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Sample records for fiber cbcf insulation

  1. Development and characterization of carbon-bonded carbon fiber insulation for radioisotope space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, G.C.; Robbins, J.M.

    1985-06-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS), an improved radioisotope heat source, employs a unique thermal insulation material, carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF), to protect the fuel capsule and to help achieve the highest possible specific power. The CBCF insulation is made from chopped rayon fiber about 10 ..mu..m in diameter and 250 ..mu..m long, which is carbonized and bonded with phenolic resin particles. The CBCF shapes, both tubes and plates, are formed in a multiple molding facility by vacuum molding a water slurry of the carbonized chopped-rayon fiber (54 wt %) and phenolic resin (46 wt %). The molded shapes are subsequently dried and cured. Final carbonization of the resin is at 1600/sup 0/C. Machining to close tolerances (+-0.08 mm) is accomplished by conventional tooling and fixturing. The resulting material is an excellent lightweight insulation with a nominal density of 0.2 Mg/m/sup 3/ and a thermal conductivity of 0.24 W(m.K) in vacuum at 2000/sup 0/C. Several attributes that make CBCF superior to other known high-temperature insulation materials for the GPHS application have been identified. It has the excellent attributes of light weight, low thermal conductivity, chemical compatibility, and high-temperature capabilities. The mechanical strength of CBCF insulation is satisfactory for the GPHS application; it has passed vibration tests simulating launch conditions. The basic fabrication technique was refined to eliminate undesirable large pores and cracks often present in materials fabricated by earlier techniques. Also, processing was scaled up to incease the fabrication rate by a factor of 10. The specific properties of the CBCF were tailored by adjusting material and processing variables to obtain the desired results. We report here how work on CBCF characterization and development conducted at ORNL from 1978 through 1980 has contributed to the GPHS program to meet the requirements of both the Galileo and Ulysees Missions.

  2. Carbon-bonded carbon fiber insulation for radioisotope space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, G.C.; Robbins, J.M.

    1985-05-01

    A carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulation developed for a radioisotope heat source is made from chopped rayon fiber about 10 ..mu..m in diameter and 250 ..mu..m long, which is carbonized and bonded with phenolic resin particles. The CBCF is an excellent lightweight insulating material with a nominal density of 0.2 Mg/m/sup 3/ and a thermal conductivity of 0.24 W/(m-K) in vacuum at 2000/sup 0/C. Several attributes that make CBCF particularly suitable for the heat source application have been identified. These include light weight, low thermal conductivity, chemical compatibility, and high-temperature capabilities. The mechanical strength of CBCF insulation is satisfactory for the application. The basic fabrication technique was refined to eliminate undesirable large pores and cracks often present in materials fabricated by earlier techniques. Also, processing was scaled up to increase the fabrication rate by a factor of 10. The specific properties of the CBCF were tailored by adjusting material and processing variables to obtain the desired results. 22 references, 13 figures, 4 tables.

  3. Carbon-bonded carbon fiber insulation for radioisotope space power systems

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, G C; Robbins, J M

    1985-05-01

    A carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulation developed for a radioisotope heat source is made from chopped rayon fiber about 10..mu..m long, which is carbonized and bonded with phenolic resin particles. The CBCF is an excellent lightweight insulating material with a nominal density of 0.2 Mg/m/sup 3/ and a thermal conductivity of 0.24 W/(m-K) in vacuum at 2000/sup 0/C. (Several attributes that make CBCF particularly suitable for the heat source application have been identified.) These include light weight, low thermal conductivity, chemical compatibility, and hightemperature capabilities. The mechanical strength of CBCF insulation is satisfactory for the application. The basic fabrication technique was refined to eliminate undesirable large pores and cracks often present in materials fabricated by earlier techniques. Also, processing was scaled up to increase the fabrication rate by a factor of 10. The specific properties of the CBCF were tailored by adjusting material and processing variables to obtain the desired results.

  4. Insulated Fiber Brush.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An insulated-strand fiber brush is provided for a DC motor /generator. The brush is comprised of a plurality of fiber segments which are insulated from one another near the contact surface of a rotor bar. In one embodiment, insulating spacers are fixed to a brush assembly and wear with the fibers, and in another embodiment insulation is provided by a separate shell. (Author)

  5. Installing fiber insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, D. S.; Warren, A. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method for installing fragile, high temperature insulation batting in an elongated cavity or in a resilient wire sleeve to form a resilient seal. The batting is preformed to rough dimensions and wrapped in a plastic film, the film being of a material which is fugitive at a high temperature. The film is heat sealed and trimmed to form a snugly fit skin which overlaps at least at one end to permit attachment of a pull cord. The film absorbs the tensile force of pulling the film enclosed batting through the cavity or wire mesh sleeve and is subsequently driven off by high temperature baking, leaving only the insulation in the cavity or wire mesh sleeve.

  6. Fiber Reinforced Composites for Insulation and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Roy M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The work involves two areas: Composites, optimum fiber placement with initial construction of a pressure vessel, and the general subject of insulation, a continual concern in harsh thermal environments. Insulation

  7. Cotton-Fiber-Filled Rubber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Floyd A.

    1987-01-01

    Carbonization of fibers at high temperatures improves strength and erosion resistance. Cotton linters tested as replacement for asbestos filler currently used in rubber insulation in solid rocket motors. Cotton-filled rubber insulation has industrial uses; in some kinds of chemical- or metal-processing equipment, hoses, and protective clothing.

  8. Compression Testing of Alumina Fiber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.

    2006-01-01

    A series of tests were conducted to measure the response of alumina fiber insulation to compression loading. The alumina fiber insulation is a candidate gasket material for the Space Shuttle Government Furnished Equipment (GFE) Tile Overlay Repair. Tests were conducted at room temperature and 2300 F. The alumina fiber insulation is a fibrous insulation blanket which was supplied to Langley in two forms, a nominal 3 lb/ft3 version and a nominal 9 lb/ft3 version. The 3 lb/ft3 material was tested as sheets 0.15 and 0.25 inches thick and the 9 lb/ft3 material in sheets 1 inch thick. The material showed very non-linear compression behavior with the compressive resistance of the material increasing as the material was compressed. The 3 lb/ft3 0.15-inch thick material required 4.1 psi to reach the nominal installation thickness of 0.045 inches and retain a load of 2.1 lbs during unloading. Testing at 2300 F resulted in a stiffer more board-like material. The 3 lb/ft3 0.15-inch thick material retained 1 psi of compressive resistance after a 10 minute hold at 2300 F and 0.045 inches thickness.

  9. Thermally Insulating, Kinematic Tensioned-Fiber Suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voellmer, George M.

    2004-01-01

    A salt pill and some parts of a thermally insulating, kinematic suspension system that holds the salt pill rigidly in an adiabatic-demagnetization refrigerator (ADR) is presented. "Salt pill" in this context denotes a unit comprising a cylindrical container, a matrix of gold wires in the container, and a cylinder of ferric ammonium alum (a paramagnetic salt) that has been deposited on the wires. The structural members used in this system for both thermal insulation and positioning are aromatic polyamide fibers (Kevlar(R) or equivalent) under tension. This suspension system is designed to satisfy several special requirements to ensure the proper operation of the ADR. These requirements are to (1) maintain the salt pill at a specified position within the cylindrical bore of an electromagnet; (2) prevent vibrations, which would cause dissipation of heat in the salt pill; and (3) minimize the conduction of heat from the electromagnet bore and other neighboring objects to the salt pill; all while (4) protecting the salt pill (which is fragile) against all tensile and bending loads other than those attributable to its own weight. In addition, the system is required to consist of two subsystems -- one for the top end and one for the bottom end of the salt pill -- that can be assembled and tensioned separately from each other and from the salt pill, then later attached to the salt pill.

  10. Development program to produce mullite fiber insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Long, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    Processing methods were utilized to form a mullite fiber-Kaowool felt. The formation of a blended felt using the Rotoformer wet-laying method was successful. Felt products were evaluated for tensile strength, thermal stability, thermal conductivity and structural integrity at 1259 C and 1371 C. Textile processing methods failed in an attempt to form a yarn from staple and multifilament mullite fiber due to fiber damage through mechanical handling. The refractoriness of pure Kaowool ceramic fiber is improved with additions of 30% or greater mullite fiber.

  11. Ceramic fiber insulation impregnated with an infra-red retardant coating and method for production thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Alfred A. (Inventor); Tarkanian, Ryan Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invented insulation is a ceramic fiber insulation wherein the ceramic fibers are treated with a coating which contains transition metal oxides. The invented process for coating the insulation is a process of applying the transition metal oxide coating to the fibers of the insulation after the fibers have been formed into a tile or other porous body. The coating of transition metal oxide lowers the transmittance of radiation through the insulation thereby lowering the temperature of the backface of the insulation and better protecting the structure that underlies the insulation.

  12. THERMAL INSULATION FROM LIGNIN-DERIVED CARBON FIBERS

    SciTech Connect

    Albers, Tracy; Chen, Chong; Eberle, Cliff; Webb, Daniel C

    2014-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and GrafTech International Holdings Inc. (GrafTech) have collaborated to develop and demonstrate the performance of high temperature thermal insulation prototypes made from lignin-based carbon fibers (LBCF). This was the first reported production of LBCF or resulting products at scale > 1 kg. The results will potentially lead to the first commercial application of LBCF. The goal of the commercial application is to replace expensive, foreign-sourced isotropic pitch carbon fibers with lower cost carbon fibers made from a domestically sourced, bio-derived (renewable) feedstock. LBCF can help resolve supply chain vulnerability and reduce the production cost for high temperature thermal insulation as well as create US jobs. The performance of the LBCF prototypes was measured and found to be comparable to that of the current commercial product. During production of the insulation prototypes, the project team demonstrated lignin compounding/pelletization, fiber production, heat treatment, and compositing at scales far surpassing those previously demonstrated in LBCF R&D or production.

  13. Polymer/glass nanocomposite fiber as an insulating material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taygun, M. Erol; Akkaya, I.; Gönen, S. Ö.; Küçükbayrak, S.

    2017-02-01

    Production of the insulation materials with using nanofibers is the unique idea. With this idea, insulating facilities are enhanced with compressing air between the layers of nanofibers. Basically, glass wool is used as an insulation material. On the other hand, nanofiber glasses can be preferred for insulation purposes to be able to obtain insulation materials better then glass wool. From this point of view in this study, glass nanofibers were formed with sol-gel method by utilizing electrospinning technique. In the experimental part, first of all, sol-gel and polyvinylpyrolidone (PVP)/ethanol solutions were prepared. Then the relation of rheological properties with electrospinnability of PVP/sol-gel solutions was investigated by using a rheometer. Results showed that viscosity increased with the concentration of PVP. Meanwhile, the morphology of electrospun PVP/glass nanofibers was investigated by scanning electron microscope. It was also observed that the homogeneous nanofiber structure was obtained when the viscosity of the solution was 0.006 Pa.s. According to SEM results, it was concluded that nanocomposite fiber having a nanostructured morphology may be a good candidate for thermal insulation applications in the industry.

  14. Airflow Resistance of Loose-Fill Mineral Fiber Insulations in Retrofit Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, C. J.; Fox, M. J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-02-01

    This report expands on Building America Report 1109 by applying the experimental apparatus and test method to dense-pack retrofit applications using mineral fiber insulation materials. Three (3) fiber glass insulation materials and one (1) stone wool insulation material were tested, and the results compared to the cellulose results from the previous study.

  15. Airflow Resistance of Loose-Fill Mineral Fiber Insulations in Retrofit Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Schumacher, C. J.; Fox, M. J.; Lstiburek, J.

    2015-02-01

    This report expands on Building America Report 1109 by applying the experimental apparatus and test method to dense-pack retrofit applications using mineral fiber insulation materials. Three fiber glass insulation materials and one stone wool insulation material were tested, and the results compared to the cellulose results from the previous study.

  16. Rocket motors incorporating basalt fiber and nanoclay compositions and methods of insulating a rocket motor with the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajiwala, Himansu M. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    An insulation composition that comprises at least one nitrile butadiene rubber, basalt fibers, and nanoclay is disclosed. Further disclosed is an insulation composition that comprises polybenzimidazole fibers, basalt fibers, and nanoclay. The basalt fibers may be present in the insulation compositions in a range of from approximately 1% by weight to approximately 6% by weight of the total weight of the insulation composition. The nanoclay may be present in the insulation compositions in a range of from approximately 5% by weight to approximately 10% by weight of the total weight of the insulation composition. Rocket motors including the insulation compositions and methods of insulating a rocket motor are also disclosed.

  17. Basalt fiber and nanoclay compositions, articles incorporating the same, and methods of insulating a rocket motor with the same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gajiwala, Himansu M. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An insulation composition that comprises at least one nitrile butadiene rubber, basalt fibers, and nanoclay is disclosed. Further disclosed is an insulation composition that comprises polybenzimidazole fibers, basalt fibers, and nanoclay. The basalt fibers may be present in the insulation compositions in a range of from approximately 1% by weight to approximately 6% by weight of the total weight of the insulation composition. The nanoclay may be present in the insulation compositions in a range of from approximately 5% by weight to approximately 10% by weight of the total weight of the insulation composition. Rocket motors including the insulation compositions and methods of insulating a rocket motor are also disclosed.

  18. Electrical Insulation Characteristics of Glass Fiber Reinforced Resins

    SciTech Connect

    Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor; James, David Randy; Ellis, Alvin R

    2009-01-01

    Non-metallic structural materials that act as an electrical insulation are needed for cryogenic power applications. One of the extensively utilized materials is glass fiber reinforced resins (GFRR) and may also be known as GFRP and FRP. They are created from glass fiber cloth that are impregnated with an epoxy resin under pressure and heat. Although the materials based on GFRR have been employed extensively, reports about their dielectric properties at cryogenic temperatures and larger thicknesses are generally lacking in the literature. Therefore to guide electrical apparatus designers for cryogenic applications, GFRR samples with different thicknesses are tested in a liquid nitrogen bath. Scaling relation between the dielectric breakdown strength and the GFFR thickness is established. Their loss tangents are also reported at various frequencies.

  19. Early development of ceramic fiber insulation for the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D.; Strouhal, G.; Gangler, J. J.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution of reusable surface insulation is described, with attention to the mullite and other aluminosilicates, zirconia, and silicon carbide-coated carbon compositions experimented with in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Evaluation and development concentrated in this period on such aspects of design and material properties as cold soak performance, attachment, shock impingement, surface coating cracks, and tile gap design and heating. In addressing the central problem of heat-shield thermal conductivity, it was found that for a given density, silica fibers had a lower conductivity than those of mullite. This was due to the one-micron, as opposed to 4.7-micron, diameter of the silica fibers, which resulted in smaller pores and therefore less convective and radiative heat transfer. Attention is also given to tile coating materials and the high-temperature processes by which they were applied.

  20. Multilayered thermal insulation formed of zirconia bonded layers of zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, Jr., George E.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.

    1988-01-01

    A multilayered thermal insulating composite is formed of a first layer of zirconia-bonded zirconia fibers for utilization near the hot phase or surface of a furnace or the like. A second layer of zirconia-bonded metal oxide fibers is attached to the zirconia fiber layer by a transition layer formed of intermingled zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers. The thermal insulation is fabricated by vacuum molding with the layers being sequentially applied from aqueous solutions containing the fibers to a configured mandrel. A portion of the solution containing the fibers forming the first layer is intermixed with the solution containing the fibers of the second layer for forming the layer of mixed fibers. The two layers of fibers joined together by the transition layer are saturated with a solution of zirconium oxynitrate which provides a zirconia matrix for the composite when the fibers are sintered together at their nexi.

  1. Multilayered thermal insulation formed of zirconia bonded layers of zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.

    1988-09-13

    A multilayered thermal insulating composite is formed of a first layer of zirconia-bonded zirconia fibers for utilization near the hot phase or surface of a furnace or the like. A second layer of zirconia-bonded metal oxide fibers is attached to the zirconia fiber layer by a transition layer formed of intermingled zirconia fibers and metal oxide fibers. The thermal insulation is fabricated by vacuum molding with the layers being sequentially applied from aqueous solutions containing the fibers to a configured mandrel. A portion of the solution containing the fibers forming the first layer is intermixed with the solution containing the fibers of the second layer for forming the layer of mixed fibers. The two layers of fibers joined together by the transition layer are saturated with a solution of zirconium oxynitrate which provides a zirconia matrix for the composite when the fibers are sintered together at their nexi.

  2. Fibers and fabrics with insulating, water-proofing, and flame-resistant properties

    DOEpatents

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Coronado, Paul R.

    2004-04-20

    Fibers, and fabrics produced from the fibers, are made water repellent, fire-retardant and/or thermally insulating by filling void spaces in the fibers and/or fabrics with a powdered material. When the powder is sufficiently finely divided, it clings tenaciously to the fabric's fibers and to itself, resisting the tendency to be removed from the fabric.

  3. Insulation Materials Comprising Fibers Having a Partially Cured Polymer Coating Thereon, Articles Including Such Insulation Materials, and Methods of Forming Such Materials and Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Richard E. (Inventor); Meeks, Craig L. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    Insulation materials have a coating of a partially cured polymer on a plurality of fibers, and the plurality of coated fibers in a cross-linked polymeric matrix. Insulation may be formed by applying a preceramic polymer to a plurality of fibers, heating the preceramic polymer to form a partially cured polymer over at least portions of the plurality of fibers, disposing the plurality of fibers in a polymeric material, and curing the polymeric material. A rocket motor may be formed by disposing a plurality of coated fibers in an insulation precursor, curing the insulation precursor to form an insulation material without sintering the partially cured polymer, and providing an energetic material over the polymeric material. An article includes an insulation material over at least one surface.

  4. Effects of carbon/graphite fiber contamination on high voltage electrical insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrity, T.; Eichler, C.

    1980-01-01

    The contamination mechanics and resulting failure modes of high voltage electrical insulation due to carbon/graphite fibers were examined. The high voltage insulation vulnerability to carbon/graphite fiber induced failure was evaluated using a contamination system which consisted of a fiber chopper, dispersal chamber, a contamination chamber, and air ducts and suction blower. Tests were conducted to evaluate the effects of fiber length, weathering, and wetness on the insulator's resistance to carbon/graphite fibers. The ability of nuclear, fossil, and hydro power generating stations to maintain normal power generation when the surrounding environment is contaminated by an accidental carbon fiber release was investigated. The vulnerability assessment included only the power plant generating equipment and its associated controls, instrumentation, and auxiliary and support systems.

  5. Fiber glass prevents cracking of polyurethane foam insulation on cryogenic vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forge, D. A.

    1968-01-01

    Fiber glass material, placed between polyurethane foam insulation and the outer surfaces of cryogenic vessels, retains its resilience at cryogenic temperatures and provides an expansion layer between the metal surfaces and the polyurethane foam, preventing cracking of the latter.

  6. Basalt fiber insulating material with a mineral binding agent for industrial use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drozdyuk, T.; Aizenshtadt, A.; Tutygin, A.; Frolova, M.

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers a possibility of using mining industry waste as a binding agent for heat insulating material on the basis of basalt fiber. The main objective of the research is to produce a heat-insulating material to be applied in machine building in high-temperature environments. After synthetic binder having been replaced by a mineral one, an environmentally sound thermal insulating material having desirable heat-protecting ability and not failing when exposed to high temperatures was obtained.

  7. Measure Guideline: Three High Performance Mineral Fiber Insulation Board Retrofit Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, Ken

    2015-01-01

    This Measure Guideline describes a high performance enclosure retrofit package that uses mineral fiber insulation board. The Measure Guideline describes retrofit assembly and details for wood frame roof and walls and for cast concrete foundations. This Measure Guideline is intended to serve contractors and designers seeking guidance for non-foam exterior insulation retrofit.

  8. Measure Guideline: Three High Performance Mineral Fiber Insulation Board Retrofit Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhauser, K.

    2015-01-01

    This Measure Guideline describes a high performance enclosure retrofit package that uses mineral fiber insulation board, and is intended to serve contractors and designers seeking guidance for non-foam exterior insulation retrofit processes. The guideline describes retrofit assembly and details for wood frame roof and walls and for cast concrete foundations.

  9. Structural health monitoring for insulation panels of LNG carriers using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Myung Hyun; Son, Young Joo; Kang, Sung Won; Lee, Jae Myung; Na, Sung Soo

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate dynamic failure initiation and failure modes of insulation panels of LNG carriers. Insulation panels of LNG cargo tanks may include mechanical failures such as cracks as well as delaminations within the layers due to impact sloshing loads and fatigue loadings, and these failures cause a significant decrease of structural integrity. In this study, a structural health monitoring system, employing fiber optic sensors is developed for monitoring various failures that can occur in LNG insulation panels. Fiber optic sensors have the advantage of being embedded inside of insulation panels. The signal of embedded fiber optic sensors is used to calculate the strain of insulation panels and is processed by digital filtering to identify damage initiations. It has been observed that the presence of defects and delaminations produce noticeable changes in the strain measurement in a predictable manner. In addition, fiber optic sensors are used to measure static and dynamic strain variations of insulation panels with and without damage. It is expected that this study will be used as a fundamental study for the safety assessment of the LNG insulation panels.

  10. Development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, P.C.; DePoorter, G.L.; Munoz, D.R.

    1991-02-01

    We have initiated a three phase investigation of the development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer usable lifetimes. This report presents the results of the first phase of the study, performed from Aug. 1989 through Feb. 1991, which shows that significant energy saving are possible through the use of high temperature insulating fibers that better retain their efficient insulating properties during the service lifetime of the fibers. The remaining phases of this program include the pilot scale development and then full scale production feasibility development and evaluation of enhanced high temperature refractory insulting fibers. This first proof of principle phase of the program presents a summary of the current use patterns of refractory fibers, a laboratory evaluation of the high temperature performance characteristics of selected typical refractory fibers and an analysis of the potential energy savings through the use of enhanced refractory fibers. The current use patterns of refractory fibers span a wide range of industries and high temperature furnaces within those industries. The majority of high temperature fiber applications are in furnaces operating between 2000 and 26000{degrees}F. The fibers used in furnaces operating within this range provide attractive thermal resistance and low thermal storage at reasonable cost. A series of heat treatment studies performed for this phase of the program has shown that the refractory fibers, as initially manufactured, have attractive thermal conductivities for high temperature applications but the fibers go through rapid devitrification and subsequent crystal growth upon high temperature exposure. Development of improved fibers, maintaining the favorable characteristics of the existing as-manufactured fibers, could save between 1 and 4% of the energy consumed in high temperature furnaces using refractory fibers.

  11. Standard specification for glass fiber felt thermal insulation. ASTM standard

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1997-01-01

    This specification is under the jurisdiction of ASTM Committee C-16 on Thermal Insulation and is the direct responsibility of Subcommittee C16.23 on Blanket and Loose Fill Insulation. Current edition approved Dec. 10, 1996. Published January 1997. Originally published as C 1086-87. Last previous edition was C 1086-90a.

  12. Use of coconut fiber as a low-cost thermal insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Kochhar, G.S.; Manohar, K.

    1997-11-01

    Cost is one of the major factors to be considered when choosing a thermal insulator. Design engineers continuously strive to provide the best at the lowest possible cost. In the tropics climate conditions are essentially hot and humid and a cause for daily discomfort. To some extent, air-conditioning of buildings has solved this problem. The major deterrent to air-conditioning is the exorbitant cost of imported thermal insulation materials. This has prompted a search for local, low-cost but effective thermal insulation for buildings. Coconut fiber is available at minimal cost from the copra industry in Trinidad, as it is a waste product from the coconut. The viability of using coconut fiber as building thermal insulation was explored by conducting thermal conductivity tests on 200 mm X 400 mm X 60 mm thick slab-like specimens. The test equipment used was a locally designed constant temperature hot box apparatus. This apparatus was designed to test slab-like specimens under steady-state conditions. The reliability if this experimental set up was checked using Gypsum Plaster. The thermal conductivity test results for coconut fiber over the density range 30 kg/m{sup 3} to 115 kg/m{sup 3} showed the characteristic hooked shape graph for fibrous material. For the 60 mm thick specimens at a mean temperature of 39 C, a minimum thermal conductivity of 0.058 W/mK occurred at an optimum density of 85 kg/m{sup 3}. The thermal conductivity of commonly used industrial insulators, namely loose-fill expanded vermiculite, cellular glass and blanket fiber glass, at a mean temperature of 38 C are 0.066 W/mK, 0.061 W/mK and 0.052 W/mK respectively. When compared, these results show that air dried coconut fiber has far reaching potential for use as an effective building thermal insulation.

  13. Development of New Generation of Thermally-Enhanced Fiber Glass Insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Yarbrough, David W; Childs, Phillip W; Miller, William A; Atchley, Jerald Allen; Shrestha, Som S

    2010-03-01

    This report presents experimental and numerical results from thermal performance studies. The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC and John s Manville was to design a basic concept of a new generation of thermally-enhanced fiber glass insulation. Different types of Phase Change Materials (PCMs) have been tested as dynamic components in buildings during the last 4 decades. Most historical studies have found that PCMs enhance building energy performance. Some PCM-enhanced building materials, like PCM-gypsum boards or PCM-impregnated concretes have already found their limited applications in different countries. Today, continued improvements in building envelope technologies suggest that throughout Southern and Central U.S. climates, residences may soon be routinely constructed with PCM in order to maximize insulation effectiveness and maintain low heating and cooling loads. The proposed thermally-enhanced fiber glass insulation will maximize this integration by utilizing a highly-efficient building envelope with high-R thermal insulation, active thermal mass and superior air-tightness. Improved thermal resistance will come from modifications in infrared internal characteristics of the fiber glass insulation. Thermal mass effect can be provided by proprietary thermally-active microencapsulated phase change material (PCM). Work carried out at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on the CRADA is described in this report.

  14. Improved coating for silica fiber based ceramic Reusable Surface Insulation (CRSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, T. J.

    1974-01-01

    A series of coatings was developed for the space shuttle type silica fiber insulation system and characterized for optical and physical properties. Reentry simulation tests were run using a radiant panel and also using a hypersonic plasma arc. The coatings produced had improved physical and optical properties as well as greater reuse capability over the GE version of the JSC-0042 coating.

  15. High-temperature properties of ceramic fibers and insulations for thermal protection of atmospheric entry and hypersonic cruise vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Pitts, William C.; Araujo, Myrian; Zimmerman, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayer insulations (MIs) which will operate in the 500 to 1000 C temperature range are being considered for possible applications on aerospace vehicles subject to convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The insulations described consist of ceramic fibers, insulations, and metal foils quilted together with ceramic thread. As these types of insulations have highly anisotropic properties, the total heat transfer characteristics must be determined. Data are presented on the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of four types of MIs and are compared to the baseline Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation currently used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. In addition, the high temperature properties of the fibers used in these MIs are discussed. The fibers investigated included silica and three types of aluminoborosilicate (ABS). Static tension tests were performed at temperatures up to 1200 C and the ultimate strain, tensile strength, and tensile modulus of single fibers were determined.

  16. High temperature properties of ceramic fibers and insulations for thermal protection of atmospheric entry and hypersonic cruise vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Pitts, William C.; Araujo, Myrian; Zimmerman, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayer insulations (MIs) which will operate in the 500 to 1000 C temperature range are being considered for possible applications on aerospace vehicles subject to convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The insulations described consist of ceramic fibers, insulations, and metal foils quilted together with ceramic thread. As these types of insulations have highly anisotropic properties, the total heat transfer characteristics must be determined. Data are presented on the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of four types of MIs and are compared to the baseline Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation currently used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. In addition, the high temperature properties of the fibers used in these MIs are discussed. The fibers investigated included silica and three types of aluminoborosilicate (ABS). Static tension tests were performed at temperatures up to 1200 C and the ultimate strain, tensile strength, and tensile modulus of single fibers were determined.

  17. High-temperature properties of ceramic fibers and insulations for thermal protection of atmospheric entry and hypersonic cruise vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Kourtides, D.A.; Pitts, W.C.; Araujo, M.; Zimmerman, R.S.

    1988-02-01

    Multilayer insulations (MIs) which will operate in the 500 to 1000 C temperature range are being considered for possible applications on aerospace vehicles subject to convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The insulations described consist of ceramic fibers, insulations, and metal foils quilted together with ceramic thread. As these types of insulations have highly anisotropic properties, the total heat transfer characteristics must be determined. Data are presented on the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of four types of MIs and are compared to the baseline Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation currently used on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. In addition, the high temperature properties of the fibers used in these MIs are discussed. The fibers investigated included silica and three types of aluminoborosilicate (ABS). Static tension tests were performed at temperatures up to 1200 C and the ultimate strain, tensile strength, and tensile modulus of single fibers were determined.

  18. Insulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Dennis

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with insulation. Its objective is for the student to be able to determine insulation needs of new or existing structures, select type to use, use installation techniques, calculate costs, and apply safety factors. Some topics covered…

  19. A method and technique for installing light-weight fragile, high-temperature fiber insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballantine, T. J. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A method of installing fragile, light-weight, high-temperature fiber insulation, particularly where the insulation is to be used as a seal strip providing a high order of thermal barrier insulation is described. The process is based on provision of a strip of the mineral batting cut oversize by a predetermined amount, saturated in a fugitive polymer solution, compressed in a mold, dried and cured to form a rigidized batting material which may be machined to required shape. The machined dimensions would normally be at least nominally less than the dimensions of the cavity to be sealed. After insertion in the cavity, which may be a wire-mesh seal enclosure, the apparatus is subjected to baking at a temperature sufficiently high to cause the resin to burn off cleanly, leaving the batting substantially in its original condition and expanded into the cavity or seal enclosure.

  20. Method and technique for installing light-weight, fragile, high-temperature fiber insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, B. C. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A method of installing fragile, light weight, high temperature fiber insulation, particularly where the insulation is to be used as a seal strip providing a high order of thermal barrier insulation is discussed. The process is based on provision of a strip of the mineral batting cut oversize by a predetermined amount, saturated in a fugitive polymer solution, compressed in a mold, dried and cured to form a rigidized batting material which is machined to required shape. The machine dimensions would normally be at least nominally less than the dimensions of the cavity to be sealed. After insertion in the cavity, which may be a wire-mesh seal enclosure, the apparatus is subjected to baking at a temperature sufficiently high to cause the resin to burn off cleanly, leaving the batting substantially in its original condition and expanded into the cavity or seal enclosure.

  1. High power L-band mode-locked fiber laser based on topological insulator saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Meng, Yichang; Semaan, Georges; Salhi, Mohamed; Niang, Alioune; Guesmi, Khmaies; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Sanchez, Francois

    2015-09-07

    We demonstrate a passive mode-locked Er:Yb doped double-clad fiber laser using a microfiber-based topological insulator (Bi(2)Se(3)) saturable absorber (TISA). By optimizing the cavity loss and output coupling ratio, the mode-locked fiber laser can operate in L-band with high average output power. With the highest pump power of 5 W, 91st harmonic mode locking of soliton bunches with average output power of 308 mW was obtained. This is the first report that the TISA based erbium-doped fiber laser operating above 1.6 μm and is also the highest output power yet reported in TISA based passive mode-locked fiber laser.

  2. 70-fs mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser with topological insulator

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjun; Pang, Lihui; Han, Hainian; Tian, Wenlong; Chen, Hao; Lei, Ming; Yan, Peiguang; Wei, Zhiyi

    2016-01-01

    Femtosecond optical pulses have applications in optical communication, astronomical frequency combs, and laser spectroscopy. Here, a hybrid mode-locked erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser with topological insulator (TI) is proposed, for the first time to our best knowledge. The pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method is employed to fabricate the fiber-taper TI saturable absorber (TISA). By virtue of the fiber-taper TISA, the hybrid EDF laser is passively mode-locked using the nonlinear polarization evolution (NPE), and emits 70 fs pulses at 1542 nm, whose 3 dB spectral width is 63 nm with a repetition rate and transfer efficiency of 95.4 MHz and 14.12%, respectively. Our experiments indicate that the proposed hybrid mode-locked EDF lasers have better performance to achieve shorter pulses with higher power and lower mode-locking threshold in the future. PMID:26813439

  3. Polarization domain wall pulses in a microfiber-based topological insulator fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jingmin; Li, Xingliang; Zhang, Shumin; Zhang, Han; Yan, Peiguang; Han, Mengmeng; Pang, Zhaoguang; Yang, Zhenjun

    2016-07-06

    Topological insulators (TIs), are novel two-dimension materials, which can act as effective saturable absorbers (SAs) in a fiber laser. Moreover, based on the evanescent wave interaction, deposition of the TI on microfiber would create an effective SA, which has combined advantages from the strong nonlinear optical response in TI material together with the sufficiently-long-range interaction length in fiber taper. By using this type of TI SA, various scalar solitons have been obtained in fiber lasers. However, a single mode fiber always exhibits birefringence, and hence can support two orthogonal degenerate modes. Here we investigate experimentally the vector characters of a TI SA fiber laser. Using the saturated absorption and the high nonlinearity of the TI SA, a rich variety of dynamic states, including polarization-locked dark pulses and their harmonic mode locked counterparts, polarization-locked noise-like pulses and their harmonic mode locked counterparts, incoherently coupled polarization domain wall pulses, including bright square pulses, bright-dark pulse pairs, dark pulses and bright square pulse-dark pulse pairs are all observed with different pump powers and polarization states.

  4. Polarization domain wall pulses in a microfiber-based topological insulator fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingmin; Li, Xingliang; Zhang, Shumin; Zhang, Han; Yan, Peiguang; Han, Mengmeng; Pang, Zhaoguang; Yang, Zhenjun

    2016-07-01

    Topological insulators (TIs), are novel two-dimension materials, which can act as effective saturable absorbers (SAs) in a fiber laser. Moreover, based on the evanescent wave interaction, deposition of the TI on microfiber would create an effective SA, which has combined advantages from the strong nonlinear optical response in TI material together with the sufficiently-long-range interaction length in fiber taper. By using this type of TI SA, various scalar solitons have been obtained in fiber lasers. However, a single mode fiber always exhibits birefringence, and hence can support two orthogonal degenerate modes. Here we investigate experimentally the vector characters of a TI SA fiber laser. Using the saturated absorption and the high nonlinearity of the TI SA, a rich variety of dynamic states, including polarization-locked dark pulses and their harmonic mode locked counterparts, polarization-locked noise-like pulses and their harmonic mode locked counterparts, incoherently coupled polarization domain wall pulses, including bright square pulses, bright-dark pulse pairs, dark pulses and bright square pulse-dark pulse pairs are all observed with different pump powers and polarization states.

  5. Polarization domain wall pulses in a microfiber-based topological insulator fiber laser

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingmin; Li, Xingliang; Zhang, Shumin; Zhang, Han; Yan, Peiguang; Han, Mengmeng; Pang, Zhaoguang; Yang, Zhenjun

    2016-01-01

    Topological insulators (TIs), are novel two-dimension materials, which can act as effective saturable absorbers (SAs) in a fiber laser. Moreover, based on the evanescent wave interaction, deposition of the TI on microfiber would create an effective SA, which has combined advantages from the strong nonlinear optical response in TI material together with the sufficiently-long-range interaction length in fiber taper. By using this type of TI SA, various scalar solitons have been obtained in fiber lasers. However, a single mode fiber always exhibits birefringence, and hence can support two orthogonal degenerate modes. Here we investigate experimentally the vector characters of a TI SA fiber laser. Using the saturated absorption and the high nonlinearity of the TI SA, a rich variety of dynamic states, including polarization-locked dark pulses and their harmonic mode locked counterparts, polarization-locked noise-like pulses and their harmonic mode locked counterparts, incoherently coupled polarization domain wall pulses, including bright square pulses, bright-dark pulse pairs, dark pulses and bright square pulse-dark pulse pairs are all observed with different pump powers and polarization states. PMID:27381942

  6. Femtosecond pulse generation from a topological insulator mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Zheng, Xu-Wu; Liu, Meng; Zhao, Nian; Luo, Ai-Ping; Luo, Zhi-Chao; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Han; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Wen, Shuang-Chun

    2014-03-24

    We reported on the generation of femtosecond pulse in a fiber ring laser by using a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-based topological insulator (TI), Bi2Se3 saturable absorber (SA). The PVA-TI composite has a low saturable optical intensity of 12 MW/cm2 and a modulation depth of ~3.9%. By incorporating the fabricated PVA-TISA into a fiber laser, mode-locking operation could be achieved at a low pump threshold of 25 mW. After an optimization of the cavity parameters, optical pulse with ~660 fs centered at 1557.5 nm wavelength had been generated. The experimental results demonstrate that the PVA could be an excellent host material for fabricating high-performance TISA, and also indicate that the filmy PVA-TISA is indeed a good candidate for ultrafast saturable absorption device.

  7. Development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes: Phase 2, Improved refractory fiber and industrial benefit development. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yifang; Curtis, J.M.; DePoorter, G.L.; Martin, P.C.; Munoz, D.R.

    1995-05-01

    This is Phase II of a three-phase study for the development of high performance refractory fibers with enhanced insulating properties and longer service lifetimes, for use in the aluminum, glass, cement, and iron and steel industries. Fiberization of 24 out of 25 compositions in the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-Si0{sub 2}-Zr0{sub 2} system were achieved. These 24 and three existing fiber compositions were evaluated: The shrinkage and the crystalline and vitreous phases were determined vs heat treatment time and temperature. Four theoretical models were developed: Shrinkage, devitrification kinetics, density change, and fiberization. Although some of the fibers formed during Phase II had properties as good as the reference ASZ fiber, no fiber had a significantly improved performance. This work, although not entirely successful, did produce significant benefits to refractory insulating fiber manufacturers and users: Mechanisms of both linear and thickness shrinkage for vitreous refractory fibers were determined, devitrification kinetics were quantified and used in models to predict shrinkage during service, and the mechanism of fiber formation in the melt spinning process was studied.

  8. Development of a Fire-Resistant Anti-Sweat Submarine Hull Insulation Based on Fiber Glass Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-09-01

    CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS-1963-A6w " ;’’ ..J’ d’ ,.,, -,,,.. ,.- -,. . 11111, , .. b,, I - - -.. .,. , .. . ..°.. III. . . ,Lm’ Johns ... Manville Research & Development Center DEVELOPMENT OF A FIRE-RESISTANT ANTI-SWEAT SUBMARINE HULL INSULATION BASED ON FIBER *" GLASS MATERIALS Oct icrb iz Ic

  9. Development of an external ceramic insulation for the space shuttle orbiter. Part 3: Development of stabilized aluminum phosphate fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, T.; Tanzilli, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    The development of reusable surface insulation materials that are thermal shock resistant and highly refractory is discussed. A stabilized, high-cristobalite, aluminum orthophosphate fiber was developed and found to possess the desired qualities. The application of such a material to heat shielding for space shuttles is examined.

  10. Novel Application of Glass Fibers Recovered From Waste Printed Circuit Boards as Sound and Thermal Insulation Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhixing; Shen, Zhigang; Ma, Shulin; Zhang, Xiaojing

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the feasibility of using glass fibers, a recycled material from waste printed circuit boards (WPCB), as sound absorption and thermal insulation material. Glass fibers were obtained through a fluidized-bed recycling process. Acoustic properties of the recovered glass fibers (RGF) were measured and compared with some commercial sound absorbing materials, such as expanded perlite (EP), expanded vermiculite (EV), and commercial glass fiber. Results show that RGF have good sound absorption ability over the whole tested frequency range (100-6400 Hz). The average sound absorption coefficient of RGF is 0.86, which is prior to those of EP (0.81) and EV (0.73). Noise reduction coefficient analysis indicates that the absorption ability of RGF can meet the requirement of II rating for sound absorbing material according to national standard. The thermal insulation results show that RGF has a fair low thermal conductivity (0.046 W/m K), which is comparable to those of some insulation materials (i.e., EV, EP, and rock wool). Besides, an empirical dependence of thermal conductivity on material temperature was determined for RGF. All the results showed that the reuse of RGF for sound and thermal insulation material provided a promising way for recycling WPCB and obtaining high beneficial products.

  11. Fundamental studies on the nature and properties of ceramic fiber insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, J. I.; Whittemore, O. J., Jr.; Scott, W. D.; Miller, A. D.; Smiser, L. W.; Leiser, D. B.

    1975-01-01

    Silica and mullite fibers used to fabricate reusable surface insulation (RSI) for the space shuttle orbiter may devitrify/recrystallize within the temperature range anticipated upon reentry. This is shown to be dependent upon impurity level, temperature, and time at temperature. It is determined that the effects of the material improvement and optimization program are positive. The degree of crystallinity is shown to have a predominant effect upon the strength of fabricated RSI tile, and limits are determined. Models are developed to predict tensile strengths and shrinkage rates of silica tile based upon readily measurable parameters. Thermal cycling which simulates reentry results in an increase in the crystallinity and in the porosity of tile coatings.

  12. Compact wavelength router based on a Silicon-on-insulator arrayed waveguide grating pigtailed to a fiber array.

    PubMed

    Dumon, P; Bogaerts, W; Van Thourhout, D; Taillaert, D; Baets, R; Wouters, J; Beckx, S; Jaenen, P

    2006-01-23

    We demonstrate a compact, fiber-pigtailed, 4-by-4 wavelength router in Silicon-on-insulator photonic wires, fabricated using CMOS processing methods. The core is an AWG with a 250GHz channel spacing and 1THz free spectral range, on a 425x155 microm(2) footprint. The insertion loss of the AWG was reduced to 3.5dB by applying a two-step processing technique. The crosstalk is -12dB. The device was pigtailed using vertical fiber couplers and an eight-fiber array connector.

  13. Hybrid aerogel rigid ceramic fiber insulation and method of producing same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barney, Andrea O. (Inventor); Heng, Vann (Inventor); Oka, Kris Shigeko (Inventor); Santos, Maryann (Inventor); Zinn, Alfred A. (Inventor); Droege, Michael (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A hybrid insulation material comprises of porous ceramic substrate material impregnated with nanoporous material and method of making the same is the topic of this invention. The porous substrate material has bulk density ranging from 6 to 20 lb/ft.sup.3 and is composed of about 60 to 80 wt % silica (SiO.sub.2) 20 to 40 wt % alumina (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3) fibers, and with about 0.1 to 1.0 wt % boron-containing constituent as the sintering agent. The nanoporous material has density ranging from 1.0 to 10 lb/ft.sup.3 and is either fully or partially impregnated into the substrate to block the pores, resulting in substantial reduction in conduction via radiation and convention. The nanoporous material used to impregnate the fiber substrate is preferably formed from a precursor of alkoxysilane, alcohol, water, and an acid or base catalyst for silica aerogels, and from a precursor of aluminum alkoxide, alcohol, water, and an acid or base catalyst for alumina aerogels.

  14. Wavelength-tunable picosecond soliton fiber laser with Topological Insulator: Bi2Se3 as a mode locker.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chujun; Zou, Yanhong; Chen, Yu; Wang, Zhiteng; Lu, Shunbin; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuangchun; Tang, Dingyuan

    2012-12-03

    Based on the open-aperture Z-scan measurement, we firstly uncovered the saturable absorption property of the topological insulator (TI): Bi2Se3. A high absolute modulation depth up to 98% and a saturation intensity of 0.49 GWcm(-2) were identified. By incorporating this novel saturable absorber material into an erbium-doped fiber laser, wavelength tunable soliton operation was experimentally demonstrated. Our result indicates that like the atomic layer graphene, the topological insulator Bi2Se3 could also operate as an effective saturable absorber for the passive mode locking of lasers at the telecommunication band.

  15. Contribution study to the thermal insulation of the builders in the desert regions of exploiting gypsum fiber reinforced palm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsi, Fouad; Kriker, Abdelouahed; Abani, Said

    2017-02-01

    Algerian Desert areas were characterized by very hot climate in summer and very cold in winter. The most widely used building material in these areas are concrete, mortar cement, which has a bad thermal insulation, causing a significant increase in cooling and heating costs; in order to avoid this problem it become a must to replace these materials with a good thermal isolation material and lower production cost. This work is part of the evaluation of local materials by improving their performance in the field of thermal insulation, which is considered a first step in the development of new local materials to be used in the construction field, the material used in this study is the gypsum reinforced with date palm fiber. In fact, Algeria has extraordinary resources in natural fibers (from Palm, Abaca, Hemp…) but without any large valorization in building materials. The aim of this work is then to characterization of those date palm fibers in new building materials approved for use in the construction of buildings in the desert areas. The date palm fibers were added to samples of the gypsum material in the form of cutting layers at different volume fraction, so as to determine the extent of their impact in the improvement of the thermal performance. The results were very satisfactory, reaching improvement rate of 16% for samples gypsum reinforced with single cut fiber form, and 32% of the samples reinforced with fiber in the form of layers.

  16. Radio-frequency and microwave load comprising a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Everleigh, Carl A.; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    A billet of low-density carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) composite is machined into a desired attenuator or load element shape (usually tapering). The CBCF composite is used as a free-standing load element or, preferably, brazed to the copper, brass or aluminum components of coaxial transmission lines or microwave waveguides. A novel braze method was developed for the brazing step. The resulting attenuator and/or load devices are robust, relatively inexpensive, more easily fabricated, and have improved performance over conventional graded-coating loads.

  17. Radio-frequency and microwave load comprising a carbon-bonded carbon fiber composite

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Johnson, A.C.; Everleigh, C.A.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1998-04-21

    A billet of low-density carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) composite is machined into a desired attenuator or load element shape (usually tapering). The CBCF composite is used as a free-standing load element or, preferably, brazed to the copper, brass or aluminum components of coaxial transmission lines or microwave waveguides. A novel braze method was developed for the brazing step. The resulting attenuator and/or load devices are robust, relatively inexpensive, more easily fabricated, and have improved performance over conventional graded-coating loads. 9 figs.

  18. Q-switched mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser based on topological insulator Bi(2)Se(3) deposited fiber taper.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Jing Dong; Zhu, Tao; Zhang, Han; Zhao, Chu Jun; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Hua

    2014-08-10

    We have demonstrated the passive Q-switching mode-locking operation in an erbium-doped fiber (EDF) laser by using topological insulator Bi(2)Se(3) deposited on fiber taper, whose damage threshold can be further increased by the large evanescent field interacting length. Due to the low saturation intensity, stable Q-switched mode-locked fiber lasers centered at 1562 nm can be generated at a pump power of 10 mW. The temporal and spectral characteristics for different pump strengths have also been investigated. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first time a Q-switched mode-locked EDF laser based on the fiber taper deposited by Bi(2)Se(3) was generated.

  19. Formation of noise-like square-wave pulses in a microfiber based topological insulator fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jingmin; Zhang, Shumin; Li, Xingliang; Han, Mengmeng; Han, Huiyun; Yan, Dan; Shang, Ce; Feng, Yali

    2016-11-01

    We demonstrated the formation of noise-like square-wave pulses in an Er-doped fiber laser, using a microfiber based topological insulator as a saturated absorber (SA). The SA guaranteed both excellent saturable absorption and high nonlinearity. The pulse width can be increased ranging from 0.985 to 5.503 ns by increasing the pump power from 212 to 284 mW with the polarization state fixed. Moreover, with the adjustment of the polarization controllers in the cavity, the pulse width can be adjusted obviously. Worth mentioning, it was the first time that the noise-like square-wave pulse formed in a microfiber based topological insulator fiber laser.

  20. Optimization of the contents of hollow glass microsphere and sodium hexametaphosphate for glass fiber vacuum insulation panel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. D.; Chen, Z. F.; Zhou, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, various additive amounts of hollow glass microspheres (HGMs) and sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) powders were blended with flame attenuated glass wool (FAGW) to form hybrid core materials (HCMs) through the wet method. Among them, the SHMP was dissolved in the glass fiber suspension and coated on the surface of glass fibers while the HGMs were insoluble in the glass fiber suspension and filled in the fiber-fiber pores. The average pore diameter of the FAGW/HGM HCMs was 8-11 μm which was near the same as that of flame attenuated glass fiber mats (FAGMs, i.e., 10.5 µm). The tensile strength of the SHMP coated FAGMs was enhanced from 160 N/m to 370 N/m when SHMP content increased from 0 wt.% to 0.2 wt.%. By contrast, the tensile strength of the FAGW/HGM HCMs decreased from 160 N/m to 40 N/m when HGM content increased from 0 wt.% to 50 wt.%. Both the FAGW/HGM HCMs and SHMP coated FAGMs were vacuumed completely to form vacuum insulation panels (VIPs). The results showed that both the addition of SHMP and HGM led a slight increase in the thermal conductivity of the corresponding VIPs. To obtain a high-quality VIP, the optimal SHMP content and HGM content in glass fiber suspension was 0.12-0.2 wt.% and 0 wt.%.

  1. 2 GHz passively harmonic mode-locked fiber laser by a microfiber-based topological insulator saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhi-Chao; Liu, Meng; Liu, Hao; Zheng, Xu-Wu; Luo, Ai-Ping; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuang-Chun; Xu, Wen-Cheng

    2013-12-15

    We report on the generation of passive harmonic mode locking of a fiber laser using a microfiber-based topological insulator (TI) Bi(2)Te(3) saturable absorber (SA). The optical deposition method was employed to fabricate the microfiber-based TISA. By virtue of the excellent nonlinear optical property of the proposed TISA, the fiber laser could operate at the pulse repetition rate of 2.04 GHz under a pump power of 126 mW, corresponding to the 418th harmonic of fundamental repetition frequency. The results demonstrate that the microfiber-based TI photonic device can operate as both the high nonlinear optical component and the SA in fiber lasers, and could also find other applications in the related fields of photonics.

  2. Direct Insulation-to-Conduction Transformation of Adhesive Catecholamine for Simultaneous Increases of Electrical Conductivity and Mechanical Strength of CNT Fibers.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seongwoo; Chou, Jeffrey B; Lee, Kyueui; Lee, Dongju; Hong, Soon Hyung; Zhao, Rong; Lee, Haeshin; Kim, Sang-gook

    2015-06-03

    Increase in conductivity and mechanical properties of a carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber inspired by mussel-adhesion chemistry is described. Infiltration of polydopamine into an as-drawn CNT fiber followed by pyrolysis results in a direct insulation-to-conduction transformation of poly(dopamine) into pyrolyzed-poly(dopamine) (py-PDA), retaining the intrinsic adhesive function of catecholamine. The py-PDA enhances both the electrical conductivity and the mechanical strength of the CNT fibers.

  3. Cellulose Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Fire retardant cellulose insulation is produced by shredding old newspapers and treating them with a combination of chemicals. Insulating material is blown into walls and attics to form a fiber layer which blocks the flow of air. All-Weather Insulation's founders asked NASA/UK-TAP to help. They wanted to know what chemicals added to newspaper would produce an insulating material capable of meeting federal specifications. TAP researched the query and furnished extensive information. The information contributed to successful development of the product and helped launch a small business enterprise which is now growing rapidly.

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Cladding Attachment Over Mineral Fiber Insulation Board

    SciTech Connect

    2015-03-01

    Exterior insulating sheathing for high performance building enclosures is an important strategy for meeting energy efficiency requirements in many climates and can position an existing building to perform at the level of best-in-class new construction. Insulation board is also important in high performance building retrofit situations where minimal disruption at the interior is typically desired.

  5. Insulation Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Manufactured by Hitco Materials Division of Armco, Inc. a ceramic fiber insulation material known as Refrasil has been used extensively as a heat-absorbing ablative reinforcement for such space systems as rocket motor nozzles, combustion chambers, and re-entry shields. Refrasil fibers are highly porous and do not melt or vaporize until fibers exceed 3,100 degrees Fahrenheit. Due to these and other properties, Refrasil has found utility in a number of industrial high temperature applications where glass, asbestos and other materials fail. Hitco used this insulation to assist Richardson Co., Inc. in the manufacturing of hard rubber and plastic molded battery cases.

  6. Tunable triple-wavelength mode-locked fiber laser with topological insulator Bi2Se3 solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Bo; Yao, Yong

    2016-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrated a tunable triple-wavelength mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser with few-layer topological insulator: Bi2Se3/polyvinyl alcohol solution. By properly adjusting the pump power and the polarization state, the single-, dual-, and triple-wavelength mode-locking operation could be stably initiated with a wavelength-tunable range (˜1 nm) and a variable wavelength spacing (1.7 or 2 nm). Meanwhile, it exhibits the maximum output power of 10 mW and pulse energy of 1.12 nJ at the pump power of 175 mW. The simple, low-cost triple-wavelength mode-locked fiber laser might be applied in various potential fields, such as optical communication, biomedical research, and sensing system.

  7. Narrow line-width single-longitudinal-mode fiber laser using silicon-on-insulator based micro-ring-resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Hsu, Yung; Hsu, Chin-Wei; Yang, Ling-Gang; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung; Lai, Yin-Chieh; Tsang, Hon-Ki

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose and demonstrate a stable single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) fiber laser with narrow line-width by using an integrated silicon-on-insulator micro-ring resonator (SOI MRR) and two subsidiary fiber rings for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The laser is tunable over the wavelength range from 1546 to 1570 nm, with only step tuning of 2 nm steps. A maximum 49 dB side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) can be achieved. The compact SOI MRR provides a large free-spectral-range (FSR), while the subsidiary rings provide Vernier effect producing a single lasing mode. The FSR of the SOI MRR can be very large and controllable (since it is easy to fabricate small SOI MRR when compared with making small fiber-rings) using the complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compactable SOI fabrication processes. In our proposed laser, the measured single sideband (SSB) spectrum shows that the densely spaced longitudinal modes can be significantly suppressed to achieve SLM. The laser linewidth is only 3.5 kHz measured by using the self-heterodyne method. 30 min stability evaluation in terms of lasing wavelength and optical power is performed; showing the optical wavelength and power are both very stable, with fluctuations of only 0.02 nm and 0.8 dB, respectively.

  8. Solid Rocket Motor Insulation Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-13

    3μ Kevlar Pulp Kevlar Fibers Bulk Phase, 1/4” long SEM 11 Distribution A: Public Release. Distribution unlimited Carbon Nanofibers • Many Types...Distribution unlimited Carbon Nanofibers Nanomaterials for Insulation Case Insulation Goal: 50% Lower Erosion of Insulation (44% weight reduction...used fiber is the Chrysotile fiber (pliable and nonfriable) 10 Distribution A: Public Release. Distribution unlimited Other Fibers Kevlar Fibers

  9. Electrically Insulated Sensing of Respiratory Rate and Heartbeat Using Optical Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Suaste-Gómez, Ernesto; Hernández-Rivera, Daniel; Sánchez-Sánchez, Anabel S.; Villarreal-Calva, Elsy

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and heart rates are among the most important physiological parameters used to monitor patients' health. It is important to design devices that can measure these parameters without risking or altering the subject's health. In this context, a novel sensing method to monitor simultaneously the heartbeat and respiratory rate signals of patients within an electrically safety environment was developed and tested. An optical fiber-based sensor was used in order to detect two optical phenomena. Photo-plethysmography and the relation between bending radius and attenuation of optical fiber were coupled through a single beam light traveling along this fiber. PMID:25405510

  10. Electrically insulated sensing of respiratory rate and heartbeat using optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Suaste-Gómez, Ernesto; Hernández-Rivera, Daniel; Sánchez-Sánchez, Anabel S; Villarreal-Calva, Elsy

    2014-11-14

    Respiratory and heart rates are among the most important physiological parameters used to monitor patients' health. It is important to design devices that can measure these parameters without risking or altering the subject's health. In this context, a novel sensing method to monitor simultaneously the heartbeat and respiratory rate signals of patients within an electrically safety environment was developed and tested. An optical fiber-based sensor was used in order to detect two optical phenomena. Photo-plethysmography and the relation between bending radius and attenuation of optical fiber were coupled through a single beam light traveling along this fiber.

  11. Tilted fiber Bragg grating sensor interrogation system using a high-resolution silicon-on-insulator arrayed waveguide grating.

    PubMed

    Cheben, Pavel; Post, Edith; Janz, Siegfried; Albert, Jacques; Laronche, Albane; Schmid, Jens H; Xu, Dan-Xia; Lamontagne, Boris; Lapointe, Jean; Delâge, André; Densmore, Adam

    2008-11-15

    We report a compact high-resolution arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) interrogator system designed to measure the relative wavelength spacing between two individual resonances of a tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) refractometer. The TFBG refractometer benefits from an internal wavelength and power reference provided by the core mode reflection resonance that can be used to determine cladding mode perturbations with high accuracy. The AWG interrogator is a planar waveguide device fabricated on a silicon-on-insulator platform, having 50 channels with a 0.18 nm wavelength separation and a footprint of 8 mmx8 mm. By overlaying two adjacent interference orders of the AWG we demonstrate simultaneous monitoring of two widely separated resonances in real time with high wavelength resolution. The standard deviation of the measured wavelength shifts is 1.2 pm, and it is limited by the resolution of the optical spectrum analyzer used for the interrogator calibration measurements.

  12. Fiber Optic Sensor for Acoustic Detection of Partial Discharges in Oil-Paper Insulated Electrical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Posada-Roman, Julio; Garcia-Souto, Jose A.; Rubio-Serrano, Jesus

    2012-01-01

    A fiber optic interferometric sensor with an intrinsic transducer along a length of the fiber is presented for ultrasound measurements of the acoustic emission from partial discharges inside oil-filled power apparatus. The sensor is designed for high sensitivity measurements in a harsh electromagnetic field environment, with wide temperature changes and immersion in oil. It allows enough sensitivity for the application, for which the acoustic pressure is in the range of units of Pa at a frequency of 150 kHz. In addition, the accessibility to the sensing region is guaranteed by immune fiber-optic cables and the optical phase sensor output. The sensor design is a compact and rugged coil of fiber. In addition to a complete calibration, the in-situ results show that two types of partial discharges are measured through their acoustic emissions with the sensor immersed in oil. PMID:22666058

  13. Cellulosic building insulation versus mineral wool, fiberglass or perlite: installer's exposure by inhalation of fibers, dust, endotoxin and fire-retardant additives.

    PubMed

    Breum, N O; Schneider, T; Jørgensen, O; Valdbjørn Rasmussen, T; Skibstrup Eriksen, S

    2003-11-01

    A task-specific exposure matrix was designed for workers installing building insulation materials. A priori, a matrix element was defined by type of task (installer or helper), type of work area (attic spaces or wall cavities) and type of insulation material (slabs from mineral wool, fiberglass or flax; loose-fill cellulosic material or perlite). In the laboratory a mock-up (full scale) of a one-family house was used for simulated installation of insulation materials (four replicates per matrix element). Personal exposure to dust and fibers was measured. The dust was analyzed for content of endotoxin and some trace elements (boron and aluminum) from fire-retardant or mold-resistant additives. Fibers were characterized as WHO fibers or non-WHO fibers. In support of the exposure matrix, the dustiness of all the materials was measured in a rotating drum tester. For installers in attic spaces, risk of exposure was low for inhalation of dust and WHO fibers from slab materials of mineral wool or fiberglass. Slab materials from flax may cause high risk of exposure to endotoxin. The risk of exposure by inhalation of dust from loose-fill materials was high for installers in attic spaces and for some of the materials risk of exposure was high for boron and aluminum. Exposure by inhalation of cellulosic WHO fibers was high but little is known about the health effects and a risk assessment is not possible. For the insulation of walls, the risk of installers' exposure by inhalation of dust and fibers was low for the slab materials, while a high risk was observed for loose-fill materials. The exposure to WHO fibers was positively correlated to the dust exposure. A dust level of 6.1 mg/m3 was shown to be useful as a proxy for screening exposure to WHO fibers in excess of 10(6) fibers/m3. In the rotating drum, slabs of insulation material from mineral wool or fiberglass were tested as not dusty. Cellulosic loose-fill materials were tested as very dusty, and perlite proved to be

  14. Developing Topological Insulator Fiber Based Photon Pairs Source for Ultrafast Optoelectronic Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    singular opportunity for accurate quantum operations in secure quantum communications and quantum computation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Topological insulator...entangled photon pairs; quantum computation 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT U 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF...the magneto- optic effect together with a large third order nonlinearity in TI: Bi2Se3 offers a singular opportunity for accurate quantum operations

  15. High-Temperature Properties of Ceramic Fibers and Insulations for Thermal Protection of Atmospheric Entry and Hypersonic Cruise Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Pitts, William C.; Araujo, Myrian; Zimmerman, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Multilayer insulations which will operate in the 500C to 1000C temperature range are being considered for possible applications on aerospace vehicles subject to convective and radiative heating during atmospheric entry. The insulations described in this paper consist of ceramic fabrics, insulations, and metal foils quilted together using ceramic thread. As these types of insulations have highly anisotropic properties, the total heat transfer characteristics of these insulations must be determined. Data are presented on the thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity of four types of multilayer insulations and are compared to the baseline Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation

  16. The formation of various multi-soliton patterns and noise-like pulse in a fiber laser passively mode-locked by a topological insulator based saturable absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Wu, Man; Tang, Pinghua; Chen, Shuqing; Du, Juan; Jiang, Guobao; Li, Ying; Zhao, Chujun; Zhang, Han; Wen, Shuangchun

    2014-05-01

    We experimentally investigated the formation of various multi-soliton patterns and noise-like (NL) pulses in an erbium-doped fiber laser passively mode-locked by a new type of saturable absorber: topological insulator. With the increase of pump power, various multi-soliton operation states—ordered, chaotic and bunched multiple-soliton—were subsequently obtained. Once the pump power exceeds 401 mW, an NL pulse state emerged, with a maximum 3 dB bandwidth of about 9.3 nm. This systematic study clearly demonstrated that a topological insulator could be an effective saturable absorber for the formation of various soliton operation states in a fiber laser cavity.

  17. 2006/07 Field Testing of Cellulose Fiber Insulation Enhanced with Phase Change Material

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Jan; Yarbrough, David W; Miller, William A; Petrie, Thomas; Childs, Phillip W; Syed, Azam M

    2008-12-01

    Most recent improvements in building envelope technologies suggest that in the near future, residences will be routinely constructed to operate with very low heating and cooling loads. In that light, the application of novel building materials containing active thermal components (e.g., phase change materials [PCMs,] sub-venting, radiant barriers, and integrated hydronic systems) is like a final step in achieving relatively significant heating and cooling energy savings from technological improvements in the building envelope. It is expected that optimized building envelope designs using PCMs for energy storage can effectively bring notable savings in energy consumption and reductions in peak hour power loads. During 2006/07, a research team at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) performed a series of laboratory and field tests of several wall and roof assemblies using PCM-enhanced cellulose insulation. This report summarizes the test results from the perspective of energy performance. The ORNL team is working on both inorganic and organic PCMs; this report discusses only paraffinic PCMs. A limited economical analysis also is presented. PCMs have been tested as a thermal mass component in buildings for at least 40 years. Most of the research studies found that PCMs enhanced building energy performance. In the case of the application of organic PCMs, problems such as high initial cost and PCM leaking (surface sweating) have hampered widespread adoption. Paraffinic hydrocarbon PCMs generally performed well, with the exception that they increased the flammability of the building envelope.

  18. [Assessment of exposure to ceramic fibers during insulation operations in a thermoelectric power plant].

    PubMed

    Marconi, A; Cavariani, F; Carai, A; Cacchioli, G; Papandrea, F; Cacchioli, E

    2001-01-01

    Refractory ceramic fibre concentrations were measured during renewal of the insulation lining of a turbine located in a large power plant. Personal and stationary samples were collected during operations, which involved installing and ripping out standard and pre-coated and pre-shaped ceramic fibre blankets. Operation-length average (OLA) and TWA exposure levels were about 500 F/l and about 100 F/l, respectively, for installing and ripping out operations where non-coated blankets were handled. In these cases specific task-associated personal exposure levels up to 1000 F/l were measured. Personal exposure levels up to as much as 10 times lower were observed in operations involving pre-coated and pre-shaped blankets. The average concentration levels from area samples were always lower than those from personal samples, and showed a downward gradient with the distance from the source. Given the current carcinogenic classification of refractory ceramic fibres (class 2, European), the necessity is stressed of introducing adequate working practices and control measures (adoption of pre-coated and pre-shaped fibrous materials whenever possible, confinement of working area, use of local air extractions ventilation with HEPA filter unit, use of garments for personal protection and respirators, use of wetting or binding liquids prior to removal, quick cleaning of debris from working area), in order to keep the exposure levels and the number of potentially exposed workers to the minimum.

  19. [Exposure to ceramic fibers in the work environment. III. occupational exposure to ceramic fibers in plants which produce and apply insulation materials made of ceramic fibers].

    PubMed

    Wojtczak, J; Kieć-Swierczyńska, M; Maciejewska, A

    1997-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the exposure to dust in the work environment of plants which produced and apply packing and insulation materials made of ceramic fibres. The study revealed that workers were exposed to dust containing respirable ceramic fibres and in some cases (production of packing cord, insulating tape and paperboard) respirable asbestos fibres. The mean concentration of respirable fibres ranged from 0.05 to 0.62 f/l cm3, and concentrations of total dust fell between 0.6 and 23.2 mg/m3. The mean concentrations of respirable fibres were usually below (0.5 f/l cm3 for respirable ceramic fibres with asbestos mixture; 1 f/cm3 for respirable ceramic fibres), and of total dust much higher (1 mg/m3 and 2 mg/m3, respectively) than MAC values proposed. The initial dermatological examinations (25 workers) allow the conclusion that contact with ceramic fibres induces in some workers acute dermatitis and dermal papilla.

  20. Cryogenic insulation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhard, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    Multilayer insulations for long term cryogenic storage are described. The development effort resulted in an insulation concept using lightweight radiation shields, separated by low conductive Dacron fiber tufts. The insulation is usually referred to as Superfloc. The fiber tufts are arranged in a triangular pattern and stand about .040 in. above the radiation shield base. Thermal and structural evaluation of Superfloc indicated that this material is a strong candidate for the development of high performance thermal protection systems because of its high strength, purge gas evacuation capability during boost, its density control and easy application to a tank.

  1. Topological insulator: Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/polyvinyl alcohol film-assisted multi-wavelength ultrafast erbium-doped fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Bo; Yao, Yong Yang, Yan-Fu; Yuan, Yi-Jun; Wang, Rui-Lai; Wang, Shu-Guang; Ren, Zhong-Hua; Yan, Bo

    2015-02-14

    We experimentally demonstrate a multi-wavelength ultrafast erbium-doped fiber laser incorporating a μm-scale topological insulator: Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3}/Polyvinyl Alcohol film as both an excellent saturable absorber for mode-locking and a high-nonlinear medium to induce a giant third order optical nonlinear effect for mitigating the mode competition of erbium-doped fiber laser and stabilizing the multi-wavelength oscillation. By properly adjusting the pump power and the polarization state, the single-, dual-, triple-, four-wavelength mode-locking pulse could be stably initiated. For the four-wavelength operation, we obtain its pulse width of ∼22 ps and a fundamental repetition rate of 8.83 MHz. The fiber laser exhibits the maximum output power of 9.7 mW with the pulse energy of 1.1 nJ and peak power of 50 W at the pump power of 155 mW. Our study shows that the simple, stable, low-cost multi-wavelength ultrafast fiber laser could be applied in various potential fields, such as optical communication, biomedical research, and radar system.

  2. A joint research project -- Investigating man-made vitreous fiber (MMVF) insulation removal practices in the power industry, with preliminary results of potential worker exposure to airborne MMVF fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Axten, C.W.; Anoush, F.

    1996-10-01

    Man-made vitreous fibers (MMVFs) are components of a large number of important products manufactured worldwide, and include glass wool, rock and slag wool, and refractory ceramic fibers. These fibers are distinguished from each other by their chemical composition, physical properties and methods of production. Glass wool, or fiber glass as it is more commonly known is a borosilicate compound, produced from molten sand and inorganic materials under highly controlled conditions, Rock and slag wool, sometimes collectively referred to as mineral wool, is comprised of calcium-magnesium-aluminum-silicate glass. Slag wool is produced by melting a mixture of various blast furnace iron ore slags and other raw materials such as clay, sand and limestone in a coke fired cupola. Rock wool is produced using the same process, with a mixture of various natural and synthetic rock sources that yield the desired composition. In both rock and slag wool manufacturing, typically one raw material is the primary component, with other material added to supplement chemical deficiencies. The purpose of this study was to develop a flexible, representative, and valid exposure database for fiber glass and rock and slag wool insulation removal and reinstallation in a cross section of industrial environments with excellent supporting documentation. This information will be used to make more informed decisions to further worker health and safety through recommendation of exposure controls, product modifications, and personal protective equipment use and/or work practice controls.

  3. Feasibility and process scale-up low cost alumina fibers for advanced Re-usable Surface Insulation (RSI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, A.

    1975-01-01

    The objective of this program was to establish feasibility of a process to produce low cost aluminum oxide fibers having sufficient strength, flexibility, and thermal stability for multiple re-use at temperatures to 1480 C in advanced RSI type heat shields for reentry vehicles. Using bench-scale processing apparatus, the Alcoa 'Saphiber' process was successfully modified to produce nominally 8 microns diameter polycrystalline alpha-alumina fiber. Thermal stability was demonstrated in vacuum reheating tests to 1371 C and in atmospheric reheating to 1483 C. Individual fiber properties of strength, modulus, and flexibility were not determined because of friability and short length of the fiber. Rigidized tile produced from fiber of nominally 8, 20 and 40 micron diameter had thermal conductivities significantly higher than those of RSI SiO2 or mullite at relatively low temperature but became comparable above about 1000 C. Tile densities were high due to short fiber length, especially in the coarser diameter fiber. No significant effect of fiber diameter on thermal properties could be determined form the data. Mechanical properties of tiles deteriorated as fiber diameter increased.

  4. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  5. Laccase-Catalyzed Surface Modification of Thermo-Mechanical Pulp (TMP) for the Production of Wood Fiber Insulation Boards Using Industrial Process Water

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Mark; Ruedin, Pascal; Civardi, Chiara; Richter, Michael; Hach, André; Christen, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Low-density wood fiber insulation boards are traditionally manufactured in a wet process using a closed water circuit (process water). The water of these industrial processes contains natural phenolic extractives, aside from small amounts of admixtures (e.g., binders and paraffin). The suitability of two fungal laccases and one bacterial laccase was determined by biochemical characterization considering stability and substrate spectra. In a series of laboratory scale experiments, the selected commercial laccase from Myceliophtora thermophila was used to catalyze the surface modification of thermo-mechanical pulp (TMP) using process water. The laccase catalyzed the covalent binding of the phenolic compounds of the process water onto the wood fiber surface and led to change of the surface chemistry directly via crosslinking of lignin moieties. Although a complete substitution of the binder was not accomplished by laccase, the combined use of laccase and latex significantly improved the mechanical strength properties of wood fiber boards. The enzymatically-treated TMP showed better interactions with the synthetic binder, as shown by FTIR-analysis. Moreover, the enzyme is extensively stable in the process water and the approach requires no fresh water as well as no cost-intensive mediator. By applying a second-order polynomial model in combination with the genetic algorithm (GA), the required amount of laccase and synthetic latex could be optimized enabling the reduction of the binder by 40%. PMID:26046652

  6. Laccase-Catalyzed Surface Modification of Thermo-Mechanical Pulp (TMP) for the Production of Wood Fiber Insulation Boards Using Industrial Process Water.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Mark; Ruedin, Pascal; Civardi, Chiara; Richter, Michael; Hach, André; Christen, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Low-density wood fiber insulation boards are traditionally manufactured in a wet process using a closed water circuit (process water). The water of these industrial processes contains natural phenolic extractives, aside from small amounts of admixtures (e.g., binders and paraffin). The suitability of two fungal laccases and one bacterial laccase was determined by biochemical characterization considering stability and substrate spectra. In a series of laboratory scale experiments, the selected commercial laccase from Myceliophtora thermophila was used to catalyze the surface modification of thermo-mechanical pulp (TMP) using process water. The laccase catalyzed the covalent binding of the phenolic compounds of the process water onto the wood fiber surface and led to change of the surface chemistry directly via crosslinking of lignin moieties. Although a complete substitution of the binder was not accomplished by laccase, the combined use of laccase and latex significantly improved the mechanical strength properties of wood fiber boards. The enzymatically-treated TMP showed better interactions with the synthetic binder, as shown by FTIR-analysis. Moreover, the enzyme is extensively stable in the process water and the approach requires no fresh water as well as no cost-intensive mediator. By applying a second-order polynomial model in combination with the genetic algorithm (GA), the required amount of laccase and synthetic latex could be optimized enabling the reduction of the binder by 40%.

  7. Dissipative rogue waves induced by long-range chaotic multi-pulse interactions in a fiber laser with a topological insulator-deposited microfiber photonic device.

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng; Cai, Ze-Rong; Hu, Song; Luo, Ai-Ping; Zhao, Chu-Jun; Zhang, Han; Xu, Wen-Cheng; Luo, Zhi-Chao

    2015-10-15

    We reported on the generation of dissipative rogue waves (DRWs) induced by long-range chaotic multi-pulse interactions in a fiber laser based on a topological insulator (TI)-deposited microfiber photonic device. By virtue of the simultaneous saturable absorption effect and high nonlinearity provided by the TI-deposited microfiber, a localized, chaotic multi-pulse wave packet with strong long-range nonlinear interactions could be obtained, which gives rise to the formation of DRWs. The results might enhance the understanding of DRWs in optical systems, and further demonstrated that the TI-deposited microfiber could be considered as an excellent photonic device with both saturable absorption and highly nonlinear effects for the application field of nonlinear optics.

  8. High-quality and Large-size Topological Insulator Bi2Te3-Gold Saturable Absorber Mirror for Mode-Locking Fiber Laser

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hou-Ren; Tsai, Chih-Ya; Cheng, Hsin-Ming; Lin, Kuei-Huei; Yen, Po-Hsiu; Chen, Chyong-Hua; Hsieh, Wen-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A novel high-quality, large-size, reflection-type topological insulator Bi2Te3-Gold (BG) film-based nonlinear optical modulator has been successfully fabricated as a two-dimensional saturable absorber mirror (SAM) by pulsed laser deposition (PLD). This BG-SAM possesses saturation fluence of 108.3 μJ/cm2, modulation depth (ΔR) of 6.5%, non-saturable loss of 38.4%, high damage threshold above 1.354 mJ/cm2 and excellent uniformity providing for the generation of passive mode-locked (ML) pulses for erbium-doped fiber lasers (EDFLs) on a large sample area. Under 124 mW 976 nm pumping, We obtained 452-fs continuous-wave ML pulses with pulse energy of 91 pJ and full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 6.72-nm from this EDFL. The results clearly evidence that the PLD is an efficient method for fabricating BG-SAM that is suitable for a compact ultrafast ML fiber laser system. PMID:27917938

  9. Mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser based on evanescent field interaction with Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} topological insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sotor, J. Sobon, G.; Abramski, K. M.; Grodecki, K.

    2014-06-23

    In this Letter, we demonstrate a mode-locked Er-doped fiber laser incorporating antimony telluride (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) topological insulator (TI) as a saturable absorber (SA). The laser was capable of generating 270 fs-short soliton pulses at 1560 nm wavelength, which are the shortest solitons generated with a TI-based saturable absorber so far. In order to form a saturable absorber, a bulk piece of Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} was deposited on a side-polished single-mode fiber with the presence of a low refractive index polymer. Such saturable absorber exhibits modulation depth at the level of 6% with less than 3 dB of non-saturable losses. Our study shows that TI-based saturable absorbers with evanescent field interaction might compete with SAs based on carbon nanomaterials, like graphene or nanotubes. Additionally, thanks to the interaction with the evanescent field, the material is not exposed to high optical power, which allows to avoid optical or thermal damage.

  10. Lightweight Ceramic Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W. H.; Creedon, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Fiber burnout process yields low densities. Low density attained by process of sacrificial burnout. Graphite or carbon fibers mixed into slurry of silica, alumina, and boron-compound fibers in amounts ranging from 25 to 75 percent of total fiber content by weight. Mixture formed into blocks and dried. Blocks placed in kiln and heated to 1,600 degrees F(870 degrees C) for several hours. Graphite or carbon fibers slowly oxidize away, leaving voids and reducing block density. Finally, blocks heated to 2,350 degrees F (1,290 degrees C) for 90 minutes to bond remaining ceramic fibers together. Developed for use on Space Shuttle and other spacecraft, rigid insulation machined to requisite shape and bonded in place.

  11. Investigation of the fire performance of building insulation in full-scale and laboratory fire tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfelder, W.A.

    1984-04-01

    Twenty-two insulations are exposed to fire tests including the 25 ft Tunnel test, the Attic Floor Radiant Panel test and actual fire conditions of a simulated attic configuration. The insulations consisted of a number of cellulose fiber insulations, utilizing various chemical treatments, glass fiber and mineral fiber insulations. The fire performance characteristics of the insulations were measured in each of the three test scenarios and the report compares their results.

  12. Advanced Space Suit Insulation Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.

    2000-01-01

    For planetary applications, the space suit insulation has unique requirements because it must perform in a dynamic mode to protect humans in the harsh dust, pressure and temperature environments. Since the presence of a gaseous planetary atmosphere adds significant thermal conductance to the suit insulation, the current multi-layer flexible insulation designed for vacuum applications is not suitable in reduced pressure planetary environments such as that of Mars. Therefore a feasibility study has been conducted at NASA to identify the most promising insulation concepts that can be developed to provide an acceptable suit insulation. Insulation concepts surveyed include foams, microspheres, microfibers, and vacuum jackets. The feasibility study includes a literature survey of potential concepts, an evaluation of test results for initial insulation concepts, and a development philosophy to be pursued as a result of the initial testing and conceptual surveys. The recommended focus is on microfibers due to the versatility of fiber structure configurations, the wide choice of fiber materials available, the maturity of the fiber processing industry, and past experience with fibers in insulation applications

  13. Automotive Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between Boeing North America and BSR Products, Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials are now used to insulate race cars. BSR has created special TPS blanket insulation kits for use on autos that take part in NASCAR events, and other race cars through its nationwide catalog distribution system. Temperatures inside a race car's cockpit can soar to a sweltering 140 to 160 degrees, with the extreme heat coming through the engine firewall, transmission tunnel, and floor. It is common for NASCAR drivers to endure blisters and burns due to the excessive heat. Tests on a car insulated with the TPS material showed a temperature drop of some 50 degrees in the driver's cockpit. BSR-TPS Products, Inc. now manufactures insulation kits for distribution to race car teams around the world.

  14. Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Commercially known as Solimide, Temptronics, Inc.'s thermal insulation has application in such vehicles as aircraft, spacecraft and surface transportation systems (i.e. rapid transit cars, trains, buses, and ships) as acoustical treatment for door, wall, and ceiling panels, as a means of reducing vibrations, and as thermal insulation (also useful in industrial equipment). Product originated from research conducted by Johnson Space Center on advanced flame-resistant materials for minimizing fire hazard in the Shuttle and other flight vehicles.

  15. Insulated laser tube structure and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Dittbenner, Gerald R.

    1999-01-01

    An insulated high temperature ceramic laser tube having substantially uniform insulation along the length of the tube is disclosed having particulate ceramic insulation positioned between the outer wall of the ceramic laser tube and the inner surface of tubular ceramic fiber insulation which surrounds the ceramic laser tube. The particulate ceramic insulation is preferably a ceramic capable of sintering to the outer surface of the ceramic laser tube and to the inner surface of the tubular ceramic fiber insulation. The addition of the particulate ceramic insulation to fill all the voids between the ceramic laser tube and the fibrous ceramic insulation permits the laser tube to be operated at a substantially uniform temperature throughout the length of the laser tube.

  16. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Apollo and subsequent spacecraft have had highly effective radiation barriers; made of aluminized polymer film, they bar or let in heat to maintain consistent temperatures inside. Tech 2000, formerly Quantum International Corporation used the NASA technology in its insulating materials, Super "Q" Radiant Barrier, for home, industry and mobile applications. The insulation combines industrial aluminum foil overlaid around a core of another material, usually propylene or mylar. The outer layer reflects up to 97 percent of heat; the central layer creates a thermal break in the structure and thus allows low radiant energy emission. The Quantum Cool Wall, used in cars and trucks, takes up little space while providing superior insulation, thus reducing spoilage and costs. The panels can also dampen sound and engine, exhaust and solar heat.

  17. 40 CFR 426.10 - Applicability; description of the insulation fiberglass subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... insulation fiberglass subcategory. 426.10 Section 426.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Insulation Fiberglass Subcategory § 426.10 Applicability; description of the insulation fiberglass... insulation fiberglass in which molten glass is either directly or indirectly made, continuously fiberized...

  18. 40 CFR 426.10 - Applicability; description of the insulation fiberglass subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... insulation fiberglass subcategory. 426.10 Section 426.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Insulation Fiberglass Subcategory § 426.10 Applicability; description of the insulation fiberglass... insulation fiberglass in which molten glass is either directly or indirectly made, continuously fiberized...

  19. 40 CFR 426.10 - Applicability; description of the insulation fiberglass subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... insulation fiberglass subcategory. 426.10 Section 426.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... CATEGORY Insulation Fiberglass Subcategory § 426.10 Applicability; description of the insulation fiberglass... insulation fiberglass in which molten glass is either directly or indirectly made, continuously fiberized...

  20. Insulation Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Apex Mills Corporation's superinsulators are used by makers of cold weather apparel, parkas, jackets, boots and outdoor gear such as sleeping bags. Their attraction in such applications is that radiant barrier insulation offers excellent warmth retention at minimal weight and bulk.

  1. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiation insulation technology from Apollo and subsequent spacecraft was used to develop superinsulators, used by makers of cold weather apparel, to make parkas, jackets, boots and outdoor gear such as sleeping bags. The radiant barrier technology offers warmth retention at minimal weight and bulk.

  2. Window insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, W. A.

    1985-10-01

    An insulator for mounting to a window. A pair of plastic layers including a plurality of partitions positioned therebetween form air pockets between the layers. A plurality of suction cups and suction grooves arranged in rows on one outer surface of the sheet removably secure the sheet to a window. The sheet includes a circumferentially extending recessed portion receiving the window frame.

  3. Microsphere insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Mark S. (Inventor); Willen, Gary S. (Inventor); Mohling, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A new insulation system is provided that contains microspheres. This insulation system can be used to provide insulated panels and clamshells, and to insulate annular spaces around objects used to transfer, store, or transport cryogens and other temperature-sensitive materials. This insulation system provides better performance with reduced maintenance than current insulation systems.

  4. Development of an external ceramic insulation for the space shuttle orbiter. Part 2: Optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanzilli, R. A. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The basic insulation improvement study concentrated upon evaluating variables which could result in significant near-term gains in mechanical behavior and insulation effectiveness of the baseline system. The approaches undertaken included: evaluation of small diameter fibers, optimization of binder: slurry characteristics, evaluation of techniques for controlling fiber orientation, optimization of firing cycle, and the evaluation of methods for improving insulation efficiency. A detailed discussion of these basic insulation improvement studies is presented.

  5. Procedure for dispersing fiber bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Padilla, D.

    1974-01-01

    Fiber bundles are dispersed and fibers are cleaned within enclosed container; therefore, safety clothing, masks, and eye protection are not required. Procedure also could be used wherever materials, such as fiberglass or insulation, require dispersion, fluffing, or cleaning. Process could be automated into continuous operation for handling large quantities of fiber.

  6. High-Tech, Low-Temp Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) contract with Ames, S.D. Miller & Associates developed new manufacturing methods for multi-layer metal spacecraft insulation that could significantly reduce launch weight and launch costs. The new honeycomb structure is more efficient than fibers for insulation. Honeycombs can be made from metals for high temperature uses, even plastic insulation from recycled milk bottles. Under development are blankets made from recycled milk bottles which will be field tested by the Red Cross and ambulance companies. Currently available are honeycomb mittens based on the same technology.

  7. Tank Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  8. Insulators for high voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Looms, J.S.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book describes electrical insulators for high voltage applications. Topics considered include the insulating materials, the manufacture of wet process porcelain, the manufacture of tempered glass, the glass-fibre core, the polymeric housing, the common problem - terminating an insulator, mechanical constraints, the physics of pollution flashover, the physics of contamination, testing of insulators, conclusions from testing, remedies for flashover, insulators for special cases, interference and noise, and the insulator of the future.

  9. Optical fiber tip with point light source of SPPs driven by three-dimensional nanostructured asymmetric metal-insulator-metal layer cap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshikane, Yasushi; Murai, Kensuke; Nakano, Motohiro

    2015-09-01

    Numerical analysis of three dimensional optical electro-magnetic field in a circular-truncated conical optical fiber covered by asymmetric MIM structure has been performed by a commercial finite element method package, COMSOL Multiphysics coupled with Wave Optics Module. The outermost thick metallic layer has twin nano-hole, and the waveguiding twin-hole could draw surface plasmon polaritions (SPPs) excited in the MIM structure to the surface. Finally the guided two SPPs could unite each other and may create a single bright spot. The systematic simulation is continuing, and the results will give us valuable counsel for control of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) appearing around the MIM structure and twin nano-hole. (1) Optimal design of the 3D FEM model for 8-core Xeon server and rational approach for the FEM analysis, (2) behavior of SPPs affected by wavelength and polarization of light travel through fiber, (3) change in excitation condition of SPPs caused by shape of the MIM structure and twin-hole, (4) effectiveness of additional nanostructures that are aimed at focusing control of two SPPs come out from the corners of twin-hole, (5) scanning ability of the MIM/twin-hole probe at nanostructured sample surface (i.e. amount of forward and backward scattering of SPPs) will be presented and discussed. Several FIBed prototypes and their characteristic of light emission will also reported.

  10. Improvement of Reusable Surface Insulation (RSI) materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blome, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    The mullite fiber based hardened compacted fibers (HCF) type of reusable surface insulation was further developed for use in the Space Shuttle Program. Two hundred fifty formulations of fiber mixtures, fillers, binders, and organic processing aids were made using mullite fibers as the basic ingredient. Most of the work was accomplished on 15-lb/cu ft material. It was established that higher density materials are stronger with strength values as high as 250 lb/sq in. in tension. New measurement techniques and equipment were developed for accurate determination of strength and strain to failure. Room temperature to 2300 F stress-strain relationships were made. The room temperature tensile modulus of elasticity is 61,700 lb/sq in. and the strain at failure is 0.165 percent, typically, when measured longitudinally parallel to the long axes of the fibers. Thermal insulating effectiveness was increased 20 percent by reducing the diameter of some of the fibers in the material. Improvements were made in density uniformity and strength uniformity in a block of HCF by mixing improvements and by the use of organic additives. Specifications were established on the materials and processes used in making the insulation.

  11. Reflective Coating on Fibrous Insulation for Reduced Heat Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, Derek D.; Prasad, B. Durga; Glass, David E.; Wiedemann, Karl E.

    1997-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer through fibrous insulation used in thermal protection systems (TPS) is significant at high temperatures (1200 C). Decreasing the radiative heat transfer through the fibrous insulation can thus have a major impact on the insulating ability of the TPS. Reflective coatings applied directly to the individual fibers in fibrous insulation should decrease the radiative heat transfer leading to an insulation with decreased effective thermal conductivity. Coatings with high infrared reflectance have been developed using sol-gel techniques. Using this technique, uniform coatings can be applied to fibrous insulation without an appreciable increase in insulation weight or density. Scanning electron microscopy, Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy, and ellipsometry have been performed to evaluate coating performance.

  12. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  13. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  14. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  15. Sound Insulation in Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gösele, K.; Schröder, E.

    Sound insulation between the different rooms inside a building or to the outside is a very complex problem. First, the airborne sound insulation of ceilings, walls, doors and windows is important. Second, a sufficient structure-borne sound insulation, also called impact sound insulation, for the ceilings, has to be provided especially. Finally, the service equipment should be sufficiently quiet.

  16. Environmental and Sustainable Technology Evaluation: Mold-Resistant Armacell Insulation--Armacell LLC, AP Armaflex Black

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ESTE test program measured the mold resistance of Armacell AP Armaflex Black insulation. Tests for emissions of VOCs and formaldehyde were also performed. AP Armaflex Roll Insulation is a black flexible closed-cell, fiber-free elastomeric thermal insulation. The expanded clos...

  17. Reusable silica surface-insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, H. E.; Smith, M.; Leiser, D.

    1973-01-01

    Material was specifically developed for manufacture of insulating tiles, but it can be molded into other shapes as required. Basic raw materials are high-purity silica fiber, fumed-silica powder, and reagent-grade starch. Only purest materials are used, and care must be taken to avoid contamination during processing.

  18. Thermal/acoustical aircraft insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struzik, E. A.; Kunz, R.; Lin, R.

    1975-01-01

    Attempts made to improve the acoustical properties of low density Fiberfrax foam, an aircraft insulation material, are reported. Characterizations were also made of the physical and thermal properties. Two methods, optimization of fiber blend composition and modification of the foam fabrication process, were examined as possible means of improving foam acoustics. Flame impingement tests were also made; results show performance was satisfactory.

  19. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy.

  20. Effect of Cyclic Aeroconvective Heating on Flexible Thermal Insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.; Zambrano, Brian; Kowalski, Tom; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of cyclic aeroconvective heating on the thermal performance of ceramic flexible insulations considered for potential use as thermal protection systems or thermal insulations for future hypersonic vehicles such as the Reusable Launch Vehicles (RLV's) and other applications where structures require thermal protection from severe heating. The thermal response of these materials after exposure to cyclic aeroconvective heating from a plasma arc is described. The thermal insulations evaluated were Composite Flexible Blanket Insulations composed of an outer layer of aluminoborosilicate fabric and alumina insulation. The insulations were evaluated with and without a high emissivity coating. These insulations were exposed to the plasma arc stream for nine minutes reaching surface temperatures of 1150 C and a heat flux of 10.5 W/sq cm. Insulations were exposed three, six, or nine times in order to demonstrate reusability and to determine the effect oi coatings on the surface durability of these insulations. Test results demonstrated the capability of these insulations to protect either composite or metallic structures from high heating environments. It is shown that high emittance coatings reduce backface temperatures. The durability of these insulations when impacted at low velocities was also demonstrated. The interaction of the coatings with the ceramic fibers was characterized. An analytical thermal model was utilized to correlate experimental thermal test results with calculated values.

  1. Measurement of insulation layers using DTS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, David; Kajnar, Tomas; Koudelka, Petr; Latal, Jan; Hurta, Jan; Kepak, Stanislav; Jaros, Jakub; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing systems (DTS) are based on the principle of reflectometer and allow us to measure the temperature along the optical fiber. Optical fiber in these systems is used as a temperature sensor which can measure up to thousands of points simultaneously. DTS sensors use nonlinear phenomenon known as Raman scattering for temperature measurement. The advantages of this system include immunity to electromagnetic radiation, low cost of optical fiber, the possibility of measurement to a distance of 10 km and safe use in flammable or corrosive environments. The small size of optical fiber allows using in applications where the dimensions of the other sensors were problematic. A typical example of the DTS application is the fire detection in tunnels and buildings at risk, detection of water leaks on dikes and dams or monitoring of temperature in mine shafts. This article deals with the measurement of temperature transmission over various insulation layers using the DTS system. One of the problems of temperature transmission is that most of the sensors cannot measure the entire temperature profile but only allows a point measurement. This problem is solved by DTS systems with optical fibers. Optical fiber, due to its small size, can be applied among various insulation layers that were formed by rock wool. Three sensory layers formed by rings of multimode optical tightbuffered fiber with 50/125 micron core/cladding dimension were applied. The layers were linked together allowing a direct comparison of measured temperature. Rows of rings were placed on the margins and one was in the middle. Individual rings were linked together into the horizontal lines. Thus we were able to cover the whole surface of the insulation layers. Measurement was carried out in a closed air-conditioned room for 37 hours. Graphs with the progress of temperature at time and place were compiled from the measured data.

  2. Plasma vitrification of asbestos fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Asbestos is a mineral in the form of long, thread-like fibers. Asbestos fibers have been among the best insulators of pipes, boilers, ducts, tanks, etc., in buildings, ships, and industrial furnaces. Over 150,000 metric tons of asbestos were consumed in the United States in 1984. The Environmental Protection Agency has declared asbestos fibers a known human carcinogen. And today, asbestos insulators are being replaced by manmade non-hazardous fibers. Millions of tons of replaced asbestos fiber insulators are in storage, awaiting the demonstration of effective alternative disposal technologies. Plasma vitrification has been demonstrated during May, June and July 1995 as a viable, cost-effective, safe technology for asbestos fiber disposal. A low-mass plasma arc heater is submerged under the waste asbestos insulating materials, and the intense heat of the plasma flame heats and melts the fibers. The by-product is dark, non-hazardous glass pellets. The vitrification process renders the asbestos waste safe for use as road construction aggregates or other fill materials. This paper will describe the results of start-up of a 1 ton-per-hour Plasma Mobile Asbestos Vitrification (MAV) Plant at a DOD Site in Port Clinton, Ohio. The Plasma MAV Plant is being demonstrated for the on-site disposal of 1.5 million pounds of Amosite asbestos fibers.

  3. Preheating Cold Gas Thruster Flow Through a Thermal Energy Storage Conversion System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    thermophotovoltaic cells for the conversion of stored heat to electrical energy for various satellite systems, as well as a heat exchanger imbedded in the phase...material, has been designed as part of a power and propulsion system for use in low Earth orbit. The design includes thermophotovoltaic cells for the...radiation shields, a layer of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulation, and an outer container. The TPV, composed of GaSb cells , is located

  4. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Wei, George C.

    1984-01-01

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  5. Method for forming fibrous silicon carbide insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    A method whereby silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composites are prepared from carbon-bonded C fiber composites is disclosed. Carbon-bonded C fiber composite material is treated with gaseous silicon monoxide generated from the reaction of a mixture of colloidal silica and carbon black at an elevated temperature in an argon atmosphere. The carbon in the carbon bond and fiber is thus chemically converted to SiC resulting in a silicon carbide-bonded SiC fiber composite that can be used for fabricating dense, high-strength high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments.

  6. Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.; Wikstrom, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a comparative study of cryogenic insulation systems performed are presented. The key aspects of thermal insulation relative to cryogenic system design, testing, manufacturing, and maintenance are discussed. An overview of insulation development from an energy conservation perspective is given. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications provide three levels of thermal conductivity. Actual thermal performance of standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is several times less than laboratory performance and often 10 times worse than ideal performance. The cost-effectiveness of the insulation system depends on thermal performance; flexibility and durability; ease of use in handling, installation, and maintenance; and overall cost including operations, maintenance, and life cycle. Results of comprehensive testing of both conventional and novel materials such as aerogel composites using cryostat boil-off methods are given. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems that operate at a soft vacuum level is the primary focus of this paper.

  7. Vehicular Storage of Hydrogen in Insulated Pressure Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Berry, G D; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F

    2005-01-03

    This paper describes the development of an alternative technology for storing hydrogen fuel onboard automobiles. Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can accept cryogenic liquid fuel, cryogenic compressed gas or compressed gas at ambient temperature. Insulated pressure vessels offer advantages over conventional H{sub 2} storage approaches. Insulated pressure vessels are more compact and require less carbon fiber than GH{sub 2} vessels. They have lower evaporative losses than LH{sub 2} tanks, and are much lighter than metal hydrides. After outlining the advantages of hydrogen fuel and insulated pressure vessels, the paper describes the experimental and analytical work conducted to verify that insulated pressure vessels can be used safely for vehicular H{sub 2} storage. The paper describes tests that have been conducted to evaluate the safety of insulated pressure vessels. Insulated pressure vessels have successfully completed a series of DOT, ISO and SAE certification tests. A draft procedure for insulated pressure vessel certification has been generated to assist in a future commercialization of this technology. An insulated pressure vessel has been installed in a hydrogen fueled truck and it is currently being subjected to extensive testing.

  8. Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Dooling, D.

    1999-01-01

    Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines provides data on multilayer insulation materials used by previous spacecraft such as Spacelab and the Long-Duration Exposure Facility and outlines other concerns. The data presented in the document are presented for information only. They can be used as guidelines for multilayer insulation design for future spacecraft provided the thermal requirements of each new design and the environmental effects on these materials are taken into account.

  9. The electrical characteristics of solid insulators for 154 kV class HTS transformer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheon, H. G.; Choi, J. H.; Pang, M. S.; Kim, W. J.; Kim, S. H.

    2011-11-01

    HTS transformer, without any loss of insulation lifetime due to the reduction in terms of size and weight, can increase the overload capacity, and have some benefits such as the improvement in efficiency, minimization of environmental pollution, and convenient spatial arrangement, which contribute a lot to electric power system operation. However, for practical insulation design of the HTS transformer, it is necessary to establish the research on electrical properties LN2 as well as solid insulators. These solid insulators have been used as main insulations for HTS transformer. In this paper, we discussed breakdown and V-t characteristics of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) and pressboard in LN2.

  10. High voltage insulation of bushing for HTS power equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Woo-Jin; Choi, Jae-Hyeong; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2012-12-01

    For the operation of high temperature superconducting (HTS) power equipments, it is necessary to develop insulating materials and high voltage (HV) insulation technology at cryogenic temperature of bushing. Liquid nitrogen (LN2) is an attractive dielectric liquid. Also, the polymer insulating materials are expected to be used as solid materials such as glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP), polytetra-fluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon), Silicon (Si) rubber, aromatic polyamide (Nomex), EPDM/Silicon alloy compound (EPDM/Si). In this paper, the surface flashover characteristics of various insulating materials in LN2 are studied. These results are studied at both AC and impulse voltage under a non-uniform field. The use of GFRP and Teflon as insulation body for HTS bushing should be much desirable. Especially, GFRP is excellent material not only surface flashover characteristics but also mechanical characteristics at cryogenic temperature. The surface flashover is most serious problem for the shed design in LN2 and operation of superconducting equipments.

  11. Alternator insulation evaluation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, W. B.; Schaefer, R. F.; Balke, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to predict the remaining electrical insulation life of a 60 KW homopolar inductor alternator following completion of NASA turbo-alternator endurance tests for SNAP-8 space electrical power systems application. The insulation quality was established for two alternators following completion of these tests. A step-temperature aging test procedure was developed for insulation life prediction and applied to one of the two alternators. Armature winding insulation life of over 80,000 hours for an average winding temperature of 248 degrees C was predicted using the developed procedure.

  12. Anderson Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, James Jun; Zhou, Tong; Gu, Z. C.; Law, K. T.

    When a magnetic field is applied to a quantum spin Hall insulator (QSHI) without inversion symmetry, the edge states become gapful due to the breaking of time reversal symmetry (TRS) and the QSHI becomes a trivial spin Hall insulator (SHI) whose Chern number is N = 0 . In this work we show that disorder can drive such a SHI to a Chern insulator (CI) with N = 1 which supports a gapless chiral edge state. This CI exists in a finite range of disorder strength. Interestingly, the edge state is protected by the bulk mobility gap instead of an energy gap. For this reason, the new phase is called an Anderson Chern insulator (ACI).

  13. Loose-fill insulations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Whether you are increasing the insulation levels in your current home or selecting insulation for a new home, choosing the right insulation material can be challenging. Fibrous loose-fill insulations such as cellulose, fiberglass, and rock wool are options you may wish to consider. This publication will introduce you to these materials--what they are, how they are applied, how they compare with each other, and other considerations regarding their use--so that you can decide whether loose fills are right for your home.

  14. Composite Flexible Blanket Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Pitts, William C. (Inventor); Goldstein, Howard E. (Inventor); Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with the currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems are useful in providing lightweight insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  15. Studies of plastic insulators under shock conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Oona, H.; Goforth, J. H.; Tasker, D. G.; King, J. C.; Sena, F. C.; Kiuttu, G.; Casvassos, T.

    2001-01-01

    As experiments done with explosively driven switches and magnetic flux compression generators become complex, the details become increasingly important. In most experiments the detonation of explosives is done through hyers of material that include metal and plastic, which may retard the detonation, and at the same time the insulating materials must maintain their integrity at high voltages. We have initiated some small-scale experiments that use a few hundred grams of explosives to study effects on shocked materials. These studies look at effects on detonation through various materials as a function of their thickness, and will be compared with hydrodynamic computer modeling done with the MESA2D code. Another related series of experiments observed the voltage breakdown o f insulators under shock conditions. In this set of experiments insulators made of polyethylene, Teflon and Mylar were placed between two electrodes and exposed to 12OKV during a shock. The timing of the shock was determined from light produced at a flash gap. Photo-diodes coupled to optical fibers were used to transmit the signals to the diagnostic bunker. A Pearson probe was used to monitor the voltage at the insulator during the breakdown. The timing of the breakdown relative to the shock arrival time was recorded. The breakdown data as a function of materials and geometry are provided in this report. Also, these data are compared with computer simulations that may suggest material conditions at the time of insulator failure.

  16. Thermal insulation attaching means. [adhesive bonding of felt vibration insulators under ceramic tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved isolation system is provided for attaching ceramic tiles of insulating material to the surface of a structure to be protected against extreme temperatures of the nature expected to be encountered by the space shuttle orbiter. This system isolates the fragile ceramic tiles from thermally and mechanically induced vehicle structural strains. The insulating tiles are affixed to a felt isolation pad formed of closely arranged and randomly oriented fibers by means of a flexible adhesive and in turn the felt pad is affixed to the metallic vehicle structure by an additional layer of flexible adhesive.

  17. Non-Asbestos Insulation Testing Using a Plasma Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, R. E.; Prince, A. S.; Selvidge, S. A.; Phelps, J.; Martin, C. L.; Lawrence, T. W.

    2000-01-01

    Insulation obsolescence issues are a major concern for the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM). As old sources of raw materials disappear, new sources must be found and qualified. No simple, inexpensive test presently exists for predicting the erosion performance of a candidate insulation in the full-scale motor, Large motor tests cost million of dollars and therefore can only be used on a few very select candidates. There is a need for a simple, low cost method of screening insulation performance that can simulate some of the different erosion environments found in the RSRM. This paper describes a series of erosion tests on two different non-asbestos insulation formulations, a KEVLAR(registered) fiber-filled and a carbon fiber-filled insulation containing Ethylene-Propylene-Diene Monomer (EPDM) rubber as the binder. The test instrument was a plasma torch device. The two main variables investigated were heat flux and alumina particle impingement concentration. Statistical analysis revealed that the two different formulations had very different responses to the main variable. The results of this work indicate that there may be fundamental differences in how these insulation formulations perform in the motor operating environment. The plasma torch appears to offer a low-cost means of obtaining a fundamental understanding of insulation response to critical factors in a series of statistically designed experiments.

  18. Gas insulated transmission line with insulators having field controlling recesses

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.; Pederson, Bjorn O.

    1984-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line having a novel insulator for supporting an inner conductor concentrically within an outer sheath. The insulator has a recess contiguous with the periphery of one of the outer and inner conductors. The recess is disposed to a depth equal to an optimum gap for the dielectric insulating fluid used for the high voltage insulation or alternately disposed to a large depth so as to reduce the field at the critical conductor/insulator interface.

  19. Comparison of thermal insulation performance of fibrous materials for the advanced space suit.

    PubMed

    Paul, Heather L; Diller, Kenneth R

    2003-10-01

    The current multi-layer insulation used in the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) will not be effective in the atmosphere of Mars due to the presence of interstitial gases. Alternative thermal insulation means have been subjected to preliminary evaluation by NASA to attempt to identify a material that will meet the target conductivity of 0.005 W/m-K. This study analyzes numerically the thermal conductivity performance for three of these candidate insulating fiber materials in terms of various denier (size), interstitial void fractions, interstitial void media, and orientations to the applied temperature gradient to evaluate their applicability for the new Mars suit insulation. The results demonstrate that the best conductive insulation is achieved for a high-void-fraction configuration with a grooved fiber cross section, aerogel void medium, and the fibers oriented normal to the heat flux vector. However, this configuration still exceeds the target thermal conductivity by a factor of 1.5.

  20. Preparation of silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    Silicon carbide fibers suitable for use in the fabrication of dense, high-strength, high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments are fabricated by a new, simplified method wherein a mixture of short-length rayon fibers and colloidal silica is homogenized in a water slurry. Water is removed from the mixture by drying in air at 120/sup 0/C and the fibers are carbonized by (pyrolysis) heating the mixture to 800 to 1000/sup 0/C in argon. The mixture is subsequently reacted at 1550 to 1900/sup 0/C in argon to yield pure ..beta..-SiC fibers.

  1. Thermal insulation blanket material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusch, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to provide a tailorable advanced blanket insulation based on a woven design having an integrally woven core structure. A highly pure quartz yarn was selected for weaving and the cells formed were filled with a microquartz felt insulation.

  2. Thermal insulation blanket material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, R. H.

    1982-06-01

    A study was conducted to provide a tailorable advanced blanket insulation based on a woven design having an integrally woven core structure. A highly pure quartz yarn was selected for weaving and the cells formed were filled with a microquartz felt insulation.

  3. Insulation Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    Heating and cooling account for 50-70% of the energy consumed in the average American home. Heating water accounts for another 20%. A poorly insulated home loses much of this energy, causing drafty rooms and high energy bills. This fact sheet discusses how to determine if your home needs more insulation, the additional thermal resistance (called…

  4. Mineral Wool Insulation Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowatsch, Stefan

    Mineral wool is considered the best known insulation type among the wide variety of insulation materials. There are three types of mineral wool, and these consist of glass, stone (rock), and slag wool. The overall manufacturing processes, along with features such as specifications and characteristics for each of these types, as well as the role of the binder within the process are described.

  5. Mott-insulator dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lundh, Emil

    2011-09-15

    The hydrodynamics of a lattice Bose gas in a time-dependent external potential is studied in a mean-field approximation. The conditions under which a Mott insulating region can melt, and the local density can adjust to the new potential, are determined. In the case of a suddenly switched potential, it is found that the Mott insulator stays insulating and the density will not adjust if the switch is too abrupt. This comes about because too rapid currents result in Bloch oscillation-type current reversals. For a stirrer moved through a Mott insulating cloud, it is seen that only if the stirrer starts in a superfluid region and the velocity is comparable to the time scale set by the tunneling will the Mott insulator be affected.

  6. Dynamics insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. E. W.; Hepler, W. A.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced dynamic insulation systems were analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A particular performance measure is proposed in order to characterize various insulations in a unique manner. This measure is related to a base quantity, the refrigeration power ratio. The latter is the minimum refrigeration power, for a particular dynamic insulation limit, to the actual reliquefaction power associated with cryoliquid boiloff. This ratio serves as reference quantity which is approximately constant for a specific ductless insulation at a chosen normal boiling point. Each real container with support structure, vent tube, and other transverse components requires a larger refrigeration power. The ratio of the actual experimental power to the theoretical value of the support-less system is a suitable measure of the entire insulation performance as far as parasitic heat leakage is concerned. The present characterization is illustrated using simple thermodynamic system examples including experiments with liquid nitrogen. Numerical values are presented and a comparison with liquid helium is given.

  7. Breakdown of organic insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells and their associated electrical interconnects and leads were encapsulated in transparent elastomeric materials. Their purpose in a photovoltaic module, one of the most important for these elastomeric encapsulation materials, is to function as electrical insulation. This includes internal insulation between adjacent solar cells, between other encapsulated electrical parts, and between the total internal electrical circuitry and external metal frames, grounded areas, and module surfaces. Catastrophic electrical breakdown of the encapsulant insulation materials or electrical current through these materials or module edges to external locations can lead to module failure and can create hazards to humans. Electrical insulation stability, advanced elastomeric encapsulation materials are developed which are intended to be intrinsically free of in-situ ionic impurities, have ultralow water absorption, be weather-stable (UV, oxygen), and have high mechanical flexibility. Efforts to develop a method of assessing the life potential of organic insulation materials in photovoltaic modules are described.

  8. Development of a Low-Cost Ceramic Insulation Material for Magnet Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, M. W.; Hooker, M. W.; Fabian, P. E.; Codell, D. E.; Arzberger, S. C.; Grandlienard, S. D.; Kano, K. S.

    2006-03-01

    Future magnet designs for fusion devices and particle accelerators will require cost-effective, radiation-resistant materials. The use of hybrid inorganic/organic composite insulation systems will improve the lifetime, reliability, and performance of these systems. Previously, Composite Technology Development, Inc. (CTD) developed a highly-radiation-resistant, hybrid inorganic/organic insulation system, CTD-1012PX, which can be co-processed with the magnet's Nb3Sn superconductor. This process allows the coil to be wound and insulated prior to heat treatment. However, the cost of the CTD-1012PX insulation system is generally higher than organic insulations due to the higher prices of the ceramic fibers and ceramic-matrix precursor materials. Recently, CTD demonstrated the potential for significantly reducing the cost of hybrid ceramic/organic insulation through the development of a lower-cost inorganic-matrix system and the use of lower-cost reinforcement fibers. Without accounting for the cost of a yet-to-be-developed fiber/matrix interface material, the new insulation system costs approximately 16 percent of the currently used CTD-1012PX system. This paper summarizes an on-going effort to develop this new low-cost, hybrid inorganic/organic insulation system. The options evaluated for cost reduction, as well as mechanical test results showing the effects of these changes on the properties of the insulation system, are presented..

  9. Cooper Pair Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James

    One of the recent advances in the field of the Superconductor to Insulator Transition (SIT) has been the discovery and characterization of the Cooper Pair Insulator phase. This bosonic insulator, which consists of localized Cooper pairs, exhibits activated transport and a giant magneto-resistance peak. These features differ markedly from the weakly localized transport that emerges as pairs break at a ``fermionic'' SIT. I will describe how our experiments on films nano-patterned with a nearly triangular array of holes have enabled us to 1) distinguish bosonic insulators from fermionic insulators, 2) show that Cooper pairs, rather than quasi-particles dominate the transport in the Cooper Pair insulator phase, 3) demonstrate that very weak, sub nano-meter thickness inhomogeneities control whether a bosonic or fermionic insulator forms at an SIT and 4) reveal that Cooper pairs disintegrate rather than becoming more tightly bound deep in the localized phase. We have also developed a method, using a magnetic field, to tune flux disorder reversibly in these films. I will present our latest results on the influence of magnetic flux disorder and random gauge fields on phenomena near bosonic SITs. This work was performed in collaboration with M. D. Stewart, Jr., Hung Q. Nguyen, Shawna M. Hollen, Jimmy Joy, Xue Zhang, Gustavo Fernandez, Jeffrey Shainline and Jimmy Xu. It was supported by NSF Grants DMR 1307290 and DMR-0907357.

  10. Internal insulation system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an internal insulation system for cryogenic liquids is described. The insulation system is based on a gas layer concept in which capillary or surface tension effects are used to maintain a stable gas layer within a cellular core structure between the tank wall and the contained cryogen. In this work, a 1.8 meter diameter tank was insulated and tested with liquid hydrogen. Ability to withstand cycling of the aluminum tank wall to 450 K was a design and test condition.

  11. Microsphere Insulation Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, R.; Allen, M.; Baumgartner, R.

    2006-01-01

    Microsphere insulation panels (MIPs) have been developed as lightweight, longlasting replacements for the foam and vacuum-jacketed systems heretofore used for thermally insulating cryogenic vessels and transfer ducts. The microsphere core material of a typical MIP consists of hollow glass bubbles, which have a combination of advantageous mechanical, chemical, and thermal-insulation properties heretofore available only separately in different materials. In particular, a core filling of glass microspheres has high crush strength and low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum.

  12. Insulation fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    Electricity bills, oil bills, gas bills - all homeowners pay for one or more of these utilities, and wish they paid less. Often many of us do not really know how to control or reduce our utility bills. We resign ourselves to high bills because we think that is the price we have to pay for a comfortable home. We encourage our children to turn off the lights and appliances, but may not recognize the benefits of insulating the attic. This publication provides facts relative to home insulation. It discusses where to insulate, what products to use, the decision making process, installation options, and sources of additional information.

  13. Building Insulation Materials Compilation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    this material in use. Extruded polystyrene shows a permeability to water vapor of 0.6 perm-in when tested by ASTM- C355 -64 and a volumetric water...ASTM- C355 , and water absorption less than 2% by weight by ASTM-C272. Polystyrene foam insulating boards and sheathing are used in residential...Insulations C520 Test for Density of Granular Loose Fill Insulations C1622 Test for Apparent Density of Rigid Cellular Plastics C355 Test for Water Vapor

  14. Investigation of the adhesive bonding technology for the insulator structure of EAST neutral beam injector

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jiang-Long Li, Jun; Hu, Chun-Dong; Xie, Ya-Hong; Jing, Hao

    2014-07-15

    A key issue on the development of EAST ion source was the junction design of insulator structure, which consists of three insulators and four supporting flanges of electrode grid. Because the ion source is installed on the vertical plane, the insulator structure has to withstand large bending and shear stress due to the gravity of whole ion source. Through a mechanical analysis, it was calculated that the maximum bending normal stress was 0.34 MPa and shear stress was 0.23 MPa on the insulator structure. Due to the advantages of simplicity and high strength, the adhesive bonding technology was applied to the junction of insulator structure. A tensile testing campaign of different junction designs between insulator and supporting flange was performed, and a junction design of stainless steel and fiber enhanced epoxy resin with epoxy adhesive was determined. The insulator structure based on the determined design can satisfy both the requirements of high-voltage holding and mechanical strength.

  15. Description of the insulation system for the Langley 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawing, P. L.; Dress, D. A.; Kilgore, R. A.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal insulation system of the Langley 0.3 Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel is described. The insulation system is designed to operate from room temperature down to about 77.4 K, the temperature of liquid nitrogen at 1 atmosphere. A detailed description is given of the primary insulation sytem consists of glass fiber mats, a three part vapor barrier, and a dry positive pressure purge system. Also described are several secondary insulation systems required for the test section, actuators, and tunnel supports. An appendix briefly describes the original insulation system which is considered inferior to the one presently in place. The time required for opening and closing portions of the insulation system for modification or repair to the tunnel has been reduced, typically, from a few days for the original thermal insulating system to a few hours for the present system.

  16. Nonflammable, Hydrophobic Aerogel Composites for Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redouane, Begag

    2005-01-01

    Aerogel composites that are both nonflammable and hydrophobic have been developed for use as lightweight thermal- insulation materials for cryogenic systems. Aerogels are well known in the industry for their effectiveness as thermal insulators under cryogenic conditions, but the treatments used heretofore to render them hydrophobic also make them flammable. Nonflammability would make it safer to use aerogel insulation, especially in oxygen-rich environments and on cryogenic systems that contain liquid oxygen. A composite of this type is a silica aerogel reinforced with fibers. In comparison with unreinforced aerogels, the aerogel composite is about ten times as stiff and strong, better able to withstand handling, and more amenable to machining to required shapes. The composite can be made hydrophobic and nonflammable by appropriate design of a sol-gel process used to synthesize the aerogel component. In addition to very low thermal conductivity needed for insulation, aerogel composites of this type have been found to exhibit high resistance to moisture and nonflammability in oxygen-rich atmospheres: Samples floating on water for months gained no weight and showed no signs of deterioration. Samples were found to be nonflammable, even in pure oxygen at atmospheric pressure [14.7 psia (0.10 MPa)

  17. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema

    James Valles

    2016-07-12

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  18. Composite flexible blanket insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Lowe, David M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An improved composite flexible blanket insulation is presented comprising top silicon carbide having an interlock design, wherein the reflective shield is composed of single or double aluminized polyimide and wherein the polyimide film has a honeycomb pattern.

  19. Topological insulators: Engineered heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesjedal, Thorsten; Chen, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    The combination of topological properties and magnetic order can lead to new quantum states and exotic physical phenomena. In particular, the coupling between topological insulators and antiferromagnets enables magnetic and electronic structural engineering.

  20. Improved Sprayable Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. F.; Sharpe, M. H.; Lester, C. N.; Echols, Sherman; Simpson, W. G.; Lambert, J. D.; Norton, W. F.; Mclemore, J. P.; Patel, A. K.; Patel, S. V.; Shockney, C. H.; Adams, G. R.; Kelly, M. R.; White, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    MSA-2 and MSA-2A, two similar improved versions of Marshall sprayable ablator, insulating material developed at Marshall Space Flight Center to replace both sheets of cork and MSA-1. Suitable for use on large vehicles and structures exposed to fire or other sources of heat by design or accident. Ablative insulation turns into strong char when exposed to high temperature; highly desireable property in original spacecraft application and possibly in some terrestrial applications.

  1. Insulator for laser housing

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, D.B.

    1992-12-29

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

  2. Insulator for laser housing

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, David B.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member.

  3. Vacuum foil insulation system

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, John P.; Sabolcik, Rudolph E.; Svedberg, Robert C.

    1976-11-16

    In a multifoil thermal insulation package having a plurality of concentric cylindrical cups, means are provided for reducing heat loss from the penetration region which extends through the cups. At least one cup includes an integral skirt extending from one end of the cup to intersection with the penetration means. Assembly of the insulation package with the skirted cup is facilitated by splitting the cup to allow it to be opened up and fitted around the other cups during assembly.

  4. Surface flashover of insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.

    1988-08-31

    This paper reviews surface flashover (i.e., voltage breakdown along the surfaces of insulators), primarily in vacuum, although some comments are made about surface/flashover in high pressure gases. Theories and models relating to surface flashover are discussed, along with pertinent experimental results. Also, some suggestions are made regarding how to choose the material, geometry, and processing when selecting an insulator for a particular application.

  5. Perioperative thermal insulation.

    PubMed

    Bräuer, Anselm; Perl, Thorsten; English, Michael J M; Quintel, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Perioperative hypothermia remains a common problem during anesthesia and surgery. Unfortunately, the implementation of new minimally invasive surgical procedures has not lead to a reduction of this problem. Heat losses from the skin can be reduced by thermal insulation to avoid perioperative hypothermia. However, only a small amount of information is available regarding the physical properties of insulating materials used in the Operating Room (OR). Therefore, several materials using validated manikins were tested. Heat loss from the surface of the manikin can be described as:"Q = h . DeltaT . A" where Q = heat flux, h = heat exchange coefficient, DeltaT = temperature gradient between the environment and surface, and A = covered area. Heat flux per unit area and surface temperature were measured with calibrated heat flux transducers. Environmental temperature was measured using a thermoanemometer. The temperature gradient between the surface and environment (DeltaT) was varied and "h" was determined by linear regression analysis as the slope of "DeltaT" versus heat flux per unit area. The reciprocal of the heat exchange coefficient defines the insulation. The insulation values of the materials varied between 0.01 Clo (plastic bag) to 2.79 Clo (2 layers of a hospital duvet). Given the range of insulating materials available for outdoor activities, significant improvement in insulation of patients in the OR is both possible and desirable.

  6. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/m2, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/m2). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  7. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/sq m, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/sq m). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  8. Carcinogenicity of the insulation wools: reassessment of the IARC evaluation.

    PubMed

    Brown, R C; Davis, J M; Douglas, D; Gruber, U F; Hoskins, J A; Ilgren, E B; Johnson, N F; Rossiter, C E; Wagner, J C

    1991-08-01

    In assessing the health evidence concerning man-made mineral fibers, the chemical composition, surface activity, durability, and size of fibers have to be taken into account. Special-purpose fine glass fibers need to be separated from the insulation wools (glass, rock, and slag wool). The epidemiological evidence is sufficient to conclude that there has been no mesothelioma risk to workers producing or using glass wool, rock wool, or slag wool. The epidemiological studies have been large and powerful, and they show no evidence of a cause-effect relationship between lung cancer and exposure to glass wool, rock wool, or slag wool fibers. There is some evidence of a small cancer hazard attached to the manufacturing process in slag wool plants 20 to 50 years ago, when asbestos was used in some products and other carcinogenic substances were present. However, this hazard is not associated with any index of exposure to slag wool itself. Animal inhalation studies of ordinary insulation wools also show that there is no evidence of hazard associated with exposure to these relatively coarse, soluble fibers. The evidence of carcinogenicity is limited to experiments with special-purpose fine durable glass fibers or experimental fibers, and only when these fibers are injected directly into the pleural or peritoneal cavity. Multiple chronic inhalation studies of these same special-purpose fine glass fibers have not produced evidence of carcinogenicity. It is suggested that the present IARC evaluation of the carcinogenic risk of insulation wools should be revised to Category 3: not classifiable as to carcinogenicity to humans.

  9. Insulation Characteristics of Bushing Shed at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, W. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, S. H.

    2014-05-01

    In the development of high-Tc superconducting(HTS) devices, the bushing for HTS devices (HTS bushing) is the core technology, the need to because of supply high voltage to the cable or the winding of the transformer. The lower part of the bushing is exposed to the liquid nitrogen (LN2), and it has many sheds. In particular, the insulation body with sheds and electrical insulation at cryogenic temperature have attracted a great deal of interest from the view point of the size, weight and efficiency of bushing. This study has mainly investigated the shed and insulation body by comparing glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRP) in LN2. We investigated the surface discharge characteristics according to insulating materials, width and height of the shed.

  10. Thermal insulation of wet shielded metal arc welds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keenan, Patrick J.

    1993-06-01

    Computational and experimental studies were performed to determine the effect of static thermal insulation on the quality of wet shielded metal arc welds (SMAW). A commercially available heat flow and fluid dynamics spectral-element computer program was used to model a wet SMAW and to determine the potential effect on the weld cooling rate of placing thermal insulation adjacent to the weld line. Experimental manual welds were made on a low carbon equivalent (0.285) mild steel and on a higher carbon equivalent (0.410) high tensile strength steel, using woven fabrics of alumina-boria-silica fibers to insulate the surface of the plate being welded. The effect of the insulation on weld quality was evaluated through the use of post-weld Rockwell Scale hardness measurements on the surface of the weld heat affected zones (HAZ's) and by visual inspection of sectioned welds at 10 X magnification. The computational simulation demonstrated a 150% increase in surface HAZ peak temperature and a significant decrease in weld cooling rate with respect to uninsulated welds, for welds in which ideal insulation had been placed on the base plate surface adjacent to the weld line. Experimental mild steel welds showed a reduction in surface HAZ hardness attributable to insulation at a 77% significance level. A visual comparison of the cross-sections of two welds made in 0.410 carbon equivalent steel-with approximately equivalent heat input-revealed underbead cracking in the uninsulated weld but not in the insulated weld.

  11. Fiber Optic Detector For Liquid Chemical Leaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luukkala, Mauri; Raatikainen, Pekka; Salo, Olli

    1989-10-01

    This paper describes a simple and economical sensor which employs fiber optics to detect the presence of hazardous liquid chemicals, particularly undiluted hydrocarbons. The device is best suited to monitor the interstitial space of double walled underground storage tanks. Because the sensor is plastic and is situated at the end of a passive and insulating optical fiber the sensor can be considered inherently safe. The optical fiber used for this device can be up to several hundred meters long.

  12. Great prospects for fiber optics sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, T. E.

    1983-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide noise immunity and galvanic insulation at the measurement point. Interest in such sensors is increasing for these reasons. In the United States sales are expected to increase from 12 million dollars in 1981 to 180 million in 1991. Interferometric sensors based on single modus fibers deliver extremely high sensitivity, while sensors based on multi-modus fibers are more easily manufactured. The fiber optic sensors which are available today are based on point measurements. Development of fiber optic sensors in Norway is being carried out at the Central institute and has resulted in the development of medical manometers which are now undergoing clinical testing.

  13. Optical fiber gas sensor development and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, W.; Ho, H. L.

    2008-12-01

    This paper reports recent development and application of optical fiber gas sensors using absorption spectroscopy, including open-path gas sensors using fiber coupled micro-optic cells and photonic bandgap (PBG) fibers. A fiber-optic sensor system capable of detecting dissolved fault gases in oil-insulated equipment in power industry is presented. The gases include methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2) and ethylene (C2H4). In addition, the development of gas sensor using PBG fiber will be reported.

  14. Properties of textile grade ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pudnos, Eric

    1992-01-01

    The availability of textile grade ceramic fibers has sparked great interest for applications in composite reinforcement and high temperature insulation. This paper summarizes the properties of various small diameter textile grade ceramic fibers currently available. Room temperature mechanical and electrical properties of the fibers are discussed for three cases: ambient conditions, after heat aging in argon, and after heat aging in wet air. Dow Corning (R) HPZ Ceramic Fiber, a silicon nitride type fiber, is shown to have improved retention of mechanical and electrical properties above 1200 C.

  15. Mechanical and Thermal Characteristics of Insulation Materials for the KSTAR Magnet System at Cryogenic Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Wooho; Lim, Bungsu; Kim, Myungkyu; Park, Hyunki; Kim, Keeman; Chu, Yong; Lee, Sangil

    2004-06-01

    The KSTAR(Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) superconducting magnet is electrically insulated by the composite material of epoxy resin and glass fiber (2.5 kV/mm) and Kapton (8 kV/mm). The insulation composite material of epoxy resin and glass fiber is prepared using a VPI (Vacuum Pressure Impregnation) process. The superconducting magnet is under mechanical stress caused by the large temperature difference between the operation temperature of the magnet and room temperature. The large electro-magnetic force during the operation of the magnet is also exerted on the magnet. Therefore, the characteristics of the insulation material at cryogenic temperatures are very important and the tensile stress and thermal expansion coefficient for the insulation materials of the KSTAR superconducting magnet are measured. This paper presents results on mechanical properties of the insulation material for KSTAR magnets, such as density, ultimate tensile stress and thermal contraction between room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  16. Glass fiber manufacturing and fiber safety: the producer's perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, J R; Hadley, J G

    1994-01-01

    Historically, the potential health effects of airborne fibers have been associated with the dose, dimension, and durability. Increasing focus is being placed on the latter category. Concern about airborne fiber safety could be reduced by manufacturing fibers that are not respirable; however, due to performance and manufacturing constraints on glasswool insulations, this is not possible today. These products are an important part of today's economy and as a major manufacturer, Owens-Corning is committed to producing and marketing materials that are both safe and effective in their intended use. To this end, manufacturing technology seeks to produce materials that generate low concentrations of airborne fibers, thus minimizing exposure and irritation. The range of fiber diameters is controlled to assure effective product performance and, as far as possible, to minimize respirability. Glass compositions are designed to allow effective fiber forming and ultimate product function. Fiber dissolution is primarily a function of composition; this too, can be controlled within certain constraints. Coupled with these broad parameters is an extensive product stewardship program to assure the safety of these materials. This article will discuss the factors that influence glasswool insulation production, use, and safety. PMID:7882953

  17. Insulation bonding test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  18. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  19. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Hartmann, John L.

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  20. Reusable Surface Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation, developed by Ames Research Center, protects the Space Shuttle from the searing heat that engulfs it on reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. Initially integrated into the Space Shuttle by Rockwell International, production was transferred to Hi-Temp Insulation Inc. in 1974. Over the years, Hi-Temp has created many new technologies to meet the requirements of the Space Shuttle program. This expertise is also used commercially, including insulation blankets to cover aircrafts parts, fire barrier material to protect aircraft engine cowlings and aircraft rescue fire fighter suits. A Fire Protection Division has also been established, offering the first suit designed exclusively by and for aircraft rescue fire fighters. Hi-Temp is a supplier to the Los Angeles City Fire Department as well as other major U.S. civil and military fire departments.

  1. Silicon Carbide Fiber/Mullite Composites from Rapidly Solidified Aluminosilicate Powder.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    was the ~60 weight % Al20 3 , ~40 weight % Sio 2 Fiberfrax H insulating fibers fabricated by the Carborundum Company. By milling, these fibers were...obtained by dry ball milling Carborundum’s high temperature insulation known as Fiberfrax H. This is a fibrous material that is produced in commercial

  2. Notes on topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Ralph M.; Li, Dan; Wehefritz-Kaufmann, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    This paper is a survey of the ℤ2-valued invariant of topological insulators used in condensed matter physics. The ℤ-valued topological invariant, which was originally called the TKNN invariant in physics, has now been fully understood as the first Chern number. The ℤ2 invariant is more mysterious; we will explain its equivalent descriptions from different points of view and provide the relations between them. These invariants provide the classification of topological insulators with different symmetries in which K-theory plays an important role. Moreover, we establish that both invariants are realizations of index theorems which can also be understood in terms of condensed matter physics.

  3. Thermal insulation protection means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotts, R. L.; Smith, J. A.; Strouhal, G. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A system for providing thermal insulation for portions of a spacecraft which do not exceed 900 F during ascent or reentry relative to the earth's atmosphere is described. The thermal insulation is formed of relatively large flexible sheets of needled Nomex felt having a flexible waterproof coating. The thickness of the felt is sized to protect against projected temperatures and is attached to the structure by a resin adhesive. Vent holes in the sheets allow ventilation while maintaining waterproofing. The system is heat treated to provide thermal stability.

  4. Insulator breakdown measurements in a poor vacuum and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect

    Vogtlin, G.E.

    1990-06-01

    Breakdown measurements have been made on insulators with 0 and 45 degree angle surfaces. A technique of observing the electrons produced from the process has given some insight into the mechanisms involved. A three nanosecond pulse was used to induce breakdown. The electrons striking the anode were observed with a plastic fluor and open shutter camera. Two breakdown patterns were interpreted as cathode initiated and anode initiated breakdown. The breakdown process normally encountered was anode initiated with a positive 45 degree insulator. If the anode side was relieved with an internal electrode, the breakdown changed to cathode initiated at a higher level. If the cathode surface was then anodized, the breakdown switched back to the anode at an even higher level. Individual explosive emission sites on the cathode surface could be observed. Insulator breakdown was usually not associated with these sites. Multiple pulses allowed measurement of plasma expansion of the explosive emission sites. It is believed that breakdown with longer pulses is due to the expansion of the explosive emission site plasma to the insulator surface. Measurements were conducted with and without voltage conditioning. It appears that conditioning is achieved without explosive emission. It is believed that this is due to organic fibers that are removed by the conditioning. Organic fibers were used to induce both anode and cathode breakdown. Measurements of fiberous material have shown explosive emission a low as 100 kV on a three nanosecond time scale and below 20 kv/cm on a longer time scale. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Thermographic inspection of external thermal insulation systems with mechanical fixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, Nuno; Simões, Inês; Serra, Catarina; Tadeu, António

    2015-05-01

    An External Thermal Insulation Composite System (ETICS) kit may include anchors to mechanically fix the insulation product onto the wall. Using this option increases safety when compared to a simple bonded solution, however, it is more expensive and needs higher labor resources. The insulation product is then coated with rendering, which applied to the insulation material without any air gap. The rendering comprises one or more layers of coats with an embedded reinforcement. The most common multi-coat rendering system presents a base coat applied directly to the insulation product with a glass fiber mesh as reinforcement, followed by a second base coat, before a very thin coat (key coat) that prepares the surface to receive the finishing and decorative coat. The thickness of the rendering system may vary between around 5 to 10 mm. The higher thicknesses may be associated with a reinforcement composed by two layers of glass fiber mesh. The main purpose of this work is to apply infrared thermography (IRT) techniques to 2 ETICS solution (single or double layer of glass fiber mesh) and evaluate its capability in the detection of anchors. The reliability of IRT was tested using an ETICS configuration of expanded cork boards and a rendering system with one or two layers of glass fiber mesh. An active thermography approach was performed in laboratory conditions, in transmission and reflection mode. In the reflection mode halogen lamps and air heater were employed as the thermal stimulus. Air heater was also the source used in the transmission mode tests. The resulting data was processed in both time and frequency domains. In this last approach, phase contrast images were generated and studied.

  6. Self-Healing Wire Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured, reactants within the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  7. Fiber reinforced concrete solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Slemmons, A. J.; Newgard, P. J.

    1985-05-07

    A solar collector is disclosed comprising a glass member having a solar selective coating thereon, and a molded, glass-reinforced concrete member bonded to the glass member and shaped to provide a series of passageways between the glass member and the fiber-reinforced concrete member capable of carrying heat exchanging fluid therethrough. The fiber-reinforced concrete member may be formed by spraying a thin layer of concrete and chopped fibers such as chopped glass fibers onto a mold to provide an inexpensive and lightweight, thin-walled member. The fiber-reinforced concrete member may have a lightweight cellular concrete backing thereon for insulation purposes. The collector is further characterized by the use of materials which have substantially matching thermal coefficients of expansion over the temperature range normally encountered in the use of solar collectors.

  8. Thermal Insulation Performance of Textile Structures for Spacesuit Applications at Martian Pressure and Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndoff, Evelyne; Trevino, Luis A.

    2000-01-01

    Protection of astronauts from the extreme temperatures in the space environment has been provided in the past using multi-layer insulation in ultra-high vacuum environments of low earth orbit and the lunar surface. For planetary environments with residual gas atmospheres such as Mars with ambient pressures between 8 to 14 hPa (8 to 14 mbar), new protection techniques are required because of the dominating effect of the ambient gas on heat loss through the insulation. At Mars ambient pressure levels, the heat loss can be excessive at expected suit external temperatures of 172 K with state-of-the-art suit insulation, requiring an active heat source and its accompanying weight and volume penalties. Micro-fibers have been identified as one potential structure to reduce the heat losses, but existing fundamental data on fiber heat transfer at low pressure is lacking for integrated fabric structures. This baseline study presents insulation performance test data at different pressures and fabric loads for selected polyesters and aramids as a function of fiber density, fiber diameter, fabric density, and fabric construction. A set of trend data of thermal conductivity versus ambient pressure is presented for each fiber and fabric construction design to identify the design effects on thermal conductivity at various ambient pressures, and to select a fiber and fabric design for further development as a suit insulation. The trend data also shows the pressure level at which thermal conductivity approaches a minimum, below which no further improvement is possible for a given fiber and fabric design. The pressure levels and resulting thermal conductivities from the trend data can then be compared to the ambient pressure at a planetary surface, Mars for example, to determine if a particular fiber and fabric design has potential as a suit insulation.

  9. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOEpatents

    Vanacek, D.L.; Pike, C.D.

    1982-07-13

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly having a tubular insulator extending between the ground plane ring and the high voltage ring. The insulator is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring to the high voltage ring, producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall of the insulator to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly.

  10. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-04-30

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

  11. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  12. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R

    2006-08-16

    Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators are vacuum insulating structures composed of thin, alternating layers of dielectric and metal. They are currently being developed for application to high-current accelerators and related pulsed power systems. This paper describes some of the High-Gradient Insulator research currently being conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  13. Elastomer Unistructure Insulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Faulkerson, J. Braucht, and R. Behymer . References 1. R. 0. Godwin, W. F. Hagen, J. F. Holzrichter, W. W. Simmons, and J. B. Trenholme, "Livermore...enhanced triggered gas switches, Proc Conference Energy Storage, Compression, and Switching, p. 463, (November 5-7, 1974 ) Switch Insulator- · Figure 1

  14. Insulated ECG electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portnoy, W. M.; David, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Insulated, capacitively coupled electrode does not require electrolyte paste for attachment. Other features of electrode include wide range of nontoxic material that may be employed for dielectric because of sputtering technique used. Also, electrode size is reduced because there is no need for external compensating networks with FET operational amplifier.

  15. Erosion of polyurethane insulation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, S.

    1973-01-01

    Detailed description of the test program in which erosion of the spray foam insulation used in the S-II stage of the Saturn-V Apollo launch vehicle was investigated. The behavior of the spray foam was investigated at the elevated temperature and static pressure appropriate to the S-II stage environment, but in the absence of the aerodynamic shear stress.

  16. Preassembly Of Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izu, Y. D.; Yoshioka, E. N.; Rosario, T.

    1988-01-01

    Concept for preassembling high-temperature insulating tiles speeds and simplifies installation and repair and reduces damage from handling. Preassembly concept facilitates placement of tiles on gently contoured surfaces as well as on flat ones. Tiles bonded to nylon mesh with room-temperature-vulcanizing silicon rubber. Spacing between tiles is 0.03 in. Applications include boilers, kilns, and furnaces.

  17. The Polar Insulation Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban-Rich, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author developed an activity called "The Polar Insulation Investigation." This activity builds on students' natural interest in "things polar" and introduces them to animal adaptations in a unique way. The aim of the exploration is to determine the role of animal coverings (e.g., blubber, fur, and feathers) and to see which is…

  18. Improved insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Multilayer material consisting of embossed, silver-coated Mylar, nylon net, and silk net is useful for thermal-protection systems and cryogenic containers. Embossing serves two purposes: helps separate radiation barriers and controls radiant energy diffusion. Insulation requires no maintenance after installation.

  19. THERMAL INSULATION SYSTEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, Stanislaw D. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems and with methods of their production. The thermal insulation systems incorporate at least one reflection layer and at least one spacer layer in an alternating pattern. Each spacer layer includes a fill layer and a carrier layer. The fill layer may be separate from the carrier layer, or it may be a part of the carrier layer, i.e., mechanically injected into the carrier layer or chemically formed in the carrier layer. Fill layers contain a powder having a high surface area and low bulk density. Movement of powder within a fill layer is restricted by electrostatic effects with the reflection layer combined with the presence of a carrier layer, or by containing the powder in the carrier layer. The powder in the spacer layer may be compressed from its bulk density. The thermal insulation systems may further contain an outer casing. Thermal insulation systems may further include strips and seams to form a matrix of sections. Such sections serve to limit loss of powder from a fill layer to a single section and reduce heat losses along the reflection layer.

  20. Alaska Pipeline Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Crude oil moving through the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline must be kept at a relatively high temperature, about 180 degrees Fahrenheit, to maintain the fluidity of the oil. In Arctic weather, that demands highly effective insulation. General Electric Co.'s Space Division, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, provided it with a spinoff product called Therm-O-Trol. Shown being installed on the pipeline, Therm-O-Trol is a metal-bonded polyurethane foam especially formulated for Arctic insulation. A second GE spinoff product, Therm-O-Case, solved a related problem involved in bringing hot crude oil from 2,000-foot-deep wells to the surface without transferring oil heat to the surrounding permafrost soil; heat transfer could melt the frozen terrain and cause dislocations that might destroy expensive well casings. Therm-O-Case is a double-walled oil well casing with multi-layered insulation which provides an effective barrier to heat transfer. Therm-O-Trol and Therm-O-Case are members of a family of insulating products which stemmed from technology developed by GE Space Division in heat transferlthermal control work on Gemini, Apollo and other NASA programs.

  1. Use of Several Thermal Analysis Techniques to Study the Cracking of an Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR) Insulator on the Booster Separation Motor (BSM) of the Space Shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Two different vendor rubber formulations have been used to produce the silica-filled NBR insulators for the BSM used on both of the Solid Rocket Boosters (SRBs) of the Space Shuttle. A number of lots of the BSM insulator in 1998-99 exhibited surface cracks and/or crazing. Each insulator is bonded to the BSM aluminum aft closure with an epoxy adhesive. Induced insulator stresses from adhesive cure are likely greatest where the insulator/adhesive contour is the greatest, thus showing increased insulator surface cracking in this area. Thermal analysis testing by Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermomechanical Analysis (TMA) was performed on one each of the two vendor BSM insulators previously bonded that exhibited the surface cracking. The TMA data from the film/fiber technique yielded the most meaningful results, with thin insulator surface samples containing cracks having roughly the same modulus (stiffness) as thin insulator bulk samples just underneath.

  2. Transcription Independent Insulation at TFIIIC-Dependent Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Lourdes; Dhillon, Namrita; Kamakaka, Rohinton T.

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin insulators separate active from repressed chromatin domains. In yeast the RNA pol III transcription machinery bound to tRNA genes function with histone acetylases and chromatin remodelers to restrict the spread of heterochromatin. Our results collectively demonstrate that binding of TFIIIC is necessary for insulation but binding of TFIIIB along with TFIIIC likely improves the probability of complex formation at an insulator. Insulation by this transcription factor occurs in the absence of RNA polymerase III or polymerase II but requires specific histone acetylases and chromatin remodelers. This analysis identifies a minimal set of factors required for insulation. PMID:19596900

  3. Integrated Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Integrated multilayer insulation (IMLI) is being developed as an improved alternative to conventional multilayer insulation (MLI), which is more than 50 years old. A typical conventional MLI blanket comprises between 10 and 120 metallized polymer films separated by polyester nets. MLI is the best thermal- insulation material for use in a vacuum, and is the insulation material of choice for spacecraft and cryogenic systems. However, conventional MLI has several disadvantages: It is difficult or impossible to maintain the desired value of gap distance between the film layers (and consequently, it is difficult or impossible to ensure consistent performance), and fabrication and installation are labor-intensive and difficult. The development of IMLI is intended to overcome these disadvantages to some extent and to offer some additional advantages over conventional MLI. The main difference between IMLI and conventional MLI lies in the method of maintaining the gaps between the film layers. In IMLI, the film layers are separated by what its developers call a micro-molded discrete matrix, which can be loosely characterized as consisting of arrays of highly engineered, small, lightweight, polymer (typically, thermoplastic) frames attached to, and placed between, the film layers. The term "micro-molded" refers to both the smallness of the frames and the fact that they are fabricated in a process that forms precise small features, described below, that are essential to attainment of the desired properties. The term "discrete" refers to the nature of the matrix as consisting of separate frames, in contradistinction to a unitary frame spanning entire volume of an insulation blanket.

  4. Anisotropic fibrous thermal insulator of relatively thick cross section and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Reynolds, Carl D.; Ardary, Zane L.

    1979-01-01

    The present invention is directed to an anisotropic thermal insulator formed of carbon-bonded organic or inorganic fibers and having a thickness or cross section greater than about 3 centimeters. Delaminations and deleterious internal stresses generated during binder curing and carbonizing operations employed in the fabrication of thick fibrous insulation of thicknesses greater than 3 centimeters are essentially obviated by the method of the present invention. A slurry of fibers, thermosetting resin binder and water is vacuum molded into the selected insulator configuration with the total thickness of the molded slurry being less than about 3 centimeters, the binder is thermoset to join the fibers together at their nexaes, and then the binder is carbonized to form the carbon bond. A second slurry of the fibers, binder and water is then applied over the carbonized body with the vacuum molding, binder thermosetting and carbonizing steps being repeated to form a layered insulator with the binder providing a carbon bond between the layers. The molding, thermosetting and carbonizing steps may be repeated with additional slurries until the thermal insulator is of the desired final thickness. An additional feature of the present invention is provided by incorporating opacifying materials in any of the desired layers so as to provide different insulating properties at various temperatures. Concentration and/or type of additive can be varied from layer-to-layer.

  5. Efficient application of boron fire retardant to cellulosic loose-fill insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wegner, T.H.; Holmes, C.A.

    1983-01-01

    Different methods of applying boron fire-retardant chemicals were investigated for their effectiveness in improving the fire performance of cellulose insulation. Loose-fill insulation derived from newsprint was treated with boric acid/borax (1:1) applied as either a dry powder or an aqueous solution; vapor deposition treatment was also evaluated for applying boric acid. Insulation produced by direct conversion from wood chips was treated with an aqueous solution and by vapor deposition. Nominal fire retardant application levels of 10, 18, and 25% (based on newsprint or wood fiber weight) were employed. The aqueous method gave better flame-spread resistance than dry powder or vapor application. Wavelength dispersive spectroscopy showed more uniform distribution of fire retardant on the fiber surface and penetration into the fiber when applied by the aqueous method. Smoldering resistance showed little dependence on application method but did depend on fire retardant level, insulation density, and particle size. Thermal conductivity was independent of fire-retardant application method, fire retardant level, and insulation density. Overall, wood fiber and newsprint insulation gave very comparable results.

  6. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Anaya, R M; Blackfield, D; Chen, Y -; Falabella, S; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Paul, A C; Sampayan, S; Sanders, D M; Watson, J A; Caporaso, G J; Krogh, M

    2006-11-15

    High voltage systems operated in vacuum require insulating materials to maintain spacing between conductors held at different potentials, and may be used to maintain a nonconductive vacuum boundary. Traditional vacuum insulators generally consist of a single material, but insulating structures composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal can also be built. These ''High-Gradient Insulators'' have been experimentally shown to withstand higher voltage gradients than comparable conventional insulators. As a result, they have application to a wide range of high-voltage vacuum systems where compact size is important. This paper describes ongoing research on these structures, as well as the current theoretical understanding driving this work.

  7. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  8. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  9. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components, and, with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives, functionally required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g., powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf-life characteristics.

  10. EPDM rocket motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guillot, David G. (Inventor); Harvey, Albert R. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A novel and improved EPDM formulation for a solid propellant rocket motor is described wherein hexadiene EPDM monomer components are replaced by alkylidene norbornene components and with appropriate adjustment of curing and other additives functionally-required rheological and physical characteristics are achieved with the desired compatibility with any one of a plurality of solid filler materials, e.g. powder silica, carbon fibers or aramid fibers, and with appropriate adhesion and extended storage or shelf life characteristics.

  11. Spin Seebeck insulator.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Xiao, J; Adachi, H; Ohe, J; Takahashi, S; Ieda, J; Ota, T; Kajiwara, Y; Umezawa, H; Kawai, H; Bauer, G E W; Maekawa, S; Saitoh, E

    2010-11-01

    Thermoelectric generation is an essential function in future energy-saving technologies. However, it has so far been an exclusive feature of electric conductors, a situation which limits its application; conduction electrons are often problematic in the thermal design of devices. Here we report electric voltage generation from heat flowing in an insulator. We reveal that, despite the absence of conduction electrons, the magnetic insulator LaY(2)Fe(5)O(12) can convert a heat flow into a spin voltage. Attached Pt films can then transform this spin voltage into an electric voltage as a result of the inverse spin Hall effect. The experimental results require us to introduce a thermally activated interface spin exchange between LaY(2)Fe(5)O(12) and Pt. Our findings extend the range of potential materials for thermoelectric applications and provide a crucial piece of information for understanding the physics of the spin Seebeck effect.

  12. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  13. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  14. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  15. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  16. Floquet Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushin, Adolfo G.; Gómez-León, Álvaro; Neupert, Titus

    2014-04-01

    We show theoretically that periodically driven systems with short range Hubbard interactions offer a feasible platform to experimentally realize fractional Chern insulator states. We exemplify the procedure for both the driven honeycomb and the square lattice, where we derive the effective steady state band structure of the driven system by using the Floquet theory and subsequently study the interacting system with exact numerical diagonalization. The fractional Chern insulator state equivalent to the 1/3 Laughlin state appears at 7/12 total filling (1/6 filling of the upper band). The state also features spontaneous ferromagnetism and is thus an example of the spontaneous breaking of a continuous symmetry along with a topological phase transition. We discuss light-driven graphene and shaken optical lattices as possible experimental systems that can realize such a state.

  17. Effect of chromia doping of thermal stability of silica fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaplatynsky, I.

    1974-01-01

    Commercial silica fibers of the type being evaluated for reusable surface insulation for reentry vehicles were found to be porous and composed of subfibers. The effect on shrinkage and devitrification of soaking such silica fibers in water, acetic acid, chromium acetate, and chromium nitrate solutions was studied. Felted specimens made of chromia-doped fibers shrunk only about one-half as much as those made of untreated fibers after exposure in air for 4 hours at 1300 C. The devitrification rate of fibers given prolonged soaks in chromium nitrate was as low as that of as-received fibers.

  18. High temperature insulation materials for reradiative thermal protection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes, T. A.

    1972-01-01

    Results are presented of a two year program to evaluate packaged thermal insulations for use under a metallic radiative TPS of a shuttle orbiter vehicle. Evaluations demonstrated their survival for up to 100 mission reuse cycles under shuttle acoustic and thermal loads with peak temperatures of 1000 F, 1800 F, 2000 F, 2200 F and 2500 F. The specimens were composed of low density refractory fiber felts, packaged in thin gage metal foils. In addition, studies were conducted on the venting requirements of the packages, salt spray resistance of the metal foils, and the thermal conductivity of many of the insulations as a function of temperature and ambient air pressure. Data is also presented on the radiant energy transport through insulations, and back-scattering coefficients were experimentally determined as a function of source temperature.

  19. Evaluation of insulated pressure vessels for cryogenic hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Garcia-Villazana, O; Martinez-Frias, J

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents an analytical and experimental evaluation of the applicability of insulated pressure vessels for hydrogen-fueled light-duty vehicles. Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH?) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH2). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The purpose of this work is to verify that commercially available aluminum-lined, fiber- wrapped vessels can be used for cryogenic hydrogen storage. The paper reports on previous and ongoing tests and analyses that have the purpose of improving the system design and assure its safety.

  20. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  1. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  2. Polymer Coating of Carbon Nanotube Fibers for Electric Microcables

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Noe T.; Ochmann, Timothy; Kienzle, Nicholas; Ruff, Brad; Haase, Mark R.; Hopkins, Tracy; Pixley, Sarah; Mast, David; Schulz, Mark J.; Shanov, Vesselin

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered the most promising candidates to replace Cu and Al in a large number of electrical, mechanical and thermal applications. Although most CNT industrial applications require macro and micro size CNT fiber assemblies, several techniques to make conducting CNT fibers, threads, yarns and ropes have been reported to this day, and improvement of their electrical and mechanical conductivity continues. Some electrical applications of these CNT conducting fibers require an insulating layer for electrical insulation and protection against mechanical tearing. Ideally, a flexible insulator such as hydrogenated nitrile butadiene rubber (HNBR) on the CNT fiber can allow fabrication of CNT coils that can be assembled into lightweight, corrosion resistant electrical motors and transformers. HNBR is a largely used commercial polymer that unlike other cable-coating polymers such as polyvinyl chloride (PVC), it provides unique continuous and uniform coating on the CNT fibers. The polymer coated/insulated CNT fibers have a 26.54 μm average diameter—which is approximately four times the diameter of a red blood cell—is produced by a simple dip-coating process. Our results confirm that HNBR in solution creates a few microns uniform insulation and mechanical protection over a CNT fiber that is used as the electrically conducting core. PMID:28344254

  3. Improved DC Gun Insulator

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Neubauer, K.B. Beard, R. Sah, C. Hernandez-Garcia, G. Neil

    2009-05-01

    Many user facilities such as synchrotron light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and have poor reliability, in part because energetic electrons bury themselves in the ceramic, creating a buildup of charge and causing eventual puncture. A novel ceramic manufacturing process is proposed. It will incorporate bulk resistivity in the region where it is needed to bleed off accumulated charge caused by highly energetic electrons. This process will be optimized to provide an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of the HV standoff ceramic cylinder. A computer model will be used to determine the optimum cylinder dimensions and required resistivity gradient for an example RF gun application. A ceramic material example with resistivity gradient appropriate for use as a DC gun insulator will be fabricated by glazing using doping compounds and tested.

  4. Weyl Mott Insulator

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Takahiro; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic Weyl fermion (WF) often appears in the band structure of three dimensional magnetic materials and acts as a source or sink of the Berry curvature, i.e., the (anti-)monopole. It has been believed that the WFs are stable due to their topological indices except when two Weyl fermions of opposite chiralities annihilate pairwise. Here, we theoretically show for a model including the electron-electron interaction that the Mott gap opens for each WF without violating the topological stability, leading to a topological Mott insulator dubbed Weyl Mott insulator (WMI). This WMI is characterized by several novel features such as (i) energy gaps in the angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) and the optical conductivity, (ii) the nonvanishing Hall conductance, and (iii) the Fermi arc on the surface with the penetration depth diverging as approaching to the momentum at which the Weyl point is projected. Experimental detection of the WMI by distinguishing from conventional Mott insulators is discussed with possible relevance to pyrochlore iridates. PMID:26822023

  5. Nearly Seamless Vacuum-Insulated Boxes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stepanian, Christopher J.; Ou, Danny; Hu, Xiangjun

    2010-01-01

    A design concept, and a fabrication process that would implement the design concept, have been proposed for nearly seamless vacuum-insulated boxes that could be the main structural components of a variety of controlled-temperature containers, including common household refrigerators and insulating containers for shipping foods. In a typical case, a vacuum-insulated box would be shaped like a rectangular parallelepiped conventional refrigerator box having five fully closed sides and a hinged door on the sixth side. Although it is possible to construct the five-closed-side portion of the box as an assembly of five unitary vacuum-insulated panels, it is not desirable to do so because the relatively high thermal conductances of the seams between the panels would contribute significant amounts of heat leakage, relative to the leakage through the panels themselves. In contrast, the proposal would make it possible to reduce heat leakage by constructing the five-closed-side portion of the box plus the stationary portion (if any) of the sixth side as a single, seamless unit; the only remaining seam would be the edge seal around the door. The basic cross-sectional configuration of each side of a vacuum-insulated box according to the proposal would be that of a conventional vacuum-insulated panel: a low-density, porous core material filling a partially evacuated space between face sheets. However, neither the face sheets nor the core would be conventional. The face sheets would be opposite sides of a vacuum bag. The core material would be a flexible polymer-modified silica aerogel of the type described in Silica/Polymer and Silica/Polymer/Fiber Composite Aero - gels (MSC-23736) in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. As noted in that article, the stiffness of this core material against compression is greater than that of prior aerogels. This is an important advantage because it translates to greater retention of thickness and, hence, of insulation performance when pressure is

  6. Insulator - Insulator Contact Charging as a Function of Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Calle, C. I.

    2006-01-01

    Metal - metal and metal - insulator contact or triboelectric charging are well known phenomena with good theoretical understanding of the charge exchange mechanism. However, insulator - insulator charging is not as well understood. Theoretical and experimental research has been performed that shows that the surface charge on an insulator after triboelectric charging with another insulator is rapidly dissipated with lowered atmospheric pressure. This pressure discharge is consistent with surface ions being evaporated off the surface once their vapor pressure is attained. A two-phase equilibrium model based on an ideal gas of singly charged ions in equilibrium with a submonolayer adsorbed film was developed to describe the pressure dependence of the surface charge on an insulator. The resulting charge density equation is an electrostatic version of the Langmuir isotherm.

  7. Heat Transfer Modeling for Rigid High-Temperature Fibrous Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Cunnington, George R.; Knutson, Jeffrey R.

    2012-01-01

    Combined radiation and conduction heat transfer through a high-temperature, high-porosity, rigid multiple-fiber fibrous insulation was modeled using a thermal model previously used to model heat transfer in flexible single-fiber fibrous insulation. The rigid insulation studied was alumina enhanced thermal barrier (AETB) at densities between 130 and 260 kilograms per cubic meter. The model consists of using the diffusion approximation for radiation heat transfer, a semi-empirical solid conduction model, and a standard gas conduction model. The relevant parameters needed for the heat transfer model were estimated from steady-state thermal measurements in nitrogen gas at various temperatures and environmental pressures. The heat transfer modeling methodology was evaluated by comparison with standard thermal conductivity measurements, and steady-state thermal measurements in helium and carbon dioxide gases. The heat transfer model is applicable over the temperature range of 300 to 1360 K, pressure range of 0.133 to 101.3 x 10(exp 3) Pa, and over the insulation density range of 130 to 260 kilograms per cubic meter in various gaseous environments.

  8. Behavior of Insulated Carbon-FRP-Strengthened RC Beams Exposed to Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayin, B.

    2014-09-01

    There are two main approaches to improving the fire resistance of fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) systems. While the most common method is to protect or insulate the FRP system, an other way is to use fibers and resins with a better fire performance. This paper presents a numerical investigation into the five protection behavior of insulated carbon-fiber-reinforced-polymer (CFRP)-strengthened reinforced concrete (RC) beams. The effects of external loading and thermal expansion of materials at elevated temperatures are taken into consideration in a finite-element model. The validity of the numerical model is demonstrated with results from an existing experimental study on insulated CFRP-strengthened RC beams. Conclusions of this investigation are employed to predict the structural behavior of CFRP-strengthened concrete structures.

  9. Repetitively pulsed vacuum insulator flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, J.W.; Buttram, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the flashover strength of various vacuum insulators under conditions of repetitive pulsing. The pulse duration was 30 ns, and the thickness of a typical insulator sample was 1.8 cm. Data were taken for 45 insulators from five different materials. An insulator was subjected to an extended series of pulses at a given repetition rate and field. If flashover was not detected, the field level was increased and the sequence repeated. At rates up to 50 pulses per second, there was no apparent dependence of flashover field on rate. In addition, some ''single shot'' data were taken, including various modifications of the geometries and surface textures of the insulators. Only two to the modifications increased the flashover strength significantly over that of a 45 sample: (1) annealing some plastics (roughly a 35% increase), and (2) extending the insulator to cover the surfaces of both electrodes (an increase of nearly a factor of two).

  10. PPO foam - Liquid hydrogen insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, G. B.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive fabrication and test program is described which has demonstrated the integrity of PPO (polyphenylene oxide) foam as an internal insulation. PPO is shown to be capable of withstanding multiple reuses on such cryogenic-fueled launch vehicles as the Space Shuttle. The major advantages of this internal insulation is the absence of a pressure load on the insulation, reduced handling damage, and minimization of cyclic thermal stresses by a 'warm' bond line.

  11. Solid rocket motor internal insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twichell, S. E. (Editor); Keller, R. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Internal insulation in a solid rocket motor is defined as a layer of heat barrier material placed between the internal surface of the case propellant. The primary purpose is to prevent the case from reaching temperatures that endanger its structural integrity. Secondary functions of the insulation are listed and guidelines for avoiding critical problems in the development of internal insulation for rocket motors are presented.

  12. High Gradient Multilayer Insulator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S E; Caporaso, G J; Nunnally, W C; Sanders, D M; Watson, J A; Krogh, M L; Anderson, H U

    2004-06-03

    We are investigating a novel insulator concept that involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods less than 1 mm. These structures perform 1.5 to 4 times better than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We survey our ongoing studies investigating the performance under long pulse electron beam, short pulse, and full reversing conditions.

  13. Magnetic insulation for plasma propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Dora E.

    1990-01-01

    The design parameters of effective magnetic insulation for plasma engines are discussed. An experimental model used to demonstrate the process of plasma acceleration and magnetic insulation is considered which consists of a copper strap that is wound around a glass tube and connected to a capacitor. In order to adequately model the magnetic insulation mechanisms, a computer algorithm is developed. Plasma engines, with their efficient utilization of the propellant mass, are expected to provide the next-generation advanced propulsion systems.

  14. Insulating Cryogenic Pipes With Frost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, J. G.; Bova, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Crystallized water vapor fills voids in pipe insulation. Small, carefully controlled amount of water vapor introduced into dry nitrogen gas before it enters aft fuselage. Vapor freezes on pipes, filling cracks in insulation. Ice prevents gaseous nitrogen from condensing on pipes and dripping on structure, in addition to helping to insulate all parts. Industrial applications include large refrigeration plants or facilities that use cryogenic liquids.

  15. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOEpatents

    Vanecek, David L.; Pike, Chester D.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly (10) having a tubular insulator (15) extending between the ground plane ring (16) and the high voltage ring (30). The insulator (15) is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring (16) to the high voltage ring (30), producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall (27) of the insulator (15) to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly (10).

  16. Process for fabrication of stabilized aluminum phosphate fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormiston, T. J.; Tanzilli, R. A.

    1974-01-01

    Ceramic possesses ideal property combination of high refractoriness and low thermal expansion. Fiber exceeds performance of fused silica fibers at high temperatures. It shrinks less, does not devitrify into unstable cristobalite structure, and is potentially less sensitive to impurities. Might be used for high-temperature insulation, fire protection, composites, and refractories.

  17. Material Properties for Fiber-Reinforced Silica Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan; Rouanet, Stephane; Moses, John; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Ceramic fiber-reinforced silica aerogels are novel materials for high performance insulation, including thermal protection materials. Experimental data are presented for the thermal and mechanical properties, showing the trends exhibited over a range of fiber loadings and silica aerogel densities. Test results are compared to that of unreinforced bulk aerogels.

  18. Effective Thermal Conductivity of High Temperature Insulations for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    1999-01-01

    An experimental apparatus was designed to measure the effective thermal conductivity of various high temperature insulations subject to large temperature gradients representative of typical launch vehicle re-entry aerodynamic heating conditions. The insulation sample cold side was maintained around room temperature, while the hot side was heated to temperatures as high as 1800 degrees Fahrenheit. The environmental pressure was varied from 0.0001 to 760 torr. All the measurements were performed in a dry gaseous nitrogen environment. The effective thermal conductivity of Saffil, Q-Fiber felt, Cerachrome, and three multi-layer insulation configurations were measured.

  19. Tests of insulation systems for Nb3Sn wind and react coils

    SciTech Connect

    Bossert, R.; Ambrosio, G; Andreev, N.; Whitson, G.; Zlobin, A.; /Fermilab

    2007-07-01

    Tests were performed to assess the viability of several cable insulation systems for use in Nb{sub 3}Sn accelerator magnets. Insulated stacks of cables were subjected to reaction cycles commonly used for Nb{sub 3}Sn coils. After reaction and epoxy impregnation, current leakage between turns was measured at pressures up to 180 MPa and turn-to-turn potentials up to 500V. Systems consisting of S-2 glass, ceramic fiber, and E-glass were tested. Several methods of applying the insulation were incorporated, including sleeves and various spiral wrapped configurations. Methods of sample preparation and testing are described and results are reported.

  20. Tests of Insulation Systems for Nb3SN Wind and React Coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossert, R.; Ambrosio, G.; Andreev, N.; Whitson, G.; Zlobin, A.

    2008-03-01

    Tests were performed to assess the viability of several cable insulation systems for use in Nb3Sn accelerator magnets. Insulated stacks of cables were subjected to reaction cycles commonly used for Nb3Sn coils. After reaction and epoxy impregnation, current leakage between turns was measured at pressures up to 180 MPa and turn-to-turn potentials up to 500 V. Systems consisting of S-2 glass, ceramic fiber, and E-glass were tested. Several methods of applying the insulation were incorporated, including sleeves and various spiral wrapped configurations. Methods of sample preparation and testing are described and results are reported.

  1. Electrical Conductivity in Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Anil Kumar

    2003-03-01

    ABSTRACT In insulating solid(Plastic Sheet)of 0.73mm thickness, the conduction process was ohmic at low D.C. electric feilds, but the feild strength increased the conductivity became feild dependent at high feilds and it exhibited some conductivity and the variation in conduction current was none-ohmic.The mechanism of electron transfer between two metallic electrodes separated by insulating material has received considerable attention. The electron transfer current was studied on 0.73mm plastic sheet and(I-V),(log I-log V),(log J-E^1/2)and (log o- 1/T) relations have been studied and the value of slope,electronic dielectric constant and activation energy for nature of conduction mechanism and process have been determined.The electrical conductivity measurements were carried out at room temperature (32.5 celcius)under high D.C. electric feilds of the order of 10^6 volt/meter.The sample of insulator(plastic sheet) was sandwiched between the aluminium electrodes of designed experimental cell,The effect of very high varying feilds at 32.5 celcius temperature,the electrical conduction has been proposed on the data obtained.The non-ohmic behavior in the sample seemed to start at an electric feild 3x10^6 volt/meter.In this case on data obtained it was concluded that "SCHOTTKY EMISSION MECHANISM" has been proposed. The activation energy was calculated by plotting(log o-1/T)characterstics at running temperature and it was found 0.325ev which is less than 1.0,It confirms predominance of Electronic Conduction. I=current in ampere V=volt T=temperature O=conductivity

  2. Fiber biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber cells arising from seed epidermis is the most important agricultural textile commodity in the world. To produce fully mature fibers, approximately two months of fiber developmental process are required. The timing of four distinctive fiber development stages consisting of initiation, ...

  3. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  4. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  5. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Bich, George J.; Gupta, Tapan K.

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  6. Fibrous-Ceramic/Aerogel Composite Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan M.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2004-01-01

    Fibrous-ceramic/aerogel composite tiles have been invented to afford combinations of thermal-insulation and mechanical properties superior to those attainable by making tiles of fibrous ceramics alone or aerogels alone. These lightweight tiles can be tailored to a variety of applications that range from insulating cryogenic tanks to protecting spacecraft against re-entry heating. The advantages and disadvantages of fibrous ceramics and aerogels can be summarized as follows: Tiles made of ceramic fibers are known for mechanical strength, toughness, and machinability. Fibrous ceramic tiles are highly effective as thermal insulators in a vacuum. However, undesirably, the porosity of these materials makes them permeable by gases, so that in the presence of air or other gases, convection and gas-phase conduction contribute to the effective thermal conductivity of the tiles. Other disadvantages of the porosity and permeability of fibrous ceramic tiles arise because gases (e.g., water vapor or cryogenic gases) can condense in pores. This condensation contributes to weight, and in the case of cryogenic systems, the heat of condensation undesirably adds to the heat flowing to the objects that one seeks to keep cold. Moreover, there is a risk of explosion associated with vaporization of previously condensed gas upon reheating. Aerogels offer low permeability, low density, and low thermal conductivity, but are mechanically fragile. The basic idea of the present invention is to exploit the best features of fibrous ceramic tiles and aerogels. In a composite tile according to the invention, the fibrous ceramic serves as a matrix that mechanically supports the aerogel, while the aerogel serves as a low-conductivity, low-permeability filling that closes what would otherwise be the open pores of the fibrous ceramic. Because the aerogel eliminates or at least suppresses permeation by gas, gas-phase conduction, and convection, the thermal conductivity of such a composite even at

  7. Washing Off Polyurethane Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Fogel, Irving

    1990-01-01

    Jet of hot water removes material quickly and safely. Simple, environmentally sound technique found to remove polyurethane foam insulation from metal parts. Developed for (but not limited to) use during rebuilding of fuel system of Space Shuttle main engine, during which insulation must be removed for penetrant inspection of metal parts.

  8. Plastic Materials for Insulating Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, S. F.; Grossman, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the production and use of polymer materials as thermal insulators. Lists several materials that provide varying degrees of insulation. Describes the production of polymer foam and focuses on the major applications of polystyrene foam, polyurethane foam, and polyisocyanurate foam. (TW)

  9. Smaller insulators handle higher voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, G.

    1997-10-01

    Researcher at Lawrence Livermore have designed the Ultra High Gradient Insulator, a device that can reliably withstand electrical voltages four times greater than before. The Ultra-HGI is designed with alternating layers which divide voltages so finely that the chances of failure are small, and when they do occur, they are confined to a very small portion of the insulator.

  10. Tailorable Advanced Blanket Insulation (TABI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M.; Goldstein, Howard E.

    1987-01-01

    Single layer and multilayer insulating blankets for high-temperature service fabricated without sewing. TABI woven fabric made of aluminoborosilicate. Triangular-cross-section flutes of core filled with silica batting. Flexible blanket formed into curved shapes, providing high-temperature and high-heat-flux insulation.

  11. The birth of topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joel E

    2010-03-11

    Certain insulators have exotic metallic states on their surfaces. These states are formed by topological effects that also render the electrons travelling on such surfaces insensitive to scattering by impurities. Such topological insulators may provide new routes to generating novel phases and particles, possibly finding uses in technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing.

  12. Recirculating sprayer for fiber-filled paints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, R. K.

    1980-01-01

    Recirculating paint sprayer applies spray of coarse filler in highly volatile solvent. Sprayer was developed for applying insulation material containing epxoy resin, glass fibers, and inert fillers suspended in chlorinated solvents. Sprayer resists abrasive action of fiberglass filler and chemical activity of solvent. Pump and position ensure more uniform pressure at spray gun without backpressure regulator, which tended to clog in old sprayer.

  13. Hybrid Multifoil Aerogel Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Paik, Jong-Ah; Jones, Steven; Nesmith, Bill

    2008-01-01

    This innovation blends the merits of multifoil insulation (MFI) with aerogel-based insulation to develop a highly versatile, ultra-low thermally conductive material called hybrid multifoil aerogel thermal insulation (HyMATI). The density of the opacified aerogel is 240 mg/cm3 and has thermal conductivity in the 20 mW/mK range in high vacuum and 25 mW/mK in 1 atmosphere of gas (such as argon) up to 800 C. It is stable up to 1,000 C. This is equal to commercially available high-temperature thermal insulation. The thermal conductivity of the aerogel is 36 percent lower compared to several commercially available insulations when tested in 1 atmosphere of argon gas up to 800 C.

  14. Two classes of Mott insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dung-Hai; Kivelson, Steven A.

    2003-01-01

    There are two classes of Mott insulators in nature, distinguished by their responses to weak doping. With increasing chemical potential, type I Mott insulators undergo a first order phase transition from the undoped to the doped phase. In the presence of long-range Coulomb interactions, this leads to an inhomogeneous state exhibiting “micro-phase separation.” In contrast, in type II Mott insulators charges go in continuously above a critical chemical potential. We show that if the insulating state has a broken symmetry, this increases the likelihood that it will be type I. There exists a close analogy between these two types of Mott insulators and the familiar type I and type II superconductors.

  15. Topological Insulators from Electronic Superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Yusuke; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of realizing topological insulators by the spontaneous formation of electronic superstructures is theoretically investigated in a minimal two-orbital model including both the spin-orbit coupling and electron correlations on a triangular lattice. Using the mean-field approximation, we show that the model exhibits several different types of charge-ordered insulators, where the charge disproportionation forms a honeycomb or kagome superstructure. We find that the charge-ordered insulators in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling can be topological insulators showing quantized spin Hall conductivity. Their band gap is dependent on electron correlations as well as the spin-orbit coupling, and even vanishes while showing the massless Dirac dispersion at the transition to a trivial charge-ordered insulator. Our results suggest a new route to realize and control topological states of quantum matter by the interplay between the spin-orbit coupling and electron correlations.

  16. Impacting device for testing insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, J. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An electro-mechanical impacting device for testing the bonding of foam insulation to metal is descirbed. The device lightly impacts foam insulation attached to metal to determine whether the insulation is properly bonded to the metal and to determine the quality of the bond. A force measuring device, preferably a load cell mounted on the impacting device, measures the force of the impact and the duration of the time the hammer head is actually in contact with the insulation. The impactor is designed in the form of a handgun having a driving spring which can propel a plunger forward to cause a hammer head to impact the insulation. The device utilizes a trigger mechanism which provides precise adjustements, allowing fireproof operation.

  17. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulating Concrete Forms

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project investigated insulating concrete forms—rigid foam, hollow walls that are filled with concrete for highly insulated, hurricane-resistant construction.

  18. Acoustical properties of nonwoven fiber network structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascan, Mevlut

    Sound insulation is one of the most important issues for the automotive and building industries. Because they are porous fibrous structures, textile materials can be used as sound insulating and sound absorbing materials. Very high-density materials such as steel can insulate sound very effectively but these rigid materials reflect most of the sound back to the environment, causing sound pollution. Additionally, because high-density, rigid materials are also heavy and high cost, they cannot be used for sound insulation for the automotive and building industries. Nonwoven materials are more suitable for these industries, and they can also absorb sound in order to decrease sound pollution in the environment. Therefore, nonwoven materials are one of the most important materials for sound insulation and absorption applications materials. Insulation and absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics depend on fiber geometry and fiber arrangement within the fabric structure. Because of their complex structure, it is very difficult to define the microstructure of nonwovens. The structure of nonwovens only has fibers and voids that are filled by air. Because of the complexity of fiber-void geometry, there is still not a very accurate theory or model that defines the structural arrangement. A considerable amount of modeling has been reported in literature [1--19], but most models are not accurate due to the assumptions made. Voids that are covered by fibers are called pores in nonwoven structures and their geometry is very important, especially for the absorption properties of nonwovens. In order to define the sound absorption properties of nonwoven fabrics, individual pore structure and the number of pores per unit thickness of the fabric should be determined. In this research, instead of trying to define pores, the properties of the fibers are investigated and the number of fibers per volume of fabric is taken as a parameter in the theory. Then the effect of the nonwoven

  19. Development of tailorable advanced blanket insulation for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calamito, Dominic P.

    1987-01-01

    Two items of Tailorable Advanced Blanket Insulation (TABI) for Advanced Space Transportation Systems were produced. The first consisted of flat panels made from integrally woven, 3-D fluted core having parallel fabric faces and connecting ribs of Nicalon silicon carbide yarns. The triangular cross section of the flutes were filled with mandrels of processed Q-Fiber Felt. Forty panels were prepared with only minimal problems, mostly resulting from the unavailability of insulation with the proper density. Rigidizing the fluted fabric prior to inserting the insulation reduced the production time. The procedures for producing the fabric, insulation mandrels, and TABI panels are described. The second item was an effort to determine the feasibility of producing contoured TABI shapes from gores cut from flat, insulated fluted core panels. Two gores of integrally woven fluted core and single ply fabric (ICAS) were insulated and joined into a large spherical shape employing a tadpole insulator at the mating edges. The fluted core segment of each ICAS consisted of an Astroquartz face fabric and Nicalon face and rib fabrics, while the single ply fabric segment was Nicalon. Further development will be required. The success of fabricating this assembly indicates that this concept may be feasible for certain types of space insulation requirements. The procedures developed for weaving the ICAS, joining the gores, and coating certain areas of the fabrics are presented.

  20. Metallization of electronic insulators

    DOEpatents

    Gottesfeld, Shimshon; Uribe, Francisco A.

    1994-01-01

    An electroplated element is formed to include an insulating substrate, a conducting polymer polymerized in situ on the substrate, and a metal layer deposited on the conducting polymer. In one application a circuit board is formed by polymerizing pyrrole on an epoxy-fiberglass substrate in a single step process and then electrodepositing a metal over the resulting polypyrrole polymer. No chemical deposition of the metal is required prior to electroplating and the resulting layer of substrate-polymer-metal has excellent adhesion characteristics. The metal deposition is surprisingly smooth and uniform over the relatively high resistance film of polypyrrole. A continuous manufacturing process is obtained by filtering the solution between successive substrates to remove polymer formed in the solution, by maintaining the solution oxidizing potential within selected limits, and by adding a strong oxidant, such as KMnO.sub.4 at periodic intervals to maintain a low sheet resistivity in the resulting conducting polymer film.

  1. Quantum Mechanics in Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Aeppli, G.

    2009-08-20

    Atomic physics is undergoing a large revival because of the possibility of trapping and cooling ions and atoms both for individual quantum control as well as collective quantum states, such as Bose-Einstein condensates. The present lectures start from the 'atomic' physics of isolated atoms in semiconductors and insulators and proceed to coupling them together to yield magnets undergoing quantum phase transitions as well as displaying novel quantum states with no classical analogs. The lectures are based on: G.-Y. Xu et al., Science 317, 1049-1052 (2007); G. Aeppli, P. Warburton, C. Renner, BT Technology Journal, 24, 163-169 (2006); H. M. Ronnow et al., Science 308, 392-395 (2005) and N. Q. Vinh et al., PNAS 105, 10649-10653 (2008).

  2. SEALED INSULATOR BUSHING

    DOEpatents

    Carmichael, H.

    1952-11-11

    The manufacture of electrode insulators that are mechanically strong, shock-proof, vacuum tight, and are capable of withstanding gas pressures of many atmospheres under intense neutron bombardment, such as may be needed in an ionization chamber, is described. The ansulator comprises a bolt within a quartz tube, surrounded by a bushing held in place by two quartz rings, and tightened to a pressure of 1,000 pounds per square inch by a nut and washer. Quartz is the superior material to meet these conditions, however, to withstand this pressure the quartz must be fire polished, lapped to form smooth and parallel surfaces, and again fire polished to form an extremely smooth and fracture resistant mating surface.

  3. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOEpatents

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  4. Boron nitride insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Jr., Chester S.; Cavin, O. Burl; McCulloch, Reginald W.; Clark, David L.

    1978-01-01

    High temperature BN-insulated heaters for use as fuel pin simulators in reactor thermal hydraulic test facility studies comprise a cylindrical housing and a concentric heating element disposed within the housing and spaced apart from the housing to define an annular region therebetween. The annular region contains BN for providing electrical resistance and thermal conductivity between the housing and the heating element. The fabrication method of this invention comprises the steps of cold pressing BN powder at a pressure of 20 to 80,000 psig and a dwell time of at least 0.1-3 seconds to provide hollow cylindrical preforms of suitable dimensions for insertion into the annular region, the BN powder having a tap density of about 0.6-1.1 g/cm.sup.3 and an orientation ratio of at least about 100/3.5. The preforms are inserted into the annular region and crushed in place.

  5. Insulated face brick

    SciTech Connect

    Cromrich, J.; Cromrich, L.B.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a method for forming insulated brick intended solely for use in building walls and having superior insulation qualities and lighter weight consonant with the load bearing capabilities of building bricks and the appearance of facing brick. It comprises dry mixing two parts of vermiculite and one part of brick clay, thereby forming a dry mixture having a vermiculite to clay ratio of approximately two-to-one by volume; adding water to the dry mixture and mixing, so that a substantially dry admixture having expanded vermiculite and brick clay is formed; forming a facing layer solely from brick clay; molding and compressing the substantially dry admixture, so as to form a generally rectangular main body layer having parallel top and bottom faces, a pair of parallel side faces and a pair of parallel end faces, respectively, the top and bottom faces being substantially larger in area than the respective side faces, and the side faces being substantially larger in area than the respective end faces, the body layer further having at least one bore formed therein, the bore running from the top face to the bottom face perpendicularly thereto and substantially parallel to the side surfaces thereof, the bore being substantially centrally disposed and wherein the facing layer is disposed on one of the side surfaces of the body portion; curing the molded admixture having the facing layer disposed thereon; whereby a cured brick is formed; and firing the cured brick and the facing layer disposed thereon, whereby an integral brick is formed having top and bottom faces of the brick which are entirely devoid of facing layers, wherein the brick has the desired load bearing capability substantially between its top and bottom faces, whereby the outer facing layer only provides the desired appearance and weather resistance, and further whereby the weight of the brick is substantially reduced.

  6. Chemical components of shredded paper insulation: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Kelman, B J; Swenson, L J; Uppala, L V; Cohen, J M; Millette, J R; Mueller, W F

    1999-03-01

    We conducted an evaluation of shredded paper insulation to identify potentially toxic components. The study was to provide a preliminary characterization of a few samples of insulation currently in use. The following samples were analyzed: previously produced insulation (PPI) containing fire retardants, shredded recycled paper (PPI feedstock), freshly produced insulation (FPI), and insulation which had been installed in a residence (II). Volatile constituents were analyzed by GC-MS from headspace air of samples held at room temperature or heated to 90 degrees C. Extractable constituents were sampled by extracting with methylene chloride, and analyzing by GC-MS. Formaldehyde analysis was done according to EPA Method TO11. Headspace air at room temperature contained no detectable quantities of volatile constituents for any sample measured. In headspace air at 90 degrees C, only PPI contained traces of aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and higher aldehydes, and FPI traces of toluene. Extracts of PPI contained traces of octadecadienoic acid methyl ester and aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons and higher aldehydes. Extracts of PPI feedstock contained traces of a substituted cyclohexenecarboxylic acid. FPI contained extractable diethyl phthalate (30-50 micrograms/g). Extracts of II contained traces of methyl palmitate, an octadecenoic acid methyl ester, and a phthalate plasticizer. No formaldehyde was detected. PPI was composed of approximately 98 percent paper fiber and 2 percent pre-gelatinized starch. PPI samples agglomerated together with less than 0.01 percent separating from clumps as fine dust. Boron and sodium were expected and confirmed because they were added to PPI and FPI as fire retardants. Chromium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, phosphorus, and silicon were present at detectable concentrations. Study calculations indicate that an occupant would have to completely consume all the fine particles produced from 3.3 kg of insulation per day to

  7. Superconductivity-related insulating behavior.

    PubMed

    Sambandamurthy, G; Engel, L W; Johansson, A; Shahar, D

    2004-03-12

    We present the results of an experimental study of superconducting, disordered, thin films of amorphous indium oxide. These films can be driven from the superconducting phase to a reentrant insulating state by the application of a perpendicular magnetic field (B). We find that the high-B insulator exhibits activated transport with a characteristic temperature, TI. TI has a maximum value (TpI) that is close to the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) at B=0, suggesting a possible relation between the conduction mechanisms in the superconducting and insulating phases. Tp(I) and Tc display opposite dependences on the disorder strength.

  8. Fiber Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalle, Leona

    1976-01-01

    Describes a course in fiber techniques, which covers design methods involving fibers and fabric, that students in the Art Department at Sleeping Giant Junior High School had the opportunity to learn. (Author/RK)

  9. Silicon-on-insulator integrated optic transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Robin J.

    1997-04-01

    Silicon-on-insulator offers the chance to produce integrated optical `circuits' with properties which are appropriate even for demanding applications. Developments in SOI waveguide technology have been combined with the well- developed micro-engineering properties of silicon for use in fields such as telecommunication and sensors. An integrated optical transceiver is selected as an example with which to describe the features of the technology. The design will be used to illustrate the benefits brought by the use of SOI waveguide elements. These functional `building blocks' include alignment features, integrated mode-matching waveguide tapers, tap-off couplers and low back-reflection interfaces. Further possible integrated elements are described, including WDMs, as relevant to optical transceiver technology. The economic and technical drivers and difficulties surrounding the convergence of electrical, CMOS-like and optical SOI technologies are also considered. There is a spreading acceptance that low-cost motherboard technology is needed, to realize volume production of optical transceivers. A range of materials solutions have been reported. The relative merits of SOI technology are discussed. Motherboard techniques provide a platform for precise optical alignment between components. The SOI approach can deliver self-aligned waveguide and hybridization features--such as fiber attach or laser diode connections--and includes the ability to adapt to laser diode and optical fiber near-field characteristics.

  10. High temperature thermal insulating composite

    DOEpatents

    Brassell, Gilbert W.; Lewis, Jr., John

    1983-01-01

    A composite contains in one region graphite flakes and refractory fibers in arbonized polymeric resin and in an adjacent region a gradually diminishing weight proportion of graphite flakes, refractory fibers, and the same carbonized resin.

  11. Dietary Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble ... types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and ...

  12. Synthesis, electrical and thermal conductivities, and potential applications of graphite fluoride fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Long, Martin; Stahl, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Graphite fluoride fibers can be produced by fluorinating pristine or intercalated graphite fibers. The higher the degree of graphitization of the fibers, the higher the temperature needed to reach the same degree of fluorination. Structural damage during high temperature fluorination can be reduced or eliminated by pretreating the fibers with bromine and/or fluorine. The electrical resistivity of the fibers was in the 0.01 to 10 to the 11th ohm-cm range. The thermal conductivity of these fibers ranged from 5 to 75 W/m-K, which is much larger than the thermal conductivity of glass (1.1 W/m-K), the commonly used fiber in epoxy composites. A composite made from graphite fluoride fibers and epoxy or PTFE may be highly thermally conducting and electrically insulating or semiconducting. The electrically insulating product may be used as heat sinks for electrical or electronic instruments.

  13. Polyimide/Glass Composite High-Temperature Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pater, Ruth H.; Vasquez, Peter; Chatlin, Richard L.; Smith, Donald L.; Skalski, Thomas J.; Johnson, Gary S.; Chu, Sang-Hyon

    2009-01-01

    Lightweight composites of RP46 polyimide and glass fibers have been found to be useful as extraordinarily fire-resistant electrical-insulation materials. RP46 is a polyimide of the polymerization of monomeric reactants (PMR) type, developed by NASA Langley Research Center. RP46 has properties that make it attractive for use in electrical insulation at high temperatures. These properties include high-temperature resistance, low relative permittivity, low dissipation factor, outstanding mechanical properties, and excellent resistance to moisture and chemicals. Moreover, RP46 contains no halogen or other toxic materials and when burned it does not produce toxic fume or gaseous materials. The U. S. Navy has been seeking lightweight, high-temperature-resistant electrical-insulation materials in a program directed toward reducing fire hazards and weights in ship electrical systems. To satisfy the requirements of this program, an electrical-insulation material must withstand a 3-hour gas-flame test at 1,600 F (about 871 C). Prior to the development reported here, RP46 was rated for use at temperatures from -150 to +700 F (about -101 to 371 C), and no polymeric product - not even RP46 - was expected to withstand the Navy 3-hour gas-flame test.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF FLEXIBLE POLYMERS AS THERMAL INSULATION IN SOLID-PROPELLANT ROCKET MOTORS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    insulation in solid-propellant rocket motors. During the report period, efforts were concentrated on: (1) the internal flexibilization of epoxy, melamine ...and furan resins , (2) the investigation of other fillers besides asbestos fibers, (3) mechanical testing of aged, externally plasticized epoxy resins ...4) oxyacetylene torch testing of filled epoxy resins , and (5) static motor testing of filled flexible phenolic resins . (Author)

  15. Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chu-Hsuan; Liu, Chee Wee

    2010-01-01

    The major radiation of the Sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III–V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows. PMID:22163382

  16. Light-weight ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, ceramic insulation such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes may contain also an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gel. The siloxane gel is dried at ambient pressures to form a siloxane ceramic precursor without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursor is subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation, can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C. and is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  17. Measure Guideline: Basement Insulation Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and is intended to be a practical resources for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  18. Evaluation of thermal insulation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbers, O. J.; Conti, J. C.; Mcgee, J. V.; Mcpherson, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    Data was obtained on silicone-bonded fiberglass, isocyanurate foam, and two dozen other insulators. Materials were selected to withstand heat sterilization, outer space, and the Martian atmosphere. Significant environmental parameters were vibration, landing shock, and launch venting.

  19. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOEpatents

    Forsyth, Eric B.; Muller, Albert C.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.

  20. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  1. Lung function in insulation workers.

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, J; Netterstrøm, B; Wolff, C

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of working with modern insulation materials (rock and glass wool), the members of the Copenhagen Union of Insulation Workers were invited to participate in a study based on a health examination that included lung function tests. Three hundred and forty men (74%) agreed to participate, and 166 bus drivers served as the control group. Age distribution, height, and smoking habits were similar in the two groups. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were used as tests for lung function. There were no differences in FVC between the study and control groups, but the insulation workers had significantly lower values of FEV1 (mean 2.51) compared with the controls (mean 3.4 1), independent of smoking habits. Six years before the present study, 114 of the insulation workers participated in a similar study, and eight years after the initial study, the lung function of 59 of the bus drivers was tested. The decline in FVC in insulation workers who smoked was significantly higher (7.7 cl/year) than in bus drivers who smoked (3.1 cl/year); the decline in FEV1 was significantly higher in insulation workers independent of smoking habits (17.0 cl/year v 2.9 cl/year). Self assessed former exposure to asbestos was not associated with lung function in insulation workers. The study concludes that working with modern insulation materials is associated with increased risk of developing obstructive lung disease. PMID:8457492

  2. Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Malecha, Richard F.; Chilenskas, Albert A.

    1994-01-01

    A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communcation with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket.

  3. Multilayer high performance insulation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A number of tests are required to evaluate both multilayer high performance insulation samples and the materials that comprise them. Some of the techniques and tests being employed for these evaluations and some of the results obtained from thermal conductivity tests, outgassing studies, effect of pressure on layer density tests, hypervelocity impact tests, and a multilayer high performance insulation ambient storage program at the Kennedy Space Center are presented.

  4. MAS Bulletin. Microtherm Thermal Insulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-03

    EUROPEAN OFFICE Box 39, FPO New York 0951P .0700 Phone (AV)235.ൕjLomm) 409-4131 MASB 16-89 11 1 E, March 1989 MICROTHERM THERMAL INSULAT 00T...Background. Microtherm insulation is being marketed by Figure 1 illustrates the relative differenbeibetween Microtherm Micropore Insulation, Ltd., of Wirral...tivity properties. Figure 2 displays thermal conductivity compari- facturer has introduced a new product - Microtherm MPS, a sons between Microtherm MPS

  5. Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

    1994-09-20

    A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

  6. Magnetically insulated opening switch research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, M. W.; Kraft, R.

    1987-01-01

    We examine the feasibility of an opening switch concept based on magnetic insulation in a coaxial thermionic diode. It is found that the impedance ratio between closed and open states of the diode is marginal for efficient energy transfer via this type of switch. The open, or insulated state of the diode is characterized by current leakage across the magnetic field which is associated with the presence of plasma waves.

  7. Advances in cryogenic foam insulations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.; Watts, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a discretely oriented thread-reinforced polyurethane foam thermal insulation system for liquid hydrogen fuel tanks. The 3-D foam and glass liner composite is designed to be adhesively bonded to the inside surface of the tank wall and to be in direct contact with liquid hydrogen. All elements of this insulation composite are capable of sustaining the loads and environmental conditions imposed by testing under simulated Space Shuttle vehicle requirements at temperatures between -423 and +350 F.

  8. Advanced silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godbey, D.; Hughes, H.; Kub, F.

    1991-01-01

    Undoped, thin-layer silicon-on-insulator was fabricated using wafer bonding and selective etching techniques employing a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown Si0.7Ge0.3 layer as an etch stop. Defect free, undoped 200-350 nm silicon layers over silicon dioxide are routinely fabricated using this procedure. A new selective silicon-germanium etch was developed that significantly improves the ease of fabrication of the bond and etch back silicon insulator (BESOI) material.

  9. Model Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2016-05-01

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators—Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Zk parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν =k /(C +1 ) and (ii) nematic states at ν =k /2 , where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k +1 ) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments.

  10. High Voltage Insulation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherb, V.; Rogalla, K.; Gollor, M.

    2008-09-01

    In preparation of new Electronic Power Conditioners (EPC's) for Travelling Wave Tub Amplifiers (TWTA's) on telecom satellites a study for the development of new high voltage insulation technology is performed. The initiative is mandatory to allow compact designs and to enable higher operating voltages. In a first task a market analysis was performed, comparing different materials with respect to their properties and processes. A hierarchy of selection criteria was established and finally five material candidates (4 Epoxy resins and 1 Polyurethane resin) were selected to be further investigated in the test program. Samples for the test program were designed to represent core elements of an EPC, the high voltage transformer and Printed Circuit Boards of the high voltage section. All five materials were assessed in the practical work flow of the potting process and electrical, mechanical, thermal and lifetime testing was performed. Although the lifetime tests results were overlayed by a larges scatter, finally two candidates have been identified for use in a subsequent qualification program. This activity forms part of element 5 of the ESA ARTES Programme.

  11. Processing of Rigidized Rei-mullite Insulative Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gebhardt, J. J.; Gorsuch, P. D.; Braun, M. A.

    1973-01-01

    Systematic development and evaluation of ceramic fiber Mullite are summarized: (1) Major reductions in thermal protection system weight have been achieved by reducing the density and thermal conductivity of the insulation by 20 and 25 percent; (2) already adequate structural margins-of-safety have been greatly enhanced by increasing the tensile strength and strain-to-failure capabilities of the insulation by factors of 3 and 2; (3) cost effectiveness has been increased through the achievement of a high degree of uniformity and reproducibility of properties and through process simplification and binder modifications; and (4) maximization of multimission capability at surface temperatures of 1644 K has been achieved through firing cycle adjustments and the development of a material with high dimensional stability.

  12. Thermal blanket insulation for advanced space transportation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusch, Richard H.

    1985-01-01

    The feasibility of weaving Nextel ceramic and Nicalon silicon carbide yarns into integrally woven, three dimensional fluted core fabrics was demonstrated. Parallel face fabrics joined with woven fabric ribs to form triangular cross section flutes between the faces were woven into three single and one double layer configuration. High warp yarn density in the double layer configuration caused considerable yarn breakage during weaving. The flutes of all four fabrics were filled with mandrels made from Q-Fiber Felt and FRCI-20-12 to form candidate insulation panels for advanced Space Transportation Systems. Procedures for preparing and inserting the mandrels were developed. Recommendations are made on investigating alternate methods for filling the flutes with insulation, and for improving the weaving of these types of fabrics.

  13. Pressure Dependence of Insulator-Insulator Contact Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of insulator-insulator triboelectric (contact) charging is being studied by the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at KSC. The hypothesis that surface ion exchange is the primary mechanism is being tested experimentally. A two-phase model based on a small partial pressure of singly charged ions in an ambient ideal gas in equilibrium with a submonolayer adsorbed film will provide predictions about charging as a function Of ion mass, pressure, temperature, and surface adsorption energy. Interactions between ions will be considered in terms of coulombic and screened potential energies. This work is yielding better understanding of the triboelectrification of insulators, which is an important problem in. space exploration technology. The work is also relevant to important industrial processes such as xerography and the application of paints and coatings. Determining a better understanding of the fundamental mechanism of insulator-insulator triboelectrification will hopefully lead to better means of eliminating or at least mitigating its hazards and enhancing its useful applications.

  14. Flashover tests of artificially iced insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Charneski, M.D.; Gaibrois, G.L.; Whitney, B.F.

    1982-08-01

    Test apparatus and procedures were developed to test energized, non-contaminated, 120 kV system insulators under simulated freezing rain conditions. The flashover performances were compared between non-ceramic composite transmission line insulators and standard porcelain 5 3/4 x 10 inch suspension insulators. Standard and long leak Multicone porcelain insulators were also compared in the icing tests to standard porcelain station post insulators. Icing tests at several voltage stresses provided the full flashover range of the insulators from the minimum or zero flashovers in ten trials up to the maximum or 10 flashovers in 10 trials. Using the desired insulator voltage stress flashover curve for specific insulator types and the voltage stress applied to the insulator, the comparative probability of flashover due to ice storms on the system can be evaluated for 120 kV, 230 kV and 345 kV systems.

  15. Evaluation of protective coatings under thermal insulation at high temperatures by the use of an innovative design

    SciTech Connect

    Lasarte, C.; Rincon, O.T. de; Montiel, A.

    1994-12-31

    In order to disseminate the existing information on protective systems that have given good performance results, NACE published Document 6H-189 through its technical groups working on coatings for carbon and stainless steels under insulation and corrosion under thermal insulation. This report is unique in its kind and, in the opinion of the authors of this paper, the next step should be the characterization of each of these systems in combination with different insulating materials. Based on NACE Document No. 6H-189, the design of a probe was developed to evaluate, in a salt chamber, the protective coatings which were supposed to work under thermal insulation at high temperatures (30--1,500 C) . This paper describes the results obtained with different combinations of protective coatings (Silicone-Aluminum, Zinc-Rich and Aluminum Metallizing), and thermal insulators (mineral wool, fiber glass and calcium silicate).

  16. Insulating phases of vanadium dioxide are Mott-Hubbard insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, T. J.; Hendriks, C.; Walter, E. J.; Yoon, Joonseok; Ju, Honglyoul; Smith, R.; Carr, G. L.; Krakauer, H.; Qazilbash, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    We present comprehensive broadband optical spectroscopy data on two insulating phases of vanadium dioxide (V O2 ): monoclinic M2 and triclinic. The main result of our work is that the energy gap and the electronic structure are essentially unaltered by the first-order structural phase transition between the M2 and triclinic phases. Moreover, the optical interband features in the M2 and triclinic phases are remarkably similar to those observed in the well-studied monoclinic M1 insulating phase of V O2 . As the energy gap is insensitive to the different lattice structures of the three insulating phases, we rule out vanadium-vanadium pairing (the Peierls component) as the dominant contributor to the opening of the gap. Rather, the energy gap arises primarily from intra-atomic Coulomb correlations.

  17. Corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulation---Mechanisms and evaluation of electrochemical methods for assessing corrosion behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Stansbury, E.E.

    1991-10-01

    An evaluation has been made of the corrosiveness of selected wet residential building thermal insulation materials in contact with low carbon steel. Investigations were conducted both in wet insulations and in filtered leachates from insulations derived from thirteen cellulosic, three mineral fiber and four foam products. Potentiodynamic polarization measurements are reported from which the overall corrosion response was assessed and then the techniques of Tafel and polarization resistance analysis applied to estimate corrosion rates. Corrosion rates were also estimated electrochemically using a direct reading instrument which performs the rate calculation based on the polarization resistance principle. Direct determinations of corrosion rate were based on weight loss measurements.

  18. Study of thermal insulation for airborne liquid hydrogen fuel tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruccia, F. E.; Lindstrom, R. S.; Lucas, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    A concept for a fail-safe thermal protection system was developed. From screening tests, approximately 30 foams, adhesives, and reinforcing fibers using 0.3-meter square liquid nitrogen cold plate, CPR 452 and Stafoam AA1602, both reinforced with 10 percent by weight of 1/16 inch milled OCF Style 701 Fiberglas, were selected for further tests. Cyclic tests with these materials in 2-inch thicknesses bonded on a 0.6-meter square cold plate with Crest 7410 adhesive systems, were successful. Zero permeability gas barriers were identified and found to be compatible with the insulating concept.

  19. Positron Annihilation in Insulating Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P; Sterne, PA

    2002-10-18

    We describe positron results from a wide range of insulating materials. We have completed positron experiments on a range of zeolite-y samples, KDP crystals, alkali halides and laser damaged SiO{sub 2}. Present theoretical understanding of positron behavior in insulators is incomplete and our combined theoretical and experimental approach is aimed at developing a predictive understanding of positrons and positronium annihilation characteristics in insulators. Results from alkali halides and alkaline-earth halides show that positrons annihilate with only the halide ions, with no apparent contribution from the alkali or alkaline-earth cations. This contradicts the results of our existing theory for metals, which predicts roughly equal annihilation contributions from cation and anion. We also present result obtained using Munich positron microprobe on laser damaged SiO{sub 2} samples.

  20. Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.; Johnson, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

  1. Floquet topological insulators for sound

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Romain; Khanikaev, Alexander B; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The unique conduction properties of condensed matter systems with topological order have recently inspired a quest for the similar effects in classical wave phenomena. Acoustic topological insulators, in particular, hold the promise to revolutionize our ability to control sound, allowing for large isolation in the bulk and broadband one-way transport along their edges, with topological immunity against structural defects and disorder. So far, these fascinating properties have been obtained relying on moving media, which may introduce noise and absorption losses, hindering the practical potential of topological acoustics. Here we overcome these limitations by modulating in time the acoustic properties of a lattice of resonators, introducing the concept of acoustic Floquet topological insulators. We show that acoustic waves provide a fertile ground to apply the anomalous physics of Floquet topological insulators, and demonstrate their relevance for a wide range of acoustic applications, including broadband acoustic isolation and topologically protected, nonreciprocal acoustic emitters. PMID:27312175

  2. Process for making ceramic insulation

    DOEpatents

    Akash, Akash; Balakrishnan, G. Nair

    2009-12-08

    A method is provided for producing insulation materials and insulation for high temperature applications using novel castable and powder-based ceramics. The ceramic components produced using the proposed process offers (i) a fine porosity (from nano-to micro scale); (ii) a superior strength-to-weight ratio; and (iii) flexibility in designing multilayered features offering multifunctionality which will increase the service lifetime of insulation and refractory components used in the solid oxide fuel cell, direct carbon fuel cell, furnace, metal melting, glass, chemical, paper/pulp, automobile, industrial heating, coal, and power generation industries. Further, the ceramic components made using this method may have net-shape and/or net-size advantages with minimum post machining requirements.

  3. Floquet topological insulators for sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Romain; Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Alù, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The unique conduction properties of condensed matter systems with topological order have recently inspired a quest for the similar effects in classical wave phenomena. Acoustic topological insulators, in particular, hold the promise to revolutionize our ability to control sound, allowing for large isolation in the bulk and broadband one-way transport along their edges, with topological immunity against structural defects and disorder. So far, these fascinating properties have been obtained relying on moving media, which may introduce noise and absorption losses, hindering the practical potential of topological acoustics. Here we overcome these limitations by modulating in time the acoustic properties of a lattice of resonators, introducing the concept of acoustic Floquet topological insulators. We show that acoustic waves provide a fertile ground to apply the anomalous physics of Floquet topological insulators, and demonstrate their relevance for a wide range of acoustic applications, including broadband acoustic isolation and topologically protected, nonreciprocal acoustic emitters.

  4. Railgun experiments with Lexan insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Burton, Rodney L.; Goldstein, Shyke A.

    1989-06-01

    A series of railgun experiments has been performed using Lexan insulators in both round and square bores, and with closed-breech and open-breech/injected configurations. Measured armature lengths have been roughly constant at 5-10 cm in a 1-cm bore for all Lexan insulator shots, indicating that the ablated Lexan is not swept up. Projectiles have been observed to reach peak velocity of 5.65 km/s with clean armature structures; i.e., no separated secondary arc or restrike. However, in most cases a secondary arc does occur with Lexan and limits the achievable velocity. Occasionally, stationary secondary arcs have also been observed for a particularly leaky gun assembly. The effect of insulator ablation on performance is discussed, indicating that Lexan may be useful at up to 8-10 km/s for well-sealed railguns.

  5. Magnetic inhibition of insulator flashover

    SciTech Connect

    VanDevender, J.P.; McDaniel, D.H.; Neau, E.L.; Mattis, R.E.; Bergeron, K.D.

    1982-06-01

    Electrical breakdown across a vacuum/plastic interface in the presence of applied or self-generated magnetic fields, B< or =3.5 T, was investigated. The E x B drift of charged particles near the interface in these experiments was away from the insulator surface. The self-magnetic field effects on a plastic vacuum insulator flashover were examined with inductive loads, particle beam loads, and imploding plasma loads. Average breakdown electric fields of up to 38 MV/m were observed. Power densities of 100 TW/m/sup 2/ were passed through acrylic-vacuum interfaces. The flashover electric fields were improved over the B = 0 fields from previous experiments by factors of 7.1, 5.0, and 1.8 for the -45/sup 0/, 0/sup 0/, and +45/sup 0/ insulators, respectively.

  6. Performance and Certification Testing of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Garcia-Villazana, O; Espinosa-Loza, F

    2001-06-03

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH2) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH2). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described here is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Required future tests are described that will prove that no technical barriers exist to the safe use of aluminum-fiber vessels at cryogenic temperatures. Future activities also include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for obtaining certification for insulated pressure vessels.

  7. Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage: Analysis and Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Garcia-Villazana, O; Espinosa-Loza, F

    2001-06-26

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described here is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Required future tests are described that will prove that no technical barriers exist to the safe use of aluminum-fiber vessels at cryogenic temperatures. Future activities also include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for obtaining certification for insulated pressure vessels.

  8. Analysis and Testing of High Temperature Fibrous Insulation for Reusable Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran

    1999-01-01

    Analytical models were developed to model the heat transfer through high-temperature fibrous insulation used in metallic thermal protection systems on reusable launch vehicles. The optically thick approximation was used to simulate radiation heat transfer through the insulation. Different models for gaseous conduction and solid conduction in the fibers, and for combining the various modes of heat transfer into a local, volume-averaged, thermal conductivity were considered. The governing heat transfer equations were solved numerically, and effective thermal conductivities were calculated from the steady-state results. An experimental apparatus was developed to measure the apparent thermal conductivity of insulation subjected to pressures, temperatures and temperature gradients representative of re-entry conditions for launch vehicles. The apparent thermal conductivity of an alumina fiber insulation was measured at nominal densities of 24, 48 and 96 kg/cu m. Data were obtained at environmental pressures from 10(exp 4) to 760 torr, with the insulation cold side maintained at room temperature and its hot side temperature varying up to 1000 C. The experimental results were used to evaluate the analytical models. The best analytical model resulted in effective thermal conductivity predictions that were within 8% of experimental results.

  9. Expanded perlite insulation selected for process piping in $80 million boric acid plant

    SciTech Connect

    Nannini, L.; Gaines, A.

    1982-03-01

    U.S. Borax's new $80 million chemical facility in Boron, California utilizes the most modern technology to produce 200,000 tons per year of boric acid that is used in texyile fiber glass, various types of heat resistant glasses, metallurgy, drugs and cosmetics. The boric acid plant contains thousands of feet of pipe to convey liquors to mixing tanks, clarifiers, crystallizers, centrifuges and other equipment for the refining process. Steel pipe lined with polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) was used for a major portion of the piping system to avoid corrosion problems and assure products free of contaminants. The process lines were insulated with a lightweight, asbestos-free product made of expanded perlite containing millions of air cells for low thermal conductivity, bonded together by special binders and reinforcing fibers for good compressive strength. The rigid, molded, insulation can withstand continuous and cycling temperatures to 1500/sup 0/F with minimal shrinkage, and contains less than 150 ppm chlorides to avoid stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels. The boric acid plant, which is one of the world's largest, began operations in August 1980, and the performance of the expanded perlite pipe insulation in maintaining process temperatures is considered very satisfactory. Any line leakage that occurred during start-up or normal operation has not affected the heat barrier efficiency or structural integrity of the insulation. The combined strength of the insulation and PVC jacket has prevented any serious damage to the pipe covering when struck or scraped.

  10. Combined Heat Transfer in High-Porosity High-Temperature Fibrous Insulations: Theory and Experimental Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Cunnington, George R.; Miller, Steve D.; Knutson, Jeffry R.

    2010-01-01

    Combined radiation and conduction heat transfer through various high-temperature, high-porosity, unbonded (loose) fibrous insulations was modeled based on first principles. The diffusion approximation was used for modeling the radiation component of heat transfer in the optically thick insulations. The relevant parameters needed for the heat transfer model were derived from experimental data. Semi-empirical formulations were used to model the solid conduction contribution of heat transfer in fibrous insulations with the relevant parameters inferred from thermal conductivity measurements at cryogenic temperatures in a vacuum. The specific extinction coefficient for radiation heat transfer was obtained from high-temperature steady-state thermal measurements with large temperature gradients maintained across the sample thickness in a vacuum. Standard gas conduction modeling was used in the heat transfer formulation. This heat transfer modeling methodology was applied to silica, two types of alumina, and a zirconia-based fibrous insulation, and to a variation of opacified fibrous insulation (OFI). OFI is a class of insulations manufactured by embedding efficient ceramic opacifiers in various unbonded fibrous insulations to significantly attenuate the radiation component of heat transfer. The heat transfer modeling methodology was validated by comparison with more rigorous analytical solutions and with standard thermal conductivity measurements. The validated heat transfer model is applicable to various densities of these high-porosity insulations as long as the fiber properties are the same (index of refraction, size distribution, orientation, and length). Furthermore, the heat transfer data for these insulations can be obtained at any static pressure in any working gas environment without the need to perform tests in various gases at various pressures.

  11. Aerogels Insulate Against Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, NASA started to pursue the development of aerogel for cryogenic insulation. Kennedy Space Center awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to Aspen Systems Inc., of Marlborough, Massachusetts, that resulted in a new manufacturing process and a new flexible, durable, easy-to-use form of aerogel. Aspen Systems formed Aspen Aerogels Inc., in Northborough, Massachusetts, to market the product, and by 2009, the company had become the leading provider of aerogel in the United States, producing nearly 20 million square feet per year. With an array of commercial applications, the NASA-derived aerogel has most recently been applied to protect and insulate people s hands and feet.

  12. High temperature insulation barrier composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A composite material suitable for providing insulation for the nozzle structure of the Space Shuttle and other similar surfaces is disclosed. The composite layer is comprised of an outer skin layer of nickel chromium and an interleaved inner region comprising a top layer of nickel chromium foil which acts as a primary convective shield. There are at least two layers of alumina batting adjacent to the layers of silicon carbide fabric. An additional layer of nickel chromium foil is used as a secondary convective shield. The composite is particularly advantageous for use as nozzle insulation because of its ability to withstand high reentry temperatures, its flexibility, oxidation resistance, low conductivity, and light weight.

  13. Inversion-symmetric topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Taylor L.; Prodan, Emil; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2011-06-01

    We analyze translationally invariant insulators with inversion symmetry that fall outside the current established classification of topological insulators. These insulators exhibit no edge or surface modes in the energy spectrum and hence they are not edge metals when the Fermi level is in the bulk gap. However, they do exhibit protected modes in the entanglement spectrum localized on the cut between two entangled regions. Their entanglement entropy cannot be made to vanish adiabatically, and hence the insulators can be called topological. There is a direct connection between the inversion eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian band structure and the midgap states in the entanglement spectrum. The classification of protected entanglement levels is given by an integer N, which is the difference between the negative inversion eigenvalues at inversion symmetric points in the Brillouin zone, taken in sets of 2. When the Hamiltonian describes a Chern insulator or a nontrivial time-reversal invariant topological insulator, the entirety of the entanglement spectrum exhibits spectral flow. If the Chern number is zero for the former, or time reversal is broken in the latter, the entanglement spectrum does not have spectral flow, but, depending on the inversion eigenvalues, can still exhibit protected midgap bands similar to impurity bands in normal semiconductors. Although spectral flow is broken (implying the absence of real edge or surface modes in the original Hamiltonian), the midgap entanglement bands cannot be adiabatically removed, and the insulator is “topological.” We analyze the linear response of these insulators and provide proofs and examples of when the inversion eigenvalues determine a nontrivial charge polarization, a quantum Hall effect, an anisotropic three-dimensional (3D) quantum Hall effect, or a magnetoelectric polarization. In one dimension, we establish a link between the product of the inversion eigenvalues of all occupied bands at all inversion

  14. Fiber-Reinforced Epoxy Composites and Methods of Making Same Without the Use of Oven or Autoclave

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnell, Thomas J. (Inventor); Rauscher, Michael D. (Inventor); Stienecker, Rick D. (Inventor); Nickerson, David M. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Method embodiments for producing a fiber-reinforced epoxy composite comprise providing a mold defining a shape for a composite, applying a fiber reinforcement over the mold, covering the mold and fiber reinforcement thereon in a vacuum enclosure, performing a vacuum on the vacuum enclosure to produce a pressure gradient, insulating at least a portion of the vacuum enclosure with thermal insulation, infusing the fiber reinforcement with a reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent under vacuum conditions, wherein the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent generates exothermic heat, and producing the fiber-reinforced epoxy composite having a glass transition temperature of at least about 100.degree. C. by curing the fiber reinforcement infused with the reactive mixture of uncured epoxy resin and curing agent by utilizing the exothermically generated heat, wherein the curing is conducted inside the thermally insulated vacuum enclosure without utilization of an external heat source or an external radiation source.

  15. Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for January 2000 through March 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2000-08-18

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides radioisotope Power Systems (BPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of .I 997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at OBNL.

  16. Quarterly Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program tasks for April 2000 through June 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2000-10-23

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems (OSDPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVSs) and weld shields (WSs). This quarterly report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from OSDPS for fiscal year (FY) 2000. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, clad vent sets (CVSs), and weld shields (WSs). In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of flight quality (FQ) components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for two new RPS. The last section is dedicated to studies of the potential for the production of 238Pu at ORNL.

  17. Partial Model of Insulator/Insulator Contact Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael; Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Mucciolo, E. R.

    2005-01-01

    Two papers present a two-phase equilibrium model that partly explains insulator/ insulator contact charging. In this model, a vapor of ions within a gas is in equilibrium with a submonolayer of ions of the same species that have been adsorbed on the surface of an insulator. The surface is modeled as having localized states, each with a certain energy of adsorption for an ion. In an earlier version of the model described in the first paper, the ions do not interact with each other. Using the grand canonical ensemble, the chemical potentials of both vapor and absorbed phases are derived and equated to determine the vapor pressure. If a charge is assigned to the vapor particles (in particular, if single ionization is assumed), then the surface charge density associated with adsorbed ions can be calculated as a function of pressure. In a later version of the model presented in the second paper, the submodel of the vapor phase is extended to include electrostatic interactions between vapor ions and adsorbed ones as well as the screening effect, at a given distance from the surface, of ions closer to the surface. Theoretical values of this model closely match preliminary experimental data on the discharge of insulators as a function of pressure.

  18. Experimental Realizations of Magnetic Topological Insulator and Topological Crystalline Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Suyang

    2013-03-01

    Over the past few years the experimental research on three-dimensional topological insulators have emerged as one of the most rapidly developing fields in condensed matter physics. In this talk, we report on two new developments in the field: The first part is on the dynamic interplay between ferromagnetism and the Z2 topological insulator state (leading to a magnetic topological insulator). We present our spin-resolved photoemission and magnetic dichroic experiments on MBE grown films where a hedgehog-like spin texture is revealed on the magnetically ordered surface of Mn-Bi2Se3 revealing a Berry's phase gradient in energy-momentum space of the crystal. A chemically/electrically tunable Berry's phase switch is further demonstrated via the tuning of the spin groundstate in Mn-Bi2Se3 revealed in our data (Nature Physics 8, 616 (2012)). The second part of this talk describes our experimental observation of a new topological phase of matter, namely a topological crystalline insulator where space group symmetries replace the role of time-reversal symmetry in an otherwise Z2 topological insulator predicted in theory. We experimentally investigate the possibility of a mirror symmetry protected topological phase transition in the Pb1-xSnxTe alloy system, which has long been known to contain an even number of band inversions based on band theory. Our experimental results show that at a composition below the theoretically predicted band inversion, the system is fully gapped, whereas in the band-inverted regime, the surface exhibits even number of spin-polarized Dirac cone states revealing mirror-protected topological order (Nature Communications 3, 1192 (2012)) distinct from that observed in Z2 topological insulators. We discuss future experimental possibilities opened up by these new developments in topological insulators research. This work is in collaboration with M. Neupane, C. Liu, N. Alidoust, I. Belopolski, D. Qian, D.M. Zhang, A. Richardella, A. Marcinkova, Q

  19. Insulation board and process of making

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    Insulation board capable of bearing a load without significant loss of insulating capacity due to compression, produced by a method wherein the board is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  20. New insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenski, George

    1994-01-01

    Outlined in this presentation is the background to insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications, the Air Force wiring policy, the purpose and contract requirements of new insulation constructions, the test plan, and the test results.

  1. Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    The surface of an insulator under vacuum and under electrical charge will flashover when illuminated by a critical dose of ultra-violet (UV...fluence (energy per unit area) required to induce surface flashover of vacuum insulators for some candid insulator materials: High Density... Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination1 J. B. Javedani, T.L. Houck, D.A. Lahowe, G.E. Vogtlin and D.A. Goerz Lawrence Livermore

  2. 16 CFR 460.18 - Insulation ads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSULATION § 460.18 Insulation ads. (a) If your ad gives an R-value, you must give the type of insulation and... your ad gives a price, you must give the type of insulation, the R-value at a specific thickness, the... you give the price per square foot, you do not have to give the coverage area. (c) If your ad...

  3. 16 CFR 460.18 - Insulation ads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSULATION § 460.18 Insulation ads. (a) If your ad gives an R-value, you must give the type of insulation and... your ad gives a price, you must give the type of insulation, the R-value at a specific thickness, the... you give the price per square foot, you do not have to give the coverage area. (c) If your ad...

  4. Application of composite insulators to transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, E.A.; Brown, R.L.; Karady, G.; Nicholls, J.L.; Orbeck, T.; Pargamin, L.

    1983-05-01

    The paper provides guidelines for the application of composite insulators to transmission lines. These guidelines are based on utility field experiences, results of research laboratory tests and manufacturers' recommendations. Discussed are interchangeability with porcelain and glass insulators, application in contaminated environments, material ageing, insulator icing, the use of grease, resistance to vandalism, temperature extremes, and the need for grading rings. Clarification is provided on the mechanical rating of composite insulators because there is not yet general agreement by various industry groups.

  5. Forming Refractory Insulation On Copper Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlock, J.; Roberts, G.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative insulating process forms flexible coat of uncured refractory insulating material on copper wire. Coated wire formed into coil or other complex shape. Wire-coating apparatus forms "green" coat on copper wire. After wire coiled, heating converts "green" coat to refractory electrical insulator. When cured to final brittle form, insulating material withstands temperatures above melting temperature of wire. Process used to make coils for motors, solenoids, and other electrical devices to be operated at high temperatures.

  6. Fibrous insulations with transparent cover for passive use of solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caps, R.; Fricke, J.

    1989-03-01

    Fibrous thermal insulation protected by a transparent pane instead of an opaque cover applied to the exterior of house walls exhibits an improved efficiency. The fibrous layer and the house wall behind it are heated upon absorption of solar radiation and thermal leakage from the interior of the house is significantly reduced. The transparently covered fibrous insulation is well suited to retrofit old residential and commercial buildings. The optimal design parameters for the fibrous layer are as follows: thickness, 5 cm; density, 10kg-m-3; fiber diameter, 20 μn; and albedo in the visible, ω vis> 0.9.

  7. 46 CFR 153.240 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insulation. 153.240 Section 153.240 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 153.240 Insulation. Cargo containment system insulation made necessary by the requirements of this...

  8. 46 CFR 153.240 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation. 153.240 Section 153.240 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 153.240 Insulation. Cargo containment system insulation made necessary by the requirements of this...

  9. 49 CFR 179.201-11 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation. 179.201-11 Section 179.201-11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201-11 Insulation. (a) Insulation shall be...

  10. 46 CFR 153.240 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Insulation. 153.240 Section 153.240 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 153.240 Insulation. Cargo containment system insulation made necessary by the requirements of this...

  11. 46 CFR 153.240 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Insulation. 153.240 Section 153.240 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 153.240 Insulation. Cargo containment system insulation made necessary by the requirements of this...

  12. 46 CFR 153.240 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Insulation. 153.240 Section 153.240 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 153.240 Insulation. Cargo containment system insulation made necessary by the requirements of this...

  13. Analyzing Gases From Decomposing Electrical Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Gary; Shelley, Timothy J.; Morelli, John J.

    1995-01-01

    Test fixture holds insulated wire and traps gases emitted by heating of wire. Used with gas chromatograph and/or mass spectrometer, to analyze gases emitted by insulation on wire when wire heated with controlled current in controlled atmosphere to simulate pyrolysis, combustion, and arc tracking. Small, inexpensive, easily maintained, and relatively nonreactive to organic compounds produced during breakdown of insulation.

  14. Advanced solid propellant motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Russ, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced lightweight insulation system suitable for use in long duration, low pressure planetary orbiter-type motor applications was developed. Experiments included the screening of various filler and binder materials with optimization studies combining the best of each. Small scale test motor data were used to judge the degree of success.

  15. Thermal Insulation from Hardwood Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, I.; Grinfelds, U.; Vikele, L.; Rozenberga, L.; Zeps, M.; Luguza, S.

    2015-11-01

    Adequate heat is one of the prerequisites for human wellbeing; therefore, building insulation is required in places where the outside temperature is not suitable for living. The climate change, with its rising temperatures and longer dry periods, promotes enlargement of the regions with conditions more convenient for hardwood species than for softwood species. Birch (Betula pendula) is the most common hardwood species in Latvia. The aim of this work was to obtain birch fibres from wood residues of plywood production and to form low-density thermal insulation boards. Board formation and production was done in the presence of water; natural binder, fire retardant and fungicide were added in different concentrations. Board properties such as density, transportability or resistance to particulate loss, thermal conductivity and reaction to fire were investigated. This study included thermal insulation boards with the density of 102-120 kg/m3; a strong correlation between density and the binder amount was found. Transportability also improved with the addition of a binder, and 0.1-0.5% of the binder was the most appropriate amount for this purpose. The measured thermal conductivity was in the range of 0.040-0.043 W/(m·K). Fire resistance increased with adding the fire retardant. We concluded that birch fibres are applicable for thermal insulation board production, and it is possible to diversify board properties, changing the amount of different additives.

  16. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  17. On effective holographic Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggioli, Matteo; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2016-12-01

    We present a class of holographic models that behave effectively as prototypes of Mott insulators — materials where electron-electron interactions dominate transport phenomena. The main ingredient in the gravity dual is that the gauge-field dynamics contains self-interactions by way of a particular type of non-linear electrodynamics. The electrical response in these models exhibits typical features of Mott-like states: i) the low-temperature DC conductivity is unboundedly low; ii) metal-insulator transitions appear by varying various parameters; iii) for large enough self-interaction strength, the conductivity can even decrease with increasing doping (density of carriers) — which appears as a sharp manifestation of `traffic-jam'-like behaviour; iv) the insulating state becomes very unstable towards superconductivity at large enough doping. We exhibit some of the properties of the resulting insulator-superconductor transition, which is sensitive to the momentum dissipation rate in a specific way. These models imply a clear and generic correlation between Mott behaviour and significant effects in the nonlinear electrical response. We compute the nonlinear current-voltage curve in our model and find that indeed at large voltage the conductivity is largely reduced.

  18. Magnetically Insulated Opening Switch Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    this research is to investigate the validity of the magneti- cally insulated opening switch concept proposed by Eninger (Ref. 5, Appendix 1). The...1973). 3. Y. Carmel, and J. Nation, Phys, Rev. Lett. 31, 286 (1973). 4. T.J. Orzechowski, and G. Bekefi, Phys. Fluids 19, 43 (1976). U 5. 3. Eninger

  19. Graphite Fluoride Fiber Composites For Heat Sinking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Long, Martin; Stahl, Mark

    1989-01-01

    Graphite fluoride fiber/polymer composite materials consist of graphite fluoride fibers in epoxy, polytetrafluoroethylene, or polyimide resin. Combines high electrical resistivity with high thermal conductivity and solves heat-transfer problems of many electrical systems. Commercially available in powder form, for use as dry lubricant or cathode material in lithium batteries. Produced by direct fluorination of graphite powder at temperature of 400 to 650 degree C. Applications include printed-circuit boards for high-density power electronics, insulators for magnetic-field cores like those found in alternators and transformers, substrates for thin-film resistors, and electrical-protection layers in aircraft de-icers.

  20. BOA: Pipe-asbestos insulation removal robot system

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.; Mutschler, E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes the BOA system, a mobile pipe-external crawler used to remotely strip and bag (possibly contaminated) asbestos-containing lagging and insulation materials (ACLIM) from various diameter pipes in (primarily) industrial installations across the DOE weapons complex. The mechanical removal of ACLIM is very cost-effective due to the relatively low productivity and high cost involved in human removal scenarios. BOA, a mechanical system capable of removing most forms of lagging (paper, plaster, aluminum sheet, clamps, screws and chicken-wire), and insulation (paper, tar, asbestos fiber, mag-block) uses a circular cutter and compression paddles to cut and strip the insulation off the pipe through compression, while a HEPA-filter and encapsulant system maintain a certifiable vacuum and moisture content inside the system and on the pipe, respectively. The crawler system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. Key design parameters and performance parameters are developed and used in performance testing. Since the current system is a testbed, we also discuss future enhancements and outline two deployment scenarios (robotic and manual) for the final system to be designed and completed by the end of FY `95. An on-site demonstration is currently planned for Fernald in Ohio and Oak Ridge in Tennessee.

  1. Insulation design of cryogenic bushing for superconducting electric power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, J. Y.; Lee, Y. J.; Shin, W. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Kim, J. T.; Lee, B. W.; Lee, S. H.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the superconductivity projects to develop commercial superconducting devices for extra high voltage transmission lines have been undergoing in many countries. One of the critical components to be developed for high voltage superconducting devices, including superconducting transformers, cables, and fault current limiters, is a high voltage bushing, to supply high current to devices without insulating difficulties, that is designed for cryogenic environments. Unfortunately, suitable bushings for HTS equipment were not fully developed for some cryogenic insulation issues. Such high voltage bushings would need to provide electrical insulation capabilities from room temperature to cryogenic temperatures. In this paper, design factors of cryogenic bushings were discussed and test results of specimen were introduced in detail. First, the dielectric strength of three kinds of metals has been measured with uniform and non-uniform electrodes by withstand voltage of impulse and AC breakdown test in LN2. Second, puncture breakdown voltage of glass fiber reinforced plastics (GFRPs) plates has been analyzed with non-uniform electrodes. Finally, creepage discharge voltages were measured according to the configuration of non-uniform and uniform electrode on the FRP plate. From the test results, we obtained the basic design factors of extra high voltage condenser bushing, which could be used in cryogenic environment.

  2. Effect of composition on thermal conductivity of silica insulation media.

    PubMed

    Park, Sung; Kwon, Young-Pil; Kwon, Hyuk-Chon; Lee, Hae-Weon; Lee, Jae Chun

    2008-10-01

    Nano-sized fumed silica-based insulation media were prepared by adding TiO2 powders and ceramic fibers as opacifiers and structural integrity improvers, respectively. The high temperature thermal conductivities of the fumed silica-based insulation media were investigated using different types of TiO2 opacifier and by varying its content. The opacifying effects of nanostructured TiO2 powders produced by homogeneous precipitation process at low temperatures (HPPLT) were compared with those of commercial TiO2 powder. The nanostructured HPPLT TiO2 powder with a mean particle size of 1.8 microm was more effective to reduce radiative heat transfer than the commercial one with a similar mean particle size. The insulation samples with the HPPLT TiO2 powder showed about 46% lower thermal conductivity at temperatures of about 820 degrees C than those with the commercial one. This interesting result might be due to the more effective radiation scattering efficiency of the nanostructured HPPLT TiO2 powder which has better gap filling and coating capability in nano-sized composite compacts.

  3. Treating Fibrous Insulation to Reduce Thermal Conductivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Alfred; Tarkanian, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    A chemical treatment reduces the convective and radiative contributions to the effective thermal conductivity of porous fibrous thermal-insulation tile. The net effect of the treatment is to coat the surfaces of fibers with a mixture of transition-metal oxides (TMOs) without filling the pores. The TMO coats reduce the cross-sectional areas available for convection while absorbing and scattering thermal radiation in the pores, thereby rendering the tile largely opaque to thermal radiation. The treatment involves a sol-gel process: A solution containing a mixture of transition-metal-oxide-precursor salts plus a gelling agent (e.g., tetraethylorthosilicate) is partially cured, then, before it visibly gels, is used to impregnate the tile. The solution in the tile is gelled, then dried, and then the tile is fired to convert the precursor salts to the desired mixed TMO phases. The amounts of the various TMOs ultimately incorporated into the tile can be tailored via the concentrations of salts in the solution, and the impregnation depth can be tailored via the viscosity of the solution and/or the volume of the solution relative to that of the tile. The amounts of the TMOs determine the absorption and scattering spectra.

  4. Synthetic vitreous fibers--inhalation studies.

    PubMed

    McConnell, E E

    1994-12-01

    Synthetic vitreous fibers (SVFs), often referred to as "man-made vitreous fibers," are a class of materials that have their major uses for insulation against heat and sound. The original fibers are produced by melting various types of rock, clay, etc. and then blowing or extruding them into fibers of particular properties. During production and use small fractions of airborne fibers can be generated. Because of this a series of state-of-the-art inhalation studies was initiated to study the possible health hazards presented by the four major types of vitreous materials [two types of insulation glass wool, rock wool, slag wool, and four types of refractory ceramic fibers (RCF)] found in the workplace or to which the general public may be exposed. Rats and hamsters (30 mg/m3 kaolin-based RCF only) were exposed by nose-only inhalation to 3, 16, or 30 mg/m3 for 6 hr/day, 5 days/week, for 18 (hamsters) or 24 (rats) months and were held for lifetime observation (until approximately 20% survival) to study the chronic toxicity and potential carcinogenic activity of these classes of SVFs. Chrysotile or crocidolite asbestos served as positive controls. All of the fibers stimulated an inflammatory response characterized by an increase in the number of pulmonary macrophages at the level of the terminal bronchioles and proximal alveoli. RCF produced interstitial fibrosis in the walls of the proximal alveoli as early as 3 months and rock wool by 12 months. The only fiber which showed carcinogenic activity was RCF which produced a dose-related increase in both primary lung neoplasms (rats only) and mesotheliomas (rats and hamsters).

  5. Clad fiber capacitor and method of making same

    DOEpatents

    Tuncer, Enis

    2012-12-11

    A clad capacitor and method of manufacture includes assembling a preform comprising a ductile, electrically conductive fiber; a ductile, electrically insulating cladding positioned on the fiber; and a ductile, electrically conductive sleeve positioned over the cladding. One or more preforms are then bundled, heated and drawn along a longitudinal axis to decrease the diameter of the ductile components of the preform and fuse the preform into a unitized strand.

  6. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  7. Certification Testing and Demonstration of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen and Natural Gas Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Schaffer, R; Clapper, W

    2002-05-22

    We are working on developing an alternative technology for storage of hydrogen or natural gas on light-duty vehicles. This technology has been titled insulated pressure vessels. Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can accept either liquid fuel or ambient-temperature compressed fuel. Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of cryogenic liquid fuel tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (fuel flexibility, lower energy requirement for fuel liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). The work described in this paper is directed at verifying that commercially available pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen or LNG. The use of commercially available pressure vessels significantly reduces the cost and complexity of the insulated pressure vessel development effort. This paper describes a series of tests that have been done with aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped vessels to evaluate the damage caused by low temperature operation. All analysis and experiments to date indicate that no significant damage has resulted. Future activities include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for obtaining insulated pressure vessel certification.

  8. Thermal test of the insulation structure for LH 2 tank by using the large experimental apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, S.; Onishi, K.; Konshima, N.; Nishigaki, K.

    Conceptual designs of large mass LH 2 (liquid hydrogen) storage systems, whose capacity is 50,000 m3, have been studied in the Japanese hydrogen project, World Energy Network (WE-NET) [K. Fukuda, in: WE-NET Hydrogen Energy Symposium, 1999, P1-P41]. This study has concluded that their thermal insulation structures for the huge LH 2 tanks should be developed. Their actual insulation structures comprise not only the insulation material but also reinforced members and joints. To evaluate their thermal performance correctly, a large test specimen including reinforced members and joints will be necessary. After verifying the thermal performance of a developed large experimental apparatus [S. Kamiya, Cryogenics 40 (1) (2000) 35] for measuring the thermal conductance of various insulation structures, we tested two specimens, a vacuum multilayer insulation (MLI) with a glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) support and a vacuum solid insulation (microtherm ®) with joints. The thermal background test for verifying the thermal design of the experimental apparatus showed that the background heat leak is 0.1 W, small enough to satisfy apparatus performance requirement. The thermal conductance measurements of specimens also showed that thermal heat fluxes of MLI with a GFRP support and microtherm ® are 8 and 5.4 W/m2, respectively.

  9. Insulation Performance of Heat-Resistant Material for High-Speed Aircraft Under Thermal Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Dafang; Wang, Yuewu; Gao, Zhentong; Yang, Jialing

    2015-09-01

    Lightweight insulation materials are widely used to thermally protect high-speed aircraft, such as missiles. Thermal conductivity is an important parameter used to evaluate the efficiency of a material's thermal insulation performance. Since thermal conductivities provided from material handbooks or manufacturers are discrete data for different temperature ranges, there is a deviation between those and actual parameters in terms of continuous nonlinear variations. Therefore, this study measures the thermal conductivities of lightweight thermal insulation materials at high temperatures, and the relationship between the thermal conductivity and temperature is obtained. A finite element model of the thermal insulation materials is also established and applied to numerically calculate the thermal insulation properties for high-temperature ceramic fiber insulation materials using the experimentally obtained nonlinear relationship between thermal conductivity and temperature. Additionally, a transient aerodynamic heating experiment simulation system is used to thermally test the same materials; the calculated and experimental results for the same materials are compared, which exhibit good consistency that demonstrates that accurate results can be obtained from the numerical computation using the relationship established from the experimentally measured conductivity and temperature.

  10. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  11. Synthesis, physical and chemical properties, and potential applications of graphite fluoride fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Long, Martin; Stahl, Mark

    1987-01-01

    Graphite fluoride fibers can be produced by fluorinating pristine or intercalated graphite fibers. The higher the degree of graphitization of the fibers, the higher the temperature needed to reach the same degree of fluorination. Pitched based fibers were fluorinated to flourine-to-carbon atom rations between 0 and 1. The graphite fluoride fibers with a fluorine-to-carbon atom ration near 1 have extensive visible structural damage. On the other hand, fluorination of fibers pretreated with bromine or fluorine and bromine result in fibers with a fluorine-to-carbon atom ratio nearly equal to 0.5 with no visible structural damage. The electrical resistivity of the fibers is dependent upon the fluorine to carbon atom ratio and ranged from .01 to 10 to the 11th ohm/cm. The thermal conductivity of these fibers ranged from 5 to 73 W/m-k, which is much larger than the thermal conductivity of glass, which is the regular filler in epoxy composites. If graphite fluoride fibers are used as a filler in epoxy or PTFE, the resulting composite may be a high thermal conductivity material with an electrical resistivity in either the insulator or semiconductor range. The electrically insulating product may provide heat transfer with lower temperature gradients than many current electrical insulators. Potential applications are presented.

  12. From a normal insulator to a topological insulator in plumbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiang-Long; Huang, Li; Wu, Jiansheng

    2017-03-01

    Plumbene, similar to silicene, has a buckled honeycomb structure with a large band gap (˜400 meV). All previous studies have shown that it is a normal insulator. Here, we perform first-principles calculations and employ a sixteen-band tight-binding model with nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor hopping terms to investigate electronic structures and topological properties of the plumbene monolayer. We find that it can become a topological insulator with a large bulk gap (˜200 meV) through electron doping, and the nontrivial state is very robust with respect to external strain. Plumbene can be an ideal candidate for realizing the quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature. By investigating effects of external electric and magnetic fields on electronic structures and transport properties of plumbene, we present two rich phase diagrams with and without electron doping and propose a theoretical design for a four-state spin-valley filter.

  13. Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly

    PubMed Central

    Gurudatta, B. V.

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA–protein complexes with broad functions in nuclear biology. Drosophila has at least five different types of insulators; recent results suggest that these different insulators share some components that may allow them to function through common mechanisms. Data from genome-wide localization studies of insulator proteins indicate a possible functional specialization, with different insulators playing distinct roles in nuclear biology. Cells have developed mechanisms to control insulator activity by recruiting specialized proteins or by covalent modification of core components. Current results suggest that insulators set up cell-specific blueprints of nuclear organization that may contribute to the establishment of different patterns of gene expression during cell differentiation and development. PMID:19752045

  14. Fireblocking Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    PBI was originally developed for space suits. In 1980, the need for an alternative to asbestos and stricter government anti-pollution standards led to commercialization of the fire blocking fiber. PBI is used for auto racing driver suits and aircraft seat covers. The fiber does not burn in air, is durable and easily maintained. It has been specified by a number of airliners and is manufactured by Hoechst-Celanese Corporation.

  15. Dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Madar, Z; Thorne, R

    1987-01-01

    Studies done on dietary fiber (DF) over the past five years are presented in this Review. The involvement of dietary fiber in the control of plasma glucose and lipid levels is now established. Two dietary fiber sources (soybean and fenugreek) were studied in our laboratory and are discussed herein. These sources were found to be potentially beneficial in the reduction of plasma glucose in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus subjects. They are shown to be acceptable by human subjects and are easy to use either in a mixture of milk products and in cooking. The mechanism by which dietary fiber alters the nutrient absorption is also discussed. The effect of DF on gastric emptying, transit time, adsorption and glucose transport may contribute to reducing plasma glucose and lipid levels. DF was found to be effective in controlling blood glucose and lipid levels of pregnant diabetic women. Dietary fiber may also be potentially beneficial in the reduction of exogenous insulin requirements in these subjects. However, increased consumption of DF may cause adverse side effects; the binding capabilities of fiber may affect nutrient availability, particularly that of minerals and prolonged and high DF dosage supplementation must be regarded cautiously. This is particularly true when recommending such a diet for pregnant or lactating women, children or subjects with nutritional disorders. Physiological effects of DF appear to depend heavily on the source and composition of fiber. Using a combination of DF from a variety of sources may reduce the actual mass of fiber required to obtain the desired metabolic effects and will result in a more palatable diet. Previously observed problems, such as excess flatus, diarrhea and mineral malabsorption would also be minimized.

  16. Nanocomposite Fibers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    attempts to prepare carbon nanotube , CNT, containing fiber material. Modulus and tenacity tests on experimentally prepared nanosilica filled PET...individual entities of nanofibers, such as carbon nanotubes and SiC whiskers, silica and clay, into polymers with the goal of producing new forms of...if carbon nanotube (CNT) particle implanted fibers are used, one would expect a great increase in the electrical conductivity of the so-reinforced

  17. Measuring High Temperatures In Ceramic-Fiber Blankets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A.

    1996-01-01

    Thermocouple assemblies devised specifically for measuring temperatures at fixed locations within insulating blankets made of such ceramic fibers as alumina, silicon carbide, and/or aluminoborosilicate. Thermocouples measure temperatures from 100 to 3,200 degrees F in oxidizing atmospheres. Wires enclosed in alumina sheath for protection against hot oxidation and mechanical damage.

  18. 24 CFR 200.946 - Building product standards and certification program for exterior finish and insulation systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Standard Specification for Greige Woven Glass Fabrics. (vi) ASTM D 3273-86—(Reapproved 1991) Standard Test... Glass Fiber Reinforcing Mesh for Use in Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS), Class PB. (xv... defects occur, the manufacturer shall make a pro-rata allowance for replacement or pay the owner...

  19. 24 CFR 200.946 - Building product standards and certification program for exterior finish and insulation systems...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Standard Specification for Greige Woven Glass Fabrics. (vi) ASTM D 3273-86—(Reapproved 1991) Standard Test... Glass Fiber Reinforcing Mesh for Use in Exterior Insulation and Finish Systems (EIFS), Class PB. (xv... defects occur, the manufacturer shall make a pro-rata allowance for replacement or pay the owner...

  20. Dielectric strength, swelling and weight loss of the ITER Toroidal Field Model Coil insulation after low temperature reactor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, K.; Weber, H. W.; Hastik, R.; Hauser, H.; Gerstenberg, H.

    2000-04-01

    The insulation system for the Toroidal Field Model Coil of ITER is a fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) laminate, which consists of a combined Kapton/R-glass-fiber reinforcement tape, vacuum-impregnated with an epoxy DGEBA system. Pure disk shaped laminates, FRP/stainless-steel sandwiches, and conductor insulation prototypes were irradiated at 5 K in a fission reactor up to a fast neutron fluence of 10 22 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) to investigate the radiation induced degradation of the dielectric strength of the insulation system. After warm-up to room temperature, swelling, weight loss, and the breakdown strength were measured at 77 K. The sandwich swells by 4% at a fluence of 5×10 21 m-2 and by 9% at 1×10 22 m-2. The weight loss of the FRP is 2% at 1×10 22 m-2. The dielectric strength remained unchanged over the whole dose range.

  1. Approximating metal-insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Carlo; Rayanov, Kristian; Pavlov, Boris; Martin, Gaven; Flach, Sergej

    2015-12-01

    We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step, the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate Metal-Insulator Transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges, which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-André model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase, similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

  2. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-06

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  3. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  4. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  5. Insulation assembly for electric machine

    DOEpatents

    Rhoads, Frederick W.; Titmuss, David F.; Parish, Harold; Campbell, John D.

    2013-10-15

    An insulation assembly is provided that includes a generally annularly-shaped main body and at least two spaced-apart fingers extending radially inwards from the main body. The spaced-apart fingers define a gap between the fingers. A slot liner may be inserted within the gap. The main body may include a plurality of circumferentially distributed segments. Each one of the plurality of segments may be operatively connected to another of the plurality of segments to form the continuous main body. The slot liner may be formed as a single extruded piece defining a plurality of cavities. A plurality of conductors (extendable from the stator assembly) may be axially inserted within a respective one of the plurality of cavities. The insulation assembly electrically isolates the conductors in the electric motor from the stator stack and from other conductors.

  6. SUPPORTING AND HEAT INSULATING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Birmingham, B.W.; Brown, H.; Scott, R.B.; Vander-arend, P.C.

    1959-01-27

    A method is described for simultaneously supporting inner and outer members spaced from each other and heat insulating them from each other comprising an inner and outer member together defining an annular cavity. Each member carries a shoulder projecting towards the other member. A stack of annular metal plates in the cavity is held between the shoulder of the outer member and the shoulder of the inner member. The edges of the metal plate forming the stack are exposed to the cavity and to evacuation conditions which may exist within thc cavity. The stack of metal plates acts to both support one of the members with respect to the other and as a heat insulator.

  7. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, Larry D.; Ballard, William P.; Clark, M. Collins; Marder, Barry M.

    1988-01-01

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields arfe produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap.

  8. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, L.D.; Ballard, W.P.; Clark, M.C.; Marder, B.M.

    1987-05-19

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields are produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap. 11 figs.

  9. Performance Evaluation Tests of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinoza-Loza, F

    2002-03-01

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen. This flexibility results in multiple advantages with respect to compressed hydrogen tanks or low-pressure liquid hydrogen tanks. Our work is directed at verifying that commercially available aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. A series of tests have been conducted, and the results indicate that no significant vessel damage has resulted from cryogenic operation. Future activities include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for certification of insulated pressure vessels.

  10. Certification Testing and Demonstration of Insulated Pressure Vessels for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F

    2002-05-22

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen. This flexibility results in multiple advantages with respect to compressed hydrogen tanks or low-pressure liquid hydrogen tanks. Our work is directed at verifying that commercially available aluminum-lined, fiber-wrapped pressure vessels can be safely used to store liquid hydrogen. A series of tests have been conducted, and the results indicate that no significant vessel damage has resulted from cryogenic operation. Future activities include a demonstration project in which the insulated pressure vessels will be installed and tested on two vehicles. A draft standard will also be generated for certification of insulated pressure vessels.

  11. Assessment of health implications related to processing and use of natural wool insulation products.

    PubMed

    Mansour, E; Loxton, C; Elias, R M; Ormondroyd, G A

    2014-12-01

    This paper discusses possible health implications related to dust particles released during the manufacture of sheep's wool-based non-woven insulation material. Such insulation may replace traditional synthetic insulation products used in roofs, wall cavities, etc. A review of the literature concerning organic dusts in general and sheep's wool fiber summarizes dust exposure patterns, toxicological pathways and the hazards imposed by inhalation and explosion risk. This paper highlights a need for more research in order to refrain from overgeneralizing potential pulmonary and carcinogenic risks across the industries. Variables existing between industries such as the use of different wool types, processes, and additives are shown to have varying health effects. Within the final section of the paper, the health issues raised are compared with those that have been extensively documented for the rock and glass wool industries.

  12. Subnanosecond Breakdown of Insulating Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-29

    50so O0 PRESSURE Itorr] Fig. 6. Breakdown voltage for argon and air with 100 kV pulser amplitude Breakdown voltages for surface flashover differ from the...developments in the field of high speed/high power electromagnetics applica- tions, such as Ultrawideband (UWB) radar, plasma limiters, and fast general...voltages for short pulses is of relevance for many switching and insulation tasks, for both volume breakdown in differ- ent media as well as for surface

  13. Materials for foam type insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. E.

    1971-01-01

    An internal foam fabrication is one of the concepts being considered for cryogenic insulation on the hydrogen tanks of the shuttle vehicle. The three-dimensional polyurethane used on the S-4 B tanks failed to meet the higher temperature requirements of the shuttle vehicle, however, and other foams under consideration include polyisocyanurates, polyphenylene oxides, polyimides, and polybenzimidazoles. Improved adhesive systems for attaching the foams to the interior tank wall are under study.

  14. Flexible pile thermal barrier insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Fell, D. M.; Tesinsky, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible pile thermal barrier insulator included a plurality of upstanding pile yarns. A generally planar backing section supported the upstanding pile yarns. The backing section included a plurality of filler yarns forming a mesh in a first direction. A plurality of warp yarns were looped around said filler yarns and pile yarns in the backing section and formed a mesh in a second direction. A binder prevented separation of the yarns in the backing section.

  15. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  16. Supplemental multilayer insulation research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, P. J.; Stochl, R. J.

    1995-07-01

    The Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF) provides a small scale test bed for conducting cryogenic experiments in a vacuum environment. The facility vacuum system is capable of simulating a Space Shuttle launch pressure profile as well as providing a steady space vacuum environment of 1.3 x 10(exp -4) Newton/sq meter (1 x 10(exp -6) torr). Warm side boundary temperatures can be maintained constant between 111 K (200 R) and 361 K (650 R) using a temperature controlled shroud. The shroud can also simulate a typical lunar day-night temperature profile. The test hardware consists of a cryogenic calorimeter supported by the lid of the vacuum chamber. A 0.45 cu meter (120 gallon) vacuum jacketed storage/supply tank is available for conditioning the cryogen prior to use in the calorimeter. The facility was initially designed to evaluate the thermal performance of insulation systems for long-term storage in space. The facility has recently been used to evaluate the performance of various new insulation systems for LH2 and LN2 ground storage dewars.

  17. Supplemental multilayer insulation research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, P.J.; Stochl, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF) provides a small scale test bed for conducting cryogenic experiments in a vacuum environment. The facility vacuum system is capable of simulating a Space Shuttle launch pressure profile as well as providing a steady space vacuum environment of 1.3{times}10{sup -4} N/m{sup 2}(1 x 10{sup -6} torr). Warm side boundary temperatures can be maintained constant between 111 K(200 R) and 361 K(650 R) using a temperature controlled shroud. The shroud can also simulate a typical lunar day-night temperature profile. The test hardware consists of a cryogenic calorimeter supported by the lid of the vacuum chamber. A 0.45 m{sup 3} (120 gal) vacuum jacketed storage/supply tank is available for conditioning the cryogen prior to use in the calorimeter. The facility was initially designed to evaluate the thermal performance of insulation systems for long-term storage in space. The facility has recently been used to evaluate the performance of various new insulation systems for LH{sub 2} and LN{sub 2} ground storage dewars.

  18. Supplemental multilayer insulation research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, P. J.; Stochl, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF) provides a small scale test bed for conducting cryogenic experiments in a vacuum environment. The facility vacuum system is capable of simulating a Space Shuttle launch pressure profile as well as providing a steady space vacuum environment of 1.3 x 10(exp -4) Newton/sq meter (1 x 10(exp -6) torr). Warm side boundary temperatures can be maintained constant between 111 K (200 R) and 361 K (650 R) using a temperature controlled shroud. The shroud can also simulate a typical lunar day-night temperature profile. The test hardware consists of a cryogenic calorimeter supported by the lid of the vacuum chamber. A 0.45 cu meter (120 gallon) vacuum jacketed storage/supply tank is available for conditioning the cryogen prior to use in the calorimeter. The facility was initially designed to evaluate the thermal performance of insulation systems for long-term storage in space. The facility has recently been used to evaluate the performance of various new insulation systems for LH2 and LN2 ground storage dewars.

  19. Lightning vulnerability of fiber-optic cables.

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, Leonard E.; Caldwell, Michele

    2008-06-01

    One reason to use optical fibers to transmit data is for isolation from unintended electrical energy. Using fiber optics in an application where the fiber cable/system penetrates the aperture of a grounded enclosure serves two purposes: first, it allows for control signals to be transmitted where they are required, and second, the insulating properties of the fiber system help to electrically isolate the fiber terminations on the inside of the grounded enclosure. A fundamental question is whether fiber optic cables can allow electrical energy to pass through a grounded enclosure, with a lightning strike representing an extreme but very important case. A DC test bed capable of producing voltages up to 200 kV was used to characterize electrical properties of a variety of fiber optic cable samples. Leakage current in the samples were measured with a micro-Ammeter. In addition to the leakage current measurements, samples were also tested to DC voltage breakdown. After the fiber optic cables samples were tested with DC methods, they were tested under representative lightning conditions at the Sandia Lightning Simulator (SLS). Simulated lightning currents of 30 kA and 200 kA were selected for this test series. This paper documents measurement methods and test results for DC high voltage and simulated lightning tests performed at the Sandia Lightning Simulator on fiber optic cables. The tests performed at the SLS evaluated whether electrical energy can be conducted inside or along the surface of a fiber optic cable into a grounded enclosure under representative lightning conditions.

  20. Thermal Performance Of Space Suit Elements With Aerogel Insulation For Moon And Mars Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Henry H.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.; Trevino, Luis A.

    2006-01-01

    Flexible fiber-reinforced aerogel composites were studied for use as insulation materials of a future space suit for Moon and Mars exploration. High flexibility and good thermal insulation properties of fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composites at both high and low vacuum conditions make it a promising insulation candidate for the space suit application. This paper first presents the results of a durability (mechanical cycling) study of these aerogels composites in the context of retaining their thermal performance. The study shows that some of these Aerogels materials retained most of their insulation performance after up to 250,000 cycles of mechanical flex cycling. This paper also examines the problem of integrating these flexible aerogel composites into the current space suit elements. Thermal conductivity evaluations are proposed for different types of aerogels space suit elements to identify the lay-up concept that may have the best overall thermal performance for both Moon and Mars environments. Potential solutions in mitigating the silica dusting issue related to the application of these aerogels materials for the space suit elements are also discussed.

  1. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for April 1, 2002 Through September 20, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2002-12-03

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  2. Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2008 through September 30, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    King, James F

    2010-05-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. ORNL has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2009. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS.

  3. ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2010 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2011

    SciTech Connect

    King, James F

    2012-05-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. These components were also produced for the Pluto New Horizons and Mars Science Lab missions launched in January 2006 and November 2011respectively. The ORNL has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for nearly four decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2011. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS. Work has also been initiated to establish fabrication capabilities for the Light Weight Radioisotope Heater Units.

  4. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Programs Tasks for October 1, 2005, through September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    2006-09-30

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  5. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technical Program Tasks for October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    2007-04-02

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  6. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2007 Through September 30,2008

    SciTech Connect

    King, James F

    2009-04-01

    The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides RPS for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of RPS for fiscal year (FY) 2008. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new RPS.

  7. ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2005 THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2006

    SciTech Connect

    King, James F

    2007-04-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2006. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  8. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2002 Through September 30, 2003

    SciTech Connect

    King, J.F.

    2004-05-18

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2003. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  9. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Tasks for October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004

    SciTech Connect

    None listed

    2005-06-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2004. Production and production maintenance activities for flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  10. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for September 2000 through March 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, J.P.

    2001-05-22

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) and weld shields (WS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2001. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, CVS, and WS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials. or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  11. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power Systems Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2006 Through September 30, 2007

    SciTech Connect

    King, James F

    2008-04-01

    The Office of Radioisotope Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Radioisotope Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2007. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  12. Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2001 Through March 31, 2002

    SciTech Connect

    J. P. Moore, JPM

    2002-05-22

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. For the Cassini Mission, for example, ORNL was involved in the production of carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS). This report has been divided into three sections to reflect program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2002. The first section deals primarily with maintenance of the capability to produce flight quality (FQ) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS. In all three cases, production maintenance is assured by the manufacture of limited quantities of FQ components. The second section deals with several technology activities to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop technologies for new radioisotope power systems. The last section is dedicated to studies related to the production of {sup 238}Pu.

  13. ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT OF RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEM MATERIALS PRODUCTION AND TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM TASKS FOR OCTOBER 1, 2004, THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-30

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  14. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Tasks for October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    None listed

    2006-08-03

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  15. Annual Technical Progress Report of Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program Tasks for October 1, 2004 Through September 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect

    King, James F

    2006-06-01

    The Office of Space and Defense Power Systems of the Department of Energy (DOE) provides Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) for applications where conventional power systems are not feasible. For example, radioisotope thermoelectric generators were supplied by the DOE to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for deep space missions including the Cassini Mission launched in October of 1997 to study the planet Saturn. For the Cassini Mission, ORNL produced carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and clad vent sets (CVS) used in the generators. The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been involved in developing materials and technology and producing components for the DOE for more than three decades. This report reflects program guidance from the Office of Space and Defense Power Systems for fiscal year (FY) 2005. Production activities for prime quality (prime) CBCF insulator sets, iridium alloy blanks and foil, and CVS are summarized in this report. Technology activities are also reported that were conducted to improve the manufacturing processes, characterize materials, or to develop information for new radioisotope power systems.

  16. Design and development of polyphenylene oxide foam as a reusable internal insulation for LH2 tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Material specification and fabrication process procedures for foam production are presented. The properties of mechanical strength, modulus of elasticity, density and thermal conductivity were measured and related to foam quality. Properties unique to the foam such as a gas layer insulation, density gradient parallel to the fiber direction, and gas flow conductance in both directions were correlated with foam quality. Inspection and quality control tests procedures are outlined and photographs of test equipment and test specimens are shown.

  17. ASRM case insulation design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Matthew S.; Tam, William F. S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the achievements made on the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case insulation design and development program. The ASRM case insulation system described herein protects the metal case and joints from direct radiation and hot gas impingement. Critical failure of solid rocket systems is often traceable to failure of the insulation design. The wide ranging accomplishments included the development of a nonasbestos insulation material for ASRM that replaced the existing Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) asbestos-filled nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) along with a performance gain of 300 pounds, and improved reliability of all the insulation joint designs, i.e., segmented case joint, case-to-nozzle and case-to-igniter joint. The insulation process development program included the internal stripwinding process. This process advancement allowed Aerojet to match to exceed the capability of other propulsion companies.

  18. Hydrogen storage in insulated pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.M.; Garcia-Villazana, O.

    1998-08-01

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). This paper shows an evaluation of the applicability of the insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles. The paper shows an evaluation of evaporative losses and insulation requirements and a description of the current analysis and experimental plans for testing insulated pressure vessels. The results show significant advantages to the use of insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles.

  19. High pressure electrical insulated feed thru connector

    DOEpatents

    Oeschger, Joseph E.; Berkeland, James E.

    1979-11-13

    A feed-thru type hermetic electrical connector including at least one connector pin feeding through an insulator block within the metallic body of the connector shell. A compression stop arrangement coaxially disposed about the insulator body is brazed to the shell, and the shoulder on the insulator block bears against this top in a compression mode, the high pressure or internal connector being at the opposite end of the shell. Seals between the pin and an internal bore at the high pressure end of the insulator block and between the insulator block and the metallic shell at the high pressure end are hermetically brazed in place, the first of these also functioning to transfer the axial compressive load without permitting appreciable shear action between the pin and insulator block.

  20. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B. S.; Hsu, Y.-T.; Zeng, B.; Hatnean, M. Ciomaga; Harrison, N.; Zhu, Z.; Hartstein, M.; Kiourlappou, M.; Srivastava, A.; Johannes, M. D.; Murphy, T. P.; Park, J.-H.; Balicas, L.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Balakrishnan, G.; Sebastian, Suchitra E.

    2015-07-01

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. The quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  1. ASRM case insulation design and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Matthew S.; Tam, William F. S.

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes the achievements made on the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case insulation design and development program. The ASRM case insulation system described herein protects the metal case and joints from direct radiation and hot gas impingement. Critical failure of solid rocket systems is often traceable to failure of the insulation design. The wide ranging accomplishments included the development of a nonasbestos insulation material for ASRM that replaced the existing Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) asbestos-filled nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) along with a performance gain of 300 pounds, and improved reliability of all the insulation joint designs, i.e., segmented case joint, case-to-nozzle and case-to-igniter joint. The insulation process development program included the internal stripwinding process. This process advancement allowed Aerojet to match to exceed the capability of other propulsion companies.

  2. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Neil; Tan, B. S.; Hsu, Y. -T.; Zeng, B.; Hatnean, M. Ciomaga; Zhu, Z.; Hartstein, M.; Kiourlappou, M.; Srivastava, A.; Johannes, M. D.; Murphy, T. P.; Park, J. -H.; Balicas, L.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Balakrishnan, G.; Sebastian, Suchitra E.

    2015-07-17

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. As a result, the quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  3. High-temperature zirconia insulation and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Lewis, J. Jr.

    1988-05-10

    The present invention is directed to a highly pure, partially stabilized, fibrous zirconia composite for use as thermal insulation in environments where temperatures up to about 2,000 C are utilized. The composite of the present invention is fabricated into any suitable configuration such as a cone, cylinder, dome or the like by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of partially stabilized zirconia fibers into a desired configuration on a suitably shaped mandrel. The molded fibers are infiltrated with zirconyl nitrate and the resulting structure is then dried to form a rigid structure which may be removed and placed in a furnace. The structure is then heated in air to a temperature of about 600 C for driving off the nitrate from the structure and for oxidizing the zirconyl ion to zirconia. Thereafter, the structure is heated to about 950 to 1,250 C to fuse the zirconia fibers at their nexi in a matrix of zirconia. The composite produced by the present invention is self-supporting and can be readily machined to desired final dimensions. Additional heating to about 1,800 to 2,000 C further improves structural rigidity.

  4. High-temperature zirconia insulation and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, Jr., George E.; Holcombe, Jr., Cressie E.; Lewis, Jr., John

    1988-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a highly pure, partially stabilized, fibrous zirconia composite for use as thermal insulation in environments where temperatures up to about 2000.degree. C. are utilized. The composite of the present invention is fabricated into any suitable configuration such as a cone, cylinder, dome or the like by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of partially stabilized zirconia fibers into a desired configuration on a suitably shaped mandrel. The molded fibers are infiltrated with zirconyl nitrate and the resulting structure is then dried to form a rigid structure which may be removed and placed in a furnace. The structure is then heated in air to a temperature of about 600.degree. C. for driving off the nitrate from the structure and for oxidizing the zirconyl ion to zirconia. Thereafter, the structure is heated to about 950.degree. to 1,250.degree. C. to fuse the zirconia fibers at their nexi in a matrix of zirconia. The composite produced by the present invention is self-supporting and can be readily machined to desired final dimensions. Additional heating to about 1800.degree. to 2000.degree. C. further improves structural rigidity.

  5. High-temperature zirconia insulation and method for making same

    DOEpatents

    Wrenn, G.E. Jr.; Holcombe, C.E. Jr.; Lewis, J. Jr.

    The present invention is directed to a highly pure, partially stabilized, fibrous zirconia composite for use as thermal insulation in environments where temperatures up to about 2,000/sup 0/C are utilized. The composite of the present invention is fabricated into any suitable configuration such as a cone, cylinder dome or the like by vacuum molding an aqueous slurry of partially stabilized zirconia fibers into a desired configuration on a suitably shaped mandrel. The molded fibers are infiltrated with zirconyl nitrate and the resulting structure is then dried to form a rigid structure which may be removed and placed in a furnace. The structure is then heated in air to a temperature of about 600/sup 0/C for driving off the nitrate from the structure and for oxidizing the zirconyl ion to zirconia. Thereafter, the structure is heated to about 950/sup 0/ to 1,250/sup 0/C to fuse the zirconia fibers at their nexi in a matrix of zirconia. The composite produced by the present invention is self-supporting and can be readily machined to desired final dimensions. Additional heating to about 1800/sup 0/ to 2000/sup 0/C further improves structural rigidity.

  6. DC Characterization of High Gradient Multilayer Insulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    electric field for surface flashover is not directly proportional to the insulator length i.e. doubling the length of a simple, bulk (single material...or composite) insulator does not double the voltage where surface flashover occurs. Literature suggests the most likely mechanism of flashover in... surface flashover or other fault. As a result, we did not observe damage to the electrodes or the sample insulators following a flashover . For

  7. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  8. DC CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH GRADIENT MULTILAYER INSULATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J A; Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S E; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M L

    2005-05-26

    We have developed a novel insulator concept that involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods less than 1 mm. We have demonstrated that these structures perform 2 to 5 times better than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We present new testing results showing exceptional behavior at DC, with gradients in excess of 110kV/cm in vacuum.

  9. Ignitability of some insulation and building materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Murphy, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    A variety of insulation and building materials were evaluated for ignitability, using a screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Ignitability tended to be greater with the more efficient insulation materials because the insulating qualities resulted in a more rapid rise in temperature at the exposed surface. The use of a noncombustible facing material is recommended to provide protection from surface ignition.

  10. Gas insulated substation equipment for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kenedy, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    Until recently the only available method for construction of high voltage systems was to use exposed air insulated equipment supported on porcelain columns. The past decade has witnessed the introduction and wide acceptance of compressed gas insulated equipment as a viable alternative to the conventional substation system. The characteristics of gas insulated substations (GIS) and their application for industrial use at service voltages at 69 kV and above are discussed.

  11. Historical Review of VLF Insulator Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    construction contractor, Woerfel Corporation , on the other hand. The controversy concerned the accept- ability of the guy strain insulators in terms of meeting...specification, 21-75-0043, resulted in Contract N62477-75- C-0043 to Decca Austin Insulator Corporation of Branson, Ontario; after a design conference in...Appendix F: NELC Specification: Insulator Assembly, Electrical, VLF Antenna Base (ELEX-I-157) 7. Appendix G: Megatek Corporation Final Report: Testing

  12. Aerogels Insulate Missions and Consumer Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Aspen Aerogels, of Northborough, Massachusetts, worked with NASA through an SBIR contract with Kennedy Space Center to develop a robust, flexible form of aerogel for cryogenic insulation for space shuttle launch applications. The company has since used the same manufacturing process developed under the SBIR award to expand its product offerings into the more commercial realms, making the naturally fragile aerogel available for the first time as a standard insulation that can be handled and installed just like standard insulation.

  13. Photovoltaic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  14. ATR FTIR Mapping of Leather Fiber Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondi, G.; Grünewald, T.; Petutschnigg, A.; Schnabel, T.

    2015-01-01

    Leather fiber panels are very promising materials for many applications, not only for the easy availability of the constituents but also for their outstanding fi re-retardant properties. These innovative composite panels can be an excellent material for building insulation, and in recent times, the interest of industries in this composite board has considerably arisen. For this reason the discrimination of the components in the leather fiber panels is becoming fundamental in order to ensure their homogeneous properties. A method to characterize the surface of these materials is then required. An ATR FTIR mapping system for the leather fiber panels has been performed with a Perkin-Elmer microscope coupled with a Frontier FTIR spectrometer. The system has successfully allowed transforming the optical image to a chemical one. This technique can be considered as a right tool for routine controls of the surface quality, especially when the leather shavings cannot be optically distinguished.

  15. 16 CFR 460.2 - What is home insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSULATION § 460.2 What is home insulation. Insulation is any material mainly used to slow down heat flow. It... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What is home insulation. 460.2 Section 460.2..., semirigid, flexible, or loose-fill form. Home insulation is for use in old or new homes,...

  16. 16 CFR 460.2 - What is home insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSULATION § 460.2 What is home insulation. Insulation is any material mainly used to slow down heat flow. It... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What is home insulation. 460.2 Section 460.2..., semirigid, flexible, or loose-fill form. Home insulation is for use in old or new homes,...

  17. 16 CFR 460.2 - What is home insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSULATION § 460.2 What is home insulation. Insulation is any material mainly used to slow down heat flow. It... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What is home insulation. 460.2 Section 460.2..., semirigid, flexible, or loose-fill form. Home insulation is for use in old or new homes,...

  18. Systems and Methods for Providing Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods provide a multi-layer insulation (MLI) that includes a plurality of sealed metalized volumes in a stacked arrangement, wherein the plurality of sealed metalized volumes encapsulate a gas therein, with the gas having one of a thermal insulating property, an acoustic insulating property, or a combination insulating property thereof. The MLI also includes at least one spacer between adjacent sealed metalized volumes of the plurality of sealed metalized volumes and a protective cover surrounding the plurality of sealed metalized volumes.

  19. Inspecting Pipe Radiographically Through Asbestos Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianettino, David P.

    1994-01-01

    Welds between sections of insulated steampipe located and inspected radiographically. Unless need to repair defective weld, one avoids cost, time, and hazard of removing asbestos insulation. Enables inspectors to locate and evaluate nondestructively any weld in pipe system, without shutting down steam. Hidden weld joints first located by use of low-power fluoroscope, moved along pipe while technician observes fluoroscopic image. Low-energy x rays from fluoroscope penetrate insulation but not pipe. Weld bead appears in silhouette on fluoroscope screen. Technician then accurately marks weld sites on insulation for later inspection.

  20. Transmission in graphene-topological insulator heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beule, C.; Zarenia, M.; Partoens, B.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate scattering of the topological surface state of a three-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulator when graphene is deposited on the topological-insulator surface. Specifically, we consider the (111) surface of a Bi2Se3 -like topological insulator. We present a low-energy model for the graphene-topological insulator heterostructure and we calculate the transmission probability at zigzag and armchair edges of the deposited graphene, and the conductance through graphene nanoribbon barriers, and show that its features can be understood from antiresonances in the transmission probability.

  1. Multilayer ultra high gradient insulator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Vitello, P.A.; Krogh, M.L.; Elizondo, J.M.

    1998-03-27

    We are investigating a novel insulator concept which involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods less than 1 mm. These structures perform many times better (about 1.5 to 4 times higher breakdown electric field) than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We present our ongoing studies investigating the degradation of the breakdown electric field resulting from surface roughness, the effect of gas pressure, and the performance of the insulator structure under bi-polar stress. Further, we present our initial modeling studies.

  2. Thermal Insulation Strips Conserve Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Launching the space shuttle involves an interesting paradox: While the temperatures inside the shuttle s main engines climb higher than 6,000 F hot enough to boil iron for fuel, the engines use liquid hydrogen, the second coldest liquid on Earth after liquid helium. Maintained below 20 K (-423 F), the liquid hydrogen is contained in the shuttle s rust-colored external tank. The external tank also contains liquid oxygen (kept below a somewhat less chilly 90 K or -297 F) that combines with the hydrogen to create an explosive mixture that along with the shuttle s two, powdered aluminum-fueled solid rocket boosters allows the shuttle to escape Earth s gravity. The cryogenic temperatures of the main engines liquid fuel can cause ice, frost, or liquefied air to build up on the external tank and other parts of the numerous launch fueling systems, posing a possible debris risk when the ice breaks off during launch and causing difficulties in the transfer and control of these cryogenic liquid propellants. Keeping the fuel at the necessary ultra-cold temperatures while minimizing ice buildup and other safety hazards, as well as reducing the operational maintenance costs, has required NASA to explore innovative ways for providing superior thermal insulation systems. To address the challenge, the Agency turned to an insulating technology so effective that, even though it is mostly air, a thin sheet can prevent a blowtorch from igniting a match. Aerogels were invented in 1931 and demonstrate properties that make them the most extraordinary insulating materials known; a 1-inch-thick piece of aerogel provides the same insulation as layering 15 panes of glass with air pockets in between. Derived from silica, aluminum oxide, or carbon gels using a supercritical drying process - resulting in a composition of almost 99-percent air - aerogels are the world s lightest solid (among 15 other titles they hold in the Guinness World Records), can float indefinitely on water if treated to be

  3. Carbon Fiber from Biomass

    SciTech Connect

    Milbrandt, Anelia; Booth, Samuel

    2016-09-01

    Carbon fiber (CF), known also as graphite fiber, is a lightweight, strong, and flexible material used in both structural (load-bearing) and non-structural applications (e.g., thermal insulation). The high cost of precursors (the starting material used to make CF, which comes predominately from fossil sources) and manufacturing have kept CF a niche market with applications limited mostly to high-performance structural materials (e.g., aerospace). Alternative precursors to reduce CF cost and dependence on fossil sources have been investigated over the years, including biomass-derived precursors such as rayon, lignin, glycerol, and lignocellulosic sugars. The purpose of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of CF precursors from biomass and their market potential. We examine the potential CF production from these precursors, the state of technology and applications, and the production cost (when data are available). We discuss their advantages and limitations. We also discuss the physical properties of biomass-based CF, and we compare them to those of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based CF. We also discuss manufacturing and end-product considerations for bio-based CF, as well as considerations for plant siting and biomass feedstock logistics, feedstock competition, and risk mitigation strategies. The main contribution of this study is that it provides detailed technical and market information about each bio-based CF precursor in one document while other studies focus on one precursor at a time or a particular topic (e.g., processing). Thus, this publication allows for a comprehensive view of the CF potential from all biomass sources and serves as a reference for both novice and experienced professionals interested in CF production from alternative sources.

  4. Electrical Conduction in Thin Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Anil Kumar, , Dr.

    2003-10-01

    ABSTRACT: The study of Conduction mechanism in Insulator(Mica)of thickness from 20-80 microns has been carried out.The effect of varying electrical fields upto 50 MV/m at room temperature were studied.A sample of thickness 80 microns exibits non-linear behavior at fields beyond 24 MV/m. Other sample of thickness 50 microns,40 microns and 20 microns exibit linear behavior at low fields.On increasing the field furthur a sharp rise in current is obersved. Eventually at fields beyond 20 MV/m,the current does not continue to rise sharply and the rate of increase slow down very much.The log J-log V characterstics were obtained for various samples.For a sample of thickness of 20 microns,there are three distinct regions were found, having different slopes.The slope the second region indicates a square law dependence.The studies with these Mica films indicated different conduction processes at different field strenght.At field,ranging from(10-20)MV/m, the current was found to be SPACE-CHARGE LIMITED,due to shallow trapping of electrons.Beyond this field,however,at room temperature,the current did not show as sharp a rise as it should in case of an insulator caontaining shallow traps.This behavior has been attributed to the electron- phonon interactions.At higher temperature the current increased with fields as in the case of an insulator contaning shallow traps.A SPACE-CHARGE LIMITED CONDUCTION MECHANISM due to shallow traping of electrons has been suggested.This has been undertaken in view of growing interest and application of integrated circuitry.

  5. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOEpatents

    Forsyth, E.B.; Muller, A.C.

    1983-07-15

    The present invention is a cable which, although constructed from inexpensive polyolefin tapes and using typical impregnating oils, furnishes high voltage capability up to 765 kV, and has such excellent dielectric characteristics and heat transfer properties that it is capable of operation at capacities equal to or higher than presently available cables at a given voltage. This is accomplished by using polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene insulating tape which has been specially processed to attain properties which are not generally found in these materials, but are required for their use in impregnated electrical cables. Chief among these properties is compatibility with impregnating oil.

  6. Superconducting interfaces between insulating oxides.

    PubMed

    Reyren, N; Thiel, S; Caviglia, A D; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Hammerl, G; Richter, C; Schneider, C W; Kopp, T; Rüetschi, A-S; Jaccard, D; Gabay, M; Muller, D A; Triscone, J-M; Mannhart, J

    2007-08-31

    At interfaces between complex oxides, electronic systems with unusual electronic properties can be generated. We report on superconductivity in the electron gas formed at the interface between two insulating dielectric perovskite oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The behavior of the electron gas is that of a two-dimensional superconductor, confined to a thin sheet at the interface. The superconducting transition temperature of congruent with 200 millikelvin provides a strict upper limit to the thickness of the superconducting layer of congruent with 10 nanometers.

  7. Insulating panels with rice husk

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, J.; Veras, J.

    1986-01-01

    This study includes the quantitative results of tests caried out on 7.5 x 15.0 cm cylindrical test pieces and fullsized panels with a cement and rice husk, produced by using means belonging to the so-called ''appropriate technologies''. These results are summarized and analyzed with a view to providing a possible alternative for substituting other insulating materials, which are generally imported, in developing countries. The technical results presented point towards a promising future for the task undertaken, within the context of a research project on ''materials, technologies and prototypes for very low-cost housing'' which, in a - multinational capacity, is being developed at the Instituto E. Torroja.

  8. Electrically insulating and sealing frame

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Robin J.

    1983-11-08

    A combination gas seal and electrical insulator having a closed frame shape interconnects a fuel cell stack and a reactant gas plenum of a fuel cell generator. The frame can be of rectangular shape including at least one slidable spline connection in each side to permit expansion or contraction consistent with that of the walls of the gas plenum and fuel cell stack. The slidable spline connections in the frame sides minimizes lateral movement between the frame side members and sealing material interposed between the frame and the fuel cell stack or between the frame and the reactant gas plenum.

  9. Processing of insulators and semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Quick, Nathaniel R.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Duty, Chad Edward; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Angelini, Joseph Attilio

    2015-06-16

    A method is disclosed for processing an insulator material or a semiconductor material. The method includes pulsing a plasma lamp onto the material to diffuse a doping substance into the material, to activate the doping substance in the material or to metallize a large area region of the material. The method may further include pulsing a laser onto a selected region of the material to diffuse a doping substance into the material, to activate the doping substance in the material or to metallize a selected region of the material.

  10. Orbital disc insulator for SF.sub.6 gas-insulated bus

    DOEpatents

    Bacvarov, Dosio C.; Gomarac, Nicholas G.

    1977-01-01

    An insulator for supporting a high voltage conductor within a gas-filled grounded housing consists of radially spaced insulation rings fitted to the exterior of the bus and the interior of the grounded housing respectively, and the spaced rings are connected by trefoil type rings which are integrally formed with the spaced insulation rings.

  11. Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Moorhead, A.J.

    1997-07-15

    A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to ``wick`` into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy. 1 fig.

  12. Method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals

    DOEpatents

    Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.; Moorhead, Arthur J.

    1997-01-01

    A method for joining carbon-carbon composites to metals by brazing. Conventional brazing of recently developed carbon-bonded carbon fiber (CBCF) material to a metal substrate is limited by the tendency of the braze alloy to "wick" into the CBCF composite rather than to form a strong bond. The surface of the CBCF composite that is to be bonded is first sealed with a fairly dense carbonaceous layer achieved by any of several methods. The sealed surface is then brazed to the metal substrate by vacuum brazing with a Ti-Cu-Be alloy.

  13. R&D on glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites for superconducting Tokamak.

    PubMed

    Hu, Nannan; Wang, Ke; Ma, Hongming; Pan, Wanjiang; Chen, Qingqing

    2016-01-01

    The glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites play an important role in superconducting Tokamak, which are used to insulate the metal components, such as superconducting winding, cooling pipes, metal electrodes and so on. For the components made of metal and glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites, thermal shrinkage leads to non-ignorable thermal stress, therefore, much attention should be paid on the thermal shrinkage rate of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites. The structural design of glass fiber reinforced epoxy resin composites should aim at reducing thermal stress. In this paper, the density, glass fiber content and thermal shrinkage rate of five insulation tubes were tested. The testing results will be applied in structural design and mechanical analysis of isolators for superconducting Tokamak.

  14. Preliminary experimental study of a carbon fiber array cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, An-kun; Fan, Yu-wei

    2016-08-01

    The preliminary experimental results of a carbon fiber array cathode for the magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) operations are reported. When the diode voltage and diode current were 480 kV and 44 kA, respectively, high-power microwaves with a peak power of about 3 GW and a pulse duration of about 60 ns were obtained in a MILO device with the carbon fiber array cathode. The preliminary experimental results show that the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the diode current and the microwave power is stable until 700 shots. No obvious damage or deterioration can be observed in the carbon fiber surface morphology after 700 shots. Moreover, the cathode performance has no observable deterioration after 700 shots. In conclusion, the maintain-free lifetime of the carbon fiber array cathode is more than 700 shots. In this way, this carbon fiber array cathode offers a potential replacement for the existing velvet cathode.

  15. Containerless high purity pulling process and apparatus for glass fiber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.; Ethridge, E. C. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for pulling optical glass fibers in a containerless environment is disclosed which includes a single axis acoustical levitation furnace in which a specimen is levitated and melted. A reflector unit is carried in the interior of the furnace and includes a reflector disposed centrally about the acoustical axis of the levitator. The reflector unit includes a circular shroud of insulation and a copper sleeve inserted in the unit which is hollow at for receiving a cooling medium. A fiber pulling bore is formed centrally in the reflector unit surrounded by cooling jacket to enhance solidification and formation of a fiber. A starting fiber strand is introduced into the melt and pulled outwardly through bore whereby the specimen fiber is started and formed as pulled therethrough. In order to replenish the melt and thus enable a continous process, a movable secondary reflector is provided which captures a supplemental specimen pellet and by movement of the reflector transfers it to the melt.

  16. Estimation of the thermal conductivity of hemp based insulation material from 3D tomographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sawalhi, R.; Lux, J.; Salagnac, P.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we are interested in the structural and thermal characterization of natural fiber insulation materials. The thermal performance of these materials depends on the arrangement of fibers, which is the consequence of the manufacturing process. In order to optimize these materials, thermal conductivity models can be used to correlate some relevant structural parameters with the effective thermal conductivity. However, only a few models are able to take into account the anisotropy of such material related to the fibers orientation, and these models still need realistic input data (fiber orientation distribution, porosity, etc.). The structural characteristics are here directly measured on a 3D tomographic image using advanced image analysis techniques. Critical structural parameters like porosity, pore and fiber size distribution as well as local fiber orientation distribution are measured. The results of the tested conductivity models are then compared with the conductivity tensor obtained by numerical simulation on the discretized 3D microstructure, as well as available experimental measurements. We show that 1D analytical models are generally not suitable for assessing the thermal conductivity of such anisotropic media. Yet, a few anisotropic models can still be of interest to relate some structural parameters, like the fiber orientation distribution, to the thermal properties. Finally, our results emphasize that numerical simulations on 3D realistic microstructure is a very interesting alternative to experimental measurements.

  17. Dielectric strength of irradiated fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, Karl; Weber, Harald W.; Hastik, Ronald; Hauser, Hans; Gerstenberg, Heiko

    2001-05-01

    The insulation system for the toroidal field model coil of international thermonuclear experimental reactor is a fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) laminate, which consists of a combined Kapton/R-glass-fiber reinforcement tape, vacuum-impregnated with an epoxy DGEBA system. Pure disk-shaped laminates, disk-shaped FRP/stainless-steel sandwiches, and conductor insulation prototypes were irradiated at 5 K in a fission reactor up to a fast neutron fluence of 10 22 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) to investigate the radiation induced degradation of the dielectric strength of the insulation system. After warm-up to room temperature, swelling, weight loss, and the breakdown strength were measured at 77 K. The sandwich swells by 4% at a fluence of 5×10 21 m -2 and by 9% at 1×10 22 m -2. The weight loss of the FRP is 2% at 1×10 22 m -2. The dielectric strength remained unchanged over the whole dose range.

  18. Interfacing Topological Insulators with Ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardella, Anthony

    In topological insulators, the surface states arise from strong spin-orbit coupling while the degeneracy of the Dirac point is protected by time reversal symmetry. Introducing magnetism in proximity to the surface states breaks this symmetry, destroying the non-trivial Berry phase at the Dirac point and leads to a hedgehog spin texture near the newly opened magnetic gap. This symmetry broken phase leads to a host of unusual physics, such as the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. In this talk, we discuss the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of such magnetically interfaced and magnetically doped topological insulators. Such materials often suffer from structural defects and interfacial layers, as well as from degradation during device fabrication. In particular, it is shown that Cr doped (Bi1-x,Sbx)2Te3 can exhibit perfect Hall quantization at low temperatures despite these defects. However, the magnetic ordering of this material was found to be quite unusual, displaying a super-paramagnetic like character, perhaps reflecting this disorder. Such observations highlight the surprising behavior of such broken symmetry phases in topological materials. This work was performed in collaboration with A. Kandala, M. Liu, W. Wang, N.P. Ong, C.-X. Liu, and N. Samarth, in addition to the authors of the references cited. This work was supported by funding from ARO/MURI, DARPA and ONR.

  19. Sialons as high temperature insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Kuo, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    Sialons were evaluated for application as high temperature electrical insulators in contact with molybdenum and tungsten components in hard vacuum applications. Both D.C. and variable frequency A.C. resistivity data indicate the sialons to have electrical resistivity similar to common oxide in the 1000 C or higher range. Metallographic evaluations indicate good bonding of the type 15R ALN polytype to molybdenum and tungsten. The beta prime or modified silicon nitride phase was unacceptable in terms of vacuum stability. Additives effect on electrical resistivity. Similar resistivity decreases were produced by additions of molybdenum or tungsten to form cermets. The use of hot pressing at 1800 C with ALN, Al2 O3 and Si3N4 starting powders produced a better product than did a combination of SiO2 and AIN staring powders. It was indicated that sialons will be suitable insulators in the 1600K range in contact with molybdenum or tungsten if they are produced as a pure ceramic and subsequently bonded to the metal components at temperatures in the 1600K range.

  20. Corona processing of insulating oil

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.

    1996-07-01

    It is well known that sustained corona discharge in insulating oil lowers its dielectric strength and simultaneously reduces its corona resistance. Therefore, for operating stresses in the corona regime, activity typically increases with time and, if allowed to continue, eventually leads to breakdown of the oil and failure of the component or system. It is, therefore, common practice to periodically replace oil in devices such as large power transformers and switch gear before breakdown occurs. Sealed components such as capacitors are typically replaced. Recent experiments have demonstrated that the dielectric properties of corona weakened oil can not only be restored, but actually improved by a simple regeneration process. These experiments were carried out on high voltage pulse transformer windings which were operated at high rep rates until partial discharges formed. Reprocessing the oil after each operating cycle resulted in successively longer operational periods before partial discharges appeared. In a separate experiment, a process was developed to precondition transformer oil to raise its corona inception voltage before using it to insulate a high voltage component, thus giving it a longer initial service life for a given operating stress or permitting higher stress operation for limited operating times.

  1. Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure

    DOEpatents

    Vohra, A.

    1999-03-02

    A low-cost exterior insulation process of stacking bags of insulating material against a wall and covering them with wire mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value. 2 figs.

  2. The new science of fiber safety: Assuring the safety of fiber-based materials for acoustic and noise control applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadley, John

    2005-09-01

    In 2001, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) assembled a group of 18 international experts on the health effects of fibers. Their task was to review the available science on the health aspects of glass, rock, and slag wool fibers. The group of experts determined that glass, rock, and slag wool insulation fibers should be removed from the IARC list of possible carcinogens. That decision was based fundamentally on the development of new science that has led to an understanding of those properties of fibers which affect their potential biological activity. This presentation will provide both an overview of this new science and provide guidelines to assure the safety of fiber-based materials used in acoustic and noise-control applications.

  3. Electrical and Mechanical Characterizations of Nanocomposite Insulation for HTS Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J K; Fabian, Paul E; Hooker, M W; Lizotte, M J; Tuncer, Enis; Sauers, Isidor

    2011-01-01

    As HTS wire technology continues to advance, a critical need has emerged for dielectric materials that can be used in superconducting components such as terminations, fault current limiters, transformers, and motors. To address this need, CTD is developing nanocomposite insulations based on epoxy and benzoxazine chemistries. Depending on part geometry, some processing methods are more efficient than others. For this reason, CTD is investigating both fiber-reinforced and filled resin systems for use in these applications. A thorough set of electrical testing including AC breakdown, breakdown as a function of thickness, and flashover shows promising performance characteristics. In addition, mechanical testing (short beam shear and compression) indicate that these new materials to have as good or better performance than G10.

  4. Durability of crosslinked polydimethylsyloxanes: the case of composite insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delor-Jestin, Florence; Tomer, Namrata S.; Pal Singh, Raj; Lacoste, Jacques

    2008-04-01

    Most applications of silicones are linked to their hydrophobic properties and (or) their high resistance to ageing (e.g. thermal ageing and photoageing). However, when placed in extreme environments, these materials can fail as in the case of epoxy/fiber glass composite powerlines insulators, where crosslinked polymethylsyloxanes (PDMSs) are used as the protective envelope (housing) of the insulator. We report on the behavior of both pure/noncrosslinked PDMSs and typical formulations used in industrial insulators, i.e. containing peroxide crosslinked PDMS, alumina trioxide hydrated (ATH) and silica. Special attention is paid on both (i) the sources of potential degradation and (ii) the best analytical methods that can be applied to the study of very complex formulations. (i) Aside from conventional types of ageing such as photo-ageing and thermal, hydrolytic, and service life ageings, treatments with acidic vapors, plasma and ozone possibly generating species from the reaction of a high electric field with air were also performed, which allowed to accelerate electrical and out-door ageings and to obtain differently aged materials. (ii) Aside from conventional analytical methods of polymer degradation such as FTIR/ATR spectroscopy and SEC, TG, hardness measurements, more specific methods like photo/DSC, TG/IR, thermoporosimetry, resistivity and density measurements were also performed to characterize the chemical and physical evolutions of polymer materials. In particular, it was found that treatment with nitric acid vapor has detrimental effects on the properties of both fire retardants (e.g. ATH) and PDMSs, affecting the hardness and resistivity of the formulated material.

  5. Durability of crosslinked polydimethylsyloxanes: the case of composite insulators

    PubMed Central

    Delor-Jestin, Florence; Tomer, Namrata S; Pal Singh, Raj; Lacoste, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    Most applications of silicones are linked to their hydrophobic properties and (or) their high resistance to ageing (e.g. thermal ageing and photoageing). However, when placed in extreme environments, these materials can fail as in the case of epoxy/fiber glass composite powerlines insulators, where crosslinked polymethylsyloxanes (PDMSs) are used as the protective envelope (housing) of the insulator. We report on the behavior of both pure/noncrosslinked PDMSs and typical formulations used in industrial insulators, i.e. containing peroxide crosslinked PDMS, alumina trioxide hydrated (ATH) and silica. Special attention is paid on both (i) the sources of potential degradation and (ii) the best analytical methods that can be applied to the study of very complex formulations. (i) Aside from conventional types of ageing such as photo-ageing and thermal, hydrolytic, and service life ageings, treatments with acidic vapors, plasma and ozone possibly generating species from the reaction of a high electric field with air were also performed, which allowed to accelerate electrical and out-door ageings and to obtain differently aged materials. (ii) Aside from conventional analytical methods of polymer degradation such as FTIR/ATR spectroscopy and SEC, TG, hardness measurements, more specific methods like photo/DSC, TG/IR, thermoporosimetry, resistivity and density measurements were also performed to characterize the chemical and physical evolutions of polymer materials. In particular, it was found that treatment with nitric acid vapor has detrimental effects on the properties of both fire retardants (e.g. ATH) and PDMSs, affecting the hardness and resistivity of the formulated material. PMID:27877973

  6. Reflecting layers reduce weight of insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. D.; Schlessinger, E. D.; Rockoff, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    Metalized films placed between layers of fibrous material maintain equivalent thermal conductivity while cutting blanket density in half. Tests indicate that insulation with 1 lb/cu ft density with goldized films has thermal conductivity equal to 2 lb/cu ft of conventional insulation. Concept reduces weight in commercial aircraft and increases cargo space.

  7. Internal capillary insulation for cryogenic tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrew, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Capillary-type insulation was devised for installation on inside of liquid methane fuel tanks for future aircraft. Insulation consists of honeycomb core of fiberglass cloth impregnated with polyimide resin which is bonded onto metal tank wall using polyimide adhesive. Capillary holes in each honeycomb cell admit methane which provides static pressure in cell.

  8. Development of extruded polymer insulated superconducting cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaki, M.; Nagao, M.; Mizuno, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Horii, K.

    A superconducting power cable which has a structure similar to the conventional extruded polyethylene cable is proposed. The main features of the design are to exploit the excellent electrical properties of polymers at cryogenic temperatures and to separate the helium coolant from the electrical insulation. However, the most hazardous problem of this insulation system is cracking of the extruded polymer insulation during cooling. In order to examine the feasibility of the above proposal, a superconducting cable of rated voltage 20 kV and rated current 2 kA was manufactured, being suitable for the university laboratory tests. Extruded polyethylene or ethylene propylene rubber was adopted as electrical insulation. Current transmission tests up to 2.5 kA were performed with extruded polyethylene insulated superconducting cable though the insulation cracked during cooling. Voltage application tests were carried out with fair success at the liquid helium temperature with extruded ethylene propylene rubber insulated cable. This ia a breakthrough in terms of the electrical insulation design of cryogenic cables.

  9. Insulation board and process of making

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-08-27

    Insulation board is described which is capable of bearing a load without significant loss of insulating capacity due to compression, produced by a method wherein the board is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

  10. Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode

    DOEpatents

    Seidel, David B.; Slutz, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

  11. Insulator (Heat and Frost). Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRory, Aline; Ally, Mohamed

    This analysis covers tasks performed by an insulator, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as heat and frost insulator. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To facilitate understanding the nature of the occupation,…

  12. Engineered Ceramic Insulators for High Field Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. A.

    2006-03-01

    High field magnet coils made from brittle A15 superconductors need to be rigidly contained by their support structure but yet be electrically insulated from it. Current insulators (end shoes, pole pieces, spacers, mandrels, etc.) are often made from coated metallic shapes that satisfy the mechanical and thermal requirements but are electrically unreliable. The insulating coating on the metal core too often chips or flakes, causing electrical shorts. Any replacement insulator materials must manage the thermal expansion mismatch to control the stress within the coil enabling the achievement of ultimate magnet performance. A novel ceramic insulator has been developed that eliminates the potential for shorting while maintaining high structural integrity and thermal performance. The insulator composition can be engineered to provide a thermal expansion that matches the coil expansion, minimizing detrimental stress on the superconductor. These ceramic insulators are capable of surviving high temperature heat treatments and are radiation resistant. The material can withstand high mechanical loads generated during magnet operation. These more robust insulators will lower the magnet production costs, which will help enable future devices to be constructed within budgetary restrictions.

  13. Topological insulators: A romance with many dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Hari C.

    2010-07-01

    Electric charges on the boundaries of certain insulators are programmed by topology to keep moving forward when they encounter an obstacle, rather than scattering backwards and increasing the resistance of the system. This is just one reason why topological insulators are one of the hottest topics in physics right now.

  14. 49 CFR 179.300-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation. 179.300-4 Section 179.300-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-4 Insulation. (a) Tanks shall not...

  15. 49 CFR 179.220-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... space between the inner container and the outer shell must contain an approved insulation material. ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insulation. 179.220-4 Section 179.220-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  16. 49 CFR 179.220-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inner container and the outer shell must contain an approved insulation material. ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation. 179.220-4 Section 179.220-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  17. 49 CFR 179.220-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inner container and the outer shell must contain an approved insulation material. ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Insulation. 179.220-4 Section 179.220-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  18. 49 CFR 179.300-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Insulation. 179.300-4 Section 179.300-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-4 Insulation. (a) Tanks shall not...

  19. 49 CFR 179.220-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inner container and the outer shell must contain an approved insulation material. ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Insulation. 179.220-4 Section 179.220-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  20. 49 CFR 179.300-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Insulation. 179.300-4 Section 179.300-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-4 Insulation. (a) Tanks shall not...

  1. 49 CFR 179.300-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Insulation. 179.300-4 Section 179.300-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-4 Insulation. (a) Tanks shall not...

  2. Method of thermally insulating a wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Mckinzie, H.L.

    1981-07-07

    A method is claimed for thermally insulating the borehole of a well in a thermal process for oil recovery by providing in the annular space between the casing and the well tubing a flowable, solid material having thermal insulating properties, such as vermiculite or perlite. Removal of the material is by fluidization thereof.

  3. Triple-glazed insulating unit with improved edge insulation

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, George B.; Buchanan, Michael J.

    2016-06-07

    An insulating unit includes a first spacer frame between first and second sheets, e.g. glass sheets, and a second spacer frame between the second sheet and a third sheet. A first surface of the first spacer frame is adhered to inner surface of the first sheet, and an opposite second surface of the first spacer frame is adhered to a first surface of the second sheet, by a moisture impervious adhesive layer. A first outer surface of the second spacer frame is adhered to a second surface of the second sheet, and an opposite second outer surface of the second spacer frame is adhered to an inner surface of the third sheet, by the adhesive layer. The first spacer frame and the second spacer frame have an offset of greater than zero.

  4. BOA: Asbestos pipe insulation removal robot system. Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Schempf, H.; Bares, J.E.

    1995-02-01

    The project described in this report targets the development of a mechanized system for safe, cost-efficient and automated abatement of asbestos containing materials used as pipe insulation. Based on several key design criteria and site visits, a proof-of-concept prototype robot system, dubbed BOA, was designed and built, which automatically strips the lagging and insulation from the pipes, and encapsulates them under complete vacuum operation. The system can operate on straight runs of piping in horizontal or vertical orientations. Currently we are limited to four-inch diameter piping without obstacles as well as a somewhat laborious emplacement and removal procedure -- restrictions to be alleviated through continued development. BOA removed asbestos at a rate of 4-5 ft./h compared to 3 ft./h for manual removal of asbestos with a 3-person crew. The containment and vacuum system on BOA was able to achieve the regulatory requirement for airborne fiber emissions of 0.01 fibers/ccm/ 8-hr. shift. This program consists of two phases. The first phase was completed and a demonstration was given to a review panel, consisting of DOE headquarters and site representatives as well as commercial abatement industry representatives. Based on the technical and programmatic recommendations drafted, presented and discussed during the review meeting, a new plan for the Phase II effort of this project was developed. Phase 11 will consist of a 26-month effort, with an up-front 4-month site-, market-, cost/benefit and regulatory study before the next BOA robot (14 months) is built, and then deployed and demonstrated (3 months) at a DOE site (such as Fernald or Oak Ridge) by the beginning of FY`97.

  5. Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Lahowe, D A; Vogtlin, G E; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    The surface of an insulator under vacuum and under electrical charge will flashover when illuminated by a critical dose of ultra-violet (UV) radiation - depending on the insulator size and material, insulator cone angle, the applied voltage and insulator shot-history. A testbed comprised of an excimer laser (KrF, 248 nm, {approx}16 MW, 30 ns FWHM,), a vacuum chamber, and a negative polarity dc high voltage power supply ({le} -60 kV) were assembled to test 1.0 cm thick angled insulators for surface-flashover. Several candidate insulator materials, e.g. High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex, of varying cone angles were tested against UV illumination. Commercial energy meters were used to measure the UV fluence of the pulsed laser beam. In-house designed and fabricated capacitive probes (D-dots, >12 GHz bandwidth) were embedded in the anode electrode underneath the insulator to determine the time of UV arrival and time of flashover. Of the tested insulators, the +45 degree Rexolite insulator showed more resistance to UV for surface flashover; at UV fluence level of less than 13 mJ/cm{sup 2}, it was not possible to induce a flashover for up to -60 kV of DC potential across the insulator's surface. The probes also permitted the electrical charge on the insulator before and after flashover to be inferred. Photon to electron conversion efficiency for the surface of Rexolite insulator was determined from charge-balance equation. In order to understand the physical mechanism leading to flashover, we further experimented with the +45 degree Rexolite insulator by masking portions of the UV beam to illuminate only a section of the insulator surface; (1) the half nearest the cathode and subsequently, (2) the half nearest the anode. The critical UV fluence and time to flashover were measured and the results in each case were then compared with the base case of full-beam illumination. It was discovered that the time for the

  6. Novel Cryogenic Insulation Materials: Aerogel Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan

    2001-01-01

    New insulation materials are being developed to economically and reliably insulate future reusable spacecraft cryogenic tanks over a planned lifecycle of extreme thermal challenges. These insulation materials must prevent heat loss as well as moisture and oxygen condensation on the cryogenic tanks during extended groundhold, must withstand spacecraft launch conditions, and must protect a partly full or empty reusable cryogenic tank from significant reentry heating. To perform over such an extreme temperature range, novel composites were developed from aerogels and high-temperature matrix material such as Space Shuttle tile. These materials were fabricated and tested for use both as cryogenic insulation and as high-temperature insulation. The test results given in this paper were generated during spacecraft re-entry heating simulation tests using cryogenic cooling.

  7. ITER CENTRAL SOLENOID COIL INSULATION QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N; Mann, T L; Miller, J R; Freudenberg, K D; Reed, R P; Walsh, R P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2009-06-11

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4 x 4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  8. Polyimide Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Fay, Catharine C. (Inventor); Working, Dennis C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A polyimide fiber having textile physical property characteristics and the process of melt extruding same from a polyimide powder. Polyimide powder formed as the reaction product of the monomers 3.4'-ODA and ODPA, and endcapped with phthalic anhydride to control the molecular weight thereof, is melt extruded in the temperature range of 340? C. to 360? C. and at heights of 100.5 inches, 209 inches and 364.5 inches. The fibers obtained have a diameter in the range of 0.0068 inch to 0.0147 inch; a mean tensile strength in the range of 15.6 to 23.1 ksi; a mean modulus of 406 to 465 ksi; and a mean elongation in the range of 14 to 103%.

  9. Polyimide Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St.Clair, Terry L. (Inventor); Fay, Catharine C. (Inventor); Working, Dennis C. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A polyimide fiber having textile physical property characteristics and the process of melt extruding same from a polyimide powder. Polyimide powder formed as the reaction product of the monomers 3.4'-ODA and ODPA, and end- capped with phthalic anhydride to control the molecular weight thereof, is melt extruded in the temperature range of 340 C. to 360 C. and at heights of 100.5 inches. 209 inches and 364.5 inches. The fibers obtained have a diameter in the range of 0.0068 inch to 0.0147 inch; a mean tensile strength in the range of 15.6 to 23.1 ksi; a mean modulus of 406 to 465 ksi, and a mean elongation in the range of 14 to 103%.

  10. Novel approaches for alleviation of electrical hazards of graphite-fiber composites. [aircraft safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramohalli, K.

    1979-01-01

    Four basically different approaches were considered: gasification of fibers, retention in the matrix, clumping to prevent entrainment, and electrical insulation of fibers. The techniques used to achieve them are described in some detail. These involved surface treatment of fibers to improve the wettability of fibers and coating the fibers with the selected substances before laying them up for composite fabrication. Thermogravimetric analyses were performed on the plain and treated fibers in inert (nitrogen, argon) and reactive (air) atmospheres. The treated fibers embedded in epoxy were ignited in a Bunsen flame to determine the efficiency of these treatments. A simple apparatus was assembled to detect the time for the first short circuit (in a typical electrical circuit) when exposed to the combustion products from a graphite fiber composite fire. The state-of-the-art and treated fibers cast in typical epoxy were burned and ranked for potential success. It was inferred that the gasification schemes appear promising when reduction or oxidation is tried. It was also found that some very promising candidates were available for the clumping and for the electrical insulation of fibers.

  11. Review of animal/in vitro data on biological effects of man-made fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Ellouk, S A; Jaurand, M C

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the investigations with man-made fibers (MMF). Insulation woods: glasswool (GW), rockwool (RW), slagwool (SW), glass microfibers (GMF), glass filaments (GFiI), and refractory ceramic fibers (RCF) have been used in experimental animals and in in vitro cell systems. A large heterogeneous number of fibers, methods of fiber preparation, size selection, aerosolization, fiber size, and fiber burden measurement were noted, rendering difficult a comparison between results. By inhalation, RCF and asbestos used as positive controls produced a significant tumor increase. In some studies, a low tumor yield was found after inhalation of insulation wools; when all inhalation data were gathered, a significant tumor increase was found with GW. However, it is difficult to draw definitive conclusions on the potential of other fiber types because, in addition to the different compositions of the fibers, differences in fiber number and sizes existed, especially in comparison with asbestos. Moreover, experiments using inoculation, especially by the intraperitoneal route revealed a carcinogenic potential of all fibers types but GFiI and SW. In these two groups a small number of animals has been investigated and the fiber characteristics were sometimes irrelevant. So far, a relationship between the carcinogenic potency and fiber dimensions has been established. Other fiber parameters may be of importance (surface chemistry, biopersistence, fiber structure, for example) but further investigations are necessary to determine the correlations between these parameters and tumor incidence. In vitro experiments have emphasized the fiber characteristics identified in vivo as playing a role in the carcinogenic potency and should be developed as a better approach of the mechanistic effects of MMF. PMID:7925187

  12. Reconfigurable Microwave Photonic Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-12-01

    Using full 3D finite-element simulation and underlining Hamiltonian models, we demonstrate reconfigurable photonic analogues of topological insulators on a regular lattice of tunable posts in a reentrant 3D lumped element-type system. The tunability allows a dynamical in situ change of media chirality and other properties via the alteration of the same parameter for all posts, and as a result, great flexibility in the choice of bulk-edge configurations. Additionally, one-way photon transport without an external magnetic field is demonstrated. The ideas are illustrated by using both full finite-element simulation as well as simplified harmonic oscillator models. Dynamical reconfigurability of the proposed systems paves the way to a class of systems that can be employed for random access, topological signal processing, and sensing.

  13. Automatic insulation resistance testing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wyant, Francis J.; Nowlen, Steven P.; Luker, Spencer M.

    2005-06-14

    An apparatus and method for automatic measurement of insulation resistances of a multi-conductor cable. In one embodiment of the invention, the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, a plurality of input relay controlled contacts, a plurality of output relay controlled contacts, a relay controller and a computer. In another embodiment of the invention the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, an input switching unit, an output switching unit and a control unit/data logger. Embodiments of the apparatus of the invention may also incorporate cable fire testing means. The apparatus and methods of the present invention use either voltage or current for input and output measured variables.

  14. Topological Insulator and Thermoelectric Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong

    The recent discovery of topological insulator (TI) offers new opportunities for the development of thermoelectricity, because many TIs (like Bi2Te3) are excellent thermoelectric materials. In this talk, I will first introduce our theoretical predictions of anomalous Seebeck effect and strong size effect in TI [PRL 112, 226801 (2014)]. Then I will report our recent proof experiments, which find in TI thin films that (i) the hole-type Seebeck effect and the electron-type Hall effect coexist in the same TI sample for all the measured temperatures (up to 300 K), and (ii) the thermoelectric properties depend sensitively on the film thickness. The unconventional phenomena are revealed to be closely related to the topological nature of the material. These findings may inspire new ideas for designing TI-based high-efficiency thermoelectric devices.

  15. Disorder induced Floquet Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Paraj; Lindner, Netanel; Rechtsman, Mikael; Refael, Gil

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of realizing a disorder induced topological state in two dimensional periodically driven systems. This phenomenon is akin to the topological Anderson insulator (TAI) in equilibrium systems. We focus on graphene band structures, where in the presence of the driving electromagnetic field, but in the absence of disorder, the system starts off in a trivial state due to the presence of a sublattice potential. We show that by adding on-site disorder a topological state is induced in this system. We numerically compute the average Bott index (the analog of the Chern number for disordered systems) to show that starting from a trivial phase, topological behavior can be observed at finite disorder strength. In the topological phase, we detect chiral edge states by a numerical time evolution of wavepackets at the edge of the system. We propose an experimental set-up in photonic lattices to observe this phenomenon.

  16. Quantum Capacitance in Topological Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Faxian; Meyer, Nicholas; Kou, Xufeng; He, Liang; Lang, Murong; Wang, Yong; Yu, Xinxin; Fedorov, Alexei V.; Zou, Jin; Wang, Kang L.

    2012-01-01

    Topological insulators show unique properties resulting from massless, Dirac-like surface states that are protected by time-reversal symmetry. Theory predicts that the surface states exhibit a quantum spin Hall effect with counter-propagating electrons carrying opposite spins in the absence of an external magnetic field. However, to date, the revelation of these states through conventional transport measurements remains a significant challenge owing to the predominance of bulk carriers. Here, we report on an experimental observation of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in quantum capacitance measurements, which originate from topological helical states. Unlike the traditional transport approach, the quantum capacitance measurements are remarkably alleviated from bulk interference at high excitation frequencies, thus enabling a distinction between the surface and bulk. We also demonstrate easy access to the surface states at relatively high temperatures up to 60 K. Our approach may eventually facilitate an exciting exploration of exotic topological properties at room temperature. PMID:22993694

  17. Measurement of Heat Transfer in Unbonded Silica Fibrous Insulation and Comparison with Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daryabeigi, Kamran; Knutson, Jeffrey R.; Cunnington, George R.

    2007-01-01

    Effective thermal conductivity of a high porosity unbonded silica fibrous insulation specimen was measured over a pressure range of 0.001 to 750 torr (0.1 to 101.3 x 10(exp 3) Pa), and with large temperature gradients maintained across the sample thickness: hot side temperature range of 360 to 1360 K, with the cold side at room temperature. The measurements were compared with the theoretical solution of combined radiation/conduction heat transfer. The previously developed radiation heat transfer model used in this study is based on a modified diffusion approximation, and uses deterministic parameters that define the composition and morphology of the medium: distributions of fiber size and orientation, fiber volume fractions, and the spectral complex refractive index of the fibers. The close agreement between experimental and theoretical data further verifies the theoretical model over a wide range of temperatures and pressures.

  18. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D.S.

    2010-06-02

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [11-20] direction with a rectangular crosssection and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with {approx}1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitals to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states.

  19. Development of High Performance Composite Foam Insulation with Vacuum Insulation Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; SmithPhD, Douglas; LettsPhD, John; YaoPhD, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Development of a high performance thermal insulation (thermal resistance or R-value per inch of R-12 hr-ft2- F/Btu-in or greater), with twice the thermal resistance of state-of-the-art commercial insulation materials ( R6/inch for foam insulation), promises a transformational impact in the area of building insulation. In 2010, in the US, the building envelope-related primary energy consumption was 15.6 quads, of which 5.75 quads were due to opaque wall and roof sections; the total US consumption (building, industrial and transportation) was 98 quads. In other words, the wall and roof contribution was almost 6% of the entire US primary energy consumption. Building energy modeling analyses have shown that adding insulation to increase the R-value of the external walls of residential buildings by R10-20 (hr-ft2- F/Btu) can yield savings of 38-50% in wall-generated heating and cooling loads. Adding R20 will require substantial thicknesses of current commercial insulation materials, often requiring significant (and sometimes cost-prohibitive) alterations to existing buildings. This article describes the development of a next-generation composite insulation with a target thermal resistance of R25 for a 2 inch thick board (R12/inch or higher). The composite insulation will contain vacuum insulation cores, which are nominally R35-40/inch, encapsulated in polyisocyanurate foam. A recently-developed variant of vacuum insulation, called modified atmosphere insulation (MAI), was used in this research. Some background information on the thermal performance and distinguishing features of MAI has been provided. Technical details of the composite insulation development and manufacturing as well as laboratory evaluation of prototype insulation boards are presented.

  20. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

    2014-09-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4 inches wide by 4 feet to 5 feet deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  1. Slab edge insulating form system and methods

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Brain E.; Barsun, Stephan K.; Bourne, Richard C.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Springer, David A.

    2009-10-06

    A method of forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising constructing a foundation frame, the frame comprising an insulating form having an opening, inserting a pocket former into the opening; placing concrete inside the foundation frame; and removing the pocket former after the placed concrete has set, wherein the concrete forms a pocket in the placed concrete that is accessible through the opening. The method may further comprise sealing the opening by placing a sealing plug or sealing material in the opening. A system for forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising a plurality of interconnected insulating forms, the insulating forms having a rigid outer member protecting and encasing an insulating material, and at least one gripping lip extending outwardly from the outer member to provide a pest barrier. At least one insulating form has an opening into which a removable pocket former is inserted. The system may also provide a tension anchor positioned in the pocket former and a tendon connected to the tension anchor.

  2. Moisture performance analysis of EPS frost insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ojanen, T.; Kokko, E.

    1997-11-01

    A horizontal layer of expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) is widely used as a frost insulation of building foundations in the Nordic countries. The performance properties of the insulation depend strongly on the moisture level of the material. Experimental methods are needed to produce samples for testing the material properties in realistic moisture conditions. The objective was to analyze the moisture loads and the wetting mechanisms of horizontal EPS frost insulation. Typical wetting tests, water immersion and diffusive water vapor absorption tests, were studied and the results were compared with the data from site investigations. Usually these tests give higher moisture contents of EPS than what are detected in drained frost insulation applications. Also the effect of different parameters, like the immersion depth and temperature gradient were studied. Special attention was paid to study the effect of diffusion on the wetting process. Numerical simulation showed that under real working conditions the long period diffusive moisture absorption in EPS frost insulation remained lower than 1% Vol. Moisture performance was determined experimentally as a function of the distance between the insulation and the free water level in the ground. The main moisture loads and the principles for good moisture performance of frost insulation are presented.

  3. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

    2014-10-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  4. Ultra-Violet Induced Insulator Flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Kelly, B T; Lahowe, D A; Shirk, M D; Goerz, D A

    2008-05-21

    Insulators are critical components in high-energy, pulsed power systems. It is known that the vacuum surface of the insulator will flashover when illuminated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation depending on the insulator material, insulator cone angle, applied voltage and insulator shot-history. A testbed comprised of an excimer laser (KrF, 248 nm, {approx} 2 MW/cm{sup 2}, 30 ns FWHM,), a vacuum chamber (low 1.0E-6 torr), and dc high voltage power supply (<60 kV) was assembled for insulator testing to measure the UV dose during a flashover event. Five in-house developed and calibrated fast D-Dot probes (>12 GHz, bandwidth) were embedded in the anode electrode underneath the insulator to determine the time of flashover with respect to UV arrival. A commercial energy meter were used to measure the UV fluence for each pulse. Four insulator materials High Density Polyethylene, Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex with side-angles of 0, {+-}30, and {+-}45 degrees, 1.0 cm thick samples, were tested with a maximum UV fluence of 75 mJ/cm{sup 2} and at varying electrode charge (10 kV to 60 kV). This information clarified/corrected earlier published studies. A new phenomenon was observed related to the UV power level on flashover that as the UV pulse intensity was increased, the UV fluence on the insulator prior to flashover was also increased. This effect would bias the data towards higher minimum flashover fluence.

  5. Industrial Applications of Graphite Fluoride Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh; Kucera, Donald

    1991-01-01

    Based on fluorination technology developed during 1934 to 1959, and the fiber technology developed during the 1970s, a new process was developed to produce graphite fluoride fibers. In the process, pitch based graphitized carbon fibers are at first intercalated and deintercalated several times by bromine and iodine, followed by several cycles of nitrogen heating and fluorination at 350 to 370 C. Electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties of this fiber depend on the fluorination process and the fluorine content of the graphite fluoride product. However, these properties are between those of graphite and those of PTFE (Teflon). Therefore, it is considered to be a semiplastic. The physical properties suggest that this new material may have many new and unexplored applications. For example, it can be a thermally conductive electrical insulator. Its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) can be adjusted to match that of silicon, and therefore, it can be a heat sinking printed circuit board which is CTE compatible with silicon. Using these fibers in printed circuit boards may provide improved electrical performance and reliability of the electronics on the board over existing designs. Also, since it releases fluorine at 300 C or higher, it can be used as a material to store fluorine and to conduct fluorination. This application may simplify the fluorination process and reduce the risk of handling fluorine.

  6. Aerogel-Based Multilayer Insulation with Micrometeoroid Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Begag, Redouane; White, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    Ultra-low-density, highly hydrophobic, fiber-reinforced aerogel material integrated with MLI (aluminized Mylar reflectors and B4A Dacron separators) offers a highly effective insulation package by providing unsurpassed thermal performance and significant robustness, delivering substantial MMOD protection via the addition of a novel, durable, external aerogel layer. The hydrophobic nature of the aerogel is an important property for maintaining thermal performance if the material is exposed to the environment (i.e. rain, snow, etc.) during ground installations. The hybrid aerogel/MLI/MMOD solution affords an attractive alternative because it will perform thermally in the same range as MLI at all vacuum levels (including high vacuum), and offers significant protection from micrometeoroid damage. During this effort, the required low-density and resilient aerogel materials have been developed that are needed to optimize the thermal performance for space (high vacuum) cryotank applications. The proposed insulation/MMOD package is composed of two sections: a stack of interleaved aerogel layers and MLI intended for cryotank thermal insulation, and a 1.5- to 1-in. (.2.5- to 3.8- cm) thick aerogel layer (on top of the insulation portion) for MMOD protection. Learning that low-density aerogel cannot withstand the hypervelocity impact test conditions, the innovators decided during the course of the program to fabricate a high-density and strong material based on a cross-linked aerogel (X-aerogel; developed elsewhere by the innovators) for MMOD protection. This system has shown a very high compressive strength that is capable of withstanding high-impact tests if a proper configuration of the MMOD aerogel layer is used. It was learned that by stacking two X-aerogel layers [1.5-in. (.3.8-cm) thick] separated by an air gap, the system would be able to hold the threat at a speed of 5 km/s and gpass h the test. The first aerogel panel stopped the projectile from damaging the second

  7. Urea formaldehyde foam: a dangerous insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Keough, C.

    1980-12-01

    Insulating a home with urea formaldehyde foam can lead to severe health problems due to poisoning from formaldehyde gas. Respiratory problems, allergies, memory loss, and mental problems can result from exposure to foam insulation fumes. Research is now under way at the Chemical Industry Inst., Univ. of Washington, and other institutions to learn more about the health effects of formaldehyde foam and to develop possible remedies to these problems. Several states are either banning or controlling the use of this type of home insulation.

  8. Floquet Topological Insulators in Uranium Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shu-Ting; Savrasov, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    A major issue regarding the Uranium based nuclear fuels is to conduct the heat from the core area to its outer area. Unfortunately, those materials are notorious for their extremely low thermal conductivity due to the phonon-dominated-heat-transport properties in insulating states. Although metallic Uranium compounds are helpful in increasing the thermal conductivity, their low melting point still make those efforts in vain. In this report, we will figure out potential Uranium based Floquet topological insulators where the insulating bulk states accompanied with metallic surface states is achieved by applying periodic electrical fields which makes the coexistence of both benefits possible.

  9. Refractory Oxidative-Resistant Ceramic Carbon Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    High-temperature, lightweight, ceramic carbon insulation is prepared by coating or impregnating a porous carbon substrate with a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of an organodialkoxy silane and an organotrialkoxy silane in an acid or base medium in the presence of the carbon substrate. The siloxane gel is subsequently dried on the carbon substrate to form a ceramic carbon precursor. The carbon precursor is pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the ceramic insulation containing carbon, silicon, and oxygen. The carbon insulation is characterized as a porous, fibrous, carbon ceramic tile which is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft.

  10. Silicon on insulator self-aligned transistors

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2003-11-18

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) self-aligned transistors. Standard processing of silicon substrates is used to fabricate the transistors. Physical spaces, between the source and gate, and the drain and gate, introduced by etching the polysilicon gate material, are used to provide connecting implants (bridges) which allow the transistor to perform normally. After completion of the silicon substrate processing, the silicon wafer is bonded to an insulator (glass) substrate, and the silicon substrate is removed leaving the transistors on the insulator (glass) substrate. Transistors fabricated by this method may be utilized, for example, in flat panel displays, etc.

  11. Insulation failure assessment under random energization overvoltages

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdy, A.M.; Anis, H.I.; El-Morshedy, A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper offers a new simple approach to the evaluation of the risk of failure of external insulation in view of their known probabilistic nature. This is applied to EHV transmission systems subjected to energization overvoltages. The randomness, both in the applied stresses and insulation`s withstand characteristics are numerically simulated and then integrated to assess the risk of failure. Overvoltage control methods are accounted for, such as the use of pre-insertion breaker resistors, series capacitive compensation, and the installation of shunt reactors.

  12. Measure Guideline: Hybrid Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-05-01

    This measure guideline provides recommendations for designs and variations for retrofit hybrid assemblies in improving interior foundation insulation and water management of basements. Variations include closed cell spray foam (ccSPF) with membrane waterproofing or air gap membrane drainage layers, rigid board foam insulation at flat walls (cast concrete or CMU block), a 'partial drainage' detail making use of the bulk water drainage that occurs through the field of a rubble stone wall, and non-drained spray foam assemblies (including slab insulation).

  13. Measure Guideline. Hybrid Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-05-01

    This measure guideline provides recommendations for designs and variations for retrofit hybrid assemblies in improving interior foundation insulation and water management of basements. Variations include closed cell spray foam (ccSPF) with membrane waterproofing or air gap membrane drainage layers, rigid board foam insulation at flat walls (cast concrete or CMU block), a “partial drainage” detail making use of the bulk water drainage that occurs through the field of a rubble stone wall, and non-drained spray foam assemblies (including slab insulation).

  14. Double layered tailorable advanced blanket insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falstrup, D.

    1983-01-01

    An advanced flexible reusable surface insulation material for future space shuttle flights was investigated. A conventional fly shuttle loom with special modifications to weave an integral double layer triangular core fabric from quartz yarn was used. Two types of insulating material were inserted into the cells of the fabric, and a procedure to accomplish this was developed. The program is follow up of a program in which single layer rectangular cell core fabrics are woven and a single type of insulating material was inserted into the cells.

  15. Electrical Strength of Multilayer Vacuum Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Caporaso, G J

    2008-07-01

    The electrical strength of vacuum insulators is a key constraint in the design of particle accelerators and pulsed power systems. Vacuum insulating structures assembled from alternating layers of metal and dielectric can result in improved performance compared to conventional insulators, but previous attempts to optimize their design have yielded seemingly inconsistent results. Here, we present two models for the electrical strength of these structures, one assuming failure by vacuum arcing between adjacent metal layers and the other assuming failure by vacuum surface flashover. These models predict scaling laws which are in agreement with the experimental data currently available.

  16. Qualification Status of Non-Asbestos Internal Insulation in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Louie

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a status of the qualification efforts associated with NASA's RSRMV non-asbestos internal insulation program. For many years, NASA has been actively engaged in removal of asbestos from the shuttle RSRM motors due to occupation health concerns where technicians are working with an EPA banned material. Careful laboratory and subscale testing has lead to the downselect of a organic fiber known as Polybenzimidazol to replace the asbestos fiber filler in the existing synthetic rubber copolymer Nitrile Butadiene - now named PBI/NBR. Manufacturing, processing, and layup of the new material has been a challenge due to the differences in the baseline shuttle RSRM internal insulator properties and PBI/NBR material properties. For this study, data gathering and reduction procedures for thermal and chemical property characterization for the new candidate material are discussed. Difficulties with test procedures, implementation of properties into the Charring Material Ablator (CMA) codes, and results correlation with static motor fire data are provided. After two successful five segment motor firings using the PBI/NBR insulator, performance results for the new material look good and the material should eventually be qualified for man rated use in large solid rocket motor applications.

  17. Commercialization of New Carbon Fiber Materials Based on Sustainable Resources for Energy Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, Cliff; Webb, Daniel C; Albers, Tracy; Chen, Chong

    2013-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and GrafTech International have collaborated to develop and demonstrate the performance of high temperature thermal insulation prototypes made from lignin-based carbon fibers. This project will potentially lead to the first commercial application of lignin-based carbon fibers (LBCF). The goal of the commercial application is to replace expensive, Chinese-sourced isotropic pitch carbon fibers with lower cost carbon fibers made from a domestically sourced, bio-derived (renewable) feedstock. LBCF can help recapture jobs that were previously exported to China while resolving a supply chain vulnerability and reducing the production cost for GrafTech s high temperature thermal insulation. The performance of the LBCF prototypes was measured and found to be comparable to that of the current commercial product. During production of the insulation prototypes, ORNL and GrafTech demonstrated lignin compounding/pelletization, fiber production, heat treatment, and compositing at scales far surpassing those previously demonstrated in LBCF R&D or production. A plan was developed for the commercialization of LBCF thermal insulation, with key milestones including qualification of multiple scalable lignin sources in 2013, tons-scale production and field testing by customers in 2014, and product launch as soon thereafter as production capabilities can be constructed and commissioned.

  18. Electromagnetic Nondestructive Evaluation of Wire Insulation and Models of Insulation Material Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowler, Nicola; Kessler, Michael R.; Li, Li; Hondred, Peter R.; Chen, Tianming

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have been widely used as wiring electrical insulation materials in space/air-craft. The dielectric properties of insulation polymers can change over time, however, due to various aging processes such as exposure to heat, humidity and mechanical stress. Therefore, the study of polymers used in electrical insulation of wiring is important to the aerospace industry due to potential loss of life and aircraft in the event of an electrical fire caused by breakdown of wiring insulation. Part of this research is focused on studying the mechanisms of various environmental aging process of the polymers used in electrical wiring insulation and the ways in which their dielectric properties change as the material is subject to the aging processes. The other part of the project is to determine the feasibility of a new capacitive nondestructive testing method to indicate degradation in the wiring insulation, by measuring its permittivity.

  19. Product stewardship and science: safe manufacture and use of fiber glass.

    PubMed

    Hesterberg, Thomas W; Anderson, Robert; Bernstein, David M; Bunn, William B; Chase, Gerald A; Jankousky, Angela Libby; Marsh, Gary M; McClellan, Roger O

    2012-03-01

    This paper describes a proactive product stewardship program for glass fibers. That effort included epidemiological studies of workers, establishment of stringent workplace exposure limits, liaison with customers on safe use of products and, most importantly, a research program to evaluate the safety of existing glass fiber products and guide development of new even safer products. Chronic inhalation exposure bioassays were conducted with rodents and hamsters. Amosite and crocidolite asbestos produced respiratory tract cancers as did exposure to "biopersistent" synthetic vitreous fibers. "less biopersistent" glass fibers did not cause respiratory tract cancers. Corollary studies demonstrated the role of slow fiber dissolution rates and biopersistence in cancer induction. These results guided development of safer glass fiber products and have been used in Europe to regulate fibers and by IARC and NTP in classifying fibers. IARC concluded special purpose fibers and refractory ceramic fibers are "possibly carcinogenic to humans" and insulation glass wool, continuous glass filament, rock wool and slag wool are "not classifiable as to their carcinogenicity to human." The NTP's 12th report on carcinogens lists "Certain Glass Wool Fibers (Inhalable)" as "reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen." "Certain" in the descriptor refers to "biopersistent" glass fibers and excludes "less biopersistent" glass fibers.

  20. 16 CFR 460.2 - What is home insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is home insulation. 460.2 Section 460.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.2 What is home insulation. Insulation is any material mainly used to slow down heat flow....