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Sample records for fhc exhibits tumorigenic

  1. Rat embryo fibroblast cells expressing human papillomavirus 1a genes exhibit altered growth properties and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Loewenstein, P M

    1986-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 1a (HPV1a) induces benign tumors (papillomas or warts) in humans under natural conditions of infection but has not been found to replicate significantly in cell culture or in experimental animals. To establish model systems to study the oncogenic properties and expression of HPV genes, we established cell lines by cotransfecting the 3Y1 rat fibroblast cell line with HPV1a DNA constructs containing an intact early gene region and the Tn5 neomycin resistance gene. Most cell lines selected for expression of the neomycin resistance gene by treatment with the antibiotic G-418 contained viral DNA in a high-molecular-weight form. The growth characteristics of several cell lines containing high copy numbers of HPV1a DNA were studied further. They were shown to differ from the parental cell line and from G-418-resistant cell lines that did not incorporate viral DNA in the following properties: morphological alteration, increased cell density at confluence, growth in 0.5% serum, efficient anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, and rapid formation of tumors in nude mice. Those cell lines that possessed altered growth properties and tumorigenicity were found to express abundant quantities of polyadenylated virus-specific RNA species in the cytoplasm. Images PMID:3023676

  2. Everolimus exhibits anti-tumorigenic activity in obesity-induced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hui; Zhong, Yan; Jackson, Amanda L.; Clark, Leslie H.; Kilgore, Josh; Zhang, Lu; Han, Jianjun; Sheng, Xiugui; Gilliam, Timothy P.; Gehrig, Paola A.; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Everolimus inhibits mTOR kinase activity and its downstream targets by acting on mTORC1 and has anti-tumorigenic activity in ovarian cancer. Clinical and epidemiologic data find that obesity is associated with worse outcomes in ovarian cancer. In addition, obesity leads to hyperactivation of the mTOR pathway in epithelial tissues, suggesting that mTOR inhibitors may be a logical choice for treatment in obesity-driven cancers. However, it remains unclear if obesity impacts the effect of everolimus on tumor growth in ovarian cancer. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of everolimus on cytotoxicity, cell metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle, cell stress and invasion in human ovarian cancer cells. A genetically engineered mouse model of serous ovarian cancer fed a high fat diet or low fat diet allowed further investigation into the inter-relationship between everolimus and obesity in vivo. Everolimus significantly inhibited cellular proliferation, induced cell cycle G1 arrest and apoptosis, reduced invasion and caused cellular stress via inhibition of mTOR pathways in vitro. Hypoglycemic conditions enhanced the sensitivity of cells to everolimus through the disruption of glycolysis. Moreover, everolimus was found to inhibit ovarian tumor growth in both obese and lean mice. This reduction coincided with a decrease in expression of Ki-67 and phosphorylated-S6, as well as an increase in cleaved caspase 3 and phosphorylated-AKT. Metabolite profiling revealed that everolimus was able to alter tumor metabolism through different metabolic pathways in the obese and lean mice. Our findings support that everolimus may be a promising therapeutic agent for obesity-driven ovarian cancers. PMID:26959121

  3. The HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, simvastatin, exhibits anti-metastatic and anti-tumorigenic effects in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Xiugui; Han, Xiaoyun; Schointuch, Monica N.; Gilliam, Timothy P.; Gehrig, Paola A.; Zhou, Chunxiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States. The mevalonate pathway is thought to be a potential oncogenic pathway in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer. Simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) inhibitor, is a widely used drug for inhibiting the synthesis of cholesterol and may also have anti-tumorigenic activity. Our goal was to evaluate the effects of simvastatin on ovarian cancer cell lines, primary cultures of ovarian cancer cells and in an orthotopic ovarian cancer mouse model. Simvastatin significantly inhibited cellular proliferation, induced cell cycle G1 arrest and apoptosis, and caused cellular stress via reduction in the enzymatic activity of HMGCR and inhibition of the MAPK and mTOR pathways in ovarian cancer cells. Furthermore, simvastatin induced DNA damage and reduced cell adhesion and invasion. Simvastatin also exerted anti-proliferative effects on primary cell cultures of ovarian cancer. Treatment with simvastatin in an orthotopic mouse model reduced ovarian tumor growth, coincident with decreased Ki-67, HMGCR, phosphorylated-Akt and phosphorylated-p42/44 protein expression. Our findings demonstrate that simvastatin may have therapeutic benefit for ovarian cancer treatment and be worthy of further exploration in clinical trials. PMID:26503475

  4. Tumorigenic lung tumorospheres exhibit stem-like features with significantly increased expression of CD133 and ABCG2

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wensi; Luo, Yi; Li, Boyi; Zhang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the existence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in human tumors, and the successful certification of CSCs may lead to the identification of therapeutic targets, which are more effective for the treatment of cancer. The use of spherical cancer models has increased in popularity in cancer stem cell investigations. Tumorospheres, which are used as a model of CSCs and are established in serum-free medium supplemented with growth factors under non-adherent conditions, are one of the most commonly used cancer spherical models and are a valuable method for enriching the CSC fraction. To investigate whether this model is applicable in lung cancer (LC), the identification of lung CSCs and their capacities is essential. In the present study, lung CSCs were enriched by sphere-forming culturing and their stem-like properties were assessed. The results indicated that the lung tumorospheres had enhanced proliferation, clonality, invasion and cisplatin-resistance, and showed significantly increased expression levels of CD133 and breast cancer resistance protein (ABCG2). These results, together with findings previously reported in literature, indicated that the sphere-forming culturing of LC cells induced the enrichment of CSCs and that the tumorospheres exhibited stem cell characteristics. In addition, the higher expression levels of CD133 and ABCG2 in the tumorospheres may provide a rationale for therapeutic targets for LC. PMID:27432082

  5. Lichen secondary metabolites in Flavocetraria cucullata exhibit anti-cancer effects on human cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and suppression of tumorigenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Thanh Thi; Yoon, Somy; Yang, Yi; Lee, Ho-Bin; Oh, Soonok; Jeong, Min-Hye; Kim, Jong-Jin; Yee, Sung-Tae; Crişan, Florin; Moon, Cheol; Lee, Kwang Youl; Kim, Kyung Keun; Hur, Jae-Seoun; Kim, Hangun

    2014-01-01

    Lichens are symbiotic organisms which produce distinct secondary metabolic products. In the present study, we tested the cytotoxic activity of 17 lichen species against several human cancer cells and further investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying their anti-cancer activity. We found that among 17 lichens species, F. cucullata exhibited the most potent cytotoxicity in several human cancer cells. High performance liquid chromatography analysis revealed that the acetone extract of F. cucullata contains usnic acid, salazinic acid, Squamatic acid, Baeomycesic acid, d-protolichesterinic acid, and lichesterinic acid as subcomponents. MTT assay showed that cancer cell lines were more vulnerable to the cytotoxic effects of the extract than non-cancer cell lines. Furthermore, among the identified subcomponents, usnic acid treatment had a similar cytotoxic effect on cancer cell lines but with lower potency than the extract. At a lethal dose, treatment with the extract or with usnic acid greatly increased the apoptotic cell population and specifically activated the apoptotic signaling pathway; however, using sub-lethal doses, extract and usnic acid treatment decreased cancer cell motility and inhibited in vitro and in vivo tumorigenic potentials. In these cells, we observed significantly reduced levels of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers and phosphor-Akt, while phosphor-c-Jun and phosphor-ERK1/2 levels were only marginally affected. Overall, the anti-cancer activity of the extract is more potent than that of usnic acid alone. Taken together, F. cucullata and its subcomponent, usnic acid together with additional component, exert anti-cancer effects on human cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis and the inhibition of EMT. PMID:25360754

  6. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  7. Characterization of T cells and cytokines in the aqueous humour (AH) in patients with Fuchs' heterochromic cyclitis (FHC) and idiopathic anterior uveitis (IAU)

    PubMed Central

    Muhaya, M; Calder, V; Towler, H M A; Shaer, B; McLauchlan, M; Lightman, S

    1998-01-01

    FHC and IAU are two forms of anterior uveitis which are localized to the eyes with no evidence of systemic involvement. However, FHC has distinct clinical features and differs from IAU in that the inflammation is low grade, steroid non-responsive, and has a less aggressive clinical course. To try to dissect the mechanism for this difference the phenotypes of the cells in the AH and blood (PB) and the cytokines present in the AH in patients with FHC and IAU were compared. Three-colour flow cytometry was performed on the cells isolated from the AH and PB. Percentage of cells bearing the following markers were determined: CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD25, CD8/CD25, CD19 and CD14. The cytokines IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) were assayed by ELISA. In both groups T cell numbers were higher in the AH than PB, although the distribution of T cell subsets in PB was similar. In the AH, CD8+ T cell numbers were higher in FHC than in IAU (P = 0·003), whilst CD4+ numbers were higher in IAU than FHC (P = 0·01). AH cytokine profiles were different in the two groups: IFN-γ levels were higher and IL-12 levels lower in the FHC group than IAU (P = 0·02), whilst IL-10 levels tended to be higher in the FHC group (P = 0·5). We suggest that different local mechanisms governing the balance of T cell/cytokine-mediated inflammation in the anterior segment may underlie clinical differences such as chronicity and response to steroids in these disorders. PMID:9472671

  8. Test Series 2: seismic-fragility tests of naturally-aged Class 1E Exide FHC-19 battery cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bonzon, L. L.; Hente, D. B.; Kukreti, B. M.; Schendel, J.; Tulk, J. D.; Janis, W. J.; Black, D. A.; Paulsen, G. D.; Aucoin, B. D.

    1985-03-01

    The seismic-fragility of naturally-aged nuclear station safety-related batteries is of interest for two reasons: (1) to determine actual failure modes and their thresholds and (2) to determine the validity of using the electrical capacity of individual cells as an indicator of the ''end-of-life'' of a battery if subjected to a seismic event. This report, the second in a test series of an extensive seismic research program, covers the testing of 10-year old lead-calcium Exide FHC-19 cells from the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Station operated by the Baltimore Gas and Electric Company. The Exide cells were tested in two configurations using a triaxial shake table: single-cell tests, both rigidly and loosely mounted; and multicell (three-cell) tests, mounted in a typical battery rack. A total of six electrically active cells was used in the two different cell configurations.

  9. Hypoxia-Regulated Delta-like 1 Homologue Enhances Cancer Cell Stemness and Tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yuri; Lin, Qun; Zelterman, Daniel; Yun, Zhong

    2010-01-01

    Reduced oxygenation, or hypoxia, inhibits differentiation and facilitates stem cell maintenance. Hypoxia commonly occurs in solid tumors and promotes malignant progression. Hypoxic tumors are aggressive and exhibit stem cell–like characteristics. It remains unclear, however, whether and how hypoxia regulates cancer cell differentiation and maintains cancer cell stemness. Here, we show that hypoxia increases the expression of the stem cell gene DLK1, or delta-like 1 homologue (Drosophila), in neuronal tumor cells. Inhibition of DLK1 enhances spontaneous differentiation, decreases clonogenicity, and reduces in vivo tumor growth. Overexpression of DLK1 inhibits differentiation and enhances tumorigenic potentials. We further show that the DLK1 cytoplasmic domain, especially Tyrosine339 and Serine355, is required for maintaining both clonogenicity and tumorigenicity. Because elevated DLK1 expression is found in many tumor types, our observations suggest that hypoxia and DLK1 may constitute an important stem cell pathway for the regulation of cancer stem cell–like functionality and tumorigenicity. PMID:19934310

  10. Upgrading coal-derived liquids by means other than hydrotreatment. II. Tumorigenicity and tumorigens

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, C.; Jones, A.R.; Caton, J.E.; Griest, W.H.; Smith, L.E.; Guerin, M.R.

    1985-05-01

    Distillation was confirmed to be a generally desirable first step in upgrading coal-derived liquids. Not only bactericidal mutagenicity, but also tumorigenicity (as gauged by a ten-animal time-to-tumor assay) is segregated into the vacuum gas oil fraction (boiling range >343/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F)). Three non-hydrotreating processes (acid treatment, deasphalting, and furfural extraction) were found ineffective in reducing known tumorigens (especially benzo(a)pyrene) and tumorigenicity of the vacuum gas oil fraction. The benzo(a)pyrene content of the treated products (but not their mutagenicity) was found to be qualitative indicator for skin tumorigenicity. Two novel nonhydrotreatment processes, a three-step oxidation and NaOH treatment at elevated temperature and pressure, were investigated and found to have little utility in removing benzo(a)pyrene. 11 refs., 7 tabs.

  11. SV40-IMMORTALIZED NON-TUMORIGENIC AND TUMORIGENIC CELL LINES DIFFER IN EXPRESSION OF HALLMARK VIRAL RESPONSE MRNAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    SV40-Immortalized Non-Tumorigenic and Tumorigenic Cell Lines Differ in Expression of Hallmark Viral Response mRNAs.

    Prior to the use of an in vitra/in viva transformation system to examine the tumorigenic activity of environmental contaminants, in vitra gene expression pa...

  12. Folate levels modulate oncogene-induced replication stress and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Lamm, Noa; Maoz, Karin; Bester, Assaf C; Im, Michael M; Shewach, Donna S; Karni, Rotem; Kerem, Batsheva

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomal instability in early cancer stages is caused by replication stress. One mechanism by which oncogene expression induces replication stress is to drive cell proliferation with insufficient nucleotide levels. Cancer development is driven by alterations in both genetic and environmental factors. Here, we investigated whether replication stress can be modulated by both genetic and non-genetic factors and whether the extent of replication stress affects the probability of neoplastic transformation. To do so, we studied the effect of folate, a micronutrient that is essential for nucleotide biosynthesis, on oncogene-induced tumorigenicity. We show that folate deficiency by itself leads to replication stress in a concentration-dependent manner. Folate deficiency significantly enhances oncogene-induced replication stress, leading to increased DNA damage and tumorigenicity in vitro. Importantly, oncogene-expressing cells, when grown under folate deficiency, exhibit a significantly increased frequency of tumor development in mice. These findings suggest that replication stress is a quantitative trait affected by both genetic and non-genetic factors and that the extent of replication stress plays an important role in cancer development. PMID:26197802

  13. Skin tumorigenic potential of benzanthrone: prevention by ascorbic acid.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Neelam; Kumar, Sandeep; Ansari, Kausar M; Khanna, S K; Das, Mukul

    2013-09-01

    Benzanthrone (BA) exposed occupational workers have been found to exhibit toxicological manifestations in the skin, thus it is quite likely that long term exposure may lead to skin tumorigenicity. Thus, attempts were made to elucidate the tumor initiating and promoting potentials of pure (PBA) and commercial benzanthrone (CBA). Additionally, the preventive role of ascorbic acid (AsA) was also assessed. PBA showed tumor initiating activity while CBA demonstrated tumor initiating as well as promoting activities in two-stage mouse skin tumor protocol. Further, prior treatment of AsA to PBA and CBA followed by twice weekly application of 12-o-tetradecanoyl phorbal myristate acetate (TPA) resulted into delayed onset of tumor formation and similarly single application of 7,12-dimethylbenz [α] anthracene (DMBA) followed by twice weekly application of AsA and CBA showed an increase in the latency period. Thus, AsA showed a protective effect against CBA promoted skin tumor. Furthermore, the topical application of CBA significantly increased the levels of xenobiotic enzymes. The animals topically treated with AsA along with topical application of CBA, restored all the impairment observed in enzyme activities. Thus, this study suggested that AsA can be useful in preventing PBA and CBA induced skin tumorigenicity.

  14. Tumorigenicity Evaluation of Umbilical Cord Blood-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Woojin; Kim, Ok-Sun; Lee, Sunyeong; Han, Su-Yeon; Jeong, Eun Ju; Park, Hyun-Shin; Kim, Hea-Won; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2016-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified in multiple types of tissue and exhibit characteristic self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation abilities. However, the possibility of oncogenic transformation after transplantation is concerning. In this study, we investigated the tumorigenic potential of umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) relative to MRC-5 and HeLa cells (negative and positive controls, respectively) both in vitro and in vivo. To evaluate tumorigenicity in vitro, anchorage-independent growth was assessed using the soft agar colony formation assay. hUCB-MSCs and MRC-5 cells formed few colonies, while HeLa cells formed a greater number of larger colonies, indicating that hUCB-MSCs and MRC-5 cells do not have anchorage-independent proliferation potential. To detect tumorigenicity in vivo, hUCB-MSCs were implanted as a single subcutaneous injection into BALB/c-nu mice. No tumor formation was observed in mice transplanted with hUCB-MSCs or MRC-5 cells based on macroand microscopic examinations; however, all mice transplanted with HeLa cells developed tumors that stained positive for a human gene according to immunohistochemical analysis. In conclusion, hUCB-MSCs do not exhibit tumorigenic potential based on in vitro and in vivo assays under our experimental conditions, providing further evidence of their safety for clinical applications.

  15. Tumorigenicity Evaluation of Umbilical Cord Blood-derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Woojin; Kim, Ok-Sun; Lee, Sunyeong; Han, Su-Yeon; Jeong, Eun Ju; Park, Hyun-shin; Kim, Hea-Won; Moon, Kyoung-Sik

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been identified in multiple types of tissue and exhibit characteristic self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation abilities. However, the possibility of oncogenic transformation after transplantation is concerning. In this study, we investigated the tumorigenic potential of umbilical cord blood-derived MSCs (hUCB-MSCs) relative to MRC-5 and HeLa cells (negative and positive controls, respectively) both in vitro and in vivo. To evaluate tumorigenicity in vitro, anchorage-independent growth was assessed using the soft agar colony formation assay. hUCB-MSCs and MRC-5 cells formed few colonies, while HeLa cells formed a greater number of larger colonies, indicating that hUCB-MSCs and MRC-5 cells do not have anchorage-independent proliferation potential. To detect tumorigenicity in vivo, hUCB-MSCs were implanted as a single subcutaneous injection into BALB/c-nu mice. No tumor formation was observed in mice transplanted with hUCB-MSCs or MRC-5 cells based on macroand microscopic examinations; however, all mice transplanted with HeLa cells developed tumors that stained positive for a human gene according to immunohistochemical analysis. In conclusion, hUCB-MSCs do not exhibit tumorigenic potential based on in vitro and in vivo assays under our experimental conditions, providing further evidence of their safety for clinical applications. PMID:27437093

  16. [The Fernando Henrique Cardoso (FHC) and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva (Lula) governments and the policy for the civil servant workforce of the Brazilian government].

    PubMed

    Costa, Nilson do Rosario; Lamarca, Isabel

    2013-06-01

    This article analyzes the configuration of the active civil servant workforce of the Brazilian government during Fernando Henrique Cardoso - FHC - (1995-2002) and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva - Lula - (2003-2010) mandates. The article associates the condition of the workforce of the Brazilian government with the changes in the government coalition. The residual participation of the Ministry of Health (MOH) in the direct provision of public services influenced the downward trend of the federal workforce.The implementation of the Unified Health System (SUS) was strongly affected by the structural adjustment of the workforce at the federal level during the decades of 1990 and 2000.

  17. Interfacial geometry dictates cancer cell tumorigenicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junmin; Abdeen, Amr A.; Wycislo, Kathryn L.; Fan, Timothy M.; Kilian, Kristopher A.

    2016-08-01

    Within the heterogeneous architecture of tumour tissue there exists an elusive population of stem-like cells that are implicated in both recurrence and metastasis. Here, by using engineered extracellular matrices, we show that geometric features at the perimeter of tumour tissue will prime a population of cells with a stem-cell-like phenotype. These cells show characteristics of cancer stem cells in vitro, as well as enhanced tumorigenicity in murine models of primary tumour growth and pulmonary metastases. We also show that interfacial geometry modulates cell shape, adhesion through integrin α5β1, MAPK and STAT activity, and initiation of pluripotency signalling. Our results for several human cancer cell lines suggest that interfacial geometry triggers a general mechanism for the regulation of cancer-cell state. Similar to how a growing tumour can co-opt normal soluble signalling pathways, our findings demonstrate how cancer can also exploit geometry to orchestrate oncogenesis.

  18. In vivo mutagenicity of conazole fungicides correlates with tumorigenicity

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity te...

  19. Differential cell cycle response of nontumorigenic and tumorigenic human papillomavirus-positive keratinocytes towards transforming growth factor-beta1.

    PubMed

    Hasskarl, J; Butz, K; Whitaker, N; Ullmann, A; Dürst, M; Hoppe-Seyler, F

    2000-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are causative agents of a number of malignancies in humans, including cervical cancer. Their tumorigenic potential is linked to expression of the viral E6/E7 genes which can interfere with normal cell cycle control by targeting p53, p21WAF1, p27KIP1, and pRb. We show here that nontumorigenic and tumorigenic HPV-positive keratinocytes (HPK) exhibit striking differences in the response of cell cycle regulatory genes towards transforming growth factor beta-beta1. Treatment with this agent led to an efficient induction of p53 and the growth-inhibitory p15INK4 and p21WAF1 genes only in nontumorigenic HPKs and was linked to an efficient reduction in viral E6/E7 oncogene expression. This was associated with increased pRb levels, exhibiting sustained hypophosphorylation, and a permanent growth arrest in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, tumorigenic HPKs exhibited only a modest rise in p53 protein levels and a substantially reduced induction of the p15INK4 and p21WAF1 genes, which was linked to a lesser degree of viral oncogene repression. In addition, tumorigenic HPKs rapidly resumed cell growth after a transient G1 arrest, concomitantly with the reappearance of hyperphosphorylated pRb. These results support the notion that the progression of HPV-positive cells to a malignant phenotype is associated with increased resistance to growth inhibition by transforming growth factor-beta1. This is linked in the tumorigenic cells to a lack of persistent G1 arrest, inefficient induction of several cell cycle control genes involved in growth inhibition, and inefficient repression of the growth-promoting viral E6/E7 oncogenes. PMID:10794545

  20. Tumorigenic and adhesive properties of heparanase

    PubMed Central

    Levy-Adam, Flonia; Ilan, Neta; Vlodavsky, Israel

    2010-01-01

    Heparanase is an endo-β-glucuronidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains presumably at sites of low sulfation, activity that is strongly implicated with cell invasion associated with cancer metastasis, a consequence of structural modification that loosens the extracellular matrix barrier. In addition, heparanase exerts pro-adhesive properties, mediated by clustering of membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans (i.e., syndecans) and activation of signaling molecules such as Akt, Src, EGFR, and Rac in a heparan sulfate-dependent and -independent manner. Activation of signaling cascades by enzymatically inactive heparanase and by a peptide corresponding to its substrate binding domain not only increases cell adhesion but also facilitates cancer cell growth. This notion is supported by preclinical and clinical settings, encouraging the development of anti-heparanase therapeutics. Here we summarize recent progress in heparanase research emphasizing the molecular mechanisms that govern its pro-tumorigenic and pro-adhesive properties. Pro-adhesive properties of the heparanase homolog, heparanase 2 (Hpa2), are also discussed. Enzymatic activity-independent function of proteases (i.e., matrix metalloproteinases) is discussed in the context of cell adhesion and tumor progression. Collectively, these examples suggest that enzyme function exceeds beyond the enzymatic aspect, thus significantly expanding the scope of the functional proteome. Cross-talk with matrix metalloproteinases and the role of heparanase in pathological settings other than cancer is also described. PMID:20619346

  1. Identification of Coordinately Regulated Functional Modules in Thyroid Tissues from Rats Exposed to a Tumorigenic and a Non-Tumorigenic Conazole Fungicide Using Oncomine®

    EPA Science Inventory

    Conazoles are triazole- or imidazole-containing fungicides used in agriculture and medicine. Using transcriptomic analysis of rat thyroid tissues exposed to either tumorigenic or non-tumorigenic structurally related conazoles, we identified new findings on thyroid gene expressio...

  2. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA damage correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazolefungicides triadimefon and propiconazole have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazole myclobutanil w...

  3. Transcriptional responses in thyroid tissues from rats treated with a tumorigenic and a non-tumorigenic triazole conazole fungicide

    SciTech Connect

    Hester, Susan D. Nesnow, Stephen

    2008-03-15

    Conazoles are azole-containing fungicides that are used in agriculture and medicine. Conazoles can induce follicular cell adenomas of the thyroid in rats after chronic bioassay. The goal of this study was to identify pathways and networks of genes that were associated with thyroid tumorigenesis through transcriptional analyses. To this end, we compared transcriptional profiles from tissues of rats treated with a tumorigenic and a non-tumorigenic conazole. Triadimefon, a rat thyroid tumorigen, and myclobutanil, which was not tumorigenic in rats after a 2-year bioassay, were administered in the feed to male Wistar/Han rats for 30 or 90 days similar to the treatment conditions previously used in their chronic bioassays. Thyroid gene expression was determined using high density Affymetrix GeneChips (Rat 230{sub 2}). Gene expression was analyzed by the Gene Set Expression Analyses method which clearly separated the tumorigenic treatments (tumorigenic response group (TRG)) from the non-tumorigenic treatments (non-tumorigenic response group (NRG)). Core genes from these gene sets were mapped to canonical, metabolic, and GeneGo processes and these processes compared across group and treatment time. Extensive analyses were performed on the 30-day gene sets as they represented the major perturbations. Gene sets in the 30-day TRG group had over representation of fatty acid metabolism, oxidation, and degradation processes (including PPAR{gamma} and CYP involvement), and of cell proliferation responses. Core genes from these gene sets were combined into networks and found to possess signaling interactions. In addition, the core genes in each gene set were compared with genes known to be associated with human thyroid cancer. Among the genes that appeared in both rat and human data sets were: Acaca, Asns, Cebpg, Crem, Ddit3, Gja1, Grn, Jun, Junb, and Vegf. These genes were major contributors in the previously developed network from triadimefon-treated rat thyroids. It is

  4. Tumorigenic effects of dichloroacetic acid in female F344 rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Introduction: Dichloroacetic acid (DCA) is a halogenated organic acid produced during oxidant disinfection of drinking water. Prior studies indicate that DCA may increase liver tumors in mice. Here we evaluated the hepatic tumorigenicity of DCA in female rats when given alone ...

  5. Tumorigenic properties of alternative osteopontin isoforms in mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Sergey V.; Ivanova, Alla V.; Goparaju, Chandra M.V.; Chen, Yuanbin; Beck, Amanda; Pass, Harvey I.

    2009-05-08

    Osteopontin (SPP1) is an inflammatory cytokine that we previously characterized as a diagnostic marker in patients with asbestos-induced malignant mesothelioma (MM). While SPP1 shows both pro- and anti-tumorigenic biological effects, little is known about the molecular basis of these activities. In this study, we demonstrate that while healthy pleura possesses all three differentially spliced SPP1 isoforms (A-C), in clinical MM specimens isoform A is markedly up-regulated and predominant. To provide a clue to possible functions of the SPP1 isoforms we next performed their functional evaluation via transient expression in MM cell lines. As a result, we report that isoforms A-C demonstrate different activities in cell proliferation, wound closure, and invasion assays. These findings suggest different functions for SPP1 isoforms and underline pro-tumorigenic properties of isoforms A and B.

  6. Altered tumor cell growth and tumorigenicity in models of microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, K.; Taga, M.; Furian, L.; Odle, J.; Sundaresan, A.; Pellis, N.; Andrassy, R.; Kulkarni, A.

    Spaceflight environment and microgravity (MG) causes immune dysfunction and is a major health risk to humans, especially during long-term space missions. The effects of microgravity environment on tumor growth and carcinogenesis are yet unknown. Hence, we investigated the effects of simulated MG (SMG) on tumor growth and tumorigenicity using in vivo and in vitro models. B16 melanoma cells were cultured in static flask (FL) and rotating wall vessel bioreactors (BIO) to measure growth and properties, melanin production and apoptosis. BIO cultures had 50% decreased growth (p<0.01), increased doubling time and a 150% increase in melanin production (p<0.05). Flow cytometric analysis showed increased apoptosis in BIO. When BIO cultured melanoma cells were inoculated sc in mice there was a significant increase in tumorigenicity as compared to FL cells. Thus SMG may have supported &selected highly tumorigenic cells and it is pos sible that in addition to decreased immune function MG may alter tumor cell characteristics and invasiveness. Thus it is important to study effects of microgravity environment and its stressors using experimental tumors and SMG to understand and evaluate carcinogenic responses to true microgravity. Further studies on carcinogenic events and their mechanisms will allow us develop and formulate countermeasures and protect space travelers. Additional results will be presented. (Supported by NASA NCC8-168 grant, ADK)

  7. Outdoor Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) at the John C. Stennis Space Center has exhibits located in front of the Visitors Center. These boat-shaped buoys are moored in areas of the ocean that experience hostile environmental conditions. The instruments installed gather information and relay it to the National Weather Service by satellite. Nomad buoys are 20 feet long and weigh 13,900 pounds. They provide information on wind speed and direction, humidity levels, air and sea surface temperature and air pressure. U.S. Coast Guard ships transport buoys to their mooring sites.

  8. Midbody accumulation through evasion of autophagy contributes to cellular reprogramming and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Tse-Chun; Chen, Chun-Ting; Baron, Desiree; Onder, Tamer T.; Loewer, Sabine; Almeida, Sandra; Weismann, Cara; Xu, Ping; Houghton, Jean-Marie; Gao, Fen-Biao; Daley, George Q.; Doxsey, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    The midbody (MB) is a singular organelle formed between daughter cells during cytokinesis and required for their final separation. MBs persist in cells long after division as midbody derivatives (MBds), but their fate is unclear. Here we show that MBds are inherited asymmetrically by the daughter cell with the older centrosome. They selectively accumulate in stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and potential cancer ‘stem cells’ (CSCs) in vivo and in vitro. MBd loss accompanies stem cell differentiation, and involves autophagic degradation mediated by binding of the autophagic receptor, NBR1, to the MB protein Cep55. Differentiating cells and normal dividing cells do not accumulate MBds and possess high autophagic activity. Stem cells and cancer cells accumulate MBds by evading autophagosome encapsulation and exhibit low autophagic activity. MBd enrichment enhances reprogramming to iPSCs and increases in vitro tumorigenicity of cancer cells. These results suggest unexpected roles for MBds in stem cells and CSCs. PMID:21909099

  9. Effect of MUC1/β-catenin interaction on the tumorigenic capacity of pancreatic CD133+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Andreia Mota; Rei, Margarida; Freitas, Rita; Ricardo, Sara; Caffrey, Thomas; David, Leonor; Almeida, Raquel; Hollingsworth, Michael Anthony; Santos-Silva, Filipe

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that the biological function of cluster of differentiation (CD)133 remains unclear, this glycoprotein is currently used in the identification and isolation of tumor-initiating cells from certain malignant tumors, including pancreatic cancer. In the present study, the involvement of mucin 1 (MUC1) in the signaling pathways of a highly tumorigenic CD133+ cellular subpopulation sorted from the pancreatic cancer cell line HPAF-II was evaluated. The expression of MUC1-cytoplasmic domain (MUC1-CD) and oncogenic signaling transducers (epidermal growth factor receptor, protein kinase C delta, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and growth factor receptor-bound protein 2), as well as the association between MUC1 and β-catenin, were characterized in HPAF-II CD133+ and CD133low cell subpopulations and in tumor xenografts generated from these cells. Compared with HPAF CD133low cells, HPAF-II CD133+ cancer cells exhibited increased tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice, which was associated with overexpression of MUC1 and with the accordingly altered expression profile of MUC1-associated signaling partners. Additionally, MUC1-CD/β-catenin interactions were increased both in the HPAF-II CD133+ cell subpopulation and derived tumor xenografts compared with HPAF CD133low cells. These results suggest that, in comparison with HPAF CD133low cells, CD133+ cells exhibit higher expression of MUC1, which contributes to their tumorigenic phenotype through increased interaction between MUC1-CD and β-catenin, which in turn modulates oncogenic signaling cascades. PMID:27602113

  10. Effect of MUC1/β-catenin interaction on the tumorigenic capacity of pancreatic CD133+ cells

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Andreia Mota; Rei, Margarida; Freitas, Rita; Ricardo, Sara; Caffrey, Thomas; David, Leonor; Almeida, Raquel; Hollingsworth, Michael Anthony; Santos-Silva, Filipe

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that the biological function of cluster of differentiation (CD)133 remains unclear, this glycoprotein is currently used in the identification and isolation of tumor-initiating cells from certain malignant tumors, including pancreatic cancer. In the present study, the involvement of mucin 1 (MUC1) in the signaling pathways of a highly tumorigenic CD133+ cellular subpopulation sorted from the pancreatic cancer cell line HPAF-II was evaluated. The expression of MUC1-cytoplasmic domain (MUC1-CD) and oncogenic signaling transducers (epidermal growth factor receptor, protein kinase C delta, glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta and growth factor receptor-bound protein 2), as well as the association between MUC1 and β-catenin, were characterized in HPAF-II CD133+ and CD133low cell subpopulations and in tumor xenografts generated from these cells. Compared with HPAF CD133low cells, HPAF-II CD133+ cancer cells exhibited increased tumorigenic potential in immunocompromised mice, which was associated with overexpression of MUC1 and with the accordingly altered expression profile of MUC1-associated signaling partners. Additionally, MUC1-CD/β-catenin interactions were increased both in the HPAF-II CD133+ cell subpopulation and derived tumor xenografts compared with HPAF CD133low cells. These results suggest that, in comparison with HPAF CD133low cells, CD133+ cells exhibit higher expression of MUC1, which contributes to their tumorigenic phenotype through increased interaction between MUC1-CD and β-catenin, which in turn modulates oncogenic signaling cascades.

  11. Shed syndecan-2 enhances tumorigenic activities of colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sojoong; Choi, Youngsil; Jun, Eunsung; Kim, In-San; Kim, Seong-Eun; Jung, Sung-Ae; Oh, Eok-Soo

    2015-01-01

    Because earlier studies showed the cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan, syndecan-2, sheds from colon cancer cells in culture, the functional roles of shed syndecan-2 were assessed. A non-cleavable mutant of syndecan-2 in which the Asn148-Leu149 residues were replaced with Asn148-Ile149, had decreased shedding, less cancer-associated activities of syndecan-2 in vitro, and less syndecan-2-mediated metastasis of mouse melanoma cells in vivo, suggesting the importance of shedding on syndecan-2-mediated pro-tumorigenic functions. Indeed, shed syndecan-2 from cancer-conditioned media and recombinant shed syndecan-2 enhanced cancer-associated activities, and depletion of shed syndecan-2 abolished these effects. Similarly, shed syndecan-2 was detected from sera of patients from advanced carcinoma (625.9 ng/ml) and promoted cancer-associated activities. Furthermore, a series of syndecan-2 deletion mutants showed that the tumorigenic activity of shed syndecan-2 resided in the C-terminus of the extracellular domain and a shed syndecan-2 synthetic peptide (16 residues) was sufficient to establish subcutaneous primary growth of HT29 colon cancer cells, pulmonary metastases (B16F10 cells), and primary intrasplenic tumor growth and liver metastases (4T1 cells). Taken together, these results demonstrate that shed syndecan-2 directly enhances colon cancer progression and may be a promising therapeutic target for controlling colon cancer development. PMID:25686828

  12. PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Echizen, Kanae; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Hayashi, Tomoatsu; Sabit, Hemragul; Furuta, Takuya; Nakai, Miyuki; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Nishimura, Yukiko; Taniue, Kenzui; Morishita, Yasuyuki; Hirano, Shinji; Terai, Kenta; Todo, Tomoki; Ino, Yasushi; Mukasa, Akitake; Takayanagi, Shunsaku; Ohtani, Ryohei; Saito, Nobuhito; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • PCDH10 is required for the proliferation, survival and self-renewal of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 is required for glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Abstract: Protocadherin10 (PCDH10)/OL-protocadherin is a cadherin-related transmembrane protein that has multiple roles in the brain, including facilitating specific cell–cell connections, cell migration and axon guidance. It has recently been reported that PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor and that its overexpression inhibits proliferation or invasion of multiple tumor cells. However, the function of PCDH10 in glioblastoma cells has not been elucidated. In contrast to previous reports on other tumors, we show here that suppression of the expression of PCDH10 by RNA interference (RNAi) induces the growth arrest and apoptosis of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that knockdown of PCDH10 inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice. These results suggest that PCDH10 is required for the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma.

  13. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  14. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole mutagenicity and tumorigenicity in mouse liver.**

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have previously shown that the conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole, which are tumorigenic in mouse liver, are in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue" transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses. The nontumorigenic conazole myclo...

  15. CD146 is a novel marker for highly tumorigenic cells and a potential therapeutic target in malignant rhabdoid tumor

    PubMed Central

    Nodomi, S; Umeda, K; Saida, S; Kinehara, T; Hamabata, T; Daifu, T; Kato, I; Hiramatsu, H; Watanabe, K-i; Kuwahara, Y; Iehara, T; Adachi, S; Konishi, E; Nakahata, T; Hosoi, H; Heike, T

    2016-01-01

    Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) is a rare, highly aggressive pediatric malignancy that primarily develops during infancy and early childhood. Despite the existing standard of intensive multimodal therapy, the prognosis of patients with MRT is dismal; therefore, a greater understanding of the biology of this disease is required to establish novel therapies. In this study, we identified a highly tumorigenic sub-population in MRT, based on the expression of CD146 (also known as melanoma cell adhesion molecule), a cell adhesion molecule expressed by neural crest cells and various derivatives. CD146+ cells isolated from four MRT cell lines by cell sorting exhibited enhanced self-renewal and invasive potential in vitro. In a xenograft model using immunodeficient NOD/Shi-scid IL-2Rγ-null mice, purified CD146+ cells obtained from MRT cell lines or a primary tumor exhibited the exclusive ability to form tumors in vivo. Blocking of CD146-related mechanisms, either by short hairpin RNA knockdown or treatment with a polyclonal antibody against CD146, effectively suppressed tumor growth of MRT cells both in vitro and in vivo via induction of apoptosis by inactivating Akt. Furthermore, CD146 positivity in immunohistological analysis of 11 MRT patient samples was associated with poor patient outcomes. These results suggest that CD146 defines a distinct sub-population in MRT with high tumorigenic capacity and that this marker represents a promising therapeutic target. PMID:27041577

  16. Nonylphenol effects on human prostate non tumorigenic cells.

    PubMed

    Forte, Maurizio; Di Lorenzo, Mariana; Carrizzo, Albino; Valiante, Salvatore; Vecchione, Carmine; Laforgia, Vincenza; De Falco, Maria

    2016-05-16

    Nonylphenol (NP) is an industrial chemical with estrogenic activity both in vivo and in vitro; estrogens play a critical role in the development of prostate and may be the cause of some pathological states, including cancer. In this study we examined the effects of NP on human prostate non tumorigenic epithelial cells (PNT1A) investigating on cell proliferation, interaction with estrogen receptors (ERs) and gene expression of genes involved in prostate diseases. We found that NP affects cell proliferation at 10(-6)M, promoting a cytoplasm-nucleus translocation of ERα and not ERβ, like the natural estrogen 17β-estradiol (E2). Moreover, we showed that NP enhances gene expression of key regulators of cell cycle. Estrogen selective antagonist ICI182780 in part reverted the observed effects of NP. These results confirm the estrogenic activity of NP and suggest that other transduction pathways may be involved in NP action on prostate. PMID:27260121

  17. Arginyltransferase ATE1 suppresses cell tumorigenic potential and inversely correlates with metastases in human cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Zhang, Fangliang; Colavita, Kristen; Leu, Nicolae Adrian; Kurosaka, Satoshi; Kumar, Akhilesh; Birnbaum, Michael D.; Győrffy, Balázs; Dong, Dawei W.; Shtutman, Michael; Kashina, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Arginylation is an emerging posttranslational modification mediated by arginyltransferase (ATE1) that is essential for mammalian embryogenesis and regulation of the cytoskeleton. Here, we discovered that Ate1 knockout embryonic fibroblasts exhibit tumorigenic properties, including abnormally rapid contact-independent growth, reduced ability to form cell-cell contacts, and chromosomal aberrations. Ate1 knockout fibroblasts can form large colonies in Matrigel and exhibit invasive behavior, unlike wild type fibroblasts. Furthermore, Ate1 knockout cells form tumors in subcutaneous xenograft assays in immunocompromised mice. Abnormal growth in these cells can be partially rescued by reintroduction of stably expressed specific Ate1 isoforms, which also reduce the ability of these cells to form tumors. Tumor array studies and bioinformatics analysis show that Ate1 is down-regulated in several types of human cancer samples at the protein level, and that its transcription level inversely correlates with metastatic progression and patient survival. We conclude that Ate1 knockout results in carcinogenic transformation of cultured fibroblasts, suggesting that in addition to its previously known activities Ate1 gene is essential for tumor suppression and also likely participates in suppression of metastatic growth. PMID:26686093

  18. Use of Ti Plasmid DNA Probes for Determining Tumorigenicity of Agrobacterium Strains

    PubMed Central

    Burr, Thomas J.; Norelli, John L.; Katz, Barbara H.; Bishop, Andrew L.

    1990-01-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two 32P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 106 CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains. Images PMID:16348218

  19. Use of Ti plasmid DNA probes for determining tumorigenicity of agrobacterium strains

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, T.J.; Norelli, J.L.; Katz, B.H.; Bishop, A.L. )

    1990-06-01

    Probes consisting of T-DNA genes from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were used for determining tumorigenicity of strains. Two {sup 32}P-labeled probes hybridized with 28 of 28 tumorigenic strains of the pathogen but not with 20 of 22 nontumorigenic strains. One probe, pTHE17, consists of all but the far left portion of the T-DNA of strain C58. Probe SmaI7 consists of SmaI fragment 7 of pTiC58, including onc genes 1, 4, and 6a and most of 2. Another probe, pAL4044, consisting of the vir region of strain Ach-5, hybridized with several nontumorigenic as well as tumorigenic strains. Colony hybridizations were done with 28 tumorigenic and 22 nontumorigenic Agrobacterium strains. About 10{sup 6} CFU of the different tumorigenic strains were detectable with this method. Southern analyses confirmed the presence or absence of Ti plasmids in strains for which tumorigenicity was questioned. Colony hybridization with the T-DNA probes provides a rapid and sensitive means for determining the tumorigenic nature of Agrobacterium strains.

  20. Cholera toxin treatment stimulates tumorigenicity of Rous sarcoma virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gottesman, M M; Roth, C; Vlahakis, G; Pastan, I

    1984-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells transformed by Rous sarcoma virus form tumors poorly in nude mice. Tumorigenicity was markedly stimulated by pretreatment of the cells with cholera toxin, which raises cyclic AMP levels and activates cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase. Increased tumorigenicity was manifested by a severalfold increase in the rate of tumor formation, as well as earlier appearance and more rapid growth of tumors. In contrast, spontaneously transformed Chinese hamster ovary cells showed decreased tumorigenicity after cholera toxin treatment. The activation of tumorigenic potential in Rous sarcoma virus-transformed Chinese hamster ovary cells by cholera toxin correlated with increased phosphorylation of the viral oncogene product pp60src and stimulation of its tyrosine kinase activity. PMID:6098816

  1. IN VIVO MUTAGENICITY OF CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES CORRELATES WITH TUMORIGENICITY-JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. All three conazoles are generally inactive in short-term genotoxicity t...

  2. Altered microRNA expression induced by tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants ...

  3. A microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural and therapeutic fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants o...

  4. A potential microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver

    EPA Science Inventory

    Triadimefon, propiconazole and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants of conazole tumor...

  5. The stem cell factor SOX2 regulates the tumorigenic potential in human gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hütz, Katharina; Mejías-Luque, Raquel; Farsakova, Katarina; Ogris, Manfred; Krebs, Stefan; Anton, Martina; Vieth, Michael; Schüller, Ulrich; Schneider, Marlon R; Blum, Helmut; Wagner, Ernst; Jung, Andreas; Gerhard, Markus

    2014-04-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is still one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide, which is mainly attributable to late diagnosis and poor treatment options. Infection with Helicobacter pylori, different environmental factors and genetic alterations are known to influence the risk of developing gastric tumors. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in gastric carcinogenesis are still not fully understood, making it difficult to design targeted therapeutic approaches. Aberrant expression of the specific gastric differentiation marker SOX2 has been observed in stomach cancer. However, the role of SOX2 in gastric tumors has not been well established to date. To elucidate the role of SOX2 in gastric tumorigenesis, SOX2 transcriptional activity was blocked in AZ-521 cells. Interestingly, inhibition of SOX2 reduced cell proliferation and migration, increased apoptosis and induced changes in cell cycle. Blocking of SOX2 also reduced the tumorigenic potential of AZ-521 cells in vivo. In addition, correlation of SOX2 expression and proliferation was observed in a subset of human gastric tumors. Finally, target genes of SOX2 were for the first time identified by RNA microarray in GC cells. Taken together, the results presented here indicate that SOX2 controls several aspects related to GC development and progression by regulating the expression of members of important signaling pathways. These findings could provide new therapeutic options for a subset of GCs exhibiting SOX2 deregulation.

  6. Enhanced sensitivity of tumorigenic cells to rapid rounding induced by phenylalaninol.

    PubMed

    Mak, W W; Pinteric, L; Wong, J T

    1980-09-01

    This study describes a rounding reaction induced in mammalian cells by the addition of phenylalaninol. In the Chinese hamster ovary tsH1 line the rounding occurred rapidly with a half time of 1 min at 25 mM phenylalaninol. After the removal of phenylalaninol, the rounding was reversed, leading to the reflattening of the cells with a half-time of 3.5 min. Rounding was inhibited by dibutyryl-cAMP and testosterone, and reflattening by cytochalasin B. Either in the case of the tsH1 line and its growth-control revertant GRC+L-73, or in the case of SV40-transformed and untransformed human WI-38 cells, the transformed cells displayed a weakened resistance toward rounding. Likewise rat cells transformed by th highly oncogenic adenovirus-12 were more sensitive to rounding than cells transformed by the poorly oncogenic adenovirus-5, which in turn were more sensitive than untransformed cells. However, drug-resistant cell-surface mutants of the Chinese hamster ovary GAT- line also exhibited an altered sensitivity to rounding. These findings suggest that more than one cellular component determines cellular sensitivity to phenylalaninol-induced rounding. One of these components is specifically altered, giving rise to an enhanced sensitivity, in the course of tumorigenic transformation. PMID:6257353

  7. Tumorigenicity assays in nude mice: analysis of an implanted gelatin-sponge method

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, P.M.; Travis, G.L.; Saunders, G.C.; Ray, F.A.; Stevenson, A.P.; Bame, K.; Cram, L.S.

    1982-01-01

    Gelatin sponges, preimplanted in nude mice for 10 days, were used for an improved assay for tumorigenicity of cultured cells. Cells inoculated through the skin into such sponges yielded tumors more rapidly and with greater frequency than with newly implanted sponges or into subcutaneous tissue. However, an unexpected loss of cells occurred in the first few days after implantation. This loss may be an important aspect of tumorigenicity assays of all kinds, and is readily studied with the sponge methods described.

  8. Soft fibrin gels promote selection and growth of tumorigenic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Tan, Youhua; Zhang, Huafeng; Zhang, Yi; Xu, Pingwei; Chen, Junwei; Poh, Yeh-Chuin; Tang, Ke; Wang, Ning; Huang, Bo

    2012-08-01

    The identification of stem-cell-like cancer cells through conventional methods that depend on stem cell markers is often unreliable. We developed a mechanical method for selecting tumorigenic cells by culturing single cancer cells in fibrin matrices of ~100 Pa in stiffness. When cultured within these gels, primary human cancer cells or single cancer cells from mouse or human cancer cell lines grew within a few days into individual round colonies that resembled embryonic stem cell colonies. Subcutaneous or intravenous injection of 10 or 100 fibrin-cultured cells in syngeneic or severe combined immunodeficiency mice led to the formation of solid tumours at the site of injection or at the distant lung organ much more efficiently than control cancer cells selected using conventional surface marker methods or cultured on conventional rigid dishes or on soft gels. Remarkably, as few as ten such cells were able to survive and form tumours in the lungs of wild-type non-syngeneic mice.

  9. Hospicells (ascites-derived stromal cells) promote tumorigenicity and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Pasquet, Marlene; Golzio, Muriel; Mery, Eliane; Rafii, Arash; Benabbou, Nadia; Mirshahi, Pezhman; Hennebelle, Isabelle; Bourin, Philippe; Allal, Ben; Teissie, Justin; Mirshahi, Massoud; Couderc, Bettina

    2010-05-01

    The microenvironment is known to play a dominant role in cancer progression. Cells closely associated with tumoral cells, named hospicells, have been recently isolated from the ascites of ovarian cancer patients. Whilst these cells present no specific markers from known cell lineages, they do share some homology with bone marrow-derived or adipose tissue-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (CD9, CD10, CD29, CD146, CD166, HLA-1). We studied the role of hospicells in ovarian carcinoma progression. In vitro, these cells had no effect on the growth of human ovarian carcinoma cell lines OVCAR-3, SKOV-1 and IGROV-1. In vivo, their co-injection with adenocarcinoma cells enhanced tumor growth whatever the tumor model used (subcutaneous and intraperitoneally established xenografts in athymic mice). In addition, their injection increased the development of ascites in tumor-bearing mice. Fluorescent macroscopy revealed an association between hospicells and ovarian adenocarcinoma cells within the tumor mass. Tumors obtained by coinjection of hospicells and human ovarian adenocarcinoma cells presented an increased microvascularization indicating that the hospicells could promote tumorigenicity of ovarian tumor cells in vivovia their action on angiogenesis. This effect on angiogenesis could be attributed to the increased HIF1alpha and VEGF expression associated with the presence of the hospicells. Collectively, these data indicate a role for these ascite-derived stromal cells in promoting tumor growth by increasing angiogenesis.

  10. Psoralen-containing sunscreen is tumorigenic in hairless mice

    SciTech Connect

    Cartwright, L.E.; Walter, J.F.

    1983-06-01

    Sunscreens containing 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) are currently being marketed to promote tanning by inducing psoralen-mediated ultraviolet (UV) A (320-400 nm) melanogenesis. The rationale is that this may prevent UVB (290-320 nm) radiation-induced skin damage. However, mouse studies have shown that 5-MOP has the same cutaneous photocarcinogenic potential as 8-methoxypsoralen. In addition, the 5-MOP--containing sunscreen Sun System III (SS III), when combined with UVA, induces epidermal ornithine decarboxylase activity, an enzyme associated with tumor promotion. Therefore, we investigated whether SS III had sufficient psoralen concentration to be tumorigenic in hairless mice exposed to chronic, intermittent UVA radiation. SS III was applied to hairless mice 5 days per week for 20 weeks. After each application the mice were exposed to 2.5 to 10 joules/cm2 UVA radiation. All test groups developed atypical squamous papillomas in direct proportion to the dosage of UVA radiation received. A shorter latency period for tumor development was seen with larger UVA doses. Test animals followed up to 1 year developed invasive squamous cell tumors. Control groups (SS III without UVA and UVA without SS III) remained free of tumors. Animals receiving SS III plus UVA developed persistent skin thickening and increased dermal cyst formation similar to that reported with chronic exposure to UVB, a known carcinogenic wavelength.

  11. Soluble Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 and Echocardiography in Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hyun Suk; Hur, Mina; Kim, Hanah; Magrini, Laura; Marino, Rossella; Di Somma, Salvatore

    2016-11-01

    Soluble suppression of tumorigenicity 2 (sST2) has emerged as a biomarker of cardiac stretch or remodeling, and has demonstrated a role in acutely decompensated heart failure. However, its role in sepsis-induced cardiac dysfunction is still unknown. We explored whether sST2 serum concentration reflects either systolic or diastolic dysfunction as measured by Doppler echocardiography. In a total of 127 patients with sepsis, correlations between sST2 and blood pressure, left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction, LV diastolic filling (ratio of early transmitral flow velocity to early diastolic mitral annulus velocity), and resting pulmonary arterial pressure were evaluated. Correlations between sST2 and other sepsis biomarkers (high-sensitivity C-reactive protein [hs-CRP] and procalcitonin) were also examined. sST2 showed a moderate correlation with mean arterial pressure (r=-0.3499) but no correlation with LV ejection fraction, diastolic filling, or resting pulmonary hypertension. It showed moderate correlations with hs-CRP and procalcitonin (r=0.2608 and r=0.3829, respectively). sST2 might have a role as a biomarker of shock or inflammation, but it cannot reflect echocardiographic findings of LV ejection fraction or diastolic filling in sepsis. PMID:27578513

  12. Secretion of protein disulphide isomerase AGR2 confers tumorigenic properties

    PubMed Central

    Fessart, Delphine; Domblides, Charlotte; Avril, Tony; Eriksson, Leif A; Begueret, Hugues; Pineau, Raphael; Malrieux, Camille; Dugot-Senant, Nathalie; Lucchesi, Carlo; Chevet, Eric; Delom, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an instrumental role in determining the spatial orientation of epithelial polarity and the formation of lumens in glandular tissues during morphogenesis. Here, we show that the Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER)-resident protein anterior gradient-2 (AGR2), a soluble protein-disulfide isomerase involved in ER protein folding and quality control, is secreted and interacts with the ECM. Extracellular AGR2 (eAGR2) is a microenvironmental regulator of epithelial tissue architecture, which plays a role in the preneoplastic phenotype and contributes to epithelial tumorigenicity. Indeed, eAGR2, is secreted as a functionally active protein independently of its thioredoxin-like domain (CXXS) and of its ER-retention domain (KTEL), and is sufficient, by itself, to promote the acquisition of invasive and metastatic features. Therefore, we conclude that eAGR2 plays an extracellular role independent of its ER function and we elucidate this gain-of-function as a novel and unexpected critical ECM microenvironmental pro-oncogenic regulator of epithelial morphogenesis and tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13887.001 PMID:27240165

  13. LKB1 expression reverses the tumorigenicity of L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Ge; Gao, Qing; Tao, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    The tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein kinase, plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we revealed that human hepatic L02 cells had severely impaired endogenous LKB1 expression as gauged by western blot, northern blot and RT-PCR analyses. Stable ectopic expression of LKB1 in L02 cells resulted in decreased cell growth, hypophosphorylation of Rb, and marked attenuation of colony formation on soft agar. Inoculation of L02 cells into immunocompromised mice resulted in the development of subcutaneous tumors, which could be completely abrogated by ectopic LKB1 expression. The tumors that formed in the mouse model recapitulated the histopathological features of hepatocellular carcinoma under the microscope. Our results jointly suggest that severely compromised endogenous LKB1 expression in the L02 cell line may confer to L02 cells tumor-initiating capacities in vivo and in vitro, and ectopic LKB1 expression antagonizes the tumorigenic properties of L02 cells. Our findings imply that caution may be needed to interpret the results obtained on the widely used human hepatic L02 cell line. The L02 cell line may be a new model to define the cellular mechanisms of liver transformation, and to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth suppressive effect of LKB1. PMID:27349837

  14. LKB1 expression reverses the tumorigenicity of L02 cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiaoyan; Xu, Ge; Gao, Qing; Tao, Xiaohong

    2016-08-01

    The tumor-suppressor liver kinase B1 (LKB1), a highly conserved and ubiquitously expressed protein kinase, plays a critical role in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we revealed that human hepatic L02 cells had severely impaired endogenous LKB1 expression as gauged by western blot, northern blot and RT-PCR analyses. Stable ectopic expression of LKB1 in L02 cells resulted in decreased cell growth, hypophosphorylation of Rb, and marked attenuation of colony formation on soft agar. Inoculation of L02 cells into immunocompromised mice resulted in the development of subcutaneous tumors, which could be completely abrogated by ectopic LKB1 expression. The tumors that formed in the mouse model recapitulated the histopathological features of hepatocellular carcinoma under the microscope. Our results jointly suggest that severely compromised endogenous LKB1 expression in the L02 cell line may confer to L02 cells tumor-initiating capacities in vivo and in vitro, and ectopic LKB1 expression antagonizes the tumorigenic properties of L02 cells. Our findings imply that caution may be needed to interpret the results obtained on the widely used human hepatic L02 cell line. The L02 cell line may be a new model to define the cellular mechanisms of liver transformation, and to unravel the molecular mechanisms underlying the growth suppressive effect of LKB1.

  15. Hepatitis C virus core protein cooperates with ras and transforms primary rat embryo fibroblasts to tumorigenic phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Ray, R B; Lagging, L M; Meyer, K; Ray, R

    1996-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein regulates cellular protooncogenes at the transcriptional level; this observation implicates core protein in the alteration of normal hepatocyte growth. In the present study, the transforming potential of the HCV core gene was investigated by using primary rat embryo fibroblast (REF) cells which were transfected with or without cooperative oncogenes. Integration of the HCV core gene resulted in expression of the viral protein in REF stable transformants. REF cells cotransfected with HCV core and H-ras genes became transformed and exhibited rapid proliferation, anchor-independent growth, and tumor formation in athymic nude mice. Results from these studies suggest that the core protein plays an important role in the regulation of HCV-infected cell growth and in the transformation to tumorigenic phenotype. These observations suggest a possible mechanism for this viral protein in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma in HCV-infected humans. PMID:8676467

  16. Development and characterization of two human triple-negative breast cancer cell lines with highly tumorigenic and metastatic capabilities.

    PubMed

    Su, Yanrong; Pogash, Thomas J; Nguyen, Theresa D; Russo, Jose

    2016-03-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a group of cancer with high diversity, limited therapies, and poor prognosis. TNBC cell lines and animal models provide effective tools for studies and drug discovery. Here, we report the development of two TNBC cell lines (XtMCF and LmMCF) based on our existing cell model that consists of normal breast epithelial cell line MCF10F, estradiol-transformed cells trMCF, and Boyden chamber-selected tumorigenic cells bsMCF. The XtMCF and LmMCF cell line were derived from xenograft and lung metastasis of bsMCF cells, respectively. The bsMCF, XtMCF, and LmMCF cells have undergone epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), exhibiting a mesenchymal-like feature. In vivo studies showed XtMCF and LmMCF cells were highly tumorigenic and metastatic. The injection of 5 × 10(4) cells to CB17/SCID mice mammary fat pad produced xenografts in 9/9 mice and tumors reached 10 millimeters in diameter in 5 weeks. The injection of 1 × 10(6) XtMCF or 8 × 10(4) LmMCF cells into the mice tail vein was sufficient to form extensive lung metastases in 4 weeks. The two new cell lines exhibited CD44(+) /CD49f(+) and CD44(+) /EpCAM(+) cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics, and the EGF-like domain of EpCAM was cleaved off. Together with the normal and early transformed counterparts, herein we provide a complete cancer model for the study of initiation, evolution, and identification of new therapeutics for TNBC. The finding that EGF-like domain of EpCAM was cleaved off in cells which have undergone EMT suggests this cleavage may be involved in the EMT process and the cancer stem cell properties of these cells.

  17. CdSe magic-sized quantum dots incorporated in biomembrane models at the air-water interface composed of components of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Thiago E; Lopes, Carla C; Nader, Helena B; Silva, Anielle C A; Dantas, Noelio O; Siqueira, José R; Caseli, Luciano

    2016-07-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) magic-sized quantum dots (MSQDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with stable luminescence that are feasible for biomedical applications, especially for in vivo and in vitro imaging of tumor cells. In this work, we investigated the specific interaction of CdSe MSQDs with tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells using Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of lipids as membrane models for diagnosis of cancerous cells. Surface pressure-area isotherms and polarization modulation reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) showed an intrinsic interaction between the quantum dots, inserted in the aqueous subphase, and Langmuir monolayers constituted either of selected lipids or of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cell extracts. The films were transferred to solid supports to obtain microscopic images, providing information on their morphology. Similarity between films with different compositions representing cell membranes, with or without the quantum dots, was evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal microscopy. This study demonstrates that the affinity of quantum dots for models representing cancer cells permits the use of these systems as devices for cancer diagnosis. PMID:27107554

  18. CdSe magic-sized quantum dots incorporated in biomembrane models at the air-water interface composed of components of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Thiago E; Lopes, Carla C; Nader, Helena B; Silva, Anielle C A; Dantas, Noelio O; Siqueira, José R; Caseli, Luciano

    2016-07-01

    Cadmium selenide (CdSe) magic-sized quantum dots (MSQDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals with stable luminescence that are feasible for biomedical applications, especially for in vivo and in vitro imaging of tumor cells. In this work, we investigated the specific interaction of CdSe MSQDs with tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cells using Langmuir monolayers and Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) films of lipids as membrane models for diagnosis of cancerous cells. Surface pressure-area isotherms and polarization modulation reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) showed an intrinsic interaction between the quantum dots, inserted in the aqueous subphase, and Langmuir monolayers constituted either of selected lipids or of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic cell extracts. The films were transferred to solid supports to obtain microscopic images, providing information on their morphology. Similarity between films with different compositions representing cell membranes, with or without the quantum dots, was evaluated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and confocal microscopy. This study demonstrates that the affinity of quantum dots for models representing cancer cells permits the use of these systems as devices for cancer diagnosis.

  19. Effect of zinc on prostatic tumorigenicity in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pei; Li, Tie Luo; Guan, Zhi Xin; Franklin, Renty B; Costello, Leslie C

    2003-12-01

    Prostate epithelial cells accumulate the highest zinc levels of any cells in the body. Evidence indicates that zinc plays critical roles in the normal function and pathology of the prostate gland. We have identified two important effects of zinc in the prostate epithelial cells: the inhibition of m-aconitase and the induction of mitochondrial apoptogenesis. However, at the present time, the effects of zinc on prostatic cells in in vivo conditions have not yet been reported. The objectives of this in vivo study were to investigate the effect of zinc on: tumorogenicity in nude mice, zinc accumulation in tumor tissues, and the levels of mitochondrial membrane permeability related proteins, Bax/Bcl-2. A tumorigenicity animal model was established using male nude mice (4-6 weeks old) with inoculation of PC-3 cells (5-10x10(6)/mL) prepared in 10% Matrigel. The mice were treated with zinc by ALZET osmotic pumps (Durect Corporation), with a releasing rate of 0.25 micro l/h for 28 days. Zinc concentrations of the tumor tissues were determined by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer method. Frozen sections of tumor tissues were prepared for TUNEL assay. The levels of Bax and Bcl-2 in the tumor tissues were determined by Western blot analyses. Our study demonstrated that in vivo treatment of zinc increased zinc accumulation and citrate production in PC-3 cell induced tumor tissues and inhibited tumor growth. The inhibitory effect of zinc appears to result from zinc-induced apoptosis by regulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability-related Bax/Bcl-2 proteins. PMID:15033742

  20. ALDH/CD44 identifies uniquely tumorigenic cancer stem cells in salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Pearson, Alexander T; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Kim, Hong Sun; Mochizuki, Daiki; Basura, Gregory; Helman, Joseph; Mantesso, Andrea; Castilho, Rogério M; Wicha, Max S; Nör, Jacques E

    2015-09-29

    A small sub-population of cells characterized by increased tumorigenic potential, ability to self-renew and to differentiate into cells that make up the tumor bulk, has been characterized in some (but not all) tumor types. These unique cells, namedcancer stem cells, are considered drivers of tumor progression in these tumors. The purpose of this work is to understand if cancer stem cells play a functional role in the tumorigenesis of salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas. Here, we investigated the expression of putative cancer stem cell markers (ALDH, CD10, CD24, CD44) in primary human mucoepidermoid carcinomas by immunofluorescence, in vitro salisphere assays, and in vivo tumorigenicity assays in immunodeficient mice. Human mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells (UM-HMC-1, UM-HMC-3A, UM-HMC-3B) sorted for high levels of ALDH activity and CD44 expression (ALDHhighCD44high) consistently formed primary and secondary salispheres in vitro, and showed enhanced tumorigenic potential in vivo (defined as time to tumor palpability, tumor growth after palpability), when compared to ALDHlowCD44low cells. Cells sorted for CD10/CD24, and CD10/CD44 showed varying trends of salisphere formation, but consistently low in vivo tumorigenic potential. And finally, cells sorted for CD44/CD24 showed inconsistent results in salisphere formation and tumorigenic potential assays when different cell lines were evaluated. Collectively, these data demonstrate that salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas contain a small population of cancer stem cells with enhanced tumorigenic potential and that are characterized by high ALDH activity and CD44 expression. These results suggest that patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma might benefit from therapies that ablate these highly tumorigenic cells.

  1. ALDH/CD44 identifies uniquely tumorigenic cancer stem cells in salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Adams, April; Warner, Kristy; Pearson, Alexander T.; Zhang, Zhaocheng; Kim, Hong Sun; Mochizuki, Daiki; Basura, Gregory; Helman, Joseph; Mantesso, Andrea; Castilho, Rogério M.; Wicha, Max S.; Nör, Jacques E.

    2015-01-01

    A small sub-population of cells characterized by increased tumorigenic potential, ability to self-renew and to differentiate into cells that make up the tumor bulk, has been characterized in some (but not all) tumor types. These unique cells, namedcancer stem cells, are considered drivers of tumor progression in these tumors. The purpose of this work is to understand if cancer stem cells play a functional role in the tumorigenesis of salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas. Here, we investigated the expression of putative cancer stem cell markers (ALDH, CD10, CD24, CD44) in primary human mucoepidermoid carcinomas by immunofluorescence, in vitro salisphere assays, and in vivo tumorigenicity assays in immunodeficient mice. Human mucoepidermoid carcinoma cells (UM-HMC-1, UM-HMC-3A, UM-HMC-3B) sorted for high levels of ALDH activity and CD44 expression (ALDHhighCD44high) consistently formed primary and secondary salispheres in vitro, and showed enhanced tumorigenic potential in vivo (defined as time to tumor palpability, tumor growth after palpability), when compared to ALDHlowCD44low cells. Cells sorted for CD10/CD24, and CD10/CD44 showed varying trends of salisphere formation, but consistently low in vivo tumorigenic potential. And finally, cells sorted for CD44/CD24 showed inconsistent results in salisphere formation and tumorigenic potential assays when different cell lines were evaluated. Collectively, these data demonstrate that salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinomas contain a small population of cancer stem cells with enhanced tumorigenic potential and that are characterized by high ALDH activity and CD44 expression. These results suggest that patients with mucoepidermoid carcinoma might benefit from therapies that ablate these highly tumorigenic cells. PMID:26449187

  2. Responses of tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic mouse lung epithelial cell lines to electrophilic metabolites of the tumor promoter butylated hydroxytoluene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yude; Dwyer-Nield, Lori D; Malkinson, Alvin M; Zhang, Yan Ling; Thompson, John A

    2003-03-01

    A model system to investigate the promotion phase of pulmonary carcinogenesis involves chronic exposure of carcinogen-initiated mice to the food additive, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Previous studies strongly suggested that this activity is due to the cytochrome p450-catalyzed formation of quinone methides 2,6-di-tert-butyl-4-methylenecyclohexa-2,5-dienone (BHT-QM) and 6-tert-butyl-2-(1',1'-dimethyl-2'-hydroxy)ethyl-4-methylenecyclohexa-2,5-dienone (BHTOH-QM). The effects of these electrophiles on non-tumorigenic C10 and E10 epithelial cell lines derived from a normal mouse lung explant were compared with effects on their corresponding neoplastic siblings, the A5 and E9 spontaneous transformants, respectively. The tumorigenic cells were more resistant to cell killing, with LC(50) values of 165-180 microM for BHT-QM and 12-22 microM for BHTOH-QM, versus LC(50) values in the non-tumorigenic cells of 105-118 microM and 5.0-6.0 microM, respectively. Constitutive glutathione (GSH) concentrations were 12-20 nmol/10(6) cells, and BHT-QM toxicity was enhanced >2-fold by depleting GSH with buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Formation of the GSH conjugate of BHT-QM accounted for a substantial fraction of the cellular GSH lost by quinone methide exposure. Enhanced lipid peroxidation and superoxide formation occurred in all cell lines treated with BHT-QM, but both tumorigenic lines contained higher levels of GSH S-transferase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities. These data suggest the possibility that BHT-derived quinone methides may exert their promoting effects by inducing oxidative stress; such stress is better tolerated by tumorigenic cells, which have higher levels of antioxidant enzymes. Normal cells are destroyed more readily which allows neoplastic cells to expand their proliferation.

  3. Transcriptional profiles in liver from rats treated with tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic triazole conazole fungicides: Propiconazole, triadimefon, and myclobutanil.

    PubMed

    Hester, Susan D; Wolf, Douglas C; Nesnow, Stephen; Thai, Sheau-Fung

    2006-01-01

    Conazoles are a class of fungicides used as pharmaceutical and agricultural agents. In chronic bioassays in rats, triadimefon was hepatotoxic and induced follicular cell adenomas in the thyroid gland, whereas, propiconazole and myclobutanil were hepatotoxic but had no effect on the thyroid gland. These conazoles administered in the feed to male Wistar/Han rats were found to induce hepatomegaly, induce high levels of pentoxyresorufin-O-dealkylase, increase cell proliferation in the liver, increase serum cholesterol, decrease serum T3 and T4, and increase hepatic uridine diphosphoglucuronosyl transferase activity. The goal of the present study was to define pathways that explain the biologic outcomes. Male Wistar/Han rats (3 per group), were exposed to the 3 conazoles in the feed for 4, 30, or 90 days of treatment at tumorigenic and nontumorigenic doses. Hepatic gene expression was determined using high-density Affymetrix GeneChips (Rat 230_2). Differential gene expression was assessed at the probe level using Robust Multichip Average analysis. Principal component analysis by treatment and time showed within group sample similarity and that the treatment groups were distinct from each other. The number of altered genes varied by treatment, dose, and time. The greatest number of altered genes was induced by triadimefon and propiconazole after 90 days of treatment, while myclobutanil had minimal effects at that time point. Pathway level analyses revealed that after 90 days of treatment the most significant numbers of altered pathways were related to cell signaling, growth, and metabolism. Pathway level analysis for triadimefon and propiconazole resulted in 71 altered pathways common to both chemicals. These pathways controlled cholesterol metabolism, activation of nuclear receptors, and N-ras and K-ras signaling. There were 37 pathways uniquely changed by propiconazole, and triadimefon uniquely altered 34 pathways. Pathway level analysis of altered gene expression

  4. Skin tumorigenic potential of crude and refined coal liquids and analogous petroleum products.

    PubMed

    Witschi, H P; Smith, L H; Frome, E L; Pequet-Goad, M E; Griest, W H; Ho, C H; Guerin, M R

    1987-08-01

    The skin tumorigenic potential of seven complex hydrocarbon mixtures was determined: a coal-derived raw blend composed of light and heavy oils, a low- and high-severity hydrotreated product of that blend, and naphthas and fuel oils from the raw blend or from natural petroleum. Male and female C3H/Bdf mice were exposed three times per week to each test mixture by dermal application of 50 microliters of neat, 50, or 25% (w/v) preparations. Room, vehicle, and benzo[alpha]pyrene control groups were run concurrently. The raw blend produced an almost 100% incidence of skin tumors at all three doses while tumorigenicity was considerably decreased by hydrotreating the blend both in terms of incidence and onset. The tumorigenicities of the naphthas and fuel oils derived from the raw blend or from petroleums were low relative to that of the parent mixture. Although tumorigens in the raw blend were much reduced by hydrotreatment, tumorigenicity of the other agents did not parallel the content of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons known to be good tumor initiators. PMID:3653572

  5. SOX9-mediated upregulation of LGR5 is important for glioblastoma tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraoka, Koji; Hayashi, Tomoatsu; Kaneko, Ryusuke; Nasu-Nishimura, Yukiko; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2015-05-01

    LGR5 plays an important role in the self-renewal of stem cells and is used as a marker identifying self-renewing stem cells in small intestine and hair follicles. Moreover, LGR5 has been reported to be overexpressed in several cancers. SOX9 is a transcription factor that plays a key role in development, differentiation and lineage commitment in various tissues. It has also been reported that SOX9 is overexpressed in a variety of cancers and contributes to their malignant phenotype. Here we show that LGR5 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We further show that SOX9 is upregulated in glioblastoma cells and directly enhances the expression of LGR5. We also demonstrate that knockdown of SOX9 suppresses the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. These results suggest that SOX9-mediated transcriptional regulation of LGR5 is critical for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that the SOX9-LGR5 pathway could be a potentially promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Highlights: • LGR5 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • SOX9 directly enhances the expression of LGR5. • SOX9 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells.

  6. Molecular alterations in tumorigenic human bronchial and breast epithelial cells induced by high let radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Zhao, Y. L.; Roy, D.; Piao, C. Q.; Calaf, G.; Hall, E. J.

    Carcinogenesis is a multi-stage process with sequence of genetic events governing the phenotypic expression of a series of transformation steps leading to the development of metastatic cancer. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) and breast (MCF-10F) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 150 keV/μm alpha particles or 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Cell fusion studies indicated that radiation-induced tumorigenic phenotype in BEP2D cells could be completely suppressed by fusion with non-tumorigenic BEP2D cells. The differential expressions of known genes between tumorigenic bronchial and breast cells induced by alpha particles and their respective control cultures were compared using cDNA expression array. Among the 11 genes identified to be differentially expressed in BEP2D cells, three ( DCC, DNA-PK and p21 CIPI) were shown to be consistently down-regulated by 2 to 4 fold in all the 5 tumor cell lines examined. In contrast, their expressions in the fusion cell lines were comparable to control BEP2D cells. Similarly, expression levels of a series of genes were found to be altered in a step-wise manner among tumorigenic MCF-10F cells. The results are highly suggestive that functional alterations of these genes may be causally related to the carcinogenic process.

  7. Conformational Sampling and Binding Site Assessment of Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 Ectodomain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chao-Yie; Delproposto, James; Chinnaswamy, Krishnapriya; Brown, William Clay; Wang, Shuying; Stuckey, Jeanne A.; Wang, Xinquan

    2016-01-01

    Suppression of Tumorigenicity 2 (ST2), a member of the interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) family, activates type 2 immune responses to pathogens and tissue damage via binding to IL-33. Dysregulated responses contribute to asthma, graft-versus-host and autoinflammatory diseases and disorders. To study ST2 structure for inhibitor development, we performed the principal component (PC) analysis on the crystal structures of IL1-1R1, IL1-1R2, ST2 and the refined ST2 ectodomain (ST2ECD) models, constructed from previously reported small-angle X-ray scattering data. The analysis facilitates mapping of the ST2ECD conformations to PC subspace for characterizing structural changes. Extensive coverage of ST2ECD conformations was then obtained using the accelerated molecular dynamics simulations started with the IL-33 bound ST2ECD structure as instructed by their projected locations on the PC subspace. Cluster analysis of all conformations further determined representative conformations of ST2ECD ensemble in solution. Alignment of the representative conformations with the ST2/IL-33 structure showed that the D3 domain of ST2ECD (containing D1-D3 domains) in most conformations exhibits no clashes with IL-33 in the crystal structure. Our experimental binding data informed that the D1-D2 domain of ST2ECD contributes predominantly to the interaction between ST2ECD and IL-33 underscoring the importance of the D1-D2 domain in binding. Computational binding site assessment revealed one third of the total detected binding sites in the representative conformations may be suitable for binding to potent small molecules. Locations of these sites include the D1-D2 domain ST2ECD and modulation sites conformed to ST2ECD conformations. Our study provides structural models and analyses of ST2ECD that could be useful for inhibitor discovery. PMID:26735493

  8. A medium hyperglycosylated podocalyxin enables noninvasive and quantitative detection of tumorigenic human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tateno, Hiroaki; Onuma, Yasuko; Ito, Yuzuru; Hiemori, Keiko; Aiki, Yasuhiko; Shimizu, Madoka; Higuchi, Kumiko; Fukuda, Masakazu; Warashina, Masaki; Honda, Susumu; Asashima, Makoto; Hirabayashi, Jun

    2014-01-01

    While human pluripotent stem cells are attractive sources for cell-replacement therapies, a major concern remains regarding their tumorigenic potential. Thus, safety assessment of human pluripotent stem cell-based products in terms of tumorigenicity is critical. Previously we have identified a pluripotent stem cell-specific lectin probe rBC2LCN recognizing hyperglycosylated podocalyxin as a cell surface ligand. Here we demonstrate that hyperglycosylated podocalyxin is secreted from human pluripotent stem cells into cell culture supernatants. We establish a sandwich assay system, named the GlycoStem test, targeting the soluble hyperglycosylated podocalyxin using rBC2LCN. The GlycoStem test is sufficiently sensitive and quantitative to detect residual human pluripotent stem cells. This work provides a proof of concept for the noninvasive and quantitative detection of tumorigenic human pluripotent stem cells using cell culture supernatants. The developed method should increase the safety of human pluripotent stem cell-based cell therapies. PMID:24518842

  9. Controlling immune rejection is a fail-safe system against potential tumorigenicity after human iPSC-derived neural stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Itakura, Go; Kobayashi, Yoshiomi; Nishimura, Soraya; Iwai, Hiroki; Takano, Morito; Iwanami, Akio; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Okano, Hideyuki; Nakamura, Masaya

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work reported functional recovery after transplantation of mouse and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (hiPSC-NS/PCs) into rodent models of spinal cord injury (SCI). Although hiPSC-NS/PCs proved useful for the treatment of SCI, the tumorigenicity of the transplanted cells must be resolved before they can be used in clinical applications. The current study sought to determine the feasibility of ablation of the tumors formed after hiPSC-NS/PC transplantation through immunoregulation. Tumorigenic hiPSC-NS/PCs were transplanted into the intact spinal cords of immunocompetent BALB/cA mice with or without immunosuppressant treatment. In vivo bioluminescence imaging was used to evaluate the chronological survival and growth of the transplanted cells. The graft survival rate was 0% in the group without immunosuppressants versus 100% in the group with immunosuppressants. Most of the mice that received immunosuppressants exhibited hind-limb paralysis owing to tumor growth at 3 months after iPSC-NS/PC transplantation. Histological analysis showed that the tumors shared certain characteristics with low-grade gliomas rather than with teratomas. After confirming the progression of the tumors in immunosuppressed mice, the immunosuppressant agents were discontinued, resulting in the complete rejection of iPSC-NS/PC-derived masses within 42 days after drug cessation. In accordance with the tumor rejection, hind-limb motor function was recovered in all of the mice. Moreover, infiltration of microglia and lymphocytes was observed during the course of tumor rejection, along with apoptosis of iPSC-NS/PC-generated cells. Thus, immune rejection can be used as a fail-safe system against potential tumorigenicity after transplantation of iPSC-NS/PCs to treat SCI.

  10. Decreased tumorigenicity correlates with expression of altered cell surface carbohydrates in Lec9 CHO cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ripka, J; Shin, S; Stanley, P

    1986-01-01

    To investigate a role for surface carbohydrates in cellular malignancy, 15 different glycosylation-defective CHO cell mutants were examined for their tumorigenic and metastatic capacities after subcutaneous injection into nude mice. Most of the glycosylation mutants displayed similar or slightly decreased tumorigenicity compared with parental CHO cells. Neither parental CHO cells nor any of the mutants were observed to metastasize. However, independent isolates of one mutant type, Lec9, showed a dramatic reduction in tumor formation. The altered carbohydrates expressed at the surface of Lec9 cells appeared to be responsible for their loss of tumorigenicity, because revertants for lectin resistance were able to form tumors, and a double mutant (Lec9.Lec1) that expressed a Lec1 glycosylation phenotype also formed tumors. Finally, Lec9 cells were able to form tumors in gamma-irradiated nude mice, suggesting that recognition by an irradiation-sensitive host cell(s) was responsible for their reduced tumorigenicity in untreated nude mice. PMID:3785164

  11. Evaluation of tumorigenic risk of tissue-engineered oral mucosal epithelial cells by using combinational examinations.

    PubMed

    Thépot, A; Morel, A P; Justin, V; Desanlis, A; Thivillier, L; Hoffman, E; Till, M; Accardi, R; Tommasino, M; Breton, P; Hainaut, P; Damour, O

    2010-01-01

    Recently, oral mucosal epithelial cells were proposed as a cell source of the autologous cell transplant therapy for corneal trauma or disease. The question addressed is to know if the biological conditions of grafting could induce certain cellular, molecular, and genetic alterations that might increase the risk of mutations and possibly of cellular transformation. Recent progress in cancer research enables us to depict the generation mechanisms and basic characteristics of human cancer cells from molecular, cytological, and biological aspects. The aim of this study is to evaluate the risk of tumorigenicity of the oral mucosal epithelial culture process in order to mitigate that risk, if any, before clinical application. Oral mucosal epithelial cells from three different human donors were investigated by combinational examinations to detect possible tumorigenic transformation. We investigated (i) clonogenic and karyology types, (ii) the validation of proliferation rate, (iii) the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, (iv) anchorage-independent growth potential, and (v) tumorigenicity on nude mice. Results show that the culture process used in this study presents no risk of tumorigenicity. PMID:20977830

  12. A Tumorigenic Factor Interactome Connected Through Tumor Suppressor MicroRNA-198 in Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marin-Muller, Christian; Li, Dali; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Li, Min; Chen, Changyi; Hodges, Sally E.; Fisher, William E.; Mo, Qianxing; Hung, Mien-Chie; Yao, Qizhi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The majority of pancreatic cancers (PCs) overexpress mesothelin (MSLN), which contributes to enhanced proliferation, invasion and migration. However, the MSLN regulatory network is still unclear. Here, we investigated the regulation of a panel of tumorigenic factors, and explored the potential of MSLN regulated miR-198 treatment in vivo. Experimental Design The expression and functional regulation of the tumorigenic factors MSLN, NF-κB, and the homeobox transcription factors (TFs) POU2F2 (OCT-2), Pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox factor 1 (PBX-1), valosin-containing protein (VCP), and miR-198 were studied in PC cell lines, patient tumor samples and in xenograft PC mouse models. Results We found that miR-198 is downregulated in PC and is involved in an intricate reciprocal regulatory loop with MSLN, which represses miR-198 through NF-κB-mediated OCT-2 induction. Furthermore, miR-198 repression leads to overexpression of PBX-1 and VCP. The dysregulated PBX-1/VCP axis leads to increased tumorigenicity. Reconstitution of miR-198 in PC cells results in reduced tumor growth, metastasis, and increased survival through direct targeting MSLN, PBX-1, and VCP. Most interestingly, reduced levels of miR-198 in human tissue samples are associated with upregulation of these tumorigenic factors (MSLN, OCT-2, PBX-1, VCP) and predict poor survival. Reduced miR-198 expression links this tumor network signature and prognosticates poor patient outcome. High miR-198 disrupts the network and predicts better prognosis and increased survival. Conclusions MiR-198 acts as a central tumor suppressor and modulates the molecular makeup of a critical interactome in PC, indicating a potential prognostic marker signature and the therapeutic potential of attacking this tumorigenic network through a central vantage point. PMID:23989979

  13. Ethics on Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vick, Randy M.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses ethical questions raised by an exhibition of work by an artist with a history of mental illness and the exhibition's relevance to art therapy and “outsider art” discourse on the subject. Considerations for how such an exhibit could be handled had the circumstances included an art therapist and art therapy client are…

  14. Serum CEA levels in patients with gastric carcinoma correlate with the tumorigenicity of their xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Kiyama, T; Onda, M; Tokunaga, A; Okuda, T; Mizutani, T; Yoshiyuki, T; Shimizu, Y; Nishi, K; Matsukura, N; Tanaka, N

    1991-01-01

    We examined the correlation among preoperative serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) levels, staining properties of the tumors by CEA immunohistochemistry and the tumorigenicity of their xenografts in nude mice, in 28 patients with gastric cancer. Eleven (40 per cent) of them were positive for serum CEA (greater than or equal to 2.5 ng/ml) and seven (25 per cent) of the xenografts were tumorigenic in nude mice. All the tumorigenic cases were positive for serum CEA (p less than 0.001) and the mean value of the serum CEA level in the patients with tumorigenic neoplasms was 20.8 ng/ml, being significantly higher than that (1.4 ng/ml) in the patients with non-tumorigenic neoplasms (p less than 0.001). Twenty-five of the 28 carcinomas (89 per cent) were positive for CEA staining in their cancer cells by the ABC method and CEA localization correlated with tumorigenicity (p less than 0.05). These results suggest that the serum CEA level in patients is correlated with the tumorigenicity of their gastric carcinoma xenografts in nude mice and may account for the poor prognosis of patients with high serum CEA.

  15. Expression of the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin is specifically correlated with tumorigenic expression in human cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Stanbridge, E J; Rosen, S W; Sussman, H H

    1982-01-01

    The expression of HeLa parent phenotype protein markers, the alpha subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin and placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes, has been evaluated in paired tumorigenic and nontumorigenic HeLa-fibroblast human cell hybrids. Both of these proteins have been used clinically as markers of malignancy. The results showed that both are expressed in the hybrids. Expression of the gonadotropin subunit in the hybrids is specifically correlated with tumorigenicity; the placental alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme showed no such correlation and was expressed in both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic hybrids. PMID:6959112

  16. A Teaching Aids Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahanja, Salah

    1985-01-01

    Describes an exhibition for the benefit of teachers of English in Arab Primary Schools, which was prepared by third-year students at the Teachers College for Arab Teachers. The exhibition included games, songs, audiovisual aids, crossword puzzles, vocabulary, spelling booklets, preposition aids, and worksheet and lesson planning aids. (SED)

  17. Effects of maple (Acer) plant part extracts on proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of human tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic colon cells.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Li, Liya; Seeram, Navindra P

    2012-07-01

    Phenolic-enriched extracts of maple sap and syrup, obtained from the sugar and red maple species (Acer saccharum Marsh, A. rubrum L., respectively), are reported to show anticancer effects. Despite traditional medicinal uses of various other parts of these plants by Native Americans, they have not been investigated for anticancer activity. Here leaves, stems/twigs, barks and sapwoods of both maple species were evaluated for antiproliferative effects against human colon tumorigenic (HCT-116, HT-29, Caco-2) and non-tumorigenic (CCD-18Co) cells. Extracts were standardized to total phenolic and ginnalin-A (isolated in our laboratory) levels. Overall, the extracts inhibited the growth of the colon cancer more than normal cells (over two-fold), their activities increased with their ginnalin-A levels, with red > sugar maple extracts. The red maple leaf extract, which contained the highest ginnalin-A content, was the most active extract (IC₅₀  = 35 and 16 µg/mL for extract and ginnalin-A, respectively). The extracts were not cytotoxic nor did they induce apoptosis of the colon cancer cells. However, cell cycle analyses revealed that the antiproliferative effects of the extracts were mediated through cell cycle arrest in the S-phase. The results from the current study suggest that these maple plant part extracts may have potential anticolon cancer effects. PMID:22147441

  18. Effects of maple (Acer) plant part extracts on proliferation, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest of human tumorigenic and non-tumorigenic colon cells.

    PubMed

    González-Sarrías, Antonio; Li, Liya; Seeram, Navindra P

    2012-07-01

    Phenolic-enriched extracts of maple sap and syrup, obtained from the sugar and red maple species (Acer saccharum Marsh, A. rubrum L., respectively), are reported to show anticancer effects. Despite traditional medicinal uses of various other parts of these plants by Native Americans, they have not been investigated for anticancer activity. Here leaves, stems/twigs, barks and sapwoods of both maple species were evaluated for antiproliferative effects against human colon tumorigenic (HCT-116, HT-29, Caco-2) and non-tumorigenic (CCD-18Co) cells. Extracts were standardized to total phenolic and ginnalin-A (isolated in our laboratory) levels. Overall, the extracts inhibited the growth of the colon cancer more than normal cells (over two-fold), their activities increased with their ginnalin-A levels, with red > sugar maple extracts. The red maple leaf extract, which contained the highest ginnalin-A content, was the most active extract (IC₅₀  = 35 and 16 µg/mL for extract and ginnalin-A, respectively). The extracts were not cytotoxic nor did they induce apoptosis of the colon cancer cells. However, cell cycle analyses revealed that the antiproliferative effects of the extracts were mediated through cell cycle arrest in the S-phase. The results from the current study suggest that these maple plant part extracts may have potential anticolon cancer effects.

  19. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIγ enhances stem-like traits and tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yongfang; Zhou, You; Zhang, Chenchen; Yang, Yiming; Yang, Ying; Xu, Haiyan; Xu, Rongzhen; Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Highly tumorigenic stem-like cells, considered tumor-initiating cells (TICs), are the main cause of lung cancer initiation, relapse, and drug resistance. In this study, we identified that Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIγ (CaMKIIγ) was aberrantly expressed in highly tumorigenic stem-like lung cancer cells, and was also correlated with poor prognosis in human lung cancer. Functionally, CaMKIIγ enhanced stem-like traits and the tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells in an Akt- and β-catenin-dependent manner. In addition, we found that CaMKIIγ upregulated Oct4 expression via Akt-mediated histone acetylation. Taken together, our findings reveal a critical role of CaMKIIγ in regulating the stemness and tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells and offer a promising therapeutic target for TICs. PMID:25965829

  20. Embryonic and tumorigenic pathways converge via Nodal signaling: role in melanoma aggressiveness.

    PubMed

    Topczewska, Jolanta M; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Margaryan, Naira V; Sam, Anthony; Hess, Angela R; Wheaton, William W; Nickoloff, Brian J; Topczewski, Jacek; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2006-08-01

    Bidirectional cellular communication is integral to both cancer progression and embryological development. In addition, aggressive tumor cells are phenotypically plastic, sharing many properties with embryonic cells. Owing to the similarities between these two types of cells, the developing zebrafish can be used as a biosensor for tumor-derived signals. Using this system, we show that aggressive melanoma cells secrete Nodal (a potent embryonic morphogen) and consequently can induce ectopic formation of the embryonic axis. We further show that Nodal is present in human metastatic tumors, but not in normal skin, and thus may be involved in melanoma pathogenesis. Inhibition of Nodal signaling reduces melanoma cell invasiveness, colony formation and tumorigenicity. Nodal inhibition also promotes the reversion of melanoma cells toward a melanocytic phenotype. These data suggest that Nodal signaling has a key role in melanoma cell plasticity and tumorigenicity, thereby providing a previously unknown molecular target for regulating tumor progression. PMID:16892036

  1. Tumorigenic Xenopus cells express several maternal and early embryonic mRNAs

    SciTech Connect

    Picard, J.J.; Pelle, R.; Schonne, E.; Dworkin-Rastl, E.; Dworkin, M.B.

    1986-11-01

    Recombinant cDNA libraries were constructed from poly (A)/sup +/ RNA isolated from different stages of oogenesis and embryogenesis from the clawed toad Xenopus laevis. Hybridization analyses were used to describe the accumulation of specific RNAs represented by these cDNA clones in oocytes, embryos, adult liver, a cell line derived from Xenopus borealis embryos (Xb693), and a tumorigenic substrain of that cell line (Xb693T). It was found that from 550 cDNA clones analyses, six sequences accumulate to higher titers in poly(A)/sup +/ RNA isolated from the tumorigenic cell line compared with the nontumorigenic cell line. All six sequences were expressed at high levels during oogenesis. DNA sequencing of these three sequences followed by a computer search of protein data banks has identified them as coding for the glycolytic enzyme enolase, the ATP-ADP carrier protein, and a-tubulin.

  2. Inhibition of heregulin expression blocks tumorigenicity and metastasis of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Shamon-Taylor, Lisa A.; Mehmi, Inderjit; Tang, Careen K.; Cardillo, Marina; Lupu, Ruth

    2001-12-20

    The growth factor Heregulin (HRG) is expressed in 30% of breast cancer tumors. HRG induces tumorigenicity and metastasis of breast cancer cells. Our investigation into whether blockage of HRG reduces the aggressiveness of breast cancer cells demonstrated that transfection of MDA-MB-231 with an HRG antisense cDNA suppressed proliferation, tumorigenicity, and metastasis. Blockage of the aggressive phenotype is mediated possibly through inactivation of the erbB signaling pathways and a decrease in MMP-9 activity. Our study is the first to report that HRG is a key promoter of breast cancer progression and should be deemed as a potential target in developing therapies for the treatment of breast carcinomas.

  3. Design and synthesis of new 2-arylnaphthyridin-4-ones as potent antitumor agents targeting tumorigenic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chin-Yu; Cheng, Yung-Yi; Chang, Ling-Chu; Huang, Li-Jiau; Chou, Li-Chen; Huang, Chi-Hung; Tsai, Meng-Tung; Liao, Chih-Chang; Hsu, Mei-Hua; Lin, Hui-Yi; Wu, Tian-Shung; Wen, Yen-Fang; Zhao, Yu; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2015-01-27

    To develop new anticancer drug candidates from 2-arylnaphthyridin-4-one (AN), we have designed and synthesized a series of 3'-hydroxy and 6-hydroxy derivatives of AN. The results of cytotoxicity screening indicated that the replacement of the 3'-methoxy moiety on the C-ring phenyl group of AN (6a-e) with 3'-hydroxy (7a-e) made no significant effect on the inhibitory activity against HL-60, Hep3B and NCI-H460 cancer cell lines. On the other hand, replacing the 6-methoxy group on the A-ring of AN (6g-i) with a 6-hydroxy group (7g-i) resulted in reduced inhibitory activity against the above three cancer cell lines. Among the above-mentioned target compounds, 2-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-5-methyl-1,8-naphthyridin-4(1H)-one (7a) demonstrated the greatest potency and the best selectivity toward tumorigenic cancer cell lines. In a 7a preliminary mechanism of action study in Hep3B hepatoma cells, 7a showed the effects on microtubules followed by cell cycle arrest and sequentially led to apoptosis. In addition, a phosphate prodrug (11) of 7a exhibited significant antitumor activity when tested in a Hep3B xenograft nude mice model. Since compound 11 has demonstrated good development potential, it is recommended for further preclinical studies.

  4. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; Harold, J.; Morrow, C.

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. There are many ways for scientists to help develop science exhibitions. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). Two of its exhibitions, Space Weather Center and MarsQuest, are currently on tour. Another exhibition, Alien Earths, is in development. The Space Weather Center was developed in partnership with various research missions at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot traveling exhibition. The exhibit's second 3-year tour began this January at the Detroit Science Center. It is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. The 3,000 square-foot traveling exhibition, called Alien Earths, will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. Alien Earths has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Besides the exhibits, SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous

  5. Isolation of stem-like cells from spontaneous feline mammary carcinomas: Phenotypic characterization and tumorigenic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, Federica; Wurth, Roberto; Ratto, Alessandra; Campanella, Chiara; Vito, Guendalina; Thellung, Stefano; Daga, Antonio; Cilli, Michele; Ferrari, Angelo; Florio, Tullio

    2012-04-15

    Current carcinogenesis theory states that only a small subset of tumor cells, the cancer stem cells or tumor initiating cells (TICs), are responsible for tumor formation and progression. Human breast cancer-initiating cells have been identified as CD44-expressing cells, which retain tumorigenic activity and display stem cell-like properties. Spontaneous feline mammary carcinoma (FMC) is an aggressive cancer, which shows biological similarities to the human tumor counterpart. We report the isolation and phenotypic characterization of FMC-derived stem/progenitor cells, showing in vitro self-renewal, long-lasting proliferation and in vivo tumorigenicity. Twenty-one FMC samples were collected, histologically classified and characterized for the expression of Ki67, EGFR, ER-{alpha} and CD44, by immunohistochemistry. By culture in stem cell permissive conditions, we isolated, from 13 FMCs, a CD44-positive subpopulation able to survive and proliferate in vitro as mammospheres of different sizes and morphologies. When injected in NOD/SCID mice, FMC stem-like cells initiate tumors, generating cell heterogeneity and recapitulating the original histotype. In serum-containing medium, spheroid cells showed differentiation properties as shown by morphological changes, the loss of CD44 expression and tumorigenic potential. These data show that stem-defined culture of FMC enriches for TICs and validate the use of these cells as a suitable model for comparative oncology studies of mammary biology and testing therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating TICs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Feline mammary carcinoma contain a sub-population of stem-like cells expressing CD44 Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These grow as spheres in serum-free medium and self-renew Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isolated stem-like cancer cells initiate tumor in immunodeficient mice Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Xenografted tumors are phenotypically similar to the original tumor Black

  6. A potential microRNA signature for tumorigenic conazoles in mouse liver.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey A; Blackman, Carl F; Thai, Sheau-Fung; Li, Zhiguang; Kohan, Michael; Jones, Carlton P; Chen, Tao

    2010-04-01

    Triadimefon, propiconazole, and myclobutanil are conazoles, an important class of agricultural fungicides. Triadimefon and propiconazole are mouse liver tumorigens, while myclobutanil is not. As part of a coordinated study to understand the molecular determinants of conazole tumorigenicity, we analyzed the microRNA expression levels in control and conazole-treated mice after 90 d of administration in feed. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs composed of approximately 19-24 nucleotides in length, and have been shown to interact with mRNA (usually 3' UTR) to suppress its expression. MicroRNAs play a key role in diverse biological processes, including development, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Groups of mice were fed either control diet or diet containing 1800 ppm triadimefon, 2500 ppm propiconazole, or 2000 ppm myclobutanil. MicroRNA was isolated from livers and analyzed using Superarray whole mouse genome miRNA PCR arrays from SABioscience. Data were analyzed using the significance analysis of microarrays (SAM) procedure. We identified those miRNAs whose expression was either increased or decreased relative to untreated controls with q < or = 0.01. The tumorigenic conazoles induced many more changes in miRNA expression than the nontumorigenic conazole. A group of 19 miRNAs was identified whose expression was significantly altered in both triadimefon- and propiconazole-treated animals but not in myclobutanil-treated animals. All but one of the altered miRNAs were downregulated compared to controls. This pattern of altered miRNA expression may represent a signature for tumorigenic conazole exposure in mouse liver after 90 d of treatment.

  7. REST controls self-renewal and tumorigenic competence of human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Conti, Luciano; Crisafulli, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Tortoreto, Monica; Brilli, Elisa; Conforti, Paola; Zunino, Franco; Magrassi, Lorenzo; Schiffer, Davide; Cattaneo, Elena

    2012-01-01

    The Repressor Element 1 Silencing Transcription factor (REST/NRSF) is a master repressor of neuronal programs in non-neuronal lineages shown to function as a central regulator of developmental programs and stem cell physiology. Aberrant REST function has been associated with a number of pathological conditions. In cancer biology, REST has been shown to play a tumor suppressor activity in epithelial cancers but an oncogenic role in brain childhood malignancies such as neuroblastoma and medulloblastoma. Here we examined REST expression in human glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) specimens and its role in GBM cells carrying self-renewal and tumorigenic competence. We found REST to be expressed in GBM specimens, its presence being particularly enriched in tumor cells in the perivascular compartment. Significantly, REST is highly expressed in self-renewing tumorigenic-competent GBM cells and its knock down strongly reduces their self-renewal in vitro and tumor-initiating capacity in vivo and affects levels of miR-124 and its downstream targets. These results indicate that REST contributes to GBM maintenance by affecting its self-renewing and tumorigenic cellular component and that, hence, a better understanding of these circuitries in these cells might lead to new exploitable therapeutic targets. PMID:22701651

  8. Genomic instability and tumorigenic induction in immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells by heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hei, T. K.; Piao, C. Q.; Wu, L. J.; Willey, J. C.; Hall, E. J.

    1998-11-01

    Carcinogenesis is postulated to be a progressive multistage process characterized by an increase in genomic instability and clonal selection with each mutational event endowing a selective growth advantage. Genomic instability as manifested by the amplification of specific gene fragments is common among tumor and transformed cells. In the present study, immortalized human bronchial (BEP2D) cells were irradiated with graded doses of either 1GeV/nucleon 56Fe ions or 150 keV/μm alpha particles. Transformed cells developed through a series of successive steps before becoming tumorigenic in nude mice. Tumorigenic cells showed neither ras mutations nor deletion in the p16 tumor suppressor gene. In contrast, they harbored mutations in the p53 gene and over-expressed cyclin D1. Genomic instability among transformed cells at various stage of the carcinogenic process was examined based on frequencies of PALA resistance. Incidence of genomic instability was highest among established tumor cell lines relative to transformed, non-tumorigenic and control cell lines. Treatment of BEP2D cells with a 4 mM dose of the aminothiol WR-1065 significantly reduced their neoplastic transforming response to 56Fe particles. This model provides an opportunity to study the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in malignant transformation of human epithelial cells by heavy ions.

  9. Tumorigenicity of hypoxic respiring cancer cells revealed by a hypoxia–cell cycle dual reporter

    PubMed Central

    Le, Anne; Stine, Zachary E.; Nguyen, Christopher; Afzal, Junaid; Sun, Peng; Hamaker, Max; Siegel, Nicholas M.; Gouw, Arvin M.; Kang, Byung-hak; Yu, Shu-Han; Cochran, Rory L.; Sailor, Kurt A.; Song, Hongjun; Dang, Chi V.

    2014-01-01

    Although aerobic glycolysis provides an advantage in the hypoxic tumor microenvironment, some cancer cells can also respire via oxidative phosphorylation. These respiring (“non-Warburg”) cells were previously thought not to play a key role in tumorigenesis and thus fell from favor in the literature. We sought to determine whether subpopulations of hypoxic cancer cells have different metabolic phenotypes and gene-expression profiles that could influence tumorigenicity and therapeutic response, and we therefore developed a dual fluorescent protein reporter, HypoxCR, that detects hypoxic [hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) active] and/or cycling cells. Using HEK293T cells as a model, we identified four distinct hypoxic cell populations by flow cytometry. The non-HIF/noncycling cell population expressed a unique set of genes involved in mitochondrial function. Relative to the other subpopulations, these hypoxic “non-Warburg” cells had highest oxygen consumption rates and mitochondrial capacity consistent with increased mitochondrial respiration. We found that these respiring cells were unexpectedly tumorigenic, suggesting that continued respiration under limiting oxygen conditions may be required for tumorigenicity. PMID:25114222

  10. Loss of tumorigenic potential upon transdifferentiation from keratinocytic into melanocytic lineage

    PubMed Central

    Fehrenbach, Sabrina; Novak, Daniel; Bernhardt, Mathias; Larribere, Lionel; Boukamp, Petra; Umansky, Viktor; Utikal, Jochen

    2016-01-01

    Lineage-specific transcription factors determine the cell fate during development. Direct conversion of several cell types into other lineages has been achieved by the overexpression of specific transcription factors. Even cancer cells have been demonstrated to be amenable to transdifferentiation. Here, we identified a distinct set of transcription factors, which are sufficient to transform cells of the keratinocytic lineage to melanocyte-like cells. Melanocyte marker expression was induced and melanosome formation was observed in non-tumorigenic keratinocytes (HaCaT) and tumorigenic squamous cell carcinoma (MET-4) cells. Moreover, reduced proliferation, cell metabolism, invasion and migration were measured in vitro in transdifferentiated MT-MET-4 cells. A loss of tumorigenic potential of squamous cell carcinoma cells could be due to the upregulation of the melanocyte differentiation associated gene IL-24. Our data show that cells from the keratinocytic lineage can be transdifferented into the melanocytic lineage and provide a proof of principle for a potential new therapeutic strategy. PMID:27387763

  11. MIF Maintains the Tumorigenic Capacity of Brain Tumor-Initiating Cells by Directly Inhibiting p53.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Raita; Ohta, Shigeki; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Sugihara, Eiji; Okano, Hideyuki; Saya, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka; Kawase, Takeshi; Yoshida, Kazunari; Toda, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    Tumor-initiating cells thought to drive brain cancer are embedded in a complex heterogeneous histology. In this study, we isolated primary cells from 21 human brain tumor specimens to establish cell lines with high tumorigenic potential and to identify the molecules enabling this capability. The morphology, sphere-forming ability upon expansion, and differentiation potential of all cell lines were indistinguishable in vitro However, testing for tumorigenicity revealed two distinct cell types, brain tumor-initiating cells (BTIC) and non-BTIC. We found that macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) was highly expressed in BTIC compared with non-BTIC. MIF bound directly to both wild-type and mutant p53 but regulated p53-dependent cell growth by different mechanisms, depending on glioma cell line and p53 status. MIF physically interacted with wild-type p53 in the nucleus and inhibited its transcription-dependent functions. In contrast, MIF bound to mutant p53 in the cytoplasm and abrogated transcription-independent induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, MIF knockdown inhibited BTIC-induced tumor formation in a mouse xenograft model, leading to increased overall survival. Collectively, our findings suggest that MIF regulates BTIC function through direct, intracellular inhibition of p53, shedding light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the tumorigenicity of certain malignant brain cells. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2813-23. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980763

  12. New Hurricane Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A new exhibit in StenniSphere depicting NASA's role in hurricane prediction and research and SSC's role in helping the region recover from Hurricane Katrina. The cyclone-shaped exhibit focuses on the effects of the Aug. 29, 2005 storm and outlines how NASA is working to improve weather forecasting. Through photos, 3-D models and digital animations, the exhibit tells the story of what happened inside the storm and how NASA's scientific research can increase the accuracy of hurricane tracking and modeling.

  13. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  14. Communicating Science through Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, Paul

    2005-04-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. Science exhibitions also provide a marvelous opportunity for scientists to become engaged in the exhibit development process. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on two of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (on tour for four years) and Alien Earths (its tour began early in 2005). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, Planet Quest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in ``habitable zones'' around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. SSI is also developing interactive web sites based on exhibit themes. New technologies are transforming the Web from a static medium to an interactive environment with tremendous potential for informal education and inquiry-based investigations. This talk will focus on the role informal science projects play in effectively communicating science to a broad, public audience.

  15. Swamp to Space exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The menacing-looking alligator is really harmless. It is one of the realistic props to help convince visitors that the feel of the swamp is real in StenniSphere's Swamp to Space exhibit at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss. The historical section of the Swamp to Space exhibit tells the story of why and how Stennis Space Center came to be. It also pays tribute to the families who moved their homes to make way for the space age in Mississippi.

  16. Exhibition in Sight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    Ludwig Mies van der Rohe is known primarily as an architect. However, he also designed chairs and tables. Discusses an exhibit held in New York City a few months ago which showed how well the famous architect achieved his goals in the area of furniture design. (Author/RK)

  17. Exhibition in Sight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasserman, Burton

    1978-01-01

    One of the most offbeat exhibitions presented in the last several years was the widely celebrated Warhol-Wyeth duo show, "Portraits of Each Other", held at the Brandywine River Museum in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. Discusses their paintings and their diametrically different personalities. (Author/RK)

  18. Systematic dissection of phenotypic, functional, and tumorigenic heterogeneity of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Deng, Qu; Jeter, Collene; Liu, Can; Honorio, Sofia; Li, Hangwen; Davis, Tammy; Suraneni, Mahipal; Laffin, Brian; Qin, Jichao; Li, Qiuhui; Yang, Tao; Whitney, Pamela; Shen, Jianjun; Huang, Jiaoti; Tang, Dean G.

    2015-01-01

    Human cancers are heterogeneous containing stem-like cancer cells operationally defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) that possess great tumor-initiating and long-term tumor-propagating properties. In this study, we systematically dissect the phenotypic, functional and tumorigenic heterogeneity in human prostate cancer (PCa) using xenograft models and >70 patient tumor samples. In the first part, we further investigate the PSA−/lo PCa cell population, which we have recently shown to harbor self-renewing long-term tumor-propagating cells and present several novel findings. We show that discordant AR and PSA expression in both untreated and castration-resistant PCa (CRPC) results in AR+PSA+, AR+PSA−, AR−PSA−, and AR−PSA+ subtypes of PCa cells that manifest differential sensitivities to therapeutics. We further demonstrate that castration leads to a great enrichment of PSA−/lo PCa cells in both xenograft tumors and CRPC samples and systemic androgen levels dynamically regulate the relative abundance of PSA+ versus PSA−/lo PCa cells that impacts the kinetics of tumor growth. We also present evidence that the PSA−/lo PCa cells possess distinct epigenetic profiles. As the PSA−/lo PCa cell population is heterogeneous, in the second part, we employ two PSA− (Du145 and PC3) and two PSA+ (LAPC9 and LAPC4) PCa models as well as patient tumor cells to further dissect the clonogenic and tumorigenic subsets. We report that different PCa models possess distinct tumorigenic subpopulations that both commonly and uniquely express important signaling pathways that could represent therapeutic targets. Our results have important implications in understanding PCa cell heterogeneity, response to clinical therapeutics, and cellular mechanisms underlying CRPC. PMID:26246472

  19. Utility of the mouse dermal promotion assay in comparing the tumorigenic potential of cigarette mainstream smoke.

    PubMed

    Smith, Carr J; Perfetti, Thomas A; Garg, Rajni; Hansch, Corwin

    2006-10-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified a number of the chemical constituents reported in cigarette mainstream smoke (MS) as carcinogens. In the international literature, 81 IARC classified carcinogens have been reported historically in MS. Cigarette smoke is a complex aerosol of minute liquid droplets (termed the particulate phase) suspended within a mixture of gases (CO(2), CO, NO(x), etc.) and semi-volatile compounds. The gases and semi-volatiles are termed the vapor phase. Due to early difficulties in inducing carcinomas in laboratory animals following inhalation exposure to MS, the mouse dermal promotion assay became the standard method of comparing the tumorigenic potential of cigarette smoke condensates (the particulate phase of MS nearly devoid of MS gases and having a significant reduction of the semi-volatile components of the vapor phase). Of the 81 IARC carcinogens reported in MS, 48 are found exclusively in the particulate phase, 29 in the vapor phase only, and four IARC carcinogens in both phases. A general comparison of the quantity and potency of the individual carcinogenic constituents of the MS vapor and particulate phases illustrates that the potential carcinogenic contribution from the vapor phase might be significant. Therefore, the mouse dermal promotion assay may not be a sensitive comparator of the tumorigenic potential of different MSs displaying a diversity of vapor phase components. However, when used in a weight-of-the-evidence approach that includes smoke chemistry, in vitro studies using whole smoke and human exposure studies evaluating both vapor and particulate phase smoke constituents, the mouse dermal promotion assay remains an important risk assessment tool as the only test that reproducibly measures the tumorigenic potential of cigarette smoke condensate.

  20. The antagonism between MCT-1 and p53 affects the tumorigenic outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background MCT-1 oncoprotein accelerates p53 protein degradation via a proteosome pathway. Synergistic promotion of the xenograft tumorigenicity has been demonstrated in circumstance of p53 loss alongside MCT-1 overexpression. However, the molecular regulation between MCT-1 and p53 in tumor development remains ambiguous. We speculate that MCT-1 may counteract p53 through the diverse mechanisms that determine the tumorigenic outcomes. Results MCT-1 has now identified as a novel target gene of p53 transcriptional regulation. MCT-1 promoter region contains the response elements reactive with wild-type p53 but not mutant p53. Functional p53 suppresses MCT-1 promoter activity and MCT-1 mRNA stability. In a negative feedback regulation, constitutively expressed MCT-1 decreases p53 promoter function and p53 mRNA stability. The apoptotic events are also significantly prevented by oncogenic MCT-1 in a p53-dependent or a p53-independent fashion, according to the genotoxic mechanism. Moreover, oncogenic MCT-1 promotes the tumorigenicity in mice xenografts of p53-null and p53-positive lung cancer cells. In support of the tumor growth are irrepressible by p53 reactivation in vivo, the inhibitors of p53 (MDM2, Pirh2, and Cop1) are constantly stimulated by MCT-1 oncoprotein. Conclusions The oppositions between MCT-1 and p53 are firstly confirmed at multistage processes that include transcription control, mRNA metabolism, and protein expression. MCT-1 oncogenicity can overcome p53 function that persistently advances the tumor development. PMID:21138557

  1. HIF-1-alpha links mitochondrial perturbation to the dynamic acquisition of breast cancer tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ching-Ying; Cheng, Chun-Ting; Hou, Peifeng; Lin, Yi-Pei; Ma, Huimin; Chung, Yiyin; Chi, Kevin; Chen, Yuan; Li, Wei; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Ann, David K.

    2016-01-01

    Up-regulation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α), even in normoxia, is a common feature of solid malignancies. However, the mechanisms of increased HIF-1α abundance, and its role in regulating breast cancer plasticity are not fully understood. We have previously demonstrated that dimethyl-2-ketoglutarate (DKG), a widely used cell membrane-permeable α-ketoglutarate (α-KG) analogue, transiently stabilizes HIF-1α by inhibiting prolyl hydroxylase 2. Here, we report that breast cancer tumorigenicity can be acquired through prolonged treatment with DKG. Our results indicate that, in response to prolonged DKG treatment, mitochondrial respiration becomes uncoupled, leading to the accumulation of succinate and fumarate in breast cancer cells. Further, we found that an early increase in the oxygen flux rate was accompanied by a delayed enhancement of glycolysis. Together, our results indicate that these events trigger a dynamic enrichment for cells with pluripotent/stem-like cell markers and tumorsphere-forming capacity. Moreover, DKG-mediated metabolic reprogramming results in HIF-1α induction and reductive carboxylation pathway activation. Both HIF-1α accumulation and the tumor-promoting metabolic state are required for DKG-promoted tumor repopulation capacity in vivo. Our data suggest that mitochondrial adaptation to DKG elevates the ratio of succinate or fumarate to α-KG, which in turn stabilizes HIF-1α and reprograms breast cancer cells into a stem-like state. Therefore, our results demonstrate that metabolic regulation, with succinate and/or fumarate accumulation, governs the dynamic transition of breast cancer tumorigenic states and we suggest that HIF-1α is indispensable for breast cancer tumorigenicity. PMID:27058900

  2. CD271 Expression on Patient Melanoma Cells Is Unstable and Unlinked to Tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Boyle, Samantha E; Fedele, Clare G; Corbin, Vincent; Wybacz, Elisha; Szeto, Pacman; Lewin, Jeremy; Young, Richard J; Wong, Annie; Fuller, Robert; Spillane, John; Speakman, David; Donahoe, Simon; Pohl, Miklos; Gyorki, David; Henderson, Michael A; Johnstone, Ricky W; Papenfuss, Anthony T; Shackleton, Mark

    2016-07-01

    The stability of markers that identify cancer cells that propagate disease is important to the outcomes of targeted therapy strategies. In human melanoma, conflicting data exist as to whether hierarchical expression of CD271/p75/NGFR (nerve growth factor receptor) marks cells with enriched tumorigenicity, which would compel their specific targeting in therapy. To test whether these discrepancies relate to differences among groups in assay approaches, we undertook side-by-side testing of published methods of patient-derived melanoma xenografting (PDX), including comparisons of tissue digestion procedures or coinjected Matrigel formulations. We found that CD271(-) and CD271(+) melanoma cells from each of seven patients were similarly tumorigenic, regardless of assay variations. Surprisingly variable CD271 expression patterns were observed in the analyses of sibling PDX tumors (n = 68) grown in the same experiments from either CD271(-) or CD271(+) cells obtained from patients. This indicates unstable intratumoral lineage relationships between CD271(-) and CD271(+) melanoma cells that are inconsistent with classical, epigenetically based theories of disease progression, such as the cancer stem cell and plasticity models. SNP genotyping of pairs of sibling PDX tumors grown from phenotypically identical CD271(-) or CD271(+) cells showed large pairwise differences in copy number (28%-48%). Differences were also apparent in the copy number profiles of CD271(-) and CD271(+) cells purified directly from each of the four melanomas (1.4%-23%). Thus, CD271 expression in patient melanomas is unstable, not consistently linked to increased tumorigenicity and associated with genetic heterogeneity, undermining its use as a marker in clinical studies. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3965-77. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325642

  3. Baculovirus-mediated miRNA regulation to suppress hepatocellular carcinoma tumorigenicity and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiu-Ling; Wu, Jaw-Ching; Chen, Guan-Yu; Yuan, Pei-Hsiang; Tseng, Yen-Wen; Li, Kuei-Chang; Hwang, Shiaw-Min; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA 122 (miR-122) is a tumor suppressor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) but is lowly expressed in HCC cells. MiR-151 is aberrantly overexpressed in HCC cells and promotes HCC metastasis yet its roles on HCC tumorigenicity are unknown. To combat HCC tumorigenicity/metastasis, we developed Sleeping Beauty (SB)-based hybrid baculovirus (BV) vectors that expressed (i) miR-122 precursors (pre-miR-122), (ii) miR-151 sponges, or (iii) pre-miR-122 and miR-151 sponges. Transduction of aggressive HCC cells (Mahlavu) with the pre-miR-122-expressing BV tremendously enhanced miR-122 levels for >6 weeks, suppressed the levels of downstream effectors (e.g., ADAM10 and Bcl-w), proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, motility and migration/invasion in vitro. Intratumoral injection of the pre-miR-122-expressing BV attenuated the HCC growth/metastasis. The miR-151 sponges-expressing BV diminished the miR-151 levels for 6 weeks, enhanced RhoGDIA expression, suppressed RhoGTPases, as well as motility and migration/invasion of Mahlavu cells. Intratumoral injection of the miR-151 sponge-expressing BV impeded not only HCC metastasis but also cell proliferation, MMP expression and tumor growth in vivo. The BV co-expressing pre-miR-122 and miR-151 sponges also simultaneously enhanced miR-122 expression and inhibited miR-151, and conferred antitumor/anti-metastasis effects albeit lack of synergism. These data implicate the potentials of the SB-based hybrid BV for persistently modulating miRNA and suppressing HCC tumorigenicity/metastasis. PMID:25023326

  4. Quantitative changes in endogenous DNA adducts correlate with conazole in vivo mutagenicity and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Ross, Jeffrey A; Leavitt, Sharon A; Schmid, Judith E; Nelson, Garret B

    2012-09-01

    The mouse liver tumorigenic conazole fungicides triadimefon and propiconazole have previously been shown to be in vivo mouse liver mutagens in the Big Blue™ transgenic mutation assay when administered in feed at tumorigenic doses, whereas the nontumorigenic conazole myclobutanil was not mutagenic. DNA sequencing of the mutants recovered from each treatment group as well as from animals receiving control diet revealed that propiconazole- and triadimefon-induced mutations do not represent general clonal expansion of background mutations, and support the hypothesis that they arise from the accumulation of endogenous reactive metabolic intermediates within the liver in vivo. We therefore measured the spectra of endogenous DNA adducts in the livers of mice from these studies to determine if there were quantitative or qualitative differences between mice receiving tumorigenic or nontumorigenic conazoles compared to concurrent control animals. We resolved and quantitated 16 individual adduct spots by (32)P postlabelling and thin layer chromatography using three solvent systems. Qualitatively, we observed the same DNA adducts in control mice as in mice receiving conazoles. However, the 13 adducts with the highest chromatographic mobility were, as a group, present at significantly higher amounts in the livers of mice treated with propiconazole and triadimefon than in their concurrent controls, whereas this same group of DNA adducts in the myclobutanil-treated mice was not different from controls. This same group of endogenous adducts were significantly correlated with mutant frequency across all treatment groups (P = 0.002), as were total endogenous DNA adduct levels (P = 0.005). We hypothesise that this treatment-related increase in endogenous DNA adducts, together with concomitant increases in cell proliferation previously reported to be induced by conazoles, explain the observed increased in vivo mutation frequencies previously reported to be induced by treatment with

  5. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows onlookers viewing displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  6. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows Justin Varnadore, son of a Marshall TV employee, at the controls of one of the many displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  7. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 leaving the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the exhibit site. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at MSFC, the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit, automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids and emergency and safety systems, are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  8. Online Exhibits & Concept Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douma, M.

    2009-12-01

    Presenting the complexity of geosciences to the public via the Internet poses a number of challenges. For example, utilizing various - and sometimes redundant - Web 2.0 tools can quickly devour limited time. Do you tweet? Do you write press releases? Do you create an exhibit or concept map? The presentation will provide participants with a context for utilizing Web 2.0 tools by briefly highlighting methods of online scientific communication across several dimensions. It will address issues of: * breadth and depth (e.g. from narrow topics to well-rounded views), * presentation methods (e.g. from text to multimedia, from momentary to enduring), * sources and audiences (e.g. for experts or for the public, content developed by producers to that developed by users), * content display (e.g. from linear to non-linear, from instructive to entertaining), * barriers to entry (e.g. from an incumbent advantage to neophyte accessible, from amateur to professional), * cost and reach (e.g. from cheap to expensive), and * impact (e.g. the amount learned, from anonymity to brand awareness). Against this backdrop, the presentation will provide an overview of two methods of online information dissemination, exhibits and concept maps, using the WebExhibits online museum (www.webexhibits.org) and SpicyNodes information visualization tool (www.spicynodes.org) as examples, with tips on how geoscientists can use either to communicate their science. Richly interactive online exhibits can serve to engage a large audience, appeal to visitors with multiple learning styles, prompt exploration and discovery, and present a topic’s breadth and depth. WebExhibits, which was among the first online museums, delivers interactive information, virtual experiments, and hands-on activities to the public. While large, multidisciplinary exhibits on topics like “Color Vision and Art” or “Calendars Through the Ages” require teams of scholars, user interface experts, professional writers and editors

  9. Space Shuttle Cockpit exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Want to sit in the cockpit of the Space Shuttle and watch astronauts work in outer space? At StenniSphere, you can do that and much more. StenniSphere, the visitor center at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., presents 14,000-square-feet of interactive exhibits that depict America's race for space as well as a glimpse of the future. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  10. Smithsonian climate change exhibits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mohi

    2006-05-01

    Two new museum exhibits, ``Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely'' and ``Atmosphere: Change is in the Air'' opened 15 April at the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., in partnership with the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, NASA, and the U.S. National Science Foundation. In ``Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely,'' anecdotes from indigenous polar people reveal how climate changes have affected life within the last 50 years. For example, as permafrost melts and sea ice shrinks, plant distributions and animal migration patterns are changing, severely affecting culture.

  11. Oncogenic Ras activation of Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase-independent pathways is sufficient to cause tumorigenic transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Khosravi-Far, R; White, M A; Westwick, J K; Solski, P A; Chrzanowska-Wodnicka, M; Van Aelst, L; Wigler, M H; Der, C J

    1996-01-01

    Substantial evidence supports a critical role for the activation of the Raf-1/MEK/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in oncogenic Ras-mediated transformation. For example, dominant negative mutants of Raf-1, MEK, and mitogen-activated protein kinase all inhibit Ras transformation. Furthermore, the observation that plasma membrane-localized Raf-1 exhibits the same transforming potency as oncogenic Ras suggests that Raf-1 activation alone is sufficient to mediate full Ras transforming activity. However, the recent identification of other candidate Ras effectors (e.g., RalGDS and phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase) suggests that activation of other downstream effector-mediated signaling pathways may also mediate Ras transforming activity. In support of this, two H-Ras effector domain mutants, H-Ras(12V, 37G) and H-Ras(12V, 40C), which are defective for Raf binding and activation, induced potent tumorigenic transformation of some strains of NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. These Raf-binding defective mutants of H-Ras induced a transformed morphology that was indistinguishable from that induced by activated members of Rho family proteins. Furthermore, the transforming activities of both of these mutants were synergistically enhanced by activated Raf-1 and inhibited by the dominant negative RhoA(19N) mutant, indicating that Ras may cause transformation that occurs via coordinate activation of Raf-dependent and -independent pathways that involves Rho family proteins. Finally, cotransfection of H-Ras(12V, 37G) and H-Ras(12V, 40C) resulted in synergistic cooperation of their focus-forming activities, indicating that Ras activates at least two Raf-independent, Ras effector-mediated signaling events. PMID:8668210

  12. Starship 2040 Exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a 'real' Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  13. Transcriptional Repressor DAXX Promotes Prostate Cancer Tumorigenicity via Suppression of Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Puto, Lorena A; Brognard, John; Hunter, Tony

    2015-06-19

    The DAXX transcriptional repressor was originally associated with apoptotic cell death. However, recent evidence that DAXX represses several tumor suppressor genes, including the DAPK1 and DAPK3 protein kinases, and is up-regulated in many cancers argues that a pro-survival role may predominate in a cancer context. Here, we report that DAXX has potent growth-enhancing effects on primary prostatic malignancy through inhibition of autophagy. Through stable gene knockdown and mouse subcutaneous xenograft studies, we demonstrate that DAXX promotes tumorigenicity of human ALVA-31 and PC3 prostate cancer (PCa) cells in vivo. Importantly, DAXX represses expression of essential autophagy modulators DAPK3 and ULK1 in vivo, revealing autophagy suppression as a mechanism through which DAXX promotes PCa tumorigenicity. Furthermore, DAXX knockdown increases autophagic flux in cultured PCa cells. Finally, interrogation of the Oncomine(TM) database suggests that DAXX overexpression is associated with malignant transformation in several human cancers, including prostate and pancreatic cancers. Thus, DAXX may represent a new cancer biomarker for the detection of aggressive disease, whose tissue-specific down-regulation can serve as an improved therapeutic modality. Our results establish DAXX as a pro-survival protein in PCa and reveal that, in the early stages of tumorigenesis, autophagy suppresses prostate tumor formation.

  14. Temperature-sensitive tumorigenicity of cells transformed by a mutant of Moloney sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Klarlund, J K; Forchhammer, J

    1980-01-01

    Normal rat kidney cells were nonproductively infected either with CP27, a mutant of Moloney sarcoma virus that is temperature-sensitive for maintenance of transformation, or with the parental wild-type virus. The nonproducer cells were inoculated into the tails of athymic nude mice that were subsequently incubated at 28 or 36 degrees C. CP27-infected cells induced tumors only at 28 degrees C, whereas cells infected with wild-type Moloney sarcoma virus were tumorigenic at both temperatures. Tumors induced at 28 degrees C by wild-type virus-infected cells grew faster after shift of the mice to 36 degrees C. In contrast, tumors induced by CP27-infected cells regressed upon shift to 36 degrees C, indicating that continuous expression of viral functions is required for persistence and growth of the tumors. After regression, secondary tumor growth was observed late after upshift of temperature-sensitive tumors. Cells recovered from these late-appearing tumors were tumorigenic at the nonpermissive temperature, and tumors induced by these cells did not regress after upshift. Virus rescued from these recovered cells retained the temperature-sensitivity for focus formation, indicating that the occurrence of the phenotypically wild-type cells was due to host cell modifications rather than to reversion of the CP27 genome. Images PMID:6929500

  15. Concurrent overexpression of RET/PTC1 and TTF1 confers tumorigenicity to thyrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Toyoshi; Kobayashi, Tetsuro

    2013-01-01

    A variant located on 14q13.3 nearest to thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF1) predisposes individuals to thyroid cancer, but whether this variant is related to the RET/PTC rearrangement associated with human papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTCs) is unknown. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects of RET/PTC1 on the expression of thyroid-specific genes in thyrocytes and their relationship with malignant transformation of the thyrocytes. In the absence or presence of TSH, an extracellular signal-regulated kinase was phosphorylated in FRTL5 cells that stably expressed RET/PTC1, and these cells grew independently of TSH. FRTL (RET/PTC1) cells produced 566% more thyroglobulin mRNA and 474% more Na+/I− symporter mRNA than did the control FRTL (pcDNA) cells. FRTL (RET/PTC1) cells expressed 468% more Ttf1 mRNA than did FRTL (pcDNA) cells, but these two cell types did not differ significantly with respect to Pax8 or Ttf2 mRNA levels. When FRTL (RET/PTC1) cells and FRTL (pcDNA), cells were injected into each of nine nude mice, each mouse developed a single tumor at the site of FRTL (RET/PTC1) cell injection; in contrast, tumor formation never occurred at sites of FRTL (cDNA) cells injection. Tumors resulting from FRTL (RET/PTC1) cells retained 125I-uptake activity; moreover, the cells invaded into surrounding skeletal muscle. When overexpression of Ttf1 in FRTL (RET/PTC1) cells was silenced, the cells completely lost their tumorigenic potential. Exogenous TTF1 cDNA enhanced the tumorigenicity of BHP18-21v cells, human PTC cells that express RET/PTC1, in nude mice. These results indicated that concurrent overexpression of RET/PTC1 and TTF1 confers tumorigenicity to FRTL5 and BHP18-21v cells in nude mice. PMID:24014739

  16. Silencing of Kv4.1 potassium channels inhibits cell proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jang, Soo Hwa; Choi, Changsun; Hong, Seong-Geun; Yarishkin, Oleg V.; Bae, Young Min; Kim, Jae Gon; O'Grady, Scott M.; Kang, Kyung-Sun; Ryu, Pan Dong; Lee, So Yeong

    2009-06-26

    Potassium channel activity has been shown to facilitate cell proliferation in cancer cells. In the present study, the role of Kv4.1 channels in immortal and tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells was investigated. Kv4.1 protein expression was positively correlated with tumorigenicity. Moreover, transfection with siRNAs targeting Kv4.1 mRNA suppressed proliferation of tumorigenic mammary epithelial cells. Experiments using mRNA isolated from human breast cancer tissues revealed that the level of Kv4.1 mRNA expression varied depending on the stage of the tumor. Kv4.1 protein expression increased during stages T2 and T3 compared to normal tissue. These results demonstrated that Kv4.1 plays a role in proliferation of tumorigenic human mammary epithelial cells. In addition, elevated Kv4.1 expression may be useful as a diagnostic marker for staging mammary tumors and selective blockers of Kv4.1 may serve to suppress tumor cell proliferation.

  17. Scaffold-Free Coculture Spheroids of Human Colonic Adenocarcinoma Cells and Normal Colonic Fibroblasts Promote Tumorigenicity in Nude Mice123

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-il; Lee, Jisu; Kwon, Ju-Lee; Park, Hong-Bum; Lee, Su-Yel; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Sung, Jaekye; Kim, Jin Man; Song, Kyu Sang; Kim, Kyung-Hee

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to form a scaffold-free coculture spheroid model of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (CACs) and normal colonic fibroblasts (NCFs) and to use the spheroids to investigate the role of NCFs in the tumorigenicity of CACs in nude mice. We analysed three-dimensional (3D) scaffold-free coculture spheroids of CACs and NCFs. CAC Matrigel invasion assays and tumorigenicity assays in nude mice were performed to examine the effect of NCFs on CAC invasive behaviour and tumorigenicity in 3D spheroids. We investigated the expression pattern of fibroblast activation protein-α (FAP-α) by immunohistochemical staining. CAC monocultures did not form densely-packed 3D spheroids, whereas cocultured CACs and NCFs formed 3D spheroids. The 3D coculture spheroids seeded on a Matrigel extracellular matrix showed higher CAC invasiveness compared to CACs alone or CACs and NCFs in suspension. 3D spheroids injected into nude mice generated more and faster-growing tumors compared to CACs alone or mixed suspensions consisting of CACs and NCFs. FAP-α was expressed in NCFs-CACs cocultures and xenograft tumors, whereas monocultures of NCFs or CACs were negative for FAP-α expression. Our findings provide evidence that the interaction between CACs and NCFs is essential for the tumorigenicity of cancer cells as well as for tumor propagation. PMID:26947885

  18. Effects of space flight exposure on cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Yuehui; Zhang, Zhijie; Luo, Chen; Tong, Yongqing; Zhou, Guohua; Xie, Pingli; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Guancheng

    2008-12-01

    It is well recognized that harsh outer space environment, consisting of microgravity and radiation, poses significant health risks for human cells. To investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on cancer cells we examined the biological changes in Caski cells carried by the "Shen Zhou IV" spaceship. After exposure for 7 days in spaceflight, 1440 survival subclonal cell lines were established and 4 cell lines were screened. 44F10 and 17E3 were selected because of their increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, while 48A9 and 31F2 had slower cytological events. Experiments with cell proliferation assay, flow cytometry, soft agar assay, tumorigenesis assay and DNA microarray analysis have shown that selected cell lines presented multiple biological changes in cell morphology, cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression. These results suggest that space environment exposure can make significant biological impact on cancer cells and provide an entry point to find the immunological target of tumorigenesis.

  19. Suppression of tumorigenicity in transformed cells after transfection with vinculin cDNA

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Transfection of chicken vinculin cDNA into two tumor cell lines expressing diminished levels of the endogenous protein, brought about a drastic suppression of their tumorigenic ability. The SV-40-transformed Balb/c 3T3 line (SVT2) contains four times less vinculin than the parental 3T3 cells, and the rat adenocarcinoma BSp73ASML has no detectable vinculin. Restoration of vinculin in these cells, up to the levels found in 3T3 cells, resulted in an apparent increase in substrate adhesiveness, a decrease in the ability to grow in soft agar, and suppression of their capacity to develop tumors after injection into syngeneic hosts or nude mice. These results suggest that vinculin, a cytoplasmic component of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesions, may have a major suppressive effect on the transformed phenotype. PMID:1400584

  20. A physical sciences network characterization of non-tumorigenic and metastatic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers Network; Agus, David B.; Alexander, Jenolyn F.; Arap, Wadih; Ashili, Shashanka; Aslan, Joseph E.; Austin, Robert H.; Backman, Vadim; Bethel, Kelly J.; Bonneau, Richard; Chen, Wei-Chiang; Chen-Tanyolac, Chira; Choi, Nathan C.; Curley, Steven A.; Dallas, Matthew; Damania, Dhwanil; Davies, Paul C. W.; Decuzzi, Paolo; Dickinson, Laura; Estevez-Salmeron, Luis; Estrella, Veronica; Ferrari, Mauro; Fischbach, Claudia; Foo, Jasmine; Fraley, Stephanie I.; Frantz, Christian; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Gascard, Philippe; Gatenby, Robert A.; Geng, Yue; Gerecht, Sharon; Gillies, Robert J.; Godin, Biana; Grady, William M.; Greenfield, Alex; Hemphill, Courtney; Hempstead, Barbara L.; Hielscher, Abigail; Hillis, W. Daniel; Holland, Eric C.; Ibrahim-Hashim, Arig; Jacks, Tyler; Johnson, Roger H.; Joo, Ahyoung; Katz, Jonathan E.; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Kesselman, Carl; King, Michael R.; Konstantopoulos, Konstantinos; Kraning-Rush, Casey M.; Kuhn, Peter; Kung, Kevin; Kwee, Brian; Lakins, Johnathon N.; Lambert, Guillaume; Liao, David; Licht, Jonathan D.; Liphardt, Jan T.; Liu, Liyu; Lloyd, Mark C.; Lyubimova, Anna; Mallick, Parag; Marko, John; McCarty, Owen J. T.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Michor, Franziska; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; Nandakumar, Vivek; O'Halloran, Thomas V.; Oh, Steve; Pasqualini, Renata; Paszek, Matthew J.; Philips, Kevin G.; Poultney, Christopher S.; Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Reinhart-King, Cynthia A.; Ros, Robert; Semenza, Gregg L.; Senechal, Patti; Shuler, Michael L.; Srinivasan, Srimeenakshi; Staunton, Jack R.; Stypula, Yolanda; Subramanian, Hariharan; Tlsty, Thea D.; Tormoen, Garth W.; Tseng, Yiider; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Verbridge, Scott S.; Wan, Jenny C.; Weaver, Valerie M.; Widom, Jonathan; Will, Christine; Wirtz, Denis; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan; Wu, Pei-Hsun

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the transition from non-cancerous to metastatic from a physical sciences perspective, the Physical Sciences-Oncology Centers (PS-OC) Network performed molecular and biophysical comparative studies of the non-tumorigenic MCF-10A and metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast epithelial cell lines, commonly used as models of cancer metastasis. Experiments were performed in 20 laboratories from 12 PS-OCs. Each laboratory was supplied with identical aliquots and common reagents and culture protocols. Analyses of these measurements revealed dramatic differences in their mechanics, migration, adhesion, oxygen response, and proteomic profiles. Model-based multi-omics approaches identified key differences between these cells' regulatory networks involved in morphology and survival. These results provide a multifaceted description of cellular parameters of two widely used cell lines and demonstrate the value of the PS-OC Network approach for integration of diverse experimental observations to elucidate the phenotypes associated with cancer metastasis.

  1. Mutations in BALB Mitochondrial DNA Induce CCL20 Up-regulation Promoting Tumorigenic Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Sligh, James; Janda, Jaroslav; Jandova, Jana

    2014-01-01

    mtDNA mutations are common in human cancers and are thought to contribute to the process of neoplasia. We examined the role of mtDNA mutations in skin cancer by generating fibroblast cybrids harboring a mutation in the gene encoding the mitochondrial tRNA for arginine. This somatic mutation (9821insA) was previously reported in UV-induced hyperkeratotic skin tumors in hairless mice and confers specific tumorigenic phenotypes to mutant cybrids. Microarray analysis revealed and RT-PCR along with Western blot analysis confirmed the up-regulation of CCL20 and its receptor CCR6 in mtBALB haplotype containing the mt-Tr 9821insA allele compared to wild type mtB6 haplotype. Based on reported role of CCL20 in cancer progression we examined whether the hyper-proliferation and enhanced motility of mtBALB haplotype would be associated with CCL20 levels. Treatment of both genotypes with recombinant CCL20 (rmCCL20) resulted in enhanced growth and motility of mtB6 cybrids. Furthermore, the acquired somatic alteration increased the in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids through the up-regulation of CCL20 since neutralizing antibody significantly decreased in vivo tumor growth of these cells; and tumors from anti-CCL20 treated mice injected with mtBALB cybrids showed significantly decreased CCL20 levels. When rmCCL20 or mtBALB cybrids were used as chemotactic stimuli, mtB6 cybrids showed increased motility while anti-CCL20 antibody decreased the migration and in vivo tumor growth of mtBALB cybrids. Moreover, the inhibitors of MAPK signaling and NF-κB activation inhibited CCL20 expression in mtBALB cybrids and decreased their migratory capabilities. Thus, acquired mtDNA mutations may promote tumorigenic phenotypes through up-regulation of chemokine CCL20. PMID:25177208

  2. AS30D Model of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Tumorigenicity and Preliminary Characterization by Imaging, Histopathology, and Immunohistochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Scott M.; Callstrom, Matthew R.; Knudsen, Bruce; Anderson, Jill L.; Butters, Kim A.; Grande, Joseph P.; Roberts, Lewis R.; Woodrum, David A.

    2013-02-15

    This study was designed to determine the tumorigenicity of the AS30D HCC cell line following orthotopic injection into rat liver and preliminarily characterize the tumor model by both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) as well as histopathology and immunohistochemistry.MaterialsAS30D cell line in vitro proliferation was assessed by using MTT assay. Female rats (N = 5) underwent injection of the AS30D cell line into one site in the liver. Rats subsequently underwent MR imaging at days 7 and 14 to assess tumor establishment and volume. One rat underwent US of the liver at day 7. Rats were euthanized at day 7 or 14 and livers were subjected to gross, histopathologic (H and E), and immunohistochemical (CD31) analysis to assess for tumor growth and neovascularization. AS30D cell line demonstrated an in vitro doubling time of 33.2 {+-} 5.3 h. MR imaging demonstrated hyperintense T2-weighted and hypointense T1-weighted lesions with tumor induction in five of five and three of three sites at days 7 and 14, respectively. The mean (SD) tumor volume was 126.1 {+-} 36.2 mm{sup 3} at day 7 (N = 5). US of the liver demonstrated a well-circumscribed, hypoechoic mass and comparison of tumor dimensions agreed well with MRI. Analysis of H and E- and CD31-stained sections demonstrated moderate-high grade epithelial tumors with minimal tumor necrosis and evidence of diffuse intratumoral and peritumoral neovascularization by day 7. AS30D HCC cell line is tumorigenic following orthotopic injection into rat liver and can be used to generate an early vascularizing, slower-growing rat HCC tumor model.

  3. Sensitive Tumorigenic Potential Evaluation of Adult Human Multipotent Neural Cells Immortalized by hTERT Gene Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da Eun; Kim, Sung Soo; Song, Hye Jin; Pyeon, Hee Jang; Kang, Kyeongjin; Hong, Seung-Cheol; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and therapeutic genes are emerging as a new therapeutic approach to treat various neurodegenerative diseases with few effective treatment options. However, potential formation of tumors by stem cells has hampered their clinical application. Moreover, adequate preclinical platforms to precisely test tumorigenic potential of stem cells are controversial. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of various animal models for in vivo stem cell tumorigenicity testing to identify the most sensitive platform. Then, tumorigenic potential of adult human multipotent neural cells (ahMNCs) immortalized by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene was examined as a stem cell model with therapeutic genes. When human glioblastoma (GBM) cells were injected into adult (4–6-week-old) Balb/c-nu, adult NOD/SCID, adult NOG, or neonate (1–2-week-old) NOG mice, the neonate NOG mice showed significantly faster tumorigenesis than that of the other groups regardless of intracranial or subcutaneous injection route. Two kinds of ahMNCs (682TL and 779TL) were primary cultured from surgical samples of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Although the ahMNCs were immortalized by lentiviral hTERT gene delivery (hTERT-682TL and hTERT-779TL), they did not form any detectable masses, even in the most sensitive neonate NOG mouse platform. Moreover, the hTERT-ahMNCs had no gross chromosomal abnormalities on a karyotype analysis. Taken together, our data suggest that neonate NOG mice could be a sensitive animal platform to test tumorigenic potential of stem cell therapeutics and that ahMNCs could be a genetically stable stem cell source with little tumorigenic activity to develop regenerative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27391353

  4. Sensitive Tumorigenic Potential Evaluation of Adult Human Multipotent Neural Cells Immortalized by hTERT Gene Transduction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kee Hang; Nam, Hyun; Jeong, Da Eun; Kim, Sung Soo; Song, Hye Jin; Pyeon, Hee Jang; Kang, Kyeongjin; Hong, Seung-Cheol; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells and therapeutic genes are emerging as a new therapeutic approach to treat various neurodegenerative diseases with few effective treatment options. However, potential formation of tumors by stem cells has hampered their clinical application. Moreover, adequate preclinical platforms to precisely test tumorigenic potential of stem cells are controversial. In this study, we compared the sensitivity of various animal models for in vivo stem cell tumorigenicity testing to identify the most sensitive platform. Then, tumorigenic potential of adult human multipotent neural cells (ahMNCs) immortalized by the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) gene was examined as a stem cell model with therapeutic genes. When human glioblastoma (GBM) cells were injected into adult (4-6-week-old) Balb/c-nu, adult NOD/SCID, adult NOG, or neonate (1-2-week-old) NOG mice, the neonate NOG mice showed significantly faster tumorigenesis than that of the other groups regardless of intracranial or subcutaneous injection route. Two kinds of ahMNCs (682TL and 779TL) were primary cultured from surgical samples of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Although the ahMNCs were immortalized by lentiviral hTERT gene delivery (hTERT-682TL and hTERT-779TL), they did not form any detectable masses, even in the most sensitive neonate NOG mouse platform. Moreover, the hTERT-ahMNCs had no gross chromosomal abnormalities on a karyotype analysis. Taken together, our data suggest that neonate NOG mice could be a sensitive animal platform to test tumorigenic potential of stem cell therapeutics and that ahMNCs could be a genetically stable stem cell source with little tumorigenic activity to develop regenerative treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27391353

  5. Downregulation of LSD1 suppresses the proliferation, tumorigenicity and invasion of papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cells

    PubMed Central

    KONG, LING-LING; MAN, DONG-MEI; WANG, TIAN; ZHANG, GUO-AN; CUI, WEN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the effects of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1) downregulation, induced by small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection, on the proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion of the papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cell line. The siRNA targeting LSD1 and scrambled non-targeting siRNA were each transfected into papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cells. Downregulation of LSD1 mRNA and protein level was evaluated by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and immunocytochemical (ICC) analysis and western blotting, respectively. A Cell Counting kit-8 assay was applied to estimate the effect of LSD1-siRNA on cell growth. Migration and invasion abilities were estimated by Transwell chamber assay. A soft agar colony formation assay was performed to estimate the effect of LSD1-siRNA on tumorigenicity in vitro. ICC data showed that LSD1 protein was strongly expressed in the blank and control K1 cells compared with the LSD1-siRNA cells (F=15.192, P<0.01). Compared with the control cells, cells transfected with siRNA targeting LSD1 exhibited significant downregulation of LSD1 mRNA (t=6.845, P<0.01) and protein (F=53.764, P<0.01) levels. siRNA targeting LSD1 also downregulated cell proliferation following transfection for 24, 48 and 72 h (t=4.777, P<0.001; t=3.302, P=0.003; and t=3.017, P=0.006, respectively). Compared with the control group, the amount of cell invasion was gradually reduced in the LSD1-siRNA group (t=12.301, P<0.01). The number of migrating cells was significantly higher in the negative control group compared with the LSD1-siRNA group (t=7.911, P<0.01), and the ability of colony formation in the LSD1-siRNA cells was notably reduced in the soft agar formation assay (t=3.612, P=0.005). siRNA targeting LSD1 efficiently inhibits the proliferation, colony formation, migration and invasion of papillary thyroid carcinoma K1 cells. PMID:27073501

  6. Decreased 8N sub 3 -(gamma- sup 32 P)GTP photolabeling of G sub s. alpha. in tumorigenic lung epithelial cell lines: Association with decreased hormone responsiveness and loss of contact-inhibited growth

    SciTech Connect

    Droms, K.A.; Malkinson, A.M. ); Haley, B.E. ); Smith, G.J. )

    1989-06-01

    The 45-kDa {alpha} subunit of the signal transducing G{sub s} protein complex, which stimulates receptor-coupled adenylate cyclase, incorporated less of the photoaffinity probe, 8N{sub 3}-({gamma}-{sup 32}P)GTP, in extracts from tumorigenic cell lines in comparison with nontumorigenic cell lines derived from mouse lung epithelium. Immunoblotting experiments using anti-G{sub s}{alpha} antibodies demonstrated that tumor cells do not have a decreased amount of G{sub s}{alpha} and photolabeling of tumor cell G{sub s}{alpha} increased when the rate of nucleotide exchange was promoted. Therefore, tumor cell G{sub s}{alpha} function may be altered. Consistent with this hypothesis is the observation that the tumor cells exhibited decreased responsiveness to the {beta}-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. G{sub s}{alpha} photolabeling in growing nontumorigenic cells was reduced to a level resembling that observed in tumor cells, but photolabeling increased when cells became contact-inhibited. This increase in 8N{sub 3}-({gamma}-{sup 32}P)GTP incorporation into G{sub s}{alpha} by normal cells at confluence was not seen in the tumorigenic cells. Since G{sub s}{alpha} photolabeling was inversely proportional to the percentage of ({sup 3}H) thymidine-labeled nuclei at confluence, the authors suggest that the altered G{sub s}{alpha} in tumor cells is involved in the loss of cell growth regulation.

  7. Influence of the site of tumor growth on the capacity of a low tumorigenic line of Friend erythroleukemia cells to differentiate.

    PubMed Central

    Gresser, I.; Moss, J.; Woodrow, D.; Le Bousse, C.; Maury, C.; Proietti, E.; Belardelli, F.

    1991-01-01

    Friend erythroleukemia cells (FLC) passaged in mice are highly tumorigenic and multiply extensively in the livers of suckling DBA/2 mice without differentiating. In contrast, in vitro passaged FLCs injected intravenously were of low tumorigenicity, multiplied to a limited extent in the livers of suckling mice, and underwent marked differentiation from the proerythroblast to the orthochromatic erythroblast stage in the liver. The presence of characteristic C-type virions budding from the cell surface in various stages of erythroid differentiation served as a marker of the injected FLCs. When the same in vitro passaged FLCs that differentiated in the liver were injected subcutaneously in suckling mice, they formed large subcutaneous tumors consisting of sheets of undifferentiated tumor cells. It is concluded that the tumorigenicity of FLCs depended on the site of tumor growth and that there is an inverse correlation between the tumorigenic capacity and the capacity to differentiate. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2024705

  8. Comparative lung tumorigenicity of parent and mononitro-polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in the BLU:Ha newborn mouse assay

    SciTech Connect

    Busby, W.F. Jr.; Stevens, E.K.; Martin, C.N.; Chow, F.L.; Garner, R.C.

    1989-07-01

    A BLU:Ha newborn mouse lung adenoma bioassay was employed to compare the tumorigenicity of selected mononitroarenes and unsubstituted parent compounds 6 months after initial treatment. The presence of a nitro group had a variable effect upon compound potency in which tumorigenicity was increased, abolished, or unchanged. On the basis of results with equimolar doses, the potency of benzo(a)pyrene was greater than 6-nitrobenzo(a)pyrene (inactive), 6-nitrochrysene was much greater than chrysene (inactive), 3-nitrofluoranthene (active) was equal to fluoranthene (active), and 1-nitropyrene (inactive) was equivalent to pyrene (inactive). The potency series among the mononitroarenes was 6-nitrochyrsene much greater than 3-nitrofluoranthene greater than 6-nitrobenzo(a)pyrene (inactive) = 1-nitropyrene (inactive). Lung tumor incidence and multiplicity were similar for both males and females. No consistent pattern was observed for the occasional appearance of lymphoma or hepatic nodular hyperplasia in the various treatment groups.

  9. Risk of tumorigenicity in mesenchymal stromal cell-based therapies--bridging scientific observations and regulatory viewpoints.

    PubMed

    Barkholt, Lisbeth; Flory, Egbert; Jekerle, Veronika; Lucas-Samuel, Sophie; Ahnert, Peter; Bisset, Louise; Büscher, Dirk; Fibbe, Willem; Foussat, Arnaud; Kwa, Marcel; Lantz, Olivier; Mačiulaitis, Romaldas; Palomäki, Tiina; Schneider, Christian K; Sensebé, Luc; Tachdjian, Gérard; Tarte, Karin; Tosca, Lucie; Salmikangas, Paula

    2013-07-01

    In the past decade, the therapeutic value of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been studied in various indications, thereby taking advantage of their immunosuppressive properties. Easy procurement from bone marrow, adipose tissue or other sources and conventional in vitro expansion culture have made their clinical use attractive. Bridging the gap between current scientific knowledge and regulatory prospects on the transformation potential and possible tumorigenicity of MSCs, the Cell Products Working Party and the Committee for Advanced Therapies organized a meeting with leading European experts in the field of MSCs. This meeting elucidated the risk of potential tumorigenicity related to MSC-based therapies from two angles: the scientific perspective and the regulatory point of view. The conclusions of this meeting, including the current regulatory thinking on quality, nonclinical and clinical aspects for MSCs, are presented in this review, leading to a clearer way forward for the development of such products.

  10. Assessment of transformed properties in vitro and of tumorigenicity in vivo in primary keratinocytes cultured for epidermal sheet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Thépot, A; Desanlis, A; Venet, E; Thivillier, L; Justin, V; Morel, A P; Defraipont, F; Till, M; Krutovskikh, V; Tommasino, M; Damour, O; Hainaut, P

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes are used as a cell source for autologous and allogenic cell transplant therapy for skin burns. The question addressed here is to determine whether the culture process may induce cellular, molecular, or genetic alterations that might increase the risk of cellular transformation. Keratinocytes from four different human donors were investigated for molecular and cellular parameters indicative of transformation status, including (i) karyotype, (ii) telomere length, (iii) proliferation rate, (iv) epithelial-mesenchymal transition, (v) anchorage-independent growth potential, and (vi) tumorigenicity in nude mice. Results show that, despite increased cell survival in one keratinocyte strain, none of the cultures displayed characteristics of cell transformations, implying that the culture protocol does not generate artefacts leading to the selection of transformed cells. We conclude that the current protocol does not result in an increased risk of tumorigenicity of transplanted cells. PMID:21188234

  11. Assessment of Transformed Properties In Vitro and of Tumorigenicity In Vivo in Primary Keratinocytes Cultured for Epidermal Sheet Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thépot, A.; Desanlis, A.; Venet, E.; Thivillier, L.; Justin, V.; Morel, A. P.; DeFraipont, F.; Till, M.; Krutovskikh, V.; Tommasino, M.; Damour, O.; Hainaut, P.

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes are used as a cell source for autologous and allogenic cell transplant therapy for skin burns. The question addressed here is to determine whether the culture process may induce cellular, molecular, or genetic alterations that might increase the risk of cellular transformation. Keratinocytes from four different human donors were investigated for molecular and cellular parameters indicative of transformation status, including (i) karyotype, (ii) telomere length, (iii) proliferation rate, (iv) epithelial-mesenchymal transition, (v) anchorage-independent growth potential, and (vi) tumorigenicity in nude mice. Results show that, despite increased cell survival in one keratinocyte strain, none of the cultures displayed characteristics of cell transformations, implying that the culture protocol does not generate artefacts leading to the selection of transformed cells. We conclude that the current protocol does not result in an increased risk of tumorigenicity of transplanted cells. PMID:21188234

  12. ATOH1 Can Regulate the Tumorigenicity of Gastric Cancer Cells by Inducing the Differentiation of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Han, Myoung-Eun; Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Seon-Young; Kang, Chi-Dug; Oh, Sae-Ock

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been shown to mediate tumorigenicity, chemo-resistance, radio-resistance and metastasis, which suggest they be considered therapeutic targets. Because their differentiated daughter cells are no longer tumorigenic, to induce the differentiation of CSCs can be one of strategies which can eradicate CSCs. Here we show that ATOH1 can induce the differentiation of gastric cancer stem cells (GCSCs). Real time PCR and western blot analysis showed that ATOH1 was induced during the differentiation of GCSCs. Furthermore, the lentivirus-induced overexpression of ATOH1 in GCSCs and in gastric cancer cell lines significantly induced differentiation, reduced proliferation and sphere formation, and reduced in vivo tumor formation in the subcutaneous injection and liver metastasis xenograft models. These results suggest ATOH1 be considered for the development of a differentiation therapy for gastric cancer. PMID:25950549

  13. Highly selective CD44-specific gold nanorods for photothermal ablation of tumorigenic subpopulations generated in MCF7 mammospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eugene; Hong, Yoochan; Choi, Jihye; Haam, Seungjoo; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Yang, Jaemoon

    2012-11-01

    Heterogeneous stem-like populations within tumor tissues are the primary suspects in causing cancer recurrence and malignancy. It is essential to selectively kill these tumorigenic populations. We created a novel system for photothermally ablating specific cells from three-dimensional mammospheres. A CD44-positive subpopulation, with tumorigenic and self-renewal potential, spontaneously arises in MCF7 breast cancer cell-engineered mammospheres. Using anti-CD44 antibody-linked gold nanorods, which strongly absorb near infrared light and increase local temperature, we effectively targeted and photo-ablated atypical cells. This biomarker-specific photothermal ablation model, using a smart nanoplatform, is a promising new strategy for selectively killing cancer cells, while sparing normal tissues.

  14. Critical role of zinc finger protein 521 in the control of growth, clonogenicity and tumorigenic potential of medulloblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Iaccino, Enrico; Scicchitano, Stefania; Lupia, Michela; Chiarella, Emanuela; Mega, Tiziana; Bernaudo, Francesca; Pelaggi, Daniela; Mesuraca, Maria; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Semenkow, Samantha; Bar, Eli E.; Kool, Marcel; Pfister, Stefan; Bond, Heather M.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Steinkühler, Christian; Morrone, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The stem cell-associated transcription co-factor ZNF521 has been implicated in the control of hematopoietic, osteo-adipogenic and neural progenitor cells. ZNF521 is highly expressed in cerebellum and in particular in the neonatal external granule layer that contains candidate medulloblastoma cells-of-origin, and in the majority of human medulloblastomas. Here we have explored its involvement in the control of human and murine medulloblastoma cells. The effect of ZNF521 on growth and tumorigenic potential of human medulloblastoma cell lines as well as primary Ptc1−/+ mouse medulloblastoma cells was investigated in a variety of in vitro and in vivo assays, by modulating its expression using lentiviral vectors carrying the ZNF521 cDNA, or shRNAs that silence its expression. Enforced overexpression of ZNF521 in DAOY medulloblastoma cells significantly increased their proliferation, growth as spheroids and ability to generate clones in single-cell cultures and semisolid media, and enhanced their migratory ability in wound-healing assays. Importantly, ZNF521-expressing cells displayed a greatly enhanced tumorigenic potential in nude mice. All these activities required the ZNF521 N-terminal motif that recruits the nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase complex, which might therefore represent an appealing therapeutic target. Conversely, silencing of ZNF521 in human UW228 medulloblastoma cells that display high baseline expression decreased their proliferation, clonogenicity, sphere formation and wound-healing ability. Similarly, Zfp521 silencing in mouse Ptc1−/+ medulloblastoma cells drastically reduced their growth and tumorigenic potential. Our data strongly support the notion that ZNF521, through the recruitment of the NuRD complex, contributes to the clonogenic growth, migration and tumorigenicity of medulloblastoma cells. PMID:23907569

  15. Established breast cancer stem cell markers do not correlate with in vivo tumorigenicity of tumor-initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Christian; Jobs, Gabriele; Thomas, Markus; Burtscher, Helmut; Kubbies, Manfred

    2012-12-01

    The tumor-initiating capacity of primary human breast cancer cells is maintained in vitro by culturing these cells as spheres/aggregates. Inoculation of small cell numbers derived from these non-adherent cultures leads to rapid xenograft tumor formation in mice. Accordingly, injection of more differentiated monolayer cells derived from spheres results in significantly decelerated tumor growth. For our study, two breast cancer cell lines were generated from primary tumors and cultured as mammospheres or as their adherent counterparts. We examined the in vivo tumorigenicity of these cells by injecting serial dilutions into immunodeficient mice. Inoculation of 106 cells per mouse led to rapid tumor formation, irrespective of cell line or culture conditions. However, after injection of only 103 cells, solely sphere cells were highly tumorigenic. In vitro, we investigated differentiation markers, established breast CSC markers and conducted mRNA profiling. Cytokeratin 5 and 18 were increased in both monolayer cell types, indicating a more differentiated phenotype. All cell lines were CD24(-)/CD44(+) and did not express CD133, CD326 or E-cadherin. ALDH1 activity was not detectable in any cell line. A verapamil‑sensitive Hoechst side population was present in sphere cells, but there was no correlation with tumorigenicity in vivo. mRNA profiling did not reveal upregulation of relevant transcription factors. In vitro cell cycle kinetics and in vivo tumor doubling times displayed no difference between sphere and monolayer cultures. Our data indicate that intrinsic genetic and functional markers investigated are not indicative of the in vivo tumori-genicity of putative breast tumor-initiating cells.

  16. Prospective identification of tumorigenic osteosarcoma cancer stem cells in OS99-1 cells based on high aldehyde dehydrogenase activity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Park, Paul; Zhang, Huina; La Marca, Frank; Lin, Chia-Ying

    2011-01-15

    High aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity has recently been used to identify tumorigenic cell fractions in many cancer types. Herein we hypothesized that a subpopulation of cells with cancer stem cells (CSCs) properties could be identified in established human osteosarcoma cell lines based on high ALDH activity. We previously showed that a subpopulation of cells with high ALDH activity were present in 4 selected human osteosarcoma cell lines, of which a significantly higher ALDH activity was present in the OS99-1 cell line that was originally derived from a highly aggressive primary human osteosarcoma. Using a xenograft model in which OS99-1 cells were grown in NOD/SCID mice, we identified a highly tumorigenic subpopulation of osteosarcoma cells based on their high ALDH activity. Cells with high ALDH activity (ALDH(br) cells) from the OS99-1 xenografts were much less frequent, averaging 3% of the entire tumor population, compared to those isolated directly from the OS99-1 cell line. ALDH(br) cells from the xenograft were enriched with greater tumorigenicity compared to their counterparts with low ALDH activity (ALDH(lo) cells), generating new tumors with as few as 100 cells in vivo. The highly tumorigenic ALDH(br) cells illustrated the stem cell characteristics of self-renewal, the ability to produce differentiated progeny and increased expression of stem cell marker genes OCT3/4A, Nanog and Sox-2. The isolation of osteosarcoma CSCs by their high ALDH activity may provide new insight into the study of osteosarcoma-initiating cells and may potentially have therapeutic implications for human osteosarcoma.

  17. Neural Stem Cell Tumorigenicity and Biodistribution Assessment for Phase I Clinical Trial in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Garitaonandia, Ibon; Gonzalez, Rodolfo; Christiansen-Weber, Trudy; Abramihina, Tatiana; Poustovoitov, Maxim; Noskov, Alexander; Sherman, Glenn; Semechkin, Andrey; Snyder, Evan; Kern, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (PSC) have the potential to revolutionize regenerative medicine. However undifferentiated PSC can form tumors and strict quality control measures and safety studies must be conducted before clinical translation. Here we describe preclinical tumorigenicity and biodistribution safety studies that were required by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) prior to conducting a Phase I clinical trial evaluating the safety and tolerability of human parthenogenetic stem cell derived neural stem cells ISC-hpNSC for treating Parkinson’s disease (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT02452723). To mitigate the risk of having residual PSC in the final ISC-hpNSC population, we conducted sensitive in vitro assays using flow cytometry and qRT-PCR analyses and in vivo assays to determine acute toxicity, tumorigenicity and biodistribution. The results from these safety studies show the lack of residual undifferentiated PSC, negligible tumorigenic potential by ISC-hpNSC and provide additional assurance to their clinical application. PMID:27686862

  18. Ubiquitin-specific protease 28 is overexpressed in human glioblastomas and contributes to glioma tumorigenicity by regulating MYC expression

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zengwu; Song, Qimin; Xue, Jian; Zhao, Yumei

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor MYC, which is dysregulated in the majority of gliomas, is difficult to target directly. Deubiquitinase ubiquitin-specific protease 28 (USP28) stabilizes oncogenic factors, including MYC. However, the contribution of USP28 in tumorigenesis, particularly in glioma, is unknown. Here, we determined the expression of USP28 and assessed its clinical significance in human glioma. We found that USP28 is overexpressed in human glioma but not in normal brain tissue. The level of USP28 protein expression in human glioma tissues was directly correlated with glioma grade. Meanwhile, the level of USP28 protein expression in human glioblastoma tissues was inversely correlated with patient survival. Enforced USP28 expression promotes SW1783 glioma cell proliferation. Moreover, gliomas that arose from USP28-transfected SW1783 cells displayed tumorigenicity in nude mouse model systems. Inhibition of USP28 expression in glioblastoma U373 cells suppressed anchorage-independent growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Furthermore, USP28 regulates the expression of MYC protein, which is essential in USP28-induced cell growth in glioma cells. These results showed that USP28 is overexpressed in human glioblastomas and it contributes to glioma tumorigenicity. Therefore, USP28 could be a new target of therapy for human malignant glioma. PMID:26209720

  19. Antagonistic Cross-Regulation between Sox9 and Sox10 Controls an Anti-tumorigenic Program in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Shakhova, Olga; Cheng, Phil; Mishra, Pravin J.; Zingg, Daniel; Schaefer, Simon M.; Debbache, Julien; Häusel, Jessica; Matter, Claudia; Guo, Theresa; Davis, Sean; Meltzer, Paul; Mihic-Probst, Daniela; Moch, Holger; Wegner, Michael; Merlino, Glenn; Levesque, Mitchell P.; Dummer, Reinhard; Santoro, Raffaella; Cinelli, Paolo; Sommer, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is the most fatal skin cancer, but the etiology of this devastating disease is still poorly understood. Recently, the transcription factor Sox10 has been shown to promote both melanoma initiation and progression. Reducing SOX10 expression levels in human melanoma cells and in a genetic melanoma mouse model, efficiently abolishes tumorigenesis by inducing cell cycle exit and apoptosis. Here, we show that this anti-tumorigenic effect functionally involves SOX9, a factor related to SOX10 and upregulated in melanoma cells upon loss of SOX10. Unlike SOX10, SOX9 is not required for normal melanocyte stem cell function, the formation of hyperplastic lesions, and melanoma initiation. To the contrary, SOX9 overexpression results in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and a gene expression profile shared by melanoma cells with reduced SOX10 expression. Moreover, SOX9 binds to the SOX10 promoter and induces downregulation of SOX10 expression, revealing a feedback loop reinforcing the SOX10 low/SOX9 high ant,m/ii-tumorigenic program. Finally, SOX9 is required in vitro and in vivo for the anti-tumorigenic effect achieved by reducing SOX10 expression. Thus, SOX10 and SOX9 are functionally antagonistic regulators of melanoma development. PMID:25629959

  20. Human skin fibroblast stromelysin: structure, glycosylation, substrate specificity, and differential expression in normal and tumorigenic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wilhelm, S.M.; Collier, I.E.; Kronberger, A.; Eisen, A.Z.; Marmer, B.L.; Grant, G.A.; Bauer, E.A.; Goldberg, G.I.

    1987-10-01

    The authors have purified and determined the complete primary structure of human stromelysin, a secreted metalloprotease with a wide range of substrate specificities. Human stromelysin is synthesized in a preproenzyme form with a calculated size of 53,977 Da and a 17-amino acid long signal peptide. Prostromelysin is secreted in two forms, with apparent molecular masses on NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE of 60 and 57 kDa. Human stromelysin is capable of degrading proteoglycan, fibronectin, laminin, and type IV collagen but not interstitial type I collagen. The enzyme is not capable of activating purified human fibroblast procollagenase. Analysis of its primary structure shows that stromelysin is in all likelihood the human analog of rat transin, which is an oncogene transformation-induced protease. The pattern of enzyme expression in normal and tumorigenic cells revealed that human skin fibroblasts in vitro secrete stromelysin constitutively. Human fetal lung fibroblasts transformed with simian virus 40, human bronchial epithelial cells transformed with the ras oncogene, fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080), and a melanoma cell strain (A 2058), do not express this protease nor can the enzyme be induced in these cells by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. The data indicate that the expression and the possible involvement of secreted metalloproteases in tumorigenesis result from a specific interaction between the transforming factor and the target cell, which may vary in different species.

  1. Knockdown of Pentraxin 3 suppresses tumorigenicity and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Chiou, Hui-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chu-Liang; Hung, Chia-Hung; Tsai, Jen-Pi; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) as an inflammatory molecule has been shown to be involved in immune response, inflammation, and cancer. However, the effects of PTX3 on the biological features of cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo have not been delineated. Immunohistochemical staining showed that increased PTX3 expression was significantly associated with tumor grade (P < 0.011) and differentiation (P < 0.019). Knocking down PTX3 with lentivirus-mediated small hairpin RNA (shRNA) in cervical cancer cell lines resulted in inhibited cell viability, diminished colony-forming ability, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, along with downregulated expression of cyclin B1, cdc2, and cdc25c, and upregulated expression of p-cdc2, p-cdc25c, p21, and p27. Furthermore, knockdown of PTX3 significantly decreased the potential of migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells by inhibiting matrix metalloproteidase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Moreover, in vivo functional studies showed PTX3-knockdown in mice suppressed tumorigenicity and lung metastatic potential. Conversely, overexpression of PTX3 enhanced proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PTX3 contributes to tumorigenesis and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells. Further studies are warranted to demonstrate PTX3 as a novel therapeutic biomarker for human cervical cancer. PMID:27377307

  2. Alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells correlate with metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Willey, J. C.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    The cellular and molecular mechanisms of radiation-induced lung cancer are not known. In the present study, alterations of p53 in tumorigenic human papillomavirus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by a single low dose of either alpha-particles or 1 GeV/nucleon (56)Fe were analyzed by PCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP) coupled with sequencing analysis and immunoprecipitation assay. A total of nine primary and four secondary tumor cell lines, three of which were metastatic, together with the parental BEP2D and primary human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells were studied. The immunoprecipitation assay showed overexpression of mutant p53 proteins in all the tumor lines but not in NHBE and BEP2D cells. PCR-SSCP and sequencing analysis found band shifts and gene mutations in all four of the secondary tumors. A G-->T transversion in codon 139 in exon 5 that replaced Lys with Asn was detected in two tumor lines. One mutation each, involving a G-->T transversion in codon 215 in exon 6 (Ser-->lle) and a G-->A transition in codon 373 in exon 8 (Arg-->His), was identified in the remaining two secondary tumors. These results suggest that p53 alterations correlate with tumorigenesis in the BEP2D cell model and that mutations in the p53 gene may be indicative of metastatic potential.

  3. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells

    PubMed Central

    Waghmare, Indrayani

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib) belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib-) surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells. PMID:27327956

  4. Suppression of laminin-5 expression leads to increased motility, tumorigenicity, and invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen Hengwai; Ziober, Amy F.; Gopal, Pallavi; Nasrallah, Ilya; Falls, Erica M.; Meneguzzi, Guerrino; Ang, Hwee-Quan; Ziober, Barry L. . E-mail: bziober@mail.med.upenn.edu

    2005-09-10

    Laminin-5 (Ln-5) is expressed in several human carcinomas and hypothesized to contribute to tumor invasion. To understand the role of Ln-5 in human cancers, we stably delivered small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) directed against the Ln-5 {gamma}2 chain into JHU-022-SCC cells (022), a non-invasive oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell line which secretes Ln-5. Lysates from {gamma}2 siRNA cells (022-si{gamma}2) had nearly undetectable levels of the {gamma}2 chain while the {alpha}3 and {beta}3 subunits of Ln-5 remained unchanged compared to parental and control. In conditioned medium from 022-si{gamma}2 cells, the {gamma}2 chain and the Ln-5 heterotrimer were barely detectable, similar to an invasive OSCC cell line. Conditioned medium from 022-si{gamma}2 cells contained less {alpha}3 and {beta}3 subunits than both parental and control. Although the proliferation and adhesive properties of the 022-si{gamma}2 cells remained similar to parental and control cells, 022-si{gamma}2 cells showed increased detachment and a fibroblastic morphology similar to invasive cells. Moreover, migration, in vitro invasion, and in vivo tumorigenicity were enhanced in 022-si{gamma}2 cells. Our results suggest that the Ln-5 {gamma}2 chain regulates the secretion of the {alpha}3 and {beta}3 subunits. More importantly, suppression of Ln-5 results in a phenotype that is representative of invasive tumor cells.

  5. Tumorigenicity and genetic profiling of circulating tumor cells in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hodgkinson, Cassandra L; Morrow, Christopher J; Li, Yaoyong; Metcalf, Robert L; Rothwell, Dominic G; Trapani, Francesca; Polanski, Radoslaw; Burt, Deborah J; Simpson, Kathryn L; Morris, Karen; Pepper, Stuart D; Nonaka, Daisuke; Greystoke, Alastair; Kelly, Paul; Bola, Becky; Krebs, Matthew G; Antonello, Jenny; Ayub, Mahmood; Faulkner, Suzanne; Priest, Lynsey; Carter, Louise; Tate, Catriona; Miller, Crispin J; Blackhall, Fiona; Brady, Ged; Dive, Caroline

    2014-08-01

    Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor with early dissemination and dismal prognosis, accounts for 15-20% of lung cancer cases and ∼200,000 deaths each year. Most cases are inoperable, and biopsies to investigate SCLC biology are rarely obtainable. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs), which are prevalent in SCLC, present a readily accessible 'liquid biopsy'. Here we show that CTCs from patients with either chemosensitive or chemorefractory SCLC are tumorigenic in immune-compromised mice, and the resultant CTC-derived explants (CDXs) mirror the donor patient's response to platinum and etoposide chemotherapy. Genomic analysis of isolated CTCs revealed considerable similarity to the corresponding CDX. Most marked differences were observed between CDXs from patients with different clinical outcomes. These data demonstrate that CTC molecular analysis via serial blood sampling could facilitate delivery of personalized medicine for SCLC. CDXs are readily passaged, and these unique mouse models provide tractable systems for therapy testing and understanding drug resistance mechanisms. PMID:24880617

  6. Experimental hepatic tumorigenicity by environmental hydrocarbon dibenzo[a,l]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Reddy, A P; Spitsbergen, J M; Mathews, C; Hendricks, J D; Bailey, G S

    1999-01-01

    There is an evident need of low-cost vertebrates to be used in experimental carcinogenesis. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) provide a useful vertebrate model system for investigating tissue tropism of carcinogens and the action mechanisms of environmental contaminants posing a potential risk to human health. Juvenile medaka 2 months of age fed diets containing 100 ppm (dry weight basis) dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DBP) for 28 days responded with hepatic neoplasia predominately of hepatocellular origin. When sampled 9 months following the termination of carcinogen exposure, medaka showed 26% incidence of neoplasia and 25% hepatic neoplasia, compared with 8% total neoplasia and 0% hepatic neoplasia in control fish. The predominant spontaneous neoplasms in this group of medaka were ovarian germ cell tumors. Hepatic neoplasia occurred at a higher incidence in female DBP-treated medaka than in males (11/29 vs 5/36). Nonneoplastic lesions observed in the livers of DBP-exposed fish included spongiosis hepatis, globular hyaline eosinophilic cytoplasmic inclusions in hepatocytes, foci of hepatocellular degeneration, extensive cytomegaly, and karyomegaly of hepatocytes. No activating exon I mutations in the one ras protooncogene examined were detected among six liver neoplasms. These results indicate that medaka are sensitive to the tumorigenic effects of the environmental carcinogen DBP, administered by dietary exposure.

  7. K-Ras Promotes Tumorigenicity through Suppression of Non-canonical Wnt Signaling.

    PubMed

    Wang, Man-Tzu; Holderfield, Matthew; Galeas, Jacqueline; Delrosario, Reyno; To, Minh D; Balmain, Allan; McCormick, Frank

    2015-11-19

    K-Ras and H-Ras share identical effectors and have similar properties; however, the high degree of tumor-type specificity associated with K-Ras and H-Ras mutations suggests that they have unique roles in oncogenesis. Here, we report that oncogenic K-Ras, but not H-Ras, suppresses non-canonical Wnt/Ca(2+) signaling, an effect that contributes strongly to its tumorigenic properties. K-Ras does this by binding to calmodulin and so reducing CaMKii activity and expression of Fzd8. Restoring Fzd8 in K-Ras mutant pancreatic cells suppresses malignancy, whereas depletion of Fzd8 in H-Ras(V12)-transformed cells enhances their tumor initiating capacity. Interrupting K-Ras-calmodulin binding using genetic means or by treatment with an orally active protein kinase C (PKC)-activator, prostratin, represses tumorigenesis in K-Ras mutant pancreatic cancer cells. These findings provide an alternative way to selectively target this "undruggable" protein.

  8. Knockdown of Pentraxin 3 suppresses tumorigenicity and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ying, Tsung-Ho; Lee, Chien-Hsing; Chiou, Hui-Ling; Yang, Shun-Fa; Lin, Chu-Liang; Hung, Chia-Hung; Tsai, Jen-Pi; Hsieh, Yi-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) as an inflammatory molecule has been shown to be involved in immune response, inflammation, and cancer. However, the effects of PTX3 on the biological features of cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo have not been delineated. Immunohistochemical staining showed that increased PTX3 expression was significantly associated with tumor grade (P < 0.011) and differentiation (P < 0.019). Knocking down PTX3 with lentivirus-mediated small hairpin RNA (shRNA) in cervical cancer cell lines resulted in inhibited cell viability, diminished colony-forming ability, and induced cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase of the cell cycle, along with downregulated expression of cyclin B1, cdc2, and cdc25c, and upregulated expression of p-cdc2, p-cdc25c, p21, and p27. Furthermore, knockdown of PTX3 significantly decreased the potential of migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells by inhibiting matrix metalloproteidase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, and urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). Moreover, in vivo functional studies showed PTX3-knockdown in mice suppressed tumorigenicity and lung metastatic potential. Conversely, overexpression of PTX3 enhanced proliferation and invasion both in vitro and in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PTX3 contributes to tumorigenesis and metastasis of human cervical cancer cells. Further studies are warranted to demonstrate PTX3 as a novel therapeutic biomarker for human cervical cancer.

  9. Phenotypic differentiation does not affect tumorigenicity of primary human colon cancer initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Dubash, Taronish D; Hoffmann, Christopher M; Oppel, Felix; Giessler, Klara M; Weber, Sarah; Dieter, Sebastian M; Hüllein, Jennifer; Zenz, Thorsten; Herbst, Friederike; Scholl, Claudia; Weichert, Wilko; Werft, Wiebke; Benner, Axel; Schmidt, Manfred; Schneider, Martin; Glimm, Hanno; Ball, Claudia R

    2016-02-28

    Within primary colorectal cancer (CRC) a subfraction of all tumor-initiating cells (TIC) drives long-term progression in serial xenotransplantation. It has been postulated that efficient maintenance of TIC activity in vitro requires serum-free spheroid culture conditions that support a stem-like state of CRC cells. To address whether tumorigenicity is indeed tightly linked to such a stem-like state in spheroids, we transferred TIC-enriched spheroid cultures to serum-containing adherent conditions that should favor their differentiation. Under these conditions, primary CRC cells did no longer grow as spheroids but formed an adherent cell layer, up-regulated colon epithelial differentiation markers, and down-regulated TIC-associated markers. Strikingly, upon xenotransplantation cells cultured under either condition equally efficient formed serially transplantable tumors. Clonal analyses of individual lentivirally marked TIC clones cultured under either culture condition revealed no systematic differences in contributing clone numbers, indicating that phenotypic differentiation does not select for few individual clones adapted to unfavorable culture conditions. Our results reveal that CRC TIC can be propagated under conditions previously thought to induce their elimination. This phenotypic plasticity allows addressing primary human CRC TIC properties in experimental settings based on adherent cell growth.

  10. Suppression of Glioblastoma Angiogenicity and Tumorigenicity by Inhibition of Endogenous Expression of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shi-Yuan; Huang, H.-J. Su; Nagane, Motoo; Ji, Xiang-Dong; Wang, Degui; Shih, Charles C.-Y.; Arap, Wadih; Huang, Chun-Ming; Cavenee, Webster K.

    1996-08-01

    The development of new capillary networks from the normal microvasculature of the host appears to be required for growth of solid tumors. Tumor cells influence this process by producing both inhibitors and positive effectors of angiogenesis. Among the latter, the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has assumed prime candidacy as a major positive physiological effector. Here, we have directly tested this hypothesis in the brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme, one of the most highly vascularized human cancers. We introduced an antisense VEGF expression construct into glioblastoma cells and found that (i) VEGF mRNA and protein levels were markedly reduced, (ii) the modified cells did not secrete sufficient factors so as to be chemoattractive for primary human microvascular endothelial cells, (iii) the modified cells were not able to sustain tumor growth in immunodeficient animals, and (iv) the density of in vivo blood vessel formation was reduced in direct relation to the reduction of VEGF secretion and tumor formation. Moreover, revertant cells that recovered the ability to secrete VEGF regained each of these tumorigenic properties. These results suggest that VEGF plays a major angiogenic role in glioblastoma.

  11. Chemical and toxicological characterization of residential oil burner emissions: II. Mutagenic, tumorigenic, and potential teratogenic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, A G; Busby, W F; Liber, H L; Thilly, W G

    1987-01-01

    Extracts of effluents from a modern residential oil burner have been evaluated in several toxicological assay systems. Bacterial mutagens were detected in extracts from both the particulate and vapor phase emissions. Effluents from continuous operation were an order of magnitude less mutagenic than those from cyclic (5 min on, 10 min off) operations. No difference in the yield of bacterial mutagens per gram of fuel burned was found between cyclic operation under low and moderate sooting conditions. On the basis of elution behavior from alumina it appeared that the bacterial mutagens collected from high sooting effluents were more polar than those from low sooting effluent. An extract that was mutagenic in bacteria did not induce a significant increase in mutation frequency to human lymphoblasts. No evidence of tumorigenicity was observed in a limited number of newborn mice after IP injection of effluent extract when compared to historical control data. Putative nonmutagenic teratogens were detected in effluent using an attachment inhibition assay. The level of these agents was reduced in effluents from continuous oil burner operation. PMID:3665866

  12. Exhibitions: Facing Outward, Pointing Inward

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    The Coalition of Essential Schools (CES) Exhibitions Project of the early 1990s produced a range of work that continues to inform the practice of using exhibitions as a "360 degree" method of transforming teaching and learning, community connections, school design, and assessment. Among that work was this paper coupling the origins of exhibitions…

  13. Eugenia jambolana Lam. Berry Extract Inhibits Growth and Induces Apoptosis of Human Breast Cancer but not Non-Tumorigenic Breast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liya; Adams, Lynn S.; Chen, Shiuan; Killian, Caroline; Ahmed, Aftab; Seeram, Navindra P.

    2009-01-01

    The ripe purple berries of the native Indian plant, Eugenia jambolana Lam., known as Jamun, are popularly consumed and available in the United States in Florida and Hawaii. Despite the growing body of data on the chemopreventive potential of edible berry extracts, there is paucity of such data for Jamun fruit. Therefore our laboratory initiated the current study with the following objectives:1) to prepare a standardized Jamun fruit extract (JFE) for biological studies and, 2) to investigate the anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects of JFE in estrogen dependent/aromatase positive (MCF-7aro), and estrogen independent (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cells, and in a normal/non-tumorigenic (MCF-10A) breast cell line. JFE was standardized to anthocyanin content using the pH differential method, and individual anthocyanins were identified by high performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet (HPLC-UV) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) methods. JFE contained 3.5% anthocyanins (as cyanidin-3-glucoside equivalents) which occur as diglucosides of five anthocyanidins/aglycons: delphinidin, cyanidin, petunidin, peonidin and malvidin. In the proliferation assay, JFE was most effective against MCF-7aro (IC50=27 µg/mL), followed by MDA-MB-231 (IC50=40 µg/mL) breast cancer cells. Importantly, JFE exhibited only mild antiproliferative effects against the normal MCF-10A (IC50>100 µg/mL) breast cells. Similarly, JFE (at 200 µg/mL) exhibited pro-apoptotic effects against the MCF-7aro (p≤0.05) and the MDA-MB-231 (p≤0.01) breast cancer cells, but not towards the normal MCF-10A breast cells. These studies suggest that JFE may have potential beneficial effects against breast cancer. PMID:19166352

  14. Role of mitogen activated protein kinases in skin tumorigenicity of Patulin

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Neha; Ansari, Kausar M.; Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhari, Bhushan P.; Dwivedi, Premendra D.; Das, Mukul

    2011-12-15

    WHO has highlighted the need to evaluate dermal toxicity of mycotoxins including Patulin (PAT), detected in several fruits. In this study the skin carcinogenic potential of topically applied PAT was investigated. Single topical application of PAT (400 nmol) showed enhanced cell proliferation ({approx} 2 fold), along with increased generation of ROS and activation of ERK, p38 and JNK MAPKs, in mouse skin. PAT exposure also showed activation of downstream target proteins, c-fos, c-Jun and NF-{kappa}B transcription factors. Further, single topical application of PAT (400 nmol) followed by twice weekly application of TPA resulted in tumor formation after 14 weeks, indicating the tumor initiating activity of PAT. However no tumors were observed when PAT was used either as a complete carcinogen (80 nmol) or as a tumor promoter (20 nmol and 40 nmol) for 25 weeks. Histopathological findings of tumors found in PAT/TPA treated mice showed that these tumors were of squamous cell carcinoma type and similar to those found in the positive control group (DMBA/TPA) along with significant increase of lipid peroxidation and decrease in free sulfydryls, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase activities. The results suggest the possible role of free radicals in PAT mediated dermal tumorigenicity involving MAPKs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single topical application of Patulin showed enhanced cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Patulin activate MAPKs, c-fos, c-Jun and NF-{kappa}B transcription factors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Patulin showed skin tumor initiating potential. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We could not detect skin tumor promoting potential of Patulin at the tested dose. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer However prolonged exposure of Patulin at a higher dose may promote tumor.

  15. Transformation of human osteoblast cells to the tumorigenic phenotype by depleted uranium-uranyl chloride.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A C; Blakely, W F; Livengood, D; Whittaker, T; Xu, J; Ejnik, J W; Hamilton, M M; Parlette, E; John, T S; Gerstenberg, H M; Hsu, H

    1998-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is a dense heavy metal used primarily in military applications. Although the health effects of occupational uranium exposure are well known, limited data exist regarding the long-term health effects of internalized DU in humans. We established an in vitro cellular model to study DU exposure. Microdosimetric assessment, determined using a Monte Carlo computer simulation based on measured intracellular and extracellular uranium levels, showed that few (0.0014%) cell nuclei were hit by alpha particles. We report the ability of DU-uranyl chloride to transform immortalized human osteoblastic cells (HOS) to the tumorigenic phenotype. DU-uranyl chloride-transformants are characterized by anchorage-independent growth, tumor formation in nude mice, expression of high levels of the k-ras oncogene, reduced production of the Rb tumor-suppressor protein, and elevated levels of sister chromatid exchanges per cell. DU-uranyl chloride treatment resulted in a 9.6 (+/- 2.8)-fold increase in transformation frequency compared to untreated cells. In comparison, nickel sulfate resulted in a 7.1 (+/- 2.1)-fold increase in transformation frequency. This is the first report showing that a DU compound caused human cell transformation to the neoplastic phenotype. Although additional studies are needed to determine if protracted DU exposure produces tumors in vivo, the implication from these in vitro results is that the risk of cancer induction from internalized DU exposure may be comparable to other biologically reactive and carcinogenic heavy-metal compounds (e.g., nickel). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:9681973

  16. Tumorigenic development of induced pluripotent stem cells in ischemic mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Toru; Kawai, Hiromi; Tian, Fengfeng; Ohta, Yasuyuki; Abe, Koji

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may provide cures for various neurological diseases. However, undifferentiated iPS cells have high tumorigenicity, and evaluation of the cells fates, especially in pathologic condition model, is needed. In this study, we demonstrated the effect of ischemic condition to undifferentiated iPS cells fates in a mouse model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). Undifferentiated iPS cells were characterized with immunofluorescent staining. The iPS cells (5 × 10⁵) were injected into ipsilateral striatum and cortex after 24 h of MCAO. Histological analysis was performed from 3 to 28 days after cell transplantation. iPS cells in ischemic brain formed teratoma with higher probability (p < 0.05) and larger volume (p < 0.01) compared with those in intact brain. Among the four transcriptional factors to produce iPS cells, c-Myc, Oct3/4, and Sox2 strongly expressed in iPS-derived tumors in ischemic brain (p < 0.01). Additionally, expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and phosphorylated vascular endothelial growth factor receptor2 (phospho-VEGFR2) were significantly increased in iPS-derived tumors in the ischemic brain (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the transcriptional factors might increase expression of MMP-9 and activate VEGFR2, promoting teratoma formation in the ischemic brain. We strongly propose that the safety of iPS cells should be evaluated not only in normal condition, but also in a pathologic, disease model.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA Polymerase POLG1 Disease Mutations and Germline Variants Promote Tumorigenic Properties.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupendra; Owens, Kjerstin M; Bajpai, Prachi; Desouki, Mohamed Mokhtar; Srinivasasainagendra, Vinodh; Tiwari, Hemant K; Singh, Keshav K

    2015-01-01

    Germline mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLG1) induce mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, depletion, and decrease oxidative phosphorylation. Earlier, we identified somatic mutations in POLG1 and the contribution of these mutations in human cancer. However, a role for germline variations in POLG1 in human cancers is unknown. In this study, we examined a role for disease associated germline variants of POLG1, POLG1 gene expression, copy number variation and regulation in human cancers. We analyzed the mutations, expression and copy number variation in POLG1 in several cancer databases and validated the analyses in primary breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines. We discovered 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine led epigenetic regulation of POLG1, mtDNA-encoded genes and increased mitochondrial respiration. We conducted comprehensive race based bioinformatics analyses of POLG1 gene in more than 33,000 European-Americans and 5,000 African-Americans. We identified a mitochondrial disease causing missense variation in polymerase domain of POLG1 protein at amino acid 1143 (E1143G) to be 25 times more prevalent in European-Americans (allele frequency 0.03777) when compared to African-American (allele frequency 0.00151) population. We identified T251I and P587L missense variations in exonuclease and linker region of POLG1 also to be more prevalent in European-Americans. Expression of these variants increased glucose consumption, decreased ATP production and increased matrigel invasion. Interestingly, conditional expression of these variants revealed that matrigel invasion properties conferred by these germline variants were reversible suggesting a role of epigenetic regulators. Indeed, we identified a set of miRNA whose expression was reversible after variant expression was turned off. Together, our studies demonstrate altered genetic and epigenetic regulation of POLG1 in human cancers and suggest a role for POLG1 germline variants in promoting tumorigenic

  18. A mutant epidermal growth factor receptor common in human glioma confers enhanced tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, R; Ji, X D; Harmon, R C; Lazar, C S; Gill, G N; Cavenee, W K; Huang, H J

    1994-01-01

    The development and neoplastic progression of human astrocytic tumors appears to result through an accumulation of genetic alterations occurring in a relatively defined order. One such alteration is amplification of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. This episomal amplification occurs in 40-50% of glioblastomas, which also normally express endogenous receptors. Moreover, a significant fraction of amplified genes are rearranged to specifically eliminate a DNA fragment containing exons 2-7 of the gene, resulting in an in-frame deletion of 801 bp of the coding sequence of the extracellular domain. Here we used retroviral transfer of such a mutant receptor (de 2-7 EGFR) into glioblastoma cells expressing normal endogenous receptors to test whether the mutant receptor was able to augment their growth and malignancy. Western blotting analysis showed that these cells expressed endogenous EGFR of 170 kDa as well as the exogenous de 2-7 EGFR of 140-155 kDa. Although holo-EGFRs were phosphorylated on tyrosine residues only after exposure of the cells to ligand, de 2-7 EGFRs were constitutively phosphorylated. In tissue culture neither addition of EGF nor expression of the mutant EGFR affected the rate of cell growth. However, when cells expressing mutant EGFR were implanted into nude mice subcutaneously or intracerebrally, tumorigenic capacity was greatly enhanced. These results suggest that a tumor-specific alteration of the EGFR plays a significant role in tumor progression perhaps by influencing interactions of tumor cells with their microenvironment in ways not easily assayed in vitro. Images PMID:8052651

  19. Loss of HSulf-1 expression enhances tumorigenicity by inhibiting Bim expression in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaoping; Khurana, Ashwani; Roy, Debarshi; Kaufmann, Scott; Shridhar, Viji

    2014-10-15

    The expression of human Sulfatase1 (HSulf-1) is downregulated in the majority of primary ovarian cancer tumors, but the functional consequence of this downregulation remains unclear. Using two different shRNAs (Sh1 and Sh2), HSulf-1 expression was stably downregulated in ovarian cancer OV202 cells. We found that HSulf-1-deficient OV202 Sh1 and Sh2 cells formed colonies in soft agar. In contrast, nontargeting control (NTC) shRNA-transduced OV202 cells did not form any colonies. Moreover, subcutaneous injection of OV202 HSulf-1-deficient cells resulted in tumor formation in nude mice, whereas OV202 NTC cells did not. Also, ectopic expression of HSulf-1 in ovarian cancer SKOV3 cells significantly suppressed tumor growth in nude mice. Here, we show that HSulf-1-deficient OV202 cells have markedly decreased expression of proapoptotic Bim protein, which can be rescued by restoring HSulf-1 expression in OV202 Sh1 cells. Enhanced expression of HSulf-1 in HSulf-1-deficient SKOV3 cells resulted in increased Bim expression. Decreased Bim levels after loss of HSulf-1 were due to increased p-ERK, because inhibition of ERK activity with PD98059 resulted in increased Bim expression. However, treatment with a PI3 kinase/AKT inhibitor, LY294002, failed to show any change in Bim protein level. Importantly, rescuing Bim expression in HSulf-1 knockdown cells significantly retarded tumor growth in nude mice. Collectively, these results suggest that loss of HSulf-1 expression promotes tumorigenicity in ovarian cancer through regulating Bim expression.

  20. Against the Odds Exhibition Opens

    MedlinePlus

    ... LA and Vox Populi organizations. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson At the exhibition, HIV and AIDS were topics addressed by Dr. Victoria Cargill (right), Director of Clinical Studies and Director of Minority ...

  1. Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, W.H.; Caesar, S.

    1992-09-01

    The Franklin Institute Science Museum provided an exhibit entitled the Greenhouse Earth: A Traveling Exhibition. This 3500 square-foot exhibit on global climate change was developed in collaboration with the Association of Science-Technology Centers. The exhibit opened at The Franklin Institute on February 14, 1992, welcoming 291,000 visitors over its three-month stay. During its three-year tour, Greenhouse Earth will travel to ten US cities, reaching two million visitors. Greenhouse Earth aims to deepen public understanding of the scientific issues of global warming and the conservation measures that can be taken to slow its effects. The exhibit features hands-on exhibitry, interactive computer programs and videos, a theater production, a demonstration cart,'' guided tours, and lectures. supplemental educational programs at the Institute included a teachers preview, a symposium on climate change, and a satellite field trip.'' The development of Greenhouse Earth included front-end and formative evaluation procedures. Evaluation includes interviews with visitors, prototypes, and summative surveys for participating museums. During its stay in Philadelphia, Greenhouse Earth was covered by the local and national press, with reviews in print and broadcast media. Greenhouse Earth is the first large-scale museum exhibit to address global climate change.

  2. Differential response of nontumorigenic and tumorigenic human papillomavirus type 16-positive epithelial cells to transforming growth factor beta 1.

    PubMed

    Braun, L; Dürst, M; Mikumo, R; Gruppuso, P

    1990-11-15

    The transforming growth factor (TGF) beta s are multifunctional polypeptide growth factors with diverse biological effects, including inhibition of epithelial cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo. To investigate the possible role of TGF beta 1 in the regulation of papillomavirus infection and papillomavirus-associated transformation, we compared the response to TGF beta 1 of normal keratinocytes, human papillomavirus, type 16 (HPV 16)-positive-immortalized keratinocytes (nontumorigenic), and HPV 16-positive cervical carcinoma cells (tumorigenic) with respect to DNA synthesis and protooncogene expression. All HPV 16-immortalized cell lines were nearly as inhibited by TGF beta 1 as normal keratinocytes, whereas two cervical carcinoma cell lines (Caski and Siha) were refractory to growth inhibition by TGF beta 1. Cell surface receptors for TGF beta 1 were present on both normal and carcinoma cell lines. In all cases, growth inhibition by TGF beta 1 was accompanied by suppression of Steady-state levels of c-myc mRNA. In contrast, TGF beta 1 induced the expression of c-jun mRNA transcripts in normal, immortalized, and tumorigenic cells. We also studied the effect of TGF beta 1 on HPV 16 mRNA expression. Steady-state levels of HPV 16 mRNA transcripts were suppressed by TGF beta 1 in the nontumorigenic HPK cells but were unaffected in the tumorigenic lines. These findings suggest that TGF beta 1 may be an in vivo modulator of HPV infection and that loss of responsiveness to this growth inhibitory signal may be involved in HPV-associated malignant transformation. PMID:2171761

  3. Histological Characterization of the Tumorigenic “Peri-Necrotic Niche” Harboring Quiescent Stem-Like Tumor Cells in Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Aya; Kimura, Tokuhiro; Sadahiro, Hirokazu; Kawano, Hiroo; Takubo, Keiyo; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Ikeda, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterization of the niches for stem-like tumor cells is important to understand and control the behavior of glioblastomas. Cell-cycle quiescence might be a common mechanism underlying the long-term maintenance of stem-cell function in normal and neoplastic stem cells, and our previous study demonstrated that quiescence induced by hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1α is associated with a high long-term repopulation capacity of hematopoietic stem cells. Based on this, we examined human astrocytoma tissues for HIF-1α-regulated quiescent stem-like tumor cells as a candidate for long-term tumorigenic cells and characterized their niche histologically. Methods Multi-color immunohistochemistry was used to visualize HIF-1α-expressing (HIF-1α+) quiescent stem-like tumor cells and their niche in astrocytoma (WHO grade II–IV) tissues. This niche was modeled using spheroids of cultured glioblastoma cells and its contribution to tumorigenicity was evaluated by sphere formation assay. Results A small subpopulation of HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like tumor cells was found in glioblastomas but not in lower-grade astrocytomas. These cells were concentrated in the zone between large ischemic necroses and blood vessels and were closer to the necrotic tissues than to the blood vessels, which suggested that a moderately hypoxic microenvironment is their niche. We successfully modeled this niche containing cells of HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like phenotype by incubating glioblastoma cell spheroids under an appropriately hypoxic condition, and the emergence of HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like cells was shown to be associated with an enhanced sphere-forming activity. Conclusions These data suggest that the “peri-necrotic niche” harboring HIF-1α+ quiescent stem-like cells confers a higher tumorigenic potential on glioblastoma cells and therefore may be a therapeutic target to control the behavior of glioblastomas. PMID:26799577

  4. Failure of catalase to protect against aflatoxin B{sub 1}-induced mouse lung tumorigenicity

    SciTech Connect

    Guindon, Katherine A.; Foley, Julie F.; Maronpot, Robert R.; Massey, Thomas E.

    2008-03-01

    The carcinogenic mycotoxin aflatoxin B{sub 1} (AFB{sub 1}) induces 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) formation in mouse lung, an effect that can be prevented by treatment with polyethylene glycol-conjugated catalase (PEG-CAT). G {yields} T transversion mutation in K-ras, an early event in AFB{sub 1}-induced mouse lung carcinogenesis, is thought to result from AFB{sub 1}-8,9-exo-epoxide binding to DNA to form AFB{sub 1}-N{sup 7}-guanine, but may also result from formation of 8-OHdG. Therefore, oxidative DNA damage may be important in AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity. The objective of this study was to determine whether PEG-CAT would prevent AFB{sub 1} tumorigenicity. Mouse lung tumorigenesis was assessed following treatment of female A/J mice with 300 kU/kg PEG-CAT ip and/or 50 mg/kg AFB{sub 1}. Mice were killed 7 months post-treatment and tumors greater than 1 mm in diameter were excised. Unexpectedly, the mean number of tumors per mouse in the PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} group (8.81 {+-} 3.64, n = 47) was greater than that of the group treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (7.05 {+-} 3.45, n = 42) (P < 0.05). The tumors obtained from mice treated with PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} were larger than those from mice treated with AFB{sub 1} alone (P < 0.05). There was no difference in K-ras exon 1 mutation spectrum or in the histological diagnosis of tumors between AFB{sub 1} and PEG-CAT + AFB{sub 1} groups (P > 0.05). In vitro incubation with mouse liver catalase (CAT) resulted in conversion of [{sup 3}H]AFB{sub 1} into a DNA-binding species, a possible explanation for the results observed in vivo. These results demonstrate that PEG-CAT is not protective against AFB{sub 1} carcinogenicity in mouse lung despite preventing DNA oxidation.

  5. Lung tumorigenic interactions in strain A/J mice of five environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed Central

    Nesnow, S; Mass, M J; Ross, J A; Galati, A J; Lambert, G R; Gennings, C; Carter, W H; Stoner, G D

    1998-01-01

    The binary, ternary, quaternary, and quintary interactions of a five-component mixture of carcinogenic environmental polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using response surface analyses are described. Initially, lung tumor dose-response curves in strain A/J mice for each of the individual PAHs benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), benzo[b]fluoranthene (B[b]F), dibenz[a,h]anthracene (DBA), 5-methylchrysene (5MC), and cyclopenta[cd]pyrene (CPP) were obtained. From these data, doses were selected for the quintary mixture study based on toxicity, survival, range of response, and predicted tumor yields. The ratios of doses among PAHs were designed to simulate PAH ratios found in environmental air and combustion samples. Quintary mixtures of B[a]P, B[b]F, DBA, 5MC, and CPP were administered to male strain A/J mice in a 2(5) factorial 32-dose group dosing scheme (combinations of five PAHs each at either high or low doses) and lung adenomas were scored. Comparison of observed lung adenoma formation with that expected from additivity identified both greater than additive and less than additive interactions that were dose related i.e., greater than additive at lower doses and less than additive at higher doses. To identify specific interactions, a response surface analysis using response addition was applied to the tumor data. This response surface model contained five dose, ten binary, ten ternary, five quaternary, and one quintary parameter. This analysis produced statistically significant values of 16 parameters. The model and model parameters were evaluated by estimating the dose-response relationships for each of the five PAHs. The predicted dose-response curves for all five PAHs indicated a good estimation. The binary interaction functions were dominated for the most part by DBA and were inhibitory. The response surface model predicted, to a significant degree, the observed lung tumorigenic responses of the quintary mixtures. These data suggest that although interactions between

  6. Toxicity profiles in rats treated with tumorigenic and nontumorigenic triazole conazole fungicides: Propiconazole, triadimefon, and myclobutanil.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Douglas C; Allen, James W; George, Michael H; Hester, Susan D; Sun, Guobin; Moore, Tanya; Thai, Sheau-Fung; Delker, Don; Winkfield, Ernest; Leavitt, Sharon; Nelson, Gail; Roop, Barbara C; Jones, Carlton; Thibodeaux, Julie; Nesnow, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Conazoles are a class of azole based fungicides used in agriculture and as pharmaceutical products. They have a common mode of antifungal action through inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis. Some members of this class have been shown to be hepatotoxic and will induce mouse hepatocellular tumors and/or rat thyroid follicular cell tumors. The particular mode of toxic and tumorigenic action for these compounds is not known, however it has been proposed that triadimefon-induced rat thyroid tumors arise through the specific mechanism of increased TSH. The present study was designed to identify commonalities of effects across the different conazoles and to determine unique features of the tissue responses that suggest a toxicity pathway and a mode of action for the observed thyroid response for triadimefon. Male Wistar/Han rats were treated with triadimefon (100, 500, 1800 ppm), propiconazole (100, 500, 2500 ppm), or myclobutanil (100, 500, 2000 ppm) in feed for 4, 30, or 90 days. The rats were evaluated for clinical signs, body and liver weight, histopathology of thyroid and liver, hepatic metabolizing enzyme activity, and serum T3, T4, TSH, and cholesterol levels. There was a dose-dependent increase in liver weight but not body weight for all treatments. The indication of cytochrome induction, pentoxyresorufin O-dealkylation (PROD) activity, had a dose-related increase at all time points for all conazoles. Uridine diphopho-glucuronosyl transferase (UDPGT), the T4 metabolizing enzyme measured as glucuronidation of 1-naphthol, was induced to the same extent after 30 and 90 days for all three conazoles. Livers from all high dose treated rats had centrilobular hepatocyte hypertrophy after 4 days, while only triadimefon and propiconazole treated rats had hepatocyte hypertrophy after 30 days, and only triadimefon treated rats had hepatocyte hypertrophy after 90 days. Thyroid follicular cell hypertrophy, increased follicular cell proliferation, and colloid depletion were

  7. Considering High-Tech Exhibits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Routman, Emily

    1994-01-01

    Discusses a variety of high-tech exhibit media used in The Living World, an educational facility operated by The Saint Louis Zoo. Considers the strengths and weaknesses of holograms, video, animatronics, video-equipped microscopes, and computer interactives. Computer interactives are treated with special attention. (LZ)

  8. ABCG2 regulates self-renewal and stem cell marker expression but not tumorigenicity or radiation resistance of glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Wee, Boyoung; Pietras, Alexander; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Bazzoli, Elena; Podlaha, Ondrej; Antczak, Christophe; Westermark, Bengt; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Djaballah, Hakim; Michor, Franziska; Holland, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Glioma cells with stem cell traits are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance and therapeutic failure. Such cells can be enriched based on their inherent drug efflux capability mediated by the ABC transporter ABCG2 using the side population assay, and their characteristics include increased self-renewal, high stem cell marker expression and high tumorigenic capacity in vivo. Here, we show that ABCG2 can actively drive expression of stem cell markers and self-renewal in glioma cells. Stem cell markers and self-renewal was enriched in cells with high ABCG2 activity, and could be specifically inhibited by pharmacological and genetic ABCG2 inhibition. Importantly, despite regulating these key characteristics of stem-like tumor cells, ABCG2 activity did not affect radiation resistance or tumorigenicity in vivo. ABCG2 effects were Notch-independent and mediated by diverse mechanisms including the transcription factor Mef. Our data demonstrate that characteristics of tumor stem cells are separable, and highlight ABCG2 as a potential driver of glioma stemness. PMID:27456282

  9. Aberrant over-expression of COX-1 intersects multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in high-grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Andrew J.; Fadare, Oluwole; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Son, Deok-Soo; Liu, Qi; Zhao, Shilin; Saskowski, Jeanette; Uddin, Md. Jashim; Daniel, Cristina; Crews, Brenda; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Crispens, Marta A.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Khabele, Dineo

    2015-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-1 (COX-1) is implicated in ovarian cancer. However, patterns of COX expression and function have been unclear and controversial. In this report, patterns of COX-1 and COX-2 gene expression were obtained from RNA-seq data through The Cancer Genome Atlas. Our analysis revealed markedly higher COX-1 mRNA expression than COX-2 in high-grade serous ovarian cancers (HGSOC) and higher COX-1 expression in HGSOC tumors than 10 other tumor types. High expression of COX-1 in HGSOC tumors was confirmed in an independent tissue microarray. In contrast, lower or similar expression of COX-1 compared to COX-2 was observed in endometrioid, mucinous and clear cell tumors. Stable COX-1 knockdown in HGSOC-representative OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cells reduced gene expression in multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways. Functional cell viability, clonogenicity, and migration/invasion assays were consistent with transcriptomic changes. These effects were reversed by stable over-expression of COX-1 in SKOV-3 cells. Our results demonstrate a distinct pattern of COX-1 over-expression in HGSOC tumors and strong association of COX-1 with multiple pro-tumorigenic pathways in ovarian cancer cells. These findings provide additional insight into the role of COX-1 in human ovarian cancer and support further development of methods to selectively target COX-1 in the management of HGSOC tumors. PMID:25972361

  10. SET and MYND domain-containing protein 3 is overexpressed in human glioma and contributes to tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bin; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Yisong; Pan, Changcun; Meng, Guolu; Xiao, Xinru; Wu, Zhen; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Liwei

    2015-11-01

    SET and MYND domain-containing protein 3 (SMYD3) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) di- and tri-methyltransferase that forms a transcriptional complex with RNA polymerase II and plays an important role in early embryonic lineage commitment through the activation of lineage-specific genes. SMYD3 activates the transcription of oncogenes and cell cycle genes in gastric and breast cancer cells. However, the contribution of SMYD3 in glioma tumorigenesis remains unknown. Here, we determined the expression of SMYD3 and assessed its clinical significance in human glioma. We found that SMYD3 was overexpressed in human glioma but not in normal brain tissue. The level of SMYD3 protein expression in human glioma tissues was directly correlated with the glioma grade. The level of SMYD3 protein expression in human glioma tissues was inversely correlated with patient survival. Enforced SMYD3 expression promoted glioma LN-18 cell proliferation. Inhibition of SMYD3 expression in glioma T98G cells suppressed their anchorage‑independent growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Furthermore, we found that SMYD3 regulated the expression of p53 protein, which is essential in SMYD3‑induced cell growth in glioma cells. These results showed that SMYD3 is overexpressed in human glioma and contributes to glioma tumorigenicity through p53. Therefore, SMYD3 may be a new potential therapeutic target for human malignant glioma. PMID:26328527

  11. SOX2 functions as a molecular rheostat to control the growth, tumorigenicity and drug responses of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wuebben, Erin L.; Wilder, Phillip J.; Cox, Jesse L.; Grunkemeyer, James A.; Caffrey, Thomas; Hollingsworth, Michael A.; Rizzino, Angie

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is a highly deadly malignancy. Expression of the stem cell transcription factor SOX2 increases during progression of PDAC. Knockdown of SOX2 in PDAC cell lines decreases growth in vitro; whereas, stable overexpression of SOX2 in one PDAC cell line reportedly increases growth in vitro. Here, we reexamined the role of SOX2 in PDAC cells, because inducible SOX2 overexpression in other tumor cell types inhibits growth. In this study, four PDAC cell lines were engineered for inducible overexpression of SOX2 or inducible knockdown of SOX2. Remarkably, inducible overexpression of SOX2 in PDAC cells inhibits growth in vitro and reduces tumorigenicity. Additionally, inducible knockdown of SOX2 in PDAC cells reduces growth in vitro and in vivo. Thus, growth and tumorigenicity of PDAC cells is highly dependent on the expression of optimal levels of SOX2 – a hallmark of molecular rheostats. We also determined that SOX2 alters the responses of PDAC cells to drugs used in PDAC clinical trials. Increasing SOX2 reduces growth inhibition mediated by MEK and AKT inhibitors; whereas knockdown of SOX2 further reduces growth when PDAC cells are treated with these inhibitors. Thus, targeting SOX2, or its mode of action, could improve the treatment of PDAC. PMID:27145457

  12. ABCG2 regulates self-renewal and stem cell marker expression but not tumorigenicity or radiation resistance of glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Wee, Boyoung; Pietras, Alexander; Ozawa, Tatsuya; Bazzoli, Elena; Podlaha, Ondrej; Antczak, Christophe; Westermark, Bengt; Nelander, Sven; Uhrbom, Lene; Forsberg-Nilsson, Karin; Djaballah, Hakim; Michor, Franziska; Holland, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma cells with stem cell traits are thought to be responsible for tumor maintenance and therapeutic failure. Such cells can be enriched based on their inherent drug efflux capability mediated by the ABC transporter ABCG2 using the side population assay, and their characteristics include increased self-renewal, high stem cell marker expression and high tumorigenic capacity in vivo. Here, we show that ABCG2 can actively drive expression of stem cell markers and self-renewal in glioma cells. Stem cell markers and self-renewal was enriched in cells with high ABCG2 activity, and could be specifically inhibited by pharmacological and genetic ABCG2 inhibition. Importantly, despite regulating these key characteristics of stem-like tumor cells, ABCG2 activity did not affect radiation resistance or tumorigenicity in vivo. ABCG2 effects were Notch-independent and mediated by diverse mechanisms including the transcription factor Mef. Our data demonstrate that characteristics of tumor stem cells are separable, and highlight ABCG2 as a potential driver of glioma stemness. PMID:27456282

  13. SET and MYND domain-containing protein 3 is overexpressed in human glioma and contributes to tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Dai, Bin; Wan, Weiqing; Zhang, Peng; Zhang, Yisong; Pan, Changcun; Meng, Guolu; Xiao, Xinru; Wu, Zhen; Jia, Wang; Zhang, Junting; Zhang, Liwei

    2015-11-01

    SET and MYND domain-containing protein 3 (SMYD3) is a histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4) di- and tri-methyltransferase that forms a transcriptional complex with RNA polymerase II and plays an important role in early embryonic lineage commitment through the activation of lineage-specific genes. SMYD3 activates the transcription of oncogenes and cell cycle genes in gastric and breast cancer cells. However, the contribution of SMYD3 in glioma tumorigenesis remains unknown. Here, we determined the expression of SMYD3 and assessed its clinical significance in human glioma. We found that SMYD3 was overexpressed in human glioma but not in normal brain tissue. The level of SMYD3 protein expression in human glioma tissues was directly correlated with the glioma grade. The level of SMYD3 protein expression in human glioma tissues was inversely correlated with patient survival. Enforced SMYD3 expression promoted glioma LN-18 cell proliferation. Inhibition of SMYD3 expression in glioma T98G cells suppressed their anchorage‑independent growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. Furthermore, we found that SMYD3 regulated the expression of p53 protein, which is essential in SMYD3‑induced cell growth in glioma cells. These results showed that SMYD3 is overexpressed in human glioma and contributes to glioma tumorigenicity through p53. Therefore, SMYD3 may be a new potential therapeutic target for human malignant glioma.

  14. Ultraviolet B irradiation promotes tumorigenic and metastatic properties in primary cutaneous melanoma via induction of interleukin 8.

    PubMed

    Singh, R K; Gutman, M; Reich, R; Bar-Eli, M

    1995-08-15

    UV radiation has been shown to play a role in the initiation of human cutaneous melanoma, but its role in the development of malignant melanoma to the metastatic state is not very well defined. Although previous studies have concentrated on the effect of UV-B on the host immune response, the effect of UV-B on the tumor cells was not elucidated. Here we show that UV-B can induce interleukin 8 (IL-8) mRNA and protein secretion in human cutaneous melanoma with negligible expression of IL-8. UV-B-induced IL-8 was constitutively expressed 60 days after irradiation in tumors implanted in mice. Induction of IL-8 was UV-B dose dependent and blocked by cyclohexamide, indicating that de novo protein synthesis is required for its expression. The UV-irradiated cells demonstrated enhanced tumorigenicity and metastatic potential in nude mice. The increase in tumorigenicity and metastatic ability could be explained by the increase in Mr 72,000 type IV collagenase activity and angiogenesis attributed to the induction of IL-8 after irradiation. The acquisition of the metastatic phenotype induced by UV-B could not be attributed to abnormalities in the p53 or MTS-1 (p16INK4) genes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to show that UV-B can increase the aggressiveness of human cutaneous melanoma for growth and metastasis. PMID:7543020

  15. Balamuthia mandrillaris exhibits metalloprotease activities.

    PubMed

    Matin, Abdul; Stins, Monique; Kim, Kwang Sik; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2006-06-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a recently identified protozoan pathogen that can cause fatal granulomatous encephalitis. However, the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of B. mandrillaris encephalitis remain unclear. Because proteases may play a role in the central nervous system (CNS) pathology, we used spectrophotometric, cytopathic and zymographic assays to assess protease activities of B. mandrillaris. Using two clinical isolates of B. mandrillaris (from human and baboon), we observed that B. mandrillaris exhibits protease activities. Zymographic assays revealed major protease bands of approximate molecular weights in the region of 40-50 kDa on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels using gelatin as substrate. The protease bands were inhibited with 1,10-phenanthroline, suggesting metallo-type proteases. The proteolytic activities were observed over a pH range of 5-11 with maximum activity at neutral pH and at 42 degrees C. Balamuthia mandrillaris proteases exhibit properties to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM), which provide structural and functional support to the brain tissue. This is shown by degradation of collagen I and III (major components of collagenous ECM), elastin (elastic fibrils of ECM), plasminogen (involved in proteolytic degradation of ECM), as well as other substrates such as casein and gelatin but not haemoglobin. However, these proteases exhibited a minimal role in B. mandrillaris-mediated host cell death in vitro using human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs). This was shown using broad-spectrum matrix metalloprotease inhibitors, GM 6001 and GM 1489, which had no effect on B. mandrillaris-mediated HBMEC cytotoxicity. This is the first demonstration that B. mandrillaris exhibits metalloproteases, which may play important role(s) in the ECM degradation and thus in CNS pathology. PMID:16706791

  16. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training.

  17. Collaborative virtual environments art exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinsky, Margaret; Anstey, Josephine; Pape, Dave E.; Aguilera, Julieta C.; Kostis, Helen-Nicole; Tsoupikova, Daria

    2005-03-01

    This panel presentation will exhibit artwork developed in CAVEs and discuss how art methodologies enhance the science of VR through collaboration, interaction and aesthetics. Artists and scientists work alongside one another to expand scientific research and artistic expression and are motivated by exhibiting collaborative virtual environments. Looking towards the arts, such as painting and sculpture, computer graphics captures a visual tradition. Virtual reality expands this tradition to not only what we face, but to what surrounds us and even what responds to our body and its gestures. Art making that once was isolated to the static frame and an optimal point of view is now out and about, in fully immersive mode within CAVEs. Art knowledge is a guide to how the aesthetics of 2D and 3D worlds affect, transform, and influence the social, intellectual and physical condition of the human body through attention to psychology, spiritual thinking, education, and cognition. The psychological interacts with the physical in the virtual in such a way that each facilitates, enhances and extends the other, culminating in a "go together" world. Attention to sharing art experience across high-speed networks introduces a dimension of liveliness and aliveness when we "become virtual" in real time with others.

  18. Crows spontaneously exhibit analogical reasoning.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, Anna; Zorina, Zoya; Obozova, Tanya; Wasserman, Edward

    2015-01-19

    Analogical reasoning is vital to advanced cognition and behavioral adaptation. Many theorists deem analogical thinking to be uniquely human and to be foundational to categorization, creative problem solving, and scientific discovery. Comparative psychologists have long been interested in the species generality of analogical reasoning, but they initially found it difficult to obtain empirical support for such thinking in nonhuman animals (for pioneering efforts, see [2, 3]). Researchers have since mustered considerable evidence and argument that relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) effectively captures the essence of analogy, in which the relevant logical arguments are presented visually. In RMTS, choice of test pair BB would be correct if the sample pair were AA, whereas choice of test pair EF would be correct if the sample pair were CD. Critically, no items in the correct test pair physically match items in the sample pair, thus demanding that only relational sameness or differentness is available to support accurate choice responding. Initial evidence suggested that only humans and apes can successfully learn RMTS with pairs of sample and test items; however, monkeys have subsequently done so. Here, we report that crows too exhibit relational matching behavior. Even more importantly, crows spontaneously display relational responding without ever having been trained on RMTS; they had only been trained on identity matching-to-sample (IMTS). Such robust and uninstructed relational matching behavior represents the most convincing evidence yet of analogical reasoning in a nonprimate species, as apes alone have spontaneously exhibited RMTS behavior after only IMTS training. PMID:25532894

  19. Circulating tumor cells exhibit stem cell characteristics in an orthotopic mouse model of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niemietz, Thomas; Betzler, Alexander M.; Nanduri, Lahiri K.; Bork, Ulrich; Kahlert, Christoph; Thepkaysone, May-Linn; Swiersy, Anka; Büchler, Markus W.; Reissfelder, Christoph; Weitz, Jürgen; Rahbari, Nuh N.

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of colorectal cancer (CRC) is closely linked to the occurrence of distant metastases, which putatively develop from circulating tumor cells (CTCs) shed into circulation by the tumor. As far more CTCs are shed than eventually metastases develop, only a small subfraction of CTCs harbor full tumorigenic potential. The aim of this study was to further characterize CRC-derived CTCs to eventually identify the clinically relevant subfraction of CTCs. We established an orthotopic mouse model of CRC which reliably develops metastases and CTCs. We were able to culture the resulting CTCs in vitro, and demonstrated their tumor-forming capacity when re-injected into mice. The CTCs were then subjected to qPCR expression profiling, revealing downregulation of epithelial and proliferation markers. Genes associated with cell-cell adhesion (claudin-7, CD166) were significantly downregulated, indicating a more metastatic phenotype of CTCs compared to bulk tumor cells derived from hepatic metastases. The stem cell markers DLG7 and BMI1 were significantly upregulated in CTC, indicating a stem cell-like phenotype and increased capacity of tumor formation and self-renewal. In concert with their in vitro and in vivo tumorigenicity, these findings indicate stem cell properties of mouse-derived CTCs. In conclusion, we developed an orthotopic mouse model of CRC recapitulating the process of CRC dissemination. CTCs derived from this model exhibit stem-cell like characteristics and are able to form colonies in vitro and tumors in vivo. Our results provide new insight into the biology of CRC-derived CTCs and may provide new therapeutic targets in the metastatic cascade of CRC. PMID:27029058

  20. EGCG inhibits the growth and tumorigenicity of nasopharyngeal tumor-initiating cells through attenuation of STAT3 activation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chien-Hung; Chao, Li-Keng; Hung, Peir-Haur; Chen, Yann-Jang

    2014-01-01

    A subset of cancer cells, termed cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) could initiate tumors and are responsible for tumor recurrence and chemotherapeutic resistance. In this study, we enriched TICs in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) by the spheres formation and characterized the stem-like signatures such as self-renewal, proliferation, chemoresistance and tumorigenicity. By this method, we investigated that epigallocathechin gallate (EGCG), the major polyphenol in green tea could target TICs and potently inhibit sphere formation, eliminate the stem-like properties and enhance chemosensitivity in NPC through attenuation of STAT3 activation, which could be important in regulating the stemness expression in NPC. Our results demonstrated that STAT3 pathway plays an important role in mediating tumor-initiating capacities in NPC and suggest that inactivation of STAT3 with EGCG may represent a potential preventive and therapeutic approach for NPC. PMID:24966947

  1. Analysis of cell surface carbohydrate expression patterns in normal and tumorigenic human breast cell lines using lectin arrays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Siyuan; Zheng, Ting; Shortreed, Michael R; Alexander, Caroline; Smith, Lloyd M

    2007-08-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play important roles in a wide variety of biological processes including cell adhesion, fertilization, differentiation, development, and tumor cell metastasis. Lectins are proteins of nonimmune origin which recognize and bind to specific carbohydrate structural epitopes. We have recently described the development and use of lectin arrays as tools for the elucidation of the carbohydrate structures expressed on cell surfaces. In the present work this technology is employed for the characterization of differences in carbohydrate expression patterns on normal and tumorigenic human breast cell lines, as well as on sublines differing in their tendency to "home" to different tissues during metastasis. Significant differences were observed, including changes that correlate with metastatic potential as well as with tissue-specific homing of metastatic cells.

  2. Specific cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region of Ras increase tumorigenicity by nanocluster augmentation

    PubMed Central

    Šolman, Maja; Ligabue, Alessio; Blaževitš, Olga; Jaiswal, Alok; Zhou, Yong; Liang, Hong; Lectez, Benoit; Kopra, Kari; Guzmán, Camilo; Härmä, Harri; Hancock, John F; Aittokallio, Tero; Abankwa, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Hotspot mutations of Ras drive cell transformation and tumorigenesis. Less frequent mutations in Ras are poorly characterized for their oncogenic potential. Yet insight into their mechanism of action may point to novel opportunities to target Ras. Here, we show that several cancer-associated mutations in the switch III region moderately increase Ras activity in all isoforms. Mutants are biochemically inconspicuous, while their clustering into nanoscale signaling complexes on the plasma membrane, termed nanocluster, is augmented. Nanoclustering dictates downstream effector recruitment, MAPK-activity, and tumorigenic cell proliferation. Our results describe an unprecedented mechanism of signaling protein activation in cancer. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08905.001 PMID:26274561

  3. Expression of the MyoD1 muscle determination gene defines differentiation capability but not tumorigenicity of human rhabdomyosarcomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hiti, A L; Bogenmann, E; Gonzales, F; Jones, P A

    1989-01-01

    Several human rhabdomyosarcoma cell lines, cultured primary tumor explants, and biopsies of tumor and normal skeletal muscle tissue expressed a 2.0-kilobase transcript that hybridized to the mouse muscle determination gene MyoD1. This transcript was found in tumor cell lines and primary explants that developed multinucleated myotubes but was absent in Wilms' tumors or cell lines and primary explants that developed multinucleated myotubes but was absent in Wilms' tumors or cell lines derived from other mesenchymal tumor cell types. Expression of the human homolog of MyoD1 therefore can define a tumor as a rhabdomyosarcoma. Transfection of the mouse MyoD1 gene into the human rhabdomyosarcoma cell line RD increased the ability of the tumor cells to differentiate into multinucleated myotubes and enhanced myosin heavy-chain gene expression but did not decrease tumorigenicity in nude mice. Images PMID:2601695

  4. Tumorigenicity of human breast cancer is associated with loss of the Ca2+-activated chloride channel CLCA2.

    PubMed

    Gruber, A D; Pauli, B U

    1999-11-01

    The human Ca2+-activated chloride channel-2 (CLCA2) is expressed in normal breast epithelium but not in breast tumors of different stages of progression. Northern analysis of nontransformed and transformed breast epithelial cell lines revealed CLCA2 expression in the nontransformed cell line MCF10A and the nontumorigenic cell line MDA-MB-453, whereas all tumorigenic cell lines were negative (MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-435, MDA-MB-468, and MCF7). When stably reintroduced into CLCA2-negative MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-435 cells, CLCA2 expression reduced Matrigel invasion in vitro and inducibility of s.c. and metastatic tumors of MDA-MB-231 cells in nude mice. Our results suggest that CLCA2 may act as a tumor suppressor in breast cancer.

  5. Nucleotide sequence analysis of a unique near-terminal region of the tumorigenic poxvirus, Shope fibroma virus.

    PubMed

    Massung, R F; McFadden, G; Moyer, R W

    1992-11-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a DNA genome of approximately 160 kb. Previous DNA sequence analysis of SFV has been mainly limited to the terminal inverted repetitions (about 12 kb at each end of the genome) and immediately adjacent regions. We have sequenced a 4 kb fragment located approximately 20 kb from the right-terminal hairpin. Within this region three complete and two partial open reading frames (ORFs) have been identified. Each of the putative polypeptides has sequence similarity to one or more previously identified poxvirus or cellular proteins, with homology to protein kinases, erythrocyte ankyrin and a vaccinia virus virulence-related protein (ORF N1L). The potential significance of these gene products with regard to the phenotype of SFV is discussed.

  6. HDAC up-regulation in early colon field carcinogenesis is involved in cell tumorigenicity through regulation of chromatin structure.

    PubMed

    Stypula-Cyrus, Yolanda; Damania, Dhwanil; Kunte, Dhananjay P; Cruz, Mart Dela; Subramanian, Hariharan; Roy, Hemant K; Backman, Vadim

    2013-01-01

    Normal cell function is dependent on the proper maintenance of chromatin structure. Regulation of chromatin structure is controlled by histone modifications that directly influence chromatin architecture and genome function. Specifically, the histone deacetylase (HDAC) family of proteins modulate chromatin compaction and are commonly dysregulated in many tumors, including colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the role of HDAC proteins in early colorectal carcinogenesis has not been previously reported. We found HDAC1, HDAC2, HDAC3, HDAC5, and HDAC7 all to be up-regulated in the field of human CRC. Furthermore, we observed that HDAC2 up-regulation is one of the earliest events in CRC carcinogenesis and observed this in human field carcinogenesis, the azoxymethane-treated rat model, and in more aggressive colon cancer cell lines. The universality of HDAC2 up-regulation suggests that HDAC2 up-regulation is a novel and important early event in CRC, which may serve as a biomarker. HDAC inhibitors (HDACIs) interfere with tumorigenic HDAC activity; however, the precise mechanisms involved in this process remain to be elucidated. We confirmed that HDAC inhibition by valproic acid (VPA) targeted the more aggressive cell line. Using nuclease digestion assays and transmission electron microscopy imaging, we observed that VPA treatment induced greater changes in chromatin structure in the more aggressive cell line. Furthermore, we used the novel imaging technique partial wave spectroscopy (PWS) to quantify nanoscale alterations in chromatin. We noted that the PWS results are consistent with the biological assays, indicating a greater effect of VPA treatment in the more aggressive cell type. Together, these results demonstrate the importance of HDAC activity in early carcinogenic events and the unique role of higher-order chromatin structure in determining cell tumorigenicity.

  7. Chronic toxicity and tumorigenicity study of aluminum potassium sulfate in B6C3F1 mice.

    PubMed

    Oneda, S; Takasaki, T; Kuriwaki, K; Ohi, Y; Umekita, Y; Hatanaka, S; Fujiyoshi, T; Yoshida, A; Yoshida, H

    1994-01-01

    The tumorigenic potential of aluminum potassium sulfate [A1K (SO4)2 12H2O, APS], a compound which exists widely in the environment, was investigated in B6C3F1 mice. APS was administered in the diet for 20 months at dose levels of 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0% (w/w). One group receiving the basal diet served as the control. Body weight gain in both sexes was decreased in the 10.0% APS treated group, and increased in the 1.0 and 2.5% APS treated groups. The survival rates at the end of the dosing period were 73.3% (male) and 78.3% (female) in the control group, and 86.7-95.0% (male) and 86.7-91.7% (female) in the APS treated groups. The survival rate showed a tendency to increase in both sexes in all the APS treated groups. In the tumor pathology, the incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma was significantly decreased in the males in the 10% APS treated group. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma was significantly decreased in females in all groups including the control group. As regards the nontumorous pathology, the incidence of myocardial eosinophilic cytoplasm showed a significant dose-dependent decrease in males in the APS treated groups. A comparison between the sexes revealed a significant decrease in the incidence of hepatocytic anisonucleosis, myocardial eosinophilic cytoplasm and acinar cell vacuolation of the submandibular gland in the females; and lymphocyte infiltration in renal cortex and pelvis, and vacuolation of cerebellar white matter were noted in the males. The results of the present study indicate that long-term administration of APS does not exert tumorigenic or any other toxic actions in B6C3F1 mice.

  8. Co-Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Markers Corresponds to a Pro-Tumorigenic Expression Profile in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Skoda, Jan; Hermanova, Marketa; Loja, Tomas; Nemec, Pavel; Neradil, Jakub; Karasek, Petr; Veselska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. Its dismal prognosis is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have been identified in PDAC using various markers. However, the co-expression of all of these markers has not yet been evaluated. Furthermore, studies that compare the expression levels of CSC markers in PDAC tumor samples and in cell lines derived directly from those tumors are lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression of putative CSC markers—CD24, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD133, and nestin—by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and quantitative PCR in 3 PDAC-derived cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in 3 corresponding tumor samples. We showed high expression of the examined CSC markers among all of the cell lines and tumor samples, with the exception of CD24 and CD44, which were enriched under in vitro conditions compared with tumor tissues. The proportions of cells positive for the remaining markers were comparable to those detected in the corresponding tumors. Co-expression analysis using flow cytometry revealed that CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells represented a significant population of the cells (range, 43 to 72%) among the cell lines. The highest proportion of CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells was detected in the cell line derived from the tumor of a patient with the shortest survival. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified the specific pro-tumorigenic expression profile of this cell line compared with the profiles of the other two cell lines. Together, CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells are present in PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors, and their increased proportion corresponds with a pro-tumorigenic gene expression profile. PMID:27414409

  9. Enrichment of c-Met+ tumorigenic stromal cells of giant cell tumor of bone and targeting by cabozantinib.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Aleksandrowicz, E; Fan, P; Schönsiegel, F; Zhang, Y; Sähr, H; Gladkich, J; Mattern, J; Depeweg, D; Lehner, B; Fellenberg, J; Herr, I

    2014-10-16

    Giant cell tumor of bone (GCTB) is a very rare tumor entity, which is little examined owing to the lack of established cell lines and mouse models and the restriction of available primary cell lines. The stromal cells of GCTB have been made responsible for the aggressive growth and metastasis, emphasizing the presence of a cancer stem cell population. To identify and target such tumor-initiating cells, stromal cells were isolated from eight freshly resected GCTB tissues. Tumorigenic properties were examined by colony and spheroid formation, differentiation, migration, MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay, immunohistochemistry, antibody protein array, Alu in situ hybridization, FACS analysis and xenotransplantation into fertilized chicken eggs and mice. A sub-population of the neoplastic stromal cells formed spheroids and colonies, differentiated to osteoblasts, migrated to wounded regions and expressed the metastasis marker CXC-chemokine receptor type 4, indicating self-renewal, invasion and differentiation potential. Compared with adherent-growing cells, markers for pluripotency, stemness and cancer progression, including the CSC surface marker c-Met, were enhanced in spheroidal cells. This c-Met-enriched sub-population formed xenograft tumors in fertilized chicken eggs and mice. Cabozantinib, an inhibitor of c-Met in phase II trials, eliminated CSC features with a higher therapeutic effect than standard chemotherapy. This study identifies a c-Met(+) tumorigenic sub-population within stromal GCTB cells and suggests the c-Met inhibitor cabozantinib as a new therapeutic option for targeted elimination of unresectable or recurrent GCTB.

  10. Activation of NFAT signaling establishes a tumorigenic microenvironment through cell autonomous and non-cell autonomous mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, P; Wang, Y; Coussens, M; Manda, K R; Casey, A M; Lin, C; Poyo, E; Pfeifer, J D; Basappa, N; Bates, C M; Ma, L; Zhang, H; Pan, M; Ding, L; Chen, F

    2014-04-01

    NFAT (the nuclear factor of activated T cells) upregulation has been linked to cellular transformation intrinsically, but it is unclear whether and how tissue cells with NFAT activation change the local environment for tumor initiation and progression. Direct evidence showing NFAT activation initiates primary tumor formation in vivo is also lacking. Using inducible transgenic mouse systems, we show that tumors form in a subset of, but not all, tissues with NFATc1 activation, indicating that NFAT oncogenic effects depend on cell types and tissue contexts. In NFATc1-induced skin and ovarian tumors, both cells with NFATc1 activation and neighboring cells without NFATc1 activation have significant upregulation of c-Myc and activation of Stat3. Besides known and suspected NFATc1 targets, such as Spp1 and Osm, we have revealed the early upregulation of a number of cytokines and cytokine receptors, as key molecular components of an inflammatory microenvironment that promotes both NFATc1(+) and NFATc1(-) cells to participate in tumor formation. Cultured cells derived from NFATc1-induced tumors were able to establish a tumorigenic microenvironment, similar to that of the primary tumors, in an NFATc1-dependent manner in nude mice with T-cell deficiency, revealing an addiction of these tumors to NFATc1 activation and downplaying a role for T cells in the NFATc1-induced tumorigenic microenvironment. These findings collectively suggest that beyond the cell autonomous effects on the upregulation of oncogenic proteins, NFATc1 activation has non-cell autonomous effects through the establishment of a promitogenic microenvironment for tumor growth. This study provides direct evidence for the ability of NFATc1 in inducing primary tumor formation in vivo and supports targeting NFAT signaling in anti-tumor therapy.

  11. Co-Expression of Cancer Stem Cell Markers Corresponds to a Pro-Tumorigenic Expression Profile in Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Skoda, Jan; Hermanova, Marketa; Loja, Tomas; Nemec, Pavel; Neradil, Jakub; Karasek, Petr; Veselska, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains one of the most lethal malignancies. Its dismal prognosis is often attributed to the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that have been identified in PDAC using various markers. However, the co-expression of all of these markers has not yet been evaluated. Furthermore, studies that compare the expression levels of CSC markers in PDAC tumor samples and in cell lines derived directly from those tumors are lacking. Here, we analyzed the expression of putative CSC markers-CD24, CD44, epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), CD133, and nestin-by immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and quantitative PCR in 3 PDAC-derived cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in 3 corresponding tumor samples. We showed high expression of the examined CSC markers among all of the cell lines and tumor samples, with the exception of CD24 and CD44, which were enriched under in vitro conditions compared with tumor tissues. The proportions of cells positive for the remaining markers were comparable to those detected in the corresponding tumors. Co-expression analysis using flow cytometry revealed that CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells represented a significant population of the cells (range, 43 to 72%) among the cell lines. The highest proportion of CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells was detected in the cell line derived from the tumor of a patient with the shortest survival. Using gene expression profiling, we further identified the specific pro-tumorigenic expression profile of this cell line compared with the profiles of the other two cell lines. Together, CD24+/CD44+/EpCAM+/CD133+ cells are present in PDAC cell lines derived from primary tumors, and their increased proportion corresponds with a pro-tumorigenic gene expression profile. PMID:27414409

  12. 17 CFR 232.102 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Regulation S-T (17 CFR 232.311(b)). (b) Amendments to all exhibits shall be filed in electronic format... designation “CE” (confirming electronic) should be placed next to the listed exhibit in the exhibit index....

  13. Tumorigenic effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals are alleviated by licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root extract through suppression of AhR expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xiao Ting; de la Cruz, Joseph; Hwang, Seong Gu; Hong, Heeok

    2014-01-01

    Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) have been reported to interfere with estrogen signaling. Exposure to these chemicals decreases the immune response and causes a wide range of diseases in animals and humans. Recently, many studies showed that licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) root extract (LRE) commonly called "gamcho" in Korea exhibits antioxidative, chemoprotective, and detoxifying properties. This study aimed to investigate the mechanism of action of LRE and to determine if and how LRE can alleviate the toxicity of EDCs. LRE was prepared by vacuum evaporation and freeze-drying after homogenization of licorice root powder that was soaked in 80% ethanol for 72 h. We used 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) as a representative EDC, which is known to induce tumors or cancers; MCF-7 breast cancer cells, used as a tumor model, were treated with TCDD and various concentrations of LRE (0, 50, 100, 200, 400 μg/mL) for 24, 48, and 72 h. As a result, TCDD stimulated MCF-7 cell proliferation, but LRE significantly inhibited TCDD-induced MCF-7 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The expression of TCDD toxicity-related genes, i.e., aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), AhR nuclear translocator, and cytochrome P450 1A1, was also down-regulated by LRE in a dose-dependent manner. Analysis of cell cycle distribution after treatment of MCF-7 cells with TCDD showed that LRE inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 cells via G2/M phase arrest. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis also revealed that LRE dose-dependently increased the expression of the tumor suppressor genes p53 and p27 and down-regulated the expression of cell cycle-related genes. These data suggest that LRE can mitigate the tumorigenic effects of TCDD in breast cancer cells by suppression of AhR expression and cell cycle arrest. Thus, LRE can be used as a potential toxicity-alleviating agent against EDC-mediated diseases.

  14. Exhibits Enhanced by Stand-Alone Computers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Rennes, Eve C.

    Both the development and evaluation of one of a set of computer programs designed for use by visitors as adjuncts to museum exhibits are described. Museum displays used were (1) a static, behind-glass exhibit on evolution; (2) a hands-on primitive stone age tools exhibit; and (3) a Foucault pendulum. A computer placed next to each exhibit served…

  15. Dinitro derivatives of pyrene and fluoranthene in diesel emission particulates and their tumorigenicity in mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Tokiwa, H; Otofuji, T; Nakagawa, R; Horikawa, K; Maeda, T; Sano, N; Izumi, K; Otsuka, H

    1986-01-01

    A number of mutagens/carcinogens in diesel emission particulates are produced and distributed into the atmosphere. On the basis of the results of chemical analysis, it was found that most of the mutagenicity in diesel particulate extracts is due to super-mutagens such as 1,3-, 1,6- and 1,8-DNP, and 3,7- and 3,9-DNF. 3,7- and 3,9-DNF are new mutagens which were isolated in this study and they induced a frameshift type mutation in the Salmonella microsome test. Each derivative of DNP and DNF was detected at a concentration of 0.01 to 0.03 ppm in the particulates while the diesel engine was used under the condition of idling. 1,6- and 1,8-DNP were tumorigenic at the injection site in BALB/c male mice when a total of 2 and 1 mg, respectively, of the compounds was given subcutaneously. The incidences for tumors by 60 weeks were at a ratio of 50 and 30%, respectively, for 1,6- and 1,8-DNP-treated mice. 4-NQO and BaP, as positive control, induced tumors at the injection site in BALB/c mice when a total of 2 and 1 mg, respectively, of the compound was given. The incidences of tumors were observed at a high ratio of 90 and 93.4%, respectively, for 4-NQO- and BaP-treated mice. Histologically the tumors were diagnosed as malignant fibrous histiocytomas in all the tumors which developed. No tumors occurred at the injection site in mice given injections of 1,3-DNP. Tumorigenicity tests of 3,7- and 3,9-DNF are now being attempted using F344/DuCrj male rats. This animal experiment is now in progress. In the 3,9-DNF-treated rats (a total of 1 mg per rat), subcutaneous tumors developed in 8 of 11 rats up to 150 days after injection, and a part of a tumor resected from a rat showed the typical features of rhabdomyosarcoma.

  16. The Coordinated Actions of TIM-3 on Cancer and Myeloid Cells in the Regulation of Tumorigenicity and Clinical Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Morita, Tomoko; Annan, Dorcas A; Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Kitada, Shohei; Suzu, Shinya; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Takeya, Motohiro; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2015-09-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of most common cancers in urogenital organs. Although recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the immunogenic properties of ccRCC as illustrated by the clinical sensitivities to various immunotherapies, the detailed immunoregulatory machineries governing the tumorigenicity of human ccRCC remain largely obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the clinical significance and functional relevance of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) expressed on tumor cells and myeloid cells in patients with ccRCC. TIM-3 expression was detected on cancer cells and CD204(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and higher expression level of TIM-3 was positively correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with ccRCC. We found that TIM-3 expression was detected on a large number of tumors, and there was significant correlation between an increased number of TAMs and high expression level of TIM-3 in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, TIM-3 rendered RCC cells with the ability to induce resistance to sunitinib and mTOR inhibitors, the standard regimen for patients with ccRCC, as well as stem cell activities. TIM-3 expression was induced on CD14(+) monocytes upon long-term stimulation with RCC cells, and TIM-3-expressing myeloid cells play a critical role in augmenting tumorigenic activities of TIM-3-negative RCC cells. More importantly, treatment with anti-TIM-3 mAb suppressed its tumorigenic effects in in vitro and in vivo settings. These findings indicate the coordinated action of TIM-3 in cancer cells and in myeloid cells regulates the tumorigenicity of human RCC.

  17. CHI3L1 plays a role in cancer through enhanced production of pro-inflammatory/pro-tumorigenic and angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Libreros, Stephania; Garcia-Areas, Ramon; Iragavarapu-Charyulu, Vijaya

    2013-12-01

    Elevated serum levels of a glycoprotein known as chitinase-3-like protein 1 (CHI3L1) have been correlated with poor prognosis and shorter survival of patients with cancer and inflammatory diseases. The biological and physiological functions of CHI3L1 in cancer have not yet been completely elucidated. In this review, we describe the role of CHI3L1 in inducing pro-inflammatory/pro-tumorigenic and angiogenic factors that could promote tumor growth and metastasis.

  18. Sirtuin 6 promotes transforming growth factor-β1/H2O2/HOCl-mediated enhancement of hepatocellular carcinoma cell tumorigenicity by suppressing cellular senescence.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin-Xia; Luo, Jing; Liu, Mei; Yan, Wei; Zhou, Zhen-Zhen; Xia, Yu-Jia; Tu, Wei; Li, Pei-Yuan; Feng, Zuo-Hua; Tian, De-An

    2015-05-01

    Sirtuin 6 (SIRT6) can function as a tumor suppressor by suppressing aerobic glycolysis and apoptosis resistance. However, the negative effect of SIRT6 on cellular senescence implies that it may also have the potential to promote tumor development. Here we report that the upregulation of SIRT6 expression was required for transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and H2O2/HOCl reactive oxygen species (ROS) to promote the tumorigenicity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. Transforming growth factor-β1/H2O2/HOCl could upregulate SIRT6 expression in HCC cells by inducing the sustained activation of ERK and Smad pathways. Sirtuin 6 in turn abrogated the inducing effect of TGF-β1/H2O2/HOCl on cellular senescence of HCC cells, and was required for the ERK pathway to efficiently suppress the expression of p16 and p21. Sirtuin 6 altered the effect of Smad and p38 MAPK pathways on cellular senescence, and contributed to the inhibitory effect of the ERK pathway on cellular senescence. However, SIRT6 was inefficient in antagonizing the promoting effect of TGF-β1/H2O2 HOCl on aerobic glycolysis and anoikis resistance. Intriguingly, if SIRT6 expression was inhibited, the promoting effect of TGF-β1/H2O2/HOCl on aerobic glycolysis and anoikis resistance was not sufficient to enhance the tumorigenicity of HCC cells. Suppressing the upregulation of SIRT6 enabled TGF-β1/H2O2/HOCl to induce cellular senescence, thereby abrogating the enhancement of HCC cell tumorigenicity by TGF-β1/H2O2/HOCl. These results suggest that SIRT6 is required for TGF-β1/H2O2/HOCl to enhance the tumorigenicity of HCC cells, and that targeting the ERK pathway to suppress the upregulation of SIRT6 might be a potential approach in comprehensive strategies for the therapy of HCC.

  19. CHI3L1 plays a role in cancer through enhanced production of pro-inflammatory/pro-tumorigenic and angiogenic factors.

    PubMed

    Libreros, Stephania; Garcia-Areas, Ramon; Iragavarapu-Charyulu, Vijaya

    2013-12-01

    Elevated serum levels of a glycoprotein known as chitinase-3-like protein 1 (CHI3L1) have been correlated with poor prognosis and shorter survival of patients with cancer and inflammatory diseases. The biological and physiological functions of CHI3L1 in cancer have not yet been completely elucidated. In this review, we describe the role of CHI3L1 in inducing pro-inflammatory/pro-tumorigenic and angiogenic factors that could promote tumor growth and metastasis. PMID:24222276

  20. The Coordinated Actions of TIM-3 on Cancer and Myeloid Cells in the Regulation of Tumorigenicity and Clinical Prognosis in Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Komohara, Yoshihiro; Morita, Tomoko; Annan, Dorcas A; Horlad, Hasita; Ohnishi, Koji; Yamada, Sohsuke; Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Kitada, Shohei; Suzu, Shinya; Kinoshita, Ichiro; Dosaka-Akita, Hirotoshi; Akashi, Koichi; Takeya, Motohiro; Jinushi, Masahisa

    2015-09-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is one of most common cancers in urogenital organs. Although recent experimental and clinical studies have shown the immunogenic properties of ccRCC as illustrated by the clinical sensitivities to various immunotherapies, the detailed immunoregulatory machineries governing the tumorigenicity of human ccRCC remain largely obscure. In this study, we demonstrated the clinical significance and functional relevance of T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing molecule-3 (TIM-3) expressed on tumor cells and myeloid cells in patients with ccRCC. TIM-3 expression was detected on cancer cells and CD204(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAM), and higher expression level of TIM-3 was positively correlated with shorter progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with ccRCC. We found that TIM-3 expression was detected on a large number of tumors, and there was significant correlation between an increased number of TAMs and high expression level of TIM-3 in patients with ccRCC. Furthermore, TIM-3 rendered RCC cells with the ability to induce resistance to sunitinib and mTOR inhibitors, the standard regimen for patients with ccRCC, as well as stem cell activities. TIM-3 expression was induced on CD14(+) monocytes upon long-term stimulation with RCC cells, and TIM-3-expressing myeloid cells play a critical role in augmenting tumorigenic activities of TIM-3-negative RCC cells. More importantly, treatment with anti-TIM-3 mAb suppressed its tumorigenic effects in in vitro and in vivo settings. These findings indicate the coordinated action of TIM-3 in cancer cells and in myeloid cells regulates the tumorigenicity of human RCC. PMID:25783986

  1. Cellular tumorigenicity in nude mice. Test of associations among loss of cell-surface fibronectin, anchorage independence, and tumor-forming ability

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN; also called large external transformation-sensitive [LETS] protein or cell-surface protein [CSP]) is a large cell-surface glycoprotein that is frequently observed to be either absent or greatly reduced on the surfaces of malignant cells grown in vitro. Because FN may be a useful molecular marker of cellular malignancy, we have carried out an extensive screening to test the specific association among the degree of expression of FN, anchorage-independent growth, and tumorigenicity in the athymic nude mouse. A variety of diploid cell strains and established cell lines were tested for the expression of surface FN by indirect immunofluorescence using rabbit antisera against human cold insoluble globulin, rodent plasma FN, or chicken cell- surface FN. Concomitantly, the cells were assayed for tumor formation in nude mice and for the ability to form colonies in methylcellulose. Tumorigenic cells often showed very low surface fluorescence, confirming earlier reports. However, many highly tumorigenic fibroblast lines from several species stained strongly with all three antisera. In contrast, the anchorage-independent phenotype was nearly always associated with tumorigenicity in approximately 35 cell lines examined in this study. In another series of experiments, FN-positive but anchorage-independent cells were grown as tumors in nude mice and then reintroduced into culture. In five of the six tumor-derived cell lines, cell-surface FN was not significantly reduced; one such cell line showed very little surface FN. Our data thus indicate that the loss of cell-surface FN is not a necessary step in the process of malignant transformation and that the growth of FN-positive cells as tumors does not require a prior selection in vivo for FN-negative subpopulations. PMID:383723

  2. JB/MS murine melanoma: a new model for studies on the modulation of differentiation and of tumorigenic and metastatic potential.

    PubMed

    Hearing, V J; Cannon, G B; Vieira, W D; Jiménez-Atiénzar, M; Kameyama, K; Law, L W

    1988-02-15

    The recently obtained JB/MS melanoma (induced by DMBA in C57Bl/6 mice) has been successfully established in culture, and characterization of various parameters of these cells, as they have been serially passaged in vivo and in vitro, has begun. The culture lines were initially highly dendritic and melanotic, growing slowly in vitro and extremely slowly in vivo. During serial passage in vivo and in vitro the cell lines have gradually evolved into less melanotic, but more proliferative, tumorigenic and metastatic cells. We have been able to demonstrate that the JB/MS melanoma shares the common melanoma TSTA previously reported for B16, K1735 and JB/RH melanomas, but does not cross-react with the S91 melanoma or with other non-melanoma cell lines used as specificity controls. The JB/MS cells can be induced to differentiate in vitro by alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone, a physiologically relevant agent, and studies have been initiated to detail the level at which this induction occurs. These sublines should prove to be excellent models for study of the progression of transformed cells from non-tumorigenic to tumorigenic phenotypes, and for progression through stages of varying metastatic potential, immunogenicity and differentiation.

  3. FoxM1 Drives a Feed-forward STAT3-activation Signaling Loop that Promotes the Self-renewal and Tumorigenicity of Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Ai-hua; Wei, Ping; Zhang, Sicong; Yao, Jun; Yuan, Ying; Zhou, Ai-dong; Lang, Frederick F.; Heimberger, Amy B.; Rao, Ganesh; Huang, Suyun

    2015-01-01

    The growth factor PDGF controls the development of glioblastoma (GBM) but its contribution to the function of GBM stem-like cells (GSC) has been little studied. Here we report that the transcription factor FoxM1 promotes PDGFA-STAT3 signaling to drive GSC self-renewal and tumorigenicity. In GBM we found a positive correlation between expression of FoxM1 and PDGF-A. In GSC and mouse neural stem cells, FoxM1 bound to the PDGF-A promoter to upregulate PDGF-A expression, acting to maintain the stem-like qualities of GSC in part through this mechanism. Analysis of the human cancer genomic database TCGA revealed that GBM express higher levels of STAT3, a PDGF-A effector signaling molecule, as compared with normal brain. FoxM1 regulated STAT3 transcription through interactions with the β-catenin/TCF4 complex. FoxM1 deficiency inhibited PDGF-A and STAT3 expression in neural stem cells and GSC, abolishing their stem-like and tumorigenic properties. Further mechanistic investigations defined a FoxM1-PDGFA-STAT3 feed-forward pathway that was sufficient to confer stem-like properties to glioma cells. Collectively, our findings showed how FoxM1 activates expression of PDGF-A and STAT3 in a pathway required to maintain the self-renewal and tumorigenicity of glioma stem-like cells. PMID:25832656

  4. Graviola: a novel promising natural-derived drug that inhibits tumorigenicity and metastasis of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo through altering cell metabolism.

    PubMed

    Torres, María P; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Purohit, Vinee; Pandey, Poomy; Joshi, Suhasini; Moore, Erik D; Johansson, Sonny L; Singh, Pankaj K; Ganti, Apar K; Batra, Surinder K

    2012-10-01

    Pancreatic tumors are resistant to conventional chemotherapies. The present study was aimed at evaluating the potential of a novel plant-derived product as a therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer (PC). The effects of an extract from the tropical tree Annona Muricata, commonly known as Graviola, was evaluated for cytotoxicity, cell metabolism, cancer-associated protein/gene expression, tumorigenicity, and metastatic properties of PC cells. Our experiments revealed that Graviola induced necrosis of PC cells by inhibiting cellular metabolism. The expression of molecules related to hypoxia and glycolysis in PC cells (i.e. HIF-1α, NF-κB, GLUT1, GLUT4, HKII, and LDHA) were downregulated in the presence of the extract. In vitro functional assays further confirmed the inhibition of tumorigenic properties of PC cells. Overall, the compounds that are naturally present in a Graviola extract inhibited multiple signaling pathways that regulate metabolism, cell cycle, survival, and metastatic properties in PC cells. Collectively, alterations in these parameters led to a decrease in tumorigenicity and metastasis of orthotopically implanted pancreatic tumors, indicating promising characteristics of the natural product against this lethal disease. PMID:22475682

  5. Tumorigenicity and adenovirus-transformed cells: Collagen interaction and cell surface laminin are controlled by the serotype origin of the E1A and E1B genes

    SciTech Connect

    Bober, F.J.; Birk, D.E.; Raska, K. Jr. ); Shenk, T. )

    1988-02-01

    A library of cells transformed with recombinant adenoviruses was used to study tumorigenicity and interaction with extracellular matrix. Cells expressing the complete E1 region of highly oncogenic adenovirus type 12 (Ad12) are tumorigenic, adhere preferentially to type IV collagen, and express cell surface laminin. Weakly tumorigenic cells, which express the E1A oncogene of Ad12 and the E1B genes of Ad5, also attach preferentially to type IV collagen but do not contain laminin on their surface. Cells which express the E1A oncogene of Ad5 and the E1B genes of Ad12 are nontumorigenic and do not preferentially attach to type IV versus type I collagen but have laminin on their surface. There is no significant difference in the amounts of laminin secreted into the culture medium among cells expressing the E1B genes of Ad5 or Ad12. In vitro assays show that cells which express the E1B genes of Ad12, irrespective of the origin of the E1A genes, can bind three times more exogenously added {sup 125}I-laminin than cells expressing the E1B genes of nononcogenic Ad5. The interaction of adenovirus-transformed cells with collagen is controlled by the serotype origin of the E1A oncogene, whereas cell surface laminin is controlled by the serotype origin of the E1B genes.

  6. Graviola: A Novel Promising Natural-Derived Drug That Inhibits Tumorigenicity and Metastasis of Pancreatic Cancer Cells In Vitro and In Vivo Through Altering Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Torres, María P.; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Purohit, Vinee; Pandey, Poomy; Joshi, Suhasini; Moore, Erik D.; Johansson, Sonny L.; Singh, Pankaj K.; Ganti, Apar K.; Batra, Surinder K.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic tumors are resistant to conventional chemotherapies. The present study was aimed at evaluating the potential of a novel plant-derived product as a therapeutic agent for pancreatic cancer (PC). The effects of an extract from the tropical tree Annona Muricata, commonly known as Graviola, was evaluated for cytotoxicity, cell metabolism, cancer-associated protein/gene expression, tumorigenicity, and metastatic properties of PC cells. Our experiments revealed that Graviola induced necrosis of PC cells by inhibiting cellular metabolism. The expression of molecules related to hypoxia and glycolysis in PC cells (i.e. HIF-1α, NF-κB, GLUT1, GLUT4, HKII, and LDHA) were downregulated in the presence of the extract. In vitro functional assays further confirmed the inhibition of tumorigenic properties of PC cells. Overall, the compounds that are naturally present in a Graviola extract inhibited multiple signaling pathways that regulate metabolism, cell cycle, survival, and metastatic properties in PC cells. Collectively, alterations in these parameters led to a decrease in tumorigenicity and metastasis of orthotopically implanted pancreatic tumors, indicating promising characteristics of the natural product against this lethal disease. PMID:22475682

  7. Subcellular Raman Microspectroscopy Imaging of Nucleic Acids and Tryptophan for Distinction of Normal Human Skin Cells and Tumorigenic Keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Piredda, Paola; Berning, Manuel; Boukamp, Petra; Volkmer, Andreas

    2015-07-01

    At present, tumor diagnostic imaging is commonly based on hematoxylin and eosin or immunohistochemical staining of biopsies, which requires tissue excision, fixation, and staining with exogenous marker molecules. Here, we report on label-free tumor imaging using confocal spontaneous Raman scattering microspectroscopy, which exploits the intrinsic vibrational contrast of endogenous biomolecular species. We present a chemically specific and quantitative approach to monitoring normal human skin cells (keratinocytes and fibroblasts) as well as the human HaCaT in vitro skin carcinogenesis model and the tumor-derived MET in vivo skin cancer progression model. Mapping the amplitudes of two spectrally well isolated Raman bands at 752 and 785 cm(-1) allowed for direct visualization of the distributions representative of tryptophan-rich proteins and nucleic acids, respectively, with subcellular spatial resolution. Using these Raman markers, it was feasible to discriminate between normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) and dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) and to confine all tumorigenic cells from both the NHEK and NHDF. First evidence for the successful application of the proposed intracellular nucleic acid and tryptophan Raman signatures for skin cancer diagnosis was further demonstrated in an organotypic cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas model, allowing for the identification of tumor cells and their surrounding stroma in the tissue context.

  8. Development of a magnetic capture hybridization real-time PCR assay for detection of tumorigenic Agrobacterium vitis in grapevines.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kameka L; Zheng, Desen; Kaewnum, Supaporn; Reid, Cheryl Lynn; Burr, Thomas

    2013-06-01

    Agrobacterium vitis, the causal agent of grape crown gall, can have severe economic effects on grape production. The bacterium survives systemically in vines and, therefore, is disseminated in propagation material. We developed an assay for use in indexing programs that is efficient and sensitive for detecting A. vitis in grape tissue. Initially, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers specific for diverse tumorigenic strains of A. vitis were developed using the virD2 gene sequence. To overcome the effects of PCR inhibitors present in plant tissue, DNA extraction methods that included magnetic capture hybridization (MCH), immunomagnetic separation (IMS), and extraction with the Mo Bio Powerfood kit were compared. The assays incorporating MCH or IMS followed by real-time PCR were 10,000-fold more sensitive than direct real-time PCR when tested using boiled bacterial cell suspensions, with detection thresholds of 10(1) CFU/ml compared with 10(5) CFU/ml. DNA extraction with the Powerfood DNA extraction kit was 10-fold more sensitive than direct real-time PCR, with a detection threshold of 10(4) CFU/ml. All three assays were able to detect A. vitis in healthy-appearing grapevine cuttings taken from infected vines. PMID:23324046

  9. IGFBP-4 Anti-Angiogenic and Anti-Tumorigenic Effects Are Associated with Anti-Cathepsin B Activity1

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, María J; Ball, Marguerite; Rukhlova, Marina; Slinn, Jacqueline; L'Abbe, Denis; Iqbal, Umar; Monette, Robert; Hagedorn, Martin; O'Connor-McCourt, Maureen D; Durocher, Yves; Stanimirovic, Danica B

    2013-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 4 (IGFBP-4/IBP-4) has potent IGF-independent anti-angiogenic and antitumorigenic effects. In this study, we demonstrated that these activities are located in the IGFBP-4 C-terminal protein fragment (CIBP-4), a region containing a thyroglobulin type 1 (Tg1) domain. Proteins bearing Tg1 domains have been shown to inhibit cathepsins, lysosomal enzymes involved in basement membrane degradation and implicated in tumor invasion and angiogenesis. In our studies, CIBP-4 was shown to internalize and co-localize with lysosomal-like structures in both endothelial cells (ECs) and glioblastoma U87MG cells. CIBP-4 also inhibited both growth factor-induced EC tubulogenesis in Matrigel and the concomitant increases in intracellular cathepsin B (CatB) activity. In vitro assays confirmed CIBP-4 capacity to block recombinant CatB activity. Biodistribution analysis of intravenously injected CIBP-4-Cy5.5 in a glioblastoma tumor xenograft model indicated targeted accumulation of CIBP-4 in tumors. Most importantly, CIBP-4 reduced tumor growth in this animal model by 60%. Pleiotropic anti-angiogenic and anti-tumorigenic activities of CIBP-4 most likely underlie its observed therapeutic potential against glioblastoma. PMID:23633927

  10. NAC, Tiron and Trolox Impair Survival of Cell Cultures Containing Glioblastoma Tumorigenic Initiating Cells by Inhibition of Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Stigliani, Sara; Carra, Elisa; Monteghirfo, Stefano; Longo, Luca; Daga, Antonio; Dono, Mariella; Zupo, Simona; Giaretti, Walter; Castagnola, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are metabolism by-products that may act as signaling molecules to sustain tumor growth. Antioxidants have been used to impair cancer cell survival. Our goal was to determine the mechanisms involved in the response to antioxidants of a human cell culture (PT4) containing glioblastoma (GBM) tumorigenic initiating cells (TICs). ROS production in the absence or presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), tiron, and trolox was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). The effects of these antioxidants on cell survival and apoptosis were evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MTT) and FCM. The biological processes modulated by these drugs were determined by oligonucleotide microarray gene expression profiling. Our results showed that NAC, tiron and trolox impaired PT4 cell survival, had minor effects on ROS levels and caused wide deregulation of cell cycle genes. Furthermore, tiron and trolox caused inhibition of cell survival in two additional cell cultures containing TICs, FO-1 and MM1, established from a melanoma and a mesothelioma patient, respectively. NAC, instead, impaired survival of the MM1 cells but not of the FO-1 cells. However, when used in combination, NAC enhanced the inhibitory effect of PLX4032 (BRAF V600E inhibitor) and Gefitinib (EGFR inhibitor), on FO-1 and PT4 cell survival. Collectively, NAC, tiron and trolox modulated gene expression and impaired the growth of cultures containing TICs primarily by inhibiting cell cycle progression. PMID:24587218

  11. Gene amplification and microsatellite instability induced in tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial cells by alpha particles and heavy ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piao, C. Q.; Hei, T. K.; Hall, E. J. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    Gene amplification and microsatellite alteration are useful markers of genomic instability in tumor and transformed cell lines. It has been suggested that genomic instability contributes to the progression of tumorigenesis by accumulating genetic changes. In this study, amplification of the carbamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbamylase, dihydro-orotase (CAD) gene in transformed and tumorigenic human bronchial epithelial (BEP2D) cells induced by either alpha particles or (56)Fe ions was assessed by measuring resistance to N-(phosphonacetyl)-l-aspartate (PALA). In addition, alterations of microsatellite loci located on chromosomes 3p and 18q were analyzed in a series of primary and secondary tumor cell lines generated in nude mice. The frequency of PALA-resistant colonies was 1-3 x 10(-3) in tumor cell lines, 5-8 x 10(-5) in transformed cells prior to inoculation into nude mice, and less than 10(-7) in control BEP2D cells. Microsatellite alterations were detected in all 11 tumor cell lines examined at the following loci: D18S34, D18S363, D18S877, D3S1038 and D3S1607. No significant difference in either PALA resistance or microsatellite instability was found in tumor cell lines that were induced by alpha particles compared to those induced by (56)Fe ions.

  12. The Membrane-Bound Form of IL-17A Promotes the Growth and Tumorigenicity of Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Van Anh, Do Thi; Park, Sang Min; Lee, Hayyoung; Kim, Young Sang

    2016-01-01

    Interleukin-17A is a member of the IL-17 family, and is known as CTLA8 in the mouse. It is produced by T lymphocytes and NK cells and has proinflammatory roles, inducing cytokine and chemokine production. However, its role in tumor biology remains controversial. We investigated the effects of locally produced IL-17A by transferring the gene encoding it into CT26 colon cancer cells, either in a secretory or a membrane-bound form. Expression of the membrane-bound form on CT26 cells dramatically enhanced their proliferation in vitro. The enhanced growth was shown to be due to an increased rate of cell cycle progression: after synchronizing cells by adding and withdrawing colcemid, the rate of cell cycle progression in the cells expressing the membrane-bound form of IL-17A was much faster than that of the control cells. Both secretory and membrane-bound IL-17A induced the expression of Sca-1 in the cancer cells. When tumor clones were grafted into syngeneic BALB/c mice, the tumor clones expressing the membrane-bound form IL-17A grew rapidly; those expressing the secretory form also grew faster than the wild type CT26 cells, but slower than the clones expressing the membrane-bound form. These results indicate that IL-17A promotes tumorigenicity by enhancing cell cycle progression. This finding should be considered in treating tumors and immune-related diseases. PMID:27378226

  13. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Große-Kreul, Jan; Busch, Maike; Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:27626280

  14. The tumorigenic FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion escapes miR-99a regulation in glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Brittany C.; Annala, Matti J.; Cogdell, David E.; Granberg, Kirsi J.; Sun, Yan; Ji, Ping; Li, Xia; Gumin, Joy; Zheng, Hong; Hu, Limei; Yli-Harja, Olli; Haapasalo, Hannu; Visakorpi, Tapio; Liu, Xiuping; Liu, Chang-gong; Sawaya, Raymond; Fuller, Gregory N.; Chen, Kexin; Lang, Frederick F.; Nykter, Matti; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Fusion genes are chromosomal aberrations that are found in many cancers and can be used as prognostic markers and drug targets in clinical practice. Fusions can lead to production of oncogenic fusion proteins or to enhanced expression of oncogenes. Several recent studies have reported that some fusion genes can escape microRNA regulation via 3′–untranslated region (3′-UTR) deletion. We performed whole transcriptome sequencing to identify fusion genes in glioma and discovered FGFR3-TACC3 fusions in 4 of 48 glioblastoma samples from patients both of mixed European and of Asian descent, but not in any of 43 low-grade glioma samples tested. The fusion, caused by tandem duplication on 4p16.3, led to the loss of the 3′-UTR of FGFR3, blocking gene regulation of miR-99a and enhancing expression of the fusion gene. The fusion gene was mutually exclusive with EGFR, PDGFR, or MET amplification. Using cultured glioblastoma cells and a mouse xenograft model, we found that fusion protein expression promoted cell proliferation and tumor progression, while WT FGFR3 protein was not tumorigenic, even under forced overexpression. These results demonstrated that the FGFR3-TACC3 gene fusion is expressed in human cancer and generates an oncogenic protein that promotes tumorigenesis in glioblastoma. PMID:23298836

  15. Establishment from Shope carcinoma induced in an inbred rabbit of culture cell lines with various potentials for differentiation and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed

    Seto, A; Isono, T; Inoue, M; Yamade, I; Ogawa, K

    1991-08-01

    Shope papillomas induced by cottontail rabbit papilloma-virus (CRPV) in domestic rabbits frequently regress spontaneously or, failing to do so, convert into squamous cell carcinomas at a high rate. This papilloma-carcinoma complex in rabbits provides an experimental model for human papillo-mavirus-associated malignancies. The aim of this study was to prepare an experimental system in inbred rabbits by establishing culture cell lines of the tumor. Squamous cell carcinoma developed from a Shope papilloma that had been induced 6 months previously by inoculating CRPV into an inbred B/J rabbit. By in vitro culturing of the tumor cells, cell lines with potentials for terminal differentiation and tumorigenicity were established. Cloning yielded sublines that varied in these potentials and possessed episomal and integrated CRPV genomes as revealed by Southern hybridization in both one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. Major CRPV-specific transcripts were similarly observed both in well-differentiated and in poorly differentiated sublines. Immunofluorescence with syngeneic rabbit antibody against tumor-specific antigens localized such antigens mainly in the nuclei of the cells of these sublines. This experimental system allows experiments that were not feasible in randomly bred rabbits. PMID:1649230

  16. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Große-Kreul, Jan; Busch, Maike; Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma.

  17. Cloning and characterization of a cDNA encoding transformation-sensitive tropomyosin isoform 3 from tumorigenic human fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, C.S.; Leavitt, J.

    1988-01-01

    The authors isolated a cDNA clone from the tumorigenic human fibroblast cell line HuT-14 that contains the entire protein coding region of tropomyosin isoform 3 (Tm3) and 781 base pairs of 5'- and 3'-untranslated sequences. Tm3, despite its apparent smaller molecular weight than Tm1 in two-dimensional gels, has the same peptide length as Tm1 (284 amino acids) and shares 83% homology with Tm1. Tm3 cDNA hybridized to an abundant mRNA of 1.3 kilobases in fetal muscle and cardiac muscle, suggesting that Tm3 is related to an ..cap alpha../sub fast/-tropomyosin. The first 188 amino acids of Tm3 are identical to those of rat or rabbit skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin, and the last 71 amino acids differ from those of rat smooth muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin by only 1 residue. Tm3 therefore appears to be encoded by the same gene that encodes the fast skeletal muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin and the smooth muscle ..cap alpha..-tropomyosin via an alternative RNA-splicing mechanism. In contrast to Tm4 and Tm5, Tm3 has a small gene family, with, at best, only one pseudogene.

  18. HEDGEHOG-GLI1 signaling regulates human glioma growth, cancer stem cell self-renewal and tumorigenicity

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Virginie; Sanchez, Pilar; de Tribolet, Nicolas; Radovanovic, Ivan; Altaba, Ariel Ruiz i

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cancer stem cells are rare tumor cells characterized by their ability to self-renew and to induce tumorigenesis. They are present in gliomas and may be responsible for the lethality of these incurable brain tumors. In the most aggressive and invasive type, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an average of ±1 year spans the period between detection and death (1). The resistence of gliomas to current therapies may be related to the existence of cancer stem cells (2–6). We find that human gliomas display a stemness signature and demonstrate that HEDGEHOG (HH)-GLI signaling regulates the expression of stemness genes in and the self-renewal of CD133+ glioma cancer stem cells. HH-GLI signaling is also required for sustained glioma growth and survival, displaying additive and synergistic effects with temozolomide, the current chemotherapeutic agent of choice, which does not affect glioma stem cell self-renewal. Finally, interference of HH-GLI signaling with cyclopamine or through lentiviral-mediated silencing demonstrates that the tumorigenicity of human gliomas in nude mice requires an active pathway. Our results reveal the essential role of HH-GLI signaling in controlling the behavior of human glioma cancer stem cells and offer new therapeutic possibilities. PMID:17196391

  19. PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1 suppresses the tumorigenicity and induces G1 cell cycle arrest in human glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da-Ming; Sun, Hong

    1998-01-01

    PTEN/MMAC1/TEP1 is a tumor suppressor that possesses intrinsic phosphatase activity. Deletions or mutations of its encoding gene are associated with a variety of human cancers. However, very little is known about the molecular mechanisms by which this important tumor suppressor regulates cell growth. Here, we show that PTEN expression potently suppressed the growth and tumorigenicity of human glioblastoma U87MG cells. The growth suppression activity of PTEN was mediated by its ability to block cell cycle progression in the G1 phase. Such an arrest correlated with a significant increase of the cell cycle kinase inhibitor p27KIP1 and a concomitant decrease in the activities of the G1 cyclin-dependent kinases. PTEN expression also led to the inhibition of Akt/protein kinase B, a serine-threonine kinase activated by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) signaling pathway. In addition, the effect of PTEN on p27KIP1 and the cell cycle can be mimicked by treatment of U87MG cells with LY294002, a selective inhibitor of PI 3-kinase. Taken together, our studies suggest that the PTEN tumor suppressor modulates G1 cell cycle progression through negatively regulating the PI 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway, and one critical target of this signaling process is the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1. PMID:9860981

  20. MEK1 signaling promotes self-renewal and tumorigenicity of liver cancer stem cells via maintaining SIRT1 protein stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Jiamin; Liu, Chungang; Liu, Limei; Chen, Xuejiao; Shan, Juanjuan; Shen, Junjie; Zhu, Wei; Qian, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer death. This high mortality has been commonly attributed to the presence of residual cancer stem cells (CSCs). Meanwhile, MEK1 signaling is regarded as a key molecular in HCC maintenance and development. However, nobody has figured out the particular mechanisms that how MEK1 signaling regulates liver CSCs self-renewal. In this study, we show that inhibition or depletion of MEK1 can significantly decrease liver CSCs self-renewal and tumor growth both in vitro and vivo conditions. Furthermore, we demonstrate that MEK1 signaling promotes liver CSCs self-renewal and tumorigenicity by maintaining SIRT1 level. Mechanistically, MEK1 signaling keeps SIRT1 protein stabilization through activating SIRT1 ubiquitination, which inhibits proteasomal degradation. Clinical analysis shows that patients co-expression of MEK1 and SIRT1 are associated with poor survival. Our finding indicates that MEK1-SIRT1 can act as a novel diagnostic biomarker and inhibition of MEK1 may be a viable therapeutic option for targeting liver CSCs treatment. PMID:26967560

  1. STK31 Is a Cell-Cycle Regulated Protein That Contributes to the Tumorigenicity of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Pao-Lin; Huang, Yung-Ling; Hsieh, Christine Chin-Jung; Lee, Jenq-Chang; Lin, Bo-Wen; Hung, Liang-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Serine/threonine kinase 31 (STK31) is one of the novel cancer/testis antigens for which its biological functions remain largely unclear. Here, we demonstrate that STK31 is overexpressed in many human colorectal cancer cell lines and tissues. STK31 co-localizes with pericentrin in the centrosomal region throughout all phases of the cell cycle. Interestingly, when cells undergo mitosis, STK31 also localizes to the centromeres, central spindle, and midbody. This localization behavior is similar to that of chromosomal passenger proteins, which are known to be the important players of the spindle assembly checkpoint. The expression of STK31 is cell cycle-dependent through the regulation of a putative D-box near its C-terminal region. Ectopically-expressed STK31-GFP increases cell migration and invasive ability without altering the proliferation rate of cancer cells, whereas the knockdown expression of endogenous STK31 by lentivirus-derived shRNA results in microtubule assembly defects that prolong the duration of mitosis and lead to apoptosis. Taken together, our results suggest that the aberrant expression of STK31 contributes to tumorigenicity in somatic cancer cells. STK31 might therefore act as a potential therapeutic target in human somatic cancers. PMID:24667656

  2. CD10-Equipped Melanoma Cells Acquire Highly Potent Tumorigenic Activity: A Plausible Explanation of Their Significance for a Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Oba, Junna; Nakahara, Takeshi; Hashimoto-Hachiya, Akiko; Liu, Min; Abe, Takeru; Hagihara, Akihito; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Furue, Masutaka

    2016-01-01

    CD10 has been widely used in cancer diagnosis. We previously demonstrated that its expression in melanoma increased with tumor progression and predicted poor patient survival. However, the mechanism by which CD10 promotes melanoma progression remains unclear. In order to elucidate the role of CD10 in melanoma, we established CD10-overexpressing A375 melanoma cells and performed DNA microarray and qRT-PCR analyses to identify changes in the gene expression profile. The microarray analysis revealed that up-regulated genes in CD10-A375 were mostly involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and resistance to apoptosis; down-regulated genes mostly belonged to the categories associated with cell adhesion and migration. Accordingly, in functional experiments, CD10-A375 showed significantly greater cell proliferation in vitro and higher tumorigenicity in vivo; CD10 enzymatic inhibitors, thiorphan and phosphoramidon, significantly blocked the tumor growth of CD10-A375 in mice. In migration and invasion assays, CD10-A375 displayed lower migratory and invasive capacity than mock-A375. CD10 augmented melanoma cell resistance to apoptosis mediated by etoposide and gemcitabine. These findings indicate that CD10 may promote tumor progression by regulating the expression profiles of genes related to cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and resistance to apoptosis. PMID:26881775

  3. CD10-Equipped Melanoma Cells Acquire Highly Potent Tumorigenic Activity: A Plausible Explanation of Their Significance for a Poor Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto-Hachiya, Akiko; Liu, Min; Abe, Takeru; Hagihara, Akihito; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Furue, Masutaka

    2016-01-01

    CD10 has been widely used in cancer diagnosis. We previously demonstrated that its expression in melanoma increased with tumor progression and predicted poor patient survival. However, the mechanism by which CD10 promotes melanoma progression remains unclear. In order to elucidate the role of CD10 in melanoma, we established CD10-overexpressing A375 melanoma cells and performed DNA microarray and qRT–PCR analyses to identify changes in the gene expression profile. The microarray analysis revealed that up-regulated genes in CD10-A375 were mostly involved in cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and resistance to apoptosis; down-regulated genes mostly belonged to the categories associated with cell adhesion and migration. Accordingly, in functional experiments, CD10-A375 showed significantly greater cell proliferation in vitro and higher tumorigenicity in vivo; CD10 enzymatic inhibitors, thiorphan and phosphoramidon, significantly blocked the tumor growth of CD10-A375 in mice. In migration and invasion assays, CD10-A375 displayed lower migratory and invasive capacity than mock-A375. CD10 augmented melanoma cell resistance to apoptosis mediated by etoposide and gemcitabine. These findings indicate that CD10 may promote tumor progression by regulating the expression profiles of genes related to cell proliferation, angiogenesis, and resistance to apoptosis. PMID:26881775

  4. Forced Trefoil Factor Family Peptide 3 (TFF3) Expression Reduces Growth, Viability, and Tumorigenicity of Human Retinoblastoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Claudia; Pikos, Stefanie; Stephan, Harald; Dünker, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Trefoil factor family (TFF) peptides have been shown to effect cell proliferation, apoptosis, migration and invasion of normal cells and various cancer cell lines. In the literature TFF peptides are controversially discussed as tumor suppressors and potential tumor progression factors. In the study presented, we investigated the effect of TFF3 overexpression on growth, viability, migration and tumorigenicity of the human retinoblastoma cell lines Y-79, WERI-Rb1, RBL-13 and RBL-15. As revealed by WST-1 and TUNEL assays as well as DAPI and BrdU cell counts, recombinant human TFF3 significantly lowers retinoblastoma cell viability and increases apoptosis levels. Transient TFF3 overexpression likewise significantly increases RB cell apoptosis. Stable, lentiviral TFF3 overexpression lowers retinoblastoma cell viability, proliferation and growth and significantly increases cell death in retinoblastoma cells. Blockage experiments using a broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor and capase-3 immunocytochemistry revealed the involvement of caspases in general and of caspase-3 in particular in TFF3 induced apoptosis in retinoblastoma cell lines. Soft agarose and in ovo chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assays revealed that TFF3 overexpression influences anchorage independent growth and significantly decreases the size of tumors forming from retinoblastoma cells. Our study demonstrates that forced TFF3 expression exerts a significant pro-apoptotic, anti-proliferative, and tumor suppressive effect in retinoblastoma cells, setting a starting point for new additive chemotherapeutic approaches in the treatment of retinoblastoma. PMID:27626280

  5. Sensitive NADH detection in a tumorigenic cell line using a nano-biosensor based on the organic complex formation.

    PubMed

    Akhtar, Mahmood H; Mir, Tanveer A; Gurudatt, N G; Chung, Saeromi; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2016-11-15

    A robust amperometric sensor for β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) detection was developed through the organic complex formation with ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) bonded on the polyethylenimine (PEI)/activated graphene oxide (AGO) layer. The EDTA immobilized sensor probe (GCE/AGO/PEI-EDTA) revealed a catalytic property towards NADH oxidation that allows for the highly sensitive electrochemical detection of NADH at a low oxidation potential. Surface characterization demonstrated that the negatively charged AGO acted as nanofillers in the positively charged PEI matrix through the charge interaction. The immobilization of EDTA on the polymer layer provided more surface area for NADH to interact with through the enhanced chemical interlocking between them. We observed the strong interaction between NADH and EDTA on the AGO/PEI layer using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the calculation of the minimized energy for complex formation. The dynamic range of NADH was determined to be between 0.05μM and 500μM with a detection limit (LD) of 20.0±1.1nM. The reliability of the developed sensor for biomedical applications was examined by detecting NADH in tumorigenic lung epithelial cells using the standard addition method. PMID:27209575

  6. Tumorigenicity analysis of heterogeneous dental stem cells and its self-modification for chromosome instability.

    PubMed

    Meng, Zhaosong; Chen, Guoqing; Chen, Jinlong; Yang, Bo; Yu, Mei; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity demonstrates that stem cells are constituted by several sub-clones in various differentiation states. The heterogeneous state is maintained by cross-talk among sub-clones, thereby ensuring stem cell adaption. In this study, we investigated the roles of heterogeneity on genetic stability. Three sub-clones (DF2, DF8 and DF18) were isolated from heterogeneous dental stem cells (DSCs), and were proved to be chromosome instability (CIN) after long term expansion. Cell apoptosis were not detected in sub-clones, which exhibited strong tumorigenesis tendency, coupled with weak expression of p53 and aberrant ultra-structure. However, 3 sub-clones did not overexpress tumor related markers or induce tumorigenesis in vivo. The mixed-culture study suggested that 3-clone-mixed culturing cells (DF1) presented apparent decrease in the ratio of aneuploidy. The screening experiment further proved that 3 sub-clones functioned separately in this modification procedure but only mixed culturing all 3 sub-clones, simulated heterogeneous microenvironment, could achieve complete modification. Additionally, osteogenesis capability of 3 sub-clones was partially influenced by CIN while DSCs still kept stronger osteogenesis than sub-clones. These results suggested aberrant sub-clones isolated from heterogeneous DSCs were not tumorigenesis and could modify CIN by cross-talk among themselves, indicating that the heterogeneity played a key role in maintaining genetic stability and differentiation capability in dental stem cells. PMID:26322910

  7. Tumorigenicity analysis of heterogeneous dental stem cells and its self-modification for chromosome instability

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Zhaosong; Chen, Guoqing; Chen, Jinlong; Yang, Bo; Yu, Mei; Feng, Lian; Jiang, Zongting; Guo, Weihua; Tian, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneity demonstrates that stem cells are constituted by several sub-clones in various differentiation states. The heterogeneous state is maintained by cross-talk among sub-clones, thereby ensuring stem cell adaption. In this study, we investigated the roles of heterogeneity on genetic stability. Three sub-clones (DF2, DF8 and DF18) were isolated from heterogeneous dental stem cells (DSCs), and were proved to be chromosome instability (CIN) after long term expansion. Cell apoptosis were not detected in sub-clones, which exhibited strong tumorigenesis tendency, coupled with weak expression of p53 and aberrant ultra-structure. However, 3 sub-clones did not overexpress tumor related markers or induce tumorigenesis in vivo. The mixed-culture study suggested that 3-clone-mixed culturing cells (DF1) presented apparent decrease in the ratio of aneuploidy. The screening experiment further proved that 3 sub-clones functioned separately in this modification procedure but only mixed culturing all 3 sub-clones, simulated heterogeneous microenvironment, could achieve complete modification. Additionally, osteogenesis capability of 3 sub-clones was partially influenced by CIN while DSCs still kept stronger osteogenesis than sub-clones. These results suggested aberrant sub-clones isolated from heterogeneous DSCs were not tumorigenesis and could modify CIN by cross-talk among themselves, indicating that the heterogeneity played a key role in maintaining genetic stability and differentiation capability in dental stem cells. PMID:26322910

  8. Science Education Through a Museum Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaparian, Azad; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Describes the polywater exhibit at the Worcester Science Center in Massachusetts. Curiosity and interest are stimulated in young people by allowing them to handle the materials in the exhibit and by providing them with instructions for making polywater. (JR)

  9. Learning by Doing, Creating a Museum Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Main, Sarah; Kallquist, Dierdre

    2000-01-01

    Describes an exhibit called Kid's Kitchen, built within a major exhibit called Biodiversity: Life Supporting Life, in order to discuss environmental prompts hidden within the kitchen designed to surprise students and get them thinking. (ASK)

  10. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shopping centers, malls, etc.) provided it is clearly established that such areas are places the general... exhibits may be forwarded to the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center via the local Navy recruiter with an information copy to the Chief of Information. The primary mission of the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center is...

  11. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shopping centers, malls, etc.) provided it is clearly established that such areas are places the general... exhibits may be forwarded to the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center via the local Navy recruiter with an information copy to the Chief of Information. The primary mission of the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center is...

  12. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shopping centers, malls, etc.) provided it is clearly established that such areas are places the general... exhibits may be forwarded to the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center via the local Navy recruiter with an information copy to the Chief of Information. The primary mission of the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center is...

  13. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shopping centers, malls, etc.) provided it is clearly established that such areas are places the general... exhibits may be forwarded to the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center via the local Navy recruiter with an information copy to the Chief of Information. The primary mission of the Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center is...

  14. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Hearings... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a...

  15. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Hearings... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a...

  16. 29 CFR 2200.70 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Hearings... separate file designated for rejected exhibits. (e) Return of physical exhibits. A party may on motion request the return of a physical exhibit within 30 days after expiration of the time for filing a...

  17. Assessment of the Tumorigenic Potential of Spontaneously Immortalized and hTERT-Immortalized Cultured Dental Pulp Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Ryan; Urraca, Nora; Skobowiat, Cezary; Hope, Kevin A.; Miravalle, Leticia; Chamberlin, Reed; Donaldson, Martin; Seagroves, Tiffany N.

    2015-01-01

    Dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) provide an exciting new avenue to study neurogenetic disorders. DPSCs are neural crest-derived cells with the ability to differentiate into numerous tissues including neurons. The therapeutic potential of stem cell-derived lines exposed to culturing ex vivo before reintroduction into patients could be limited if the cultured cells acquired tumorigenic potential. We tested whether DPSCs that spontaneously immortalized in culture acquired features of transformed cells. We analyzed immortalized DPSCs for anchorage-independent growth, genomic instability, and ability to differentiate into neurons. Finally, we tested both spontaneously immortalized and human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-immortalized DPSC lines for the ability to form tumors in immunocompromised animals. Although we observed increased colony-forming potential in soft agar for the spontaneously immortalized and hTERT-immortalized DPSC lines relative to low-passage DPSC, no tumors were detected from any of the DPSC lines tested. We noticed some genomic instability in hTERT-immortalized DPSCs but not in the spontaneously immortalized lines tested. We determined that immortalized DPSC lines generated in our laboratory, whether spontaneously or induced, have not acquired the potential to form tumors in mice. These data suggest cultured DPSC lines that can be differentiated into neurons may be safe for future in vivo therapy for neurobiological diseases. Significance This study demonstrated that immortalized dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) do not form tumors in animals and that immortalized DPSCs can be differentiated into neurons in culture. These results lend support to the use of primary and immortalized DPSCs for future therapeutic approaches to treatment of neurobiological diseases. PMID:26032749

  18. Lung cancer tumorigenicity and drug resistance are maintained through ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) tumor initiating cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Xiao, Zhijie; Wong, Sunny Kit-Man; Tin, Vicky Pui-Chi; Ho, Ka-Yan; Wang, Junwen; Sham, Mai-Har; Wong, Maria Pik

    2013-10-01

    Limited improvement in long term survival of lung cancer patients has been achieved by conventional chemotherapy or targeted therapy. To explore the potentials of tumor initiating cells (TIC)-directed therapy, it is essential to identify the cell targets and understand their maintenance mechanisms. We have analyzed the performance of ALDH/CD44 co-expression as TIC markers and treatment targets of lung cancer using well-validated in vitro and in vivo analyses in multiple established and patient-derived lung cancer cells. The ALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset showed the highest enhancement of stem cell phenotypic properties compared to ALDH(hi)CD44(lo), ALDH(lo)CD44(hi), ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) cells and unsorted controls. They showed higher invasion capacities, pluripotency genes and epithelial-mesenchymal transition transcription factors expression, lower intercellular adhesion protein expression and higher G2/M phase cell cycle fraction. In immunosuppressed mice, the ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)xenografts showed the highest tumor induction frequency, serial transplantability, shortest latency, largest volume and highest growth rates. Inhibition of sonic Hedgehog and Notch developmental pathways reduced ALDH+CD44+ compartment. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy resulted in higher AALDH(hi)CD44(hi) subset viability and ALDH(lo)CD44(lo) subset apoptosis fraction. ALDH inhibition and CD44 knockdown led to reduced stemness gene expression and sensitization to drug treatment. In accordance, clinical lung cancers containing a higher abundance of ALDH and CD44-coexpressing cells was associated with lower recurrence-free survival. Together, results suggested theALDH(hi)CD44(hi)compartment was the cellular mediator of tumorigenicity and drug resistance. Further investigation of the regulatory mechanisms underlying ALDH(hi)CD44(hi)TIC maintenance would be beneficial for the development of long term lung cancer control.

  19. Suppression of AMF/PGI-mediated tumorigenic activities by ursolic acid in cultured hepatoma cells and in a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wen-Ling; Yu, Feng-Ling; Chang, Ching-Dong; Liao, Ming-Huei; Wu, Hung-Yi; Lin, Ping-Yuan

    2013-10-01

    Our previous studies demonstrated that autocrine motility factor/phosphoglucose isomerase (AMF/PGI) possesses tumorigenic activities through the modulation of intracellular signaling. We then investigated the effects of ursolic acid (UA), oleanolic acid (OA), tangeretin, and nobiletin against AMF/PGI-mediated oncogenesis in cultured stable Huh7 and Hep3B cells expressing wild-type or mutated AMF/PGI and in a mouse model in this study. The working concentrations of the tested compounds were lower than their IC10 , which was determined by Brdu incorporation and colony formation assay. Only UA efficiently suppressed the AMF/PGI-induced Huh7 cell migration and MMP-3 secretion. Additionally, UA inhibited the AMF/PGI-mediated protection against TGF-β-induced apoptosis in Hep3B cells, whereas OA, tangeretin, and nobiletin had no effect. In Huh7 cells and tumor tissues, UA disrupted the Src/RhoA/PI 3-kinase signaling and complex formation induced by AMF/PGI. In the Hep3B system, UA dramatically suppressed AMF/PGI-induced anti-apoptotic signaling transmission, including Akt, p85, Bad, and Stat3 phosphorylation. AMF/PGI enhances tumor growth, angiogenesis, and pulmonary metastasis in mice, which is correlated with its enzymatic activity, and critically, UA intraperitoneal injection reduces the tumorigenesis in vivo, enhances apoptosis in tumor tissues and also prolongs mouse survival. Combination of sub-optimal dose of UA and cisplatin, a synergistic tumor cell-killing effects was found. Thus, UA modulates intracellular signaling and might serve as a functional natural compound for preventing or alleviating hepatocellular carcinoma.

  20. Tumorigenic risk of human induced pluripotent stem cell explants cultured on mouse SNL76/7 feeder cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Mizuna; Mitsui, Youji Kumazaki, Tsutomu; Kawahara, Yuta; Matsuo, Taira; Takahashi, Tomoko

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • hiPS cell explants formed malignant tumors when SNL76/7 feeder cells were used. • Multi type tumors developed by interaction of SNL76/7 feeder cells with hiPS cells. • Tumorigenic risk occurs by co-culture of hiPS cells with SNL76/7 feeder cells. - Abstract: The potential for tumor formation from transplanted human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derivatives represents a high risk in their application to regenerative medicine. We examined the genetic origin and characteristics of tumors, that were formed when 13 hiPSC lines, established by ourselves, and 201B7 hiPSC from Kyoto University were transplanted into severe combined immune-deficient (SCID) mice. Though teratomas formed in 58% of mice, five angiosarcomas, one malignant solitary fibrous tumor and one undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma formed in the remaining mice. Three malignant cell lines were established from the tumors, which were derived from mitomycin C (MMC)-treated SNL76/7 (MMC-SNL) feeder cells, as tumor development from fusion cells between MMC-SNL and hiPSCs was negative by genetic analysis. While parent SNL76/7 cells produced malignant tumors, neither MMC-SNL nor MMC-treated mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) produced malignant tumors. When MMC-SNL feeder cells were co-cultured with hiPSCs, growing cell lines were generated, that expressed genes similar to the parent SNL76/7 cells. Thus, hiPSCs grown on MMC-SNL feeder cells have a high risk of generating feeder-derived malignant tumors. The possible mechanism(s) of growth restoration and the formation of multiple tumor types are discussed with respect of the interactions between MMC-SNL and hiPSC.

  1. MST3 promotes proliferation and tumorigenicity through the VAV2/Rac1 signal axis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Chien-Yu; Lee, Kuo-Ting; Chen, Wei-Ching; Wang, Chih-Yang; Chang, Yung-Sheng; Huang, Hau-Lun; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Yen, Meng-Chi; Lai, Ming-Zong; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2016-01-01

    MST3 (mammalian STE20-like kinase 3) belongs to the Ste20 serine/threonine protein kinase family. The role of MST3 in tumor growth is less studied; therefore, we investigates the function of MST3 in breast cancer. Here, we demonstrate that MST3 is overexpressed in human breast tumors. Online Kaplan-Meier plotter analysis reveals that overexpression of MST3 predicts poor prognosis in breast cancer patients. Knockdown of MST3 with shRNA inhibits proliferation and anchorage-independent growth in vitro. Downregulation of MST3 in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells decreases tumor formation in NOD/SCID mice. MST3 interacts with VAV2, but not VAV3, as demonstrated by co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopy. By domain mapping of MST3, we determine that the proline-rich region of MST3 (353KDIPKRP359) interacts with the SH3 domain of VAV2. Mutation of the two proline residues in this domain significantly attenuates the interaction between MST3 and VAV2. Overexpression of wild-type MST3 (WT-MST3), but not proline-rich-deleted MST3 (ΔP-MST3), enhances the proliferation rate and anchorage-independent growth of MDA-MB-468 cells. Overexpression of MST3 increases VAV2 phosphorylation and GTP-Rac1, whereas downregulation of MST3 or delivery of ΔP-MST3 results in a reduction of VAV2 and Rac1 activation. Knockdown of MST3 inhibits cyclin D1 protein expression. The Rac1 inhibitor EHop-016 attenuates cell proliferation induced by WT-MST3. Finally, Knockdown of MST3 or Rac1 inhibitor decreases cyclin D protein expression, which is important for tumor growth. These results indicate that MST3 interacts with VAV2 to activate Rac1 and promote the tumorigenicity of breast cancer. PMID:26910843

  2. Tumorigenic WAP-T Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells: A Model for a Self-Reproducing Homeostatic Cancer Cell System

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Benjamin; Gruner, Katharina; Heinlein, Christina; Kühl, Marion; Warnecke, Gabriele; Schumacher, Udo; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V.

    2010-01-01

    Background In analogy to normal stem cell differentiation, the current cancer stem cell (CSC) model presumes a hierarchical organization and an irreversible differentiation in tumor tissue. Accordingly, CSCs should comprise only a small subset of the tumor cells, which feeds tumor growth. However, some recent findings raised doubts on the general applicability of the CSC model and asked for its refinement. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we analyzed the CSC properties of mammary carcinoma cells derived from transgenic (WAP-T) mice. We established a highly tumorigenic WAP-T cell line (G-2 cells) that displays stem-like traits. G-2 cells, as well as their clonal derivates, are closely related to primary tumors regarding histology and gene expression profiles, and reflect heterogeneity regarding their differentiation states. G-2 cultures comprise cell populations in distinct differentiation states identified by co-expression of cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratins and vimentin), a combination of cell surface markers and a set of transcription factors. Cellular subsets sorted according to expression of CD24a, CD49f, CD61, Epcam, Sca1, and Thy1 cell surface proteins, or metabolic markers (e.g. ALDH activity) are competent to reconstitute the initial cellular composition. Repopulation efficiency greatly varies between individual subsets and is influenced by interactions with the respective complementary G-2 cellular subset. The balance between differentiation states is regulated in part by the transcription factor Sox10, as depletion of Sox10 led to up-regulation of Twist2 and increased the proportion of Thy1-expressing cells representing cells in a self-renewable, reversible, quasi-mesenchymal differentiation state. Conclusions/Significance G-2 cells constitute a self-reproducing cancer cell system, maintained by bi- and unidirectional conversion of complementary cellular subsets. Our work contributes to the current controversial discussion on the existence

  3. Anti-inflammatory and Anti-tumorigenic Effects of Açai Berry in Helicobacter felis-infected mice

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ju Yup; Kim, Nayoung; Choi, Yoon Jeong; Nam, Ryoung Hee; Lee, Seonmin; Ham, Min Hee; Suh, Ji Hyung; Choi, Yoon Jin; Lee, Hye Seung; Lee, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-tumorigenic effect of açai berry after chronic Helicobacter felis colonization in the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice. Methods: A total of 57 four-week-old female C57BL/6 mice (18 control mice and 39 experimental mice) were used. The mice were administered orogastrically with vehicle only or vehicle containing H. felis, 5 times every other day. After inoculation of H. felis, mice were fed either a standard or an açai-containing diet and then sacrificed at 4, 24, and 52 weeks. The infection status and degree of inflammation were determined by culture and histopathology. The level of gastric mucosal myeloperoxidase (MPO), TNF-α, and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) were measured by ELISA. Results: At 24 weeks after inoculation, mucosal atrophy and mucous metaplasia appeared in all infected mice. At 52 weeks after inoculation, dysplastic change was noted in 10%, 25%, and 50% of mice in the H. felis-control, H. felis-açai 5%, and H. felis-açai 10% groups, respectively. The neutrophil, monocyte, atrophy, and metaplasia grades of infected mice showed no significant difference among the H. felis-infected groups. H. felis-infected mice fed with açai berry showed no significant difference compared with H. felis-infected control mice in gastric mucosal MPO, TNF-α, and IL-1β levels. Conclusions: H. felis that colonized the stomachs of C57BL/6 mice provoked inflammation, and induced mucosal atrophy, metaplasia, and dysplasia. However, açai berry did not effectively prohibit the gastric carcinogenesis which was induced by chronic H. felis infection. PMID:27051649

  4. Differential expression of centrosome regulators in Her2+ breast cancer cells versus non-tumorigenic MCF10A cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Centrosome amplification (CA) amongst particular breast cancer subtypes (Her2+ subtype) is associated with genomic instability and aggressive tumor phenotypes. However, changes in signaling pathways associated with centrosome biology have not been fully explored in subtype specific models. Novel centrosome regulatory genes that are selectively altered in Her2+ breast cancer cells are of interest in discerning why CA is more prevalent in this subtype. To determine centrosome/cell cycle genes that are altered in Her2+ cells that display CA (HCC1954) versus non-tumorigenic cells (MCF10A), we carried out a gene microarray. Expression differences were validated by real-time PCR and Western blotting. After the microarray validation, we pursued a panel of upregulated and downregulated genes based on novelty/relevance to centrosome duplication. Functional experiments measuring CA and BrdU incorporation were completed after genetic manipulation of targets (TTK, SGOL1, MDM2 and SFRP1). Amongst genes that were downregulated in HCC1954 cells, knockdown of MDM2 and SFRP1 in MCF10A cells did not consistently induce CA or impaired BrdU incorporation. Conversely, amongst upregulated genes in HCC1954 cells, knockdown of SGOL1 and TTK decreased CA in breast cancer cells, while BrdU incorporation was only altered by SGOL1 knockdown. We also explored the Kaplan Meier Plot resource and noted that MDM2 and SFRP1 are positively associated with relapse free survival in all breast cancer subtypes, while TTK is negatively correlated with overall survival of Luminal A patients. Based on this functional screen, we conclude that SGOL1 and TTK are important modulators of centrosome function in a breast cancer specific model. PMID:25278993

  5. Upregulation of adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3) increases the tumorigenic potential of cells by activating the CREB pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jin; Hwang, Jung-Ah; Lee, Jieun; Choi, Il-Ju; Seo, Hyehyun; Park, Jong-Hoon; Suzuki, Hiromu; Yamamoto, Eiichiro; Kim, In-Hoo; Jeong, Jin Sook; Ju, Mi Ha; Lee, Dong-Hee; Lee, Yeon-Su

    2013-01-01

    Adenylate cyclase 3 (ADCY3) is a widely expressed membrane-associated protein in human tissues, which catalyzes the formation of cyclic adenosine-3′,5′-monophosphate (cAMP). However, our transcriptome analysis of gastric cancer tissue samples (NCBI GEO GSE30727) revealed that ADCY3 expression was specifically altered in cancer samples. Here we investigated the tumor-promoting effects of ADCY3 overexpression and confirmed a significant correlation between the upregulation of ADCY3 and Lauren's intestinal-type gastric cancers. ADCY3 overexpression increased cell migration, invasion, proliferation, and clonogenicity in HEK293 cells; conversely, silencing ADCY3 expression in SNU-216 cells reduced these phenotypes. Interestingly, ADCY3 overexpression increased both the mRNA level and activity of matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 by increasing the levels of cAMP and phosphorylated cAMP-responsive element-binding protein (CREB). Consistent with these findings, treatment with a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor decreased MMP2 and MMP9 expression levels in ADCY3-overexpressing cells. Knockdown of ADCY3 expression by stable shRNA in human gastric cancer cells suppressed tumor growth in a tumor xenograft model. Thus, ADCY3 overexpression may exert its tumor-promoting effects via the cAMP/PKA/CREB pathway. Additionally, bisulfite sequencing of the ADCY3 promoter region revealed that gene expression was reduced by hypermethylation of CpG sites, and increased by 5-Aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC)-induced demethylation. Our study is the first to report an association of ADCY3 with gastric cancer as well as its tumorigenic potentials. In addition, we demonstrate that the expression of ADCY3 is regulated through an epigenetic mechanism. Further study on the mechanism of ADCY3 in tumorigenesis will provide the basis as a new molecular target of gastric cancer. PMID:24113161

  6. Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K upregulates the kinetochore complex component NUF2 and promotes the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sugimasa, Hironobu; Taniue, Kenzui; Kurimoto, Akiko; Takeda, Yasuko; Kawasaki, Yoshihiro; Akiyama, Tetsu

    2015-03-27

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K (hnRNP K) is a multi-functional protein involved in transcription, mRNA splicing, mRNA stabilization and translation. Although hnRNP K has been suggested to play a role in the development of many cancers, its molecular function in colorectal cancer has remained elusive. Here we show that hnRNP K plays an important role in the mitotic process in HCT116 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, we demonstrate that hnRNP K directly transactivates the NUF2 gene, the product of which is a component of the NDC80 kinetochore complex and which is known to be critical for a stable spindle microtubule-kinetochore attachment. In addition, knockdown of both hnRNP K and NUF2 caused failure in metaphase chromosome alignment and drastic decrease in the growth of colon cancer cells. These results suggest that the hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the mitotic process and proliferation of colon cancer cells and that this axis could be a target for the therapy of colon cancer. - Highlights: • hnRNP K is required for the tumorigenicity of colon cancer cells. • hnRNP K binds to the promoter region of NUF2 and activates its transcription. • NUF2 expression is correlated with hnRNP K expression in colorectal cancer tissue. • hnRNP K and NUF2 are required for metaphase chromosome alignment. • The hnRNP K-NUF2 axis is important for the proliferation of colon cancer cells.

  7. Hepatitis B virus X protein mutants exhibit distinct biological activities in hepatoma Huh7 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Xiaohong; Zhang Shuhui; Lin Jing; Zhang Shunmin; Feitelson, Mark A.; Gao Hengjun; Zhu Minghua

    2008-09-05

    The role of the hepatitis B virus X protein (HBx) in hepatocarcinogenesis remains controversial. To investigate the biological impact of hepatitis B virus x gene (HBx) mutation on hepatoma cells, plasmids expressing the full-length HBx or HBx deletion mutants were constructed. The biological activities in these transfectants were analyzed by a series of assays. Results showed that HBx3'-20 and HBx3'-40 amino acid deletion mutants exhibited an increase in cellular proliferation, focus formation, tumorigenicity, and invasive growth and metastasis through promotion of the cell cycle from G0/G1 to the S phase, when compared with the full-length HBx. In contrast, HBx3'-30 amino acid deletion mutant repressed cell proliferation by blocking in G1 phase. The expression of P53, p21{sup WAF1}, p14{sup ARF}, and MDM2 proteins was regulated by expression of HBx mutants. In conclusions, HBx variants showed different effects and functions on cell proliferation and invasion by regulation of the cell cycle progression and its associated proteins expression.

  8. Superconductive microstrip exhibiting negative differential resistivity

    DOEpatents

    Huebener, R.P.; Gallus, D.E.

    1975-10-28

    A device capable of exhibiting negative differential electrical resistivity over a range of values of current and voltage is formed by vapor- depositing a thin layer of a material capable of exhibiting superconductivity on an insulating substrate, establishing electrical connections at opposite ends of the deposited strip, and cooling the alloy into its superconducting range. The device will exhibit negative differential resistivity when biased in the current- induced resistive state.

  9. Encountering Nanotechnology in an Interactive Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murriello, Sandra E.; Knobel, Marcelo

    2008-01-01

    This article offers findings from a learning sciences-informed evaluation of a nanoscience and nanotechnology exhibition called Nano-Aventura (NanoAdventure), based on four interactive-collaborative games and two narrated videos. This traveling exhibition was developed in Brazil by the Museu Exploratorio de Ciencias for children and teenagers…

  10. Strategies for Determining Exhibit Effectiveness. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shettel, Harris H.; And Others

    This project was designed to develop research strategies and hypotheses for evaluating the effectiveness of exhibits. An exhibit on the role of the Federal Government in science and technology was used as the subject matter. Two basic groups of viewers were used, casual viewers and paid experimental viewers. Both were tested on knowledge gained…

  11. Memory and Mourning: An Exhibit History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberle, Scott G.

    2005-01-01

    Mounted by the Strong Museum in Rochester, New York, in 1993, and traveling nationally thereafter, the exhibit Memory and Mourning provided historical and contemporary perspectives to help museum guests explore their own reactions to loss and grief. In the process the exhibit's development team encountered a range of philosophical, historical,…

  12. Science Fiction Exhibits as STEM Gateways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robie, Samantha

    Women continue to hold less than a quarter of all STEM jobs in the United States, prompting many museums to develop programs and exhibits with the express goal of interesting young girls in scientific fields. At the same time, a number of recent museum exhibits have harnessed the popularity of pop culture and science fiction in order to interest general audiences in STEM subject matter, as well as using the exhibits as springboards to expand or shift mission goals and focus. Because science fiction appears to be successful at raising interest in STEM fields, it may be an effective way to garner the interest of young girls in STEM in particular. This research seeks to describe the ways in which museums are currently using science fiction exhibits to interest young girls in STEM fields and careers. Research focused on four institutions across the country hosting three separate exhibits, and included staff interviews and content analysis of exhibit descriptions, promotional materials, a summative evaluation and supplementary exhibit productions. In some ways, science fiction exhibits do serve young girls, primarily through the inclusion of female role models, staff awareness, and prototype testing to ensure interactives are attractive to girls as well as to boys. However, STEM appears to be underutilized, which may be partly due to a concern within the field that the outcome of targeting a specific gender could be construed as "stereotyping".

  13. Learning4Life on the Exhibit Floor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The exhibit floor is a wealth of knowledge. One can read, view, and listen to information presented in many formats. Somewhere on the exhibit floor there are experts on every topic, ready and waiting for one's questions. But like any research topic, frequently a structured search is required to find the best answers. This article discusses how to…

  14. A Computer-Assisted 3D Model for Analyzing the Aggregation of Tumorigenic Cells Reveals Specialized Behaviors and Unique Cell Types that Facilitate Aggregate Coalescence

    PubMed Central

    Scherer, Amanda; Kuhl, Spencer; Wessels, Deborah; Lusche, Daniel F.; Hanson, Brett; Ambrose, Joseph; Voss, Edward; Fletcher, Emily; Goldman, Charles; Soll, David R.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a 4D computer-assisted reconstruction and motion analysis system, J3D-DIAS 4.1, and applied it to the reconstruction and motion analysis of tumorigenic cells in a 3D matrix. The system is unique in that it is fast, high-resolution, acquires optical sections using DIC microscopy (hence there is no associated photoxicity), and is capable of long-term 4D reconstruction. Specifically, a z-series at 5 μm increments can be acquired in less than a minute on tissue samples embedded in a 1.5 mm thick 3D Matrigel matrix. Reconstruction can be repeated at intervals as short as every minute and continued for 30 days or longer. Images are converted to mathematical representations from which quantitative parameters can be derived. Application of this system to cancer cells from established lines and fresh tumor tissue has revealed unique behaviors and cell types not present in non-tumorigenic lines. We report here that cells from tumorigenic lines and tumors undergo rapid coalescence in 3D, mediated by specific cell types that we have named “facilitators” and “probes.” A third cell type, the “dervish”, is capable of rapid movement through the gel and does not adhere to it. These cell types have never before been described. Our data suggest that tumorigenesis in vitro is a developmental process involving coalescence facilitated by specialized cells that culminates in large hollow spheres with complex architecture. The unique effects of select monoclonal antibodies on these processes demonstrate the usefulness of the model for analyzing the mechanisms of anti-cancer drugs. PMID:25790299

  15. Chondroitin Sulfate-E Is a Negative Regulator of a Pro-Tumorigenic Wnt/Beta-Catenin-Collagen 1 Axis in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Catherine M.; Klüppel, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Expression of the glycosaminoglycan chondroitin sulfate-E (CS-E) is misregulated in many human cancers, including breast cancer. Cell-surface associated CS-E has been shown to have pro-tumorigenic functions, and pharmacological treatment with exogenous CS-E has been proposed to interfere with tumor progression mediated by endogenous CS-E. However, the effects of exogenous CS-E on breast cancer cell behavior, and the molecular mechanisms deployed by CS-E are not well understood. We show here that treatment with CS-E, but not other chondroitin forms, could interfere with the invasive protrusion formation and migration of breast cancer cells in three-dimensional organotypic cultures. Microarray analysis identified transcriptional programs controlled by CS-E in these cells. Importantly, negative regulation of the pro-metastatic extracellular matrix gene Col1a1 was required for the anti-migratory effects of exogenous CS-E. Knock-down of Col1a1 gene expression mimics the effects of CS-E treatment, while exposing cells to a preformed collagen I matrix interfered with the anti-migratory effects of CS-E. In addition, CS-E specifically interfered with Wnt/beta-catenin signaling, a known pro-tumorigenic pathway. Lastly, we demonstrate that Col1a1 is a positively regulated target gene of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway in breast cancer cells. Together, our data identify treatment with exogenous CS-E as negative regulatory mechanism of breast cancer cell motility through interference with a pro-tumorigenic Wnt/beta-catenin - Collagen I axis. PMID:25090092

  16. FAAH inhibition enhances anandamide mediated anti-tumorigenic effects in non-small cell lung cancer by downregulating the EGF/EGFR pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Janani; Sneh, Amita; Shilo, Konstantin; Nasser, Mohd W.; Ganju, Ramesh K.

    2014-01-01

    The endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA), a neurotransmitter was shown to have anti-cancer effects. Fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) metabolizes AEA and decreases its anti-tumorigenic activity. In this study, we have analyzed the role of FAAH inhibition in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We have shown that FAAH and CB1 receptor which is activated by AEA are expressed in lung adenocarcinoma patient samples and NSCLC cell lines A549 and H460. Since the synthetic analogue of anandamide (Met-F-AEA) did not possess significant anti-tumorigenic effects, we used Met-F-AEA in combination with FAAH inhibitor URB597 which significantly reduced EGF (epidermal growth factor)-induced proliferative and chemotactic activities in vitro when compared to anti-tumorigenic activity of Met-F-AEA alone. Further analysis of signaling mechanisms revealed that Met-F-AEA in combination with URB597 inhibits activation of EGFR and its downstream signaling ERK, AKT and NF-kB. In addition, it inhibited MMP2 secretion and stress fiber formation. We have also shown that the Met-F-AEA in combination with URB597 induces G0/G1 cell cycle arrest by downregulating cyclin D1 and CDK4 expressions, ultimately leading to apoptosis via activation of caspase-9 and PARP. Furthermore, the combination treatment inhibited tumor growth in a xenograft nude mouse model system. Tumors derived from Met-F-AEA and URB597 combination treated mice showed reduced EGFR, AKT and ERK activation and MMP2/MMP9 expressions when compared to Met-F-AEA or URB597 alone. Taken together, these data suggest in EGFR overexpressing NSCLC that the combination of Met-F-AEA with FAAH inhibitor resulted in superior therapeutic response compared to individual compound activity alone. PMID:24811863

  17. Tumorigenicity studies of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Kanemura, Hoshimi; Go, Masahiro J; Shikamura, Masayuki; Nishishita, Naoki; Sakai, Noriko; Kamao, Hiroyuki; Mandai, Michiko; Morinaga, Chikako; Takahashi, Masayo; Kawamata, Shin

    2014-01-01

    Basic studies of human pluripotential stem cells have advanced rapidly and stem cell products are now seeing therapeutic applications. However, questions remain regarding the tumorigenic potential of such cells. Here, we report the tumorigenic potential of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) for the treatment of wet-type, age-related macular degeneration (AMD). First, immunodeficient mouse strains (nude, SCID, NOD-SCID and NOG) were tested for HeLa cells' tumor-forming capacity by transplanting various cell doses subcutaneously with or without Matrigel. The 50% Tumor Producing Dose (TPD50 value) is the minimal dose of transplanted cells that generated tumors in 50% of animals. For HeLa cells, the TPD50 was the lowest when cells were embedded in Matrigel and transplanted into NOG mice (TPD50 = 10(1.1), n = 75). The TPD50 for undifferentiated iPSCs transplanted subcutaneously to NOG mice in Matrigel was 10(2.12); (n = 30). Based on these experiments, 1×10(6) iPSC-derived RPE were transplanted subcutaneously with Matrigel, and no tumor was found during 15 months of monitoring (n = 65). Next, to model clinical application, we assessed the tumor-forming potential of HeLa cells and iPSC 201B7 cells following subretinal transplantation of nude rats. The TPD50 for iPSCs was 10(4.73) (n = 20) and for HeLa cells 10(1.32) (n = 37) respectively. Next, the tumorigenicity of iPSC-derived RPE was tested in the subretinal space of nude rats by transplanting 0.8-1.5×10(4) iPSC-derived RPE in a collagen-lined (1 mm×1 mm) sheet. No tumor was found with iPSC-derived RPE sheets during 6-12 months of monitoring (n = 26). Considering the number of rodents used, the monitoring period, the sensitivity of detecting tumors via subcutaneous and subretinal administration routes and the incidence of tumor formation from the iPSC-derived RPE, we conclude that the tumorigenic potential of the iPSC-derived RPE was negligible.

  18. Mutagenicity, tumorigenicity, and electrophilic reactivity of the stereoisomeric platinum(II) complexes of 1,2-diaminocyclohexane.

    PubMed

    Leopold, W R; Batzinger, R P; Miller, E C; Miller, J A; Earhart, R H

    1981-11-01

    , the mutagenicities and tumorigenicities of the platinum(II) complexes did not correlate with their reported antitumor activities. Further studies appear warranted to determine whether there may be effective antitumor platinum(II) complexes that are not strongly mutagenic or carcinogenic.

  19. Interleukin-2 gene transfer into murine neuroblastoma decreases tumorigenicity and enhances systemic immunity causing regression of preestablished retroperitoneal tumors.

    PubMed

    Katsanis, E; Orchard, P J; Bausero, M A; Gorden, K B; McIvor, R S; Blazar, B R

    1994-02-01

    Murine neuroblastoma, neuro-2a, was transduced with the retroviral vector LIL-2SN in order to examine the influence of localized interleukin (IL)-2 production on the immune response against a low major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I, class II-negative, and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1-negative tumor. Two neomycin-resistant (neo R) clones, N-2a/IL-2/L (2.5 +/- 0.4 U/ml/10(6) cells/24 h) and N-2a/IL-2/H (44.6 +/- 8.8 U/ml), were studied as representative low and high IL-2 producers, respectively. Using a recently developed retroperitoneal (r.p.) model for implantation of neuroblastoma in its natural site, we demonstrated that production of IL-2 by neuro-2a reduces its tumorigenicity in a dose-dependent fashion. T-cell, but not natural killer (NK) cell, depletion significantly increased tumor induced mortality in syngeneic A/J mice. Mice genetically devoid of T-cells (C.B-17 scid/scid) also experienced a significant increase in mortality rates. This indicates that the antitumor effect of locally secreted IL-2 is mediated primarily through activation of T-cells. Immunization of mice with irradiated N-2a/IL-2/H cells resulted in protection when challenged at a later date with unmodified neuro-2a cells. Depletion of CD8+, but not CD4+, T-cells prior to vaccination abrogated the protective effect, indicating that the priming phase of the immune response is CD8+ T-cell dependent. Mice with established r.p. tumors were vaccinated with N-2a/IL-2/H, which significantly prolonged their survival compared to unimmunized controls and to mice immunized with non-IL-2-producing neuro-2a cells. Because of the similarities of this model with the human tumor, our studies indicate that IL-2-transduced neuroblastoma cells may be effective in generating systemic immunity leading to eradication of minimal residual disease.

  20. Dentin Sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) Gene-Silencing Inhibits Key Tumorigenic Activities in Human Oral Cancer Cell Line, OSC2

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Rajeshree; Tawfik, Amany; Edeh, Nneka; McCloud, Veronica; Looney, Stephen; Lewis, Jill; Hsu, Stephen; Ogbureke, Kalu U. E.

    2010-01-01

    Background We determined recently that dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP), a member of the SIBLING (Small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins) family of phosphoglycoproteins, is highly upregulated in human oral squamous cell carcinomas (OSCCs) where upregulation is associated with tumor aggressiveness. To investigate the effects of DSPP-silencing on the tumorigenic profiles of the oral cancer cell line, OSC2, short-hairpin RNA (shRNA) interference was employed to silence DSPP in OSC2 cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Multiple regions of DSPP transcript were targeted for shRNA interference using hDSP-shRNA lentiviral particles designed to silence DSPP gene expression. Control shRNA plasmid encoding a scrambled sequence incapable of degrading any known cellular mRNA was used for negative control. Following puromycin selection of stable lines of DSSP-silenced OSC2 cells, phenotypic hallmarks of oral carcinogenesis were assayed by western blot and RT-PCR analyses, MTT (cell-viability), colony-formation, modified Boyden-Chamber (migration and invasion), and flow cytometry (cell-cycle and apoptosis) analyses. DSPP-silenced OSC2 cells showed altered cell morphology, reduced viability, decreased colony-formation ability, decreased migration and invasion, G0/G1 cell-cycle arrest, and increased tumor cell sensitivity to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Furthermore, MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, VEGF, Ki-67, p53, and EGFR were down-regulated. There was a direct correlation between the degree of DSPP-silencing and MMP suppression, as indicated by least squares regression: MMP-2 {(y = 0.850x, p<0.001) (y = 1.156x, p<0.001)}, MMP-3 {(y = 0.994x, p<0.001) (y = 1.324x, p = 0.004)}, and MMP-9 {(y = 1.248x, p = 0.005, y = 0.809, p = 0.013)}. Conclusions/Significance DSPP-silencing in OSC2 cell decreased salient hallmarks of oral tumorigenesis and provides the first functional evidence of a potential key role for DSPP in oral cancer biology. The

  1. Tumorigenic poxviruses: genomic organization and DNA sequence of the telomeric region of the Shope fibroma virus genome.

    PubMed

    Upton, C; DeLange, A M; McFadden, G

    1987-09-01

    Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic poxvirus, has a 160-kb linear double-stranded DNA genome and possesses terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of 12.4 kb. The DNA sequence of the terminal 5.5 kb of the viral genome is presented and together with previously published sequences completes the entire sequence of the SFV TIR. The terminal 400-bp region contains no major open reading frames (ORFs) but does possess five related imperfect palindromes. The remaining 5.1 kb of the sequence contains seven tightly clustered and tandemly oriented ORFs, four larger than 100 amino acids in length (T1, T2, T4, and T5) and three smaller ORFs (T3A, T3B, and T3C). All are transcribed toward the viral hairpin and almost all possess the consensus sequence TTTTTNT near their 3' ends which has been implicated for the transcription termination of vaccinia virus early genes. Searches of the published DNA database revealed no sequences with significant homology with this region of the SFV genome but when the protein database was searched with the translation products of ORFs T1-T5 it was found that the N-terminus of the putative T4 polypeptide is closely related to the signal sequence of the hemagglutinin precursor from influenza A virus, suggesting that the T4 polypeptide may be secreted from SFV-infected cells. Examination of other SFV ORFs shows that T1 and T2 also possess signal-like hydrophobic amino acid stretches close to their N-termini. The protein database search also revealed that the putative T2 protein has significant homology to the insulin family of polypeptides. In terms of sequence repetitions, seven tandemly repeated copies of the hexanucleotide ATTGTT and three flanking regions of dyad symmetry were detected, all in ORF T3C. A search for palindromic sequences also revealed two clusters, one in ORF T3A/B and a second in ORF T2. ORF T2 harbors five short sequence domains, each of which consists of a 6-bp short palindrome and a 10- to 18-bp larger palindrome. The

  2. Gallic Acid, an active constituent of grape seed extract, exhibits anti-proliferative, pro-apoptotic and anti-tumorigenic effects against prostate carcinoma xenograft growth in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Manjinder; Velmurugan, Balaiya; Rajamanickam, Subapriya; Agarwal, Rajesh; Agarwal, Chapla

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Gallic acid, a natural agent present wide-range of fruits and vegetables, has been of potential interest as anti-cancer agent; herein, we evaluated its efficacy in androgen-independent DU145 and androgen-dependent-22Rv1 human prostate cancer (PCa) cells Materials and Methods Cell viability was determined by MTT and apoptosis by Annexin V-PI assays. In vivo anti-cancer efficacy was assessed by DU145 and 22Rv1 xenograft growth in nude mice given normal drinking water or one supplemented with 0.3% or 1% (w/v) gallic acid. PCNA, TUNEL and CD31 immunostaining was performed in tumor tissues for in vivo anti-proliferative, apoptotic and anti-angiogenic effects of gallic acid. Results Gallic acid decreased cell viability in a dose-dependent manner in both DU145 and 22Rv1 cells largely via apoptosis induction. In tumor studies, gallic acid feeding inhibited the growth of DU145 and 22Rv1 PCa xenografts in nude mice. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed significant inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, induction of apoptosis, and reduction of microvessel density in tumor xenografts from gallic acid-fed mice as compared to controls in both DU145 and 22Rv1 models Conclusion Taken together, our findings show the anti-PCa efficacy of gallic acid providing a rationale for additional studies with this naturally-occurring agent for its efficacy against PCa. PMID:19543955

  3. Exhibit of School Architecture, 1997. Special Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Architect, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Presents selected winners of the Texas 1997 Exhibit of School Architecture Design Competition. The Caudill and honor award winning projects are listed along with facility photos, brief descriptions, project credits, and the names of the construction companies used. (GR)

  4. Exhibit of School Architecture, 1996. Special Section.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Architect, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Presents selected winners of the Texas 1996 Exhibit of School Architecture Design Competition. The Caudill and honor award-winning projects are listed along with facility photos, brief descriptions, project credits, and the names of the construction companies used. (GR)

  5. The Making of a Museum Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bleecker, Samuel E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the preparation of the Reptile and Amphibian exhibition at the American Museum of Natural History. Various steps involved in developing the ten showcases in a six-year period are presented. (SA)

  6. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of operating such facilities. Exhibit B. A general or key map on a scale not greater than 20 miles to... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the...

  7. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of operating such facilities. Exhibit B. A general or key map on a scale not greater than 20 miles to... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the...

  8. 18 CFR 32.2 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of operating such facilities. Exhibit B. A general or key map on a scale not greater than 20 miles to... facilities used for the generation and transmission of electric energy, indicating on said map the...

  9. 28 CFR 5.201 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the existing or proposed activities engaged in or to be engaged in, including political activities, by... be filed as exhibit C: (1) A copy of the registrant's charter, articles of incorporation...

  10. 28 CFR 5.201 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the existing or proposed activities engaged in or to be engaged in, including political activities, by... be filed as exhibit C: (1) A copy of the registrant's charter, articles of incorporation...

  11. 32 CFR 705.24 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... public of the Navy's mission and operations. (2) To disseminate technical and scientific information. (3... naval equipment, models, devices and information and orientation material placed on public display for information purposes before audiences at conventions, conferences, seminars, demonstrations, exhibits,...

  12. Communicating Complex Sciences by Means of Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, S.

    2011-12-01

    Earth Sciences will have to take over the leading role in global sustainable policy and in discussions about climate change. Efforts to raise attention within the politically responsible communities as well as in the public are getting more and more support by executive and advisory boards all over the world. But how can you successfully communicate complex sciences? For example, to start communication about climate change, the first step is to encourage people to be concerned about climate change. After that, one has to start thinking about how to present data and how to include the presented data into an unprejudiced context. Therefore, the communication toolbox offers various methods to reach diverse audiences. The R&D programme GEOTECHNOLOGIEN conducts roving exhibitions as one of its most successful communication tools. With roving exhibitions GEOTECHNOLOGIEN is able to get in touch with different audiences at once. The main purpose and theme of these exhibitions is to convey the everyday means of climate change to the visitors. It is within the responsibility of science to communicate the effects of a phenomenon like climate change as well as the impact of research results to the everyday life of people. Currently, a GEOTECHNOLOGIEN roving exhibition on remote sensing with satellites deals with various issues of environmental research, including a chapter on climate change. By following the 3M-concept (Meaning - Memorable - Moving), exhibitions allow to connect the visitors daily environment and personal experiences with the presented issues and objects. Therefore, hands-on exhibits, exciting multimedia effects and high-tech artefacts have to be combined with interpretive text elements to highlight the daily significance of the scientific topics and the exhibition theme respectively. To create such an exhibition, strong conceptual planning has to be conducted. This includes the specification of stern financial as well as time wise milestones. In addition

  13. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  14. An Astrobiology Microbes Exhibit and Education Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Marilyn M.; Allen, Jaclyn S.; Stocco, Karen; Tobola, Kay; Olendzenski, Lorraine

    2001-01-01

    Telling the story of NASA-sponsored scientific research to the public in exhibits is best done by partnerships of scientists and museum professionals. Likewise, preparing classroom activities and training teachers to use them should be done by teams of teachers and scientists. Here we describe how we used such partnerships to develop a new astrobiology augmentation to the Microbes! traveling exhibit and a companion education module. "Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract."

  15. Reaching the Public through Traveling Exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-11-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) of Boulder, Colorado has recently developed two museum exhibits called Alien Earths and MarsQuest. It has just started to develop another exhibit called Giant Planets. These exhibitions provide research scientists the opportunity to engage in a number of activities that are vital to the success of these major outreach programs. Alien Earths was developed in partnership with various research missions. The focus of the presentation will be on MarsQuest and Giant Planets. MarsQuest is a 5000 square-foot, \\$3M, traveling exhibition that is now touring the country. The exhibit's second 3-year tour will enable millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and learn more about their own planet in the process. The associated planetarium show and education program will also be described, with particular emphasis on workshops to orient museum staff (e.g. museum educators and docents) and workshops for master educators near host museums and science centers. The workshops make innovative connections between the exhibition's interactive experiences and lesson plans aligned with the National Science Education Standards. These exhibit programs are good models for actively involving scientists and their discoveries to help improve informal science education in the museum community and for forging a stronger connection between formal and informal education. The presentation will also discuss how Giant Planets, a proposed 3500 square-foot traveling exhibition on the mysteries and discoveries of the outer planets, will be able to take advantage of the connections and resources that have been developed by the MarsQuest project.

  16. [All-Russian hygienic exhibitions and museums].

    PubMed

    Kuzybaeva, M P

    2011-01-01

    The material about the popularization of hygiene and health education in Russia in the second half of the 19th century to early 20th century through exhibition and museum activities has been collected for the first time and analyzed in the paper. The role of scientists and scientific medical societies in this process is noted. The significance of museum and exhibition activities in this area for the development of medical science is defined.

  17. Sex differences in science museum exhibit attraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arámbula Greenfield, Teresa

    This study examines the relative attraction of hands-on, interactive science museum exhibits for females and males. Studies have demonstrated that such exhibits can be effective learning experiences for children, with both academic and affective benefits. Other studies have shown that girls and boys do not always experience the same science-related educational opportunities and that, even when they do, they do not necessarily receive the same benefits from them. These early differences can lead to more serious educational and professional disparities later in life. As interactive museum exhibits represent a science experience that is-readily available to both girls and boys, the question arose as to whether they were being used similarly by the two groups as well as by adult women and men. It was found that both girls and boys used all types of exhibits, but that girls were more likely than boys to use puzzles and exhibits focusing on the human body; boys were more likely than girls to use computers and exhibits illustrating physical science principles. However, this was less true of children accompanied by adults (parents) than it was of unaccompanied children on school field trips who roamed the museum more freely.Received: 16 February 1994; Revised: 3 February 1995;

  18. Ultra-sensitive detection of tumorigenic cellular impurities in human cell-processed therapeutic products by digital analysis of soft agar colony formation.

    PubMed

    Kusakawa, Shinji; Yasuda, Satoshi; Kuroda, Takuya; Kawamata, Shin; Sato, Yoji

    2015-01-01

    Contamination with tumorigenic cellular impurities is one of the most pressing concerns for human cell-processed therapeutic products (hCTPs). The soft agar colony formation (SACF) assay, which is a well-known in vitro assay for the detection of malignant transformed cells, is applicable for the quality assessment of hCTPs. Here we established an image-based screening system for the SACF assay using a high-content cell analyzer termed the digital SACF assay. Dual fluorescence staining of formed colonies and the dissolution of soft agar led to accurate detection of transformed cells with the imaging cytometer. Partitioning a cell sample into multiple wells of culture plates enabled digital readout of the presence of colonies and elevated the sensitivity for their detection. In practice, the digital SACF assay detected impurity levels as low as 0.00001% of the hCTPs, i.e. only one HeLa cell contained in 10,000,000 human mesenchymal stem cells, within 30 days. The digital SACF assay saves time, is more sensitive than in vivo tumorigenicity tests, and would be useful for the quality control of hCTPs in the manufacturing process. PMID:26644244

  19. Overexpression of apolipoprotein A-I fused to an anti-transforming growth factor beta peptide modulates the tumorigenicity and immunogenicity of mouse colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Medina-Echeverz, José; Vasquez, Marcos; Gomar, Celia; Ardaiz, Nuria; Berraondo, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) promotes tumor growth, invasion and metastasis in established tumors. In this study, we analyzed the effect of overexpressing an anti-TGF-β peptide fused to apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) as a scaffold molecule. We generated and characterized stable MC38 colon carcinoma clones expressing ApoA-I fused to the anti-TGF-β peptide P144 and ApoA-I as control cells. We evaluated in vitro the gene expression profile, cell cycle and anchorage-independent growth. The in vivo tumorigenic potential and immunogenicity were analyzed inoculating the MC38 clones into C57BL/6 mice, recombination-activating gene 1 knockout mice or mice deficient in NK cells either subcutaneously or intrasplenically to generate hepatic metastases. While overexpression of ApoA-I had no effect on the parameters analyzed, ApoA-I fused to P144 markedly diminished the tumorigenic capacity and metastatic potential of MC38 in vitro and in vivo, thus generating a highly immunogenic cell line. MC38 cells transfected with ApoA-I fused to P144 triggered memory T cell responses able to eliminate the parental cell line upon re-challenge. In summary, expression of ApoA-I fused to P144 is a novel strategy to modulate TGF-β in tumor cells. These results highlight the potential of TGF-β as a target in the development of new antitumor treatments.

  20. Inhibition of the long non-coding RNA MALAT1 suppresses tumorigenicity and induces apoptosis in the human ovarian cancer SKOV3 cell line

    PubMed Central

    LIU, SHIPING; JIANG, XUAN; LI, WEIHUA; CAO, DONGYAN; SHEN, KENG; YANG, JIAXIN

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a 8,000 nucleotide-long, spliced non-coding RNA, which has been reported to be deregulated in several tumors. However, to the best of our knowledge, the role of MALAT1 in ovarian cancer has not been previously investigated. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of MALAT1 inhibition on the tumorigenity of SKOV3 cells. First, stable MALAT1-knockdown ovarian cancer cells and control cells were established using lentivirus-mediated artificial micro RNA interference in order to investigate the effect of MALAT1 inhibition on cell viability, clonability, migration, invasion and apoptosis in vitro. In addition, the effect of MALAT1 on cell growth in nude mice was assessed. To identify the possible targets of MALAT1, total RNA was extracted from MALAT1-knockdown cells and control cells and a microarray analysis was performed. The results showed that MALAT1 inhibition significantly suppressed tumorigenity in vitro and in vivo (P<0.01). Compared with the control cells, 921 genes in the MALAT1-knockdown cells were deregulated by at least two-fold. The results of the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction showed that 19 of the 20 genes selected for validation confirmed the deregulation indicated by the microarray analysis. The findings define a major oncogenic role for MALAT1, which may offer an attractive novel target for therapeutic intervention in ovarian cancer. PMID:27313681

  1. MiR-148a, a microRNA upregulated in the WNT subgroup tumors, inhibits invasion and tumorigenic potential of medulloblastoma cells by targeting Neuropilin 1

    PubMed Central

    Yogi, Kedar; Sridhar, Epari; Goel, Naina; Jalali, Rakesh; Goel, Atul; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Thorat, Rahul; Panwalkar, Pooja; Khire, Atul; Dasgupta, Archya; Shetty, Prakash; Shirsat, Neelam Vishwanath

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, a common pediatric malignant brain tumor consists of four molecular subgroups viz. WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4. MiR-148a is over-expressed in the WNT subgroup tumors, which have the lowest incidence of metastasis and excellent survival among all medulloblastomas. MiR-148a was expressed either in a transient manner using a synthetic mimic or in a stable doxycycline inducible manner using a lentiviral vector in non-WNT medulloblastoma cell lines. Expression of miR-148a to levels comparable to that in the WNT subgroup tumors was found to inhibit proliferation, clonogenic potential, invasion potential and tumorigenicity of medulloblastoma cells. MiR-148a expression in medulloblastoma cells brought about reduction in the expression of NRP1, a novel miR-148a target. Restoration of NRP1 expression in medulloblastoma cells was found to rescue the reduction in the invasion potential and tumorigenicity brought about by miR-148a expression. NRP1 is known to play role in multiple signaling pathways that promote tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. NRP1 expression in medulloblastomas was found to be associated with poor survival, with little or no expression in majority of the WNT tumors. The tumor suppressive effect of miR-148a expression accompanied by the down-regulation of NRP1 makes miR-148a an attractive therapeutic agent for the treatment of medulloblastomas. PMID:26097868

  2. MiR-148a, a microRNA upregulated in the WNT subgroup tumors, inhibits invasion and tumorigenic potential of medulloblastoma cells by targeting Neuropilin 1.

    PubMed

    Yogi, Kedar; Sridhar, Epari; Goel, Naina; Jalali, Rakesh; Goel, Atul; Moiyadi, Aliasgar; Thorat, Rahul; Panwalkar, Pooja; Khire, Atul; Dasgupta, Archya; Shetty, Prakash; Shirsat, Neelam Vishwanath

    2015-01-01

    Medulloblastoma, a common pediatric malignant brain tumor consists of four molecular subgroups viz. WNT, SHH, Group 3 and Group 4. MiR-148a is over-expressed in the WNT subgroup tumors, which have the lowest incidence of metastasis and excellent survival among all medulloblastomas. MiR-148a was expressed either in a transient manner using a synthetic mimic or in a stable doxycycline inducible manner using a lentiviral vector in non-WNT medulloblastoma cell lines. Expression of miR-148a to levels comparable to that in the WNT subgroup tumors was found to inhibit proliferation, clonogenic potential, invasion potential and tumorigenicity of medulloblastoma cells. MiR-148a expression in medulloblastoma cells brought about reduction in the expression of NRP1, a novel miR-148a target. Restoration of NRP1 expression in medulloblastoma cells was found to rescue the reduction in the invasion potential and tumorigenicity brought about by miR-148a expression. NRP1 is known to play role in multiple signaling pathways that promote tumor growth, invasion and metastasis. NRP1 expression in medulloblastomas was found to be associated with poor survival, with little or no expression in majority of the WNT tumors. The tumor suppressive effect of miR-148a expression accompanied by the down-regulation of NRP1 makes miR-148a an attractive therapeutic agent for the treatment of medulloblastomas.

  3. Using Comparative Planetology in Exhibit Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P. B.; Harold, J. B.; Morrow, C. A.

    2004-12-01

    It is critically important for the public to better understand the scientific process. Museum exhibitions are an important part of informal science education that can effectively reach public audiences as well as school groups. They provide an important gateway for the public to learn about compelling scientific endeavors. The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in producing traveling science exhibitions and their associated educational programming (i.e. interactive websites, educator workshops, public talks, instructional materials). The focus of this presentation will be on three of its exhibit projects: MarsQuest (currently on tour), Alien Earths (in fabrication), and Giant Planets (in development). MarsQuest is enabling millions of Americans to share in the excitement of the scientific exploration of Mars and to learn more about their own planet in the process. Alien Earths will bring origins-related research and discoveries to students and the American public. It has four interrelated exhibit areas: Our Place in Space, Star Birth, PlanetQuest, and Search for Life. Exhibit visitors will explore the awesome events surrounding the birth of stars and planets; they will join scientists in the hunt for planets outside our solar system including those that may be in "habitable zones" around other stars; and finally they will be able to learn about how scientists are looking for signs of life beyond Earth. Giant Planets: Exploring the Outer Solar System will take advantage of the excitement generated by the Cassini mission and bring planetary and origins research and discoveries to students and the public. It will be organized around four thematic areas: Our Solar System; Colossal Worlds; Moons, Rings, and Fields; and Make Space for Kids. Giant Planets will open in 2007. This talk will focus on the importance of making Earth comparisons in the conceptual design of each exhibit and will show several examples of how these comparisons were manifested in

  4. Evidence for a role of ferritin heavy chain in mediating reproductive processes of geese.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bo; Jiang, Dongmei; Ma, Rong; He, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Ferritin heavy chain (FHC), which exhibits ferroxidase activity and mediates the primary functions of ferritin, plays a role in regulating reproduction in animals. However, the changes in the FHC mRNA and protein levels in the HPG axis of geese remain to be determined. In the current study, FHC mRNA expression level was quantitatively monitored in the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary and ovary stroma in prelaying and laying geese. In addition, the levels of FHC mRNA and protein were determined in follicles and ovarian stroma of laying geese. In comparison to prelaying geese, the FHC mRNA expression were 2.4, 1.8, and 13 times higher in the hypothalamus, anterior pituitary and ovarian stroma of laying geese, respectively (p<0.05). FHC mRNA and protein were detected in all examined follicles and ovarian stroma. FHC mRNA expression was higher in postovulatory follicles (POFs) and atretic follicles than in developing follicles and ovarian stroma. Furthermore, the FHC protein concentration in POF3 and atretic follicles were, respectively, 1.45 and 1.7 times higher compared with that of F1 (p<0.05). In conclusion, the presented results provided evidence of a link between FHC and goose reproduction, and supplied a theoretical foundation and a new approach for studying reproduction, in particular ovarian follicular development in birds.

  5. After Terror Charges, Artist Exhibits Academic Freedom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Robin

    2008-01-01

    Steven Kurtz, a professor of visual studies at the State University of New York, has been working with various bacteria as part of his counterculture exhibit artworks for nearly 20 years. Four years ago, federal agents raided his home in a bioterrorism investigation. The federal agents had been called to the house by local police officers…

  6. The medial prefrontal cortex exhibits money illusion

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Bernd; Rangel, Antonio; Wibral, Matthias; Falk, Armin

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral economists have proposed that money illusion, which is a deviation from rationality in which individuals engage in nominal evaluation, can explain a wide range of important economic and social phenomena. This proposition stands in sharp contrast to the standard economic assumption of rationality that requires individuals to judge the value of money only on the basis of the bundle of goods that it can buy—its real value—and not on the basis of the actual amount of currency—its nominal value. We used fMRI to investigate whether the brain's reward circuitry exhibits money illusion. Subjects received prizes in 2 different experimental conditions that were identical in real economic terms, but differed in nominal terms. Thus, in the absence of money illusion there should be no differences in activation in reward-related brain areas. In contrast, we found that areas of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which have been previously associated with the processing of anticipatory and experienced rewards, and the valuation of goods, exhibited money illusion. We also found that the amount of money illusion exhibited by the vmPFC was correlated with the amount of money illusion exhibited in the evaluation of economic transactions. PMID:19307555

  7. 18 CFR 153.8 - Required exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... LNG, evidence that an appropriate and qualified concern will properly and safely receive or deliver such LNG, including a report containing detailed engineering and design information. The Commission... Office of Energy Projects, 888 First Street, NE., Washington, DC 20426; (6) Exhibit E-1. If the...

  8. 28 CFR 68.43 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhibits. 68.43 Section 68.43 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE FOR ADMINISTRATIVE HEARINGS BEFORE ADMINISTRATIVE LAW JUDGES IN CASES INVOLVING ALLEGATIONS OF UNLAWFUL EMPLOYMENT OF ALIENS,...

  9. Creating Cross-Cultural Exhibits in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Kazuyo; Erickson, Virginia; Ford, Viktoria

    Theory and practice of the Cross-Cultural Arts Exhibit project initiated by the Krannert Art Museum at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Illinois) is described in this paper. The project was developed based on the concept of post-museum. Instead of transmitting values and knowledge, communication in the post-museum stresses the…

  10. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... required supporting equipment, such as insulation medium pressurizing or forced cooling; (iii) Cathodic protection scheme; and (iv) Type of dielectric fluid and safeguards used to limit potential spills in...) Exhibit H—System analysis data. An analysis evaluating the impact the proposed facilities will have on...

  11. 17 CFR 232.102 - Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pursuant to the schedule's general instructions. See Rule 311(b) of Regulation S-T (17 CFR 232.311(b)). (b... registered investment company or a business development company). (d) Each electronic filing requiring... AND REGULATIONS FOR ELECTRONIC FILINGS Electronic Filing Requirements § 232.102 Exhibits. (a)...

  12. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER THE FEDERAL POWER ACT APPLICATIONS FOR PERMITS TO SITE...

  13. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... relation to the project and other principal interconnected system elements, as well as power flow and loss... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY...

  14. 18 CFR 50.7 - Applications: exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Applications: exhibits. 50.7 Section 50.7 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... destination of the project; (ii) Design voltage rating (kV); (iii) Operating voltage rating (kV); (iv)...

  15. The medial prefrontal cortex exhibits money illusion.

    PubMed

    Weber, Bernd; Rangel, Antonio; Wibral, Matthias; Falk, Armin

    2009-03-31

    Behavioral economists have proposed that money illusion, which is a deviation from rationality in which individuals engage in nominal evaluation, can explain a wide range of important economic and social phenomena. This proposition stands in sharp contrast to the standard economic assumption of rationality that requires individuals to judge the value of money only on the basis of the bundle of goods that it can buy-its real value-and not on the basis of the actual amount of currency-its nominal value. We used fMRI to investigate whether the brain's reward circuitry exhibits money illusion. Subjects received prizes in 2 different experimental conditions that were identical in real economic terms, but differed in nominal terms. Thus, in the absence of money illusion there should be no differences in activation in reward-related brain areas. In contrast, we found that areas of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which have been previously associated with the processing of anticipatory and experienced rewards, and the valuation of goods, exhibited money illusion. We also found that the amount of money illusion exhibited by the vmPFC was correlated with the amount of money illusion exhibited in the evaluation of economic transactions.

  16. MarsQuest: A National Traveling Exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. W.; Dusenbery, P. B.

    1998-09-01

    With the successful landing of Mars Pathfinder and the arrival of Mars Global Surveyor, a new decade of Mars exploration has commenced. MarsQuest, a 5000 square foot traveling exhibition, is being developed to further bring the excitement and discoveries of this "Decade of Mars Exploration" to the public. MarsQuest is partially funded by the Informal Science Education Program of the National Science Foundation and NASA's Office of Space Science. The Space Science Institute (SSI) in Boulder, CO, is leading the project. Scientific and educational advisors from many different universities and government laboratories, most of whom are directly involved in the active and planned Mars missions, will ensure the scientific accuracy, timeliness, and relevance of the key concepts presented in the exhibition and accompanying programs. The traveling exhibit is the primary element of the MarsQuest project. The exhibition experience, carefully keyed to current events in Mars exploration, will transport visitors to the surface of the Red Planet via large murals, dioramas, and numerous interactive displays. There they will have the opportunity to share in the spirit and thrill of exploration, and come to appreciate the similarities and differences between Earth and Mars. A planetarium show, geared to the goals of the MarsQuest project, will be an important sensory addition to the traveling exhibit. The planetarium/star-theater venue presents a unique environment where audience members can literally be surrounded by Mars images. Education and outreach programs comprise the remainder of the MarsQuest project. The goal of these is to make scientific concepts and scientific and engineering processes understandable to students via Mars-inspired curricula. MarsQuest will open in late-1999, traveling to about nine sites throughout the United States and reaching an estimated two to three million children and adults during its planned three-year tour. Mars - coming soon to a museum near

  17. The palaeontological exhibition: a venue for dialogue.

    PubMed

    Murriello, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dialogue between museums and their visitors enables museums to subsist, undergo transformations and become consolidated as socially valued cultural venues. The Museo de La Plata (Argentina) was created in the late nineteenth century as a natural history museum, and this study shows that currently the museum is valued socially as a venue for family leisure and education, at which people make sense to the objects exhibited through characteristics conferred upon them by both the institution and the visitor. Nevertheless, such dialogue is somehow affected by the museographic proposal and the public interpretation of the institutional narrative, which could be analysed within the frame of contextual learning. As a consequence, the evolutionary idea that the museum aims to communicate is distorted by the public. This article highlights the importance of considering the visitors' interpretations when planning museum exhibitions, a perspective that has been rather absent in the Argentinian museums.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of a tumorigenic benzo[a]pyrene metabolite bound to DNA at a single strand-double strand junction

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.B.; Li, B.; Shapiro, R.

    1994-12-31

    It is widely believed that cancer can be initiated when certain biochemically activated chemical substances bind to DNA to produce a covalently linked adduct. Attachment of the substance to DNA can affect the DNA shape, leading to unfortunate biological consequences. These may include replication errors, which could be among the events that start the cellular processes ultimately yielding malignant tumors. Consequently, an understanding at the molecular level of how the DNA shape is affected by such chemicals is critical to understanding the primary event in chemical carcinogenesis. If one could establish structural hallmarks that distinguish DNA bound by a malignant chemical from DNA bound by a benign one, it might ultimately be possible to employ computational tools, instead of bacterial or animal testing, to screen chemical substances for mutagenic and tumorigenic potential.

  19. Disorder in Milk Proteins: α-Lactalbumin. Part B. A Multifunctional Whey Protein Acting as an Oligomeric Molten Globular "Oil Container" in the Anti-Tumorigenic Drugs, Liprotides.

    PubMed

    Uversky, Vladimir N; Permyakov, Serge E; Breydo, Leonid; Redwan, Elrashdy M; Almehdar, Hussein A; Permyakov, Eugene A

    2016-07-15

    This is a second part of the three-part article from a series of reviews on the abundance and roles of intrinsic disorder in milk proteins. We continue to describe α-lactalbumin, a small globular Ca2+-binding protein, which besides being one of the two components of lactose synthase that catalyzes the final step of the lactose biosynthesis in the lactating mammary gland, possesses a multitude of other functions. In fact, recent studies indicated that some partially folded forms of this protein possess noticeable bactericidal activity and other forms might be related to induction of the apoptosis of tumor cells. In its anti-tumorigenic function, oligomeric α-lactalbumin serves as a founding member of a new family of anticancer drugs termed liprotides (for lipids and partially denatured proteins), where an oligomeric molten globular protein acts as an "oil container" or cargo for the delivery of oleic acid to the cell membranes.

  20. Multimodal audio guide for museums and exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebbensleben, Sandra; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2006-02-01

    In our paper we introduce a new Audio Guide concept for exploring buildings, realms and exhibitions. Actual proposed solutions work in most cases with pre-defined devices, which users have to buy or borrow. These systems often go along with complex technical installations and require a great degree of user training for device handling. Furthermore, the activation of audio commentary related to the exhibition objects is typically based on additional components like infrared, radio frequency or GPS technology. Beside the necessity of installation of specific devices for user location, these approaches often only support automatic activation with no or limited user interaction. Therefore, elaboration of alternative concepts appears worthwhile. Motivated by these aspects, we introduce a new concept based on usage of the visitor's own mobile smart phone. The advantages in our approach are twofold: firstly the Audio Guide can be used in various places without any purchase and extensive installation of additional components in or around the exhibition object. Secondly, the visitors can experience the exhibition on individual tours only by uploading the Audio Guide at a single point of entry, the Audio Guide Service Counter, and keeping it on her or his personal device. Furthermore, since the user usually is quite familiar with the interface of her or his phone and can thus interact with the application device easily. Our technical concept makes use of two general ideas for location detection and activation. Firstly, we suggest an enhanced interactive number based activation by exploiting the visual capabilities of modern smart phones and secondly we outline an active digital audio watermarking approach, where information about objects are transmitted via an analog audio channel.

  1. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit entrance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    StenniSphere at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., invites visitors to discover why America comes to Stennis Space Center before going into space. Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center.

  2. Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Designed to entertain while educating, StenniSphere at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., includes informative displays and exhibits from NASA and other agencies located at Stennis, such as this one from the Naval Meteorology and Oceanography Command. Visitors can 'travel' three-dimensionally under the sea and check on the weather back home in the Weather Center. StenniSphere is open free of charge from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.

  3. Art exhibit focuses on African astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-07-01

    Connections between Africans and astronomy are the focus of a new exhibition in the National Museum of African Art in Washington, D. C. "African Cosmos: Stellar Arts," which includes artwork, cultural items, and scientific displays from ancient to contemporary times, is the first major exhibit "that brings together arts and science focused on Africa's contribution to keen observations of the heavens over time," curator Christine Mullen Kreamer said at a 20 June news briefing. Among the exhibit's nearly 100 objects are an ancient Egyptian mummy board that includes a representation of the sky goddess Nut, sculptures by the Dogon people of Mali depicting figures in relation to the cosmos, a video that uses data from two square degrees of the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey, and a nearly floor-to-ceiling "Rainbow Serpent" constructed of plastic containers by Benin artist Hazoume. An untitled acrylic painting (Figure 1) by South African Gavin Jantjes evokes a myth of the Khoi San people of southern Africa, as it portrays a girl throwing evening fire embers into the night sky, where they remained as the Milky Way.

  4. Bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toda, Nicholas R. T.; Song, Jeremy; Nieh, James C.

    2009-10-01

    Associative learning is key to how bees recognize and return to rewarding floral resources. It thus plays a major role in pollinator floral constancy and plant gene flow. Honeybees are the primary model for pollinator associative learning, but bumblebees play an important ecological role in a wider range of habitats, and their associative learning abilities are less well understood. We assayed learning with the proboscis extension reflex (PER), using a novel method for restraining bees (capsules) designed to improve bumblebee learning. We present the first results demonstrating that bumblebees exhibit the memory spacing effect. They improve their associative learning of odor and nectar reward by exhibiting increased memory acquisition, a component of long-term memory formation, when the time interval between rewarding trials is increased. Bombus impatiens forager memory acquisition (average discrimination index values) improved by 129% and 65% at inter-trial intervals (ITI) of 5 and 3 min, respectively, as compared to an ITI of 1 min. Memory acquisition rate also increased with increasing ITI. Encapsulation significantly increases olfactory memory acquisition. Ten times more foragers exhibited at least one PER response during training in capsules as compared to traditional PER harnesses. Thus, a novel conditioning assay, encapsulation, enabled us to improve bumblebee-learning acquisition and demonstrate that spaced learning results in better memory consolidation. Such spaced learning likely plays a role in forming long-term memories of rewarding floral resources.

  5. When do children exhibit a "yes" bias?

    PubMed

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as preference-object and knowledge-object questions pertaining to objects, and knowledge-face questions pertaining to facial expressions. Four-year-olds tended to say "yes" only to knowledge-object questions. Five-year-olds did not show any strong response tendency. Six-year-olds exhibited a nay-saying bias to knowledge-face questions. Also, 3-year-olds could indicate the correct option when asked questions with 2 response options. It suggested that 3-year-olds tended to inappropriately say "yes" to yes-no questions, although they knew the answers to the questions. The mechanism of a yes bias was discussed.

  6. The E = mc{sup 2} exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, D.; Peshkin, M.

    1995-08-01

    The goal of this DOE-supported exhibition is to demystify Einstein`s formula E = mc{sup 2} by illustrating the interchangeability of matter (m) and energy (E), c{sup 2} being the exchange rate. The exhibition has two major parts, {open_quotes}matter into energy{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}energy into matter{close_quotes}, plus a video to connect them. {open_quotes}Matter into energy{close_quotes} has now been completed and has been placed on the museum floor. Positrons from a {sup 22}Na source are annihilated to produce gamma rays that are caught in NaI detectors. The viewer can alter the alignment of the detectors and observe the consequences for the rates of single and coincident counts. The viewer can also observe the effects of placing absorbers in front of the counters. Prototype explanatory graphics were placed around the exhibit and those will probably be changed after we have some experience with their effectiveness. The connecting video is in the process of being produced in collaboration with Fermilab. A cloud chamber for {open_quotes}energy into matter{close_quotes}, where gamma rays from a small Th source will produce observable pairs, was purchased and work to make the pairs visible has commenced.

  7. B7-1 expression decreases tumorigenicity and induces partial systemic immunity to murine neuroblastoma deficient in major histocompatibility complex and costimulatory molecules.

    PubMed

    Katsanis, E; Xu, Z; Bausero, M A; Dancisak, B B; Gorden, K B; Davis, G; Gray, G S; Orchard, P J; Blazar, B R

    1995-03-01

    Neuroblastoma may escape an immune attack by virtue of its low expression of surface accessory molecules essential in the antitumor response. Murine neuroblastoma, neuro-2a, was transduced with the retroviral vector LB7-1SN to examine the influence of B7-1 expression on the immune response directed against a low major histocompatibility class (MHC) I and class II negative, B7-2, and ICAM-1 negative tumor. Using a retroperitoneal model for implantation of neuroblastoma in its natural site, we demonstrated that expression of B7-1 by neuro-2a reduces its tumorigenicity. Coinjection of B7-1-positive and -negative cells improved survival compared with mice receiving B7-1-negative cells alone. This was dependent on the ratio of B7-1+ to B7-1- neuro-2a cells injected. CD8+ and not CD4+ T-cell depletion significantly increased tumor-induced mortality in syngeneic A/J mice, indicating that B7-1 decreases tumorigenicity primarily by direct constimulation of CD8+ T cells. Rejection of N-2a/B7-1 tumors or preimmunization with irradiated N-2a/B7-1 cells die not increase protection to challenge with unmodified neuro-2a cells over mice vaccinated with N-2a/neo. Furthermore, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) precursor frequencies were not significantly higher after in vivo priming and in vitro stimulation with irradiated N-2a/B7-1 compared with N-2a/neo, indicating that B7-1 costimulation by the tumor, in the absence of adequate antigen presentation by MHC molecules, may limit the generation of effective CTLs.

  8. Progression of colorectal cancer is associated with multiple tumor suppressor gene defects but inhibition of tumorigenicity is accomplished by correction of any single defect via chromosome transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Goyette, M.C.; Fasching, C.L.; Stanbridge, E.J. ); Cho, K.; Levy, D.B.; Kinzler, K.W.; Vogelstein, B. ); Paraskeva, C. )

    1992-03-01

    Colorectal cancer has been associated with the activation of ras oncogenes and with the deletion of multiple chromosomal regions including chromosomes 5q, 17p, and 18q. The candidate tumor suppressor genes from these regions are, respectively, MCC and/or APC, p53, and DCC. In order to further understanding of the molecular and genetic mechanisms involved in tumor progression and, thereby, of normal cell growth, it is important to determine whether defects in one or more of these loci contribute functionally in the progression to malignancy in colorectal cancer and whether correction of any of these defects restores normal growth control in vitro and in vivo. To address this question, the authors have utilized the technique of microcell-mediated chromosome transfer to introduce normal human chromosomes 5, 17, and 18 individually into recipient colorectal cancer cells. Additionally, chromosome 15 was introduced into SW480 cells as an irrelevant control chromosome. While the introduction of chromosome 17 into the tumorigenic colorectal cell line SW480 yielded no viable clones, cell lines were established after the introduction of chromosomes 15, 5, and 18. SW480-chromosome 5 hybrids are strongly suppressed for tumorigenicity, while SW480-chromosome 18 hybrids produce slowly growing tumors in some of the animals injected. Hybrids containing the introduced chromosome 5 express the APC gene present on that chromosome as well as the endogenous mutant transcript. Expression of the putative tumor suppressor gene, DCC, was seen in the clones containing the introduced chromosome 18 but was significantly reduced in several of the tumor reconstitute cell lines. Our findings indicate that while multiple defects in tumor suppressor genes seem to be required for progression to the malignant state in colorectal cancer, correction of only a single defect can have significant effects in vivo and/or in vitro.

  9. Non-migratory tumorigenic intrinsic cancer stem cells ensure breast cancer metastasis by generation of CXCR4(+) migrating cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Manna, A; Bhattacharjee, P; Mazumdar, M; Saha, S; Chakraborty, S; Guha, D; Adhikary, A; Jana, D; Gorain, M; Mukherjee, S A; Kundu, G C; Sarkar, D K; Das, T

    2016-09-15

    Although the role of metastatic cancer stem cells (mCSCs) in tumor progression has been well documented, our study reveals a hitherto unidentified role of tumorigenic intrinsic CSCs (iCSCs) in breast cancer metastasis. We show that unlike highly migratory mCSCs residing in the breast tumor disseminating/peripheral regions, iCSCs populate the inner mass of the tumor and are non-migratory. However iCSCs, via paracrine signaling, induce conversion of non-stem cancer cells to CSCs that (i) are identical to the previously reported mCSCs, and (ii) in contrast to iCSCs, express chemokine receptor, chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4), which is crucial for their metastatic potential. These mCSCs also demonstrate high in vivo tumorigenicity. Physical non-participation of iCSCs in metastasis is further validated in vivo, where only mCSCs are found to exist in the metastatic sites, lymph nodes and bone marrow, whereas the primary tumor retains both iCSCs and mCSCs. However, iCSCs ensure metastasis since their presence is crucial for deliverance of highly metastatic CXCR4(+) mCSCs to the migrating fraction of cells. Cumulatively, these results unveil a novel role of iCSCs in breast cancer metastasis as parental regulators of CXCR4(+) mCSCs, and highlight the therapeutic requisite of targeting iCSCs, but not CXCR4(+) mCSCs, to restrain breast cancer metastasis from the root by inhibiting the generation of mCSCs from iCSCs. Considering the pivotal role of iCSCs in tumor metastasis, the possibility of metastasis to be a 'stem cell phenomena' is suggested. PMID:26923331

  10. Non-migratory tumorigenic intrinsic cancer stem cells ensure breast cancer metastasis by generation of CXCR4(+) migrating cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, S; Manna, A; Bhattacharjee, P; Mazumdar, M; Saha, S; Chakraborty, S; Guha, D; Adhikary, A; Jana, D; Gorain, M; Mukherjee, S A; Kundu, G C; Sarkar, D K; Das, T

    2016-09-15

    Although the role of metastatic cancer stem cells (mCSCs) in tumor progression has been well documented, our study reveals a hitherto unidentified role of tumorigenic intrinsic CSCs (iCSCs) in breast cancer metastasis. We show that unlike highly migratory mCSCs residing in the breast tumor disseminating/peripheral regions, iCSCs populate the inner mass of the tumor and are non-migratory. However iCSCs, via paracrine signaling, induce conversion of non-stem cancer cells to CSCs that (i) are identical to the previously reported mCSCs, and (ii) in contrast to iCSCs, express chemokine receptor, chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4), which is crucial for their metastatic potential. These mCSCs also demonstrate high in vivo tumorigenicity. Physical non-participation of iCSCs in metastasis is further validated in vivo, where only mCSCs are found to exist in the metastatic sites, lymph nodes and bone marrow, whereas the primary tumor retains both iCSCs and mCSCs. However, iCSCs ensure metastasis since their presence is crucial for deliverance of highly metastatic CXCR4(+) mCSCs to the migrating fraction of cells. Cumulatively, these results unveil a novel role of iCSCs in breast cancer metastasis as parental regulators of CXCR4(+) mCSCs, and highlight the therapeutic requisite of targeting iCSCs, but not CXCR4(+) mCSCs, to restrain breast cancer metastasis from the root by inhibiting the generation of mCSCs from iCSCs. Considering the pivotal role of iCSCs in tumor metastasis, the possibility of metastasis to be a 'stem cell phenomena' is suggested.

  11. Non ionising radiation as a non chemical strategy in regenerative medicine: Ca(2+)-ICR "In Vitro" effect on neuronal differentiation and tumorigenicity modulation in NT2 cells.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Mario; Megiorni, Francesca; Pozzi, Deleana; Giuliani, Livio; D'Emilia, Enrico; Piccirillo, Sara; Mattei, Cristiana; Grimaldi, Settimio; Lisi, Antonella

    2013-01-01

    In regenerative medicine finding a new method for cell differentiation without pharmacological treatment or gene modification and minimal cell manipulation is a challenging goal. In this work we reported a neuronal induced differentiation and consequent reduction of tumorigenicity in NT2 human pluripotent embryonal carcinoma cells exposed to an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), matching the cyclotron frequency corresponding to the charge/mass ratio of calcium ion (Ca(2+)-ICR). These cells, capable of differentiating into post-mitotic neurons following treatment with Retinoic Acid (RA), were placed in a solenoid and exposed for 5 weeks to Ca(2+)-ICR. The solenoid was installed in a μ-metal shielded room to avoid the effect of the geomagnetic field and obtained totally controlled and reproducible conditions. Contrast microscopy analysis reveled, in the NT2 exposed cells, an important change in shape and morphology with the outgrowth of neuritic-like structures together with a lower proliferation rate and metabolic activity alike those found in the RA treated cells. A significant up-regulation of early and late neuronal differentiation markers and a significant down-regulation of the transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) and the fibroblast growth factor-4 (FGF-4) were also observed in the exposed cells. The decreased protein expression of the transforming gene Cripto-1 and the reduced capability of the exposed NT2 cells to form colonies in soft agar supported these last results. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that the Ca(2+)-ICR frequency is able to induce differentiation and reduction of tumorigenicity in NT2 exposed cells suggesting a new potential therapeutic use in regenerative medicine.

  12. Loss of tumorigenicity with simultaneous changes in radiosensitivity and photosensitivity during in vitro growth of L5178Y murine lymphoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, J.Z.; Budzicka, E.; Niepokojczycka, E.; Rosiek, O.; Szumiel, I.; Walicka, M.

    1983-10-01

    Murine leukemic lymphoblasts L5178Y-R (LY-R) undergo conversion into their L5178Y-S (LY-S) variant as a result of prolonged (5 months to 4 years) cultivation in vitro. LY-R cells are highly tumorigenic in DBA/2 mice; resistant to X-rays (D0 (mean lethal dose (reciprocal of the slope of the linear portion of dose-survival curve) ) . 0.91 grays); and sensitive to ultraviolet radiation (D0 . 0.7 J/sq m), short (up to 60 min) heat (43 degrees) treatment, and certain potential cancer drugs. LY-S cells are practically nontumorigenic in DBA/2 mice; sensitive to X-rays (D0 . 0.56 grays); and resistant to ultraviolet radiation (D0 . 5.5 J/sq m), short heat treatment, and the drugs. The differences in sensitivity of these two cell strains to physical and chemical agents are paralleled by differences in DNA repair efficiency. Although both strains can be cloned in soft agar, LY-S cells invariably show higher plating efficiencies. In vitro mean doubling times are 12 to 15 hr and approximately 10 hr for LY-R and LY-S cells, respectively. The actual loss of tumorigenicity and changes in radio- and photosensitivity associated with conversion of LY-R cells into LY-S cells occur within a short time. This indicates that these changes (and probably other phenotypic changes mentioned above) result from a single event or from several events occurring within a relatively short time elicited by in vitro culture conditions.

  13. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial Loan... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL...

  14. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial Loan... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL...

  15. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial Loan... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL...

  16. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial Loan... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL...

  17. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart E of... - Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) PROGRAM REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Business and Industrial Loan... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 G Exhibit G to Subpart E of Part 1980 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL...

  18. Mars in their eyes - a cartoon exhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pillinger, Pi.

    Recently a collection of 120 cartoons which tell the story of Mars exploration and scientific discovery, past, present and future, was held in London. We discuss the aims of the exhibition, to what extent we believe the original aims were met and report on additional outreach opportunities resulting from the project. The overriding aim was to capitalise on the popular appeal of accessible art - most people admit to enjoying cartoons. This was strengthened by hanging the originals of cartoons which had, mostly, been published in newspapers and magazines in a wide selection of countries. The provenances served to indicate the attraction of Mars to a wide public. We were fortunate to work with the Cartoon Art Trust of the UK who was in the process of relocating to new premises and opening as The Cartoon Museum, in the tourist area of Bloomsbury, central London, very close to the British Museum. "Mars in their Eyes" ran for 10 weeks during April to July 2006; immediately following which a selection of the cartoons was displayed at the week-long Royal Society Summer Exhibition. We explore the differences between the two exhibitions and comment on the various audience responses. We use this comparison to discuss whether a project which is primarily art can be extended to explain science. Does the coupling merely result in dumbing-down of both cultures or is there a true synergy? The experience has led us to coin the phrase "extreme outreach". Projects which are as ambitious as "Mars in their Eyes", without the security of a safe, captive audience, for example at a Science Centre, must be judged by different criteria. Indeed if the project does not meet comparable targets like large visitor numbers, then the honest evaluation of such details can only inform future activities and must not be reflected in the future funding of only "safe" outreach activities.

  19. Noisy neural nets exhibiting epileptic features.

    PubMed

    Kokkinidis, M; Anninos, P

    1985-04-01

    On the basis of our previous studies of noisy neural nets we propose a model for the explanation of epileptic phenomena. Our neural net model is capable of exhibiting epileptic features if the number of spontaneously firing neurons is periodically increased beyond a certain threshold. Some alternative epileptogenic mechanisms are also discussed. The epileptic behavior of the neural net is determined by a combination of certain parameters of its phase diagram. The general features of the model are consistent with several experimental observations and explain some poorly understood clinical phenomena. The differences between normal and epileptic neural nets are explained in terms of the structural properties of the model.

  20. Library exhibits and programs boost science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, Paul B.; Curtis, Lisa

    2012-05-01

    Science museums let visitors explore and discover, but for many families there are barriers—such as cost or distance—that prevent them from visiting museums and experiencing hands-on science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning. Now educators are reaching underserved audiences by developing STEM exhibits and programs for public libraries. With more than 16,000 outlets in the United States, public libraries serve almost every community in the country. Nationwide, they receive about 1.5 billion visits per year, and they offer their services for free.

  1. Nematic liquid crystals exhibiting high birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thingujam, Kiranmala; Bhattacharjee, Ayon; Choudhury, Basana; Dabrowski, Roman

    2016-06-01

    Two fluorinated isothiocyanato nematic liquid crystalline compounds, 4'-butylcyclohexyl-3, 5-difluoro-4-isothiocyanatobiphenyl and 4'-pentylcyclohexyl-3, 5-difluoro-4-isothiocynatobiphenyl are studied in detail to obtain their different physical parameters. Optical polarizing microscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, density and dielectric studies have been carried out for the two samples. Both the samples were found to have high clearing temperature (>100 °C) and exhibit small enthalpy of transition. The two samples exhibit high optical birefringence (Δ n > 0.2). The values of order parameters for the two samples were obtained using different approaches, namely, Vuks', Neugebauer's, modified Vuks' and direct extrapolation method from birefringence data. Experimentally obtained values of order parameters have also been compared with theoretical Maier-Saupe values. The parallel and perpendicular components of dielectric permittivity values of the two compounds were also calculated and their anisotropy values were found to be small. The effect of temperature on the molecular dipole moment μ and the angle of inclination β of the dipole axis with the director have also been investigated in this work.

  2. Supercomputing meets seismology in earthquake exhibit

    SciTech Connect

    Blackwell, Matt; Rodger, Arthur; Kennedy, Tom

    2013-10-03

    When the California Academy of Sciences created the "Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet" exhibit, they called on Lawrence Livermore to help combine seismic research with the latest data-driven visualization techniques. The outcome is a series of striking visualizations of earthquakes, tsunamis and tectonic plate evolution. Seismic-wave research is a core competency at Livermore. While most often associated with earthquakes, the research has many other applications of national interest, such as nuclear explosion monitoring, explosion forensics, energy exploration, and seismic acoustics. For the Academy effort, Livermore researchers simulated the San Andreas and Hayward fault events at high resolutions. Such calculations require significant computational resources. To simulate the 1906 earthquake, for instance, visualizing 125 seconds of ground motion required over 1 billion grid points, 10,000 time steps, and 7.5 hours of processor time on 2,048 cores of Livermore's Sierra machine.

  3. New Monolayered Materials Exhibiting Unusual Electronic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Bezanilla, Alejandro; Martin, Ivar; Littlewood, Peter B.

    Computationally based approaches are allowing to progress in the discovery and design of nano-scaled materials. Here we propose a series of new mono-layered compounds with exotic properties. By means of density functional theory calculations we demonstrate that the pentagonal arrangement of SiC2 yields an inverted distribution of the p-bands which leads to an unusual electronic behaviour of the material under strain [J. Phys. Chem. C, 2015, 119 (33), pp 19469]. A different pentagonal arrangement of C atoms enables the formation of Dirac cones which, unlike graphene, exhibit a strain-mediated tunable band gap. This work is supported by DOE-BES under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. Supercomputing meets seismology in earthquake exhibit

    ScienceCinema

    Blackwell, Matt; Rodger, Arthur; Kennedy, Tom

    2016-07-12

    When the California Academy of Sciences created the "Earthquake: Evidence of a Restless Planet" exhibit, they called on Lawrence Livermore to help combine seismic research with the latest data-driven visualization techniques. The outcome is a series of striking visualizations of earthquakes, tsunamis and tectonic plate evolution. Seismic-wave research is a core competency at Livermore. While most often associated with earthquakes, the research has many other applications of national interest, such as nuclear explosion monitoring, explosion forensics, energy exploration, and seismic acoustics. For the Academy effort, Livermore researchers simulated the San Andreas and Hayward fault events at high resolutions. Such calculations require significant computational resources. To simulate the 1906 earthquake, for instance, visualizing 125 seconds of ground motion required over 1 billion grid points, 10,000 time steps, and 7.5 hours of processor time on 2,048 cores of Livermore's Sierra machine.

  5. Application of an imaging system to a museum exhibition for developing interactive exhibitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyata, Kimiyoshi; Inoue, Yuka; Takiguchi, Takahiro; Tsumura, Norimichi; Nakaguchi, Toshiya; Miyake, Yoichi

    2009-10-01

    In the National Museum of Japanese History, 215,759 artifacts are stored and used for research and exhibitions. In museums, due to the limitation of space in the galleries, a guidance system is required to satisfy visitors' needs and to enhance their understanding of the artifacts. We introduce one exhibition using imaging technology to improve visitors' understanding of a kimono (traditional Japanese clothing) exhibition. In the imaging technology introduced, one data projector, one display with touch panel interface, and magnifiers were used as exhibition tools together with a real kimono. The validity of this exhibition method was confirmed by results from a visitors' interview survey. Second, to further develop the interactive guidance system, an augmented reality system that consisted of cooperation between the projector and a digital video camera was also examined. A white paper board in the observer's hand was used as a projection screen and also as an interface to control the images projected on the board. The basic performance of the proposed system was confirmed; however continuous development was necessary for applying the system to actual exhibitions.

  6. A Traveling Exhibit of Cassini Image Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, Joseph A.; Hedman, M. M.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Ebel, D.; Mac Low, M.; Lovett, L. E.; Burns, J. K.; Schaff, N.; Bilson, E. M.

    2007-10-01

    An exhibit of Cassini's images will open at NYC's American Museum of Natural History in March 2008 and then visit the Johnson Art Museum (Cornell) throughout fall 2008, including during next year's DPS. It is under consideration by several other venues in the States and overseas. The exhibit will feature 40-50 images, ranging from letter size to large posters, taken by remote-sensing instruments aboard Cassini and Huygens. Photos will be organized into a half-dozen thematic clusters (e.g., organized by celestial target or by physical process); a panel will introduce each grouping with individual images identified briefly. The Saturn system is a perfect vehicle to educate citizens about planetary science and origins. The images’ beauty should capture the public's attention, allowing us to then engage their curiosity about the relevant science. Among the Saturn system's broad suite of objects are Enceladus and Titan, two satellites of astrobiological interest; moreover, the rings display many processes active in other astrophysical disks. Several auxiliary ideas will be implemented. In Ithaca, we will project images at night against the museum's sand-colored exterior walls. A 10-12 minute musical composition has been commissioned from Roberto Sierra to open the show. We will encourage school children to participate in a human orrery circling the museum and will seek volunteers to participate in several Saturnalia. At Cornell we will involve the university and local communities, by taping their reactions to the images’ exquisite beauty as well as to their scientific content. Cassini will be the E/PO focus of next year's DPS meeting; those materials will be employed throughout the fall at New York schools and be available to travel with the show. We intend to work with NYC partners to offer teacher credits for associated weekend courses. We will produce classroom materials, including a DVD, for teacher use.

  7. Quiescent Fibroblasts Exhibit High Metabolic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemons, Johanna M. S.; Feng, Xiao-Jiang; Bennett, Bryson D.; Legesse-Miller, Aster; Johnson, Elizabeth L.; Raitman, Irene; Pollina, Elizabeth A.; Rabitz, Herschel A.; Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Coller, Hilary A.

    2010-01-01

    Many cells in mammals exist in the state of quiescence, which is characterized by reversible exit from the cell cycle. Quiescent cells are widely reported to exhibit reduced size, nucleotide synthesis, and metabolic activity. Much lower glycolytic rates have been reported in quiescent compared with proliferating lymphocytes. In contrast, we show here that primary human fibroblasts continue to exhibit high metabolic rates when induced into quiescence via contact inhibition. By monitoring isotope labeling through metabolic pathways and quantitatively identifying fluxes from the data, we show that contact-inhibited fibroblasts utilize glucose in all branches of central carbon metabolism at rates similar to those of proliferating cells, with greater overflow flux from the pentose phosphate pathway back to glycolysis. Inhibition of the pentose phosphate pathway resulted in apoptosis preferentially in quiescent fibroblasts. By feeding the cells labeled glutamine, we also detected a “backwards” flux in the tricarboxylic acid cycle from α-ketoglutarate to citrate that was enhanced in contact-inhibited fibroblasts; this flux likely contributes to shuttling of NADPH from the mitochondrion to cytosol for redox defense or fatty acid synthesis. The high metabolic activity of the fibroblasts was directed in part toward breakdown and resynthesis of protein and lipid, and in part toward excretion of extracellular matrix proteins. Thus, reduced metabolic activity is not a hallmark of the quiescent state. Quiescent fibroblasts, relieved of the biosynthetic requirements associated with generating progeny, direct their metabolic activity to preservation of self integrity and alternative functions beneficial to the organism as a whole. PMID:21049082

  8. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  9. Role in nude mice of interferon and natural killer cells in inhibiting the tumorigenicity of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells infected with hepatitis B virus

    PubMed Central

    Shouval, Daniel; Rager-Zisman, Bracha; Quan, Phuc; Shafritz, David A.; Bloom, Barry R.; Reid, Lola M.

    1983-01-01

    The human hepatoma cell line, PLC/PRF/5, which is persistently infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV), has integrated HBV-DNA, secretes HBV surface antigen (HBsAg), and does not grow readily in congenitally athymic (nu/nu) mice. The present investigation was undertaken to ascertain whether the low tumorigenicity of this cell line was governed by a host immune response and/or was related to expression of HBsAg. Subcutaneous injection of 4-5 X 106 cells into BALB/c nude mice produced localized encapsulated tumors with morphologic features of primary hepatocellular carcinoma in 25% of the animals within 29-40 d. No tumor growth was observed at lower cell inocula. In contrast, SK-HEP-1, an HBV-negative human hepatoma cell line, produced tumors at 1-5 X 106 cells inocula in 66% of the animals. Immunosuppression of mice with antilymphocyte serum (ALS) or irradiation increased tumor incidence in mice inoculated with 1 X 106 PLC/PRF/5 cells to almost 100% and produced local invasiveness. Immunosuppression also reduced the latency, i.e., time to tumor appearance, and increased mean tumor weight. These results suggest that tumorigenicity was limited by the host immune response. The nature of the response was delineated by treating nude mice challenged with tumor cells with sheep anti-mouse interferon globulin (anti-IFN). When 2 X 106 cells were injected, tumor growth occurred in 75% of anti-IFN-treated mice, whereas controls injected with the same number of cells, but not receiving anti-IFN, failed to develop tumors. The tumors in the anti-IFN-treated mice were highly invasive and the latency period until tumor appearance was reduced to 3-5 d. An inverse correlation was found between susceptibility of the hepatoma cells to natural killer (NK) activity in vitro and resistance to tumor growth in vivo. In vitro cytotoxicity for PLC/PRF/5 cells was eliminated by anti-NK 1.1 and complement, establishing the effector cell as an NK cell. NK cell activity 14 d after inoculation of

  10. Agitated Honeybees Exhibit Pessimistic Cognitive Biases

    PubMed Central

    Bateson, Melissa; Desire, Suzanne; Gartside, Sarah E.; Wright, Geraldine A.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Whether animals experience human-like emotions is controversial and of immense societal concern [1–3]. Because animals cannot provide subjective reports of how they feel, emotional state can only be inferred using physiological, cognitive, and behavioral measures [4–8]. In humans, negative feelings are reliably correlated with pessimistic cognitive biases, defined as the increased expectation of bad outcomes [9–11]. Recently, mammals [12–16] and birds [17–20] with poor welfare have also been found to display pessimistic-like decision making, but cognitive biases have not thus far been explored in invertebrates. Here, we ask whether honeybees display a pessimistic cognitive bias when they are subjected to an anxiety-like state induced by vigorous shaking designed to simulate a predatory attack. We show for the first time that agitated bees are more likely to classify ambiguous stimuli as predicting punishment. Shaken bees also have lower levels of hemolymph dopamine, octopamine, and serotonin. In demonstrating state-dependent modulation of categorization in bees, and thereby a cognitive component of emotion, we show that the bees' response to a negatively valenced event has more in common with that of vertebrates than previously thought. This finding reinforces the use of cognitive bias as a measure of negative emotional states across species and suggests that honeybees could be regarded as exhibiting emotions. Video Abstract PMID:21636277

  11. Ferromagnetism exhibited by nanoparticles of noble metals.

    PubMed

    Maitra, Urmimala; Das, Barun; Kumar, Nitesh; Sundaresan, Athinarayanan; Rao, C N R

    2011-08-22

    Gold nanoparticles with average diameters in the range 2.5-15 nm, prepared at the organic/aqueous interface by using tetrakis(hydroxymethyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC) as reducing agent, exhibit ferromagnetism whereby the saturation magnetization M(S) increases with decreasing diameter and varies linearly with the fraction of surface atoms. The value of M(S) is higher when the particles are present as a film instead of as a sol. Capping with strongly interacting ligands such as alkane thiols results in a higher M(S) value, which varies with the strength of the metal-sulfur bond. Ferromagnetism is also found in Pt and Ag nanoparticles prepared as sols, and the M(S) values vary as Pt>Au>Ag. A careful study of the temperature variation of the magnetization of Au nanoparticles, along with certain other observations, suggests that small bare nanoparticles of noble metals could indeed possess ferromagnetism, albeit weak, which is accentuated in the presence of capping agents, specially alkane thiols which form strong metal-sulfur bonds.

  12. Overexpression of wildtype EGFR is tumorigenic and denotes a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Libing; Tang, Yanna; Gao, Lei; Ren, Shengxiang; Cao, Dengfeng; Zhou, Lixin; Zhang, Aiqun; Liu, Deruo; Zhou, Caicun; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Li; Chen, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines for lung cancer treatment with EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) include only patients with mutated EGFR, although some patients with wildtype EGFR (wt-EGFR) have exhibited positive responses to this therapy as well. Biomarkers predicting the benefit from EGFR-TKIs treatment remain to be determined for patients with wild-type EGFR. Here, we report that wt-EGFR overexpression transformed cells in vitro and induced tumorigenesis in vivo in transgenic mouse models. Wt-EGFR driven lung cancer was hypersensitive to TKI treatment in mouse model. Lung cancer patients with high-expression of wt-EGFR showed longer Overall Survival in comparison to low-expression patients after TKI treatment. Our data therefore suggest that treatment with EGFR inhibitors should be extended to include not only patients with mutated EGFR but also a subset of patients with overexpression of wt-EGFR. PMID:26646697

  13. Tumorigenic properties of iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2) mediated by its specific 73-amino acids insert.

    PubMed

    Maffettone, Carmen; Chen, Guohua; Drozdov, Ignat; Ouzounis, Christos; Pantopoulos, Kostas

    2010-04-13

    Iron regulatory proteins, IRP1 and IRP2, bind to mRNAs harboring iron responsive elements and control their expression. IRPs may also perform additional functions. Thus, IRP1 exhibited apparent tumor suppressor properties in a tumor xenograft model. Here we examined the effects of IRP2 in a similar setting. Human H1299 lung cancer cells or clones engineered for tetracycline-inducible expression of wild type IRP2, or the deletion mutant IRP2(Delta73) (lacking a specific insert of 73 amino acids), were injected subcutaneously into nude mice. The induction of IRP2 profoundly stimulated the growth of tumor xenografts, and this response was blunted by addition of tetracycline in the drinking water of the animals, to turnoff the IRP2 transgene. Interestingly, IRP2(Delta73) failed to promote tumor growth above control levels. As expected, xenografts expressing the IRP2 transgene exhibited high levels of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1); however, the expression of other known IRP targets was not affected. Moreover, these xenografts manifested increased c-MYC levels and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. A microarray analysis identified distinct gene expression patterns between control and tumors containing IRP2 or IRP1 transgenes. By contrast, gene expression profiles of control and IRP2(Delta73)-related tumors were more similar, consistently with their growth phenotype. Collectively, these data demonstrate an apparent pro-oncogenic activity of IRP2 that depends on its specific 73 amino acids insert, and provide further evidence for a link between IRPs and cancer biology.

  14. Marine bacteria exhibit a bipolar distribution.

    PubMed

    Sul, Woo Jun; Oliver, Thomas A; Ducklow, Hugh W; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A; Sogin, Mitchell L

    2013-02-01

    The microbial cosmopolitan dispersion hypothesis often invoked to explain distribution patterns driven by high connectivity of oceanographic water masses and widespread dispersal ability has never been rigorously tested. By using a global marine bacterial dataset and iterative matrix randomization simulation, we show that marine bacteria exhibit a significantly greater dispersal limitation than predicted by our null model using the "everything is everywhere" tenet with no dispersal limitation scenario. Specifically, marine bacteria displayed bipolar distributions (i.e., species occurring exclusively at both poles and nowhere else) significantly less often than in the null model. Furthermore, we observed fewer taxa present in both hemispheres but more taxa present only in a single hemisphere than expected under the null model. Each of these trends diverged further from the null expectation as the compared habitats became more geographically distant but more environmentally similar. Our meta-analysis supported a latitudinal gradient in bacterial diversity with higher richness at lower latitudes, but decreased richness toward the poles. Bacteria in the tropics also demonstrated narrower latitudinal ranges at lower latitudes and relatively larger ranges in higher latitudes, conforming to the controversial macroecological pattern of the "Rapoport rule." Collectively, our findings suggest that bacteria follow biogeographic patterns more typical of macroscopic organisms, and that dispersal limitation, not just environmental selection, likely plays an important role. Distributions of microbes that deliver critical ecosystem services, particularly those in polar regions, may be vulnerable to the same impacts that environmental stressors, climate warming, and degradation in habitat quality are having on biodiversity in animal and plant species.

  15. Waves in geomaterials exhibiting negative stiffness behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esin, Maxim; Dyskin, Arcady; Pasternak, Elena

    2016-04-01

    Negative stiffness denotes the type of material behaviour when the force applied to the body decreases the body's deformation increases. Some geomaterials, for instance, rocks, demonstrate behaviour of this type at certain loads: during the compression tests the loading curves exhibit descending branch (post-peak softening). One of the possible mechanisms of the negative stiffness appearance in geomaterials is rotation of non-spherical grains. It is important to emphasize that in this case the descending branch may be reversible given that the testing machine is stiff enough (in general case it means an importance of boundary conditions). Existence of geomaterials with a negative modulus associated with rotations may have significant importance. In particular, important is understanding of the wave propagation in such materials. We study the stability of geomaterials with negative stiffness inclusions and wave propagation in it using two approaches: Cosserat continuum and discrete mass-spring models. In both cases we consider the rotational degrees of freedom in addition to the conventional translational ones. We show that despite non positiveness of the energy the materials with negative stiffness elements can be stable if certain conditions are met. In the case of Cosserat continuum the Cosserat shear modulus (the modulus relating the non-symmetrical part of shear stress and internal rotations) is allowed to assume negative values as long as its value does not exceed the value of the standard (positive) shear modulus. In the case of discrete mass-spring systems (with translational and rotational springs) the concentration of negative stiffness springs and the absolute values of negative spring stiffness are limited. The critical concentration when the system loses stability and the amplitude of the oscillations tends to infinity is equal to 1/2 and 3/5 for two- and three-dimensional cases respectively.

  16. Rats exhibit reference-dependent choice behavior.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Mehwish; Jang, Hyeran; Kralik, Jerald D; Jeong, Jaeseung

    2014-07-01

    Human preferences depend on whether a chosen outcome appears to be a loss or a gain compared with what had been expected, i.e., in comparison to a reference point. Because reference dependence has such a strong influence on human decision-making, it is important to uncover its origins, which will in turn help delineate the underlying mechanisms. It remains unknown whether rats use reference points in decision-making, and yet, the study of rats could help address the question of whether reference dependence is evolutionarily conserved among mammals and could provide a nonhuman animal model to investigate the neural mechanisms underlying this important cognitive process. The aim of the current study was to determine whether rats show reference-dependent choice behavior. We developed a novel paradigm by modifying the "T" maze by installing "pockets" to the left and right of the "T" stem that held reward pellets so rats would potentially develop reference values for each option prior to choice. We found that the rats were indeed sensitive to the way alternatives were presented. That is, they exhibited reference-dependent choice behavior by avoiding the choice option framed as a loss (e.g., having four reward pellets in the pocket, but receiving only one), at least under conditions with certain outcomes and clear differences between the reference and outcome quantities. Despite the small number of rats in this study, this species-level capacity suggests that reference dependence in general and loss aversion in particular may be conserved traits that evolved at or before the emergence of mammals.

  17. 32 CFR 705.26 - Exhibit availability report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... of all exhibits is required. (b) A current inventory of exhibits headquartered in Washington, DC, and...: Officer-in-Charge, Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC 20374....

  18. 32 CFR 705.26 - Exhibit availability report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... of all exhibits is required. (b) A current inventory of exhibits headquartered in Washington, DC, and...: Officer-in-Charge, Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC 20374....

  19. 32 CFR 705.26 - Exhibit availability report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... of all exhibits is required. (b) A current inventory of exhibits headquartered in Washington, DC, and...: Officer-in-Charge, Navy Recruiting Exhibit Center, Washington Navy Yard, Washington, DC 20374....

  20. Inhibition of STAT3, FAK and Src mediated signaling reduces cancer stem cell load, tumorigenic potential and metastasis in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Ravi; Trivedi, Rachana; Rastogi, Namrata; Singh, Manisha; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for aggressive tumor growth, metastasis and therapy resistance. In this study, we evaluated the effects of Shikonin (Shk) on breast cancer and found its anti-CSC potential. Shk treatment decreased the expression of various epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and CSC associated markers. Kinase profiling array and western blot analysis indicated that Shk inhibits STAT3, FAK and Src activation. Inhibition of these signaling proteins using standard inhibitors revealed that STAT3 inhibition affected CSCs properties more significantly than FAK or Src inhibition. We observed a significant decrease in cell migration upon FAK and Src inhibition and decrease in invasion upon inhibition of STAT3, FAK and Src. Combined inhibition of STAT3 with Src or FAK reduced the mammosphere formation, migration and invasion more significantly than the individual inhibitions. These observations indicated that the anti-breast cancer properties of Shk are due to its potential to inhibit multiple signaling proteins. Shk also reduced the activation and expression of STAT3, FAK and Src in vivo and reduced tumorigenicity, growth and metastasis of 4T1 cells. Collectively, this study underscores the translational relevance of using a single inhibitor (Shk) for compromising multiple tumor-associated signaling pathways to check cancer metastasis and stem cell load. PMID:25973915

  1. Adenine-DNA adducts derived from the highly tumorigenic dibenzo[a,l]pyrene are resistant to nucleotide excision repair while guanine adducts are not

    PubMed Central

    Kropachev, Konstantin; Kolbanovskiy, Marina; Liu, Zhi; Cai, Yuqin; Zhang, Lu; Schwaid, Adam G.; Kolbanovskiy, Alexander; Ding, Shuang; Amin, Shantu; Broyde, Suse; Geacintov, Nicholas E.

    2013-01-01

    The structural origins of differences in susceptibilities of various DNA lesions to nucleotide excision repair (NER) are poorly understood. Here we compared, in the same sequence context, the relative NER dual incision efficiencies elicited by two stereochemically distinct pairs of guanine (N2-dG) and adenine (N6-dA) DNA lesions, derived from enantiomeric genotoxic diol epoxides of the highly tumorigenic fjord region polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon dibenzo[a,l]pyrene (DB[a,l]P). Remarkably, in cell-free HeLa cell extracts, the guanine adduct with R absolute chemistry at the N2-dG linkage site is ~ 35 times more susceptible to NER dual incisions than the stereochemically identical N6-dA adduct. For the guanine and adenine adducts with S stereochemistry, a similar, but somewhat smaller effect (factor of ~15) is observed. The striking resistance of the bulky N6-dA in contrast to the modest to good susceptibilities of the N2-dG adducts to NER are interpreted in terms of the balance between lesion-induced DNA-distorting and DNA-stabilizing van der Waals interactions in their structures, that are partly reflected in the overall thermal stabilities of the modified duplexes. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the high genotoxic activity of DB[a,l]P is related to the formation of NER-resistant and persistent DB[a,l]P-derived adenine adducts in cellular DNA. PMID:23570232

  2. Upregulation of E2F8 promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenicity in breast cancer by modulating G1/S phase transition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Lin, Chuyong; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Shu; Bao, Yong; Yang, Qi; Song, Libing; Lin, Huanxin

    2016-01-01

    E2F transcription factors are involved in cell cycle regulation and synthesis of DNA in mammalian cells, and simultaneously play important roles in the development and progression of cancer when dysregulated. E2F8, a novel identified E2F family member, was found to be associated with the progression of several human cancers; however, the biological role and clinical significance of E2F8 in breast cancer remain to be further elucidated. Herein, we report that E2F8 is robustly elevated in breast cancer cell lines and clinical breast cancer tissue samples, respectively. The high expression level of E2F8 significantly correlates with clinical progression (P = 0.001), poor patient survival (P < 0.001) and a high Ki67 staining index (P = 0.008) in 187 human breast cancer specimens. Furthermore, we find that overexpressing E2F8 promotes, whereas silencing E2F8 suppresses, the proliferation and tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. We further demonstrate that E2F8 transcriptionally upregulates CCNE1 and CCNE2 via directly interacting with their respective gene promoter, which accelerates the transition of G1 to S phase of breast cancer cells. Taken together, these findings uncover a novel biologic role and regulatory mechanism of E2F8 responsible for the progression of breast cancer, indicating E2F8 may represent a novel prognostic biomarker and therapeutic target against breast cancer. PMID:26992224

  3. Holy Basil leaf extract decreases tumorigenicity and metastasis of aggressive human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo: potential role in therapy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Tomohiro; Torres, María P; Chakraborty, Subhankar; Souchek, Joshua J; Rachagani, Satyanarayana; Kaur, Sukhwinder; Macha, Muzafar; Ganti, Apar K; Hauke, Ralph J; Batra, Surinder K

    2013-08-19

    There is an urgent need to develop alternative therapies against lethal pancreatic cancer (PC). Ocimum sanctum ("Holy Basil") has been used for thousands of years in traditional Indian medicine, but its anti-tumorigenic effect remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that extracts of O. sanctum leaves inhibit the proliferation, migration, invasion, and induce apoptosis of PC cells in vitro. The expression of genes that promote the proliferation, migration and invasion of PC cells including activated ERK-1/2, FAK, and p65 (subunit of NF-κB), was downregulated in PC cells after O. sanctum treatment. Intraperitoneal injections of the aqueous extract significantly inhibited the growth of orthotopically transplanted PC cells in vivo (p<0.05). Genes that inhibit metastasis (E-cadherin) and induce apoptosis (BAD) were significantly upregulated in tumors isolated from mice treated with O. sanctum extracts, while genes that promote survival (Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL) and chemo/radiation resistance (AURKA, Chk1 and Survivin) were downregulated. Overall, our study suggests that leaves of O. sanctum could be a potential source of novel anticancer compounds in the future. PMID:23523869

  4. Differential expression of thrombospondin (THBS1) in tumorigenic and nontumorigenic prostate epithelial cells in response to a chromatin-binding soy peptide.

    PubMed

    Galvez, Alfredo F; Huang, Liping; Magbanua, Mark M J; Dawson, Kevin; Rodriguez, Raymond L

    2011-01-01

    The chemopreventive properties of the chromatin-binding soy peptide, lunasin, are well documented, but its mechanism of action is unclear. To elucidate the mechanism by which lunasin reduces tumor foci formation in cultured mammalian cells, nontumorigenic (RWPE-1) and tumorigenic (RWPE-2) human prostate epithelial cells were treated with lunasin followed by gene expression profiling and characterization of the chromatin acetylation status for certain chemopreventive genes. The genes HIF1A, PRKAR1A, TOB1, and THBS1 were upregulated by lunasin in RWPE-1 but not in RWPE-2 cells. Using histone acetyltransferase (HAT) assays with acid-extracted histones as templates, we showed that lunasin specifically inhibited H4K8 acetylation while enhanced H4K16 acetylation catalyzed by HAT enzymes p300, PCAF, and HAT1A. These results suggest a novel mechanism for lunasin-dependent upregulation of gene expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed hypoacetylation of H4K16 in RWPE-2 cells, specifically at the 5' end of THBS1 containing a CpG island. Moreover, bisulfite PCR (BSP) and subsequent DNA sequencing indicated that this CpG island was hypomethylated in RWPE-1 but hypermethylated in RWPE-2 cells. Histone hypoacetylation and DNA hypermethylation in the 5' region of THBS1 may explain the inability of lunasin to upregulate this gene in RWPE-2 cells. PMID:21526452

  5. The Activation of the Sox2 RR2 Pluripotency Transcriptional Reporter in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines is Dynamic and Labels Cells with Higher Tumorigenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias, Juan Manuel; Leis, Olatz; Pérez Ruiz, Estíbaliz; Gumuzio Barrie, Juan; Garcia-Garcia, Francisco; Aduriz, Ariane; Beloqui, Izaskun; Hernandez-Garcia, Susana; Lopez-Mato, Maria Paz; Dopazo, Joaquin; Pandiella, Atanasio; Menendez, Javier A.; Martin, Angel Garcia

    2014-01-01

    The striking similarity displayed at the mechanistic level between tumorigenesis and the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells and the fact that genes and pathways relevant for embryonic development are reactivated during tumor progression highlights the link between pluripotency and cancer. Based on these observations, we tested whether it is possible to use a pluripotency-associated transcriptional reporter, whose activation is driven by the SRR2 enhancer from the Sox2 gene promoter (named S4+ reporter), to isolate cancer stem cells (CSCs) from breast cancer cell lines. The S4+ pluripotency transcriptional reporter allows the isolation of cells with enhanced tumorigenic potential and its activation was switched on and off in the cell lines studied, reflecting a plastic cellular process. Microarray analysis comparing the populations in which the reporter construct is active versus inactive showed that positive cells expressed higher mRNA levels of cytokines (IL-8, IL-6, TNF) and genes (such as ATF3, SNAI2, and KLF6) previously related with the CSC phenotype in breast cancer. PMID:25414831

  6. Human class II major histocompatibility complex gene transfer into murine neuroblastoma leads to loss of tumorigenicity, immunity against subsequent tumor challenge, and elimination of microscopic preestablished tumors.

    PubMed

    Hock, R A; Reynolds, B D; Tucker-McClung, C L; Kwok, W W

    1995-01-01

    Immunological recognition of transformed cells is critically important to limit tumor development and proliferation. Because established tumors have escaped immune recognition and elimination, novel strategies to enhance antitumor immunity have been developed. A unique approach has used the introduction of genes encoding major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens into tumor cells. Experiments in mice have shown that the expression of syngeneic class II MHC antigens in tumor cells completely abrogates tumorigenicity and induces tumor-specific immunity. In this study we sought to determine whether a more effective antitumor immune response would be generated by introducing xenogeneic class II MHC genes into tumor cells. To address this question we used recombinant retroviruses to express human class II MHC genes in a highly malignant murine neuroblastoma cell line, Neuro-2a. We found that normal mice inoculated with Neuro-2a expressing the human class II MHC antigen did not develop tumors and were immune to subsequent challenge with unmodified Neuro-2a cells. In addition, mice bearing small established Neuro-2a tumors were cured by vaccination with Neuro-2a expressing human class II MHC. We hypothesize that a similar approach using retroviral-mediated transduction of class II MHC genes into human tumor cells may be an effective alternative to current cancer treatment.

  7. Dehydroeffusol inhibits gastric cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity by selectively inducing tumor-suppressive endoplasmic reticulum stress and a moderate apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Han, Hongyan; Fu, Shilong; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng; Cao, Zhifei

    2016-03-15

    Gastric cancer is ranked as the third leading cause of cancer-related death in the world. Although extensive efforts have been made in recent decades to treat gastric cancer with various anticancer drugs, effective anti-gastric cancer therapeutics to cure the disease are still lacking in the clinics. Therefore, potent novel anti-gastric cancer drugs are greatly needed. In this study, we explored a novel anti-gastric cancer agent from a medicinal herb named Juncus effusus and found that the active component dehydroeffusol (DHE), a small molecular phenanthrene, effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by inducing tumor suppressive endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and by triggering moderate apoptosis. Mechanistic studies revealed that DHE selectively activated the intracellular tumor suppressive stress response by promoting the overexpression of the key ER stress marker DNA damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3), through upregulation of activating transcription factor 4 (ATF4). Concurrently, DHE suppressed the expression of the cell survival and ER stress marker glucose regulated protein of molecular mass 78 (GRP78) via downregulation of the transcription factor ATF6. In addition, DHE markedly activated the stress response signaling pathway MEKK4-MKK3/6-p38-DDIT3, but significantly inhibited ERK signaling. Our data suggest that DHE inhibits gastric cancer cell growth and tumorigenicity through selectively inducing a robust tumor suppressive ER stress response and a moderate apoptosis response. Therefore, DHE may provide a novel drug candidate for further development of potential anti-gastric cancer therapeutics. PMID:26774454

  8. Coexistent ARID1A-PIK3CA mutations promote ovarian clear-cell tumorigenesis through pro-tumorigenic inflammatory cytokine signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Ronald L.; Damrauer, Jeffrey S.; Raab, Jesse R.; Schisler, Jonathan C.; Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Didion, John P.; Starmer, Joshua; Serber, Daniel; Yee, Della; Xiong, Jessie; Darr, David B.; Pardo-Manuel de Villena, Fernando; Kim, William Y.; Magnuson, Terry

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear-cell carcinoma (OCCC) is an aggressive form of ovarian cancer with high ARID1A mutation rates. Here we present a mutant mouse model of OCCC. We find that ARID1A inactivation is not sufficient for tumor formation, but requires concurrent activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase catalytic subunit, PIK3CA. Remarkably, the mice develop highly penetrant tumors with OCCC-like histopathology, culminating in hemorrhagic ascites and a median survival period of 7.5 weeks. Therapeutic treatment with the pan-PI3K inhibitor, BKM120, prolongs mouse survival by inhibiting tumor cell growth. Cross-species gene expression comparisons support a role for IL-6 inflammatory cytokine signaling in OCCC pathogenesis. We further show that ARID1A and PIK3CA mutations cooperate to promote tumor growth through sustained IL-6 overproduction. Our findings establish an epistatic relationship between SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling and PI3K pathway mutations in OCCC and demonstrate that these pathways converge on pro-tumorigenic cytokine signaling. We propose that ARID1A protects against inflammation-driven tumorigenesis. PMID:25625625

  9. Tumorigenicity by human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 in transgenic mice correlates with alterations in epithelial cell growth and differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Griep, A E; Herber, R; Jeon, S; Lohse, J K; Dubielzig, R R; Lambert, P F

    1993-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 and E7 oncogenes are thought to play a role in the development of most human cervical cancers. These E6 and E7 oncoproteins affect cell growth control at least in part through their association with and inactivation of the cellular tumor suppressor gene products, p53 and Rb. To study the biological activities of the HPV-16 E6 and E7 genes in epithelial cells in vivo, transgenic mice were generated in which expression of E6 and E7 was targeted to the ocular lens. Expression of the transgenes correlated with bilateral microphthalmia and cataracts (100% penetrance) resulting from an efficient impairment of lens fiber cell differentiation and coincident induction of cell proliferation. Lens tumors formed in 40% of adult mice from the mouse lineage with the highest level of E6 and E7 expression. Additionally, when lens cells from neonatal transgenic animals were placed in tissue culture, immortalized cell populations grew out and acquired a tumorigenic phenotype with continuous passage. These observations indicate that genetic changes in addition to the transgenes are likely necessary for tumor formation. These transgenic mice and cell lines provide the basis for further studies into the mechanism of action of E6 and E7 in eliciting the observed pathology and into the genetic alterations required for HPV-16-associated tumor progression. Images PMID:8382301

  10. EGCG-targeted p57/KIP2 reduces tumorigenicity of oral carcinoma cells: Role of c-Jun N-terminal kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Digumarthi, Hari; Aranbayeva, Zina; Wataha, John; Lewis, Jill; Messer, Regina; Qin, Haiyan; Dickinson, Douglas; Osaki, Tokio; Schuster, George S.; Hsu, Stephen

    2007-11-01

    The green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) regulates gene expression differentially in tumor and normal cells. In normal human primary epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), one of the key mediators of EGCG action is p57/KIP2, a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor. EGCG potently induces p57 in NHEK, but not in epithelial cancer cells. In humans, reduced expression of p57 often is associated with advanced tumors, and tumor cells with inactivated p57 undergo apoptosis when exposed to EGCG. The mechanism of p57 induction by EGCG is not well understood. Here, we show that in NHEK, EGCG-induces p57 via the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. In p57-negative tumor cells, JNK signaling mediates EGCG-induced apoptosis, and exogenous expression of p57 suppresses EGCG-induced apoptosis via inhibition of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). We also found that restoration of p57 expression in tumor cells significantly reduced tumorigenicity in athymic mice. These results suggest that p57 expression may be an useful indicator for the clinical course of cancers, and could be potentially useful as a target for cancer therapies.

  11. Inhibition of STAT3, FAK and Src mediated signaling reduces cancer stem cell load, tumorigenic potential and metastasis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Ravi; Trivedi, Rachana; Rastogi, Namrata; Singh, Manisha; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are responsible for aggressive tumor growth, metastasis and therapy resistance. In this study, we evaluated the effects of Shikonin (Shk) on breast cancer and found its anti-CSC potential. Shk treatment decreased the expression of various epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and CSC associated markers. Kinase profiling array and western blot analysis indicated that Shk inhibits STAT3, FAK and Src activation. Inhibition of these signaling proteins using standard inhibitors revealed that STAT3 inhibition affected CSCs properties more significantly than FAK or Src inhibition. We observed a significant decrease in cell migration upon FAK and Src inhibition and decrease in invasion upon inhibition of STAT3, FAK and Src. Combined inhibition of STAT3 with Src or FAK reduced the mammosphere formation, migration and invasion more significantly than the individual inhibitions. These observations indicated that the anti-breast cancer properties of Shk are due to its potential to inhibit multiple signaling proteins. Shk also reduced the activation and expression of STAT3, FAK and Src in vivo and reduced tumorigenicity, growth and metastasis of 4T1 cells. Collectively, this study underscores the translational relevance of using a single inhibitor (Shk) for compromising multiple tumor-associated signaling pathways to check cancer metastasis and stem cell load. PMID:25973915

  12. Thrombomodulin reduces tumorigenic and metastatic potential of lung cancer cells by up-regulation of E-cadherin and down-regulation of N-cadherin expression.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Nana; Huo, Zihe; Zhang, Bin; Meng, Mei; Cao, Zhifei; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhou, Quansheng

    2016-08-01

    Thrombomodulin (TM) is an endothelial cell membrane protein and plays critical roles in anti-thrombosis, anti-inflammation, vascular endothelial protection, and is traditionally regarded as a "vascular protection god". In recent years, although TM has been reported to be down-regulated in a variety of malignant tumors including lung cancer, the role and mechanism of TM in lung cancer are enigmatic. In this study, we found that induction of TM overexpression by cholesterol-reducing drug atorvastatin significantly diminished the tumorigenic capability of the lung cancer cells. Moreover, we demonstrated that TM overexpression caused G0/G1 phase arrest and markedly reduced the colony forming capability of the cells. Furthermore, overexpression of TM inhibited cell migration and invasion. Consistently, depletion of TM promoted cell growth, reduced the cell population at the G0/G1 phase, and enhanced cell migratory ability. Mechanistic study revealed that TM up-regulated E-cadherin but down-regulated N-cadherin expression, resulting in reversal of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the lung cancer cells. Moreover, silencing TM expression led to decreased E-cadherin and increased N-cadherin. Taken together, our study suggests that TM functions as a tumor suppressive protein, providing a conceptual framework for inducing TM overexpression as a sensible strategy and approach for novel anti-lung cancer drug discovery. PMID:27223053

  13. Upregulation of sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) promotes cell proliferation and tumorigenicity in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yingcai; Chen, Wen; Du, Xiaojun; Ning, Huiwen; Chen, Huaisheng; Shi, Ruiqing; Lin, Shaolin; Xu, Rongyu; Zhu, Jinrong; Wu, Shu; Zhou, Haiyu

    2015-01-01

    Sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9), a vital transcription factor, play important roles in numerous biological and pathological processes. However, the clinical significance and biological role of SOX9 expression has not been characterized in human esophageal squamous cell cancer (ESCC). Herein, we found that SOX9 was markedly upregulated, at both mRNA and protein level, in ESCC cell lines and ESCC tissues and that SOX9 expression was significantly correlated with tumor clinical stage, T classification, N classification, M classification, pathological differentiation, and shorter overall survival. The proliferation and tumorigenicity of ESCC cells were dramatically induced by SOX9 overexpression but were inhibited by SOX9 knockdown both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, we demonstrated that upregulation of SOX9 increased the expression of phosphorylated Akt, the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) regulator cyclin D1, phosphorylated forkhead box O (FOXO)1, and phosphorylated FOXO3, but SOX9 downregulation decreased their expression, whereas the levels of the CDK inhibitors p21Cip1 and p27Kip1 were attenuated in SOX9-transduced cells. Taken together, our results suggest that SOX9 plays an important role in promoting the proliferation and tumorigenesis of ESCC and may represent a novel prognostic marker for the disease. PMID:26384302

  14. 29 CFR 2204.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Net worth exhibit. 2204.202 Section 2204.202 Labor... COMMISSION Information Required From Applicants § 2204.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a... exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant as of the date specified by § 2204.105(c). The exhibit...

  15. 37 CFR 1.95 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions Models, Exhibits, Specimens § 1.95 Copies of exhibits. Copies of models or other physical exhibits will not ordinarily be furnished by the Office, and any model or exhibit in an application or patent shall not be taken from...

  16. Temporary and Travelling Exhibitions. Museums and Monuments, X.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daifuku, Hiroshi; And Others

    The permanent exhibition, the most typical form of museum exhibition, has failed to attract repeated visitation, since visitors quickly become familiar with the objects shown. The temporary exhibition evolved as a result for the need of repeated visitation. The temporary exhibition, set up for a period of one to six months, introduces fresh…

  17. Development of Exhibit on Arctic Climate Change Called The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely Exhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Stauffer, Barbara W.

    2006-04-01

    The exhibition, The Arctic: A Friend Acting Strangely, was developed at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of Natural History (NMNH) as a part of the museum’s Forces of Change exhibit series on global change. It opened to the public in Spring 2006, in conjunction with another Forces of Change exhibit on the Earth’s atmosphere called Change Is in the Air. The exhibit was a 2000 square-foot presentation that explored the forces and consequences of the changing Arctic as documented by scientists and native residents alike. Native peoples of the Arctic have always lived with year-to-year fluctuations in weather and ice conditions. In recent decades, they have witnessed that the climate has become unpredictable, the land and sea unfamiliar. An elder in Arctic Canada recently described the weather as uggianaqtuq —an Inuit word that can suggest strange, unexpected behavior, sometimes described as that of “a friend acting strangely.” Scientists too have been documenting dramatic changes in the Arctic. Air temperatures have warmed over most—though not all—of the Arctic since the 1950s; Arctic precipitation may have increased by as much as 8%; seasonal melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has increased on average by 16% since 1979; polar-orbiting satellites have measured a 15¬–20% decline in sea ice extent since the 1970s; aircraft reconnaissance and ship observations show a steady decrease in sea ice since the 1950s. In response to this warming, plant distributions have begun to shift and animals are changing their migration routes. Some of these changes may have beneficial effects while others may bring hardship or have costly implications. And, many scientists consider arctic change to be a ‘bell-weather’ for large-scale changes in other regions of the world. The exhibition included text, photos artifacts, hands-on interactives and other exhibitry that illustrated the changes being documented by indigenous people and scientists alike.

  18. Long-term estrogen exposure promotes carcinogen bioactivation, induces persistent changes in gene expression, and enhances the tumorigenicity of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Spink, Barbara C.; Bennett, James A.; Pentecost, Brian T.; Lostritto, Nicole; Englert, Neal A.; Benn, Geoffrey K.; Goodenough, Angela K.; Turesky, Robert J.; Spink, David C.

    2009-11-01

    The cumulative exposure to estrogens is an important determinant in the risk of breast cancer, yet the full range of mechanisms involving estrogens in the genesis and progression of breast cancer remains a subject of debate. Interactions of estrogens and environmental toxicants have received attention as putative factors contributing to carcinogenesis. Mechanistic studies have demonstrated interactions between estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), with consequences on the genes that they regulate. Many studies of ERalpha and AhR-mediated effects and crosstalk between them have focused on the initial molecular events. In this study, we investigated ERalpha- and AhR-mediated effects in long-term estrogen exposed (LTEE) MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, which were obtained by continuous culturing for at least 12 weeks in medium supplemented with 1 nM of 17beta-estradiol (E{sub 2}). With these LTEE cells and with parallel control cells cultured without E{sub 2} supplementation, we performed an extensive study of cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction, carcinogen bioactivation, global gene expression, and tumorigenicity in immunocompromised mice. We found that LTEE cells, in comparison with control cells, had higher levels of AhR mRNA and protein, greater responsiveness for AhR-regulated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 induction, a 6-fold higher initial level of benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adducts as determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, marked differences in the expression of numerous genes, and a higher rate of E{sub 2}-dependent tumor growth as xenografts. These studies indicate that LTEE causes adaptive responses in MCF-7 cells, which may reflect processes that contribute to the overall carcinogenic effect of E{sub 2}.

  19. Knock-down of Hdj2/DNAJA1 co-chaperone results in an unexpected burst of tumorigenicity of C6 glioblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Dobrodumov, Anatoliy V.; Komarova, Elena Y.; Voronkina, Irina V.; Lazarev, Vladimir F.; Margulis, Boris A.; Guzhova, Irina V.

    2016-01-01

    The chaperone system based on Hsp70 and proteins of the DnaJ family is known to protect tumor cells from a variety of cytotoxic factors, including anti-tumor therapy. To analyze whether this also functions in a highly malignant brain tumor, we knocked down the expression of Hsp70 (HSPA1A) and its two most abundant co-chaperones, Hdj1 (DNAJB1) and Hdj2 (DNAJA1) in a C6 rat glioblastoma cell line. As expected, tumor depletion of Hsp70 caused a substantial reduction in its growth rate and increased the survival of tumor-bearing animals, whereas the reduction of Hdj1 expression had no effect. Unexpectedly, a reduction in the expression of Hdj2 led to the enhanced aggressiveness of the C6 tumor, demonstrated by its rapid growth, metastasis formation and a 1.5-fold reduction in the lifespan of tumor-bearing animals. The in vitro reduction of Hdj2 expression reduced spheroid density and simultaneously enhanced the migration and invasion of C6 cells. At the molecular level, a knock-down of Hdj2 led to the relocation of N-cadherin and the enhanced activity of metalloproteinases 1, 2, 8 and 9, which are markers of highly malignant cancer cells. The changes in the actin cytoskeleton in Hdj2-depleted cells indicate that the protein is also important for prevention of the amoeboid-like transition of tumor cells. The results of this study uncover a completely new role for the Hdj2 co-chaperone in tumorigenicity and suggest that the protein is a potential drug target. PMID:26959111

  20. Transforming and Tumorigenic Activity of JAK2 by Fusion to BCR: Molecular Mechanisms of Action of a Novel BCR-JAK2 Tyrosine-Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Ormazábal, Cristina; Santos-Roncero, Matilde; Galán-Díez, Marta; Steegmann, Juan Luis; Figuera, Ángela; Arranz, Eva; Vizmanos, José Luis; Bueren, Juan A.; Río, Paula; Fernández-Ruiz, Elena

    2012-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations in tumors frequently produce fusion genes coding for chimeric proteins with a key role in oncogenesis. Recent reports described a BCR-JAK2 fusion gene in fatal chronic and acute myeloid leukemia, but the functional behavior of the chimeric protein remains uncharacterized. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays to describe a BCR-JAK2 fusion gene from a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The patient has been in complete remission for six years following treatment and autologous transplantation, and minimal residual disease was monitored by real-time RT-PCR. BCR-JAK2 codes for a protein containing the BCR oligomerization domain fused to the JAK2 tyrosine-kinase domain. In vitro analysis of transfected cells showed that BCR-JAK2 is located in the cytoplasm. Transduction of hematopoietic Ba/F3 cells with retroviral vectors carrying BCR-JAK2 induced IL-3-independent cell growth, constitutive activation of the chimeric protein as well as STAT5 phosphorylation and translocation to the nuclei, where Bcl-xL gene expression was elicited. Primary mouse progenitor cells transduced with BCR-JAK2 also showed increased proliferation and survival. Treatment with the JAK2 inhibitor TG101209 abrogated BCR-JAK2 and STAT5 phosphorylation, decreased Bcl-xL expression and triggered apoptosis of transformed Ba/F3 cells. Therefore, BCR-JAK2 is a novel tyrosine-kinase with transforming activity. It deregulates growth factor-dependent proliferation and cell survival, which can be abrogated by the TG101209 inhibitor. Moreover, transformed Ba/F3 cells developed tumors when injected subcutaneously into nude mice, thus proving the tumorigenic capacity of BCR-JAK2 in vivo. Together these findings suggest that adult and pediatric patients with BCR-ABL-negative leukemia and JAK2 overexpression may benefit from targeted therapies. PMID:22384256

  1. Long-term estrogen exposure promotes carcinogen bioactivation, induces persistent changes in gene expression, and enhances the tumorigenicity of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Spink, Barbara C.; Bennett, James A.; Pentecost, Brian T.; Lostritto, Nicole; Englert, Neal A.; Benn, Geoffrey K.; Goodenough, Angela K.; Turesky, Robert J.; Spink, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The cumulative exposure to estrogens is an important determinant in the risk of breast cancer, yet the full range of mechanisms involving estrogens in the genesis and progression of breast cancer remains a subject of debate. Interactions of estrogens and environmental toxicants have received attention as putative factors contributing to carcinogenesis. Mechanistic studies have demonstrated interactions between estrogen receptor α (ERα) and the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), with consequences on the genes that they regulate. Many studies of ERα and AhR-mediated effects and crosstalk between them have focused on the initial molecular events. In this study, we investigated ERα- and AhR-mediated effects in long-term estrogen exposed (LTEE) MCF-7 human breast cancer cells, which were obtained by continuous culturing for at least 12 weeks in medium supplemented with 1 nM of 17β-estradiol (E2). With these LTEE cells and with parallel control cells cultured without E2 supplementation, we performed an extensive study of cytochrome P450 (CYP) induction, carcinogen bioactivation, global gene expression, and tumorigenicity in immunocompromised mice. We found that LTEE cells, in comparison with control cells, had higher levels of AhR mRNA and protein, greater responsiveness for AhR-regulated CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 induction, a 6-fold higher initial level of benzo(a)pyrene-DNA adducts as determined by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, marked differences in the expression of numerous genes, and a higher rate of E2-dependent tumor growth as xenografts. These studies indicate that LTEE causes adaptive responses in MCF-7 cells, which may reflect processes that contribute to the overall carcinogenic effect of E2. PMID:19619570

  2. Arachidonoyl-ethanolamide activates endoplasmic reticulum stress-apoptosis in tumorigenic keratinocytes: Role of cyclooxygenase-2 and novel J-series prostamides.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Eman; Henderson, Kate L; Danell, Allison S; Van Dross, Rukiyah

    2016-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer and other epithelial tumors overexpress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), differentiating them from normal cells. COX-2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to prostaglandins including, the J-series prostaglandins, which induce apoptosis by mechanisms including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Arachidonoyl-ethanolamide (AEA) is a cannabinoid that causes apoptosis in diverse tumor types. Previous studies from our group demonstrated that AEA was metabolized by COX-2 to J-series prostaglandins. Thus, the current study examines the role of COX-2, J-series prostaglandins, and ER stress in AEA-induced apoptosis. In tumorigenic keratinocytes that overexpress COX-2, AEA activated the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring kinase-1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor-6 (ATF6) ER stress pathways and the ER stress apoptosis-associated proteins, C/EBP homologous protein-10 (CHOP10), caspase-12, and caspase-3. Using an ER stress inhibitor, it was determined that ER stress was required for AEA-induced apoptosis. To evaluate the role of COX-2 in ER stress-apoptosis, HaCaT keratinocytes with low endogenous COX-2 expression were transfected with COX-2 cDNA or an empty vector and AEA-induced ER stress-apoptosis occurred only in the presence of COX-2. Moreover, LC-MS analysis showed that the novel prostaglandins, 15-deoxyΔ(12,14) PGJ2 -EA and Δ(12) PGJ2 /PGJ2-EA, were synthesized from AEA. These findings suggest that AEA will be selectively toxic in tumor cells that overexpress COX-2 due to the metabolism of AEA by COX-2 to J-series prostaglandin-ethanolamides (prostamides). Hence, AEA may be an ideal topical agent for the elimination of malignancies that overexpress COX-2.

  3. Suppressive effects of acid-forming diet against the tumorigenic potential of pioglitazone hydrochloride in the urinary bladder of male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Keiichiro; Awasaki, Yasuyuki; Kandori, Hitoshi; Tanakamaru, Zen-yo; Nagai, Hirofumi; Baron, David; Yamamoto, Masaki

    2011-03-15

    Pioglitazone hydrochloride (PIO), a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) agonist, was administered orally for 85 weeks at 16 mg/kg/day to male rats fed either a diet containing 1.5% ammonium chloride (acid-forming diet) or a control diet to investigate the effects of urinary acidification induced by the acid-forming diet on the tumorigenic potential of PIO in the urinary bladder. The surviving animals at the end of the administration period were followed to the end of the 2-year study period without changes in the diet and were subjected to terminal necropsy on Week 104. The number of urinary microcrystals, evaluated by manual counting with light microscopy and by an objective method with a laser diffraction particle size analyzer, was increased by PIO on Weeks 12 and 25 and the increases were markedly suppressed by urinary acidification. Urinary citrate was decreased by PIO throughout the study period, but no changes were seen in urinary oxalate at any timepoint. The incidences of PIO-treated males bearing at least one of the advanced proliferative changes consisting of papillary hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, papilloma or carcinoma were significantly decreased from 11 of 82 males fed the control diet to 2 of 80 males fed the acid-forming diet. The acid-forming diet did not show any effects on the toxicokinetic parameters of PIO and its metabolites. Microcrystalluria appears to be involved in the development of the advanced stage proliferative lesions in bladder tumorigenesis induced by PIO in male rats.

  4. Omega-3-Acid Ethyl Esters Block the Pro-tumorigenic Effects of Obesity in Mouse Models of Postmenopausal Basal-Like and Claudin-Low Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Nikki A.; Rossi, Emily L.; Barnett, Kelsey; Yang, Peiying; Bowers, Laura W.; Hidaka, Brandon H.; Kimler, Bruce F.; Carlson, Susan E.; Shureiqi, Imad; deGraffenried, Linda A.; Fabian, Carol J.; Hursting, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity induces chronic inflammation and is an established risk and progression factor for triple-negative breast cancers, including basal-like (BL) and claudin-low (CL) subtypes. We tested the effects of dietary supplementation with ethyl esters of the marine-derived anti-inflammatory omega-3 fatty acids eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid (EPA+DHA; Lovaza®) on growth of murine BL and CL mammary tumors. Female ovariectomized C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet or a diet-induced obesity (DIO) diet with or without EPA+DHA (0.025%, resulting in blood levels of EPA and DHA comparable to women taking Lovaza 4 g/day) for 6 weeks. All mice were then orthotopically injected with Wnt-1 cells (a BL tumor cell suspension derived from MMTV-Wnt-1 transgenic mouse mammary tumors) or M-Wnt cells (a CL tumor cell line cloned from the Wnt-1 tumor cell suspension). Mice were killed when tumors were 1 cm in diameter. EPA+DHA supplementation did not significantly impact Wnt-1 or M-Wnt mammary tumor growth in normoweight control mice. However, EPA+DHA supplementation in DIO mice reduced growth of Wnt-1 and M-Wnt tumors; reduced leptin:adiponectin ratio and pro-inflammatory eicosanoids in the serum; improved insulin sensitivity; and decreased tumoral expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and phospho-p65. Thus, EPA+DHA supplementation in mouse models of postmenopausal BL and CL breast cancer offsets many of the pro-tumorigenic effects of obesity. These preclinical findings, in combination with results from parallel biomarker studies in women, suggest EPA+DHA supplementation may reduce the burden of BL and CL breast cancer in obese women. PMID:26100521

  5. Arachidonoyl-ethanolamide activates endoplasmic reticulum stress-apoptosis in tumorigenic keratinocytes: Role of cyclooxygenase-2 and novel J-series prostamides.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Eman; Henderson, Kate L; Danell, Allison S; Van Dross, Rukiyah

    2016-02-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer and other epithelial tumors overexpress cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), differentiating them from normal cells. COX-2 metabolizes arachidonic acid to prostaglandins including, the J-series prostaglandins, which induce apoptosis by mechanisms including endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Arachidonoyl-ethanolamide (AEA) is a cannabinoid that causes apoptosis in diverse tumor types. Previous studies from our group demonstrated that AEA was metabolized by COX-2 to J-series prostaglandins. Thus, the current study examines the role of COX-2, J-series prostaglandins, and ER stress in AEA-induced apoptosis. In tumorigenic keratinocytes that overexpress COX-2, AEA activated the PKR-like ER kinase (PERK), inositol requiring kinase-1 (IRE1), and activating transcription factor-6 (ATF6) ER stress pathways and the ER stress apoptosis-associated proteins, C/EBP homologous protein-10 (CHOP10), caspase-12, and caspase-3. Using an ER stress inhibitor, it was determined that ER stress was required for AEA-induced apoptosis. To evaluate the role of COX-2 in ER stress-apoptosis, HaCaT keratinocytes with low endogenous COX-2 expression were transfected with COX-2 cDNA or an empty vector and AEA-induced ER stress-apoptosis occurred only in the presence of COX-2. Moreover, LC-MS analysis showed that the novel prostaglandins, 15-deoxyΔ(12,14) PGJ2 -EA and Δ(12) PGJ2 /PGJ2-EA, were synthesized from AEA. These findings suggest that AEA will be selectively toxic in tumor cells that overexpress COX-2 due to the metabolism of AEA by COX-2 to J-series prostaglandin-ethanolamides (prostamides). Hence, AEA may be an ideal topical agent for the elimination of malignancies that overexpress COX-2. PMID:25557612

  6. miRNA-regulated delivery of lincRNA-p21 suppresses β-catenin signaling and tumorigenicity of colorectal cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Lei, Zeng-jie; Guo, Yan; Wang, Tao; Qin, Zhong-yi; Xiao, Hua-liang; Fan, Li-lin; Chen, Dong-feng; Bian, Xiu-wu; Liu, Jia; Wang, Bin

    2015-11-10

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are key cellular targets for effective cancer therapy, due to their critical roles in cancer progression and chemo/radio-resistance. Emerging evidence demonstrates that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important players in the biology of cancers. However, it remains unknown whether lncRNAs could be exploited to target CSCs. We report that large intergenic non-coding RNA p21 (lincRNA-p21) is a potent suppressor of stem-like traits of CSCs purified from both primary colorectal cancer (CRC) tissues and cell lines. A novel lincRNA-p21-expressing adenoviral vector, which was armed with miRNA responsive element (MRE) of miR-451 (Ad-lnc-p21-MRE), was generated to eliminate CRC CSCs. Integration of miR-451 MREs into the adenovirus efficiently delivered lincRNA-p21 into CSCs that contained low levels of miR-451. Moreover, lincRNA-p21 inhibited the activity of β-catenin signaling, thereby attenuating the viability, self-renewal, and glycolysis of CSCs in vitro. By limiting dilution and serial tumor formation assay, we demonstrated that Ad-lnc-p21-MRE significantly suppressed the self-renewal potential and tumorigenicity of CSCs in nude mice. Importantly, application of miR-451 MREs appeared to protect normal liver cells from off-target expression of lincRNA-p21 in both tumor-bearing and naïve mice. Taken together, these findings suggest that lncRNAs may be promising therapeutic molecules to eradicate CSCs and MREs of tumor-suppressor miRNAs, such as miR-451, may be exploited to ensure the specificity of CSC-targeting strategies.

  7. Knock-down of Hdj2/DNAJA1 co-chaperone results in an unexpected burst of tumorigenicity of C6 glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Meshalkina, Darya A; Shevtsov, Maxim A; Dobrodumov, Anatoliy V; Komarova, Elena Y; Voronkina, Irina V; Lazarev, Vladimir F; Margulis, Boris A; Guzhova, Irina V

    2016-04-19

    The chaperone system based on Hsp70 and proteins of the DnaJ family is known to protect tumor cells from a variety of cytotoxic factors, including anti-tumor therapy. To analyze whether this also functions in a highly malignant brain tumor, we knocked down the expression of Hsp70 (HSPA1A) and its two most abundant co-chaperones, Hdj1 (DNAJB1) and Hdj2 (DNAJA1) in a C6 rat glioblastoma cell line. As expected, tumor depletion of Hsp70 caused a substantial reduction in its growth rate and increased the survival of tumor-bearing animals, whereas the reduction of Hdj1 expression had no effect. Unexpectedly, a reduction in the expression of Hdj2 led to the enhanced aggressiveness of the C6 tumor, demonstrated by its rapid growth, metastasis formation and a 1.5-fold reduction in the lifespan of tumor-bearing animals. The in vitro reduction of Hdj2 expression reduced spheroid density and simultaneously enhanced the migration and invasion of C6 cells. At the molecular level, a knock-down of Hdj2 led to the relocation of N-cadherin and the enhanced activity of metalloproteinases 1, 2, 8 and 9, which are markers of highly malignant cancer cells. The changes in the actin cytoskeleton in Hdj2-depleted cells indicate that the protein is also important for prevention of the amoeboid-like transition of tumor cells. The results of this study uncover a completely new role for the Hdj2 co-chaperone in tumorigenicity and suggest that the protein is a potential drug target.

  8. FGFR3b Extracellular Loop Mutation Lacks Tumorigenicity In Vivo but Collaborates with p53/pRB Deficiency to Induce High-grade Papillary Urothelial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Haiping; He, Feng; Mendelsohn, Cathy L.; Tang, Moon-shong; Huang, Chuanshu; Wu, Xue-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Missense mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) occur in up to 80% of low-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (LGP-UCB) suggesting that these mutations are tumor drivers, although direct experimental evidence is lacking. Here we show that forced expression of FGFR3b-S249C, the most prevalent FGFR3 mutation in human LGP-UCB, in cultured urothelial cells resulted in slightly reduced surface translocation than wild-type FGFR3b, but nearly twice as much proliferation. When we expressed a mouse equivalent of this mutant (FGFR3b-S243C) in urothelia of adult transgenic mice in a tissue-specific and inducible manner, we observed significant activation of AKT and MAPK pathways. This was, however, not accompanied by urothelial proliferation or tumorigenesis over 12 months, due to compensatory tumor barriers in p16-pRB and p19-p53-p21 axes. Indeed, expressing FGFR3b-S249C in cultured human urothelial cells expressing SV40T, which functionally inactivates pRB/p53, markedly accelerated proliferation and cell-cycle progression. Furthermore, expressing FGFR3b-S243C in transgenic mouse urothelium expressing SV40T converted carcinoma-in-situ to high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma. Together, our study provides new experimental evidence indicating that the FGFR3 mutations have very limited urothelial tumorigenicity and that these mutations must collaborate with other genetic events to drive urothelial tumorigenesis. PMID:27157475

  9. Mutated epithelial cadherin is associated with increased tumorigenicity and loss of adhesion and of responsiveness to the motogenic trefoil factor 2 in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, J A; Liu, D; Wheeler, J M; Kim, H C; Beck, N E; Ilyas, M; Karayiannakis, A J; Mortensen, N J; Kmiot, W; Playford, R J; Pignatelli, M; Bodmer, W F

    1999-03-01

    Epithelial (E)-cadherin and its associated cytoplasmic proteins (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-catenins) are important mediators of epithelial cell-cell adhesion and intracellular signaling. Much evidence exists suggesting a tumor/invasion suppressor role for E-cadherin, and loss of expression, as well as mutations, has been described in a number of epithelial cancers. To investigate whether E-cadherin gene (CDH1) mutations occur in colorectal cancer, we screened 49 human colon carcinoma cell lines from 43 patients by single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) analysis and direct sequencing. In addition to silent changes, polymorphisms, and intronic variants in a number of the cell lines, we detected frameshift single-base deletions in repeat regions of exon 3 (codons 120 and 126) causing premature truncations at codon 216 in four replication-error-positive (RER+) cell lines (LS174T, HCT116, GP2d, and GP5d) derived from 3 patients. In LS174T such a mutation inevitably contributes to its lack of E-cadherin protein expression and function. Transfection of full-length E-cadherin cDNA into LS174T cells enhanced intercellular adhesion, induced differentiation, retarded proliferation, inhibited tumorigenicity, and restored responsiveness to the migratory effects induced by the motogenic trefoil factor 2 (human spasmolytic polypeptide). These results indicate that, although inactivating E-cadherin mutations occur relatively infrequently in colorectal cancer cell lines overall (3/43 = 7%), they are more common in cells with an RER+ phenotype (3/10 = 30%) and may contribute to the dysfunction of the E-cadherin-catenin-mediated adhesion/signaling system commonly seen in these tumors. These results also indicate that normal E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion can restore the ability of colonic tumor cells to respond to trefoil factor 2.

  10. Cyclin D1 silencing suppresses tumorigenicity, impairs DNA double strand break repair and thus radiosensitizes androgen-independent prostate cancer cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Xiaoming; Vetuschi, Antonella; Sferra, Roberta; Casimiro, Mathew C.; Pompili, Simona; Festuccia, Claudio; Colapietro, Alessandro; Gaudio, Eugenio; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Tombolini, Vincenzo; Pestell, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hormone-resistant prostate cancer (PCa) have higher biochemical failure rates following radiation therapy (RT). Cyclin D1 deregulated expression in PCa is associated with a more aggressive disease: however its role in radioresistance has not been determined. Cyclin D1 levels in the androgen-independent PC3 and 22Rv1 PCa cells were stably inhibited by infecting with cyclin D1-shRNA. Tumorigenicity and radiosensitivity were investigated using in vitro and in vivo experimental assays. Cyclin D1 silencing interfered with PCa oncogenic phenotype by inducing growth arrest in the G1 phase of cell cycle and reducing soft agar colony formation, migration, invasion in vitro and tumor formation and neo-angiogenesis in vivo. Depletion of cyclin D1 significantly radiosensitizes PCa cells by increasing the RT-induced DNA damages by affecting the NHEJ and HR pathways responsible of the DNA double-strand break repair. Following treatment of cells with RT the abundance of a biomarker of DNA damage, γ-H2AX, was dramatically increased in sh-cyclin D1 treated cells compared to shRNA control. Concordant with these observations DNA-PKcs-activation and RAD51-accumulation, part of the DNA double-strand break repair machinery, were reduced in shRNA-cyclin D1 treated cells compared to shRNA control. We further demonstrate the physical interaction between CCND1 with activated-ATM, -DNA-PKcs and RAD51 is enhanced by RT. Finally, siRNA-mediated silencing experiments indicated DNA-PKcs and RAD51 are downstream targets of CCND1-mediated PCa cells radioresistance. In summary, these observations suggest that CCND1 is a key mediator of PCa radioresistance and could represent a potential target for radioresistant hormone-resistant PCa. PMID:26689991

  11. Fatty acid activated PPARγ promotes tumorigenicity of prostate cancer cells by up regulating VEGF via PPAR responsive elements of the promoter

    PubMed Central

    Forootan, Farzad S.; Forootan, Shiva S.; Gou, Xiaojun; Yang, Jin; Liu, Bichong; Chen, Danqing; Fayi, Majed Saad Al; Al-Jameel, Waseem; Rudland, Philip S.; Hussain, Syed A.; Ke, Youqiang

    2016-01-01

    In previous work, it is suggested that the excessive amount of fatty acids transported by FABP5 may facilitate the malignant progression of prostate cancer cells through a FABP5-PPARγ-VEGF signal transduction axis to increase angiogenesis. To further functionally characterise the FABP5-PPARγ-VEGF signal transduction pathway, we have, in this work, investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in its tumorigenicity promoting role in prostate cancer. Suppression of PPARγ in highly malignant prostate cancer cells produced a significant reduction (up to 53%) in their proliferation rate, invasiveness (up to 89%) and anchorage-independent growth (up to 94%) in vitro. Knockdown of PPARγ gene in PC3-M cells by siRNA significantly reduced the average size of tumours formed in nude mice by 99% and tumour incidence by 90%, and significantly prolonged the latent period by 3.5 fold. Results in this study combined with some previous results suggested that FABP5 promoted VEGF expression and angiogenesis through PPARγ which was activated by fatty acids transported by FABP5. Further investigations showed that PPARγ up-regulated VEGF expression through acting with the PPAR-responsive elements in the promoter region of VEGF gene in prostate cancer cells. Although androgen can modulate VEGF expression through Sp1/Sp3 binding site on VEGF promoter in androgen-dependent prostate cancer cells, this route, disappeared as the cells gradually lost their androgen dependency; was replaced by the FABP5-PPARγ-VEGF signalling pathway. These results suggested that the FABP5-PPARγ-VEGF signal transduction axis, rather than androgen modulated route, may be a more important novel therapeutic target for angiogenesis-suppression treatment of castration resistant prostate cancer. PMID:26814431

  12. 48 CFR 204.7105 - Contract exhibits and attachments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... attachments. 204.7105 Section 204.7105 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS... 204.7105 Contract exhibits and attachments. Follow the procedures at PGI 204.7105 for use and numbering of contract exhibits and attachments....

  13. 32 CFR 705.25 - Navy Exhibit Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.25 Navy Exhibit Center. (a) The center is a... mission is to produce, transport and display U.S. Navy exhibits throughout the United States. It...

  14. Weight lifting can facilitate appreciative comprehension for museum exhibits

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Yuki; Harada, Shinya; Choi, Wonje; Fujino, Rika; Tokunaga, Akinobu; Gao, YueYun; Miura, Kayo

    2014-01-01

    Appreciation of exhibits in a museum can be equated to a virtual experience of lives in the contexts originally surrounding the exhibits. Here we focus on the importance of weight information, and hence tested whether experiencing a weight during museum exhibit appreciation affects the beholders' satisfaction and recognition memory for the exhibits. An experiment was performed at a museum exhibiting skeletal preparations of animals. We used nine preparations and prepared four weight stimuli as weight cues in accordance with the actual weight of four of the preparations: Remaining five preparations was displayed without weight stimuli. In the cued condition, participants were asked to lift up the weight stimuli during their observation of the four exhibits. In the uncued condition, participants observed the exhibits without touching the weight stimuli. After observation of the exhibits, the participants responded to a questionnaire that measured their impressions of the exhibits and the museum, and performed a recognition test on the exhibits. Results showed that memory performance was better and viewing duration was longer with weight lifting instruction than without instruction. A factor analysis on the questionnaires revealed four factors (likeability, contentment, value, and quality). A path analysis showed indirect effects of viewing duration on memory performance and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for the museum appreciation through the impression factors. Our findings provide insight into a new interactive exhibition that enables long appreciation producing positive effects on visitors' impression, memory, and value estimation for exhibits. PMID:24782807

  15. 45 CFR 1160.5 - Eligibility for domestic exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.5 Eligibility for domestic exhibitions. An indemnity agreement for...-owned objects; (B) Exhibitions outside of the United States of domestic-owned objects; or (C) Exhibitions in the United States of both foreign- and domestic-owned objects, with the foreign-owned...

  16. 77 FR 31420 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-25

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Alighiero Boetti: Game Plan... determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Alighiero Boetti: Game Plan'' imported from abroad for temporary exhibition within the United States, are of cultural significance. The objects...

  17. 14 CFR Appendix to Subpart A of... - Listing of Exhibits

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Listing of Exhibits Appendix to Subpart A of Part 1260 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION GRANTS AND COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Pt. 1260, Subpt. A, App. Appendix to Subpart A of Part 1260—Listing of Exhibits Exhibit...

  18. A Major Children's Educational Art Exhibit: An Evaluative Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlenk, George W.; Shrock, Sharon A.

    Results of a case study of an exhibit of art and artifacts designed for children are presented. The focus of the study was to apply the principles of instructional-message design to the evaluation of the exhibit. The exhibit, "Art Inside Out: Exploring Art and Culture through Time," was displayed at the Art Institute of Chicago. Textual elements,…

  19. 17 CFR 201.42 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... that exhibit in accordance with 17 CFR 201.190. ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net worth exhibit. 201.42... Regulations Pertaining to the Equal Access to Justice Act § 201.42 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each...

  20. 39 CFR 960.10 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 39 Postal Service 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Net worth exhibit. 960.10 Section 960.10 Postal... JUSTICE ACT IN POSTAL SERVICE PROCEEDINGS Information Required From Applicants § 960.10 Net worth exhibit... with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates...

  1. 10 CFR 1023.311 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1023.311 Section 1023.311 Energy... Access to Justice Act Information Required from Applicants § 1023.311 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each... application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in §...

  2. 45 CFR 13.11 - Net worth exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net worth exhibits. 13.11 Section 13.11 Public... TO JUSTICE ACT IN AGENCY PROCEEDINGS Information Required from Applicants § 13.11 Net worth exhibits. (a) Each applicant must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of...

  3. 49 CFR 826.22 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net worth exhibit. 826.22 Section 826.22... Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant...

  4. 7 CFR 1.191 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1.191 Section 1.191 Agriculture... § 1.191 Net worth exhibit. (a) An applicant, except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association, must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant...

  5. 17 CFR 148.12 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net worth exhibit. 148.12... Required from Applicants § 148.12 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a qualified tax-exempt organization or cooperative association must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the...

  6. 31 CFR 6.9 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Net worth exhibit. 6.9 Section 6.9... EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT Information Required From Applicants § 6.9 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each... application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in §...

  7. 5 CFR 2610.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 2610.202 Section 2610... THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT Information Required From Applicants § 2610.202 Net worth exhibit. (a... with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates...

  8. 49 CFR 6.19 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net worth exhibit. 6.19 Section 6.19... PROCEEDINGS Information Required from Applicants § 6.19 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a... exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in this part) when...

  9. 49 CFR 1016.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1016.202 Section 1016.202... BY PARTIES TO BOARD ADJUDICATORY PROCEEDINGS Information Required From Applicants § 1016.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the...

  10. African Past: Migrant Present. A Guide to the Exhibition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twining, Mary Arnold; Roark-Calnek, Sue

    This exhibit guide describes an exhibition of African folk arts produced by seasonal migrant farmworkers in western New York State. Workers come from the American South, Haiti, Puerto Rico, and Jamaica. The exhibition pieces were collected through the BOCES Geneseo Migrant Center's Folk Arts Program and Creative Artists Migrant Program Services…

  11. Weight lifting can facilitate appreciative comprehension for museum exhibits.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Yuki; Harada, Shinya; Choi, Wonje; Fujino, Rika; Tokunaga, Akinobu; Gao, Yueyun; Miura, Kayo

    2014-01-01

    Appreciation of exhibits in a museum can be equated to a virtual experience of lives in the contexts originally surrounding the exhibits. Here we focus on the importance of weight information, and hence tested whether experiencing a weight during museum exhibit appreciation affects the beholders' satisfaction and recognition memory for the exhibits. An experiment was performed at a museum exhibiting skeletal preparations of animals. We used nine preparations and prepared four weight stimuli as weight cues in accordance with the actual weight of four of the preparations: Remaining five preparations was displayed without weight stimuli. In the cued condition, participants were asked to lift up the weight stimuli during their observation of the four exhibits. In the uncued condition, participants observed the exhibits without touching the weight stimuli. After observation of the exhibits, the participants responded to a questionnaire that measured their impressions of the exhibits and the museum, and performed a recognition test on the exhibits. Results showed that memory performance was better and viewing duration was longer with weight lifting instruction than without instruction. A factor analysis on the questionnaires revealed four factors (likeability, contentment, value, and quality). A path analysis showed indirect effects of viewing duration on memory performance and willingness-to-pay (WTP) for the museum appreciation through the impression factors. Our findings provide insight into a new interactive exhibition that enables long appreciation producing positive effects on visitors' impression, memory, and value estimation for exhibits.

  12. Online Cultural Heritage Exhibitions: A Survey of Strategic Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liew, Chern Li

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: This paper seeks to report findings from a study that looked at a range of strategic issues faced in the development, management and maintenance of online cultural heritage exhibitions. The study examined exhibitions from different types of cultural agencies and asked questions about whether, for instance, the exhibitions are part of the…

  13. 47 CFR 1.356 - Copies of exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Copies of exhibits. 1.356 Section 1.356....356 Copies of exhibits. No document or exhibit, or part thereof, shall be received as, or admitted in... offered in evidence, copies shall be furnished to other counsel unless the presiding officer...

  14. MicroRNA-26a/-26b-COX-2-MIP-2 Loop Regulates Allergic Inflammation and Allergic Inflammation-promoted Enhanced Tumorigenic and Metastatic Potential of Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yoojung; Kim, Youngmi; Eom, Sangkyung; Kim, Misun; Park, Deokbum; Kim, Hyuna; Noh, Kyeonga; Lee, Hansoo; Lee, Yun Sil; Choe, Jongseon; Kim, Young Myeong; Jeoung, Dooil

    2015-05-29

    Cyclooxgenase-2 (COX-2) knock-out mouse experiments showed that COX-2 was necessary for in vivo allergic inflammation, such as passive cutaneous anaphylaxis, passive systemic anaphylaxis, and triphasic cutaneous allergic reaction. TargetScan analysis predicted COX-2 as a target of miR-26a and miR-26b. miR-26a/-26b decreased luciferase activity associated with COX-2-3'-UTR. miR-26a/-26b exerted negative effects on the features of in vitro and in vivo allergic inflammation by targeting COX-2. ChIP assays showed the binding of HDAC3 and SNAIL, but not COX-2, to the promoter sequences of miR-26a and miR-26b. Cytokine array analysis showed that the induction of chemokines, such as MIP-2, in the mouse passive systemic anaphylaxis model occurred in a COX-2-dependent manner. ChIP assays showed the binding of HDAC3 and COX-2 to the promoter sequences of MIP-2. In vitro and in vivo allergic inflammation was accompanied by the increased expression of MIP-2. miR-26a/-26b negatively regulated the expression of MIP-2. Allergic inflammation enhanced the tumorigenic and metastatic potential of cancer cells and induced positive feedback involving cancer cells and stromal cells, such as mast cells, macrophages, and endothelial cells. miR-26a mimic and miR-26b mimic negatively regulated the positive feedback between cancer cells and stromal cells and the positive feedback among stromal cells. miR-26a/-26b negatively regulated the enhanced tumorigenic potential by allergic inflammation. COX-2 was necessary for the enhanced metastatic potential of cancer cells by allergic inflammation. Taken together, our results indicate that the miR26a/-26b-COX-2-MIP-2 loop regulates allergic inflammation and the feedback relationship between allergic inflammation and the enhanced tumorigenic and metastatic potential.

  15. [Energy education exhibits for Insights El Paso Science Museum

    SciTech Connect

    Shubinski, R.

    1998-05-27

    The grant in question, DE-FG03-94ER75954, was awarded to Insights El Paso Science Museum to build key exhibits. These exhibits helped the Museum fulfill its mission to ``promote curiosity and stimulate interest by exploratory, entertaining, exciting, and participatory learning in a broad range of scientific disciplines to persons of all ages regionally and internationally.`` There are several current Board of Directors members who also were Board members during the grant period and who helped construct some of the exhibits. Through speaking with them and reviewing minutes of Board meetings during 1994, it has been determined that seven of the ten proposed exhibits were constructed, with an eighth exhibit constructed as an alternative. Photos of seven of the exhibits and preliminary sketches of some are attached. Following is a list of the constructed exhibits: Hot or Cold, Give and Take, Conduction, Convection, Sources of Energy, Wind Generator, Solar Tracker, and Perpetual Motion.

  16. Mutagenicity and tumorigenicity of the four enantiopure bay-region 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxide isomers of dibenz[a,h]anthracene.

    PubMed

    Chang, Richard L; Wood, Alexander W; Huang, Mou Tuan; Xie, Jian Guo; Cui, Xiao Xing; Reuhl, Kenneth R; Boyd, D R; Lin, Yong; Shih, Weichung Joe; Balani, Suresh K; Yagi, Haruhiko; Jerina, Donald M; Conney, Allan H

    2013-09-01

    Each enantiomer of the diastereomeric pair of bay-region dibenz[a,h]anthracene 3,4-diol-1,2-epoxides in which the benzylic 4-hydroxyl group and epoxide oxygen are either cis (isomer 1) or trans (isomer 2) were evaluated for mutagenic activity. In strains TA 98 and TA 100 of Salmonella typhimurium, the diol epoxide with (1S,2R,3S,4R) absolute configuration [(-)-diol epoxide-1] had the highest mutagenic activity. In Chinese hamster V-79 cells, the diol epoxide with (1R,2S,3S,4R) absolute configuration [(+)-diol epoxide-2] had the highest mutagenic activity. The (1R,2S,3R,4S) diol epoxide [(+)-diol epoxide-1] also had appreciable activity, whereas the other two bay-region diol epoxide enantiomers had very low activity. In tumor studies, the (1R,2S,3S,4R) enantiomer was the only diol epoxide isomer tested that had strong activity as a tumor initiator on mouse skin and in causing lung and liver tumors when injected into newborn mice. This stereoisomer was about one-third as active as the parent hydrocarbon, dibenz[a,h]anthracene as a tumor initiator on mouse skin; it was several-fold more active than dibenz[a,h]anthracene as a lung and liver carcinogen when injected into newborn mice. (-)-(3R,4R)-3β,4α-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydro-dibenz[a,h]anthracene [(-)-3,4-dihydrodiol] was slightly more active than dibenz[a,h]anthracene as a tumor initiator on mouse skin, whereas (+)-(3S,4S)-3α,4β-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydro-dibenz[a,h]anthracene [(+)-3,4-dihydrodiol] had only very weak activity. The present investigation and previous studies with the corresponding four possible enantiopure bay-region diol epoxide enantiomers/diastereomers of benzo[a]pyrene, benz[a]anthracene, chrysene, benzo[c]phenanthrene, dibenz[c,h]acridine, dibenz[a,h]acridine and dibenz[a,h]anthracene indicate that the bay-region diol epoxide enantiomer with [R,S,S,R] absolute stereochemistry has high tumorigenic activity on mouse skin and in newborn mice.

  17. miR-326-histone deacetylase-3 feedback loop regulates the invasion and tumorigenic and angiogenic response to anti-cancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngmi; Kim, Hyuna; Park, Hyunmi; Park, Deokbum; Lee, Hansoo; Lee, Yun Sil; Choe, Jongseon; Kim, Young Myeong; Jeoung, Dooil

    2014-10-01

    Histone modification is known to be associated with multidrug resistance phenotypes. Cancer cell lines that are resistant or have been made resistant to anti-cancer drugs showed lower expression levels of histone deacetylase-3 (HDAC3), among the histone deacetylase(s), than cancer cell lines that were sensitive to anti-cancer drugs. Celastrol and Taxol decreased the expression of HDAC3 in cancer cell lines sensitive to anti-cancer drugs. HDAC3 negatively regulated the invasion, migration, and anchorage-independent growth of cancer cells. HDAC3 conferred sensitivity to anti-cancer drugs in vitro and in vivo. TargetScan analysis predicted miR-326 as a negative regulator of HDAC3. ChIP assays and luciferase assays showed a negative feedback loop between HDAC3 and miR-326. miR-326 decreased the apoptotic effect of anti-cancer drugs, and the miR-326 inhibitor increased the apoptotic effect of anti-cancer drugs. miR-326 enhanced the invasion and migration potential of cancer cells. The miR-326 inhibitor negatively regulated the tumorigenic, metastatic, and angiogenic potential of anti-cancer drug-resistant cancer cells. HDAC3 showed a positive feedback loop with miRNAs such as miR-200b, miR-217, and miR-335. miR-200b, miR-217, and miR-335 negatively regulated the expression of miR-326 and the invasion and migration potential of cancer cells while enhancing the apoptotic effect of anti-cancer drugs. TargetScan analysis predicted miR-200b and miR-217 as negative regulators of cancer-associated gene, a cancer/testis antigen, which is known to regulate the response to anti-cancer drugs. HDAC3 and miR-326 acted upstream of the cancer-associated gene. Thus, we show that the miR-326-HDAC3 feedback loop can be employed as a target for the development of anti-cancer therapeutics.

  18. Tumorigenicity and genotoxicity of an environmental pollutant 2,7-dinitrofluorene after systemic administration at a low dose level to female rats.

    PubMed

    Malejka-Giganti, Danuta; Parkin, Daniel R; Decker, Richard W; Niehans, Gloria A; Bliss, Robin L; Churchwell, Mona I; Beland, Frederick A

    2008-05-01

    Environmental pollution with nitroaromatic compounds may pose health hazards. We have examined the tumorigenicity in female Sprague-Dawley rats of 2,7-dinitrofluorene (2,7-diNF) and 9-oxo-2,7-diNF administered by intraperitoneal (i.p.) and oral routes at 10 micromol/kg body weight, 3 times per week for 4 weeks. After i.p. treatment, the estimated median latency for the combined malignant and benign mammary tumors was decreased in 2,7-diNF- (p = 0.003) or 9-oxo-2,7-diNF-treated (p = 0.007), relative to vehicle-treated rats (42 or 64 vs. 80 weeks, respectively), whereas after oral dosing, there were no significant differences. At 90 weeks, the malignant mammary tumor incidence in 2,7-diNF-, 9-oxo-2,7-diNF- and vehicle-i.p. treated rats was 44 (p = 0.02 vs. vehicle-treated), 25 and 6%, respectively. Liver and mammary gland DNA was analyzed by HPLC combined with electrospray tandem mass spectrometry for the presence of a deoxyguanosine (dG-2,7-diNF) adduct and a deoxyadenosine (dA-2,7-diNF) adduct derived from 2,7-diNF, and a deoxyguanosine (dG-9-oxo-2,7-diNF) adduct derived from 9-oxo-2,7-diNF. Both dG-2,7-diNF and dA-2,7-diNF were detected in DNA of 2,7-diNF-treated rats, whereas only very low levels of dG-9-oxo-2,7-diNF were detected in DNA of 9-oxo-2,7-diNF-treated rats. After i.p. treatment, the dA-2,7-diNF level was higher (p < 0.01) in the mammary gland than liver (13.6 vs. 7.8 adducts/10(8) nucleotides). In the mammary gland, the dG-2,7-diNF level was higher (p < 0.05) after i.p. than oral dosing and also higher (p < 0.05) than in the liver (36 vs. 8.6 and vs. 9.1 adducts/10(8) nucleotides, respectively). The preferential display of carcinogenicity and genotoxicity in the mammary gland by low doses of 2,7-diNF signifies its potential relevance for environmental breast cancer. PMID:18183586

  19. HPV E7 contributes to the telomerase activity of immortalized and tumorigenic cells and augments E6-induced hTERT promoter function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xuefeng; Roberts, Jeffrey; Dakic, Aleksandra; Zhang, Yiyu; Schlegel, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The E6 and E7 proteins of high-risk HPVs are both required for the immortalization of primary human keratinocytes and the maintenance of the malignant phenotype of HPV-positive cancer cell lines. Our previous studies have shown that E6 protein binds Myc protein and that both E6 and Myc associate with and cooperatively activate the hTERT promoter, thereby increasing cellular telomerase activity. In this study, we evaluated the role of E7 in the maintenance and activation of telomerase in immortalized and tumorigenic cells. siRNA knockdown of either E6 or E7 (or both) in HPV-immortalized cells or an HPV-positive cancer cell line reduced hTERT transcription and telomerase activity. Since telomerase was inhibited by E7 siRNA in cells that independently expressed the E6 and E7 genes, our results reveal an independent role for E7 in the maintenance of telomerase activity. However, E7 alone was insufficient to increase endogenous hTERT mRNA or telomerase activity, although it significantly augmented E6-induced hTERT transcription and telomerase activity. To further explore this apparent E7-induced promoter augmentation, we analyzed an exogenous hTERT core promoter in transduced keratinocytes. E7 alone induced the wt hTERT promoter and augmented E6-induced hTERT promoter activity. Mutation of the E2F site in the hTERT promoter abrogated the ability of E7 to induce the hTERT promoter or to enhance the ability of E6 to induce the promoter. Correspondingly, keratinocytes expressing E6 and a mutant E7 (defective for binding pRb pocket proteins) showed lower telomerase activity than cells expressing wt E6 and wt E7. Thus, HPV E7 plays a role in the maintenance of telomerase activity in stable cell lines and augments acute, E6-induced hTERT promoter activity. PMID:18367227

  20. 18. INTERIOR OF CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE, MILESTONE GALLERY EXHIBITION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. INTERIOR OF CIVIL RIGHTS INSTITUTE, MILESTONE GALLERY EXHIBITION OF THE SIXTEENTH STREET CHURCH, LOOKING NORTHWEST - Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, 1530 Sixth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  1. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement...- and domestic-owned objects in an international exhibition. The foreign-owned objects are eligible for indemnity coverage under paragraph (a) of this section, and the domestic-owned objects may be eligible...

  2. 78 FR 7849 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Edwardian Opulence: British Art at... April 15, 2003), I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Edwardian... within the United States, are of cultural significance. The objects are imported pursuant to...

  3. 77 FR 31909 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-30

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``50th Anniversary Remembrance of the..., 2003), I hereby determine that the object to be included in the exhibition ``50th Anniversary... within the United States, is of cultural significance. The object is imported pursuant to a...

  4. 78 FR 50137 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Dena'inaq' Huch'ulyeshi: The Dena..., 2003, I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Dena'inaq' Huch'ulyeshi..., are of cultural significance. The objects are imported pursuant to loan agreements with the...

  5. 75 FR 6079 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-05

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Compass and Rule: Architecture as... 15, 2003 , I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Compass and Rule... within the United States, are of cultural significance. The objects are imported pursuant to...

  6. 78 FR 25337 - Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-30

    ... Culturally Significant Object Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Bronze Statue of a Boxer, Hellenistic..., 2003), I hereby determine that the object to be included in the exhibition ``Bronze Statue of a Boxer... significance. The object is imported pursuant to a loan agreement with the foreign owner or custodian. I...

  7. 77 FR 18295 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective... determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Roy Lichtenstein: A Retrospective'' imported... objects are imported pursuant to loan agreements with the foreign owners or custodians. I also...

  8. 76 FR 68808 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Transition to Christianity: Art of... April 15, 2003), I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Transition to... the United States, are of cultural significance. The objects are imported pursuant to loan...

  9. A Critical Appraisal of State Level Science Exhibition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nath, Baiju K.

    2007-01-01

    Science exhibitions are really great opportunities to students as well as teachers to disseminate knowledge that they have, and to experience a variety of new inventions and innovations that also need wide dissemination. The great significance of exhibition is that it fosters acquisition of different process skills leading to the development of…

  10. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart A of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false A Exhibit A to Subpart A of Part 1902 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... SUPERVISED BANK ACCOUNTS Supervised Bank Accounts of Loan, Grant, and Other Funds Exhibit A to Subpart A...

  12. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart A of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true A Exhibit A to Subpart A of Part 1902 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... SUPERVISED BANK ACCOUNTS Supervised Bank Accounts of Loan, Grant, and Other Funds Exhibit A to Subpart A...

  13. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart A of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false A Exhibit A to Subpart A of Part 1902 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... SUPERVISED BANK ACCOUNTS Supervised Bank Accounts of Loan, Grant, and Other Funds Exhibit A to Subpart A...

  14. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart A of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false A Exhibit A to Subpart A of Part 1902 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... SUPERVISED BANK ACCOUNTS Supervised Bank Accounts of Loan, Grant, and Other Funds Exhibit A to Subpart A...

  15. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  16. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  17. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  18. Designing Art Exhibitions in an Educational Virtual World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, June; Crooks, Julian

    2011-01-01

    Demonstrating the multiple features of the Cerulean Gallery in Second Life, this research report showcases several exemplar exhibits created by students, artists, and museums. Located in The Educational Media Center, a Second Life teaching and social space, the Cerulean Gallery exhibits functioned as case studies that tested its effectiveness as…

  19. A Commemorative History of the George Rogers Clark Bicentennial Exhibit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Museum Society, Inc., Indianapolis.

    This pamphlet provides an illustrated narrative history of the George Rogers Clark Bicentennial Exhibit at the Indiana State Museum. George Rogers Clark was a frontier hero of the American Revolution who explored and conquered territory in Kentucky, Ohio, and Illinois. The multimedia exhibit is open to the public from February 25, 1976 through…

  20. Making Your Trade Fair Exhibit More Productive and More Interesting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Jack

    1982-01-01

    Suggestions for producing a successful exhibit booth include the following: the effectiveness of an exhibit depends on the effectiveness of the people staffing it; avoid games and unrelated giveaway items; demonstrate product in the booth; give special attention to existing customers; and make literature available only from the booth personnel.…

  1. Using Museum Exhibits: An Innovation in Experiential Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Das, Satarupa

    2015-01-01

    Museum exhibits can be a tool in experiential learning. While instructors have documented various methods of experiential learning, they have not sufficiently explored such learning from museum exhibits. Museum researchers, however, have long found a satisfying cognitive component to museum visits. This paper narrates the author's design to…

  2. 40 CFR 17.12 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Net worth exhibit. 17.12 Section 17.12... JUSTICE ACT IN EPA ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS Information Required From Applicants § 17.12 Net worth... submit with its application a detailed exhibit showing its net worth at the time the proceeding...

  3. 10 CFR 12.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., 10 CFR part 9, subpart A. ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 12.202 Section 12.202 Energy NUCLEAR... Required From Applicants § 12.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant, except a qualified...

  4. 28 CFR 24.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Net worth exhibit. 24.202 Section 24.202... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEEDINGS Information Required From Applicants § 24.202 Net worth... submit with its application a detailed exhibit showing its net worth at the time the proceeding...

  5. 14 CFR 1262.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... disposed of in accordance with the Agency's regulations under the Freedom of Information Act, at 14 CFR... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1262.202 Section 1262... AGENCY PROCEEDINGS Information Required From Applicants § 1262.202 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each...

  6. 15 CFR 18.12 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... accordance with the Department's established procedures under the Freedom of Information Act (15 CFR Part 4). ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 18.12 Section 18.12... Information Required from Applicants § 18.12 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a qualified...

  7. 47 CFR 1.1512 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Net worth exhibit. 1.1512 Section 1.1512... Access to Justice Act (EAJA) in Agency Proceedings Information Required from Applicants § 1.1512 Net... must provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and...

  8. 22 CFR 134.12 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Net worth exhibit. 134.12 Section 134.12... Information Required From Applicants § 134.12 Net worth exhibit. (a) Each applicant except a qualifed tax... showing the net worth of the applicant and any affiliates (as defined in § 960.4(f)) when the...

  9. 29 CFR 16.202 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Net worth exhibit. 16.202 Section 16.202 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT Information Required From Applicants § 16.202 Net worth... provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any...

  10. 14 CFR 14.11 - Net worth exhibit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Net worth exhibit. 14.11 Section 14.11... IMPLEMENTING THE EQUAL ACCESS TO JUSTICE ACT OF 1980 Information Required From Applicants § 14.11 Net worth... provide with its application a detailed exhibit showing the net worth of the applicant and any...

  11. 14 CFR 77.59 - Subpoenas of witnesses and exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Subpoenas of witnesses and exhibits. 77.59 Section 77.59 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRSPACE OBJECTS AFFECTING NAVIGABLE AIRSPACE Rules of Practice for Hearings Under Subpart D § 77.59 Subpoenas of witnesses and exhibits....

  12. 7 CFR Exhibits A-F to Subpart A... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true A Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Real and Chattel Property Exhibits A-F to Subpart A of Part 1955...

  13. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart A of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false A Exhibit A to Subpart A of Part 1902 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... SUPERVISED BANK ACCOUNTS Supervised Bank Accounts of Loan, Grant, and Other Funds Exhibit A to Subpart A...

  14. Cooperative Exhibition: A New Concept for the Apparel Design Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furer, Gloria

    1982-01-01

    Explains how an apparel and textile exhibition can benefit the institution that underwrites the project, the department that sponsors it, the community, and the apparel design teacher (through the chance for professional recognition). Methods for planning such an exhibition are given. (CT)

  15. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart N of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false C Exhibit C to Subpart N of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants Exhibit C to Subpart N of Part 1944...

  16. Learning Times Two: Creating Learning through a Children's Museum Exhibit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharon, Tanya

    2012-01-01

    This article describes an innovative lab course in which students designed and constructed five developmentally (and locally) appropriate museum exhibits around the theme "Healthy Living." They installed these at a local children's museum, designed a pretest/posttest to assess children's learning from the exhibit, conducted children through the…

  17. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart L of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true A Exhibit A to Subpart L of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Exhibit A to Subpart L of Part 1940...

  18. An Exhibition on Everyday Chemistry. Communicating Chemistry to the Public.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ucko, David A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses a recent addition to the Museum of Science and Industry (Chicago) known as "Everyday Chemistry." This permanent exhibit on modern chemistry incorporates demonstrations of chemical reactions in ways intended to enhance public understanding. Describes the six cases in the exhibit and the automated aspects of their demonstrations. (TW)

  19. 46 CFR 169.805 - Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials. 169.805 Section 169.805 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.805 Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials. Officers on any...

  20. 46 CFR 169.805 - Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials. 169.805 Section 169.805 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.805 Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials. Officers on any...

  1. 46 CFR 169.805 - Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials. 169.805 Section 169.805 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.805 Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials. Officers on any...

  2. 46 CFR 169.805 - Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials. 169.805 Section 169.805 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.805 Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials. Officers on any...

  3. 46 CFR 169.805 - Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials. 169.805 Section 169.805 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Operations § 169.805 Exhibition of merchant mariner credentials. Officers on any...

  4. Gifted Kids Create a Large Scale Museum Exhibit in Indianapolis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Mary Lou; Bostwick, Alice

    1989-01-01

    Indianapolis gifted students in grades five-seven created a museum exhibit to express the views of youth while giving adults an opportunity to listen. The process involved brainstorming, selecting a topic (drug and alcohol abuse), gathering information, forming committees, building a scale model, and creating the actual exhibit. (JDD)

  5. Exhibitions: Connecting Classroom Assessment with Culminating Demonstrations of Mastery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Jill

    2009-01-01

    Exhibitions are public demonstrations of mastery that occur at culminating moments, such as at the conclusion of a unit of study, the transition from one level of schooling to the next, and graduation. Exhibitions require students to speak publicly, use evidence, present engaging visual displays, and otherwise demonstrate mastery to educators,…

  6. 32 CFR 705.25 - Navy Exhibit Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Navy Exhibit Center. 705.25 Section 705.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.25 Navy Exhibit Center. (a) The center is...

  7. 32 CFR 705.25 - Navy Exhibit Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Navy Exhibit Center. 705.25 Section 705.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.25 Navy Exhibit Center. (a) The center is...

  8. 32 CFR 705.25 - Navy Exhibit Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Navy Exhibit Center. 705.25 Section 705.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.25 Navy Exhibit Center. (a) The center is...

  9. 32 CFR 705.25 - Navy Exhibit Center.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Navy Exhibit Center. 705.25 Section 705.25 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.25 Navy Exhibit Center. (a) The center is...

  10. Modelling the Future: Exhibitions and the Materiality of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawn, Martin, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The role of World Exhibitions in the 19th and early 20th centuries was to confirm a relation between the nation state and modernity. As a display about industries, inventions and identities, the Exhibition, in a sense, put entire nations into an elevated, viewable space. It is a significant element in modernity as comparisons can be made, progress…

  11. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart G of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true G Exhibit G to Subpart G of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) GENERAL Environmental Program Exhibit G to Subpart G of Part 1940...

  12. 7 CFR Exhibit G to Subpart A of... - Performance Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Performance Bond G Exhibit G to Subpart A of Part 1924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL.... 1924, Subpt. A, Exh. G Exhibit G to Subpart A of Part 1924—Performance Bond KNOW ALL PERSONS BY...

  13. 17 CFR 229.1016 - (Item 1016) Exhibits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 1016) Exhibits. File as an exhibit to the schedule: (a) Any disclosure materials furnished to security...-9 Disclosure Material X X X Loan Agreement X X Report, Opinion or Appraisal X Contracts, Arrangements or Understandings X X X Statement re: Appraisal Rights X Oral Solicitation Materials X X......

  14. Perspectives on ... Multiculturalism and Library Exhibits: Sites of Contested Representation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reece, Gwendolyn J.

    2005-01-01

    This article analyzes a multicultural library exhibit presenting the Palestinian/Israeli conflict as a site of contested representation. Qualitative methodology is used to interrogate the exhibit and its audience reception. Drawing on insights from critical pedagogy, implications for libraries arising from this case study are given and suggestions…

  15. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart N of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true C Exhibit C to Subpart N of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants Exhibit C to Subpart N of Part 1944...

  16. 7 CFR Exhibit C to Subpart N of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true C Exhibit C to Subpart N of Part 1944 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) HOUSING Housing Preservation Grants Exhibit C to Subpart N of Part 1944...

  17. 7 CFR Exhibit F to Subpart A of... - Payment Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Payment Bond F Exhibit F to Subpart A of Part 1924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS.... A, Exh. F Exhibit F to Subpart A of Part 1924—Payment Bond KNOW ALL PERSONS BY THESE PRESENTS:...

  18. 7 CFR Exhibit F to Subpart A of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false F Exhibit F to Subpart A of Part 1962 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PERSONAL PROPERTY Servicing and Liquidation of Chattel Security Exhibit F to Subpart...

  19. 7 CFR Exhibit F to Subpart A of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false F Exhibit F to Subpart A of Part 1962 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PERSONAL PROPERTY Servicing and Liquidation of Chattel Security Exhibit F to Subpart...

  20. 7 CFR Exhibit F to Subpart A of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false F Exhibit F to Subpart A of Part 1962 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PERSONAL PROPERTY Servicing and Liquidation of Chattel Security Exhibit F to Subpart...

  1. 7 CFR Exhibit F to Subpart A of... - Payment Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Payment Bond F Exhibit F to Subpart A of Part 1924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS.... A, Exh. F Exhibit F to Subpart A of Part 1924—Payment Bond KNOW ALL PERSONS BY THESE PRESENTS:...

  2. Online Cultural Heritage Exhibitions: A Survey of Information Retrieval Features

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liew, Chern Li

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: What kinds of online cultural heritage exhibitions are now available on the internet? How far have these cultural heritage institutions voyaged in terms of harnessing the power of information and communication technology and the interactivity of multimedia systems to exhibit cultural heritage resources? This study aims to highlight the…

  3. The Development of Validated Museum Exhibits. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicol, Elizabeth H.

    Exhibit development, as conceived in this report, is an evolutionary process, drawing the museum visitor into the collaborative venture of testing and improving the exhibits. The findings of contemporary learning research were put to work in the arrangement of activities and specimens that engaged children through self-instructional sequences. The…

  4. Outreach to Science Faculty and Students through Research Exhibitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chan, Tina; Hebblethwaite, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Penfield Library at the State University of New York at Oswego (SUNY Oswego) has a gallery exhibit space near the front entrance that is used to showcase student-faculty research and art class projects. This article features the library's outreach efforts to science faculty and students through research exhibitions. The library held an…

  5. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart L of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false A Exhibit A to Subpart L of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Exhibit A to Subpart L of Part 1940...

  6. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart L of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true A Exhibit A to Subpart L of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Exhibit A to Subpart L of Part 1940...

  7. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart L of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true A Exhibit A to Subpart L of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Exhibit A to Subpart L of Part 1940...

  8. 7 CFR Exhibit A to Subpart L of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false A Exhibit A to Subpart L of Part 1940 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... Exhibit A to Subpart L of Part 1940...

  9. 7 CFR Exhibit F to Subpart A of... - Payment Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payment Bond F Exhibit F to Subpart A of Part 1924 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS.... A, Exh. F Exhibit F to Subpart A of Part 1924—Payment Bond KNOW ALL PERSONS BY THESE PRESENTS:...

  10. 7 CFR Exhibit F to Subpart A of... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true F Exhibit F to Subpart A of Part 1962 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING SERVICE, RURAL BUSINESS-COOPERATIVE... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) PERSONAL PROPERTY Servicing and Liquidation of Chattel Security Exhibit F to Subpart...

  11. 46 CFR Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart F... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false No. Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart F of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Settlement; Prehearing Procedure Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart F of Part 502...

  12. 46 CFR Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart F... - [Reserved

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false No. Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart F of Part 502 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Settlement; Prehearing Procedure Exhibit No. 1 to Subpart F of Part 502...

  13. First major museum exhibit on the science of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nary, G

    1995-05-01

    The Chicago Museum of Science and Industry recently opened its 4,000-square-foot permanent exhibit on the science of AIDS. The exhibit is designed to educate visitors about immunology and virology by presenting AIDS as an example of an immune system breakdown and showing advances made in research and prevention of diseases caused by viruses. The exhibit also seeks to engage preteens with compelling graphics and interactive displays in the hope of motivating them to pursue careers in science. One exhibit, called Frontline, allows visitors to question several physicians and researchers specializing in HIV/AIDS through a touch-screen video program. The exhibit allows these professionals to reveal their commitment and explain their views on the future of the pandemic.

  14. Exhibit Development: The Importance of Process and Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusenbery, P.; McLain, B.

    2010-08-01

    The Space Science Institute (SSI) is a national leader in developing national traveling exhibitions on space science education (e.g. Electric Space, MarsQuest, Alien Earths, Giant Worlds, Asteroids, and Discover Space). It is also known for developing effective digital media programs (e.g. www.alienearths.org), education workshops for formal and informal educators, and educational films (e.g. Inspire Me: Weightless Flights of Discovery). This paper focuses on the exhibit development process, spanning conceptual planning, design development, fabrication and launch. SSI's exhibit programs also include education and outreach programming and the development of an online version of the exhibit. Examples from Giant Worlds and Asteroids will be used to illustrate these development phases especially the importance of evaluation/research in exhibit development using a logic model approach.

  15. First major museum exhibit on the science of AIDS.

    PubMed

    Nary, G

    1995-05-01

    The Chicago Museum of Science and Industry recently opened its 4,000-square-foot permanent exhibit on the science of AIDS. The exhibit is designed to educate visitors about immunology and virology by presenting AIDS as an example of an immune system breakdown and showing advances made in research and prevention of diseases caused by viruses. The exhibit also seeks to engage preteens with compelling graphics and interactive displays in the hope of motivating them to pursue careers in science. One exhibit, called Frontline, allows visitors to question several physicians and researchers specializing in HIV/AIDS through a touch-screen video program. The exhibit allows these professionals to reveal their commitment and explain their views on the future of the pandemic. PMID:11362508

  16. T24 HRAS transformed NIH/3T3 mouse cells (GhrasT-NIH/3T3) in serial tumorigenic in vitro/in vivo passages give rise to increasingly aggressive tumorigenic cell lines T1-A and T2-A and metastatic cell lines T3-HA and T4-PA.

    PubMed

    Ray, Durwood B; Merrill, Gerald A; Brenner, Frederic J; Lytle, Laurie S; Lam, Tan; McElhinney, Aaron; Anders, Joel; Rock, Tara Tauber; Lyker, Jennifer Kier; Barcus, Scott; Leslie, Kara Hust; Kramer, Jill M; Rubenstein, Eric M; Pryor Schanz, Karen; Parkhurst, Amy J; Peck, Michelle; Good, Kimberly; Granath, Kristi Lemke; Cifra, Nicole; Detweiler, Jessalee Wantz; Stevens, Laura; Albertson, Richard; Deir, Rachael; Stewart, Elisabeth; Wingard, Katherine; Richardson, Micah Rose; Blizard, Sarah B; Gillespie, Lauren E; Kriley, Charles E; Rzewnicki, Daniel I; Jones, David H

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells often arise progressively from "normal" to "pre-cancer" to "transformed" to "local metastasis" to "metastatic disease" to "aggressive metastatic disease". Recent whole genome sequencing (WGS) and spectral karyotyping (SKY) of cancer cells and tumorigenic models have shown this progression involves three major types of genome rearrangements: ordered small step-wise changes, more dramatic "punctuated evolution" (chromoplexy), and large catastrophic steps (chromothripsis) which all occur in random combinations to generate near infinite numbers of stochastically rearranged metastatic cancer cell genomes. This paper describes a series of mouse cell lines developed sequentially to mimic this type of progression. This starts with the new GhrasT-NIH/Swiss cell line that was produced from the NIH/3T3 cell line that had been transformed by transfection with HRAS oncogene DNA from the T24 human bladder carcinoma. These GhrasT-NIH/Swiss cells were injected s.c. into NIH/Swiss mice to produce primary tumors from which one was used to establish the T1-A cell line. T1-A cells injected i.v. into the tail vein of a NIH/Swiss mouse produced a local metastatic tumor near the base of the tail from which the T2-A cell line was established. T2-A cells injected i.v. into the tail vein of a nude NIH/Swiss mouse produced metastases in the liver and one lung from which the T3-HA (H=hepatic) and T3-PA (P=pulmonary) cell lines were developed, respectively. T3-HA cells injected i.v. into a nude mouse produced a metastasis in the lung from which the T4-PA cell line was established. PCR analysis indicated the human T24 HRAS oncogene was carried along with each in vitro/in vivo transfer step and found in the T2-A and T4-PA cell lines. Light photomicrographs indicate that all transformed cells are morphologically similar. GhrasT-NIH/Swiss cells injected s.c. produced tumors in 4% of NIH/Swiss mice in 6-10 weeks; T1-A cells injected s.c. produced tumors in 100% of NIH/Swiss mice in 7

  17. Maine Exhibitions Assessment Project, September 2002-June 2004. Technical Criteria for Including Exhibition Assessments in Comprehensive Local Assessment Systems. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maine Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    In September 2002, the Maine Department of Education began organizing an Exhibition Assessment Advisory Committee whose purpose it was to consider meaningful ways to include exhibition assessments in comprehensive local assessment systems. School administrators were invited to participate and/or nominate practitioners in their districts to become…

  18. Statistical properties of chaotic dynamical systems which exhibit strange attractors

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.V.; Oberman, C.R.

    1981-07-01

    A path integral method is developed for the calculation of the statistical properties of turbulent dynamical systems. The method is applicable to conservative systems which exhibit a transition to stochasticity as well as dissipative systems which exhibit strange attractors. A specific dissipative mapping is considered in detail which models the dynamics of a Brownian particle in a wave field with a broad frequency spectrum. Results are presented for the low order statistical moments for three turbulent regimes which exhibit strange attractors corresponding to strong, intermediate, and weak collisional damping.

  19. 27 CFR 7.42 - Exhibiting certificates to Government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF MALT BEVERAGES Requirements for Approval of Labels of Malt Beverages Domestically Bottled or Packed § 7.42 Exhibiting...

  20. 27 CFR 7.42 - Exhibiting certificates to Government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF MALT BEVERAGES Requirements for Approval of Labels of Malt Beverages Domestically Bottled or Packed § 7.42 Exhibiting...

  1. 27 CFR 7.42 - Exhibiting certificates to Government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF MALT BEVERAGES Requirements for Approval of Labels of Malt Beverages Domestically Bottled or Packed § 7.42 Exhibiting...

  2. 27 CFR 7.42 - Exhibiting certificates to Government officials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF MALT BEVERAGES Requirements for Approval of Labels of Malt Beverages Domestically Bottled or Packed § 7.42 Exhibiting...

  3. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement... include more than 150 works of art by Impressionist painter Auguste Renoir. Museums in Paris and...

  4. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement... include more than 150 works of art by Impressionist painter Auguste Renoir. Museums in Paris and...

  5. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement... include more than 150 works of art by Impressionist painter Auguste Renoir. Museums in Paris and...

  6. 45 CFR 1160.4 - Eligibility for international exhibitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... AND ARTIFACTS INDEMNITY ACT § 1160.4 Eligibility for international exhibitions. An indemnity agreement... include more than 150 works of art by Impressionist painter Auguste Renoir. Museums in Paris and...

  7. 76 FR 61472 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Game of Kings: Medieval Ivory... Kings: Medieval Ivory Chessmen from the Isle of Lewis,'' imported from abroad for temporary...

  8. Unimode metamaterials exhibiting negative linear compressibility and negative thermal expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudek, Krzysztof K.; Attard, Daphne; Caruana-Gauci, Roberto; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W.; Grima, Joseph N.

    2016-02-01

    Unimode metamaterials made from rotating rigid triangles are analysed mathematically for their mechanical and thermal expansion properties. It is shown that these unimode systems exhibit positive Poisson’s ratios irrespective of size, shape and angle of aperture, with the Poisson’s ratio exhibiting giant values for certain conformations. When the Poisson’s ratio in one loading direction is larger than +1, the systems were found to exhibit the anomalous property of negative linear compressibility along this direction, that is, the systems expand in this direction when hydrostatically compressed. Also discussed are the thermal expansion properties of these systems under the assumption that the units exhibit increased rotational agitation once subjected to an increase in temperature. The effect of the geometric parameters on the aforementioned thermo-mechanical properties of the system, are discussed, with the aim of identifying negative behaviour.

  9. Science, providence, and progress at the Great Exhibition.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Geoffrey

    2012-09-01

    The Great Exhibition of 1851 is generally interpreted as a thoroughly secular event that celebrated progress in science, technology, and industry. In contrast to this perception, however, the exhibition was viewed by many contemporaries as a religious event of considerable importance. Although some religious commentators were highly critical of the exhibition and condemned the display of artifacts in the Crystal Palace as giving succor to materialism, others incorporated science and technology into their religious frameworks. Drawing on sermons, tracts, and the religious periodical press, this essay pays close attention to the ways in which science and technology were endowed with providentialist significance and particularly examines the notion of human progress used by a number of Christian writers, especially Congregationalists, who set scientific and technological progress within a teleological religious perspective. This discussion sheds fresh light not only on the Great Exhibition itself but also on the deployment of natural theology in mid-nineteenth-century Britain.

  10. 78 FR 21979 - Federal Advisory Committee on International Exhibitions Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Federal Advisory Committee on International Exhibitions Meeting AGENCY..., notice is hereby given that one meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on International...

  11. 78 FR 68479 - Federal Advisory Committee on International Exhibitions Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES Federal Advisory Committee on International Exhibitions Meeting AGENCY..., notice is hereby given that one meeting of the Federal Advisory Committee on International...

  12. "Wenn die Erde bebt", an educational public exhibition in Vienna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parithusta, Rizkita; Brueckl, Ewald; Heuer, Rudolf; Mitterbauer, Ulrike

    2010-05-01

    Natural disasters can cause the loss of human lives, an economic crisis and also the loss of irreplaceable cultural heritage. Earthquakes can mean instantaneous destruction without warning, causing extensive and often irreparable damage to our heritage. An exhibition with the title "Wenn die Erde bebt" (i.e. "When the Earth shakes") which was held at the Natural History Museum, Vienna; in an effort to introduce understanding, awareness, and preparedness to the public, facing earthquake phenomenon. The exhibition compiled and classified examples of large earthquakes and introduces into the basic principles of seismology. It further addresses earthquake impact and how to live with earthquakes, giving access to the most suitable procedure of safety education. The idea of the exhibition is communicated by the means of posters, videos, and physical models which support the understanding of seismometry, elastic rebound theory and earthquake resistant construction. The exhibition is an Austrian contribution to IYPE - International Year of Planet Earth and is now on tour through Austria.

  13. 17. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT EXHIBITION OF EVENTS OF CIVIL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. INTERIOR VIEW OF BASEMENT EXHIBITION OF EVENTS OF CIVIL RIGHTS MOVEMENT AND THE 1963 BOMBING OF THE CHURCH, LOOKING SOUTH - Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, 1530 Sixth Avenue North, Birmingham, Jefferson County, AL

  14. JoAnn Morgan looks at Newscapade exhibit.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    JoAnn Morgan, associate director for Advanced Development and Shuttle Upgrades at KSC, studies posters of space-related news stories in the mobile exhibition called 'NewsCapade with Al Neuharth.' The exhibit started its cross-country tour in San Francisco in April. It is a traveling version of the Newseum in Arlington, Va. Morgan was among four speakers discussing 'Space, the Media and the Millennium' at a reception Jan. 24 kicking off the display at KSC.

  15. Evaluating Education and Science in the KSC Visitor Complex Exhibits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Lance K.

    2000-01-01

    The continuing development of exhibits at the Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex is an excellent opportunity for NASA personnel to promote science and provide insight into NASA programs and projects for the approximately 3 million visitors that come to KSC annually. Stated goals for the Visitor Complex, in fact, emphasize science awareness and recommend broadening the appeal of the displays and exhibits for all age groups. To this end, this summer project seeks to evaluate the science content of planned exhibits/displays in relation to these developing opportunities and identify specific areas for enhancement of existing or planned exhibits and displays. To help expand the educational and science content within the developing exhibits at the Visitor Complex, this project was structured to implement the goals of the Visitor Center Director. To accomplish this, the exhibits and displays planned for completion within the year underwent review and evaluation for science content and educational direction. Planning emphasis for the individual displays was directed at combining the elements of effective education with fundamental scientific integrity, within an appealing format.

  16. University / Science Center Exhibit Development Collaboration: Strategies and Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddick, M. J.; Carliles, S.; Bartelme, L.; Patterson, J.

    2008-06-01

    Through funding from the NSF's Internship in Public Science Education (IPSE) program, Johns Hopkins University (JHU) and the Maryland Science Center (MSC) have worked together to create an exhibit based on JHU's research with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, a project to map the universe. The exhibit is a kiosk-based interactive presentation that connects to online data about the sky. It is currently displayed in SpaceLink, an area at the MSC that focuses on current events and research in astronomy. The person primarily responsible for the exhibit was a graduate student in computer science in the JHU Physics and Astronomy department. He worked with an EPO professional in the department and two members of the MSC's planetarium and exhibit staff to plan the exhibit. The team also worked with a coordinator in the JHU chemistry department, and an external evaluator. Along with increased public understanding of science, our goal was to create and evaluate a sustainable partnership between a research university and a local science center. We are producing an evaluation report discussing our collaboration and detailing lessons learned. We hope that our experience can be a model for other university / science center collaborations in the future. Some lessons that we have learned in our development effort are: start all design decisions with learning goals and objectives, write goals with evaluation in mind, focus on the process of science, and do not underestimate the challenges of working with the web as part of the exhibit technology.

  17. A phenomenological investigation of science center exhibition developers' expertise development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Denise L.

    The purpose of this study was to examine the exhibition developer role in the context of United States (U.S.) science centers, and more specifically, to investigate the way science center exhibition developers build their professional expertise. This research investigated how successfully practicing exhibition developers described their current practices, how they learned to be exhibition developers, and what factors were the most important to the developers in building their professional expertise. Qualitative data was gathered from 10 currently practicing exhibition developers from three science centers: the Exploratorium, San Francisco, California; the Field Museum, Chicago, Illinois; and the Science Museum of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota. In-depth, semistructured interviews were used to collect the data. The study embraced aspects of the phenomenological tradition and sought to derive a holistic understanding of the position and how expertise was built for it. The data were methodically coded and organized into themes prior to analysis. The data analysis found that the position consisted of numerous and varied activities, but the developers' primary roles were advocating for the visitor, storytelling, and mediating information and ideas. They conducted these activities in the context of a team and relied on an established exhibition planning process to guide their work. Developers described a process of learning exhibition development that was experiential in nature. Learning through daily practice was key, though they also consulted with mentors and relied on visitor studies to gauge the effectiveness of their work. They were adept at integrating prior knowledge gained from many aspects of their lives into their practice. The developers described several internal factors that contributed to their expertise development including the desire to help others, a natural curiosity about the world, a commitment to learning, and the ability to accept critique. They

  18. Black Holes Traveling Exhibition: This Time, It's Personal.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dussault, Mary E.; Braswell, E. L.; Sunbury, S.; Wasser, M.; Gould, R. R.

    2012-01-01

    How can you make a topic as abstract as black holes seem relevant to the life of the average museum visitor? In 2009, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics developed a 2500 square foot interactive museum exhibition, "Black Holes: Space Warps & Time Twists,” with funding from the National Science Foundation and NASA. The exhibition has been visited by more than a quarter million museum-goers, and is about to open in its sixth venue at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center in San Diego, California. We have found that encouraging visitors to adopt a custom black hole explorer's identity can help to make the science of black holes more accessible and meaningful. The Black Holes exhibition uses networked exhibit technology that serves to personalize the visitor experience, to support learning over time including beyond the gallery, and to provide a rich quantitative source of embedded evaluation data. Visitors entering the exhibition create their own bar-coded "Black Holes Explorer's Card” which they use throughout the exhibition to collect and record images, movies, their own predictions and conclusions, and other black hole artifacts. This digital database of personal discoveries grows as visitors navigate through the gallery, and an automated web-content authoring system creates a personalized online journal of their experience that they can access once they get home. We report here on new intriguing results gathered from data generated by 112,000 visitors across five different venues. For example, an initial review of the data reveals correlations between visitors’ black hole explorer identity choices and their engagement with the exhibition. We will also discuss correlations between learning gains and personalization.

  19. Cancer-initiating cells derived from established cervical cell lines exhibit stem-cell markers and increased radioresistance

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer-initiating cells (CICs) are proposed to be responsible for the generation of metastasis and resistance to therapy. Accumulating evidences indicates CICs are found among different human cancers and cell lines derived from them. Few studies address the characteristics of CICs in cervical cancer. We identify biological features of CICs from four of the best-know human cell lines from uterine cervix tumors. (HeLa, SiHa, Ca Ski, C-4 I). Methods Cells were cultured as spheres under stem-cell conditions. Flow cytometry was used to detect expression of CD34, CD49f and CD133 antigens and Hoechst 33342 staining to identify side population (SP). Magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting was applied to enrich and purify populations used to evaluate tumorigenicity in nude mice. cDNA microarray analysis and in vitro radioresistance assay were carried out under standard conditions. Results CICs, enriched as spheroids, were capable to generate reproducible tumor phenotypes in nu-nu mice and serial propagation. Injection of 1 × 103 dissociated spheroid cells induced tumors in the majority of animals, whereas injection of 1 × 105 monolayer cells remained nontumorigenic. Sphere-derived CICs expressed CD49f surface marker. Gene profiling analysis of HeLa and SiHa spheroid cells showed up-regulation of CICs markers characteristic of the female reproductive system. Importantly, epithelial to mesenchymal (EMT) transition-associated markers were found highly expressed in spheroid cells. More importantly, gene expression analysis indicated that genes required for radioresistance were also up-regulated, including components of the double-strand break (DSB) DNA repair machinery and the metabolism of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Dose-dependent radiation assay indicated indeed that CICs-enriched populations exhibit an increased resistance to ionizing radiation (IR). Conclusions We characterized a self-renewing subpopulation of CICs found among four well known human

  20. Possible epigenetic mechanisms of tumor progression: induction of high-frequency heritable but phenotypically unstable changes in the tumorigenic and metastatic properties of tumor cell populations by 5-azacytidine treatment.

    PubMed

    Kerbel, R S; Frost, P; Liteplo, R; Carlow, D A; Elliott, B E

    1984-01-01

    Treatment of a variety of highly tumorigenic mouse lines in vitro with chemical mutagens, such as ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), can result in extraordinarily high frequencies (sometimes in excess of 90%) of strongly immunogenic clones unable to grow progressively in normal syngeneic hosts. These clones will, however, grow in immunosuppressed hosts and gradually regain tumorigenic ability in normal mice if maintained in long-term (several months-1 year) culture, i.e., they are often phenotypically unstable. These features--phenotypic drift and high frequency--make it unlikely that point mutations are the underlying mechanism involved in the generation of the variants. Results presented here demonstrate that these observations can be reproduced on the same tumor lines using 5-azacytidine--an analogue of cytidine which can be incorporated into DNA causing subsequent extensive hypomethylation of cytosine residues in the absence of any significant mutagenic effects. Furthermore, 5-azacytidine treatment of a nonmetastatic mouse mammary tumor led to the emergence of a small number of heritable but unstable tumor clones capable of spontaneous metastatic spread. Because it is known that DNA hypomethylation can lead to transcriptional activation of normally silent genes, that altered methylation patterns can be somatically replicated with a high but not perfect fidelity, and that mutagens can cause DNA hypomethylation, we propose that DNA hypomethylation followed by de novo methylation represents a plausible mechanism to account not only for the induction of the nontumorigenic variants but for a number of aspects of tumor progression and tumor heterogeneity, as well. In particular, we refer to heritable phenotypic alterations in tumor cell populations which occur at very high frequency but which are not necessarily stable over very long periods of time.