    2017-04-04

    The Viperidae family venom is a rich source of bioactive compounds such as many proteases, which cause tissue necrosis and affect mostly the vascular system. However, the venom exhibits therapeutic potentials and has contributed to the development of some medical drugs. Specifically, the Montivipera bornmuelleri venom has shown to exhibit antibacterial, pro-inflammatory and antifungal activities. This work evaluates the cytotoxic effect of the M. bornmuelleri venom on human-derived keratinocytes including the non-tumorigenic HaCaT, the benign A5 and the low-grade malignant II4 cells. The toxicity of different venom concentrations (0.9, 1.87, 3.75, 7.5, 15, 30 and 60μg/mL) and their effect on the viability of the cells lines were assessed using the Lactate Dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and the Trypan blue tests after 24h of incubation. The venom was able to reduce the viability of all cell lines in a dose dependent manner with the HaCat cells being the least affected. For example, the 60μg/mL dose induced a more significant decrease the viability of A5 (44%) and II4 (21.33%) keratinocytes as compared to HaCaT cells (70.63%). Also, this venom showed a higher cytotoxic activity on the A5 (52.45%) and II4 (98.67%) cells as compared to HaCaT cells (30.14%) with an IC50 estimated at 10μg/mL on II4 and at 60μg/mL on benign A5. Those differential cytotoxic effects of the M. bornmuelleri venom pave the road for more advanced studies which might unravel the potential anticancer effects of this venom. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Primary breast tumor-derived cellular models: characterization of tumorigenic, metastatic, and cancer-associated fibroblasts in dissociated tumor (DT) cultures.

    PubMed

    Drews-Elger, Katherine; Brinkman, Joeli A; Miller, Philip; Shah, Sanket H; Harrell, J Chuck; da Silva, Thiago G; Ao, Zheng; Schlater, Amy; Azzam, Diana J; Diehl, Kathleen; Thomas, Dafydd; Slingerland, Joyce M; Perou, Charles M; Lippman, Marc E; El-Ashry, Dorraya

    2014-04-01

    Our goal was to establish primary cultures from dissociation of breast tumors in order to provide cellular models that may better recapitulate breast cancer pathogenesis and the metastatic process. Here, we report the characterization of six cellular models derived from the dissociation of primary breast tumor specimens, referred to as "dissociated tumor (DT) cells." In vitro, DT cells were characterized by proliferation assays, colony formation assays, protein, and gene expression profiling, including PAM50 predictor analysis. In vivo, tumorigenic and metastatic potential of DT cultures was assessed in NOD/SCID and NSG mice. These cellular models differ from recently developed patient-derived xenograft models in that they can be used for both in vitro and in vivo studies. PAM50 predictor analysis showed DT cultures similar to their paired primary tumor and as belonging to the basal and Her2-enriched subtypes. In vivo, three DT cultures are tumorigenic in NOD/SCID and NSG mice, and one of these is metastatic to lymph nodes and lung after orthotopic inoculation into the mammary fat pad, without excision of the primary tumor. Three DT cultures comprised of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) were isolated from luminal A, Her2-enriched, and basal primary tumors. Among the DT cells are those that are tumorigenic and metastatic in immunosuppressed mice, offering novel cellular models of ER-negative breast cancer subtypes. A group of CAFs provide tumor subtype-specific components of the tumor microenvironment (TME). Altogether, these DT cultures provide closer-to-primary cellular models for the study of breast cancer pathogenesis, metastasis, and TME.

  9. A Computer-Assisted 3D Model for Analyzing the Aggregation of Tumorigenic Cells Reveals Specialized Behaviors and Unique Cell Types that Facilitate Aggregate Coalescence

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Amanda; Kuhl, Spencer; Wessels, Deborah; Lusche, Daniel F.; Hanson, Brett; Ambrose, Joseph; Voss, Edward; Fletcher, Emily; Goldman, Charles; Soll, David R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a 4D computer-assisted reconstruction and motion analysis system, J3D-DIAS 4.1, and applied it to the reconstruction and motion analysis of tumorigenic cells in a 3D matrix. The system is unique in that it is fast, high-resolution, acquires optical sections using DIC microscopy (hence there is no associated photoxicity), and is capable of long-term 4D reconstruction. Specifically, a z-series at 5 μm increments can be acquired in less than a minute on tissue samples embedded in a 1.5 mm thick 3D Matrigel matrix. Reconstruction can be repeated at intervals as short as every minute and continued for 30 days or longer. Images are converted to mathematical representations from which quantitative parameters can be derived. Application of this system to cancer cells from established lines and fresh tumor tissue has revealed unique behaviors and cell types not present in non-tumorigenic lines. We report here that cells from tumorigenic lines and tumors undergo rapid coalescence in 3D, mediated by specific cell types that we have named “facilitators” and “probes.” A third cell type, the “dervish”, is capable of rapid movement through the gel and does not adhere to it. These cell types have never before been described. Our data suggest that tumorigenesis in vitro is a developmental process involving coalescence facilitated by specialized cells that culminates in large hollow spheres with complex architecture. The unique effects of select monoclonal antibodies on these processes demonstrate the usefulness of the model for analyzing the mechanisms of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:25790299

  10. A computer-assisted 3D model for analyzing the aggregation of tumorigenic cells reveals specialized behaviors and unique cell types that facilitate aggregate coalescence.

    PubMed

    Scherer, Amanda; Kuhl, Spencer; Wessels, Deborah; Lusche, Daniel F; Hanson, Brett; Ambrose, Joseph; Voss, Edward; Fletcher, Emily; Goldman, Charles; Soll, David R

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a 4D computer-assisted reconstruction and motion analysis system, J3D-DIAS 4.1, and applied it to the reconstruction and motion analysis of tumorigenic cells in a 3D matrix. The system is unique in that it is fast, high-resolution, acquires optical sections using DIC microscopy (hence there is no associated photoxicity), and is capable of long-term 4D reconstruction. Specifically, a z-series at 5 μm increments can be acquired in less than a minute on tissue samples embedded in a 1.5 mm thick 3D Matrigel matrix. Reconstruction can be repeated at intervals as short as every minute and continued for 30 days or longer. Images are converted to mathematical representations from which quantitative parameters can be derived. Application of this system to cancer cells from established lines and fresh tumor tissue has revealed unique behaviors and cell types not present in non-tumorigenic lines. We report here that cells from tumorigenic lines and tumors undergo rapid coalescence in 3D, mediated by specific cell types that we have named "facilitators" and "probes." A third cell type, the "dervish", is capable of rapid movement through the gel and does not adhere to it. These cell types have never before been described. Our data suggest that tumorigenesis in vitro is a developmental process involving coalescence facilitated by specialized cells that culminates in large hollow spheres with complex architecture. The unique effects of select monoclonal antibodies on these processes demonstrate the usefulness of the model for analyzing the mechanisms of anti-cancer drugs.

  11. Chondroitin Sulfate-E Is a Negative Regulator of a Pro-Tumorigenic Wnt/Beta-Catenin-Collagen 1 Axis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Catherine M.; Klüppel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate-E (CS-E) is misregulated in many human cancers, including breast cancer. Cell-surface associated CS-E has been shown to have pro-tumorigenic functions, and pharmacological treatment with exogenous CS-E has been proposed to interfere with tumor progression mediated by endogenous CS-E. However, the effects of exogenous CS-E on breast cancer cell behavior, and the molecular mechanisms deployed by CS-E are not well understood. We show here that treatment with CS-E, but not other chondroitin forms, could interfere with the invasive protrusion formation and migration of breast cancer cells in three-dimensional organotypic cultures. Microarray analysis identified transcriptional programs controlled by CS-E in these cells. Importantly, negative regulation of the pro-metastatic extracellular matrix gene Col1a1 was required for the anti-migratory effects of exogenous CS-E. Knock-down of Col1a1 gene expression mimics the effects of CS-E treatment, while exposing cells to a preformed collagen I matrix interfered with the anti-migratory effects of CS-E. In addition, CS-E specifically interfered with Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, a known pro-tumorigenic pathway. Lastly, we demonstrate that Col1a1 is a positively regulated target gene of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. Together, our data identify treatment with exogenous CS-E as negative regulatory mechanism of breast cancer cell motility through interference with a pro-tumorigenic Wnt/beta-catenin - Collagen I axis. PMID:25090092

  12. FAAH inhibition enhances anandamide mediated anti-tumorigenic effects in non-small cell lung cancer by downregulating the EGF/EGFR pathway.

    PubMed

    Ravi, Janani; Sneh, Amita; Shilo, Konstantin; Nasser, Mohd W; Ganju, Ramesh K

    2014-05-15

    The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA), a neurotransmitter was shown to have anti-cancer effects. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) metabolizes AEA and decreases its anti-tumorigenic activity. In this study, we have analyzed the role of FAAH inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We have shown that FAAH and CB1 receptor which is activated by AEA are expressed in lung adenocarcinoma patient samples and NSCLC cell lines A549 and H460. Since the synthetic analogue of anandamide (Met-F-AEA) did not possess significant anti-tumorigenic effects, we used Met-F-AEA in combination with FAAH inhibitor URB597 which significantly reduced EGF (epidermal growth factor)-induced proliferative and chemotactic activities in vitro when compared to anti-tumorigenic activity of Met-F-AEA alone. Further analysis of signaling mechanisms revealed that Met-F-AEA in combination with URB597 inhibits activation of EGFR and its downstream signaling ERK, AKT and NF-kB. In addition, it inhibited MMP2 secretion and stress fiber formation. We have also shown that the Met-F-AEA in combination with URB597 induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest by downregulating cyclin D1 and CDK4 expressions, ultimately leading to apoptosis via activation of caspase-9 and PARP. Furthermore, the combination treatment inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft nude mouse model system. Tumors derived from Met-F-AEA and URB597 combination treated mice showed reduced EGFR, AKT and ERK activation and MMP2/MMP9 expressions when compared to Met-F-AEA or URB597 alone. Taken together, these data suggest in EGFR overexpressing NSCLC that the combination of Met-F-AEA with FAAH inhibitor resulted in superior therapeutic response compared to individual compound activity alone.

  13. G-CSF Receptor Positive Neuroblastoma Subpopulations are Enriched in Chemotherapy –Resistant or Relapsed Tumors and are Highly Tumorigenic

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Danielle M.; Agarwal, Saurabh; Benham, Ashley; Coarfa, Cristian; Trahan, Denae N.; Chen, Zaowen; Stowers, Paris N.; Courtney, Amy N.; Lakoma, Anna; Barbieri, Eveline; Metelitsa, Leonid S.; Gunaratne, Preethi; Kim, Eugene S.; Shohet, Jason M.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a neural crest derived embryonal malignancy which accounts for 13% of all pediatric cancer mortality, primarily due to tumor recurrence. Therapy-resistant cancer stem cells are implicated in tumor relapse, but definitive phenotypic evidence of the existence of these cells has been lacking. In this study, we define a highly tumorigenic subpopulation in neuroblastoma with stem cell characteristics, based on the expression of CD114, which encodes the receptor for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). CD114+ cells isolated from a primary tumor and the NGP cell line by flow cytometry were highly tumorigenic and capable of both self-renewal and differentiation to progeny cells. CD114+ cells closely resembled embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells with respect to their profiles of cell cycle, microRNA and gene expression. In addition, they reflect a primitive undifferentiated neuroectodermal/neural crest phenotype revealing a developmental hierarchy within neuroblastoma tumors. We detected this de-differentiated neural crest subpopulation in all established neuroblastoma cell lines, xenograft tumors, and primary tumor specimens analyzed. Ligand activation of CD114 by the addition of exogenous G-CSF to CD114+ cells confirmed intact STAT3 upregulation, characteristic of G-CSF receptor signaling. Together our data describe a novel distinct subpopulation within neuroblastoma with enhanced tumorigenicity and a stem-cell like phenotype, further elucidating the complex heterogeneity of solid tumors such as neuroblastoma. We propose this subpopulation may represent an additional target for novel therapeutic approaches to this aggressive pediatric malignancy. PMID:23687340

  14. Gallic acid, an active constituent of grape seed extract, exhibits anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and anti-tumorigenic effects against prostate carcinoma xenograft growth in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Manjinder; Velmurugan, Balaiya; Rajamanickam, Subapriya; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2009-09-01

    Gallic acid, a natural agent present in a wide-range of fruits and vegetables, has been of potential interest as an anti-cancer agent; herein, we evaluated its efficacy in androgen-independent DU145 and androgen-dependent-22Rv1 human prostate cancer (PCa) cells. Cell viability was determined by MTT and apoptosis by Annexin V-PI assays. In vivo anti-cancer efficacy was assessed by DU145 and 22Rv1 xenograft growth in nude mice given normal drinking water or one supplemented with 0.3% or 1% (w/v) gallic acid. PCNA, TUNEL and CD31 immunostaining was performed in tumor tissues for in vivo anti-proliferative, apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of gallic acid. Gallic acid decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in both DU145 and 22Rv1 cells largely via apoptosis induction. In tumor studies, gallic acid feeding inhibited the growth of DU145 and 22Rv1 PCa xenografts in nude mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed significant inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and reduction of microvessel density in tumor xenografts from gallic acid-fed mice as compared to controls in both DU145 and 22Rv1 models. Taken together, our findings show the anti-PCa efficacy of gallic acid and provide a rationale for additional studies with this naturally-occurring agent for its efficacy against PCa.

  15. Macrophages Facilitate Coal Tar Pitch Extract-Induced Tumorigenic Transformation of Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells Mediated by NF-κB

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Feifei; Wu, Yiming; Zhang, Shaofeng; Liu, Yu; Qin, Lijuan; Wu, Yongjun; Yan, Zhen; Wu, Weidong

    2012-01-01

    Objective Chronic respiratory inflammation has been associated with lung cancer. Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) play a critical role in the formation of inflammation microenvironment. We sought to characterize the role of TAMs in coal tar pitch extract (CTPE)-induced tumorigenic transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells and the underlying mechanisms. Methods The expression of TAMs-specific CD68 in lung cancer tissues and paired adjacent tissues from cancer patients was determined using immunostaining. Co-culture of human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and macrophage-like THP-1 cells were conducted to evaluate the promotive effect of macrophages on CTPE-induced tumorigenic transformation of BEAS-2B cells. BEAS-2B cells were first treated with 2.4 µg/mL CTPE for 72 hours. After removal of CTPE, the cells were continuously cultured either with or without THP-1 cells and passaged using trypsin-EDTA. Alterations of cell cycle, karyotype, colony formation in soft agar and tumor xenograft growth in nude mice of BEAS-2B cells at passages 10, 20 and 30, indicative of tumorigenecity, were determined, respectively. In addition, mRNA and protein levels of NF-κB in BEAS-2B cells were measured with RT-PCR and western blot, respectively. B(a)P was used as the positive control. Results The over-expression of TAMs-specific CD68 around lung tumor tissues was detected and associated with lung cancer progression. The tumorigenic alterations of BEAS-2B cells including increase in cell growth rate, number of cells with aneuploidy, clonogenicity in soft agar, and tumor size in nude mice in vivo occurred at passage 10, becoming significant at passages 20 and 30 of the co-culture following CTPE removal in compared to BEAS-2B cells alone. In addition, the expression levels of NF-κB in BEAS-2B cells were positively correlated to the malignancy of BEAS-2B cells under different conditions of treatment. Conclusion The presence of macrophages facilitated CTPE

  16. The Gravity- Powered Calculator, a Galilean Exhibit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerreta, Pietro

    2014-04-01

    The Gravity-Powered Calculator is an exhibit of the Exploratorium in San Francisco. It is presented by its American creators as an amazing device that extracts the square roots of numbers, using only the force of gravity. But if you analyze his concept construction one can not help but recall the research of Galileo on falling bodies, the inclined plane and the projectile motion; exactly what the American creators did not put into prominence with their exhibit. Considering the equipment only for what it does, in my opinion, is very reductive compared to the historical roots of the Galilean mathematical physics contained therein. Moreover, if accurate deductions are contained in the famous study of S. Drake on the Galilean drawings and, in particular on Folio 167 v, the parabolic paths of the ball leaping from its launch pad after descending a slope really actualize Galileo's experiments. The exhibit therefore may be best known as a `Galilean calculator'.

  17. Localized pulses exhibiting a missilelike slow decay.

    PubMed

    Shaarawi, Amr M; Maged, Maha A; Besieris, Ioannis M; Hashish, Essam

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the quasi-missile behavior of known localized wave solutions, such as the modified power spectrum and splash pulses. We demonstrate that source-free localized waves can exhibit slow decay rates analogous to Wu's missile solutions, which are characterized by an amplitude decay rate slower than 1/R over an unlimited range. When excited from a finite aperture, the missilelike decay is not exhibited by all localized waves showing such behavior in the source-free situation. On the other hand, localized wave missiles generated from a finite aperture have peaks that exhibit quasi-missile decay. In an extended intermediate range between the near- and the far-field regions, these pulses decay at a rate slower than 1/R before switching to the usual 1/R decay.

  18. Localized pulses exhibiting a missilelike slow decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaarawi, Amr M.; Maged, Maha A.; Besieris, Ioannis M.; Hashish, Essam

    2006-08-01

    We investigate the quasi-missile behavior of known localized wave solutions, such as the modified power spectrum and splash pulses. We demonstrate that source-free localized waves can exhibit slow decay rates analogous to Wu's missile solutions, which are characterized by an amplitude decay rate slower than 1/R over an unlimited range. When excited from a finite aperture, the missilelike decay is not exhibited by all localized waves showing such behavior in the source-free situation. On the other hand, localized wave missiles generated from a finite aperture have peaks that exhibit quasi-missile decay. In an extended intermediate range between the near- and the far-field regions, these pulses decay at a rate slower than 1/R before switching to the usual 1/R decay.

  19. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-conditioned Medium Suppressed Melanoma Tumorigenicity Through the Enhancement of Natural-Killer Cellular Immunity.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Chang-Ting; Luo, Yung-Hung; Chien, Chian-Shiu; Wu, Chieh-Hung; Tseng, Pei-Chun; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Lee, Yu-Chin; Whang-Peng, Jacqueline; Chen, Yuh-Min

    2016-05-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can secrete cytokines that are involved in T-cell development and affect cytotoxic activity. To assess the effect of iPSC-conditioned medium on tumorigenicity, we retrieved splenocytes from B6 mice and cocultured them with or without irradiated B16 melanoma cells, mouse interleukin-2 (mIL-2), or iPSC-conditioned medium. Splenocyte cytotoxicity assays against B16 melanoma cells [as cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity] and P815 cells [as natural killer (NK) activity] were performed. IL-10 and interferon-γ concentrations were measured. An in vivo subcutaneous B16 melanoma growth model was performed in B6 mice and treated with iPSC-conditioned medium. The lymphocyte subpopulation depletion test was performed to determine effectors against B16 melanoma cells. We found that unstimulated splenocytes had little cytotoxic activity. Without tumor cells, mIL-2 could augment iPSC-conditioned medium-treated CTL and NK activities (P<0.01). With irradiated tumor cells, mIL-2 treatment of splenocytes could not enhance CTL or NK activity, but iPSC-conditioned medium could enhance CTL and NK activity (P<0.001). Irradiated tumor cells induced mice splenocytes to secrete more IL-10, similar to mIL-2 treatment, but not iPSC-conditioned medium treatment. mIL-2 had better efficacy than conditioned medium in inducing splenocyte interferon-γ production. The CTL and NK cell depletion test showed that the immunostimulating effect of iPSC-conditioned medium on splenocytes was through the enhancement of NK cellular activity (P<0.05). The subcutaneous melanoma growth model showed that B16-bearing mice treated with an iPSC-conditioned medium intraperitoneal injection had a decreased tumor growth rate (P<0.01). Our study suggests that iPSC-conditioned medium had a protective effect against tumor-induced immunosuppression through the enhancement of host NK cellular activity.

  20. Tumorigenic poxviruses: genomic organization and DNA sequence of the telomeric region of the Shope fibroma virus genome.

    PubMed

    Upton, C; DeLange, A M; McFadden, G

    1987-09-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a 160-kb linear double-stranded DNA genome and possesses terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 12.4 kb. The DNA sequence of the terminal 5.5 kb of the viral genome is presented and together with previously published sequences completes the entire sequence of the SFV TIR. The terminal 400-bp region contains no major open reading frames (ORFs) but does possess five related imperfect palindromes. The remaining 5.1 kb of the sequence contains seven tightly clustered and tandemly oriented ORFs, four larger than 100 amino acids in length (T1, T2, T4, and T5) and three smaller ORFs (T3A, T3B, and T3C). All are transcribed toward the viral hairpin and almost all possess the consensus sequence TTTTTNT near their 3' ends which has been implicated for the transcription termination of vaccinia virus early genes. Searches of the published DNA database revealed no sequences with significant homology with this region of the SFV genome but when the protein database was searched with the translation products of ORFs T1-T5 it was found that the N-terminus of the putative T4 polypeptide is closely related to the signal sequence of the hemagglutinin precursor from influenza A virus, suggesting that the T4 polypeptide may be secreted from SFV-infected cells. Examination of other SFV ORFs shows that T1 and T2 also possess signal-like hydrophobic amino acid stretches close to their N-termini. The protein database search also revealed that the putative T2 protein has significant homology to the insulin family of polypeptides. In terms of sequence repetitions, seven tandemly repeated copies of the hexanucleotide ATTGTT and three flanking regions of dyad symmetry were detected, all in ORF T3C. A search for palindromic sequences also revealed two clusters, one in ORF T3A/B and a second in ORF T2. ORF T2 harbors five short sequence domains, each of which consists of a 6-bp short palindrome and a 10- to 18-bp larger palindrome. The

  1. BRCA1 regulation on β-hCG: a mechanism for tumorigenicity in BRCA1 defective breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sengodan, S K; Nadhan, R; Nair, R S; Hemalatha, S K; Somasundaram, V; Sushama, R R; Rajan, A; Latha, N R; Varghese, G R; Thankappan, R K; Kumar, J M; Chil, A; Anilkumar, T V; Srinivas, P

    2017-09-04

    Human chorionic gonadotropin β (β-hCG) has been implicated in breast tumorigenesis. However, the role of this hormone is highly controversial as certain studies suggest it has anti-tumor properties while others have found it to be pro-tumorigenic. To unveil the truth, we have analyzed the expression of β-hCG in breast cancer. We identified for the first time that β-hCG expression is linked to BRCA1 status and its overexpression is seen in BRCA1 mutated breast cancer cells, BRCA1 conditional knockout mouse breast cancer tissues and BRCA1 floxed basal cell carcinoma (BCC) tissues. An analysis of three large, transcriptomic data sets from TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) expression profile confirmed the inverse correlation between BRCA1 and β-hCG in human breast cancer. Using ChIP and luciferase assays, we also demonstrated that the cancer cells with wild-type but not mutant BRCA1 directly repress the expression of β-hCG by binding to its promoter. Further, β-hCG promotes migration and invasion predominantly in BRCA1 mutant breast cancer cells. Interestingly, stable overexpression of β-hCG in BRCA1 mutant but not wild-type breast cancer cells results in the formation of spheres even on monolayer cultures. The cells of these spheres show high expression of both EMT and stem cell markers. Since β-hCG belongs to a cysteine knot family of proteins like TGFβ and TGFβ signaling is deregulated in BRCA1 defective tumors, we checked whether β-hCG can mediate signaling through TGFβRII in BRCA1 mutated cells. We found for the first time that β-hCG can bind and phosphorylate TGFβRII, irrespective of LHCGR status and induce proliferation in BRCA1 defective cells. Our results confirmed that there exists a transcriptional regulation of BRCA1 on β-hCG and BRCA1 mutation promotes β-hCG mediated tumorigenesis through TGFβRII signaling. Thus inhibiting β-hCG-TGFβRII could prove an effective treatment strategy for BRCA1 mutated tumors.

  2. The exploration of the exhibition informatization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiankang

    2017-06-01

    The construction and management of exhibition informatization is the main task and choke point during the process of Chinese exhibition industry’s transformation and promotion. There are three key points expected to realize a breakthrough during the construction of Chinese exhibition informatization, and the three aspects respectively are adopting service outsourcing to construct and maintain the database, adopting advanced chest card technology to collect various kinds of information, developing statistics analysis to maintain good cutomer relations. The success of Chinese exhibition informatization mainly calls for mature suppliers who can provide construction and maintenance of database, the proven technology, a sense of data security, advanced chest card technology, the ability of data mining and analysis and the ability to improve the exhibition service basing on the commercial information got from the data analysis. Several data security measures are expected to apply during the process of system developing, including the measures of the terminal data security, the internet data security, the media data security, the storage data security and the application data security. The informatization of this process is based on the chest card designing. At present, there are several types of chest card technology: bar code chest card; two-dimension code card; magnetic stripe chest card; smart-chip chest card. The information got from the exhibition data will help the organizers to make relevant service strategies, quantify the accumulated indexes of the customers, and improve the level of the customer’s satisfaction and loyalty, what’s more, the information can also provide more additional services like the commercial trips, VIP ceremonial reception.

  3. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... such enterprises or operations, a detailed explanation of each such relationship, including the... relationship. (5) Exhibit F—Location of facilities. A geographical map of suitable scale and detail showing all... proposed customers; derivation of numbers of customers proposed to be served; individual consumer peak...

  4. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the points... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Required exhibits. 32.2 Section 32.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  5. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the points... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required exhibits. 32.2 Section 32.2 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT...

  6. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...; number of units of locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars owned and leased; principal commodities... for each of the last 5 calendar years and for each month of the current year to latest available date... to the date of the latest balance sheet furnished as Exhibit 8, together with a monthly forecast...

  7. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...; number of units of locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars owned and leased; principal commodities... for each of the last 5 calendar years and for each month of the current year to latest available date... to the date of the latest balance sheet furnished as Exhibit 8, together with a monthly forecast...

  8. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...; number of units of locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars owned and leased; principal commodities... for each of the last 5 calendar years and for each month of the current year to latest available date... to the date of the latest balance sheet furnished as Exhibit 8, together with a monthly forecast...

  9. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...; number of units of locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars owned and leased; principal commodities... for each of the last 5 calendar years and for each month of the current year to latest available date... to the date of the latest balance sheet furnished as Exhibit 8, together with a monthly forecast...

  10. 49 CFR 250.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...; number of units of locomotives, freight cars, and passenger cars owned and leased; principal commodities... for each of the last 5 calendar years and for each month of the current year to latest available date... to the date of the latest balance sheet furnished as Exhibit 8, together with a monthly forecast...

  11. Creating Cross-Cultural Exhibits in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Kazuyo; Erickson, Virginia; Ford, Viktoria

    Theory and practice of the Cross-Cultural Arts Exhibit project initiated by the Krannert Art Museum at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Illinois) is described in this paper. The project was developed based on the concept of post-museum. Instead of transmitting values and knowledge, communication in the post-museum stresses the…

  12. After Terror Charges, Artist Exhibits Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Steven Kurtz, a professor of visual studies at the State University of New York, has been working with various bacteria as part of his counterculture exhibit artworks for nearly 20 years. Four years ago, federal agents raided his home in a bioterrorism investigation. The federal agents had been called to the house by local police officers…

  13. The medial prefrontal cortex exhibits money illusion

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernd; Rangel, Antonio; Wibral, Matthias; Falk, Armin

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral economists have proposed that money illusion, which is a deviation from rationality in which individuals engage in nominal evaluation, can explain a wide range of important economic and social phenomena. This proposition stands in sharp contrast to the standard economic assumption of rationality that requires individuals to judge the value of money only on the basis of the bundle of goods that it can buy—its real value—and not on the basis of the actual amount of currency—its nominal value. We used fMRI to investigate whether the brain's reward circuitry exhibits money illusion. Subjects received prizes in 2 different experimental conditions that were identical in real economic terms, but differed in nominal terms. Thus, in the absence of money illusion there should be no differences in activation in reward-related brain areas. In contrast, we found that areas of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which have been previously associated with the processing of anticipatory and experienced rewards, and the valuation of goods, exhibited money illusion. We also found that the amount of money illusion exhibited by the vmPFC was correlated with the amount of money illusion exhibited in the evaluation of economic transactions. PMID:19307555

  14. Graduation by Exhibition: Assessing Genuine Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Joseph P.; And Others

    This book describes a strategy for school reform, "planning backwards from exhibitions," which is a collective invention of the Coalition of Essential Schools. The strategy is based on the principle that graduation from high school should be based on genuine achievement. The first article, by Joseph P. McDonald, explains that the purpose of…

  15. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Exhibits. 705.24 Section 705.24 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS... be displayed in any appropriate location or event (including commercially owned spaces such as...

  16. 18 CFR 153.8 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... LNG, evidence that an appropriate and qualified concern will properly and safely receive or deliver such LNG, including a report containing detailed engineering and design information. The Commission... Office of Energy Projects, 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426; (6) Exhibit E-1. If the...

  17. FluxBase: An Interactive Art Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntley, Joan S.; Partridge, Michael

    1992-01-01

    Describes a computer program that gives Fluxus exhibition attendees an opportunity to experience the Flux objects in the spirit in which they were originally created. Suggests that the computer program provides a virtual approximation to the original art works without damaging them. (RS)

  18. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... be displayed in any appropriate location or event (including commercially owned spaces such as... for Navy exhibits in events of international or national scope, or those requiring major coordination... will be used. See Armed Forces Request Form, § 705.36. (4) Requests for exceptions to policy...

  19. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... be displayed in any appropriate location or event (including commercially owned spaces such as... for Navy exhibits in events of international or national scope, or those requiring major coordination... will be used. See Armed Forces Request Form, § 705.36. (4) Requests for exceptions to policy...

  20. 18 CFR 34.4 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Required exhibits. 34.4 Section 34.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATION FOR AUTHORIZATION OF THE ISSUANCE...

  1. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  2. Do Online Students Exhibit Different Learning Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausler, Joel; Sanders, John W.; Young, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    We examined the relationship between learning styles and student type. This research seeks to examine if online students exhibit different learning styles from onsite students; and, if so, what accommodations relating to learning style differences may be made for online students? Students (N = 80) were asked to complete an online survey in order…

  3. Do Online Students Exhibit Different Learning Styles?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hausler, Joel; Sanders, John W.; Young, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Do online students exhibit different learning styles from onsite students; and if so, what accommodations relating to learning style differences may be made for online students? Our ideas of best practices within this area have been evolving to keep up with our students. Various tactics have been used to make sure students understand what kinds of…

  4. 18 CFR 153.8 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... LNG, evidence that an appropriate and qualified concern will properly and safely receive or deliver such LNG, including a report containing detailed engineering and design information. The Commission... Office of Energy Projects, 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426; (6) Exhibit E-1. If the...

  5. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... separate volume or volumes shall indicate on the cover thereof applicant's name and bear Docket No. CP... an equivalent Btu basis. (12) Exhibit K—Cost of facilities. A detailed estimate of total capital cost.... (vii) A balance sheet and income statement (12 months) of most recent date available....

  6. 18 CFR 156.5 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... separate volume or volumes shall indicate on the cover thereof applicant's name and bear Docket No. CP... an equivalent Btu basis. (12) Exhibit K—Cost of facilities. A detailed estimate of total capital cost.... (vii) A balance sheet and income statement (12 months) of most recent date available....

  7. After Terror Charges, Artist Exhibits Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Steven Kurtz, a professor of visual studies at the State University of New York, has been working with various bacteria as part of his counterculture exhibit artworks for nearly 20 years. Four years ago, federal agents raided his home in a bioterrorism investigation. The federal agents had been called to the house by local police officers…

  8. Human Muse cells, non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells, have the capacity for liver regeneration by specific homing and replenishment of new hepatocytes in liver fibrosis mouse model.

    PubMed

    Iseki, Masahiro; Kushida, Yoshihiro; Wakao, Shohei; Akimoto, Takahiro; Mizuma, Masamichi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Asada, Ryuta; Shimizu, Shinobu; Unno, Michiaki; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Dezawa, Mari

    2016-11-02

    Muse cells, a novel type of non-tumorigenic pluripotent-like stem cells reside in the bone marrow, skin and adipose tissue, are collectable as cells positive for pluripotent surface marker SSEA-3. They are able to differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers. The capacity of intravenously injected human bone marrow-Muse cells to repair the liver fibrosis model of immunodeficient mice was evaluated in this study. They exhibited the ability for differentiation spontaneously into hepatoblast/hepatocyte-lineage cells and high migration toward the serum and liver tissue of carbon tetrachloride-treated mice in vitro. In vivo, they specifically accumulated into the liver, but not into other organs except the lower rate in the lung at 2 weeks after intravenous injection into the liver fibrosis model. After homing, Muse cells spontaneously differentiated in vivo into HepPar-1 (71.1±15.2%), human albumin (54.3±8.2%) and anti-trypsin (47.9±4.6%)-positive cells without fusing with host hepatocytes, and expressed mature functional markers such as human-CYP1A2, and human-Glc-6-Pase, at 8 weeks. Recovery in serum total bilirubin and albumin, and significant attenuation of fibrosis were recognized with statistical differences between the Muse group and control groups which received the vehicle or the same number of non-Muse cells, namely cells other than Muse cells in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Thus, unlike ES and iPS cells, Muse cells are unique in their efficient migration and integration into damaged liver only by intravenous injection, nontumorigenicity, and spontaneous differentiation into hepatocytes, rendering induction into hepatocytes prior to transplantation unnecessary. They are suggested to repair liver fibrosis in two simple steps; expansion after collection from the bone marrow and intravenous injection. Such feasible strategy might provide impressive regenerative performance to liver disease patients.

  9. MarsQuest: A National Traveling Exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    1998-09-01

    With the successful landing of Mars Pathfinder and the arrival of Mars Global Surveyor, a new decade of Mars exploration has commenced. MarsQuest, a 5000 square foot traveling exhibition, is being developed to further bring the excitement and discoveries of this "Decade of Mars Exploration" to the public. MarsQuest is partially funded by the Informal Science Education Program of the National Science Foundation and NASA's Office of Space Science. The Space Science Institute (SSI) in Boulder, CO, is leading the project. Scientific and educational advisors from many different universities and government laboratories, most of whom are directly involved in the active and planned Mars missions, will ensure the scientific accuracy, timeliness, and relevance of the key concepts presented in the exhibition and accompanying programs. The traveling exhibit is the primary element of the MarsQuest project. The exhibition experience, carefully keyed to current events in Mars exploration, will transport visitors to the surface of the Red Planet via large murals, dioramas, and numerous interactive displays. There they will have the opportunity to share in the spirit and thrill of exploration, and come to appreciate the similarities and differences between Earth and Mars. A planetarium show, geared to the goals of the MarsQuest project, will be an important sensory addition to the traveling exhibit. The planetarium/star-theater venue presents a unique environment where audience members can literally be surrounded by Mars images. Education and outreach programs comprise the remainder of the MarsQuest project. The goal of these is to make scientific concepts and scientific and engineering processes understandable to students via Mars-inspired curricula. MarsQuest will open in late-1999, traveling to about nine sites throughout the United States and reaching an estimated two to three million children and adults during its planned three-year tour. Mars - coming soon to a museum near

  10. Reciprocal interactions between tumor-associated macrophages and CD44-positive cancer cells via osteopontin/CD44 promote tumorigenicity in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Rao, Guanhua; Wang, Hongyi; Li, Baowei; Huang, Li; Xue, Danfeng; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Haijing; Wang, Jun; Zhu, Yushan; Lu, Youyong; Du, Lei; Chen, Quan

    2013-02-15

    CD44 is of functional importance for tumor initiation and progression in colorectal cancer, but how this molecule benefits cancer cells from the tumor microenvironment, especially tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), remains poorly defined. In vivo tumorigenic assays were conducted to assess the role of murine TAMs in the tumorigenesis of human colorectal cancer cells. Both in vitro and in vivo osteopontin (OPN) expression levels in TAMs were examined by immunohistochemistry, quantitative PCR, and Western blotting. Soft agar colony formation assays were used to estimate the clonogenicity of colorectal cancer cells that had received different treatments. The relationships between the expression levels of OPN, CD44v6, and CD68 and clinical prognosis were evaluated by tissue microarray analysis. We found that macrophages, when coinjected or cocultured with CD44-positive colorectal cancer cells, were able to produce higher levels of OPN, which in turn facilitated the tumorigenicity and clonogenicity of the colorectal cancer cells. The knockdown of CD44 or treatment with blocking antibodies to CD44 attenuated OPN secretion. OPN, through binding to its receptor CD44, activated c-jun-NH(2)-kinase signaling and promoted the clonogenicity of colorectal cancer cells. Moreover, tissue microarray data have shown that OPN expression, in combination with CD44v6, has a negative correlation with colorectal cancer patient survival. These results suggest that the OPN-CD44 interaction is important for colorectal cancer progression and could serve as a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of colorectal cancer. ©2012 AACR.

  11. Ultra-sensitive detection of tumorigenic cellular impurities in human cell-processed therapeutic products by digital analysis of soft agar colony formation.

    PubMed

    Kusakawa, Shinji; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kuroda, Takuya; Kawamata, Shin; Sato, Yoji

    2015-12-08

    Contamination with tumorigenic cellular impurities is one of the most pressing concerns for human cell-processed therapeutic products (hCTPs). The soft agar colony formation (SACF) assay, which is a well-known in vitro assay for the detection of malignant transformed cells, is applicable for the quality assessment of hCTPs. Here we established an image-based screening system for the SACF assay using a high-content cell analyzer termed the digital SACF assay. Dual fluorescence staining of formed colonies and the dissolution of soft agar led to accurate detection of transformed cells with the imaging cytometer. Partitioning a cell sample into multiple wells of culture plates enabled digital readout of the presence of colonies and elevated the sensitivity for their detection. In practice, the digital SACF assay detected impurity levels as low as 0.00001% of the hCTPs, i.e. only one HeLa cell contained in 10,000,000 human mesenchymal stem cells, within 30 days. The digital SACF assay saves time, is more sensitive than in vivo tumorigenicity tests, and would be useful for the quality control of hCTPs in the manufacturing process.

  12. Functional modification of adipocytes by grape seed extract impairs their pro-tumorigenic signaling on colon cancer stem cells and the daughter cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    With global rise in obesity, it is imperative that we identify obesity-driven factors that increase growth and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC), and also discover and develop agents with anti-CRC efficacy under obese conditions. Here in, we investigated grape seed extract (GSE), a well-defined agent with both preventive and anti-CRC efficacy, for its potential to impair pro-tumorigenic signaling of adipocytes on CRC/colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) and associated molecular mechanisms, to control CRC under obese conditions. GSE treatment significantly decreased the growth and invasion promoting effects of both mouse and human adipocytes on CRC cells. Moreover, GSE exerted a direct inhibitory effect, as well as it strongly reduced the growth promoting signals of adipocytes, on colon CSCs. These GSE effects were associated with a decrease in both mRNA and protein levels of various CSC-associated molecules. Notably, GSE effects on adipocytes were not due to changes in lipid content, but by inducing the ‘browning’ of adipocytes as evidenced by an increase in UCP-1 mRNA level and mitochondriogenesis. Together, these findings, for the first time, suggest the ability of GSE to induce ‘brown remodeling’ of white adipocytes, which causes functional modification of adipocytes thus impairing their pro-tumorigenic signals on colon CSCs/CRC cells. PMID:25294814

  13. Functional modification of adipocytes by grape seed extract impairs their pro-tumorigenic signaling on colon cancer stem cells and the daughter cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Kumar, Dileep; Raina, Komal; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2014-10-30

    With global rise in obesity, it is imperative that we identify obesity-driven factors that increase growth and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC), and also discover and develop agents with anti-CRC efficacy under obese conditions. Here in, we investigated grape seed extract (GSE), a well-defined agent with both preventive and anti-CRC efficacy, for its potential to impair pro-tumorigenic signaling of adipocytes on CRC/colon cancer stem cells (CSCs) and associated molecular mechanisms, to control CRC under obese conditions. GSE treatment significantly decreased the growth and invasion promoting effects of both mouse and human adipocytes on CRC cells. Moreover, GSE exerted a direct inhibitory effect, as well as it strongly reduced the growth promoting signals of adipocytes, on colon CSCs. These GSE effects were associated with a decrease in both mRNA and protein levels of various CSC-associated molecules. Notably, GSE effects on adipocytes were not due to changes in lipid content, but by inducing the 'browning' of adipocytes as evidenced by an increase in UCP-1 mRNA level and mitochondriogenesis. Together, these findings, for the first time, suggest the ability of GSE to induce 'brown remodeling' of white adipocytes, which causes functional modification of adipocytes thus impairing their pro-tumorigenic signals on colon CSCs/CRC cells.

  14. Barium hexaferrite (M-phase) exhibiting superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Ganapathi, L.; Gopalakrishnan, J.; Rao, C.N.R.

    1984-05-01

    Barium hexaferrite (M-phase) prepared by the flux method is found to exhibit a ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure similar to barium hexaaluminate. Morgan and Shaw as well as Iyi et al have recently reported the formation of a barium-rich phase of barium hexaaluminate possessing a ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure of the magnetoplumbite structure. In view of the similarities between the layer structures of ..beta..-aluminas and the corresponding ferrites the authors have been carrying out electron microscopic investigations of potassium ..beta..-alumina and BaA1/sub 12/O/sub 19/ along with ferrites of similar compositions. They have obtained electron diffraction patterns of barium hexaaluminate identical to those obtained by Morgan and Shaw and Iyi et al, but more interestingly, they have found a phase of barium hexaferrite (M-phase) exhibiting the ..sqrt..3a x ..sqrt..3a superstructure.

  15. The palaeontological exhibition: a venue for dialogue.

    PubMed

    Murriello, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dialogue between museums and their visitors enables museums to subsist, undergo transformations and become consolidated as socially valued cultural venues. The Museo de La Plata (Argentina) was created in the late nineteenth century as a natural history museum, and this study shows that currently the museum is valued socially as a venue for family leisure and education, at which people make sense to the objects exhibited through characteristics conferred upon them by both the institution and the visitor. Nevertheless, such dialogue is somehow affected by the museographic proposal and the public interpretation of the institutional narrative, which could be analysed within the frame of contextual learning. As a consequence, the evolutionary idea that the museum aims to communicate is distorted by the public. This article highlights the importance of considering the visitors' interpretations when planning museum exhibitions, a perspective that has been rather absent in the Argentinian museums. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  17. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit entrance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    StenniSphere at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., invites visitors to discover why America comes to Stennis Space Center before going into space. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center.

  18. 2005 Armaments Technology Seminar and Exhibition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-13

    collaboration with COCOMS(s) and all JFHQ-State, takes lead and stands up JCCSE JCCSE evolves as part of the larger DoD enterprise, leveraging the GIG and...Regiment LTC Andre Kirnes, USA, Program Manager, Mortar Systems Dr. Raymond M. Bateman , Science Advisor to Commander III Corps, US Army Research Laboratory... Bateman , Science Advisor to the Commander III Corps Report from the Field Break in Exhibit Area Ms. Angela Messer, Booz Allen Hamilton Mr. Brian Newman

  19. When do children exhibit a "yes" bias?

    PubMed

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as preference-object and knowledge-object questions pertaining to objects, and knowledge-face questions pertaining to facial expressions. Four-year-olds tended to say "yes" only to knowledge-object questions. Five-year-olds did not show any strong response tendency. Six-year-olds exhibited a nay-saying bias to knowledge-face questions. Also, 3-year-olds could indicate the correct option when asked questions with 2 response options. It suggested that 3-year-olds tended to inappropriately say "yes" to yes-no questions, although they knew the answers to the questions. The mechanism of a yes bias was discussed.

  20. Bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Nicholas R. T.; Song, Jeremy; Nieh, James C.

    2009-10-01

    Associative learning is key to how bees recognize and return to rewarding floral resources. It thus plays a major role in pollinator floral constancy and plant gene flow. Honeybees are the primary model for pollinator associative learning, but bumblebees play an important ecological role in a wider range of habitats, and their associative learning abilities are less well understood. We assayed learning with the proboscis extension reflex (PER), using a novel method for restraining bees (capsules) designed to improve bumblebee learning. We present the first results demonstrating that bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect. They improve their associative learning of odor and nectar reward by exhibiting increased memory acquisition, a component of long-term memory formation, when the time interval between rewarding trials is increased. Bombus impatiens forager memory acquisition (average discrimination index values) improved by 129% and 65% at inter-trial intervals (ITI) of 5 and 3 min, respectively, as compared to an ITI of 1 min. Memory acquisition rate also increased with increasing ITI. Encapsulation significantly increases olfactory memory acquisition. Ten times more foragers exhibited at least one PER response during training in capsules as compared to traditional PER harnesses. Thus, a novel conditioning assay, encapsulation, enabled us to improve bumblebee-learning acquisition and demonstrate that spaced learning results in better memory consolidation. Such spaced learning likely plays a role in forming long-term memories of rewarding floral resources.

  1. Art exhibit focuses on African astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    Connections between Africans and astronomy are the focus of a new exhibition in the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D. C. "African Cosmos: Stellar Arts," which includes artwork, cultural items, and scientific displays from ancient to contemporary times, is the first major exhibit "that brings together arts and science focused on Africa's contribution to keen observations of the heavens over time," curator Christine Mullen Kreamer said at a 20 June news briefing. Among the exhibit's nearly 100 objects are an ancient Egyptian mummy board that includes a representation of the sky goddess Nut, sculptures by the Dogon people of Mali depicting figures in relation to the cosmos, a video that uses data from two square degrees of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey, and a nearly floor-to-ceiling "Rainbow Serpent" constructed of plastic containers by Benin artist Hazoume. An untitled acrylic painting (Figure 1) by South African Gavin Jantjes evokes a myth of the Khoi San people of southern Africa, as it portrays a girl throwing evening fire embers into the night sky, where they remained as the Milky Way.

  2. The E = mc{sup 2} exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, D.; Peshkin, M.

    1995-08-01

    The goal of this DOE-supported exhibition is to demystify Einstein`s formula E = mc{sup 2} by illustrating the interchangeability of matter (m) and energy (E), c{sup 2} being the exchange rate. The exhibition has two major parts, {open_quotes}matter into energy{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}energy into matter{close_quotes}, plus a video to connect them. {open_quotes}Matter into energy{close_quotes} has now been completed and has been placed on the museum floor. Positrons from a {sup 22}Na source are annihilated to produce gamma rays that are caught in NaI detectors. The viewer can alter the alignment of the detectors and observe the consequences for the rates of single and coincident counts. The viewer can also observe the effects of placing absorbers in front of the counters. Prototype explanatory graphics were placed around the exhibit and those will probably be changed after we have some experience with their effectiveness. The connecting video is in the process of being produced in collaboration with Fermilab. A cloud chamber for {open_quotes}energy into matter{close_quotes}, where gamma rays from a small Th source will produce observable pairs, was purchased and work to make the pairs visible has commenced.

  3. Reduction of virion-associated σ1 fibers on oncolytic reovirus variants promotes adaptation toward tumorigenic cells.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Adil; Teicher, Carmit; Haefliger, Sarah; Shmulevitz, Maya

    2015-04-01

    Wild-type mammalian orthoreovirus serotype 3 Dearing (T3wt) is nonpathogenic in humans but preferentially infects and kills cancer cells in culture and demonstrates promising antitumor activity in vivo. Using forward genetics, we previously isolated two variants of reovirus, T3v1 and T3v2, with increased infectivity toward a panel of cancer cell lines and improved in vivo oncolysis in a murine melanoma model relative to that of T3wt. Our current study explored how mutations in T3v1 and T3v2 promote infectivity. Reovirions contain trimers of σ1, the reovirus cell attachment protein, at icosahedral capsid vertices. Quantitative Western blot analysis showed that purified T3v1 and T3v2 virions had ∼ 2- and 4-fold-lower levels of σ1 fiber than did T3wt virions. Importantly, using RNA interference to reduce σ1 levels during T3wt production, we were able to generate wild-type reovirus with reduced levels of σ1 per virion. As σ1 levels were reduced, virion infectivity increased by 2- to 5-fold per cell-bound particle, demonstrating a causal relationship between virion σ1 levels and the infectivity of incoming virions. During infection of tumorigenic L929 cells, T3wt, T3v1, and T3v2 uncoated the outer capsid proteins σ3 and μ1C at similar rates. However, having started with fewer σ1 molecules, a complete loss of σ1 was achieved sooner for T3v1 and T3v2. Distinct from intracellular uncoating, chymotrypsin digestion, as a mimic of natural enteric infection, resulted in more rapid σ3 and μ1C removal, unique disassembly intermediates, and a rapid loss of infectivity for T3v1 and T3v2 compared to T3wt. Optimal infectivity toward natural versus therapeutic niches may therefore require distinct reovirus structures and σ1 levels. Wild-type reovirus is currently in clinical trials as a potential cancer therapy. Our molecular studies on variants of reovirus with enhanced oncolytic activity in vitro and in vivo now show that distinct reovirus structures promote

  4. Temperature-Sensitive Mutants of Fujinami Sarcoma Virus: Tumorigenicity and Reversible Phosphorylation of the Transforming p140 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wen-Hwa; Bister, Klaus; Moscovici, Carlo; Duesberg, Peter H.

    1981-01-01

    Several clones of Fujinami sarcoma virus (FSV) isolated from a laboratory stock or from mutagenized virus were temperature sensitive (ts) in transformation of cells in culture. When shifted from the permissive (37°C) to the nonpermissive (41.5°C) temperature, the cellular phenotype reverted to normal within 2 h, but it required about 48 h at 37°C to revert back to the transformed morphology. A temperature-resistant (tr) FSV clone was isolated from a tumor of an animal. All ts mutants were tumorigenic in animals but induced tumors only after latent periods of 12 to 25 days, compared to 5 to 6 days with tr virus. The ts lesions of the FSV mutants affected 90% of the phosphorylation of the nonstructural, gag-related 140,000-kilodalton phosphoprotein coded by FSV (p140), but did not affect virus replication or the synthesis of p140. Upon shifting from the permissive to the nonpermissive temperature, p140 was 90% dephosphorylated with an approximate 32P half-life of 20 min. When shifted back to the permissive temperature, the preexisting p140 was rephosphorylated in the absence of protein synthesis within a 90-min test period. Likewise, most of the phosphate of fully phosphorylated p140 was exchanged at the permissive temperature within 30 to 90 min even when protein synthesis was inhibited. However, the protein structure of p140 had a half-life of 5 h at both temperatures. These results prove p140 to be a substrate of reversible phosphorylation. Superinfection and transformation of ts FSV-infected cells maintained at the nonpermissive temperature with acute leukemia virus MC29 failed to phosphorylate p140. It would follow that in vivo phosphorylation of ts p140 is controlled by an FSV-specific mechanism and is a prerequisite, not a consequence, of transformation. p140 of ts FSV recovered from cells maintained at 41.5°C with anti-gag serum was over 10 times less phosphorylated by associated kinase than the same protein recovered from cells at 37°C if assayed in

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE SERVICE, RURAL UTILITIES SERVICE, AND FARM SERVICE AGENCY,...

  6. Mars in their eyes - a cartoon exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillinger, Pi.

    Recently a collection of 120 cartoons which tell the story of Mars exploration and scientific discovery, past, present and future, was held in London. We discuss the aims of the exhibition, to what extent we believe the original aims were met and report on additional outreach opportunities resulting from the project. The overriding aim was to capitalise on the popular appeal of accessible art - most people admit to enjoying cartoons. This was strengthened by hanging the originals of cartoons which had, mostly, been published in newspapers and magazines in a wide selection of countries. The provenances served to indicate the attraction of Mars to a wide public. We were fortunate to work with the Cartoon Art Trust of the UK who was in the process of relocating to new premises and opening as The Cartoon Museum, in the tourist area of Bloomsbury, central London, very close to the British Museum. "Mars in their Eyes" ran for 10 weeks during April to July 2006; immediately following which a selection of the cartoons was displayed at the week-long Royal Society Summer Exhibition. We explore the differences between the two exhibitions and comment on the various audience responses. We use this comparison to discuss whether a project which is primarily art can be extended to explain science. Does the coupling merely result in dumbing-down of both cultures or is there a true synergy? The experience has led us to coin the phrase "extreme outreach". Projects which are as ambitious as "Mars in their Eyes", without the security of a safe, captive audience, for example at a Science Centre, must be judged by different criteria. Indeed if the project does not meet comparable targets like large visitor numbers, then the honest evaluation of such details can only inform future activities and must not be reflected in the future funding of only "safe" outreach activities.

  7. Art Therapy Exhibitions: Exploitation or Advocacy?

    PubMed

    Davis, Terri

    2017-01-01

    Promoting awareness of human trafficking by sharing trauma survivors' art and summaries of their life stories suggests ethical complexities that have been typically neglected by bioethicists. Although these survivors voluntarily share the objects they created during art therapy sessions, they are still at risk of harm, including further exploitation, due to their vulnerability, high rates of victim sensitivity, and the mental health consequences of their traumatic experiences. While some argue that the benefits of sublimation and art therapy for human trafficking survivors make sharing their art worth the risk, anti-trafficking organizations and supporters of such art exhibitions have responsibilities to be trauma informed. © 2017 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  8. EarthScope Exhibit on Capitol Hill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folger, Peter

    2004-08-01

    Politicians got a chance to see why funding the National Science Foundation is crucial to the nation's scientific enterprise during an annual exhibit and reception showcasing NSF-sponsored research, held on 22 June in the Rayburn House Office Building on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C. AGU teamed with the American Geological Institute and the Geological Society of America to co-sponsor a display about EarthScope that outlined the NSF-supported multi-year investigation into the structure and evolution of the North American continent and the physical processes controlling earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  9. A metafluid exhibiting strong optical magnetism.

    PubMed

    Sheikholeslami, Sassan N; Alaeian, Hadiseh; Koh, Ai Leen; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2013-09-11

    Advances in the field of metamaterials have enabled unprecedented control of light-matter interactions. Metamaterial constituents support high-frequency electric and magnetic dipoles, which can be used as building blocks for new materials capable of negative refraction, electromagnetic cloaking, strong visible-frequency circular dichroism, and enhancing magnetic or chiral transitions in ions and molecules. While all metamaterials to date have existed in the solid-state, considerable interest has emerged in designing a colloidal metamaterial or "metafluid". Such metafluids would combine the advantages of solution-based processing with facile integration into conventional optical components. Here we demonstrate the colloidal synthesis of an isotropic metafluid that exhibits a strong magnetic response at visible frequencies. Protein-antibody interactions are used to direct the solution-phase self-assembly of discrete metamolecules comprised of silver nanoparticles tightly packed around a single dielectric core. The electric and magnetic response of individual metamolecules and the bulk metamaterial solution are directly probed with optical scattering and spectroscopy. Effective medium calculations indicate that the bulk metamaterial exhibits a negative effective permeability and a negative refractive index at modest fill factors. This metafluid can be synthesized in large-quantity and high-quality and may accelerate development of advanced nanophotonic and metamaterial devices.

  10. Nematic liquid crystals exhibiting high birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingujam, Kiranmala; Bhattacharjee, Ayon; Choudhury, Basana; Dabrowski, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Two fluorinated isothiocyanato nematic liquid crystalline compounds, 4'-butylcyclohexyl-3, 5-difluoro-4-isothiocyanatobiphenyl and 4'-pentylcyclohexyl-3, 5-difluoro-4-isothiocynatobiphenyl are studied in detail to obtain their different physical parameters. Optical polarizing microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, density and dielectric studies have been carried out for the two samples. Both the samples were found to have high clearing temperature (>100 °C) and exhibit small enthalpy of transition. The two samples exhibit high optical birefringence (Δ n > 0.2). The values of order parameters for the two samples were obtained using different approaches, namely, Vuks', Neugebauer's, modified Vuks' and direct extrapolation method from birefringence data. Experimentally obtained values of order parameters have also been compared with theoretical Maier-Saupe values. The parallel and perpendicular components of dielectric permittivity values of the two compounds were also calculated and their anisotropy values were found to be small. The effect of temperature on the molecular dipole moment μ and the angle of inclination β of the dipole axis with the director have also been investigated in this work.

  11. In-depth N-glycome profiling of paired colorectal cancer and non-tumorigenic tissues reveals cancer-, stage- and EGFR-specific protein N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Manveen K; Kim, Hoguen; Park, Cheol Keun; Baker, Mark S; Paik, Young-Ki; Packer, Nicolle H; Hancock, William S; Fanayan, Susan; Thaysen-Andersen, Morten

    2015-10-01

    Glycomics may assist in uncovering the structure-function relationships of protein glycosylation and identify glycoprotein markers in colorectal cancer (CRC) research. Herein, we performed label-free quantitative glycomics on a carbon-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry-based analytical platform to accurately profile the N-glycosylation changes associated with CRC malignancy. N-Glycome profiling was performed on isolated membrane proteomes of paired tumorigenic and adjacent non-tumorigenic colon tissues from a cohort of five males (62.6 ± 13.1 y.o.) suffering from colorectal adenocarcinoma. The CRC tissues were typed according to their epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) status by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Detailed N-glycan characterization and relative quantitation identified an extensive structural heterogeneity with a total of 91 N-glycans. CRC-specific N-glycosylation phenotypes were observed including an overrepresentation of high mannose, hybrid and paucimannosidic type N-glycans and an under-representation of complex N-glycans (P < 0.05). Sialylation, in particular α2,6-sialylation, was significantly higher in CRC tumors relative to non-tumorigenic tissues, whereas α2,3-sialylation was down-regulated (P < 0.05). CRC stage-specific N-glycosylation was detected by high α2,3-sialylation and low bisecting β1,4-GlcNAcylation and Lewis-type fucosylation in mid-late relative to early stage CRC. Interestingly, a novel link between the EGFR status and the N-glycosylation was identified using hierarchical clustering of the N-glycome profiles. EGFR-specific N-glycan signatures included high bisecting β1,4-GlcNAcylation and low α2,3-sialylation (both P < 0.05) relative to EGFR-negative CRC tissues. This is the first study to correlate CRC stage and EGFR status with specific N-glycan features, thus advancing our understanding of the mechanisms causing the biomolecular deregulation associated with CRC.

  12. Antitumor effect of CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 on the tumorigenic cell line of BHP10-3 papillary thyroid cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Jung, Young Ho; Lee, Doh Young; Cha, Wonjae; Kim, Bo Hae; Sung, Myung-Whun; Kim, Kwang Hyun; Ahn, Soon-Hyun

    2016-10-01

    A tumorigenic cell line (BHP10-3M) derived from nontumorigenic papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) cells (BHP10-3) having rearranged during transfection (RET)/PTC1 gene rearrangement might have a higher expression of CXCR4, either quantitatively or functionally. The authors also postulated that CXCR4-mediated invasion or tumorigenesis could be blocked by CXCR4 antagonists, including AMD3100. The expression of CXCR4 in BHP10-3 and BHP10-3M cells was assessed using immunoblot analysis, flow cytometry, and quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The effect of AMD3100 on BHP10-3 and BHP10-3M cell lines was evaluated using cell proliferation assay, invasion assay, and tumor growth experiment in nude mice. Immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and quantitative RT-PCR proved that BHP10-3M cells expressed a higher level of CXCR4 than BHP10-3 cells. Although blocking CXCR4 with AMD3100 did not suppress cell proliferation in both cell lines from 1 ng/mL to 100 ng/mL concentration, AMD3100 suppressed invasion of BHP10-3M cells in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. At higher concentrations from 10(3) ng/mL to 10(5) ng/mL, the proliferation of BHP10-3M cells was inhibited more strongly by AMD3100 than that of BHP10-3 cells. Intraperitoneal injection of AMD3100 inhibited tumor formation by BHP10-3M cells in the thyroid of nude mice. A tumorigenic cell line (BHP10-3M) of PTC showed higher expression of CXCR4 quantitatively and functionally than a nontumorigenic cell line (BHP10-3). The CXCR4 antagonist (AMD3100) showed a significant antitumor effect on the tumorigenic cell line of PTC BHP10-3 cells both in vitro and in vivo. CXCR4 antagonist can be expected to have an adjuvant role in the management of PTC. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2016 © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 38: First-1486, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 17 CFR 229.601 - (Item 601) Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... by reference, the exhibits required in the exhibit table shall be filed as indicated, as part of the... exhibit table. The exhibit index shall indicate, by handwritten, typed, printed, or other legible form of... index is located. For a description of each of the exhibits included in the exhibit table, see...

  14. Supercomputing meets seismology in earthquake exhibit

    ScienceCinema

    Blackwell, Matt; Rodger, Arthur; Kennedy, Tom

    2016-07-12

    When the California Academy of Sciences created the "Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet" exhibit, they called on Lawrence Livermore to help combine seismic research with the latest data-driven visualization techniques. The outcome is a series of striking visualizations of earthquakes, tsunamis and tectonic plate evolution. Seismic-wave research is a core competency at Livermore. While most often associated with earthquakes, the research has many other applications of national interest, such as nuclear explosion monitoring, explosion forensics, energy exploration, and seismic acoustics. For the Academy effort, Livermore researchers simulated the San Andreas and Hayward fault events at high resolutions. Such calculations require significant computational resources. To simulate the 1906 earthquake, for instance, visualizing 125 seconds of ground motion required over 1 billion grid points, 10,000 time steps, and 7.5 hours of processor time on 2,048 cores of Livermore's Sierra machine.

  15. Supercomputing meets seismology in earthquake exhibit

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, Matt; Rodger, Arthur; Kennedy, Tom

    2013-10-03

    When the California Academy of Sciences created the "Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet" exhibit, they called on Lawrence Livermore to help combine seismic research with the latest data-driven visualization techniques. The outcome is a series of striking visualizations of earthquakes, tsunamis and tectonic plate evolution. Seismic-wave research is a core competency at Livermore. While most often associated with earthquakes, the research has many other applications of national interest, such as nuclear explosion monitoring, explosion forensics, energy exploration, and seismic acoustics. For the Academy effort, Livermore researchers simulated the San Andreas and Hayward fault events at high resolutions. Such calculations require significant computational resources. To simulate the 1906 earthquake, for instance, visualizing 125 seconds of ground motion required over 1 billion grid points, 10,000 time steps, and 7.5 hours of processor time on 2,048 cores of Livermore's Sierra machine.

  16. Virtual auditorium concepts for exhibition halls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Jack; Himmel, Chad; Knight, Sarah

    2002-11-01

    Many communities lack good performance facilities for symphonic music, opera, dramatic and musical arts, but have basic convention, exhibition or assembly spaces. It should be possible to develop performance space environments within large multipurpose facilities that will accommodate production and presentation of dramatic arts. Concepts for moderate-cost, temporary enhancements that transform boxy spaces into more intimate, acoustically articulated venues will be presented. Acoustical criteria and design parameters will be discussed in the context of creating a virtual auditorium within the building envelope. Physical, economic, and logistical limitations affect implementation. Sound reinforcement system augmentation can supplement the room conversion. Acceptable control of reflection patterns, reverberation, and to some extent, ambient noise, may be achieved with an array of nonpermanent reflector and absorber elements. These elements can sculpture an enclosure to approach the shape and acoustic characteristics of an auditorium. Plan and section illustrations will be included.

  17. Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres exhibit euchromatic features

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I.; Gámez-Arjona, Francisco M.; Vega-Palas, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Telomere function is influenced by chromatin structure and organization, which usually involves epigenetic modifications. We describe here the chromatin structure of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres. Based on the study of six different epigenetic marks we show that Arabidopsis telomeres exhibit euchromatic features. In contrast, subtelomeric regions and telomeric sequences present at interstitial chromosomal loci are heterochromatic. Histone methyltransferases and the chromatin remodeling protein DDM1 control subtelomeric heterochromatin formation. Whereas histone methyltransferases are required for histone H3K92Me and non-CpG DNA methylation, DDM1 directs CpG methylation but not H3K92Me or non-CpG methylation. These results argue that both kinds of proteins participate in different pathways to reinforce subtelomeric heterochromatin formation. PMID:21071395

  18. A Traveling Exhibit of Cassini Image Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Hedman, M. M.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Ebel, D.; Mac Low, M.; Lovett, L. E.; Burns, J. K.; Schaff, N.; Bilson, E. M.

    2007-10-01

    An exhibit of Cassini's images will open at NYC's American Museum of Natural History in March 2008 and then visit the Johnson Art Museum (Cornell) throughout fall 2008, including during next year's DPS. It is under consideration by several other venues in the States and overseas. The exhibit will feature 40-50 images, ranging from letter size to large posters, taken by remote-sensing instruments aboard Cassini and Huygens. Photos will be organized into a half-dozen thematic clusters (e.g., organized by celestial target or by physical process); a panel will introduce each grouping with individual images identified briefly. The Saturn system is a perfect vehicle to educate citizens about planetary science and origins. The images’ beauty should capture the public's attention, allowing us to then engage their curiosity about the relevant science. Among the Saturn system's broad suite of objects are Enceladus and Titan, two satellites of astrobiological interest; moreover, the rings display many processes active in other astrophysical disks. Several auxiliary ideas will be implemented. In Ithaca, we will project images at night against the museum's sand-colored exterior walls. A 10-12 minute musical composition has been commissioned from Roberto Sierra to open the show. We will encourage school children to participate in a human orrery circling the museum and will seek volunteers to participate in several Saturnalia. At Cornell we will involve the university and local communities, by taping their reactions to the images’ exquisite beauty as well as to their scientific content. Cassini will be the E/PO focus of next year's DPS meeting; those materials will be employed throughout the fall at New York schools and be available to travel with the show. We intend to work with NYC partners to offer teacher credits for associated weekend courses. We will produce classroom materials, including a DVD, for teacher use.

  19. Study on effect of peptide-conjugated near-infrared fluorescent quantum dots on the clone formation, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenicity ability of human buccal squamous cell carcinoma cell line BcaCD885

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Deping; Yang, Kai; Zheng, Gang; Li, Zhigang; Cao, Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have shown great development potential in noninvasive imaging and monitoring of cancer cells in vivo because of their unique optical properties. However, the key issue of whether or not QDs-labeled cancer cells affect the proliferation, apoptosis and in vivo tumorigenicity ability has not been reported. The primary issue is if the results obtained from the noninvasive visualization of QDs-labeled tumors are scientific. Here, we applied peptide-linked near-conjugated fluorescent QDs to label human buccal squamous cell carcinoma cell line (BcaCD885). We performed in vivo tumorigenicity ability assays, tumorigenic cells proliferation, and apoptotic capability assays detected by flow cytometry and plate clone formation experiment, and found that peptide-linked near-conjugated fluorescent QDs labeling did not affect the growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and tumorigenicity ability of those cancer cells. Our study provides scientific foundation to support the application of near-infrared fluorescent QDs in noninvasive imaging and monitoring of cancer cells in vivo. PMID:20957161

  20. Application of an imaging system to a museum exhibition for developing interactive exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi; Inoue, Yuka; Takiguchi, Takahiro; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Miyake, Yoichi

    2009-10-01

    In the National Museum of Japanese History, 215,759 artifacts are stored and used for research and exhibitions. In museums, due to the limitation of space in the galleries, a guidance system is required to satisfy visitors' needs and to enhance their understanding of the artifacts. We introduce one exhibition using imaging technology to improve visitors' understanding of a kimono (traditional Japanese clothing) exhibition. In the imaging technology introduced, one data projector, one display with touch panel interface, and magnifiers were used as exhibition tools together with a real kimono. The validity of this exhibition method was confirmed by results from a visitors' interview survey. Second, to further develop the interactive guidance system, an augmented reality system that consisted of cooperation between the projector and a digital video camera was also examined. A white paper board in the observer's hand was used as a projection screen and also as an interface to control the images projected on the board. The basic performance of the proposed system was confirmed; however continuous development was necessary for applying the system to actual exhibitions.

  1. E2/Estrogen Receptor/Sjogren Syndrome-Associated Autoantigen Relieves Coactivator Activator-Induced G1/S Arrest To Promote Breast Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yun Kyoung; Jung, Sung Yun; Qin, Jun; Li, Chao; Tsai, Sophia Y.; Tsai, Ming-Jer

    2014-01-01

    Coactivator activator (CoAA) is a dual-functional coregulator that regulates steroid receptor-mediated transcription and alternative splicing. Previously, we have shown that CoAA has tumor-suppressive potential in tumorigenic human kidney cells. Here, we uncover a molecular mechanism by which Sjogren syndrome-associated autoantigen (SSA), an estrogen receptor (ER) coactivator, induces MYC oncogene by removing repressive CoAA through E2-dependent degradation of CoAA and promotes G1/S transition of the cell cycle as well as anchorage-independent growth capability of breast cancer cells. We also show that E2 and ER enhance the E3 ligase activity of SSA to modulate CoAA through splicing isoform-selective ubiquitylation. We propose this as one potential molecular basis for the reduced tumor incidence in autoimmune disease patients and suggest SSA as a potential therapeutic target to treat breast cancer. PMID:24567374

  2. Disorder in Milk Proteins: α-Lactalbumin. Part B. A Multifunctional Whey Protein Acting as an Oligomeric Molten Globular "Oil Container" in the Anti-Tumorigenic Drugs, Liprotides.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N; Permyakov, Serge E; Breydo, Leonid; Redwan, Elrashdy M; Almehdar, Hussein A; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2016-07-15

    This is a second part of the three-part article from a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. We continue to describe α-lactalbumin, a small globular Ca2+-binding protein, which besides being one of the two components of lactose synthase that catalyzes the final step of the lactose biosynthesis in the lactating mammary gland, possesses a multitude of other functions. In fact, recent studies indicated that some partially folded forms of this protein possess noticeable bactericidal activity and other forms might be related to induction of the apoptosis of tumor cells. In its anti-tumorigenic function, oligomeric α-lactalbumin serves as a founding member of a new family of anticancer drugs termed liprotides (for lipids and partially denatured proteins), where an oligomeric molten globular protein acts as an "oil container" or cargo for the delivery of oleic acid to the cell membranes.

  3. [Analysis on clone in vitro and tumorigenic capacity in vivo of different subsets cells from the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Liu, Chun-ping; He, Yan-li; Tian, Yuan; Huang, Tao

    2008-07-01

    To investigate whether there are cancer stem cells in the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. Flow cytometry was applied to separate different subpopulation cells from MCF-7 cells, and their ability of clone in vitro and reconstruction tumor in vivo were determined. The ability of clone in vitro and reconstruction tumor in vivo were observed in some MCF-7 cells. Contrast with CD44+ CD24+ cells, the proportion of tumorigenic cancer cells in CD44+ CD24- cells is higher. Breast cancer stem cell exists in MCF-7 and it mainly locates the subpopulation of CD44+ CD24- cells, CD44+ CD24+ cell possibly is breast cancer progenitor cell.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulation of a tumorigenic benzo[a]pyrene metabolite bound to DNA at a single strand-double strand junction

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.B.; Li, B.; Shapiro, R.

    1994-12-31

    It is widely believed that cancer can be initiated when certain biochemically activated chemical substances bind to DNA to produce a covalently linked adduct. Attachment of the substance to DNA can affect the DNA shape, leading to unfortunate biological consequences. These may include replication errors, which could be among the events that start the cellular processes ultimately yielding malignant tumors. Consequently, an understanding at the molecular level of how the DNA shape is affected by such chemicals is critical to understanding the primary event in chemical carcinogenesis. If one could establish structural hallmarks that distinguish DNA bound by a malignant chemical from DNA bound by a benign one, it might ultimately be possible to employ computational tools, instead of bacterial or animal testing, to screen chemical substances for mutagenic and tumorigenic potential.

  5. Long-term exposures to low doses of silver nanoparticles enhanced in vitro malignant cell transformation in non-tumorigenic BEAS-2B cells.

    PubMed

    Choo, Wun Hak; Park, Cho Hee; Jung, Shi Eun; Moon, Byeonghak; Ahn, Huiyeon; Ryu, Jung Seok; Kim, Keun-Soo; Lee, Yong Hwa; Yu, Il Je; Oh, Seung Min

    2016-12-01

    To predict carcinogenic potential of AgNPs on the respiratory system, BEAS-2B cells (human bronchial epithelial cells) were chronically exposed to low- and non-cytotoxic dose (0.13 and 1.33μg/ml) of AgNPs for 4months (#40 passages). To assess malignant cell transformation of chronic exposure to AgNPs, several bioassays including anchorage independent agar colony formation, cell migration/invasion assay, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) were performed in BEAS-2B cells. Chronic exposure to AgNPs showed a significant increase of anchorage independent agar colony formation and cell migration/invasion. EMT, which is the loss of epithelial markers (E-Cadherin and Keratin) and the gain of mesenchymal marker (N-cadherin and Vimentin), was induced by chronic exposure to AgNPs. These responses indicated that chronic exposure to AgNPs could acquire characteristics of tumorigenic cells from normal BEAS-2B cells. In addition, caspase-3, p-p53, p-p38, and p-JNK were significantly decreased, while p-ERK1/2 was significantly increased. MMP-9 related to cell migration/invasion was upregulated, while a MMP-9 inhibitor, TIMP-1 was down-regulated. These results indicated that BEAS-2B cells exposed to AgNPs could induce anti-apoptotic response/anoikis resistance, and cell migration/invasion by complex regulation of MAPK kinase (p38, JNK, and ERK) and p53 signaling pathways. Therefore, we suggested that long-term exposure to low-dose of AgNPs could enhance malignant cell transformation in non-tumorigenic BEAS-2B cells. Our findings provide useful information needed to assess the carcinogenic potential of AgNPs.

  6. Non ionising radiation as a non chemical strategy in regenerative medicine: Ca(2+)-ICR "In Vitro" effect on neuronal differentiation and tumorigenicity modulation in NT2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Mario; Megiorni, Francesca; Pozzi, Deleana; Giuliani, Livio; D'Emilia, Enrico; Piccirillo, Sara; Mattei, Cristiana; Grimaldi, Settimio; Lisi, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In regenerative medicine finding a new method for cell differentiation without pharmacological treatment or gene modification and minimal cell manipulation is a challenging goal. In this work we reported a neuronal induced differentiation and consequent reduction of tumorigenicity in NT2 human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells exposed to an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), matching the cyclotron frequency corresponding to the charge/mass ratio of calcium ion (Ca(2+)-ICR). These cells, capable of differentiating into post-mitotic neurons following treatment with Retinoic Acid (RA), were placed in a solenoid and exposed for 5 weeks to Ca(2+)-ICR. The solenoid was installed in a μ-metal shielded room to avoid the effect of the geomagnetic field and obtained totally controlled and reproducible conditions. Contrast microscopy analysis reveled, in the NT2 exposed cells, an important change in shape and morphology with the outgrowth of neuritic-like structures together with a lower proliferation rate and metabolic activity alike those found in the RA treated cells. A significant up-regulation of early and late neuronal differentiation markers and a significant down-regulation of the transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) and the fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4) were also observed in the exposed cells. The decreased protein expression of the transforming gene Cripto-1 and the reduced capability of the exposed NT2 cells to form colonies in soft agar supported these last results. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Ca(2+)-ICR frequency is able to induce differentiation and reduction of tumorigenicity in NT2 exposed cells suggesting a new potential therapeutic use in regenerative medicine.

  7. Integrin α11 regulates IGF2 expression in fibroblasts to enhance tumorigenicity of human non-small-cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chang-Qi; Popova, Svetlana N.; Brown, Ewan R. S.; Barsyte-Lovejoy, Dalia; Navab, Roya; Shih, Warren; Li, Ming; Lu, Ming; Jurisica, Igor; Penn, Linda Z.; Gullberg, Donald; Tsao, Ming-Sound

    2007-01-01

    Integrin α11 (ITGA11/α11) is localized to stromal fibroblasts and commonly overexpressed in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We hypothesized that stromal α11 could be important for the tumorigenicity of NSCLC cells. SV40 immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts established from wild-type (WT) and Itga11-deficient [knockout (KO)] mice were tested for their tumorigenicity in immune-deficient mice when implanted alone or coimplanted with the A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells. A549 coimplanted with the fibroblasts showed a markedly enhanced tumor growth rate compared with A549, WT, or KO, which alone formed only small tumors. Importantly, the growth was significantly greater for A549+WT compared with A549+KO tumors. Reexpression of human α11 cDNA in KO cells rescued a tumor growth rate to that comparable with the A549+WT tumors. These findings were validated in two other NSCLC cell lines, NCI-H460 and NCI-H520. Gene expression profiling indicated that IGF2 mRNA expression level was >200 times lower in A549+KO compared with A549+WT tumors. Stable short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) down-regulation of IGF2 in WT (WTshIGF2) fibroblasts resulted in a decreased growth rate of A549+WTshIGF2, compared with A549+WT tumors. The results indicate that α11 is an important stromal factor in NSCLC and propose a paradigm for carcinoma–stromal interaction indirectly through interaction between the matrix collagen and stromal fibroblasts to stimulate cancer cell growth. PMID:17600088

  8. hnRNP L regulates the tumorigenic capacity of lung cancer xenografts in mice via caspase-9 pre-mRNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Goehe, Rachel Wilson; Shultz, Jacqueline C.; Murudkar, Charuta; Usanovic, Sanja; Lamour, Nadia F.; Massey, Davis H.; Zhang, Lian; Camidge, D. Ross; Shay, Jerry W.; Minna, John D.; Chalfant, Charles E.

    2010-01-01

    Caspase-9 is involved in the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and suggested to play a role as a tumor suppressor. Little is known about the mechanisms governing caspase-9 expression, but post-transcriptional pre-mRNA processing generates 2 splice variants from the caspase-9 gene, pro-apoptotic caspase-9a and anti-apoptotic caspase-9b. Here we demonstrate that the ratio of caspase-9 splice variants is dysregulated in non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors. Mechanistic analysis revealed that an exonic splicing silencer (ESS) regulated caspase-9 pre-mRNA processing in NSCLC cells. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L (hnRNP L) interacted with this ESS, and downregulation of hnRNP L expression induced an increase in the caspase-9a/9b ratio. Although expression of hnRNP L lowered the caspase-9a/9b ratio in NSCLC cells, expression of hnRNP L produced the opposite effect in non-transformed cells, suggesting a post-translational modification specific for NSCLC cells. Indeed, Ser52 was identified as a critical modification regulating the caspase-9a/9b ratio. Importantly, in a mouse xenograft model, downregulation of hnRNP L in NSCLC cells induced a complete loss of tumorigenic capacity that was due to the changes in caspase-9 pre-mRNA processing. This study therefore identifies a cancer-specific mechanism of hnRNP L phosphorylation and subsequent lowering of the caspase-9a/9b ratio, which is required for the tumorigenic capacity of NSCLC cells. PMID:20972334

  9. Doxycycline-Regulated p16(MTS1) Expression Suppresses the Anchorage-Independence and Tumorigenicity of Breast Cancer Cell Lines that Lack Endogenous p16.

    PubMed

    Todd, Maria C; Langan, Thomas A; Sclafani, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    The RB pathway controls the critical transition from G1 into S phase of the mammalian cell cycle. Deregulation of the RB pathway by means of RB or p16 inactivation has been implicated in the development of virtually all human cancers. Such findings have led to the view that the loss of RB-mediated regulation at the G1/S checkpoint is a precondition for human malignancy. Our analysis of the RB-positive MCF-7 and ZR75.1 breast cancer cell lines revealed a lack of endogenous p16 protein expression as a result of the homozygous deletion and methylation of the p16 gene at the CDKN2A locus, respectively. We employed the TET-OFF inducible expression system to investigate the effects of non-growth inhibitory levels of functional p16 protein upon the in vitro and in vivo transformed properties of the MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cell lines. Stable transfectants of MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cells were isolated that expressed different levels of p16 protein in the absence of doxycycline (DOX) but continued to proliferate in culture. Transfectants that expressed modest levels of p16 (relative to SV40 T antigen-transformed HBL-100 breast epithelial cells) demonstrated a marked suppression of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Further, the induction of moderate and high levels of p16 (relative to HBL-100) resulted in the suppression of tumorigenicity of both MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cells as assayed by injection into nude mice. From these data, we concluded that RB pathway restoration by non-growth inhibitory levels of p16 protein was sufficient to revert breast cancer cells to a non-transformed and non-tumorigenic state.

  10. Doxycycline-Regulated p16MTS1 Expression Suppresses the Anchorage-Independence and Tumorigenicity of Breast Cancer Cell Lines that Lack Endogenous p16

    PubMed Central

    Todd, Maria C; Langan, Thomas A; Sclafani, Robert A

    2017-01-01

    The RB pathway controls the critical transition from G1 into S phase of the mammalian cell cycle. Deregulation of the RB pathway by means of RB or p16 inactivation has been implicated in the development of virtually all human cancers. Such findings have led to the view that the loss of RB-mediated regulation at the G1/S checkpoint is a precondition for human malignancy. Our analysis of the RB-positive MCF-7 and ZR75.1 breast cancer cell lines revealed a lack of endogenous p16 protein expression as a result of the homozygous deletion and methylation of the p16 gene at the CDKN2A locus, respectively. We employed the TET-OFF inducible expression system to investigate the effects of non-growth inhibitory levels of functional p16 protein upon the in vitro and in vivo transformed properties of the MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cell lines. Stable transfectants of MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cells were isolated that expressed different levels of p16 protein in the absence of doxycycline (DOX) but continued to proliferate in culture. Transfectants that expressed modest levels of p16 (relative to SV40 T antigen-transformed HBL-100 breast epithelial cells) demonstrated a marked suppression of anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. Further, the induction of moderate and high levels of p16 (relative to HBL-100) resulted in the suppression of tumorigenicity of both MCF-7 and ZR75.1 cells as assayed by injection into nude mice. From these data, we concluded that RB pathway restoration by non-growth inhibitory levels of p16 protein was sufficient to revert breast cancer cells to a non-transformed and non-tumorigenic state. PMID:28243323

  11. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  12. Quantum Nonlocal Boxes Exhibit Stronger Distillability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Høyer, Peter; Rashid, Jibran

    2013-06-01

    The hypothetical nonlocal box (NLB) proposed by Popescu and Rohrlich allows two spatially separated parties, Alice and Bob, to exhibit stronger than quantum correlations. If the generated correlations are weak, they can sometimes be distilled into a stronger correlation by repeated applications of the NLB. Motivated by the limited distillability of NLBs, we initiate here a study of the distillation of correlations for nonlocal boxes that output quantum states rather than classical bits (qNLBs). We propose a new protocol for distillation and show that it asymptotically distills a class of correlated quantum nonlocal boxes to the value (1)/(2)(3√ {3}+1) ≈ 3.098076, whereas in contrast, the optimal non-adaptive parity protocol for classical nonlocal boxes asymptotically distills only to the value 3.0. We show that our protocol is an optimal non-adaptive protocol for 1, 2 and 3 qNLB copies by constructing a matching dual solution for the associated primal semidefinite program (SDP). We conclude that qNLBs are a stronger resource for nonlocality than NLBs. The main premise that develops from this conclusion is that the NLB model is not the strongest resource to investigate the fundamental principles that limit quantum nonlocality. As such, our work provides strong motivation to reconsider the status quo of the principles that are known to limit nonlocal correlations under the framework of qNLBs rather than NLBs.

  13. Chemically responsive fluorophores exhibiting large color changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, Jeremy C.; Harper, Aaron W.

    2002-11-01

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of a series of styryl pyrazine derivatives as chemically responsive fluorophores are reported. These styryl pyrazines were ideal for structure-property relationship studies designed to elucidate the role of molecular symmetry, polarity, planarity and cooperative and competitive intramolecular charge transfer interactions in determining their colorimetric or fluorimetric responses. These fluorophores were designed to exhibit large changes in emission in response to changes in solvent composition or addition of various analyte species. The large solvatochromic and analyte-induced changes in their spectra were related to the nature of molecular polarization upon excitation, as well as stabilization of the excited state by the molecular environment. Several of these molecules shared the structural and electronic features common to quadupolar two-photon chromophores, and were thus expected to function as chemically responsive two-photon fluorophores, as well. Calculations of their second hyperpolarizabilities (γ(-ωω,-ω,ω))and comparison to known two-photon molecules showed that these molecules were expected to be exceptional two-photon active molecules.

  14. Plant shoots exhibit synchronized oscillatory motions.

    PubMed

    Ciszak, Marzena; Masi, Elisa; Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    In animals, the ability to move has evolved as an important means of protection from predators and for enhancing nutrient uptake. In the animal kingdom, an individual's movements may become coordinated with those of other individuals that belong to the same group, which leads, for example, to the beautiful collective patterns that are observed in flocks of birds and schools of fish or in animal migration. Land plants, however, are fixed to the ground, which limits their movement and, apparently, their interactions and collective behaviors. We show that emergent maize plants grown in a group exhibit synchronized oscillatory motions that may be in-phase or anti-phase. These oscillations occur in short bursts and appear when the leaves rupture from the coleoptile tip. The appearance of these oscillations indicates an abrupt increase in the plant growth rate, which may be associated with a sudden change in the energy uptake for photosynthesis. Our results suggest that plant shoots behave as a complex network of biological oscillators, interacting through biophysical links, e.g. chemical substances or electric signals.

  15. Agitated Honeybees Exhibit Pessimistic Cognitive Biases

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Melissa; Desire, Suzanne; Gartside, Sarah E.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Whether animals experience human-like emotions is controversial and of immense societal concern [1–3]. Because animals cannot provide subjective reports of how they feel, emotional state can only be inferred using physiological, cognitive, and behavioral measures [4–8]. In humans, negative feelings are reliably correlated with pessimistic cognitive biases, defined as the increased expectation of bad outcomes [9–11]. Recently, mammals [12–16] and birds [17–20] with poor welfare have also been found to display pessimistic-like decision making, but cognitive biases have not thus far been explored in invertebrates. Here, we ask whether honeybees display a pessimistic cognitive bias when they are subjected to an anxiety-like state induced by vigorous shaking designed to simulate a predatory attack. We show for the first time that agitated bees are more likely to classify ambiguous stimuli as predicting punishment. Shaken bees also have lower levels of hemolymph dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin. In demonstrating state-dependent modulation of categorization in bees, and thereby a cognitive component of emotion, we show that the bees' response to a negatively valenced event has more in common with that of vertebrates than previously thought. This finding reinforces the use of cognitive bias as a measure of negative emotional states across species and suggests that honeybees could be regarded as exhibiting emotions. Video Abstract PMID:21636277

  16. Rotating pigment cells exhibit an intrinsic chirality.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kondo, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, cell properties, such as shape, size and function are important in morphogenesis and physiological functions. Recently, 'cellular chirality' has attracted attention as a cellular property because it can cause asymmetry in the bodies of animals. In recent in vitro studies, the left-right bias of cellular migration and of autonomous arrangement of cells under some specific culture conditions were discovered. However, it is difficult to identify the molecular mechanism underlying their intrinsic chirality because the left-right bias observed to date is subtle or is manifested in the stable orientation of cells. Here, we report that zebrafish (Danio rerio) melanophores exhibit clear cellular chirality by unidirectional counterclockwise rotational movement under isolated conditions without any special settings. The chirality is intrinsic to melanophores because the direction of the cellular rotation was not affected by the type of extracellular matrix. We further found that the cellular rotation was generated as a counter action of the clockwise movement of actin cytoskeleton. It suggested that the mechanism that directs actin cytoskeleton in the clockwise direction is pivotal for determining cellular chirality.

  17. Plant shoots exhibit synchronized oscillatory motions

    PubMed Central

    Ciszak, Marzena; Masi, Elisa; Baluška, František; Mancuso, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In animals, the ability to move has evolved as an important means of protection from predators and for enhancing nutrient uptake. In the animal kingdom, an individual's movements may become coordinated with those of other individuals that belong to the same group, which leads, for example, to the beautiful collective patterns that are observed in flocks of birds and schools of fish or in animal migration. Land plants, however, are fixed to the ground, which limits their movement and, apparently, their interactions and collective behaviors. We show that emergent maize plants grown in a group exhibit synchronized oscillatory motions that may be in-phase or anti-phase. These oscillations occur in short bursts and appear when the leaves rupture from the coleoptile tip. The appearance of these oscillations indicates an abrupt increase in the plant growth rate, which may be associated with a sudden change in the energy uptake for photosynthesis. Our results suggest that plant shoots behave as a complex network of biological oscillators, interacting through biophysical links, e.g. chemical substances or electric signals. PMID:27829981

  18. Manufacturing of peptides exhibiting biological activity.

    PubMed

    Zambrowicz, Aleksandra; Timmer, Monika; Polanowski, Antoni; Lubec, Gert; Trziszka, Tadeusz

    2013-02-01

    Numerous studies have shown that food proteins may be a source of bioactive peptides. Those peptides are encrypted in the protein sequence. They stay inactive within the parental protein until release by proteolytic enzymes (Mine and Kovacs-Nolan in Worlds Poult Sci J 62(1):87-95, 2006; Hartman and Miesel in Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:163-169, 2007). Once released the bioactive peptides exhibit several biofunctionalities and may serve therapeutic roles in body systems. Opioid peptides, peptides lowering high blood pressure, inhibiting platelet aggregation as well as being carriers of metal ions and peptides with immunostimulatory, antimicrobial and antioxidant activities have been described (Hartman and Miesel in Curr Opin Biotechnol 18:163-169, 2007). The biofunctional abilities of the peptides have therefore aroused a lot of scientific, technological and consumer interest with respect to the role of dietary proteins in controlling and influencing health (Möller et al. in Eur J Nutr 47(4):171-182, 2008). Biopeptides may find wide application in food production, the cosmetics industry as well as in the prevention and treatment of various medical conditions. They are manufactured by chemical and biotechnological methods (Marx in Chem Eng News 83(11):17-24. 2005; Hancock and Sahl in Nat Biotechnol 24(12):1551-1557, 2006). Depending on specific needs (food or pharmaceutical industry) different degrees of peptide purifications are required. This paper discusses the practicability of manufacturing bioactive peptides, especially from food proteins.

  19. Virtual Exhibition and Fruition of Archaeological Finds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manferdini, A. M.; Garagnani, S.

    2011-09-01

    During the last two decades, since digital technologies have become more sophisticated in acquiring real data and building faithful copies of them, their improvements have suggested interesting applications in the field of valorisation of Historical, Cultural and Artistic Heritage, with significant consequences in the share and widespread of knowledge. But although several technologies and methodologies for 3d digitization have recently been developed and improved, the lack of a standard procedure and the costs connected to their use still doesn't encourage the systematic digital acquisition of wide collections and heritage. The aim of this paper is to show the state of the art of a project whose aim is to provide a methodology and a procedure to create digital reproductions of artefacts for Institutions called to preserve, manage and enhance the fruition of archaeological finds inside museums or through digital exhibitions. Our project's aim is to find the most suitable procedure to digitally acquire archaeo logical artefacts that usually have small dimensions and have very complex and detailed surfaces. Within our methodology, particular attention has been paid to the use of widely shared and open-source visualization systems that enhance the involvement of the user by emphasizing three-dimensional characteristics of artefacts through virtual reality.

  20. Marine bacteria exhibit a bipolar distribution.

    PubMed

    Sul, Woo Jun; Oliver, Thomas A; Ducklow, Hugh W; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2013-02-05

    The microbial cosmopolitan dispersion hypothesis often invoked to explain distribution patterns driven by high connectivity of oceanographic water masses and widespread dispersal ability has never been rigorously tested. By using a global marine bacterial dataset and iterative matrix randomization simulation, we show that marine bacteria exhibit a significantly greater dispersal limitation than predicted by our null model using the "everything is everywhere" tenet with no dispersal limitation scenario. Specifically, marine bacteria displayed bipolar distributions (i.e., species occurring exclusively at both poles and nowhere else) significantly less often than in the null model. Furthermore, we observed fewer taxa present in both hemispheres but more taxa present only in a single hemisphere than expected under the null model. Each of these trends diverged further from the null expectation as the compared habitats became more geographically distant but more environmentally similar. Our meta-analysis supported a latitudinal gradient in bacterial diversity with higher richness at lower latitudes, but decreased richness toward the poles. Bacteria in the tropics also demonstrated narrower latitudinal ranges at lower latitudes and relatively larger ranges in higher latitudes, conforming to the controversial macroecological pattern of the "Rapoport rule." Collectively, our findings suggest that bacteria follow biogeographic patterns more typical of macroscopic organisms, and that dispersal limitation, not just environmental selection, likely plays an important role. Distributions of microbes that deliver critical ecosystem services, particularly those in polar regions, may be vulnerable to the same impacts that environmental stressors, climate warming, and degradation in habitat quality are having on biodiversity in animal and plant species.