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Sample records for fiber cell compaction

  1. Ultrastructural Analysis of the Human Lens Fiber Cell Remodeling Zone and the Initiation of Cellular Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Costello, M. Joseph; Mohamed, Ashik; Gilliland, Kurt O.; Fowler, W. Craig; Johnsen, Sönke

    2013-01-01

    The purpose is to determine the nature of the cellular rearrangements occurring through the remodeling zone (RZ) in human donor lenses, identified previously by confocal microscopy to be about 100 µm from the capsule. Human donor lenses were fixed with 10% formalin followed by 4% paraformaldehyde prior to processing for transmission electron microscopy. Of 27 fixed lenses, ages 22, 55 and 92 years were examined in detail. Overview electron micrographs confirmed the loss of cellular organization present in the outer cortex (80 µm thick) as the cells transitioned into the RZ. The transition occurred within a few cell layers and fiber cells in the RZ completely lost their classical hexagonal cross-sectional appearance. Cell interfaces became unusually interdigitated and irregular even though the radial cell columns were retained. Gap junctions appeared to be unaffected. After the RZ (40 µm thick), the cells were still irregular but more recognizable as fiber cells with typical interdigitations and the appearance of undulating membranes. Cell thickness was irregular after the RZ with some cells compacted, while others were not, up to the zone of full compaction in the adult nucleus. Similar dramatic cellular changes were observed within the RZ for each lens regardless of age. Because the cytoskeleton controls cell shape, dramatic cellular rearrangements that occur in the RZ most likely are due to alterations in the associations of crystallins to the lens-specific cytoskeletal beaded intermediate filaments. It is also likely that cytoskeletal attachments to membranes are altered to allow undulating membranes to develop. PMID:24183661

  2. The cause and consequence of fiber cell compaction in the vertebrate lens

    PubMed Central

    Bassnett, Steven; Costello, M. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Fiber cells of the ocular lens are arranged in a series of concentric shells. New growth shells are added continuously to the lens surface and, as a consequence, the preexisting shells are buried. To focus light, the refractive index of the lens cytoplasm must exceed that of the surrounding aqueous and vitreous humors, and to that end, lens cells synthesize high concentrations of soluble proteins, the crystallins. To correct for spherical aberration, it is necessary that the crystallin concentration varies from shell-to-shell, such that cellular protein content is greatest in the center of the lens. The radial variation in protein content underlies the critical gradient index (GRIN) structure of the lens. Only the outermost shells of lens fibers contain the cellular machinery necessary for protein synthesis. It is likely, therefore, that the GRIN (which spans the synthetically inactive, organelle-free zone of the lens) does not result from increased levels of protein synthesis in the core of the lens but is instead generated through loss of volume by inner fiber cells. Because volume is lost primarily in the form of cell water, the residual proteins in the central lens fibers can be concentrated to levels of >500 mg/ml. In this short review, we describe the process of fiber cell compaction, its relationship to lens growth and GRIN formation, and offer some thoughts on the likely nature of the underlying mechanism. PMID:26992780

  3. Note: Compact optical fiber coupler for diamond anvil high pressure cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pugh, E.

    2013-10-01

    A compact optical fiber coupler has been developed to allow transmission of light through an optical fiber to and from the high pressure region of a diamond anvil high pressure cell. Despite its small size the coupler has focusing adjustments and optics, which allows the light to be focused precisely on the sample within the pressure cell. The coupler is suitable for a wide range of optical measurements and particularly for high pressure measurements at low temperatures in cryostats with no optical windows. The use of the coupler to determine the pressure in a diamond anvil cell at 1.2 K using the ruby fluorescence spectra of ruby is demonstrated. The small size of the coupler and its construction out of nonmagnetic beryllium copper makes it suitable for use in high magnetic fields and for magnetization experiments.

  4. Compact and Robust Refilling and Connectorization of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber Gas Reference Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for refilling and connectorization of hollow core photonic crystal fiber gas reference cells. Thees hollow-core photonic crystal fiber allow optical propagation in air or vacuum and are for use as gas reference cell is proposed and demonstrated. It relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to a mechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers.

  5. Compact and Robust Refilling and Connectorization of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber Gas Reference Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a method for refilling and connectorization of hollow core photonic crystal fiber gas reference cells. Thees hollow-core photonic crystal fiber allow optical propagation in air or vacuum and are for use as gas reference cell is proposed and demonstrated. It relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to a mechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers.

  6. Compact and Robust Refilling and Connectorization of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber Gas Reference Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for evacuating, refilling and connectorizing hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for use asgas reference cell is proposed and demonstrated. It relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to amechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers.

  7. Compact and Robust Refilling and Connectorization of Hollow Core Photonic Crystal Fiber Gas Reference Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Meras, Patrick; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for evacuating, refilling and connectorizing hollow-core photonic crystal fiber for use asgas reference cell is proposed and demonstrated. It relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to amechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers.

  8. A compact optical fiber positioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hongzhuan; Wang, Jianping; Liu, Zhigang; Zhou, Zengxiang; Zhai, Chao; Chu, Jiaru

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a compact optical fiber positioner is proposed, which is especially suitable for small scale and high density optical fiber positioning. Based on the positioning principle of double rotation, positioner's center shaft depends on planetary gear drive principle, meshing with the fixed annular gear central motor gear driving device to rotate, and the eccentric shaft rotated driving by a coaxial eccentric motor, both center and the eccentric shaft are supported by a rolling bearings; center and eccentric shaft are both designed with electrical zero as a reference point, and both of them have position-limiting capability to ensure the safety of fiber positioning; both eccentric and center shaft are designed to eliminating clearance with spring structure, and can eliminate the influence of gear gap; both eccentric and center motor and their driving circuit can be installed in the positioner's body, and a favorable heat sink have designed, the heat bring by positioning operation can be effectively transmit to design a focal plane unit through the aluminum component, on sleeve cooling spiral airway have designed, when positioning, the cooling air flow is inlet into install hole on the focal plate, the cooling air flow can effectively take away the positioning's heat, to eliminate the impact of the focus seeing. By measuring position device's sample results show that: the unit accuracy reached 0.01mm, can meet the needs of fiber positioning.

  9. Compact fiber optic immunosensor using tapered fibers and acoustic enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chonghua; Pivarnik, Philip E.; Auger, Steven; Rand, Arthur G.; Letcher, Stephen V.

    1997-06-01

    A compact fiber-optic sensing system that features all-fiber optical design and semiconductor-laser excitation has been developed and tested. A 2X2 fiber coupler directs the input light to the SMA connected sensing fiber tip and the fluorescent signal back to a CCD fiber spectrophotometer. In this system, the fluorescent signal is confined in the fiber system so the signal-to-noise ratio is greatly improved and the system can be operate in ambient light conditions. The utilization of a red laser diode has reduced the background signal of non-essential biomolecules. The fluorescent dye used is Cy5, which has an excitation wavelength of 650 nm and a fluorescent center wavelength of 680 nm. To illustrate the biosensor's diagnostic capabilities, a sandwich immunoassay to detect Salmonella is presented. Tapered fiber tips with different shapes and treatments were studied and optimized. An enhancement system employing ultrasonic concentration of target particles has also been developed and applied to the detection of Salmonella. The immunoassay was conducted in a test chamber that also serves as an ultrasonic standing-wave cell and allows microspheres to be concentrated in a column along the fiber probe. The system demonstrates broad promise in future biomedical application.

  10. Image-based multiscale modeling predicts tissue-level and network-level fiber reorganization in stretched cell-compacted collagen gels

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Edward A.; Stylianopoulos, Triantafyllos; Tranquillo, Robert T.; Barocas, Victor H.

    2009-01-01

    The mechanical environment plays an important role in cell signaling and tissue homeostasis. Unraveling connections between externally applied loads and the cellular response is often confounded by extracellular matrix (ECM) heterogeneity. Image-based multiscale models provide a foundation for examining the fine details of tissue behavior, but they require validation at multiple scales. In this study, we developed a multiscale model that captured the anisotropy and heterogeneity of a cell-compacted collagen gel subjected to an off-axis hold mechanical test and subsequently to biaxial extension. In both the model and experiments, the ECM reorganized in a nonaffine and heterogeneous manner that depended on multiscale interactions between the fiber networks. Simulations predicted that tensile and compressive fiber forces were produced to accommodate macroscopic displacements. Fiber forces in the simulation ranged from −11.3 to 437.7 nN, with a significant fraction of fibers under compression (12.1% during off-axis stretch). The heterogeneous network restructuring predicted by the model serves as an example of how multiscale modeling techniques provide a theoretical framework for understanding relationships between ECM structure and tissue-level mechanical properties and how microscopic fiber rearrangements could lead to mechanotransductive cell signaling. PMID:19805118

  11. Durable fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Corinaldesi, V.; Moriconi, G

    2004-02-01

    In order to produce thin precast elements, a self-compacting concrete was prepared. When manufacturing these elements, homogenously dispersed steel fibers instead of ordinary steel-reinforcing mesh were added to the concrete mixture at a dosage of 10% by mass of cement. An adequate concrete strength class was achieved with a water to cement ratio of 0.40. Compression and flexure tests were carried out to assess the safety of these thin concrete elements. Moreover, serviceability aspects were taken into consideration. Firstly, drying shrinkage tests were carried out in order to evaluate the contribution of steel fibers in counteracting the high concrete strains due to a low aggregate-cement ratio. Secondly, the resistance to freezing and thawing cycles was investigated on concrete specimens in some cases superficially treated with a hydrophobic agent. Lastly, both carbonation and chloride penetration tests were carried out to assess durability behavior of this concrete mixture.

  12. Compact and stable multibeam fiber injector

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L. F., LLNL

    1998-07-01

    A compact and stable 20-beam injector was built for launching laser light into fibers for Fabry Perot velocity measurements of shock-driven surfaces. The fiber injector uses commercial mounts on mini-rails. Dielectric-coated beamsplitters provide accurate amplitude division. Minimal adjustments for stable operation are permitted by the use of a real-time video-viewer. The video system includes a non-linear camera for CW alignment and a linearized camera with a frame grabber for pulsed measurement and analysis. All 20-injection points are displayed on a single monitor. Optical requirements are given for image relay and magnification. Stimulated Brillouin scattering limitations on high-power are quantified.

  13. Fiber Volume Fraction Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2016-06-01

    Liquid resin is injected into the tapered injection chamber through the injection slots to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements in a resin injection pultrusion process. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the centerline causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to effectively penetrate through the fibers and achieve complete wetout. Fiber volume fraction in the final pultruded composite is a key to decide the mechanical and/or chemical properties of the composite. If the fiber volume fraction is too high, more fibers are squeezed together creating a fiber lean region near the wall and fiber rich region away from the wall. Also, the design of the injection chamber significantly affects the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. A tapered injection chamber is considered such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures due to the taper angle of the injection chamber. In this study, the effect of fiber volume fraction on the fiber reinforcement compaction and complete fiber wetout for a tapered injection chamber is investigated.

  14. Compact multiwavelength transmitter module for multimode fiber optic ribbon cable

    DOEpatents

    Deri, Robert J.; Pocha, Michael D.; Larson, Michael C.; Garrett, Henry E.

    2002-01-01

    A compact multiwavelength transmitter module for multimode fiber optic ribbon cable, which couples light from an M.times.N array of emitters onto N fibers, where the M wavelength may be distributed across two or more vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) chips, and combining emitters and multiplexer into a compact package that is compatible with placement on a printed circuit board. A key feature is bringing together two emitter arrays fabricated on different substrates--each array designed for a different wavelength--into close physical proximity. Another key feature is to compactly and efficiently combine the light from two or more clusters of optical emitters, each in a different wavelength band, into a fiber ribbon.

  15. Compact fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Craig; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.; Lu, Chun

    2010-10-19

    A novel electrochemical cell which may be a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is disclosed where the cathodes (144, 140) may be exposed to the air and open to the ambient atmosphere without further housing. Current collector (145) extends through a first cathode on one side of a unit and over the unit through the cathode on the other side of the unit and is in electrical contact via lead (146) with housing unit (122 and 124). Electrical insulator (170) prevents electrical contact between two units. Fuel inlet manifold (134) allows fuel to communicate with internal space (138) between the anodes (154 and 156). Electrically insulating members (164 and 166) prevent the current collector from being in electrical contact with the anode.

  16. Compact fiber optic dual-detection confocal displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Ryoung; Jang, Suin; Lee, Min Woo; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-09-20

    We propose a dual-detection confocal displacement sensor (DDCDS) with a compact fiber-based optical probe. This all-fiber-optic sensor probe is simple and robust, since it only requires simple alignment of a gradient refractive index lens and a double-clad fiber (DCF). The DDCDS is composed of two point detectors, one coupled to a single mode fiber and the other coupled to a multimode fiber, which are used to measure the light intensity from a core and an inner clad of a DCF, respectively. The ratio of the axial response curves, measured by the two detectors, can be used to obtain a linear relationship between the axial position of the object plane and the ratio of the intensity signals. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed method by measuring micromovement and fast vibration.

  17. A Compact Fiber Optic Eye Diagnostic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Dubin, Stephen; Dellavecchia, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    A new fiber optic probe developed for determining transport properties of sub-micron particles in fluid experiments in a microgravity environment has been applied to study different parts of an eye. The probe positioned in front of an eye, delivers a low power (approximately few microW) light from a laser diode into the eye and guides the light which is back scattered by different components (aqueous humor, lens, and vitreous humor) of the eye through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions in the eye lens and the gel-like materials in the vitreous humor. In a clinical setting, the probe can be mounted on a standard slit-lamp apparatus simply using a Hruby lens holder. The capability of detecting cataracts, both nuclear and cortical, in their early stages of formation, in a non invasive and quantitative fashion, has the potential in patient monitoring and in developing and testing new drugs or diet therapies to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before the surgery becomes necessary. The ability to detect biochemical and macromolecular changes in the vitreous structure can be very useful in identifying certain diseases of the posterior chamber and their complications, e.g., posterior vitreous detachment and diabetic retinopathy.

  18. A Compact Fiber Optic Eye Diagnostics System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; DellaVecchia, Michael A.; Dubin, Stephen; Zigler, J. Samuel, Jr.

    1995-01-01

    A new fiber optic probe development for determining transport properties of sub-micron particles in fluids experiments in a microgravity environment has been applied to study different parts of the eye. The probe positioned in front of an eye, delivers a low power (approximately a few mu W) light from a laser diode into the eye and guides the light which is back scattered by different components (aqueous humor, lens, and vitreous humor) of the eye through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions in the eye lens and the gel-like material in the vitreous humor. For a clinical use, the probe is mounted on a standard slit-lamp apparatus simply using Hruby lens holder. The capability of detecting cataracts, both nuclear and cortical, in their early stages of formation, in a non invasive and quantitative fashion, has the potential in patient monitoring and in developing and testing new drugs or diet therapies to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before the surgery becomes necessary. The ability to detect biochemical and macromolecular changes in the vitreous structure can be very useful in identifying certain diseases of the posterior chamber and their complications, e.g., posterior vitreous detachment and diabetic retinopathy.

  19. A compact fiber optic eye diagnostic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Dubin, Stephen; Dellavecchia, Michael A.

    1995-11-01

    A new fiber optic probe developed for determining transport properties of sub-micron particles in fluid experiments in a microgravity environment has been applied to study different parts of an eye. The probe positioned in front of an eye, delivers a low power (approximately few microW) light from a laser diode into the eye and guides the light which is back scattered by different components (aqueous humor, lens, and vitreous humor) of the eye through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions in the eye lens and the gel-like materials in the vitreous humor. In a clinical setting, the probe can be mounted on a standard slit-lamp apparatus simply using a Hruby lens holder. The capability of detecting cataracts, both nuclear and cortical, in their early stages of formation, in a non invasive and quantitative fashion, has the potential in patient monitoring and in developing and testing new drugs or diet therapies to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before the surgery becomes necessary. The ability to detect biochemical and macromolecular changes in the vitreous structure can be very useful in identifying certain diseases of the posterior chamber and their complications, e.g., posterior vitreous detachment and diabetic retinopathy.

  20. Study of the compact fiber optic photoacoustic ultrasonic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Tian, Ye; Zou, Xiaotian; Wang, Xingwei

    2012-04-01

    Recently, many studies have been exerted on developing ultrasonic transducers that can feature high frequencies for better resolutions and compact sizes for the limit space nondestructive testing applications. Conventional ultrasonic transducers, which are made by piezoelectric materials, suffer from issues such as low frequencies and bulky sizes due to the difficulty of dicing piezoelectric materials into smaller pieces. On the other hand, generating ultrasonic signals by photoacoustic principle is a promising way to generate a high frequency ultrasonic pulse. Optical fiber is a very compact material that can carry the light energy. By combining the photoacoustic principle and the optical fiber together, a novel ultrasonic transducer that features a high frequency and a compact size could be achieved. In this paper, an ultrasonic transducer using gold nanoparticles as the photoacoustic generation material is described. Gold nanoparticles are deposited on the end surface of an optical fiber acting as the ultrasonic generator. A cavity and a diaphragm are fabricated in the center of the fiber using as the ultrasonic receiver. A phase array technique is applied to the transducer to steer the direction of the acoustic beam. Simulation results demonstrated that the photoacoustic ultrasonic transducer is feasible.

  1. A compact nonlinear fiber-based optical autocorrelation peak discriminator.

    PubMed

    Fok, M P; Deng, Y; Prucnal, P R

    2009-06-08

    We experimentally demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-based optical autocorrelation peak discriminator. The approach exploits four-wave mixing in a 37-cm highly-nonlinear bismuth-oxide fiber that provides a passive and compact means for rejecting cross-correlation peaks. The autocorrelation peak discriminator plays an important role in improving the detection of optical CDMA signals. Eye diagrams and bit-error rates are measured at different power ratios. Significant receiver sensitivity improvements are obtained and error-floors are removed. The experimental results show that the autocorrelation peak discriminator works well even when the amplitudes of individual cross-correlation peaks are higher than that of the autocorrelation peak.

  2. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1997-10-14

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

  3. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, Ronald Alfred; Lewis, Irwin Charles

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counterelectrode.

  4. Remodeling of the collagen fiber architecture due to compaction in small vessels under tissue engineered conditions.

    PubMed

    Soares, Ana L F; Stekelenburg, Maria; Baaijens, Frank P T

    2011-07-01

    Mechanical loading protocols in tissue engineering (TE) aim to improve the deposition of a properly organized collagen fiber network. In addition to collagen remodeling, these conditioning protocols can result in tissue compaction. Tissue compaction is beneficial to tissue collagen alignment, yet it may lead to a loss of functionality of the TE construct due to changes in geometry after culture. Here, a mathematical model is presented to relate the changes in collagen architecture to the local compaction within a TE small blood vessel, assuming that under static conditions, compaction is the main factor responsible for collagen fiber organization. An existing structurally based model is extended to incorporate volumetric tissue compaction. Subsequently, the model is applied to describe the collagen architecture of TE constructs under either strain based or stress based stimulus functions. Our computations indicate that stress based simulations result in a helical collagen fiber distribution along the vessel wall. The helix pitch angle increases from a circumferential direction in the inner wall, over about 45 deg in the middle vessel layer, to a longitudinal direction in the outer wall. These results are consistent with experimental data from TE small diameter blood vessels. In addition, our results suggest a stress dependent remodeling of the collagen, suggesting that cell traction is responsible for collagen orientation. These findings may be of value to design improved mechanical conditioning protocols to optimize the collagen architecture in engineered tissues.

  5. Advance study of fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Mironova, M. Ivanova, M. Naidenov, V.; Georgiev, I.; Stary, J.

    2015-10-28

    Incorporation in concrete composition of steel macro- and micro – fiber reinforcement with structural function increases the degree of ductility of typically brittle cement-containing composites, which in some cases can replace completely or partially conventional steel reinforcement in the form of rods and meshes. Thus, that can reduce manufacturing, detailing and placement of conventional reinforcement, which enhances productivity and economic efficiency of the building process. In this paper, six fiber-reinforced with different amounts of steel fiber cement-containing self-compacting compositions are investigated. The results of some of their main strength-deformation characteristics are presented. Advance approach for the study of structural and material properties of these type composites is proposed by using the methods of industrial computed tomography. The obtained original tomography results about the microstructure and characteristics of individual structural components make it possible to analyze the effective macro-characteristics of the studied composites. The resulting analytical data are relevant for the purposes of multi-dimensional modeling of these systems. Multifactor structure-mechanical analysis of the obtained with different methods original scientific results is proposed. It is presented a conclusion of the capabilities and effectiveness of complex analysis in the studies to characterize the properties of self-compacting fiber-reinforced concrete.

  6. Advance study of fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironova, M.; Ivanova, M.; Naidenov, V.; Georgiev, I.; Stary, J.

    2015-10-01

    Incorporation in concrete composition of steel macro- and micro - fiber reinforcement with structural function increases the degree of ductility of typically brittle cement-containing composites, which in some cases can replace completely or partially conventional steel reinforcement in the form of rods and meshes. Thus, that can reduce manufacturing, detailing and placement of conventional reinforcement, which enhances productivity and economic efficiency of the building process. In this paper, six fiber-reinforced with different amounts of steel fiber cement-containing self-compacting compositions are investigated. The results of some of their main strength-deformation characteristics are presented. Advance approach for the study of structural and material properties of these type composites is proposed by using the methods of industrial computed tomography. The obtained original tomography results about the microstructure and characteristics of individual structural components make it possible to analyze the effective macro-characteristics of the studied composites. The resulting analytical data are relevant for the purposes of multi-dimensional modeling of these systems. Multifactor structure-mechanical analysis of the obtained with different methods original scientific results is proposed. It is presented a conclusion of the capabilities and effectiveness of complex analysis in the studies to characterize the properties of self-compacting fiber-reinforced concrete.

  7. Compact piezoelectric transducer fiber scanning probe for optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ning; Tsai, Tsung-Han; Ahsen, Osman O; Liang, Kaicheng; Lee, Hsiang-Chieh; Xue, Ping; Li, Xingde; Fujimoto, James G

    2014-01-15

    We developed a compact, optical fiber scanning piezoelectric transducer (PZT) probe for endoscopic and minimally invasive optical coherence tomography (OCT). Compared with previous forward-mount fiber designs, we present a reverse-mount design that achieves a shorter rigid length. The fiber was mounted at the proximal end of a quadruple PZT tube and scanned inside the hollow PZT tube to reduce the probe length. The fiber resonant frequency was 338 Hz using a 17-mm-long fiber. A 0.9 mm fiber deflection was achieved with a driving amplitude of 35 V. Using a GRIN lens-based optical design with a 1.3× magnification, a ∼6 μm spot was scanned over a 1.2 mm diameter field. The probe was encased in a metal hypodermic tube with a ∼25 mm rigid length and covered with a 3.2 mm outer diameter (OD) plastic sheath. Imaging was performed with a swept source OCT system based on a Fourier domain modelocked laser (FDML) light source at a 240 kHz axial scan rate and 8 μm axial resolution (in air). En face OCT imaging of skin in vivo and human colon ex vivo was demonstrated.

  8. Innovative fiber-laser architecture-based compact wind lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Tracy, Allen; Vetorino, Steve; Higgins, Richard; Sibell, Russ

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes an innovative, compact and eyesafe coherent lidar system developed for use in wind and wake vortex sensing applications. This advanced lidar system is field ruggedized with reduced size, weight, and power consumption (SWaP) configured based on an all-fiber and modular architecture. The all-fiber architecture is developed using a fiber seed laser that is coupled to uniquely configured fiber amplifier modules and associated photonic elements including an integrated 3D scanner. The scanner provides user programmable continuous 360 degree azimuth and 180 degree elevation scan angles. The system architecture eliminates free-space beam alignment issues and allows plug and play operation using graphical user interface software modules. Besides its all fiber architecture, the lidar system also provides pulsewidth agility to aid in improving range resolution. Operating at 1.54 microns and with a PRF of up to 20 KHz, the wind lidar is air cooled with overall dimensions of 30" x 46" x 60" and is designed as a Class 1 system. This lidar is capable of measuring wind velocities greater than 120 +/- 0.2 m/s over ranges greater than 10 km and with a range resolution of less than 15 m. This compact and modular system is anticipated to provide mobility, reliability, and ease of field deployment for wind and wake vortex measurements. The current lidar architecture is amenable for trace gas sensing and as such it is being evolved for airborne and space based platforms. In this paper, the key features of wind lidar instrumentation and its functionality are discussed followed by results of recent wind forecast measurements on a wind farm.

  9. Compact parallel optical interface built with optical fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Christophe; Gilbert, Karen; Bernabe, Stéphane; Albert, Blandine

    2006-09-01

    MultiChip Module approach and the use of micro-optics offer determinant solutions to reach the mechanical compactness required by most applications for high rate data communications transmitters and receivers. Such a miniaturization often leads to develop very challenging assembling processes when fiber coupling is needed. In this paper we present an original fabrication process to build very small parallel optical interface with optical fiber tips. This fabrication process is based on common fiber ribbon mounting into wet etched V shaped holder into silicon and a dicing-polishing step to create small pieces with optical quality considering flatness and roughness. The dicing-polishing principle is well-known in integrated waveguides technology. An example of realization is presented to connect a parallel optical subassembly transmitter with a MPO/MTP connector. The results show that the dicing-polishing step allows to obtain a diced-polished face with a roughness about 5 to 10nm onto the fiber. Such an optical quality is as good as a cleaved fiber when measuring light coupling performances. Thus, such micro-optical components offer a new building block for designers to extract the light from their photonic devices. Moreover, the fabrication process appears to be low cost and compatible with mass production.

  10. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasma experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V; Solberg, J; Ferriera, T; Tully, L; Stephan, P

    2008-10-02

    We have developed and tested a compact collimated sixteen channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with {approx}mm spatial and sub-{micro}s temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore Fixed Hybrid Armature experiment are presented and compared with 1-D simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  11. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasmas.

    PubMed

    Tang, V; Solberg, J M; Ferriera, T J; Tully, L K; Stephan, P L

    2009-01-01

    We developed and tested a compact collimated 16 channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with approximately millimeter spatial and submicrosecond temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore fixed hybrid armature experiment are presented and compared with one-dimensional simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  12. Compact collimated fiber optic array diagnostic for railgun plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, V.; Solberg, J. M.; Ferriera, T. J.; Tully, L. K.; Stephan, P. L.

    2009-01-15

    We developed and tested a compact collimated 16 channel fiber optic array diagnostic for studying the light emission of railgun armature plasmas with approximately millimeter spatial and submicrosecond temporal resolution. The design and operational details of the diagnostic are described. Plasma velocities, oscillation, and dimension data from the diagnostic for the Livermore fixed hybrid armature experiment are presented and compared with one-dimensional simulations. The techniques and principles discussed allow the extension of the diagnostic to other railgun and related dense plasma experiments.

  13. Modeling compact high power fiber lasers and vecsels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongbo

    Compact high power fiber lasers and the vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VECSELs) are promising candidates for high power laser sources with diffraction-limited beam quality and are currently the subject of intensive research and development. Here three large mode area fiber lasers, namely, the photonic crystal fiber (PCF) laser, the multicore fiber (MCF) laser, and the multimode interference (MMI) fiber laser, as well as the VECSEL are modeled and designed. For the PCF laser, the effective refractive index and the effective core radius of the PCF are investigated using vectorial approaches and reformulated. Then, the classical step-index fiber theory is extended to PCFs, resulting in a highly efficient vectorial effective-index method for the design and analysis of PCFs. The new approach is employed to analyze the modal properties of the PCF lasers with depressed-index cores and to effectively estimate the number of guided modes for PCFs. The MCF laser, consisting of an active MCF and a passive coreless fiber, is modeled using the vectorial mode expansion method developed in this work. The results illustrate that the mode selection in the MCF laser by the coreless fiber section is determined by the MMI effect, not the Talbot effect. Based on the MMI and self-imaging in multimode fibers, the vectorial mode expansion approach is employed to design the first MMI fiber laser demonstrated experimentally. For the design and modeling of VECSELs, the optical, thermal, and structural properties of common material systems are investigated and the most reliable material models are summarized. The nanoscale heat transport theory is applied for the first time, to the best of my knowledge, to design and model VECSELs. In addition, the most accurate strain compensation approach is selected for VECSELs incorporating strained quantum wells to maintain structural stability. The design principles for the VECSEL subcavity are elaborated and applied to design a 1040nm

  14. Simple technique for integrating compact silicon devices within optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Micco, A; Ricciardi, A; Quero, G; Crescitelli, A; Bock, W J; Cusano, A

    2014-02-15

    In this work, we present a simple fabrication process enabling the integration of a subwavelength amorphous silicon layer inside optical fibers by means of the arc discharge technique. To assess our method, we have fabricated a compact in-line Fabry-Perot interferometer consisting of a thin (<1  μm) a-Si:H layer completely embedded within a standard single-mode optical fiber. The device exhibits low loss (1.3 dB) and high interference fringe visibility (~80%) both in reflection and transmission, due to the high refractive index contrast between silica and a-Si:H. A high linear temperature sensitivity up to 106  pm/°C is demonstrated in the range 120°C-400°C. The proposed interferometer is attractive for point monitoring applications as well as for ultrahigh-temperature sensing in harsh environments.

  15. Compact frequency-quadrupled pulsed 1030nm fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, Chris; Goldberg, Lew; Cole, Brian; DiLazaro, Tom; Hays, Alan D.

    2016-03-01

    A compact 1030nm fiber laser for ultraviolet generation at 257.5nm is presented. The laser employs a short length of highly-doped, large core (20μm), coiled polarization-maintaining ytterbium-doped double-clad fiber pumped by a wavelength-stabilized 975nm diode. It is passively Q-switched via a Cr4+:YAG saturable absorber and generates 2.4W at 1030nm in a 110μJ pulse train. Lithium triborate (LBO) and beta-barium borate (BBO) are used to achieve 325mW average power at the fourth harmonic. The laser's small form factor, narrow linewidth and modest power consumption are suitable for use in a man-portable ultraviolet Raman explosives detection system.

  16. Compact Fiber Laser for 589nm Laser Guide Star Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, D.; Drobshoff, D.; Mitchell, S.; Brown, A.

    Laser guide stars are crucial to the broad use of astronomical adaptive optics, because they facilitate access to a large fraction of possible locations on the sky. Lasers tuned to the 589 nm atomic sodium resonance can create an artificial beacon at altitudes of 95-105 km, thus coming close to reproducing the light path of starlight. The deployment of multiconjugate adaptive optics on large aperture telescopes world-wide will require the use of three to nine sodium laser guide stars in order to achieve uniform correction over the aperture with a high Strehl value. Current estimates place the minimum required laser power at > 10 W per laser for a continuous wave source, though a pulsed format, nominally 6?s in length at ~ 16.7 kHz, is currently preferred as it would enable tracking the laser through the Na layer to mitigate spot elongation. The lasers also need to be compact, efficient, robust and turnkey. We are developing an all-fiber laser system for generating a 589 nm source for laser-guided adaptive optics. Fiber lasers are more compact and insensitive to alignment than their bulk laser counterparts, and the heat-dissipation characteristics of fibers, coupled with the high efficiencies demonstrated and excellent spatial mode characteristics, make them a preferred candidate for many high power applications. Our design is based on sum-frequency mixing an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser operating at 1583 nm with a 938 nm Nd:silica fiber laser in a periodically poled crystal to generate 589 nm. We have demonstrated 14 W at 1583 nm with an Er/Yb:doped fiber laser, based on a Koheras single frequency fiber oscillator amplified in an IPG Photonics fiber amplifier. The Nd:silica fiber laser is a somewhat more novel device, since the Nd3+ ions must operate on the resonance transition (i.e. 4F3/2-4I9/2), while suppressing ASE losses at the more conventional 1088 nm transition. Optimization of the ratio of the fiber core and cladding permits operation of the laser at room

  17. A compact dual-wavelength fiber laser: some design aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Christian; Zadravec, Dusan

    2017-05-01

    High performance in combination with small size, low weight and low power consumption are among the main drivers in modern defense and commercial applications of laser systems. Consequently, designers of such systems strive for innovative solutions in the field of laser technology. Ten years ago Safran Vectronix AG (hereafter Vectronix) pioneered these activities with the fielding of the first fiber laser for hand-held rangefinders. This paper will deal with the latest evolution of an eye-safe fiber laser source which can emit two wavelengths for an extended range of applications. In order to comply with high performance requirements the laser on one side has to produce high enough pulse energy and on the other side - especially due to the ever increasing requirement for compactness - to use so called single-stage amplification in combination with bending insensitive fiber solutions. Also, the ASE (Amplified Spontaneous Emission) has to be reduced as much as possible as this light enters the eye safety equation but does not contribute in terms of range performance. All of this has to meet severe environmental requirements typical for most demanding defense applications. Additionally, the laser in its rangefinding mode has to produce a sequence of high frequency pulses in such a way that no substantial temperature effects would arise and thus impair either the pulse energy or the boresight alignment. Additionally, in this paper, a compact dual-stage dual-wavelength version of the above laser will be described, which has been developed to generate much stronger pulses for very long rangefinding applications.

  18. Compact all-fiber Bessel beam generator based on hollow optical fiber combined with a hybrid polymer fiber lens.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Ki; Kim, Jongki; Jung, Yongmin; Ha, Woosung; Jeong, Yoon Seop; Lee, Sejin; Tünnermann, Andreas; Oh, K

    2009-10-01

    We report a compact all-fiber Bessel beam generator using hollow optical fiber (HOF) and coreless silica fiber based on a self-assembled polymer lens. A nearly diffraction-free Bessel beam pattern was observed with its focused beam diameter of 20 microm maintained over a propagation distance of 550 microm. The generated Bessel beams were experimentally tested under various structural parameters such as the diameters of the HOF and operating wavelengths. A beam propagation method was applied to simulate the proposed device, which shows good agreement with the experimental observations.

  19. A Compact Fiber Inclinometer Using a Thin-Core Fiber with Incorporated an Air-Gap Microcavity Fiber Interferometer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiacheng; Qiao, Xueguang; Rong, Qiangzhou; Sun, An

    2016-01-01

    A compact fiber-optic inclinometer is proposed and experimentally demonstrated based on a Fabry-Perot interference (FFPI). The sensing head consists of a short segment of thin-core fiber (TCF) following with a piece of hollow-core fiber (HCF). High-order cladding modes have been excited because of core diameter mismatch. A clear interference spectrum has been obtained as the consequence of interference among the reflected core modes and cladding modes. Fringe contrast of the interference spectrum is highly sensitive to fiber bending with direction independence, and good linearity has been observed during the bending range from 1° to 3° with a sensitivity of 2.71 dB/deg. PMID:26771614

  20. Compact all-fiber ring femtosecond laser with high fundamental repetition rate.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Xu, Shanhui; Huang, Huichang; Peng, Mingying; Yang, Zhongmin

    2012-10-22

    A 165-fs all-fiber ring laser is demonstrated with a fundamental repetition rate of 235 MHz based on a 5.7-cm-long Er(3+)/Yb(3+) codoped phosphate glass fiber and a technique of nonlinear polarization evolution. In order to further enhance the fundamental repetition rate and compact the structure of the all-fiber laser, an optical integrated module is designed. By employing this novel optical module, a much more compact 105-fs mode-locking all-fiber ring laser, operating at a 325 MHz fundamental repetition rate, is realized.

  1. Compact Concentrators for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, V. S.

    1984-01-01

    Each cell in array has own concentrator. A Cassegrain Reflector combination of paraboloidal and hyperboloidar mirrors-used with conical reflector at each element of array. Three components direct light to small solar cell. No cooling fins, fans, pumps, or heat pipes needed, not even in vacuum.

  2. Compact Concentrators for Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whang, V. S.

    1984-01-01

    Each cell in array has own concentrator. A Cassegrain Reflector combination of paraboloidal and hyperboloidar mirrors-used with conical reflector at each element of array. Three components direct light to small solar cell. No cooling fins, fans, pumps, or heat pipes needed, not even in vacuum.

  3. Resin Viscosity Influence on Fiber Compaction in Tapered Resin Injection Pultrusion Manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuram, N. B.; Roux, J. A.; Jeswani, A. L.

    2017-08-01

    Viscosity of the liquid resin effects the chemical and mechanical properties of the pultruded composite. In resin injection pultrusion manufacturing the liquid resin is injected into a specially designed tapered injection chamber through the injection slots present on top and bottom of the chamber. The resin is injected at a pressure so as to completely wetout the fiber reinforcements inside the tapered injection chamber. As the resin penetrates through the fibers, the resin also pushes the fibers away from the wall towards the center of chamber causing compaction of the fiber reinforcements. The fibers are squeezed together due to compaction, making resin penetration more difficult; thus higher resin injection pressures are required to efficaciously penetrate through the compacted fibers and achieve complete wetout. The impact of resin viscosity on resin flow, fiber compaction, wetout and on the final product is further discussed. Injection chamber design predominantly effects the resin flow inside the chamber and the minimum injection pressure required to completely wet the fibers. Therefore, a desirable injection chamber design is such that wetout occurs at lower injection pressures and at low internal pressures inside the injection chamber.

  4. A Method of Assembling Compact Coherent Fiber-Optic Bundles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Stefan; Liu, Duncan; Levine, Bruce Martin; Shao, Michael; Wallace, James

    2007-01-01

    A method of assembling coherent fiber-optic bundles in which all the fibers are packed together as closely as possible is undergoing development. The method is based, straightforwardly, on the established concept of hexagonal close packing; hence, the development efforts are focused on fixtures and techniques for practical implementation of hexagonal close packing of parallel optical fibers.

  5. Effect of hot-dry environment on fiber-reinforced self-compacting concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tioua, Tahar; Kriker, Abdelouahed; Salhi, Aimad; Barluenga, Gonzalo

    2016-07-01

    Drying shrinkage can be a major reason for the deterioration of concrete structures. Variation in ambient temperature and relative humidity cause changes in the properties of hardened concrete which can affect their mechanical and drying shrinkage characteristics. The present study investigated mechanical strength and particularly drying shrinkage properties of self-compacting concretes (SCC) reinforced with date palm fiber exposed to hot and dry environment. In this study a total of nine different fibers reinforced self compacting concrete (FRSCC) mixtures and one mixture without fiber were prepared. The volume fraction and the length of fibers reinforcement were 0.1-0.2-0.3% and 10-20-30 mm. It was observed that drying shrinkage lessened with adding low volumetric fraction and short length of fibers in curing condition (T = 20 °C and RH = 50 ± 5 %), but increased in hot and dry environment.

  6. Compact optical isolator for fibers using birefringent wedges.

    PubMed

    Shirasaki, M; Asama, K

    1982-12-01

    A new type of optical isolator for fibers is proposed in this paper. A birefringent wedge used to separate and combine the polarized light is developed, giving the isolator low forward loss and high isolation. The antire-flection process at the fiber endface reduces the forward loss and reflected return. A forward loss of 0.8 dB, a backward loss of 35 dB, and a reflected return of -32 dB were obtained. These characteristics were measured from fiber to fiber using multimode fibers with 50-/microm core diam at a wavelength of 1.3 microm. Details of the design, fabrication, and characteristics of this isolator are presented.

  7. Stretchable polymer solar cell fibers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhitao; Yang, Zhibin; Deng, Jue; Zhang, Ye; Guan, Guozhen; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-02-11

    Power yourself up: a sweater made from solar cells! Stretchable and wearable fibers are shown to be highly efficient polymer solar cells. Their stable energy conversion efficiency variation is below 10% even after 1000 bending cycles or stretching under a strain of 30%. These fibers can easily be woven into fabric from which any type of clothing can be made.

  8. Multiphoton microscopy system with a compact fiber-based femtosecond-pulse laser and handheld probe

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Kieu, Khanh; Wise, Frank W.; Chen, Zhongping

    2012-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system that integrates a compact and robust fiber laser with a miniature probe. The all normal dispersion fiber femtosecond laser has a central wavelength of 1.06 μm, pulse width of 125 fs and average power of more than 1 W. A double cladding photonic crystal fiber was used to deliver the excitation beam and to collect the two-photon signal. The hand-held probe included galvanometer-based mirror scanners, relay lenses and a focusing lens. The packaged probe had a diameter of 16 mm. Second harmonic generation (SHG) images and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) images of biological tissues were demonstrated using the system. MPM images of different biological tissues acquired by the compact system which integrates an FBFP laser, an DCPCF and a miniature handheld probe. PMID:20635426

  9. A high-resolution compact optical true-time delay beamformer using fiber Bragg grating and highly dispersive fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xinlu; Huang, Shanguo; Wei, Yongfeng; Gao, Chao; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Hanyi; Gu, Wanyi

    2014-10-01

    A high resolution optical true-time delay (OTTD) beamformer constructed by fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and highly dispersive fiber (HDF) is presented. It can produce the true time delay with the resolution of 1 ps. Besides the proposed system has compact structure and light weight even when a large number of antenna elements are present in a practical antenna array, this is because the used FBG fibers and HDFs are short and independent of the antenna element number. Theoretical analysis and numerical simulations are made. Proof-of-concept experiment results that demonstrate the feasibility of the system are presented.

  10. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths (τ (app)) and slip coefficient (β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle (ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  11. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths ( τ ( app)) and slip coefficient ( β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle ( ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  12. Compact noise-like pulse fiber laser and its application for supercontinuum generation in highly nonlinear fiber.

    PubMed

    Xia, Handing; Li, Heping; Deng, Guanglei; Li, Jianfeng; Zhang, Shangjian; Liu, Yong

    2015-11-10

    We report on supercontinuum generation in a highly nonlinear fiber (HNLF) pumped by noise-like pulses (NLPs) emitted from a compact fiber ring laser. The compact erbium-doped fiber ring laser is constructed by using an optical integrated component and mode-locked by the nonlinear polarization rotation technique. The laser produces NLPs with a 3-dB spectral bandwidth of 60.2 nm, repetition rate of 9.36 MHz, and pulse energy of 2.8 nJ. Numerical simulations reproduce the generation of NLPs in the experiment. The NLPs are then launched into a 110-m-long HNLF and a supercontinuum with a 20-dB spectral width over 500 nm is obtained. Such a simple and inexpensive supercontinuum-generation system is a potential alternative for various practical applications.

  13. Compact frequency-modulation Q-switched single-frequency fiber laser at 1083 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanfei; Feng, Zhouming; Xu, Shanhui; Mo, Shupei; Yang, Changsheng; Li, Can; Gan, Jiulin; Chen, Dongdan; Yang, Zhongmin

    2015-12-01

    A compact frequency-modulation Q-switched single-frequency fiber laser is demonstrated at 1083 nm. The short linear resonant cavity consists of a 12 mm long homemade Yb3+-doped phosphate fiber and a pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in which the Q-switching and the frequency excursion is achieved by a tensile-induced period modulation. Over 375 MHz frequency-tuning range is achieved with a modulation frequency varying from tens to hundreds of kilohertz. The highest peak power of the output pulse reaching 6.93 W at the repetition rate of 10 kHz is obtained.

  14. Note: A compact external-cavity diode laser, using feedback from an optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Potnis, S; Edge, G J A; Jackson, S; Verma, M; Vutha, A C

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a simple and compact external cavity diode laser (ECDL), where light reflected from the tip of an optical fiber provides feedback, and an interference filter provides frequency selection. The ECDL combines ease of construction with robust operation and exhibits a linewidth of 50 kHz.

  15. Note: A compact external-cavity diode laser, using feedback from an optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potnis, S.; Edge, G. J. A.; Jackson, S.; Verma, M.; Vutha, A. C.

    2017-09-01

    We demonstrate a simple and compact external cavity diode laser (ECDL), where light reflected from the tip of an optical fiber provides feedback, and an interference filter provides frequency selection. The ECDL combines ease of construction with robust operation and exhibits a linewidth of 50 kHz.

  16. AN EFFICIENT, COMPACT, AND VERSATILE FIBER DOUBLE SCRAMBLER FOR HIGH PRECISION RADIAL VELOCITY INSTRUMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Halverson, Samuel; Roy, Arpita; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, Lawrence; Levi, Eric; Schwab, Christian; Hearty, Fred; MacDonald, Nick E-mail: aur17@psu.edu

    2015-06-10

    We present the design and test results of a compact optical fiber double-scrambler for high-resolution Doppler radial velocity instruments. This device consists of a single optic: a high-index n ∼ 2 ball lens that exchanges the near and far fields between two fibers. When used in conjunction with octagonal fibers, this device yields very high scrambling gains (SGs) and greatly desensitizes the fiber output from any input illumination variations, thereby stabilizing the instrument profile of the spectrograph and improving the Doppler measurement precision. The system is also highly insensitive to input pupil variations, isolating the spectrograph from telescope illumination variations and seeing changes. By selecting the appropriate glass and lens diameter the highest efficiency is achieved when the fibers are practically in contact with the lens surface, greatly simplifying the alignment process when compared to classical double-scrambler systems. This prototype double-scrambler has demonstrated significant performance gains over previous systems, achieving SGs in excess of 10,000 with a throughput of ∼87% using uncoated Polymicro octagonal fibers. Adding a circular fiber to the fiber train further increases the SG to >20,000, limited by laboratory measurement error. While this fiber system is designed for the Habitable-zone Planet Finder spectrograph, it is more generally applicable to other instruments in the visible and near-infrared. Given the simplicity and low cost, this fiber scrambler could also easily be multiplexed for large multi-object instruments.

  17. Compact Mach-Zehnder interferometer based on photonic crystal fiber and its application in switchable multi-wavelength fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiguo; Lou, Shuqin; Wang, Liwen; Li, Honglei; Guo, Tieying; Jian, Shuisheng

    2009-08-01

    The compact Mach-Zehnder interferometer is proposed by splicing a section of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and two pieces of single mode fiber (SMF) with the air-holes of PCF intentionally collapsed in the vicinity of the splices. The depedence of the fringe spacing on the length of PCF is investigated. Based on the Mach-Zehnder interferometer as wavelength-selective filter, a switchable dual-wavelength fiber ring laser is demonstrated with a homemade erbiumdoped fiber amplifier (EDFA) as the gain medium at room temperature. By adjusting the states of the polarization controller (PC) appropriately, the laser can be switched among the stable single-and dual -wavelength lasing operations by exploiting polarization hole burning (PHB) effect.

  18. Compact Fiber-Parametric Devices for Biophotonics Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Uranus ) laser. It was chosen for this experiment due to the relatively short pulses (300 fs) with desired center wavelength. The average laser...laser (PolarOnyx - Uranus ). In the spectrum the power varies across the range of wavelength tunability, where the maximum power of ~ 100 mW is at...to the lack of stability of this system compared to the other system because the Ytterbium-doped fiber (PolarOnyx - Uranus ) laser is a novel

  19. Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-16

    energy numbers are 2.3X and 5.7X the theoretical values for lithium thionyl chloride respectively (1100 Whr/liter and 590 Whr/kg), which has the...REPORT Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Advances in lithium primary battery technology, which serves as the...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 16-Aug-2010 Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell Report Title ABSTRACT Advances in lithium primary battery technology

  20. Multiphoton microscopy system with a compact fiber-based femtosecond-pulse laser and handheld probe.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangjun; Kieu, Khanh; Wise, Frank W; Chen, Zhongping

    2011-01-01

    We report on the development of a compact multiphoton microscopy (MPM) system that integrates a compact and robust fiber laser with a miniature probe. The all normal dispersion fiber femtosecond laser has a central wavelength of 1.06 μm, pulse width of 125 fs and average power of more than 1 W. A double cladding photonic crystal fiber was used to deliver the excitation beam and to collect the two-photon signal. The hand-held probe included galvanometer-based mirror scanners, relay lenses and a focusing lens. The packaged probe had a diameter of 16 mm. Second harmonic generation (SHG) images and two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) images of biological tissues were demonstrated using the system.

  1. Fiber-Optic Based Compact Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim A.

    1995-01-01

    A propellant leak detection system based on Raman scattering principles is introduced. The proposed system is flexible and versatile as the result of the use of optical fibers. It is shown that multiple species can be monitored simultaneously. In this paper oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen are detected and monitored. The current detection sensitivity for both hydrogen and carbon monoxide is 1% partial pressure at ambient conditions. The sensitivity for oxygen and nitrogen is 0.5% partial pressure. The response time to changes in species concentration is three minutes. This system can be used to monitor multiple species at several locations.

  2. Compact mixed-reactant fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priestnall, Michael A.; Kotzeva, Vega P.; Fish, Deborah J.; Nilsson, Eva M.

    The compact mixed-reactant (CMR) fuel cell is an important new "platform" approach to the design and operation of all types of fuel cell stacks. Amongst several other advantages, CMR has the potential to reduce polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) stack component costs by around a third and to raise volumetric power densities by an order of magnitude. Mixed-reactant fuel cells, in which the fuel and oxidant within a cell are allowed to mix, rely upon the selectivity of anode and cathode electrocatalysts to separate the electrochemical oxidation of fuel and reduction of oxidant. A comprehensive review of the 50-year history of mixed-reactant literature has demonstrated that such systems can perform as well as and, in some circumstances, much better than conventional fuel cells. The significant innovation that Generics has introduced to this field is to combine the concept of mixed-reactant fuel cells with that of a fully porous membrane electrode assembly (MEA) structure. Passing a fuel-oxidant mixture through a stack of porous cells allows the conventional bipolar flow-field plates required in many fuel cell designs to be eliminated. In a conventional PEM stack, for example, the bipolar carbon flow-field plates may block up to half of the active cell area and account for up to 90% of the volume of the stack and of the order of one-third of the materials costs. In addition to all the advantages of mixed-reactant systems, the "flow-through" mode, embodied in Generics' CMR approach, significantly enhances mass-transport of reactants to the electrodes and can reduce reactant pressure drops across the stack. Redesigning fuel cells to operate in a CMR mode with selective electrodes offers the attractive prospect of much reduced stack costs and significantly higher stack power densities for all types of fuel cell. Initial modeling and proof of principle experiments using an alkaline system have confirmed the validity of the CMR approach and the potential for substantial

  3. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  4. Invited Article: A compact optically coherent fiber frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, L. C.; Deschênes, J.-D.; Sonderhouse, L.; Swann, W. C.; Khader, I. H.; Baumann, E.; Newbury, N. R.; Coddington, I.

    2015-08-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a self-referenced, optically coherent frequency comb. The system robustness is derived from a combination of an optics package based on polarization-maintaining fiber, saturable absorbers for mode-locking, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) detection of the control signals, and digital feedback control for frequency stabilization. The output is phase-coherent over a 1-2 μm octave-spanning spectrum with a pulse repetition rate of ˜200 MHz and a residual pulse-to-pulse timing jitter <3 fs well within the requirements of most frequency-comb applications. Digital control enables phase coherent operation for over 90 h, critical for phase-sensitive applications such as timekeeping. We show that this phase-slip free operation follows the fundamental limit set by the SNR of the control signals. Performance metrics from three nearly identical combs are presented. This laptop-sized comb should enable a wide-range of applications beyond the laboratory.

  5. Invited Article: A compact optically coherent fiber frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, L C; Deschênes, J-D; Sonderhouse, L; Swann, W C; Khader, I H; Baumann, E; Newbury, N R; Coddington, I

    2015-08-01

    We describe the design, fabrication, and performance of a self-referenced, optically coherent frequency comb. The system robustness is derived from a combination of an optics package based on polarization-maintaining fiber, saturable absorbers for mode-locking, high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) detection of the control signals, and digital feedback control for frequency stabilization. The output is phase-coherent over a 1-2 μm octave-spanning spectrum with a pulse repetition rate of ∼200 MHz and a residual pulse-to-pulse timing jitter <3 fs well within the requirements of most frequency-comb applications. Digital control enables phase coherent operation for over 90 h, critical for phase-sensitive applications such as timekeeping. We show that this phase-slip free operation follows the fundamental limit set by the SNR of the control signals. Performance metrics from three nearly identical combs are presented. This laptop-sized comb should enable a wide-range of applications beyond the laboratory.

  6. Compact dual channel optical fiber amplifier for space communication applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, G.; Henwood-Moroney, L.; Hosking, P.; Kehayas, E.; Stampoulidis, L.; Robertson, A.

    2015-03-01

    We present results from the development of a dual channel Optical Fiber Amplifier (OFA) that consists of two copropagating low noise EDFAs at 1565 and 1545nm. The two channels have separate outputs but can also be combined via an optical switch to a common output channel for an increased output signal power. The OFA produces up to 35dB gain at low signal input powers and a total of over 350mW optical signal power combined from both EDFA channels with a 5mW signal input. The OFA was tested with input signals between 0.1 - 20 mW over the C-band and with pump power varying from 0 - 100% of the maximum operating pump power. The OFA module has total mass of 583 g including all electrical and optical components, as well as optical and electrical bulkheads, and a total module volume of 430 cm3. The module was also radiation tested via gamma irradiation up to 100 krad TID, validating the robustness of the optical amplifier against RIA effects and its suitability for LEO and GEO satellite missions.

  7. A compact terahertz burst emission system driven with 1 μm fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamonis, Juozas; Rusteika, Nerijus; Danilevičius, Rokas; Krotkus, Arūnas

    2013-04-01

    In this work we propose a compact, easily tunable terahertz burst generation system based on the mixing of two linearly chirped optical pulses in the Michelson interferometer. The use of linearly chirped optical pulses ejected straight from the fiber laser enabled us to avoid bulky external optical pulse stretching schemes. Even for non-compensated third and higher order dispersion that is taking place in the optical fiber terahertz bursts of relatively narrow bandwidth of 55 GHz were registered. The system operation range determined from the power measurements reached 2 THz.

  8. Compact microfluidic sensing by introducing effective phase shift in fiber Bragg grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Minghui; Wang, Guanghui; Ho, Ho-Pui A.; Zhang, Xuping

    2014-10-01

    A compact microfluidic refractive index sensor fabricated by drilling hole in the middle section of a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is reported herein. The laser-drilled hole provides a microfluidic channel for the aqueous sample to pass through while at the same time permits coupling of the interrogating light to detect the target analyte. The reported sensor takes advantage of the fact that a small phase shift in the central region of the grating will result in a very sharp peak in the FBG stop-band. The phase shift can be related to a range of possible perturbations inside the microfluidic channel, including passage of cells, beads and a shift in the concentration of certain fluidic component. The amount of wavelength shift of the peak in the FBG stop-band represents the change in the refractive index inside the microfluidic channel. Simulation results indicate very favorable sensor signal characteristics such as large wavelength shift and sharp reflection dips. The reported microfluidic phase shift FGB sensor could be a good candidate for portable flow cytometry applications.

  9. Compact dual-frequency fiber laser accelerometer with sub-μg resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Qian; Jin, Long; Liang, Yizhi; Cheng, Linghao; Guan, Bai-Ou

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a compact and high-resolution dual-polarization fiber laser accelerometer. A spring-mass like scheme is constructed by fixing a 10-gram proof mass on the laser cavity to transduce applied vibration into beat-frequency change. The loading is located at the intensity maximum of intracavity light to maximize the optical response. The detection limit reaches 107 ng/Hz1/2 at 200 Hz. The working bandwidth ranges from 60 Hz to 600 Hz.

  10. Optical Fiber Borehole Strainmeter Arrays for Measuring Sediment Compaction in Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWolf, S.; Nooner, S. L.; Steckler, M. S.; Zumberge, M. A.; Akhter, S. H.

    2013-12-01

    Subsidence is the defining control on basin development and stratigraphy, and plays a major role in fluvial dynamics, coastal response to sea level, and flooding patterns in delta systems. As expected for an active delta, rates of subsidence in the GBMD are variable, averaging ~5 mm/yr but locally exceeding 10 mm/yr as measured by GPS. Such modern rates outpace sea-level rise, giving concern for major land loss at the coast where not balanced by sedimentation. However, subsidence rates vary considerably across the delta, and long-term (10^3 yrs) rates (0.5-3 mm/yr) appear to be 5-20x less than those derived from GPS measurements (1-13 mm/yr). These differences likely arise because of incompleteness of the sediment record and because subsidence is the sum of multiple causes, including sediment compaction, the isostatic response to sediment and thrust loads, and temporary elastic strain associated with the earthquake cycle. We have designed an experiment to directly measure the sediment compaction component of the observed subsidence in Bangladesh. Optical fiber strainmeters are an attractive alternative to conventional borehole extensometers since they are relatively robust and easy to deploy, and their lengths can be determined within several hundred microns in campaign-style measurements using an electronic distance meter. Since the measured path is inside an optical fiber, they do not require a straight borehole. The low attenuation of light in an optical fiber makes it possible to build strainmeters for practical borehole depths. Their primary drawback is the temperature coefficient of the fiber's index of refraction, which can be compensated for using thermistors. Building on years of experience, we have developed optical fiber strainmeters for measuring sediment compaction. The heart of each strainmeter is an optical fiber cable consisting of a stainless steel tube containing 4 standard telecom grade optical fibers. The fiber cable is terminated such that one

  11. All-passive phase locking of a compact Er:fiber laser system.

    PubMed

    Krauss, Günther; Fehrenbacher, David; Brida, Daniele; Riek, Claudius; Sell, Alexander; Huber, Rupert; Leitenstorfer, Alfred

    2011-02-15

    A passively phase-locked laser source based on compact femtosecond Er:fiber technology is introduced. The carrier-envelope offset frequency is set to zero via difference frequency generation between a soliton at a wavelength of 2 μm and a dispersive wave at 860 nm generated in the same highly nonlinear fiber. This process results in a broadband output centered at 1.55 μm. Subsequently, the 40 MHz pulse train seeds a second Er:fiber amplifier, which boosts the pulse energy up to 8 nJ at a duration of 125 fs. Excellent phase stability is demonstrated via f-to-2f spectral interferometry.

  12. Compact two wavelength Brillouin fiber laser sensor with double Brillouin frequency spacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Zhang, Mingjiang; Zhang, Jianzhong; Han, Hong; Yi, Xiaogang; Zhang, Jianguo; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-12-01

    A compact two wavelength Brillouin fiber laser (BFL) sensor with double Brillouin frequency spacing is proposed and demonstrated. In the experiment, 20 m polarization maintaining fiber is used as the sensing element and Brillouin gain medium. This short cavity configuration not only guarantees single longitudinal mode operation of two Stokes wavelengths, but also can effectively reduce external perturbations, complexity and noise of BFL in the absence of an erbium-doped fiber amplifier in intra-cavity. In experiment, about 2 MHz/°C sensitivity of beat frequency between the pump and the 2nd-order Stokes wavelength keep in good agreement with the theoretical value. Meanwhile, 0.2 °C temperature stability and  ±0.1 dB power fluctuation are better than the traditional structure. The system is simple and stable, making it convenient for more applications.

  13. Compact, compression-free, displaceable, and resealable vacuum feedthrough with built-in strain relief for sensitive components such as optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, B.; Ebert, V.

    2014-05-01

    For the direct fiber coupling of small optical measurement cells, we developed a new compact vacuum feedthrough for glass fibers and other similarly shaped objects that are compact and that offer the possibility of adjusting the fiber in longitudinal and in circular direction. The feedthrough assembly avoids compression or torsion on the fiber and thus protects, e.g., highly frangible fiber materials. In the following, we will present a brief simulation of the tightness requirements for low-pressure and low-concentration water vapor measurements and we will explain an integrated concept for a displaceable and self-adjustable, compression-free, compact, ultra-high vacuum, resealable feedthrough with good strain relief. The feedthrough has been successfully tested in a laboratory test facility and in several extractive airborne tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy hygrometers. The leakage rate of the feedthrough presented here was tested via a helium leak searcher and was quantified further in an 8-week vacuum measurement campaign. The leakage rate is determined to be 0.41 ± 0.04 × 10-9 hPa l/s, which - to our knowledge - is the first time a leakage rate for such a feedthrough has been quantified.

  14. Compact, compression-free, displaceable, and resealable vacuum feedthrough with built-in strain relief for sensitive components such as optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Buchholz, B; Ebert, V

    2014-05-01

    For the direct fiber coupling of small optical measurement cells, we developed a new compact vacuum feedthrough for glass fibers and other similarly shaped objects that are compact and that offer the possibility of adjusting the fiber in longitudinal and in circular direction. The feedthrough assembly avoids compression or torsion on the fiber and thus protects, e.g., highly frangible fiber materials. In the following, we will present a brief simulation of the tightness requirements for low-pressure and low-concentration water vapor measurements and we will explain an integrated concept for a displaceable and self-adjustable, compression-free, compact, ultra-high vacuum, resealable feedthrough with good strain relief. The feedthrough has been successfully tested in a laboratory test facility and in several extractive airborne tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy hygrometers. The leakage rate of the feedthrough presented here was tested via a helium leak searcher and was quantified further in an 8-week vacuum measurement campaign. The leakage rate is determined to be 0.41 ± 0.04 × 10(-9) hPa l/s, which--to our knowledge--is the first time a leakage rate for such a feedthrough has been quantified.

  15. Cells on foam and fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Clyde, R.

    1995-11-01

    Cells growing on high area foam and when a screen is put around the foam, it is made heavier so it can be fluidized. When foam is rotated in a half full RBC, drops are formed and mass transfer of oxygen to drops in much faster. Most fungi and some mammalian cells need oxygen. Corrugated fibers with holes in the valleys also produce drops. White rot fungus needs oxygen and it degrades many chlorine compounds, azo dyes, and TNT. Old cardboard boxes are readily available and when buried in soil, oxygen is entrapped. In a lake, the boxes expose high area. Fibers have high surface area for immobilizing cells and when the fibers are rotated, fast reactions occur, converting one chemical to another. Sugar has been fermented to alcohol in 10-15 minutes. Ethanol has high octane and does not need lead. Old cars and trucks still use lead and high levels have been found in the drinking water of several large cities. Bacteria on fibers can remove lead in a few seconds. When an RBC of plain fiber discs is rotated and a light shone in the top the light hits a thin moving film to degrade chlorine compounds. Microbes and light remove sulfur from oil. Calcium magnesium acetate is a non corrosive road deicer. Salt on roads causes millions of dollars damage to bridges and cars. An inexpensive reactor has been made for organization studies of mammalian and plant cells. A magnet is near the bottom but not touching and oxygen is put on the top where there is no seal that can leak.

  16. An All-Fiber, Modular, Compact Wind Lidar for Wind Sensing and Wake Vortex Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Sibell, Russ; Vetorino, Steve; Higgins, Richard; Tracy, Allen

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses an innovative, compact and eyesafe coherent lidar system developed for wind and wake vortex sensing applications. With an innovative all-fiber and modular transceiver architecture, the wind lidar system has reduced size, weight and power requirements, and provides enhanced performance along with operational elegance. This all-fiber architecture is developed around fiber seed laser coupled to uniquely configured fiber amplifier modules. The innovative features of this lidar system, besides its all fiber architecture, include pulsewidth agility and user programmable 3D hemispherical scanner unit. Operating at a wavelength of 1.5457 microns and with a PRF of up to 20 KHz, the lidar transmitter system is designed as a Class 1 system with dimensions of 30"(W) x 46"(L) x 60"(H). With an operational range exceeding 10 km, the wind lidar is configured to measure wind velocities of greater than 120 m/s with an accuracy of +/- 0.2 m/s and allow range resolution of less than 15 m. The dynamical configuration capability of transmitted pulsewidths from 50 ns to 400 ns allows high resolution wake vortex measurements. The scanner uses innovative liquid metal slip ring and is built using 3D printer technology with light weight nylon. As such, it provides continuous 360 degree azimuth and 180 degree elevation scan angles with an incremental motion of 0.001 degree. The lidar system is air cooled and requires 110 V for its operation. This compact and modular lidar system is anticipated to provide mobility, reliability, and ease of field deployment for wind and wake vortex measurements. Currently, this wind lidar is undergoing validation tests under various atmospheric conditions. Preliminary results of these field measurements of wind characteristics that were recently carried out in Colorado are discussed.

  17. An all-fiber, modular, compact wind lidar for wind sensing and wake vortex applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Sibell, Russel; Vetorino, Steven; Higgins, Richard; Tracy, Allen

    2015-05-01

    This paper discusses an innovative, compact and eyesafe coherent lidar system developed for wind and wake vortex sensing applications. With an innovative all-fiber and modular transceiver architecture, the wind lidar system has reduced size, weight and power requirements, and provides enhanced performance along with operational elegance. This all-fiber architecture is developed around fiber seed laser coupled to uniquely configured fiber amplifier modules. The innovative features of this lidar system, besides its all fiber architecture, include pulsewidth agility and user programmable 3D hemispherical scanner unit. Operating at a wavelength of 1.5457 microns and with a PRF of up to 20 KHz, the lidar transmitter system is designed as a Class 1 system with dimensions of 30"(W) x 46"(L) x 60"(H). With an operational range exceeding 10 km, the wind lidar is configured to measure wind velocities of greater than 120 m/s with an accuracy of +/- 0.2 m/s and allow range resolution of less than 15 m. The dynamical configuration capability of transmitted pulsewidths from 50 ns to 400 ns allows high resolution wake vortex measurements. The scanner uses innovative liquid metal slip ring and is built using 3D printer technology with light weight nylon. As such, it provides continuous 360 degree azimuth and 180 degree elevation scan angles with an incremental motion of 0.001 degree. The lidar system is air cooled and requires 110 V for its operation. This compact and modular lidar system is anticipated to provide mobility, reliability, and ease of field deployment for wind and wake vortex measurements. Currently, this wind lidar is undergoing validation tests under various atmospheric conditions. Preliminary results of these field measurements of wind characteristics that were recently carried out in Colorado are discussed.

  18. Investigation on a compact in-line multimode-single-mode-multimode fiber structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Bin; Li, Yang; Liu, Zhi-bo; Feng, Suchun; Bai, Yunlong; Xu, Yao; Jian, Shuisheng

    2016-06-01

    We carried out a detailed investigation on a compact in-line multimode single-mode multimode (MSM) fiber structure. Both theoretical modal and experimental setup were established to demonstrate the transmission characteristics and the corresponding responses of the applied strain and temperature. The proposed structure simply involves a section of the single-mode fiber (SMF) spliced to two sections of multimode fiber (MMF) and lead-in and lead-out SMFs. The excited environment-sensitive cladding modes together with the fundamental mode in the central SMF form a typical Mach-Zehnder interferometer (MZI). We analyzed the transmission characteristics of the different length of the middle SMF and the MMF in detail. In the experiment, we obtained the extinction ratio of the MSM fiber structure based MZI comb spectrum which was up to 20 dB, and sensitivities of 0.7096 pm/με (0-2000 με) and 44.12 pm/°C (10-70 °C), which proved the potential sensing applications of the proposed fiber structure.

  19. Influence of Glass Fiber on Fresh and Hardened Properties of Self Compacting Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathi Murugan, R.; Haridharan, M. K.; Natarajan, C.; Jayasankar, R.

    2017-07-01

    The practical need of self-compacting concrete (SCC) is increasing due to increase in the infrastructure competence all over the world. The effective way of increasing the strength of concrete and enhance the behaviour under extreme loading (fire) is the keen interest. Glass fibers were added for five different of volume fractions (0%, 0.1%, 0.3%, 0.5% and 0.6%) to determine the optimum percentage of glass fiber without compensating the fresh properties and enhanced hardened properties of SCC concrete. The fresh state of concrete is characterized by slump flow, T-50cm slump flow, and V-funnel and L- box tests. The results obtained in fresh state are compared with the acceptance criteria of EFNARC specification. Concrete specimens were casted to evaluate the hardened properties such as compressive strength, split tensile strength, flexural strength and modulus of elasticity. Incorporation the glass fiber into SCC reduces the workability but within the standard specification. The hardened properties of SCC glass fiber reinforced concrete were enhanced, due to bridging the pre-existing micro cracks in concrete by glass fiber addition.

  20. Compact, 17W average power, 100kW peak power, nanosecond fiber laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracco, Matthieu J.; Logan, David; Green, Jared; Balsley, David; Nelson, Mike; Small, Jay; Mettlen, Scott; Lowder, Tyson L.; McComb, Timothy S.; Kutscha, Tim; Burkholder, Gary; Smith, Michael R.; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; Randall, Matthew; Fanning, Geoff; Bell, Jake

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a robust, compact, low-cost, pulsed, linearly polarized, 1064 nm, Yb:fiber laser system capable of generating ~100 kW peak power pulses and >17 W average power at repetition rates of 80 - 285 kHz. The system employs a configurable microchip seed laser that provides nanosecond (~1.0 - 1.5 ns) pulse durations. The seed pulses are amplified in an all-fiber, polarization maintaining, large mode area (LMA) fiber amplifier optimized for high peak power operation. The LMA Yb:fiber amplifier enables near diffraction limited beam quality at 100 kW peak power. The seed laser, fiber amplifier, and beam delivery optics are packaged into an air-cooled laser head of 152×330×87 mm3 with pump power provided from a separate air-cooled laser controller. Due to the high peak power, high beam quality, spectral purity, and linearly polarized nature of the output beam, the laser is readily frequency doubled to 532 nm. Average 532 nm powers up to 7 W and peak powers exceeding 40 kW have been demonstrated. Potential for scaling to higher peak and average powers in both the green and infrared (IR) will be discussed. This laser system has been field tested and demonstrated in numerous materials processing applications in both the IR and green, including scribing and marking. We discuss recent results that demonstrate success in processing a diverse array of representative industrial samples.

  1. Biological imaging with nonlinear photothermal microscopy using a compact supercontinuum fiber laser source.

    PubMed

    He, Jinping; Miyazaki, Jun; Wang, Nan; Tsurui, Hiromichi; Kobayashi, Takayoshi

    2015-04-20

    Nonlinear photothermal microscopy is applied in the imaging of biological tissues stained with chlorophyll and hematoxylin. Experimental results show that this type of organic molecules, which absorb light but transform dominant part of the absorbed energy into heat, may be ideal probes for photothermal imaging without photochemical toxicity. Picosecond pump and probe pulses, with central wavelengths of 488 and 632 nm, respectively, are spectrally filtered from a compact supercontinuum fiber laser source. Based on the light source, a compact and sensitive super-resolution imaging system is constructed. Further more, the imaging system is much less affected by thermal blurring than photothermal microscopes with continuous-wave light sources. The spatial resolution of nonlinear photothermal microscopy is ~ 188 nm. It is ~ 23% higher than commonly utilized linear photothermal microscopy experimentally and ~43% than conventional optical microscopy theoretically. The nonlinear photothermal imaging technology can be used in the evaluation of biological tissues with high-resolution and contrast.

  2. Compact 3D photonic crystals sensing platform with 45 degree angle polished fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yuqing; Chen, Lu; Zhu, Jiali; Ni, Haibin; Xia, Wei; Wang, Ming

    2017-07-01

    Three dimensional photonic crystals are a kind of promising sensing materials in biology and chemistry. A compact structure, consists of planner colloidal crystals and 45 degree angle polished fiber, is proposed as a platform for accurate, fast, reliable three dimensional photonic crystals sensing in practice. This structure show advantages in compact size for integration and it is ease for large scale manufacture. Reflectivity of the 45 degree angle polished surface with and without a layer of Ag film are simulated by FDTD simulation. Refractive index sensing properties as well as mode distribution of this structure consists of both polystyrene opal and silica inverse opal film is investigated, and an experimental demonstration of silica inverse opal film is performed, which shows a sensitivity of 733 nm/RIU. Different kinds of three dimensional photonic crystals can also be applied in this structure for particular purpose.

  3. Compact dual-wavelength thulium-doped fiber laser employing a double-ring filter.

    PubMed

    Fan, Xuliang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Siming; Liu, Xuan; Wang, Yong; Shen, Deyuan

    2016-04-20

    In this paper, we report on stable dual-wavelength operation of a thulium-doped compact all-fiber laser using a double-ring filter as the wavelength selective element. Simultaneously lasing at 2014.4 and 2018.4 nm has been obtained via tuning the polarization controllers to adjust the relative gain and loss of the laser cavity. The side mode suppression ratios are greater than 52 dB and the output power difference between the two lasing lines is less than 0.08 dB under 2.6 W of incident pump power.

  4. A DFB fiber laser sensor system using a NI-Compact-RIO-based PGC demodulation scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; He, Jun; Feng, Lei; Li, Fang; Liu, Yu-liang

    2009-07-01

    An eight-channel distributed feedback fiber laser (DFB FL) sensor system using phase generated carrier (PGC) demodulation scheme is described in this paper. This system employs an unbalanced Michelson interferometer to convert the measurands-induced laser wavelength shifts into the phase shifts. The digital PGC algorithm is realized on the Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) module of the commercialized NI-Compact RIO. The influence of the time delay between the interferometric signal and the PGC carrier is then investigated. Finally, the experimental system is setup to validate the analysis above.

  5. Compact Optical Fiber 3D Shape Sensor Based on a Pair of Orthogonal Tilted Fiber Bragg Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Dingyi; Zhou, Wenjun; Qiao, Xueguang; Albert, Jacques

    2015-11-01

    In this work, a compact fiber-optic 3D shape sensor consisting of two serially connected 2° tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs) is proposed, where the orientations of the grating planes of the two TFBGs are orthogonal. The measurement of the reflective transmission spectrum from the pair of TFBGs was implemented by Fresnel reflection of the cleaved fiber end. The two groups of cladding mode resonances in the reflection spectrum respond differentially to bending, which allows for the unique determination of the magnitude and orientation of the bend plane (i.e. with a ± 180 degree uncertainty). Bending responses ranging from -0.33 to + 0.21 dB/m-1 (depending on orientation) are experimentally demonstrated with bending from 0 to 3.03 m-1. In the third (axial) direction, the strain is obtained directly by the shift of the TFBG Bragg wavelengths with a sensitivity of 1.06 pm/μɛ.

  6. Ultraprecise compaction and vertical strain measured in the Mississippi River Delta using Optical Fiber Strainmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatfield, W.; Zumberge, M. A.; Allison, M. A.; Bridgeman, J.; Dixon, T. H.; Elliott, D.; Nooner, S. L.; Steckler, M. S.; Tornqvist, T. E.; Wyatt, F. K.

    2016-12-01

    We are using tensioned optical fibers for the ultraprecise measurement of Earth strain in the Mississippi River Delta, where high subsidence rates threaten a large area with flooding from the Gulf of Mexico. As part of a "superstation" near Myrtle Grove, Louisiana (established with funding from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers), we have instrumented two boreholes, 10 m and 40 m deep, with interferometric optical fiber sensors. These continuously record the vertical displacements of surface monuments to cemented-in anchors at depth. GPS stations attached to the same surface monuments tie the local compaction measurements to an absolute reference frame. These measurements, with a planned installation at an intermediate depth, will allow us to partition the subsidence between layers at various levels above the Pleistocene basement. Correlating tidal loading and vertical strain, and comparing vertical strain from distant teleseisms, reveals variations in local properties with depth.

  7. Compact and high-efficiency device for Raman scattering measurement using optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Mitsui, Tadashi

    2014-11-01

    We describe the design and development of a high-efficiency optical measurement device for operation within the small bore of a high-power magnet at low temperature. For the high-efficiency measurement of light emitted from this small region, we designed a compact confocal optics with lens focusing and tilting systems, and used a piezodriven translation stage that allows micron-scale focus control of the sample position. We designed a measurement device that uses 10 m-long optical fibers in order to avoid the influence of mechanical vibration and magnetic field leakage of high-power magnets, and we also describe a technique for minimizing the fluorescence signal of optical fibers. The operation of the device was confirmed by Raman scattering measurements of monolayer graphene on quartz glass with a high signal-to-noise ratio.

  8. Compact bending sensor based on a fiber Bragg grating in an abrupt biconical taper.

    PubMed

    Cui, Wei; Si, Jinhai; Chen, Tao; Hou, Xun

    2015-05-04

    We propose and experimentally demonstrate a compact bending sensor. The head of the sensor is only 0.8 mm in length, and consists of an abrupt biconical fiber taper formed using a conventional fusion splicer, in which a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is inscribed using a femtosecond laser. The biconical taper incorporating the FBG can couple light from the cladding to the backward-propagating core mode, which realizes an interferometer in reflection-mode. Bending of the structure can be detected from the contrast change of interference fringes. A configuration to measure curvature is investigated to demonstrate the sensing characteristics. The temperature cross-sensitivity of the sensor is studied, and the results demonstrate that it is insensitive to temperature.

  9. Compact vector fiber-optic displacement sensor using an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xunli; Zhou, Ruixiang

    2017-10-01

    We demonstrate a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer for vector displacement measurement. The sensor is a compact structure in which a short length of thin-core fiber (TCF) is sandwiched between two single mode fibers (SMFs) by core-aligned fusion splicing. The TCF stub contains a refractive index modification (RIM) region which serves as a mode-coupling window over the interface between the TCF's core and cladding. We employed femtosecond laser-based direct inscription to achieve precise position of the RIM over a chosen length close to the core-cladding interface of the TCF and ensure large and stable refractive index increase in the inscribed region. Strong coupling between core and cladding modes is generated at the RIM, resulting in a well-defined interference spectrum in transmission. The transmission spectrum exhibits strong bending dependence and direction discrimination due to the azimuthally asymmetrical distribution of the RIM over the fiber's cross section. We achieved vector displacement measurement by wavelength interrogation of the interference spectrum. In the frequency spectrum, the intensity of a cladding mode resonance presents linear response to displacement as well as temperature independence.

  10. Compact cryogenic self-aligning fiber-to-detector coupling with losses below one percent.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aaron J; Lita, Adriana E; Calkins, Brice; Vayshenker, Igor; Gruber, Steven M; Nam, Sae Woo

    2011-05-09

    We present a compact packaging technique for coupling light from a single-mode telecommunication fiber to cryogenic single-photon sensitive devices. Our single-photon detectors are superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) with a collection area only a factor of a few larger than the area of the fiber core which presents significant challenges to low-loss fiber-to-detector coupling. The coupling method presented here has low loss, cryogenic compatibility, easy and reproducible assembly and low component cost. The system efficiency of the packaged single-photon counting detectors is verified by the "triplet method" of power-source calibration along with the "multiple attenuator" method that produces a calibrated single-photon flux. These calibration techniques, when used in combination with through-wafer imaging and fiber back-reflection measurements, give us confidence that we have achieved coupling losses below 1% for all devices packaged according to the self-alignment method presented in this paper.

  11. Compact all-fiber optical Faraday components using 65-wt%-terbium-doped fiber with a record Verdet constant of -32 rad/(Tm).

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Jiang, S; Marciante, J R

    2010-06-07

    A compact all-fiber Faraday isolator and a Faraday mirror are demonstrated. At the core of each of these components is an all-fiber Faraday rotator made of a 4-cm-long, 65-wt%-terbium-doped silicate fiber. The effective Verdet constant of the terbium-doped fiber is measured to be -32 rad/(Tm), which is 27 x larger than that of silica fiber. This effective Verdet constant is the largest value measured to date in any fiber and is 83% of the Verdet constant of commercially available crystal used in bulk optics-based isolators. Combining the all-fiber Faraday rotator with fiber polarizers results in a fully fusion spliced all-fiber isolator whose isolation is measured to be 19 dB. Combining the all-fiber Faraday rotator with a fiber Bragg grating results in an all-fiber Faraday mirror that rotates the polarization state of the reflected light by 88 +/- 4 degrees .

  12. Compact All-Fiber Optical Faraday Components Using 65-wt%-Terbium-Doped Fiber with a Record Verdet Constant of -32 rad/(Tm)

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Jiang, S.; Maricante, J.R.

    2010-06-04

    A compact all-fiber Faraday isolator and a Faraday mirror are demonstrated. At the core of each of these components is an all-fiber Faraday rotator made of a 4-cm-long, 65-wt%-terbium–doped silicate fiber. The effective Verdet constant of the terbium-doped fiber is measured to be –32 rad/(Tm), which is 27 × larger than that of silica fiber. This effective Verdet constant is the largest value measured to date in any fiber and is 83% of the Verdet constant of commercially available crystal used in bulk optics–based isolators. Combining the all-fiber Faraday rotator with fiber polarizers results in a fully fusion spliced all-fiber isolator whose isolation is measured to be 19 dB. Combining the all-fiber Faraday rotator with a fiber Bragg grating results in an all-fiber Faraday mirror that rotates the polarization state of the reflected light by 88 ± 4°.

  13. Highly compact fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer: A new instrument design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowakowski, B. K.; Smith, D. T.; Smith, S. T.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the design, construction, and characterization of a new optical-fiber-based, low-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer with a simple cavity formed by two reflecting surfaces (the end of a cleaved optical fiber and a plane, reflecting counter-surface), for the continuous measurement of displacements of several nanometers to several tens of millimeters. No beam collimation or focusing optics are required, resulting in a displacement sensor that is extremely compact (optical fiber diameter 125 μm), is surprisingly tolerant of misalignment (more than 5°), and can be used over a very wide range of temperatures and environmental conditions, including ultra-high-vacuum. The displacement measurement is derived from interferometric phase measurements using an infrared laser source whose wavelength is modulated sinusoidally at a frequency f. The phase signal is in turn derived from changes in the amplitudes of demodulated signals, at both the modulation frequency, f, and its harmonic at 2f, coming from a photodetector that is monitoring light intensity reflected back from the cavity as the cavity length changes. Simple quadrature detection results in phase errors corresponding to displacement errors of up to 25 nm, but by using compensation algorithms discussed in this paper, these inherent non-linearities can be reduced to below 3 nm. In addition, wavelength sweep capability enables measurement of the absolute surface separation. This experimental design creates a unique set of displacement measuring capabilities not previously combined in a single interferometer.

  14. Highly compact fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer: A new instrument design.

    PubMed

    Nowakowski, B K; Smith, D T; Smith, S T

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents the design, construction, and characterization of a new optical-fiber-based, low-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer with a simple cavity formed by two reflecting surfaces (the end of a cleaved optical fiber and a plane, reflecting counter-surface), for the continuous measurement of displacements of several nanometers to several tens of millimeters. No beam collimation or focusing optics are required, resulting in a displacement sensor that is extremely compact (optical fiber diameter 125 μm), is surprisingly tolerant of misalignment (more than 5°), and can be used over a very wide range of temperatures and environmental conditions, including ultra-high-vacuum. The displacement measurement is derived from interferometric phase measurements using an infrared laser source whose wavelength is modulated sinusoidally at a frequency f. The phase signal is in turn derived from changes in the amplitudes of demodulated signals, at both the modulation frequency, f, and its harmonic at 2f, coming from a photodetector that is monitoring light intensity reflected back from the cavity as the cavity length changes. Simple quadrature detection results in phase errors corresponding to displacement errors of up to 25 nm, but by using compensation algorithms discussed in this paper, these inherent non-linearities can be reduced to below 3 nm. In addition, wavelength sweep capability enables measurement of the absolute surface separation. This experimental design creates a unique set of displacement measuring capabilities not previously combined in a single interferometer.

  15. A compact fiber optics-based heterodyne combined normal and transverse displacement interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuanetti, Bryan; Wang, Tianxue; Prakash, Vikas

    2017-03-01

    While Photonic Doppler Velocimetry (PDV) has become a common diagnostic tool for the measurement of normal component of particle motion in shock wave experiments, this technique has not yet been modified for the measurement of combined normal and transverse motion, as needed in oblique plate impact experiments. In this paper, we discuss the design and implementation of a compact fiber-optics-based heterodyne combined normal and transverse displacement interferometer. Like the standard PDV, this diagnostic tool is assembled using commercially available telecommunications hardware and uses a 1550 nm wavelength 2 W fiber-coupled laser, an optical focuser, and single mode fibers to transport light to and from the target. Two additional optical probes capture first-order beams diffracted from a reflective grating at the target free-surface and deliver the beams past circulators and a coupler where the signal is combined to form a beat frequency. The combined signal is then digitized and analyzed to determine the transverse component of the particle motion. The maximum normal velocity that can be measured by this system is limited by the equivalent transmission bandwidth (3.795 GHz) of the combined detector, amplifier, and digitizer and is estimated to be ˜2.9 km/s. Sample symmetric oblique plate-impact experiments are performed to demonstrate the capability of this diagnostic tool in the measurement of the combined normal and transverse displacement particle motion.

  16. In-situ formation compaction monitoring in deep reservoirs by use of fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murai, Daisuke; Kunisue, Shoji; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Kokubo, Tatsuo

    2013-04-01

    1. Background The Southern Kanto gas field, the largest field of natural gas dissolved in water in Japan, is located primarily under the Chiba Prefecture. In this field 8 companies produce 460*10^6m3/y of natural gas. In addition, the concentration of the iodine in the brine is almost 2000 times that in seawater and the iodine as well as natural gas is collected from the brine. Iodine is industrially useful and essential for the human body. About 30% of world production is produced in this area in recent years. On the other hand, the land subsidence has become the big problem since 1965 and more than 10cm/mm of land subsidence was observed by leveling in 1972. The natural gas and iodine producers in this area have made a land subsidence prevention agreement with the local government and made effort to prevent and control land subsidence. Although their pumping brine for the gas and the iodine production is inferred to be the main cause of land subsidence from that time, the ratio of the formation compaction caused by pumping brine in the total land subsidence hasn't been well known. Therefore, the measurement of the actual formation compaction has become an important technological issue for the companies and they jointly have developed a new monitoring system for the formation compaction. 2. Contents (1) By using fiber optics technology, we have developed a world's first monitoring system which measures each of the in-situ formation compactions continuously without running tools into the well. (2) In order to check a reliability of this system and the problems when construction, we carried out the preliminary test. We installed the prototype system in the shallow observation well with a depth of 80 m and measured the actual formation compaction. The water well was drilled at the 10m away from the observation well and the formation was artificially compacted by pumping groundwater from it. (3) We installed the monitoring system in the deep observation well with a

  17. A tilt sensor with a compact dimension based on a long-period fiber grating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yunpeng; Zhao, Chun-Liu; Hu, Limin; Dong, Xinyong; Jin, Yongxing; Shen, Changyu; Jin, Shangzhong

    2011-09-01

    A tilt sensor with a compact dimension based on a long-period fiber grating (LPG) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The LPG is fixed in a rigid Plexi-glass tubular with a slant orientation and half of the LPG is immersed into the NaCl aqueous solutions, whereas the other half is exposed in air. The tilt angle is obtained by monitoring the dip wavelength shift of the LPG, which changes gradually when the immersed length of the LPG varies with the tilt angle. Experimental results show that the average sensitivity 0.077 nm/° is achieved within the measurement range from -30° to 30° at the static measurement.

  18. A tilt sensor with a compact dimension based on a long-period fiber grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yunpeng; Zhao, Chun-Liu; Hu, Limin; Dong, Xinyong; Jin, Yongxing; Shen, Changyu; Jin, Shangzhong

    2011-09-01

    A tilt sensor with a compact dimension based on a long-period fiber grating (LPG) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The LPG is fixed in a rigid Plexi-glass tubular with a slant orientation and half of the LPG is immersed into the NaCl aqueous solutions, whereas the other half is exposed in air. The tilt angle is obtained by monitoring the dip wavelength shift of the LPG, which changes gradually when the immersed length of the LPG varies with the tilt angle. Experimental results show that the average sensitivity 0.077 nm/° is achieved within the measurement range from -30° to 30° at the static measurement.

  19. Highly efficient compact temperature sensor using liquid infiltrated asymmetric dual elliptical core photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayyanar, N.; Vasantha Jayakantha Raja, R.; Vigneswaran, D.; Lakshmi, B.; Sumathi, M.; Porsezian, K.

    2017-02-01

    We propose a novel temperature sensor based on asymmetry in dual elliptical core photonic crystal fiber (DECPCF) structure featuring an enhanced sensitivity with wide detecting range over small distances. As we are interested in constructing compact temperature sensor, we put forth a novel design of asymmetric DECPCF where the core is infiltrated by chloroform. To accomplish the proposed aim, we consider the thermo-optic coefficient of chloroform and silica to anlayse the temperature dependent propagation characteristics of the proposed DEPCF. The unique property of temperature dependent effective refractive index has been exploited to tune coupling length and transmission spectrum, using finite element method. The subsequent calculation of transmission spectrum shows a temperature sensitivity of 42.99 nm/°C at 1.41 cm in the proposed asymmetric DECPCF.

  20. Compact, low-crosstalk, WDM filter elements for multimode ribbon fiber data links

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R. R.; Garrett, H. H.; Emanuel, M. A.; Larson, M. C.; Pocha, M. D.; Krol, D. M.; Deri, R. J.; Lowry, M. E.

    1999-01-01

    We have been developing the optical components for a source-routed wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) computer interconnect fabric that uses multi-mode fiber ribbon cable as the transmission medium. We are developing wavelength selectable VCSEL transmitters, interference filters, and a compact broadcast element. Here we report on key results from our interference filter development activities. Our WDM filter approach is based upon post-market machining of the commercially available molded plastic "MT" fiber ribbon connector. We use III-IV semiconductors grown by MBE or MOCVD as the filter materials. The high indices of our thin film materials enable us to use multimode fiber and maintain narrow passbands without the need for micro-optics. We have fabricated both 2-port and 3-port devices based upon this approach. Our current work focuses on 2-port WDM filters suitable for a broadcast and select architecture. Our single-cavity Fabry- Perot (FP) filters have demonstrated insertion losses of < 2 dB for 4 nm passbands. The maximum crosstalk suppression for the single-cavity FP filters is 18dB To improve crosstalk suppression beyond that attainable with the Lorentzian lineshapes of the single-cavity FP we have investigated some multiple-cavity Fabry-Perot (MC-FP) designs which have a spectral response with a flatter top and sharper passband edges. Filter passband edge sharpness can be quantified by the ratio of the filter 3 dB bandwidth to 18 dB bandwidth This ratio is 0.48 for our multi-cavity filter, three times sharper than the single-cavity FP devices. This device provides a 5 nm tolerance window for component wavelength variations (at 1 dB excess loss) and is suitable for 10 nm channel spacing with 23 dB crosstalk suppression between adjacent channels. The average insertion loss for the MC-l? devices is 1.6 dB. (Average of insertion losses for the 12 fibers in a filter module.) Our current MC-FP filters have a 3-dB width of 7.6nm. Fiber to fiber center

  1. Compact cantilever couplers for low-loss fiber coupling to silicon photonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Wood, Michael; Sun, Peng; Reano, Ronald M

    2012-01-02

    We demonstrate coupling from tapered optical fibers to 450 nm by 250 nm silicon strip waveguides using compact cantilever couplers. The couplers consist of silicon inverse width tapers embedded within silicon dioxide cantilevers. Finite difference time domain simulations are used to design the length of the silicon inverse width taper to as short as 6.5 μm for a cantilever width of 2 μm. Modeling of various strip waveguide taper profiles shows reduced coupling losses for a quadratic taper profile. Infrared measurements of fabricated devices demonstrate average coupling losses of 0.62 dB per connection for the quasi-TE mode and 0.50 dB per connection for the quasi-TM mode across the optical telecommunications C band. In the wavelength range from 1477 nm to 1580 nm, coupling losses for both polarizations are less than 1 dB per connection. The compact, broadband, and low-loss coupling scheme enables direct access to photonic integrated circuits on an entire chip surface without the need for dicing or cleaving the chip.

  2. Compact fiber-optic flurosensor using high-power continuous-wave violet diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Ann; Gustafsson, Ulf; Palsson, Sara; Svanberg, Sune

    2003-10-01

    In this work a compact fluorosensor has been built for point-monitoring and imaging applications. The instrument has been applied in fluorescence studies on green vegetation and on malignant tissue. The instrument is based on a violet diode laser, an integrated spectrometer and optical fibers for light delivery and collection of the fluorescence signal. This combination makes the system very compact. The high laser output power allows for coupling of the laser light into a hyperspectral diagnostic imaging instrument, developed and built by Science and Technology International. In point-monitoring mode, the instrument has been tested on superficial skin tumors and when using δ-aminolevulinic acid induced protoporphyrin IX as a tumor sensitizer, good contrast between normal and malignant tissue was achieved, clearly demonstrating its feasibility in cancer diagnostics. In imaging mode, the instrument functioned solely as a light source, coupling the excitation light into the hyperspectral imaging instrument. The set-up was tested by studying chlorophyll fluorescence from vegetation. The fluorescence signal showed a low signal-to-noise ratio mainly because of inefficient light coupling into the imaging instrument.

  3. Compact wavelength router based on a Silicon-on-insulator arrayed waveguide grating pigtailed to a fiber array.

    PubMed

    Dumon, P; Bogaerts, W; Van Thourhout, D; Taillaert, D; Baets, R; Wouters, J; Beckx, S; Jaenen, P

    2006-01-23

    We demonstrate a compact, fiber-pigtailed, 4-by-4 wavelength router in Silicon-on-insulator photonic wires, fabricated using CMOS processing methods. The core is an AWG with a 250GHz channel spacing and 1THz free spectral range, on a 425x155 microm(2) footprint. The insertion loss of the AWG was reduced to 3.5dB by applying a two-step processing technique. The crosstalk is -12dB. The device was pigtailed using vertical fiber couplers and an eight-fiber array connector.

  4. Fiber-laser-based photoacoustic microscopy and melanoma cell detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Maslov, Konstantin; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Song; Yang, Lihmei; Xia, Younan; Liu, Jian; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    For broad applications in biomedical research involving functional dynamics and clinical studies, a photoacoustic microscopy system should be compact, stable, and fast. In this work, we use a fiber laser as the photoacoustic irradiation source to meet these goals. The laser system measures 45×56×13 cm3. The stability of the laser is attributed to the intrinsic optical fiber-based light amplification and output coupling. Its 50-kHz pulse repetition rate enables fast scanning or extensive signal averaging. At the laser wavelength of 1064 nm, the photoacoustic microscope still has enough sensitivity to image small blood vessels while providing high optical absorption contrast between melanin and hemoglobin. Label-free melanoma cells in flowing bovine blood are imaged in vitro, yielding measurements of both cell size and flow speed.

  5. Compact and robust open-loop fiber-optic gyroscope for applications in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moslehi, Behzad M.; Yahalom, Ram; Faridian, Ferey; Black, Richard J.; Taylor, Edward W.; Ooi, Teng; Corder, Aaron

    2010-09-01

    Next generation navigation systems demand performance enhancements to support new applications with longer range capabilities, provide robust operation in severe thermal and vibration environments while simultaneously reducing weight, size and power dissipation. Compact, inexpensive, advanced guidance components are essential for such applications. In particular, Inertial Reference Units (IRUs) that can provide high-resolution stabilization and accurate inertial pointing knowledge are needed. For space applications, an added requirement is radiation hardening up to 300 krad over 5 to 15 years. Manufacturing specifications for the radiation-induced losses are not readily available and empirical test data is required for all components in order to optimize the system performance. Interferometric Fiber-Optic Gyroscopes (IFOGs) have proven to be a leading technology for tactical and navigational systems. The sensors have no moving parts. This ensures high reliability and a long life compared to the mechanical gyroscopes and dithered ring laser gyroscopes. However, the available architectures limit the potential size and cost of the IFOG. The work reported here describes an innovative approach for the design, fabrication, and testing of the IFOG and enables the production of a small, robust and low cost gyro with excellent noise and bandwidth characteristics with high radiation tolerance. The development is aimed at achieving a sensor volume < 5 cubic inches. The new IFOS gyro uses an open loop configuration, utilizes extremely small diameter radiation-hard fiber with customized all-digital signal processing. The optics is packaged using a combination of highly-integrated optical component assemblies with an allfiber approach that leads to a more flexible yet lower cost optical design. The IFOS gyro prototypes are implemented using a distributed architecture, where the light source, electronics and receiver are integrated in an external package, while the sensor head is

  6. High repetition pump-and-probe photoemission spectroscopy based on a compact fiber laser system.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Y; Otsu, T; Ozawa, A; Yaji, K; Tani, S; Shin, S; Kobayashi, Y

    2016-12-01

    The paper describes a time-resolved photoemission (TRPES) apparatus equipped with a Yb-doped fiber laser system delivering 1.2-eV pump and 5.9-eV probe pulses at the repetition rate of 95 MHz. Time and energy resolutions are 11.3 meV and ∼310 fs, respectively, the latter is estimated by performing TRPES on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The high repetition rate is suited for achieving high signal-to-noise ratio in TRPES spectra, thereby facilitating investigations of ultrafast electronic dynamics in the low pump fluence (p) region. TRPES of polycrystalline bismuth (Bi) at p as low as 30 nJ/mm(2) is demonstrated. The laser source is compact and is docked to an existing TRPES apparatus based on a 250-kHz Ti:sapphire laser system. The 95-MHz system is less prone to space-charge broadening effects compared to the 250-kHz system, which we explicitly show in a systematic probe-power dependency of the Fermi cutoff of polycrystalline gold. We also describe that the TRPES response of an oriented Bi(111)/HOPG sample is useful for fine-tuning the spatial overlap of the pump and probe beams even when p is as low as 30 nJ/mm(2).

  7. High repetition pump-and-probe photoemission spectroscopy based on a compact fiber laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Y.; Otsu, T.; Ozawa, A.; Yaji, K.; Tani, S.; Shin, S.; Kobayashi, Y.

    2016-12-01

    The paper describes a time-resolved photoemission (TRPES) apparatus equipped with a Yb-doped fiber laser system delivering 1.2-eV pump and 5.9-eV probe pulses at the repetition rate of 95 MHz. Time and energy resolutions are 11.3 meV and ˜310 fs, respectively, the latter is estimated by performing TRPES on a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The high repetition rate is suited for achieving high signal-to-noise ratio in TRPES spectra, thereby facilitating investigations of ultrafast electronic dynamics in the low pump fluence (p) region. TRPES of polycrystalline bismuth (Bi) at p as low as 30 nJ/mm2 is demonstrated. The laser source is compact and is docked to an existing TRPES apparatus based on a 250-kHz Ti:sapphire laser system. The 95-MHz system is less prone to space-charge broadening effects compared to the 250-kHz system, which we explicitly show in a systematic probe-power dependency of the Fermi cutoff of polycrystalline gold. We also describe that the TRPES response of an oriented Bi(111)/HOPG sample is useful for fine-tuning the spatial overlap of the pump and probe beams even when p is as low as 30 nJ/mm2.

  8. Compact high brightness diode laser emitting 500W from a 100μm fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinemann, Stefan; Fritsche, Haro; Kruschke, Bastian; Schmidt, Torsten; Gries, Wolfgang

    2013-02-01

    High power, high brightness diode lasers are beginning to compete with solid state lasers, i.e. disk and fiber lasers. The core technologies for brightness scaling of diode lasers are optical stacking and dense spectral combining (DSC), as well as improvements of the diode material. Diode lasers have the lowest cost of ownership, highest efficiency and most compact design among all lasers. Multiple Single Emitter (MSE) modules allow highest power and highest brightness diode lasers based on standard broad area diodes. Multiple single emitters, each rated at 12 W, are stacked in the fast axis with a monolithic slow axis collimator (SAC) array. Volume Bragg Gratings (VBG) stabilizes the wavelength and narrow the linewidth to less than 1 nm. Dichroic mirrors are used for dense wavelength multiplexing of 4 channels within 12 nm. Subsequently polarization multiplexing generates 450 W with a beam quality of 4.5 mm*mrad. Fast control electronics and miniaturized switched power supplies enable pulse rise times of less than 10 μs, with pulse widths continuously adjustable from 20 μs to cw. Further power scaling up to multi-kilowatts can be achieved by multiplexing up to 16 channels. The power and brightness of these systems enables the use of direct diode lasers for cutting and welding. The technologies can be transferred to other wavelengths to include 793 nm and 1530 nm. Optimized spectral combining enables further improvements in spectral brightness and power.

  9. Twenty kW fuel cell units of compact design. Part 1: Summary. Part 2: Compact fuel cell set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruene, H.,; Hoehne, K.; Strasser, K.; Stuewe, B.; Fetzer, H.

    1980-10-01

    A 7kW compact hydrogen oxygen fuel cell was developed with considerably improved specific power capabilities. The unit, consisting of a total of 70 cells with alkali electrolytes, is described and details on catalysts, electrode construction, electrolyte regenerator and electromechanical and electronic control are included. Prototype tests show the attainment of the envisaged specific power. This is attributed to an increase in power density and to the particular design concept. While certain components need further improvements, the overall feasibility of economical manufacturing, due to the production methods employed, is demonstrated.

  10. Glycoproteome of Elongating Cotton Fiber Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Saravanan; Kumar, Krishan; Pandey, Pankaj; Rajamani, Vijayalakshmi; Padmalatha, Kethireddy Venkata; Dhandapani, Gurusamy; Kanakachari, Mogilicherla; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Kumar, Polumetla Ananda; Reddy, Vanga Siva

    2013-01-01

    Cotton ovule epidermal cell differentiation into long fibers primarily depends on wall-oriented processes such as loosening, elongation, remodeling, and maturation. Such processes are governed by cell wall bound structural proteins and interacting carbohydrate active enzymes. Glycosylation plays a major role in the structural, functional, and localization aspects of the cell wall and extracellular destined proteins. Elucidating the glycoproteome of fiber cells would reflect its wall composition as well as compartmental requirement, which must be system specific. Following complementary proteomic approaches, we have identified 334 unique proteins comprising structural and regulatory families. Glycopeptide-based enrichment followed by deglycosylation with PNGase F and A revealed 92 unique peptides containing 106 formerly N-linked glycosylated sites from 67 unique proteins. Our results showed that structural proteins like arabinogalactans and carbohydrate active enzymes were relatively more abundant and showed stage- and isoform-specific expression patterns in the differentiating fiber cell. Furthermore, our data also revealed the presence of heterogeneous and novel forms of structural and regulatory glycoproteins. Comparative analysis with other plant glycoproteomes highlighted the unique composition of the fiber glycoproteome. The present study provides the first insight into the identity, abundance, diversity, and composition of the glycoproteome within single celled cotton fibers. The elucidated composition also indirectly provides clues about unicellular compartmental requirements underlying single cell differentiation. PMID:24019148

  11. Compact tunable high power picosecond source based on Yb-doped fiber amplification of gain switch laser diode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongjun; Gao, Cunxiao; Tao, Jintao; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Yishan

    2008-05-26

    A compact tunable high power picosecond source based on Yb-doped fiber amplification of gain switch laser diode is demonstrated. A multi-stage single mode Yb-doped fiber preamplifier was combined with a single mode double-clad Yb-doped fiber main amplifier to construct the amplification system, which is seeded by a gain switch laser diode. By optimizing preamplifier???s parameters to compensate the seed spectrum gain, a "flat top" broadband spectrum is obtained to realize wavelength tunable output with a self-made tunable filter. The tunable pulses were further amplified to 3.5 W average power 90 ps pulses at 1 MHz repetition rate, and the center wavelength was tunable in the ranges from 1053 nm to 1073 nm with excellent beam quality.

  12. Compact free-space optical terminal for multi-gigabit signal transmissions with a single-mode fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Yoshinori

    2009-02-01

    This paper shows the design and the performance of a new free-space optical communication terminal including the results of the indoor and outdoor demonstration experiments in a short link distance. To provide flexible and high-speed connectivity to the terrestrial free-space optical communications, a new compact laser communication terminal has been developed at NICT. The terminal has a feature to connect the free-space laser beam directly to single mode fiber by using a special fiber coupler to focus the free-space laser beam and couple it into the single mode fiber, fast and accurate fine tracking system and a small refractive-type telescope with diffraction limited performance. The bandwidth of the fine tracking system is more than 5 kHz using an off-the-shelf miniature Galvano mirror actuator and an analog PID controller.

  13. Hybrid solar cell on a carbon fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grynko, Dmytro A.; Fedoryak, Alexander N.; Smertenko, Petro S.; Dimitriev, Oleg P.; Ogurtsov, Nikolay A.; Pud, Alexander A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a method to assemble nanoscale hybrid solar cells in the form of a brush of radially oriented CdS nanowire crystals around a single carbon fiber is demonstrated for the first time. A solar cell was assembled on a carbon fiber with a diameter of ~5-10 μm which served as a core electrode; inorganic CdS nanowire crystals and organic dye or polymer layers were successively deposited on the carbon fiber as active components resulting in a core-shell photovoltaic structure. Polymer, dye-sensitized, and inverted solar cells have been prepared and compared with their analogues made on the flat indium-tin oxide electrode.

  14. Fabrication of a compact reflective long-period grating sensor with a cladding-mode-selective fiber end-face mirror.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Meng; Zhang, A Ping; Wang, Yang-Chun; Tam, Hwa-Yaw; He, Sailing

    2009-09-28

    A long-period grating (LPG) based compact optical fiber sensor working in reflection mode is demonstrated. A technique to make a mirror on the cladding region of a fiber end-face to reflect only the cladding modes was realized by growing a polymeric microtip on the core region of the fiber end-face, by photopolymerization, followed by coating the fiber end-face with an aluminum film. Using the cladding-mode-selective fiber end-face mirror, the transmission spectrum of the LPG was "inverted" and reflected. Preliminary results of using the sensor to measure the refractive index of glycerol/water solutions were successfully demonstrated.

  15. Green and ultraviolet pulse generation with a compact, fiber laser, chirped-pulse amplification system for aerosol fluorescence measurements.

    PubMed

    Lou, Janet W; Currie, Marc; Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Eversole, Jay D

    2010-10-01

    We use a compact chirped-pulse amplified system to harmonically generate ultrashort pulses for aerosol fluorescence measurements. The seed laser is a compact, all-normal dispersion, mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser with a 1050 nm center wavelength operating at 41 MHz. Average powers of more than 1.2 W at 525 nm and 350 mW at 262 nm are generated with <500 fs pulse durations. The pulses are time-stretched with high-dispersion fiber, amplified by a high-power, large-mode-area fiber amplifier, and recompressed using a chirped volume holographic Bragg grating. The resulting high-peak-power pulses allow for highly efficient harmonic generation. We also demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge, the use of a mode-locked ultraviolet source to excite individual biological particles and other calibration particles in an inlet air flow as they pass through an optical chamber. The repetition rate is ideal for biofluorescence measurements as it allows faster sampling rates as well as the higher peak powers as compared to previously demonstrated Q-switched systems while maintaining a pulse period that is longer than the typical fluorescence lifetimes. Thus, the fluorescence excitation can be considered to be quasicontinuous and requires no external synchronization and triggering.

  16. Green and ultraviolet pulse generation with a compact, fiber laser, chirped-pulse amplification system for aerosol fluorescence measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Janet W.; Currie, Marc; Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Eversole, Jay D.

    2010-10-01

    We use a compact chirped-pulse amplified system to harmonically generate ultrashort pulses for aerosol fluorescence measurements. The seed laser is a compact, all-normal dispersion, mode-locked Yb-doped fiber laser with a 1050 nm center wavelength operating at 41 MHz. Average powers of more than 1.2 W at 525 nm and 350 mW at 262 nm are generated with <500 fs pulse durations. The pulses are time-stretched with high-dispersion fiber, amplified by a high-power, large-mode-area fiber amplifier, and recompressed using a chirped volume holographic Bragg grating. The resulting high-peak-power pulses allow for highly efficient harmonic generation. We also demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge, the use of a mode-locked ultraviolet source to excite individual biological particles and other calibration particles in an inlet air flow as they pass through an optical chamber. The repetition rate is ideal for biofluorescence measurements as it allows faster sampling rates as well as the higher peak powers as compared to previously demonstrated Q-switched systems while maintaining a pulse period that is longer than the typical fluorescence lifetimes. Thus, the fluorescence excitation can be considered to be quasicontinuous and requires no external synchronization and triggering.

  17. Cells on foam and fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Clyde, R.

    1996-12-31

    Some bacteria secrete an insoluble organic polymer in which colonies of bacteria become embedded and adhere to surfaces. Some fungi also form colonies. Their metabolic functions and interactions become enhanced, offering opportunities for increased efficiency in many biological waste remediation and bioreaction processes if a large surface area is available. Plastic foam and sponge encased in wire mesh, perforated cardboard, fibers, fiber discs, and titanium dioxide on fiberglass are a few examples of large surface areas, which, if oxygen is required, can be rotated in a rotating biological contactor (RBC) to increases oxygen contact and provide greatly increased bacterial activity. Ethanol fermentation is accomplished quickly. Lead and other toxic metals are quickly immobilized in bacteria. If light is required the thin liquid film enhances reactivity to quickly degrade chlorine compounds or remove sulfur from oil. Production of calcium magnesium acetate, a non-corrosive road deicer, can also be efficiently produced in this manner. Some primitive fungi also form colonies, notably the slime molds and filament-forming fungi, that enhance their biological effects. White rot fungus readily degrades chlorine compounds, azo dyes, TNT, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PHA), for example.

  18. Study of planar heterojunction perovskite photovoltaic cells using compact titanium oxide by chemical bath deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kouhei; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kohshin; Taima, Tetsuya

    2015-08-01

    Spin-coated perovskite solar cells from sol-gels result in high processing costs because of the need for high temperatures. Here, we report a low-temperature spin-coating route to fabricate planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells using chemical bath deposition of compact-TiOx layers. Comparison of the solar cell properties of compact-TiOx and compact-TiO2 layers show that the power conversion efficiency of the planar heterojunction perovskite solar cell fabricated by the low-temperature, compact-TiOx route is comparable to that of conventional TiO2. The chemical bath deposition method requires heating to 150 °C only to form amorphous compact-TiOx films compared with the 450 °C required for crystalline anatase compact-TiO2 films.

  19. High power, compact, picosecond MOPA based on single trench fiber with single polarized diffraction-limited output.

    PubMed

    Jain, D; Alam, S; Codemard, C; Jung, Y; Zervas, M N; Sahu, J K

    2015-09-01

    We experimentally demonstrate an all-solid Yb-doped 30 μm core diameter single trench fiber. Measurements ensure a robust effective single-mode operation without the need of tight coiling as required for conventional fibers thanks to the ultralow NA (∼0.038) and resonant ring surrounding the core. All-solid and cylindrical design ensures the suitability for mass scale production with the added benefit of all-fiberized device structure. A compact master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) has been built using this fiber delivering ∼23.5  ps pulses at 13.5 MHz repetition rate delivering up to ∼52  W of average output power corresponding to a pulse energy of ∼3.8  μJ and peak power of >160  kW, while maintaining ∼76% slope efficiency. The output beam exhibits a polarization extinction ratio of more than 15 dB and a M2 less than 1.15.

  20. Strong resonance and a highly compact longperiod grating in a large-mode-area photonic crystal fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yinian; Shum, Ping; Chong, Hin-Joo; Rao, M; Lu, Chao

    2003-08-11

    A strong resonance and extremely short length long-period grating (LPG) has been fabricated in a large-mode-area photonic crystal fiber (PCF) by use of a CO2 laser heat source. We believe that such a longperiod grating in pure silica PCF is the first example of a point-by-point technique. The fabrication method is simple and repeatable. The resulting LPG has been developed with eight periodic collapses within a 2.8-mmlong period of the fiber, which gives the strong resonance of core-cladding mode coupling. The lowest mode of LP01 is at a 1529.2-nm wavelength with a full width at half-maximum of ~0.7 nm and a resonance strength of -31.5 dB. The principal advantages of this LPG are that (1) it is temperature insensitive and stable, (2) the device is compact when it is packaged, and (3) it provides practical, low-cost all-fiber filters and PCF-based devices for optical fiber communications and sensing systems.

  1. Simultaneous strain and temperature measurement using a compact photonic crystal fiber inter-modal interferometer and a fiber Bragg grating.

    PubMed

    Dong, Bo; Hao, Jianzhong; Liaw, Chin-yi; Lin, Bo; Tjin, Swee Chuan

    2010-11-10

    An all-fiber sensor scheme for simultaneous strain and temperature measurement is presented. The sensing head is formed by serially connecting a polarization maintaining photonic-crystal-fiber-based inter-modal interferometer (IMI) with a fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The IMI, exhibiting an opposite strain response as compared to that of the FBG, is highly sensitive to strain, while it is insensitive to temperature. This has potential for improving the strain and temperature measurement resolutions. A sensor resolution of ±8.3 με in strain and ±2 °C in temperature are experimentally achieved within a strain range of 0-957.6 με and a temperature range of 24 °C-64 °C, respectively.

  2. Miniature fiber optic loop subcomponent for compact sensors and dense routing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillham, Frederick J.; Stowe, David W.; Ouellette, Thomas R.; Pryshlak, Adrian P.

    1999-05-01

    Fiber optic data links and embedded sensors, such as Fabry- Perot and Mach-Zehnders, are important elements in smart structure architectures. Unfortunately, one problem with optical fiber is the inherent limit through which fibers and cables can be looped. A revolutionary, patented technology has been developed which overcomes this problem. Based on processing the fiber into low loss miniature bends, it permits routing the fiber to difficult areas, and minimizing the size of sensors and components. The minimum bend diameter for singlemode fiber is typically over two inches in diameter, to avoid light attenuation and limit stresses which could prematurely break the fiber. With the new miniature bend technology, bend diameters as small as 1 mm are readily achieved. One embodiment is a sub-component with standard singlemode fiber formed into a 180 degree bend and packaged in a glass tube only 1.5 mm OD X 8 mm long, Figure 1. Measured insertion loss is less than 0.2 dB from 1260 nm to 1680 nm. A final processing step which anneals the fiber into the eventual curvature, reduces the internal stress, thereby resulting in long life expectancy with robust immunity to external loading. This paper addresses the optical and physical performance of the sub-component. Particular attention is paid to attenuation spectra, polarization dependent loss, reflectance, thermal cycle, damp heat, and shock tests. Applications are presented which employs the bend technology. Concatenating right angle bends into a 'wire harness' demonstrates the ability to route fiber through a smart engine or satellite structure. Miniature optical coils are proposed for sensors and expansion joints.

  3. Scalable air cathode microbial fuel cells using glass fiber separators, plastic mesh supporters, and graphite fiber brush anodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Cheng, Shaoan; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-01-01

    The combined use of brush anodes and glass fiber (GF1) separators, and plastic mesh supporters were used here for the first time to create a scalable microbial fuel cell architecture. Separators prevented short circuiting of closely-spaced electrodes, and cathode supporters were used to avoid water gaps between the separator and cathode that can reduce power production. The maximum power density with a separator and supporter and a single cathode was 75 ± 1 W/m(3). Removing the separator decreased power by 8%. Adding a second cathode increased power to 154 ± 1 W/m(3). Current was increased by connecting two MFCs connected in parallel. These results show that brush anodes, combined with a glass fiber separator and a plastic mesh supporter, produce a useful MFC architecture that is inherently scalable due to good insulation between the electrodes and a compact architecture.

  4. Compact all-fiber quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor with a 30.72 kHz quartz tuning fork and spatially resolved trace gas detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yufei; He, Ying; Yu, Xin; Zhang, Jingbo; Sun, Rui; Tittel, Frank K.

    2016-02-29

    An ultra compact all-fiber quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) sensor using quartz tuning fork (QTF) with a low resonance frequency of 30.72 kHz was demonstrated. Such a sensor architecture has the advantages of easier optical alignment, lower insertion loss, lower cost, and more compact compared with a conventional QEPAS sensor using discrete optical components for laser delivery and coupling to the QTF. A fiber beam splitter and three QTFs were employed to perform multi-point detection and demonstrated the potential of spatially resolved measurements.

  5. Cross-talk free and ultra-compact fiber optic sensor for simultaneous measurement of temperature and refractive index.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hae Young; Mudhana, Gopinath; Park, Kwan Seob; Paek, Un-Chul; Lee, Byeong Ha

    2010-01-04

    We propose and demonstrate a cross-talk free simultaneous measurement system for temperature and external refractive index (ERI) implemented by dual-cavity Fabry-Perot (FP) fiber interferometer. The sensing probe consists of two cascaded FP cavities formed with a short piece of multimode fiber (MMF) and a micro-air-gap made of hollow core fiber (HOF). The fabricated sensor head was ultra-compact; the total length of the sensing part was less than 600 mum. Since the reflection spectrum of the composite FP structures is given by the superposition of each cavity spectrum, the spectrum measured in the wavelength domain was analyzed in the Fourier or spatial frequency domain. The experimental results showed that temperature could be determined independently from the spatial frequency shift without being affected by the ERI, while the ERI could be also measured solely by monitoring the intensity variation in the spatial frequency spectrum. The ERI and the temperature sensitivities were approximately 16 dB/RIU for the 1.33-1.45 index range, and 8.9 nm/ degrees C at low temperature and 14.6 nm/ degrees C at high temperature, respectively. In addition, it is also demonstrated that the proposed dual-cavity FP sensor has potential for compensating any power fluctuation that might happen in the input light source.

  6. Switchable multi-wavelength fiber ring laser based on a compact in-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer with photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, W. G.; Lou, S. Q.; Feng, S. C.; Wang, L. W.; Li, H. L.; Guo, T. Y.; Jian, S. S.

    2009-11-01

    Switchable multi-wavelength fiber ring laser with an in-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer incorporated into the ring cavity serving as wavelength-selective filter at room temperature is demonstrated. The filter is formed by splicing a section of few-mode photonic crystal fiber (PCF) and two segments of single mode fiber (SMF) with the air-holes on the both sides of PCF intentionally collapsed in the vicinity of the splices. By adjusting the states of the polarization controller (PC) appropriately, the laser can be switched among the stable single-, dual- and triple-wavelength lasing operations by exploiting polarization hole burning (PHB) effect.

  7. Cell Fractionation and Arrangement on Fibers, Beads, and Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Edelman, G. M.; Rutishauser, U.; Millette, C. F.

    1971-01-01

    A new method, fiber fractionation, has been used to isolate and separate cells. The cells are adsorbed to fibers covalently coupled to molecules such as antigens, antibodies, and lectins which can bind specifically to cell-surface components. The cells are then removed mechanically by plucking the taut fibers. Alternatively, competitive inhibitors of binding may be used to remove the cells at a lesser rate. Successful fractionations have been achieved by varying the degree of derivatization of the fibers by the lectin concanavalin A. Lymphoid cells have been separated by the use of different antigens coupled to the fibers. The method may also be used for specific fixation and manipulation of viable cell populations in culture. In addition to fibers, beads and surfaces have been specifically derivatized and used to achieve different geometrical arrangements of the cells. Images PMID:5289374

  8. Compact multimode fiber beam-shaping system based on GPU accelerated digital holography.

    PubMed

    Plöschner, Martin; Čižmár, Tomáš

    2015-01-15

    Real-time, on-demand, beam shaping at the end of the multimode fiber has recently been made possible by exploiting the computational power of rapidly evolving graphics processing unit (GPU) technology [Opt. Express 22, 2933 (2014)]. However, the current state-of-the-art system requires the presence of an acousto-optic deflector (AOD) to produce images at the end of the fiber without interference effects between neighboring output points. Here, we present a system free from the AOD complexity where we achieve the removal of the undesired interference effects computationally using GPU implemented Gerchberg-Saxton and Yang-Gu algorithms. The GPU implementation is two orders of magnitude faster than the CPU implementation which allows video-rate image control at the distal end of the fiber virtually free of interference effects.

  9. Short wavelength infrared frequency conversion in ultra-compact fiber device.

    PubMed

    Chavez Boggio, J M; Zlatanovic, S; Gholami, F; Aparicio, J M; Moro, S; Balch, K; Alic, N; Radic, S

    2010-01-18

    Linear and nonlinear characteristics of devices using millimeter-scale spools of highly nonlinear fiber are experimentally investigated within 2000-2400nm spectral range. Coils with radius larger than 3.5 mm indicate that macro-bending induced radiation loss is negligible up to 2400nm. Devices with smaller diameter coiling resulted in macro-bending losses that dominate over micro-bending losses beyond 2200nm. A tunable short-wave infrared source was constructed using a coin-sized fiber module to demonstrate an efficient nonlinear conversion from 1.26 to 2.2 microm.

  10. Ultra-broadband and compact polarization splitter based on gold filled dual-core photonic crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Khaleque, Abdul Hattori, Haroldo T.

    2015-10-14

    A polarization splitter based on gold filled dual-core photonic crystal fiber (DC-PCF) that can work from 1420 nm to 1980 nm (560 nm bandwidth) is proposed in this work. The splitter has an extinction ratio lower than −20 dB over a large bandwidth with a total length of 254.6 μm. The key principle of operation of the splitter is the induced change in the refractive index of the y-odd mode when it is coupled to the second order plasmonic mode, while other supermodes are weakly affected by the plasmonic mode. The proposed broadband and compact polarization splitter may find applications in communications and sensing, being capable of working in the infrared and mid-infrared wavelength ranges.

  11. Compact multichannel high-resolution micro-electro-mechanical systems-based interrogator for Fiber Bragg grating sensing.

    PubMed

    Ganziy, D; Rose, B; Bang, O

    2017-04-20

    We propose a novel type of compact high-resolution multichannel micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS)-based interrogator, where we replace the linear detector with a digital micromirror device (DMD). The DMD is typically cheaper and has better pixel sampling than an InGaAs detector used in the 1550 nm range, which leads to cost reduction and better performance. Moreover, the DMD is a 2D array, which means that multichannel systems can be implemented without any additional optical components in the interrogator. This makes the proposed interrogator highly cost-effective, particularly for multichannel systems. The digital nature of the DMD also provides opportunities for advanced programmable Hadamard spectroscopy, which, without significant penalties, can greatly improve the wavelength fit resolution. Our results show that DMDs can be used in high-resolution spectroscopy and for Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) interrogation.

  12. Compact distributed fiber SPR sensor based on TDM and WDM technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihai; Wei, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Chunlan; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-07

    By using a twin-core fiber (TCF), we propose and demonstrate a novel distributed SPR sensor, which employs both the time division multiplexing (TDM) technology and the wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technology together. The proposed sensor has two sensing passages with four sensing channels (and there are two sensing channels in each sensing passage). We employ the TDM technology to realize the two passage distributed sensing, which are parallel-connection; and we employ the WDM technology to realize the distributed sensing of two channels in a sensing passage, which are series-connected. In order to realize the TDM technology, we employ a two-core fiber, which has two cores in a same cladding, being equal to dividing the traditional single core into two independent sensing zones; in order to realize the WDM technology, we employ a fiber end polishing-connecting method to adjust the resonance angle/wavelength to realize the dynamic range separation. This twin-passage four-channel twin-core fiber SPR sensor is suitable for applying in fields of the multi-channel liquid refractive index and temperature self-reference measurement.

  13. Development of a compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system for precision linear stage metrology.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangzhi; Gillmer, Steven R; Woody, Shane C; Ellis, Jonathan D

    2016-06-01

    A compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system which enables fast, accurate calibration, and error mapping of precision linear stages is presented. The novel design has the advantages of simplicity, compactness, and relatively low cost. This proposed sensor can simultaneously measure displacement, two straightness errors, and changes in pitch, yaw, and roll using a single optical beam traveling between the measurement system and a small target. The optical configuration of the system and the working principle for all degrees-of-freedom are presented along with the influence and compensation of crosstalk motions in roll and straightness measurements. Several comparison experiments are conducted to investigate the feasibility and performance of the proposed system in each degree-of-freedom independently. Comparison experiments to a commercial interferometer demonstrate error standard deviations of 0.33 μm in straightness, 0.14 μrad in pitch, 0.44 μradin yaw, and 45.8 μrad in roll.

  14. Development of a compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system for precision linear stage metrology

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Xiangzhi Gillmer, Steven R.; Woody, Shane C.; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-15

    A compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system which enables fast, accurate calibration, and error mapping of precision linear stages is presented. The novel design has the advantages of simplicity, compactness, and relatively low cost. This proposed sensor can simultaneously measure displacement, two straightness errors, and changes in pitch, yaw, and roll using a single optical beam traveling between the measurement system and a small target. The optical configuration of the system and the working principle for all degrees-of-freedom are presented along with the influence and compensation of crosstalk motions in roll and straightness measurements. Several comparison experiments are conducted to investigate the feasibility and performance of the proposed system in each degree-of-freedom independently. Comparison experiments to a commercial interferometer demonstrate error standard deviations of 0.33 μm in straightness, 0.14 μrad in pitch, 0.44 μradin yaw, and 45.8 μrad in roll.

  15. Development of a compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system for precision linear stage metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiangzhi; Gillmer, Steven R.; Woody, Shane C.; Ellis, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    A compact, fiber-coupled, six degree-of-freedom measurement system which enables fast, accurate calibration, and error mapping of precision linear stages is presented. The novel design has the advantages of simplicity, compactness, and relatively low cost. This proposed sensor can simultaneously measure displacement, two straightness errors, and changes in pitch, yaw, and roll using a single optical beam traveling between the measurement system and a small target. The optical configuration of the system and the working principle for all degrees-of-freedom are presented along with the influence and compensation of crosstalk motions in roll and straightness measurements. Several comparison experiments are conducted to investigate the feasibility and performance of the proposed system in each degree-of-freedom independently. Comparison experiments to a commercial interferometer demonstrate error standard deviations of 0.33 μm in straightness, 0.14 μrad in pitch, 0.44 μradin yaw, and 45.8 μrad in roll.

  16. Fiber Bragg grating sensing system using a TO-can-based compact optical module for wavelength demodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Hong Joo; Lee, Jun Ho; Roh, Cheong Hyun; Hahn, Cheol-Koo; Choi, Young Bok; Kim, Jeong Soo; Park, Jung Ho

    2015-12-01

    A combined scheme using the light source of a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) and an optical signal processing unit (OSPU) based on the compact TO-can package is fabricated and characterized for a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing system. Due to the optical feedback behavior from the FBG sensor, the RSOA is self-injection locked and lasing occurs at the Bragg wavelength. Using the wavelength-dependent filter method, all of the components in the OSPU are compactly integrated on the TO-can package with a height of 17.6 mm and diameter of 6.0 mm. The wavelength demodulating output signals are based on the optical power difference, depending only on the wavelengths without the effect of input optical power variations. The sensitivity of the output signal to temperature shows 0.026 dB/°C. The entire FBG sensing system has an excellent linear response to temperatures controlled with an accuracy of ±0.3°C.

  17. Hollow-fiber H2/O2 fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Lawson, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    Dual-membrane hollow-fiber electrode increases reliability and lowers costs. Leakage of fuel or oxidizer through fiber does not result in failure; excess product water migrates into electrolyte where it is removed by evaporation or distillation; constant exposure of fiber to electrolyte eliminates problems of drying and consequent failure; reference electrode monitors current collectors and overall cell performance.

  18. Hollow-fiber H2/O2 fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Lawson, D. D.

    1977-01-01

    Dual-membrane hollow-fiber electrode increases reliability and lowers costs. Leakage of fuel or oxidizer through fiber does not result in failure; excess product water migrates into electrolyte where it is removed by evaporation or distillation; constant exposure of fiber to electrolyte eliminates problems of drying and consequent failure; reference electrode monitors current collectors and overall cell performance.

  19. Label-free multi-photon imaging using a compact femtosecond fiber laser mode-locked by carbon nanotube saturable absorber

    PubMed Central

    Kieu, K.; Mehravar, S.; Gowda, R.; Norwood, R. A.; Peyghambarian, N.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate label-free multi-photon imaging of biological samples using a compact Er3+-doped femtosecond fiber laser mode-locked by a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT). These compact and low cost lasers have been developed by various groups but they have not been exploited for multiphoton microscopy. Here, it is shown that various multiphoton imaging modalities (e.g. second harmonic generation (SHG), third harmonic generation (THG), two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF), and three-photon excitation fluorescence (3PEF)) can be effectively performed on various biological samples using a compact handheld CNT mode-locked femtosecond fiber laser operating in the telecommunication window near 1560nm. We also show for the first time that chlorophyll fluorescence in plant leaves and diatoms can be observed using 1560nm laser excitation via three-photon absorption. PMID:24156074

  20. Reversed Pressure Compaction: A Novel Method for Processing Composite Materials Directly from Polymer Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Yachin; Rein, Dmitry M.; Vaykhansky, Lev

    2002-03-01

    “Single component” composite materials are processed directly from oriented polymer fibers without extraneous matrix. Bonding is achieved by entanglement of macromolecules that emanate from the fiber by controlled surface melting. The key element in the processing scheme is control of the fibers’ melting temperature by hydrostatic pressure, using the following steps: a) compression to high pressure (Pu) at low temperature (To), which deforms the fiber cross-section without melting. b) raising temperature to a high level (Tu), which is below the melting point of the oriented crystals at Pu. c) pPressure reduction to an intermediate level (Pm) for controlled time. At this pressure, the fibers’ begin melting from their surface and are consolidated. d) increase of pressure back to Pu stops the melting process. e) return to ambient temperature and pressure provides the finished material. This process is applicable to a wide range of polymeric materials such as ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), polypropylene, fluorinated polymers and liquid-crystalline polymers. The fact that the main processing steps occur at a constant temperature, whereby melting and crystallization are effected by control of pressure, allows enhanced homogeneity of the fabricated material. High-performance substrates for microwave antennae and circuitry have been fabricated with this manner, as will be described in the presentation.

  1. Measurement of intrinsic optical backscattering characteristics of cells using fiber-guided near infrared light

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Intrinsic optical signals (IOS), which reflect changes in transmittance and scattering light, have been applied to characterize the physiological conditions of target biological tissues. Backscattering approaches allow mounting of the source and detector on the same side of a sample which creates a more compact physical layout of device. This study presents a compact backscattering design using fiber-optic guided near-infrared (NIR) light to measure the amplitude and phase changes of IOS under different osmotic challenges. Methods High-frequency intensity-modulated light was guided via optic fiber, which was controlled by micromanipulator to closely aim at a minimum cluster of cortical neurons. Several factors including the probe design, wavelength selection, optimal measuring distance between the fiber-optical probe and cells were considered. Our experimental setup was tested in cultured cells to observe the relationship between the changes in backscattered NIR light and cellular IOS, which is believed mainly caused by cell volume changes in hypo/hyperosmotic solutions (± 20, ± 40 and ± 60 mOsm). Results The critical parameters of the current setup including the optimal measuring distance from fiber-optical probe to target tissue and the linear relationship between backscattering intensity and cell volume were determined. The backscattering intensity was found to be inversely proportional to osmotic changes. However, the phase shift exhibited a nonlinear feature and reached a plateau at hyperosmotic solution. Conclusions Our study indicated that the backscattering NIR light guided by fiber-optical probe makes it a potential alternative for continuous observation of intrinsic optical properties of cell culture under varied physical or chemical challenges. PMID:20184751

  2. Self-regulating fiber fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eickhoff, Steven J.

    2010-04-01

    Advances in lithium primary battery technology, which serves as the gold standard power source for the dismounted soldier, have not kept pace with the ever increasing power and energy requirements of modern military electronic equipment. Fuel cells have long been touted as the solution to the dismounted soldier's power and energy problems, but until recently, have largely failed to live up to that promise. There is still a pressing need for better power sources at the Watt or sub-Watt level, especially in applications requiring nontraditional form factors (thin, prismatic) or those having special requirements like flexibility or conformability, where existing battery technology falls short. To address these needs, Honeywell is developing a Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell, which utilizes a novel fuel chemistry and regulation mechanism and micro fabrication techniques to create a flexible, conformal power source with substantially better energy density and specific energy compared to state of the art lithium primary batteries. This paper will cover Honeywell's progress on the Fiber Fuel Cell Project.

  3. The dual functions of WLIM1a in cell elongation and secondary wall formation in developing cotton fibers.

    PubMed

    Han, Li-Bo; Li, Yuan-Bao; Wang, Hai-Yun; Wu, Xiao-Min; Li, Chun-Li; Luo, Ming; Wu, Shen-Jie; Kong, Zhao-Sheng; Pei, Yan; Jiao, Gai-Li; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2013-11-01

    LIN-11, Isl1 and MEC-3 (LIM)-domain proteins play pivotal roles in a variety of cellular processes in animals, but plant LIM functions remain largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate dual roles of the WLIM1a gene in fiber development in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). WLIM1a is preferentially expressed during the elongation and secondary wall synthesis stages in developing fibers. Overexpression of WLIM1a in cotton led to significant changes in fiber length and secondary wall structure. Compared with the wild type, fibers of WLIM1a-overexpressing plants grew longer and formed a thinner and more compact secondary cell wall, which contributed to improved fiber strength and fineness. Functional studies demonstrated that (1) WLIM1a acts as an actin bundler to facilitate elongation of fiber cells and (2) WLIM1a also functions as a transcription factor to activate expression of Phe ammonia lyase-box genes involved in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis to build up the secondary cell wall. WLIM1a localizes in the cytosol and nucleus and moves into the nucleus in response to hydrogen peroxide. Taken together, these results demonstrate that WLIM1a has dual roles in cotton fiber development, elongation, and secondary wall formation. Moreover, our study shows that lignin/lignin-like phenolics may substantially affect cotton fiber quality; this finding may guide cotton breeding for improved fiber traits.

  4. Columnar deformation of human red blood cell by highly localized fiber optic Bessel beam stretcher

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungrae; Joo, Boram; Jeon, Pyo Jin; Im, Seongil; Oh, Kyunghwan

    2015-01-01

    A single human red blood cell was optically stretched along two counter-propagating fiber-optic Bessel-like beams in an integrated lab-on-a-chip structure. The beam enabled highly localized stretching of RBC, and it induced a nonlinear mechanical deformation to finally reach an irreversible columnar shape that has not been reported. We characterized and systematically quantified this optically induced mechanical deformation by the geometrical aspect ratio of stretched RBC and the irreversible stretching time. The proposed RBC mechanism can realize a versatile and compact opto-mechanical platform for optical diagnosis of biological substances in the single cell level. PMID:26601005

  5. Feasibility of a compact fiber optic probe for real time tracing of subsurface skin birefringence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tugbaev, Vitaly; Myllyla, Risto

    2005-08-01

    A novel approach anticipates real time acquisition of spatially resolved polarization data to facilitate fast cross-sectional tracing collagen-related birefringence in skin down to reticular dermis, i.e. up to the depth of a few hundreds micrometers. It is based on a unique integration of a static-type interferometer in a time domain system intended for polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT). The design concept avoids any movable parts to evolve fringes over the traced depth, and exploits liquid crystal bistable switches to rapidly discriminate between orthogonal polarization components of the analyzable signal. The signal is transmitted through a polarization maintaining fiber and detected, by turns, in the single optical channel by the same line camera of appropriate format. The approach relies on the statements proven in the art. In particular, time-domain PS-OCT based on coherent detection of the fringe intensity in orthogonal polarization components of reflected signal allows identifying at least qualitatively collagen depletion regions in subsurface skin layers. Polarization state of light backscattered from sufficiently shallow depth in skin is defined mostly by linear birefringence of collagen fibers. Propagation of light in such linearly birefringent medium satisfies the reciprocity principle in optics.

  6. Compact self-Q-switched green upconversion Er:ZBLAN all-fiber laser operating at 543.4  nm.

    PubMed

    Luo, Zhengqian; Ruan, Qiujun; Zhong, Min; Cheng, Yongjie; Yang, Runhua; Xu, Bin; Xu, Huiying; Cai, Zhiping

    2016-05-15

    We report the demonstration of a compact self-Q-switched green upconversion Er3+:ZrF4-BaF2-LaF3-AlF3-NaF (ZBLAN) fiber laser operating at 543.4 nm. The all-fiber green laser simply consists of a 45 cm high-concentration Er3+:ZBLAN fiber, a 976 nm pump source, and a pair of fiber end-facet mirrors. Under the strong excitation of the 976 nm pump laser, green upconversion lasing at 543.4 nm is achieved from the compact Er3+:ZBLAN fiber laser. Interestingly, the green laser exhibits stable self-Q-switching operation. As the 976 nm pump power is increased, the pulse repetition rate linearly increases from 25.9 to 50.8 kHz and the pulse width narrows from 7.2 to 1.95 μs. The Q-switched green laser has a pump threshold of 118 mW and a maximum output power of 6.9 mW with a slope efficiency of 30%. This is, to the best of our knowledge, the shortest-wavelength operation of a self-started or passively Q-switched fiber laser.

  7. Pulsatile cell-autonomous contractility drives compaction in the mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Maître, Jean-Léon; Niwayama, Ritsuya; Turlier, Hervé; Nédélec, François; Hiiragi, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Mammalian embryos initiate morphogenesis with compaction, which is essential for specifying the first lineages of the blastocyst. The 8-cell-stage mouse embryo compacts by enlarging its cell-cell contacts in a Cdh1-dependent manner. It was therefore proposed that Cdh1 adhesion molecules generate the forces driving compaction. Using micropipette aspiration to map all tensions in a developing embryo, we show that compaction is primarily driven by a twofold increase in tension at the cell-medium interface. We show that the principal force generator of compaction is the actomyosin cortex, which gives rise to pulsed contractions starting at the 8-cell stage. Remarkably, contractions emerge as periodic cortical waves when cells are disengaged from adhesive contacts. In line with this, tension mapping of mzCdh1(-/-) embryos suggests that Cdh1 acts by redirecting contractility away from cell-cell contacts. Our study provides a framework to understand early mammalian embryogenesis and original perspectives on evolutionary conserved pulsed contractions.

  8. 20 years of KVH fiber optic gyro technology: the evolution from large, low performance FOGs to compact, precise FOGs and FOG-based inertial systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napoli, Jay

    2016-05-01

    Precision fiber optic gyroscopes (FOGs) are critical components for an array of platforms and applications ranging from stabilization and pointing orientation of payloads and platforms to navigation and control for unmanned and autonomous systems. In addition, FOG-based inertial systems provide extremely accurate data for geo-referencing systems. Significant improvements in the performance of FOGs and FOG-based inertial systems at KVH are due, in large part, to advancements in the design and manufacture of optical fiber, as well as in manufacturing operations and signal processing. Open loop FOGs, such as those developed and manufactured by KVH Industries, offer tactical-grade performance in a robust, small package. The success of KVH FOGs and FOG-based inertial systems is due to innovations in key fields, including the development of proprietary D-shaped fiber with an elliptical core, and KVH's unique ThinFiber. KVH continually improves its FOG manufacturing processes and signal processing, which result in improved accuracies across its entire FOG product line. KVH acquired its FOG capabilities, including its patented E•Core fiber, when the company purchased Andrew Corporation's Fiber Optic Group in 1997. E•Core fiber is unique in that the light-guiding core - critical to the FOG's performance - is elliptically shaped. The elliptical core produces a fiber that has low loss and high polarization-maintaining ability. In 2010, KVH developed its ThinFiber, a 170-micron diameter fiber that retains the full performance characteristics of E•Core fiber. ThinFiber has enabled the development of very compact, high-performance open-loop FOGs, which are also used in a line of FOG-based inertial measurement units and inertial navigation systems.

  9. Perovskite solar cell with an efficient TiO₂ compact film.

    PubMed

    Ke, Weijun; Fang, Guojia; Wang, Jing; Qin, Pingli; Tao, Hong; Lei, Hongwei; Liu, Qin; Dai, Xin; Zhao, Xingzhong

    2014-09-24

    A perovskite solar cell with a thin TiO2 compact film prepared by thermal oxidation of sputtered Ti film achieved a high efficiency of 15.07%. The thin TiO2 film prepared by thermal oxidation is very dense and inhibits the recombination process at the interface. The optimum thickness of the TiO2 compact film prepared by thermal oxidation is thinner than that prepared by spin-coating method. Also, the TiO2 compact film and the TiO2 porous film can be sintered at the same time. This one-step sintering process leads to a lower dark current density, a lower series resistance, and a higher recombination resistance than those of two-step sintering. Therefore, the perovskite solar cell with the TiO2 compact film prepared by thermal oxidation has a higher short-circuit current density and a higher fill factor.

  10. Actin Filament Stress Fibers in Vascular Endothelial Cells in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Albert J.; Pollard, Thomas D.; Herman, Ira M.

    1983-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopy with 7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-3-diazole phallacidin was used to survey vertebrate tissues for actin filament bundles comparable to the stress fibers of cultured cells. Such bundles were found only in vascular endothelial cells. Like the stress fibers of cultured cells, these actin filament bundles were stained in a punctate pattern by fluorescent antibodies to both alpha-actinin and myosin. The stress fibers were oriented parallel to the direction of blood flow and were prominent in endothelial cells from regions exposed to high-velocity flow, such as the left ventricle, aortic valve, and aorta. Actin bundles may help the endothelial cell to withstand hemodynamic stress.

  11. Compact high power mid-infrared optical parametric oscillator pumped by a gain-switched fiber laser with "figure-of-h" pulse shape.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peipei; Chen, Tao; Wu, Bo; Yang, Dingzhong; Hu, Chengzhi; Wu, Pinghui; Shen, Yonghang

    2015-02-09

    We demonstrate a compact high power mid-infrared (MIR) optical parametric oscillator (OPO) pumped by a gain-switched linearly polarized, pulsed fiber laser. The gain-switched fiber laser was constructed with a piece of Yb doped polarization maintaining (PM) fiber, a pair of fiber Bragg gratings written into the matched passive PM fiber and 6 pigtailed pump laser diodes working at 915 nm with 30 W output peak power each. By modulating the pulse width of the pump laser diode, simple pedestal-free pulse shape or pedestal-free trailing pulse shape ("figure-of-h" as we call it) could be achieved from the gain-switched fiber laser. The laser was employed as the pump of a two-channel, periodically poled magnesium oxide lithium niobate-based OPO system. High power MIR emission was generated with average output power of 5.15 W at 3.8 μm channel and 8.54 W at 3.3 μm channel under the highest pump power of 45 W. The corresponding pump-to-idler conversion efficiency was computed to be 11.7% and 19.1%, respectively. Experimental results verify a significant improvement to signal-to-idler conversion efficiency by using "figure-of-h" pulses over simple pedestal-free pulses. Compared to the master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) fiber laser counterpart, the presented gain switched fiber laser is more attractive in OPO pumping due to its compactness and simplicity which are beneficial to construction of OPO systems for practical MIR applications.

  12. Hollow fiber clinostat for simulating microgravity in cell culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H. (Inventor); Miller, Teresa Y. (Inventor); Snyder, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A clinostat for simulating microgravity on cell systems carried in a fiber fixedly mounted in a rotatable culture vessel is disclosed. The clinostat is rotated horizontally along its longitudinal axis to simulate microgravity or vertically as a control response. Cells are injected into the fiber and the ends of the fiber are sealed and secured to spaced end pieces of a fiber holder assembly which consists of the end pieces, a hollow fiber, a culture vessel, and a tension spring with three alignment pins. The tension spring is positioned around the culture vessel with its ends abutting the end pieces for alignment of the spring. After the fiber is secured, the spring is decompressed to maintain tension on the fiber while it is being rotated. This assures that the fiber remains aligned along the axis of rotation. The fiber assembly is placed in the culture vessel and culture medium is added. The culture vessel is then inserted into the rotatable portion of the clinostat and subjected to rotate at selected rpms. The internal diameter of the hollow fiber determines the distance the cells are from the axis of rotation.

  13. Guidance and control of MIR TDL radiation via flexible hollow metallic rectangular pipes and fibers for possible LHS and other optical system compaction and integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C.

    1983-01-01

    Flexible hollow metallic rectangular pipes and infrared fibers are proposed as alternate media for collection, guidance and manipulation of mid-infrared tunable diode laser (TDL) radiation. Certain features of such media are found to be useful for control of TDL far field patterns, polarization and possibly intensity fluctuations. Such improvement in dimension compatibility may eventually lead to laser heterodyne spectroscopy (LHS) and optical communication system compaction and integration. Infrared optical fiber and the compound parabolic coupling of light into a hollow pipe waveguide are discussed as well as the design of the waveguide.

  14. Analyze and experiment on AC magnetic field's effect to fiber optic gyroscopes in compact stabilization control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Mao, Yao; Tian, Jing; Li, Zhijun

    2015-10-01

    Fiber optic gyroscopes (FOG) are getting more and more attention in areas such as stabilization control systems as they are all solid state and have a wide bandwidth. In stabilization systems that require wide bandwidth control, motors are usually used as actuating mechanism for active disturbance restrain. Voice coil motors (VCMs) are usually used in compact stabilization systems that require large torque and fast response. However, AC magnetic field, which can affect the output of FOG due to Faraday effect, will be generated during operation of VCMs. The frequency range affected by the AC magnetic field to the FOG's output is the same as VCMs drive signal frequency range, which is also exactly the stabilization system's working range. Therefore the effect of the AC magnetic field to FOGs must be evaluated to verify the feasibility of a stable system design that uses both FOGs and VCMs. In this article, the basic structure and operating principle of stabilization system is introduced. The influence of AC magnetic field to FOG is theoretically analyzed. The magnetic field generated by VCMs is numerically simulated based on the theory deduction of the magnetic field near energized wires. To verify the influence of the VCM generated magnetic field to the FOGs in practical designs, a simplified random fiber coil model is built for it's hard to accurately test the exact polarize axis's twisting rate in a fiber coil. The influence to the FOG's output of different random coil model is simulated and the result shows a same trend that the influence of the VCM's magnetic field to the FOG is reduced as the distance between the VCM and the FOG increasing. The influence of a VCM to a FOG with the same parameters is experimentally tested. In the Fourier transformed FOG data the same frequency point as the VCM drive signal frequency can be read. The result fit simulated result that as the distance increases, the influence decreases. The amplitude of the frequency point is just

  15. Temporal variations in cell migration and traction during fibroblast-mediated gel compaction.

    PubMed

    Shreiber, David I; Barocas, Victor H; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2003-06-01

    Current models used in our laboratory to assess the migration and traction of a population of cells within biopolymer gels are extended to investigate temporal changes in these parameters during compaction of mechanically constrained gels. The random cell migration coefficient, micro (t) is calculated using a windowing technique by regressing the mean-squared displacement of cells tracked at high magnification in three dimensions with a generalized least squares algorithm for a subset of experimental time intervals, and then shifting the window interval-by-interval until all time points are analyzed. The cell traction parameter, tau(0)(t), is determined by optimizing the solution of our anisotropic biphasic theory to tissue equivalent compaction. The windowing technique captured simulated sinusoidal and step changes in cell migration superposed on a persistent random walk in simulated cell movement. The optimization software captured simulated time dependence of compaction on cell spreading. Employment of these techniques on experimental data using rat dermal fibroblasts (RDFs) and human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) demonstrated that these cells exhibit different migration-traction relationships. Rat dermal fibroblast migration was negatively correlated to traction, suggesting migration was not the driving force for compaction with these cells, whereas human foreskin fibroblast migration was positively correlated to traction.

  16. Efficient Compact-Layer-Free, Hole-Conductor-Free, Fully Printable Mesoscopic Perovskite Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xixi; Xiong, Yuli; Mei, Anyi; Rong, Yaoguang; Hu, Yue; Hong, Li; Jin, Yingxia; Liu, Qingju; Han, Hongwei

    2016-10-05

    A compact-layer-free, hole-conductor-free, fully printable mesoscopic perovskite solar cell presents a power conversion efficiency of over 13%, which is comparable to that of the device with a TiO2 compact layer. The different wettability of the perovskite precursor solution on the surface of FTO and TiO2 possesses a significant effect on realizing efficient mesoscopic perovskite solar cell. This result shows a promising future in printable solar cells by further simplifying the fabrication process and lowering the preparation costs.

  17. Mini-Spec: A Compact, Fiber-Coupled, VPH Grating Spectrograph for Small Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nations, H. L.; Haynes, P.; Brewer, P.

    2003-05-01

    We report on the development and testing of what we believe to be the first VPH grating based spectrograph developed primarily for use at telescopes of modest aperture. To date, the most common instrument suite for such observatories is typically that of a CCD camera with attached filter wheel. While there is no doubt that a wide range of interesting and good science has been done with such instrumentation, the addition of a robust and easy to operate spectrograph would greatly increase the utility of such installations. While some commercial spectrographs exist for use on small telescopes, the authors have found them to be, with few exceptions, either inefficient, difficult for inexperienced students or amateurs to use, or not remotely operable. Correcting these deficiencies is thus the primary motivation for Mini-Spec. The design of Mini-Spec has been influenced by previous work the authors have done on a full-sized fiber-coupled spectrograph (Nations and Pierce, 2002). Mini-Spec uses some of those original design features, only reduced drastically in size. This size reduction (the spectrograph fits within a 7 inch cube), along with a much more careful choice of some critical components, has resulted in a dramatic reduction in cost. The spectrograph uses a highly efficient 1200 l/mm, 40 mm diameter vph grating on loan from Richard Rallison. Focus, central wavelength selection, and comparison lamps are all controlled via an RS-232 link and a custom Visual Basic GUI. Sample spectra of stellar and non-stellar targets will be presented along with a discussion of research projects admirably suited for this instrument. Funding for equipment has been provided by a NASA EPSCoR grant to PI Ron Canterna. HLN has been partially funded by a Wyoming Space Grant Faculty Fellowship.

  18. Perovskite Solar Cell Using a Two-Dimensional Titania Nanosheet Thin Film as the Compact Layer

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Can; Li, Yahui; Xing, Yujin; Zhang, Zelin; Zhang, Xianfeng; Li, Zhen; Shi, Yantao; Ma, Tingli; Ma, Renzhi; Wang, Kunlin; Wei, Jinquan

    2015-07-22

    The compact layer plays an important role in conducting electrons and blocking holes in perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Here, we use a two-dimensional titania nanosheet (TNS) thin film as the compact layer in CH3NH3PbI3 PSCs. TNS thin films with thicknesses ranging from 8 to 75 nm were prepared by an electrophoretic deposition method from a dilute TNS/tetrabutylammonium hydroxide solution. The TNS thin films contact the fluorine-doped tin oxide grains perfectly. Our results show that a 8-nm-thick TNS film is sufficient for acting as the compact layer. Currently, the PSC with a TNS compact layer has a high efficiency of 10.7% and relatively low hysteresis behavior.

  19. [The development, differentiation and composition of flax fiber cells].

    PubMed

    Preisner, Marta; Wojtasik, Wioleta; Szopa, Jan; Kulma, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Having vascular origin, flax fiber belongs to the sclerenchyma (steroids) and its structure is limited to the cell wall. What determines fiber properties is its composition, which in practice means the composition of the secondary cell wall. It consists of four main polymers which constitute approximately 90% of the fiber: cellulose, hemicellulose, pectin, lignin, and a variety of secondary metabolites, proteins, waxes and inorganic compounds. The cell wall is a structure with a high complexity of both the composition and interactions of the particular elements between themselves. It is determined by differentiation and cell growth as well as environmental factors, biotic and abiotic stresses. The molecular background of these processes and mechanisms regulating the synthesis and rearrangement of secondary cell walls components are being intensively studied. In this work we described the latest news about the development, composition and metabolism of flax fiber cell wall components together with the molecular explanation of these processes.

  20. Influence of well-defined mineral fibers on proliferating cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tilkes, F; Beck, E G

    1983-01-01

    The effects of well-defined asbestos and man-made mineral fibers, as well as glass and synthetic fluoroamphibole, on phagocytizing permanent rat tumor cells were tested. The following parameters were compared: cell proliferation as determined by cell count and 3H-thymidine incorporation, RNA synthesis by 3H-uridine uptake, protein synthesis by incorporation of 3H-labeled amino acids, protein content and plasma membrane permeability by release of lactic dehydrogenase. The dosage of most of the dusts was estimated gravimetrically, but for some dusts also numerically. Because of the wide range of different fibers lengths, diameters and specific weights, it was sometimes difficult to compare chemically and physically differing fiber fractions with the same fiber counts. In some cases, resulting weights are so different that a direct comparison of the conclusions is impossible. The results with fibers of diverse sources showed the same trends: the toxicity of fibers increases with increasing length and dose. In this test system we found an inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis. Protein synthesis as measured by amino acid uptake per total cell culture decreased, but the protein content of the single cell increased as determined by the Lowry method. The increase of plasma membrane permeability as determined by lactic dehydrogenase was also dependent on fiber length and concentration. Generally the thinner the fiber, the greater the toxicity when gravimetrical dosage and the same length distributions are employed. Beyond that we can state that the toxicity of fibers from different sources with similar fiber dimensions is similar. One of the glass fiber fractions has a comparable geometry (length, diameter) to the UICC fraction of chrysotile and exhibits the same high toxicity. PMID:6196187

  1. DNA conformational behavior and compaction in biomimetic systems: Toward better understanding of DNA packaging in cell.

    PubMed

    Zinchenko, Anatoly

    2016-06-01

    In a living cell, long genomic DNA is strongly compacted and exists in the environment characterized by a dense macromolecular crowding, high concentrations of mono- and divalent cations, and confinement of ca. 10μm size surrounded by a phospholipid membrane. Experimental modelling of such complex biological system is challenging but important to understand spatiotemporal dynamics and functions of the DNA in cell. The accumulated knowledge about DNA condensation/compaction in conditions resembling those in the real cell can be eventually used to design and construct partly functional "artificial cells" having potential applications in drug delivery systems, gene therapy, and production of synthetic cells. In this review, I would like to overview the past progress in our understanding of the DNA conformational behavior and, in particular, DNA condensation/compaction phenomenon and its relation to the DNA biological activity. This understanding was gained by designing relevant experimental models mimicking DNA behavior in the environment of living cell. Starting with a brief summary of classic experimental systems to study DNA condensation/compaction, in later parts, I highlight recent experimental methodologies to address the effects of macromolecular crowding and nanoscale and microscale confinements on DNA conformation dynamics. All the studies are discussed in the light of their relevance to DNA behavior in living cells, and future prospects of the field are outlined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber for monitoring leukemia cells using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)

    PubMed Central

    Khetani, Altaf; Momenpour, Ali; Alarcon, Emilio I.; Anis, Hanan

    2015-01-01

    The present paper demonstrates an antibody-free, robust, fast, and portable platform for detection of leukemia cells using Raman spectroscopy with a 785-nm laser diode coupled to a hollow core photonic crystal (HC-PCF) containing silver nanoparticles. Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most common bone marrow cancers in children and youths. Clinical studies suggest that early diagnosis and remission evaluation of myoblasts in the bone marrow are pivotal for improving patient survival. However, the current protocols for leukemic cells detection involve the use of expensive antibodies and flow cytometers. Thus, we have developed a new technology for detection of leukemia cells up to 300 cells/ml using a compact fiber HC-PCF, which offers a novel alternative to existing clinical standards. Furthermore, we were also able to accurately distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic leukemic cells. PMID:26601021

  3. Hollow core photonic crystal fiber for monitoring leukemia cells using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    PubMed

    Khetani, Altaf; Momenpour, Ali; Alarcon, Emilio I; Anis, Hanan

    2015-11-01

    The present paper demonstrates an antibody-free, robust, fast, and portable platform for detection of leukemia cells using Raman spectroscopy with a 785-nm laser diode coupled to a hollow core photonic crystal (HC-PCF) containing silver nanoparticles. Acute myeloid leukemia is one of the most common bone marrow cancers in children and youths. Clinical studies suggest that early diagnosis and remission evaluation of myoblasts in the bone marrow are pivotal for improving patient survival. However, the current protocols for leukemic cells detection involve the use of expensive antibodies and flow cytometers. Thus, we have developed a new technology for detection of leukemia cells up to 300 cells/ml using a compact fiber HC-PCF, which offers a novel alternative to existing clinical standards. Furthermore, we were also able to accurately distinguish live, apoptotic and necrotic leukemic cells.

  4. Hollow fiber culture accelerates differentiation of Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xudong; Zhang, Guoliang; Shen, Chong; Yin, Jian; Meng, Qin

    2013-08-01

    Caco-2 cells usually require 21 days of culture for developing sufficient differentiation in traditional two-dimensional Transwell culture, deviating far away from the quick differentiation of enterocytes in vivo. The recently proposed three-dimensional cultures of Caco-2 cells, though imitating the villi/crypt-like microstructure of intestinal epithelium, showed no effect on accelerating the differentiation of Caco-2 cells. In this study, a novel culture of Caco-2 cells on hollow fiber bioreactor was applied to morphologically mimic the human small intestine lumen for accelerating the expression of intestine functions. The porous hollow fibers of polyethersulfone (PES), a suitable membrane material for Caco-2 cell culture, successfully promoted cells to form confluent monolayer on the inner surface. The differentiated functions of Caco-2 cells, represented by alkaline phosphatase, γ-glutamyltransferase, and P-glycoprotein activity, were greatly higher in a 10-day hollow fiber culture than in a 21-day Transwell culture. Moreover, the Caco-2 cells on PES hollow fibers expressed higher F-actin and zonula occludens-1 protein than those on Transwell culture, indicative of an increased mechanical stress in Caco-2 cells on PES hollow fibers. The accelerated differentiation of Caco-2 cells on PES hollow fibers was unassociated with membrane chemical composition and surface roughness, but could be stimulated by hollow fiber configuration, since PES flat membranes with either rough or smooth surface failed to enhance the differentiation of Caco-2. Therefore, the accelerated expression of Caco-2 cell function on hollow fiber culture might show great values in simulation of the tissue microenvironment in vivo and guide the construction of intestinal tissue engineering apparatus.

  5. Compact Fuel-Cell System Would Consume Neat Methanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Kindler, Andrew; Valdez, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    In a proposed direct methanol fuel-cell electric-power-generating system, the fuel cells would consume neat methanol, in contradistinction to the dilute aqueous methanol solutions consumed in prior direct methanol fuel-cell systems. The design concept of the proposed fuel-cell system takes advantage of (1) electro-osmotic drag and diffusion processes to manage the flows of hydrogen and water between the anode and the cathode and (2) evaporative cooling for regulating temperature. The design concept provides for supplying enough water to the anodes to enable the use of neat methanol while ensuring conservation of water for the whole fuel-cell system.

  6. Rac1 GTPase-deficient mouse lens exhibits defects in shape, suture formation, fiber cell migration and survival.

    PubMed

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Chauhan, Bharesh K; Walker, Christopher; Zheng, Yi; Robinson, Michael L; Lang, Richard A; Rao, Ponugoti V

    2011-12-01

    Morphogenesis and shape of the ocular lens depend on epithelial cell elongation and differentiation into fiber cells, followed by the symmetric and compact organization of fiber cells within an enclosed extracellular matrix-enriched elastic capsule. The cellular mechanisms orchestrating these different events however, remain obscure. We investigated the role of the Rac1 GTPase in these processes by targeted deletion of expression using the conditional gene knockout (cKO) approach. Rac1 cKO mice were derived from two different Cre (Le-Cre and MLR-10) transgenic mice in which lens-specific Cre expression starts at embryonic day 8.75 and 10.5, respectively, in both the lens epithelium and fiber cells. The Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO mice exhibited an early-onset (E12.5) and severe lens phenotype compared to the MLR-10/Rac1 cKO (E15.5) mice. While the Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO lenses displayed delayed primary fiber cell elongation, lenses from both Rac1 cKO strains were characterized by abnormal shape, impaired secondary fiber cell migration, sutural defects and thinning of the posterior capsule which often led to rupture. Lens fiber cell N-cadherin/β-catenin/Rap1/Nectin-based cell-cell junction formation and WAVE-2/Abi-2/Nap1-regulated actin polymerization were impaired in the Rac1 deficient mice. Additionally, the Rac1 cKO lenses were characterized by a shortened epithelial sheet, reduced levels of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and increased apoptosis. Taken together, these data uncover the essential role of Rac1 GTPase activity in establishment and maintenance of lens shape, suture formation and capsule integrity, and in fiber cell migration, adhesion and survival, via regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesive interactions and ECM turnover.

  7. Rac1 GTPase -deficient mouse lens exhibits defects in shape, suture formation, fiber cell migration and survival

    PubMed Central

    Maddala, Rupalatha; Chauhan, Bharesh K.; Walker, Christopher; Zheng, Yi; Robinson, Michael L.; Lang, Richard A.; Rao, Ponugoti V.

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis and shape of the ocular lens depend on epithelial cell elongation and differentiation into fiber cells, followed by the symmetric and compact organization of fiber cells within an enclosed extracellular matrix-enriched elastic capsule. The cellular mechanisms orchestrating these different events however, remain obscure. We investigated the role of the Rac1 GTPase in these processes by targeted deletion of expression using the conditional gene knockout (cKO) approach. Rac1 cKO mice were derived from two different Cre (Le-Cre and MLR-10) transgenic mice in which lens-specific Cre expression starts at embryonic day 8.75 and 10.5, respectively, in both the lens epithelium and fiber cells. The Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO mice exhibited an early-onset (E12.5) and severe lens phenotype compared to the MLR-10/Rac1 cKO (E15.5) mice. While the Le-Cre/Rac1 cKO lenses displayed delayed primary fiber cell elongation, lenses from both Rac1 cKO strains were characterized by abnormal shape, impaired secondary fiber cell migration, sutural defects and thinning of the posterior capsule which often led to rupture. Lens fiber cell N-cadherin/β-catenin/Rap1/Nectin-based cell-cell junction formation and WAVE-2/Abi-2/Nap1-regulated actin polymerization were impaired in the Rac1 deficient mice. Additionally, the Rac1 cKO lenses were characterized by a shortened epithelial sheet, reduced levels of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and increased apoptosis. Taken together, these data uncover the essential role of Rac1 GTPase activity in establishment and maintenance of lens shape, suture formation and capsule integrity, and in fiber cell migration, adhesion and survival, via regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, cell adhesive interactions and ECM turnover. PMID:21945075

  8. 1 μJ, sub-300 fs pulse generation from a compact thulium-doped chirped pulse amplifier seeded by Raman shifted erbium-doped fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Tan, Fangzhou; Shi, Hongxing; Sun, Ruoyu; Wang, Peng; Wang, Pu

    2016-10-03

    We present a compact thulium-doped chirped pulse amplifier producing 241 fs pulses with 1 μJ energy. The system is seeded with the Raman shifted soliton generated by the combination of an erbium-doped femtosecond laser and a nonlinear fiber. The Tm-doped large mode area fiber yields output power of 71 W, corresponding to pulse energy of 2.04 μJ, with a slope efficiency of 52.2%. The amplified pulses have been compressed to a duration time of 241 fs, using a folded Treacy grating setup. The pulse energy is measured to be 1.02 μJ, corresponding to a peak power of ~3 MW. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest average power and pulse energy generated from an all-fiber, Raman shifted soliton seeded thulium-doped chirped pulse amplifier system.

  9. Single cell contractility studies based on compact moiré system over periodic gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xiaoyu; Surks, Howard; Zhang, Xin

    2010-05-01

    Abnormal vascular cell contractile performance is a hallmark of cardiovascular diseases. Conventional cell force measurement technique requires individually tracking the sensing units and complex computation efforts for further studying cell contractility. We developed instead a robust and simple compact optical moiré system that measures phase changes encoded in carrier moiré patterns generated from two layers of gratings. Cell mechanics study including cell contractile forces and stress and strain distributions during normal and abnormal cell contractions can thus be conveniently analyzed. The distinct signals from moiré patterns in longitudinal and transverse directions revealed abnormal cell mechanical contractility linked to cardiovascular disease.

  10. A compact trench-assisted multi-orbital-angular-momentum multi-ring fiber for ultrahigh-density space-division multiplexing (19 rings × 22 modes).

    PubMed

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-24

    We present a compact (130 μm cladding diameter) trench-assisted multi-orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) multi-ring fiber with 19 rings each supporting 22 modes with 18 OAM ones. Using the high-contrast-index ring and trench designs, the trench-assisted multi-OAM multi-ring fiber (TA-MOMRF) features both low-level inter-mode crosstalk and inter-ring crosstalk within a wide wavelength range (1520 to 1630 nm), which can potentially enable Pbit/s total transmission capacity and hundreds bit/s/Hz spectral efficiency in a single TA-MOMRF. Moreover, the effective refractive index difference of even and odd fiber eigenmodes induced by the ellipticity of ring and fiber bending and their impacts on the purity of OAM mode and mode coupling/crosstalk are analyzed. It is found that high-order OAM modes show preferable tolerance to the ring ellipticity and fiber bending. The designed fiber offers favorable tolerance to both small ellipticity of ring (<-22 dB crosstalk under an ellipticity of 0.5%) and small bend radius (<-20 dB crosstalk under a bend radius of 2 cm).

  11. A Compact Trench-Assisted Multi-Orbital-Angular-Momentum Multi-Ring Fiber for Ultrahigh-Density Space-Division Multiplexing (19 Rings × 22 Modes)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuhui; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    We present a compact (130 μm cladding diameter) trench-assisted multi-orbital-angular-momentum (OAM) multi-ring fiber with 19 rings each supporting 22 modes with 18 OAM ones. Using the high-contrast-index ring and trench designs, the trench-assisted multi-OAM multi-ring fiber (TA-MOMRF) features both low-level inter-mode crosstalk and inter-ring crosstalk within a wide wavelength range (1520 to 1630 nm), which can potentially enable Pbit/s total transmission capacity and hundreds bit/s/Hz spectral efficiency in a single TA-MOMRF. Moreover, the effective refractive index difference of even and odd fiber eigenmodes induced by the ellipticity of ring and fiber bending and their impacts on the purity of OAM mode and mode coupling/crosstalk are analyzed. It is found that high-order OAM modes show preferable tolerance to the ring ellipticity and fiber bending. The designed fiber offers favorable tolerance to both small ellipticity of ring (<−22 dB crosstalk under an ellipticity of 0.5%) and small bend radius (<−20 dB crosstalk under a bend radius of 2 cm). PMID:24458159

  12. Hollow fiber: a biophotonic implant for live cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silvestre, Oscar F.; Holton, Mark D.; Summers, Huw D.; Smith, Paul J.; Errington, Rachel J.

    2009-02-01

    The technical objective of this study has been to design, build and validate biocompatible hollow fiber implants based on fluorescence with integrated biophotonics components to enable in fiber kinetic cell based assays. A human osteosarcoma in vitro cell model fiber system has been established with validation studies to determine in fiber cell growth, cell cycle analysis and organization in normal and drug treated conditions. The rationale for implant development have focused on developing benchmark concepts in standard monolayer tissue culture followed by the development of in vitro hollow fiber designs; encompassing imaging with and without integrated biophotonics. Furthermore the effect of introducing targetable biosensors into the encapsulated tumor implant such as quantum dots for informing new detection readouts and possible implant designs have been evaluated. A preliminary micro/macro imaging approach has been undertaken, that could provide a mean to track distinct morphological changes in cells growing in a 3D matrix within the fiber which affect the light scattering properties of the implant. Parallel engineering studies have showed the influence of the optical properties of the fiber polymer wall in all imaging modes. Taken all together, we show the basic foundation and the opportunities for multi-modal imaging within an in vitro implant format.

  13. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, John J.; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B.; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A.; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S.; Esser, Karyn A.; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E.; Peterson, Charlotte A.

    2011-01-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca2+ sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells. PMID:21828094

  14. Effective fiber hypertrophy in satellite cell-depleted skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, John J; Mula, Jyothi; Miyazaki, Mitsunori; Erfani, Rod; Garrison, Kelcye; Farooqui, Amreen B; Srikuea, Ratchakrit; Lawson, Benjamin A; Grimes, Barry; Keller, Charles; Van Zant, Gary; Campbell, Kenneth S; Esser, Karyn A; Dupont-Versteegden, Esther E; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2011-09-01

    An important unresolved question in skeletal muscle plasticity is whether satellite cells are necessary for muscle fiber hypertrophy. To address this issue, a novel mouse strain (Pax7-DTA) was created which enabled the conditional ablation of >90% of satellite cells in mature skeletal muscle following tamoxifen administration. To test the hypothesis that satellite cells are necessary for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, the plantaris muscle of adult Pax7-DTA mice was subjected to mechanical overload by surgical removal of the synergist muscle. Following two weeks of overload, satellite cell-depleted muscle showed the same increases in muscle mass (approximately twofold) and fiber cross-sectional area with hypertrophy as observed in the vehicle-treated group. The typical increase in myonuclei with hypertrophy was absent in satellite cell-depleted fibers, resulting in expansion of the myonuclear domain. Consistent with lack of nuclear addition to enlarged fibers, long-term BrdU labeling showed a significant reduction in the number of BrdU-positive myonuclei in satellite cell-depleted muscle compared with vehicle-treated muscle. Single fiber functional analyses showed no difference in specific force, Ca(2+) sensitivity, rate of cross-bridge cycling and cooperativity between hypertrophied fibers from vehicle and tamoxifen-treated groups. Although a small component of the hypertrophic response, both fiber hyperplasia and regeneration were significantly blunted following satellite cell depletion, indicating a distinct requirement for satellite cells during these processes. These results provide convincing evidence that skeletal muscle fibers are capable of mounting a robust hypertrophic response to mechanical overload that is not dependent on satellite cells.

  15. Transport of gases and liquids through dense microbial cell aggregates cultured within hollow fiber membrane bioreactors

    SciTech Connect

    Libicki, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    The transport properties of liquids and dissolved gases in microbial cell aggregates were examined. An annular hollow fiber membrane bioreactor designed for this purpose, allowed a cell aggregate of well-defined geometry to be cultured between two retaining fibers. The transport of an inert substance through a lamellar annular hollow fiber reactor has been modeled. Calculations showed that Starling flow, a weak toroidal flow in the reactor, may account for a large fraction of the solute transport. The theoretical predictions were verified experimentally. The effective diffusive permeability of a dissolved tracer (nitrous oxide) was measured in dense microbial cell aggregates (Escherichia coli) ranging from 15% to 95% cell volume fraction. The results showed that the diffusive permeability is a monotonically decreasing function of cell volume fraction and can be described by the Hashin-Shtrikman bounds on transport in a two phase material. Using these bounds, the effective diffusive permeability of nitrous oxide in E. coli cells at 37/sup 0/C was estimated to be 8.6 x 10/sup -9/ mol/m s or 0.24 +/- 0.03 that of the diffusive permeability of the surrounding interstitial fluid. Similar measurements of the diffusive permeability of nitrous oxide in artificial aggregates (compacted cells) and disrupted microbial cells yielded virtually identical results, showing that cell structure and viability have only a small effect. The Darcy permeability of the same microbial aggregates, measured under very low flow conditions, was found to be only weakly dependent on cell volume fraction. Electron micrographs indicate that this was due to clustering of the cells which increased the effective particle size within the cell aggregate.

  16. Integrating perovskite solar cells into a flexible fiber.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Longbin; Deng, Jue; Lu, Xin; Yang, Zhibin; Peng, Huisheng

    2014-09-22

    Perovskite solar cells have triggered a rapid development of new photovoltaic devices because of high energy conversion efficiencies and their all-solid-state structures. To this end, they are particularly useful for various wearable and portable electronic devices. Perovskite solar cells with a flexible fiber structure were now prepared for the first time by continuously winding an aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube sheet electrode onto a fiber electrode; photoactive perovskite materials were incorporated in between them through a solution process. The fiber-shaped perovskite solar cell exhibits an energy conversion efficiency of 3.3%, which remained stable on bending. The perovskite solar cell fibers may be woven into electronic textiles for large-scale application by well-developed textile technologies.

  17. High temperature battery cell comprising stress free hollow fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, J. N.; Revak, T. T.; Rossini, F. J.

    1985-04-16

    Thermal stressing of hollow fibers constituting the electrolyte-separator in a high temperature battery cell, and of certain other elements thereof, is avoided by suspending the assembly comprising the anolyte tank, the tube-sheet, the hollow fibers and a cathodic current collector-distributor within the casing and employing a limp connection between the collector-distributor and the cathode terminal of the cell.

  18. Haemoglobin content modulated deformation dynamics of red blood cells on a compact disc.

    PubMed

    Kar, Shantimoy; Ghosh, Uddipta; Maiti, Tapas Kumar; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-12-21

    We investigate the deformation characteristics of red blood cells (RBCs) on a rotating compact disc platform. Our study brings out the interplay between haemoglobin content and RBC deformability in a centrifugally actuated microfluidic environment. We reveal that RBC deformations follow the similar trend of principal stress distributed throughout the radial direction, rendering an insight into the mechano-physical processes involved. This study can be used as a diagnostic marker to determine haematological disorders in diseased blood samples tested on compact disc based microfluidic platforms.

  19. De-esterified Pectins in the Cell Walls of Cotton Fiber: A Study of Fiber Mutants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the wild-type cotton (DP 5690), the cell walls of elongating cotton fibers are bilayered, with the outer layer enriched in de-esterified homogalacturonan (HGA), and an inner layer enriched in xyloglucans and cellulose. This bilayer is conspicuously absent in the cell walls of the ovule epidermal...

  20. A new fiber-optic non-contact compact laser-ultrasound scanner for fast non-destructive testing and evaluation of aircraft composites

    PubMed Central

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Laser ultrasonic (LU) inspection represents an attractive, non-contact method to evaluate composite materials. Current non-contact systems, however, have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact piezoelectric detection. They are also difficult to adjust, very expensive, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Here, we demonstrate that most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe scheme. In particular, a new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of an all-optical LU pump-probe system for non-destructive testing and evaluation of aircraft composites. The performance of the LU system is demonstrated on a composite sample with known defects. Wide-band ultrasound probe signals are generated directly at the sample surface with a pulsed fiber laser delivering nanosecond laser pulses at a repetition rate up to 76 kHz rate with a pulse energy of 0.6 mJ. A balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is employed to detect pressure signals at the same point on the composite surface. A- and B-scans obtained with the Sagnac interferometer are compared to those made with a contact wide-band polyvinylidene fluoride transducer. PMID:24737921

  1. A new fiber-optic non-contact compact laser-ultrasound scanner for fast non-destructive testing and evaluation of aircraft composites.

    PubMed

    Pelivanov, Ivan; Buma, Takashi; Xia, Jinjun; Wei, Chen-Wei; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2014-03-21

    Laser ultrasonic (LU) inspection represents an attractive, non-contact method to evaluate composite materials. Current non-contact systems, however, have relatively low sensitivity compared to contact piezoelectric detection. They are also difficult to adjust, very expensive, and strongly influenced by environmental noise. Here, we demonstrate that most of these drawbacks can be eliminated by combining a new generation of compact, inexpensive fiber lasers with new developments in fiber telecommunication optics and an optimally designed balanced probe scheme. In particular, a new type of a balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is presented as part of an all-optical LU pump-probe system for non-destructive testing and evaluation of aircraft composites. The performance of the LU system is demonstrated on a composite sample with known defects. Wide-band ultrasound probe signals are generated directly at the sample surface with a pulsed fiber laser delivering nanosecond laser pulses at a repetition rate up to 76 kHz rate with a pulse energy of 0.6 mJ. A balanced fiber-optic Sagnac interferometer is employed to detect pressure signals at the same point on the composite surface. A- and B-scans obtained with the Sagnac interferometer are compared to those made with a contact wide-band polyvinylidene fluoride transducer.

  2. Watts-level super-compact narrow-linewidth Tm-doped silica all-fiber laser near 1707 nm with fiber Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, X. S.; Guo, H. T.; Lu, M.; Yan, Z. J.; Wang, H. S.; Wang, Y. S.; Xu, Y. T.; Gao, C. X.; Cui, X. X.; Guo, Q.; Peng, B.

    2016-11-01

    Watts-level ultra-short wavelength operation of a Tm-doped all fiber laser was developed by using a 1550 nm Er-doped fiber laser pump source and a pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The laser yielded 1.28 W of continuous-wave output at 1707.01 nm with a narrow linewidth of ~44 pm by means of a 20 cm Tm-doped fiber. The dependencies of the slope efficiencies and pump threshold of the Tm-doped fiber laser versus the length of active fiber and reflectivity of the output mirror (FBG) were investigated in detail, in which the maximum average slope efficiency was 36.1%. There is no doubt that this all fiber laser will be a perfect pump source for mid-IR laser output.

  3. A Four Cell Lattice for the UCLA Compact Light Source Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.A.; Green, M.A.

    1999-03-12

    The 1.5 GeV compact light source UCS proposed for UCLA must fit into a shielded vault that is 9.144 meters (30 feet) wide. In order for the machine to fit into the allowable space, the ring circumference must be reduced 36 meters, the circumference of the six cell lattice, to something like 26 or 27 meters. The four cell lattice described in this report has a ring circumference of 27.0 meters.

  4. Development of a compact bio-optofluidic cell sorter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Pedersen, Finn; Glückstad, Jesper

    2012-03-01

    We develop an active cell sorter that utilizes machine vision for cell identification. Particles are identified based on visual features such as shape, size and color using image processing. The sorter shares features from our previously developed BioPhotonics Workstation. Hence, it benefits from the extended axial manipulation range provided by the low numerical aperture geometry. Detected particles are catapulted axially by several hundred microns, allowing them to be moved from one laminar flow region to another. As the sorting motion is transverse to the viewing plane, multiple particles can be catapulted at the same time, therefore enabling parallel sorting. The sorter is developed with a minimal footprint such that it can operate as a table top device, an advantage over flow cytometry or FACS systems.

  5. Dynamics of Cancer Cell near Collagen Fiber Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jihan; Sun, Bo

    Cell migration is an integrated process that is important in life. Migration is essential for embryonic development as well as homeostatic processes such as wound healing and immune responses. When cell migrates through connective extracellular matrix (ECM), it applies cellular traction force to ECM and senses the rigidity of their local environment. We used human breast cancer cell (MDA-MB-231) which is highly invasive and applies strong traction force to ECM. As cancer cell applies traction force to type I collage-based ECM, it deforms collagen fibers near the surface. Patterns of deforming collagen fibers are significantly different with pairs of cancer cells compared to a single cancer cell. While a pair of cancer cells within 60 um creates aligned collagen fiber chains between them permanently, a single cancer cell does not form any fiber chains. In this experiment we measured a cellular response and an interaction between a pair of cells through the chain. Finally, we analyzed correlation of directions between cancer cell migration and the collagen chain alignment.

  6. Regulation of auxin on secondary cell wall cellulose biosynthesis in developing cotton fibers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) fibers are unicellular trichomes that differentiate from epidermal cells of developing cotton ovules. Mature fibers exhibit thickened secondary walls composed of nearly pure cellulose. Cotton fiber development is divided into four overlapping phases, 1) initiation sta...

  7. Titanium diboride ceramic fiber composites for Hall-Heroult cells

    DOEpatents

    Besmann, Theodore M.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1990-01-01

    An improved cathode structure for Hall-Heroult cells for the electrolytic production of aluminum metal. This cathode structure is a preform fiber base material that is infiltrated with electrically conductive titanium diboride using chemical vapor infiltration techniques. The structure exhibits good fracture toughness, and is sufficiently resistant to attack by molten aluminum. Typically, the base can be made from a mat of high purity silicon carbide fibers. Other ceramic or carbon fibers that do not degrade at temperatures below about 1000 deg. C can be used.

  8. Titanium diboride ceramic fiber composites for Hall-Heroult cells

    DOEpatents

    Besmann, T.M.; Lowden, R.A.

    1990-05-29

    An improved cathode structure is described for Hall-Heroult cells for the electrolytic production of aluminum metal. This cathode structure is a preform fiber base material that is infiltrated with electrically conductive titanium diboride using chemical vapor infiltration techniques. The structure exhibits good fracture toughness, and is sufficiently resistant to attack by molten aluminum. Typically, the base can be made from a mat of high purity silicon carbide fibers. Other ceramic or carbon fibers that do not degrade at temperatures below about 1000 C can be used.

  9. Multi-scale undulations in human aortic endothelial cell fibers.

    PubMed

    Frketic, Jolie B; DeLaPeña, Abigail; Suaris, Melanie G; Zehnder, Steven M; Angelini, Thomas E

    2015-02-01

    Blood vessels often have an undulatory morphology, with excessive bending, kinking, and coiling occuring in diseased vasculature. The underlying physical causes of these morphologies are generally attributed, in combination, to changes in blood pressure, blood flow rate, and cell proliferation or apoptosis. However, pathological vascular morphologies often start during developmental vasculogenesis. At early stages of vasculogenesis, angioblasts (vascular endothelial cells that have not formed a lumen) assemble into primitive vessel-like fibers before blood flow occurs. If loose, fibrous aggregates of endothelial cells can generate multi-cellular undulations through mechanical instabilities, driven by the cytoskeleton, new insight into vasculature morphology may be achieved with simple in vitro models of endothelial cell fibers. Here we study mechanical instabilities in vessel-like structures made from endothelial cells embedded in a collagen matrix. We find that endothelial cell fibers contract radially over time, and undulate at two dominant wavelengths: approximately 1cm and 1mm. Simple mechanical models suggest that the long-wavelength undulation is Euler buckling in rigid confinement, while the short-wavelength buckle may arise from a mismatch between fiber bending energy and matrix deformation. These results suggest a combination of fiber-like geometry, cystoskeletal contractions, and extracellular matrix elasticity may contribute to undulatory blood vessel morphology in the absence of a lumen or blood pressure.

  10. Compact 35μm fiber coupled diode laser module based on dense wavelength division multiplexing of NBA mini-bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witte, U.; Traub, M.; Di Meo, A.; Hamann, M.; Rubel, D.; Hengesbach, S.; Hoffmann, D.

    2016-03-01

    We present a compact, modular and cross talk free approach for dense wavelength division multiplexing of high power diode lasers based on ultra-steep dielectric filters. The mini bars consist of 5 narrow stripe broad area emitters with a beam parameter product in the range of 2 mm mrad and a wavelength spacing of 2.5 nm between 2 adjacent emitters. Experimental results for fiber coupling (35 μm core diameter, NA < 0.2) of internally and externally stabilized diode lasers are presented. Optical losses are analyzed and alternative optical designs to overcome the current limitations of the setup are discussed.

  11. Compact and portable 100-GHz microresonator-based optical frequency comb generation system for dense wavelength division multiplexing fiber optic communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Yi-Chen; Liu, Tze-An; Ting, Wei-Jo; Chen, Hsin-Feng; Cheng, Yuh-Chuan; Hsu, Po-Er; Peng, Jin-Long

    2016-10-01

    A compact and portable microresonator-based optical frequency comb generation system was developed to provide an array of multiwavelength laser sources for dense wavelength division multiplexing (DWDM) fiber optic communication. The reported comb generation system was capable of producing comb lines after 7 km of travel without environmental control, indicating the effectiveness of the packaging. The comb spacing is about 98.3 GHz (i.e., ˜0.79 nm around 1553 nm), thus the comb line frequencies coincide nicely with 100-GHz DWDM channel frequencies, assuming the suggested channel bandwidth is 0.3 nm. The quality of selected comb lines was evaluated individually based on error vector magnitude (EVM) measurements along with RF spectrum measurements. An average EVM value observed is as low as 3.8%, close to typical EVM values of less than 3% used for fiber optic communication.

  12. Compact Flyeye concentrator with improved irradiance uniformity on solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Zhenfeng; Yu, Feihong

    2013-08-01

    A Flyeye concentrator with improved irradiance distribution on the solar cell in a concentrator photovoltaic system is proposed. This Flyeye concentrator is composed of four surfaces: a refractive surface, mirror surface, freeform surface, and transmissive surface. Based on the principles of geometrical optics, the contours of the proposed Flyeye concentrator are calculated according to Fermat's principle, the edge-ray principle, and the ray reversibility principle without solving partial differential equations or using an optimization algorithm, therefore a slope angle control method is used to construct the freeform surface. The solid model is established by applying a symmetry of revolution around the optical axis. Additionally, the optical performance for the Flyeye concentrator is simulated and analyzed by Monte-Carlo method. Results show that the Flyeye concentrator optical efficiency of >96.2% is achievable with 1333× concentration ratio and ±1.3 deg acceptance angle, and 1.3 low aspect ratio (average thickness to entry aperture diameter ratio). Moreover, comparing the Flyeye concentrator specification to that of the Köhler concentrator and the traditional Fresnel-type concentrator, results indicate that this concentrator has the advantages of improved uniformity, reduced thickness, and increased tolerance to the incident sunlight.

  13. The Dual Functions of WLIM1a in Cell Elongation and Secondary Wall Formation in Developing Cotton Fibers[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li-Bo; Li, Yuan-Bao; Wang, Hai-Yun; Wu, Xiao-Min; Li, Chun-Li; Luo, Ming; Wu, Shen-Jie; Kong, Zhao-Sheng; Pei, Yan; Jiao, Gai-Li; Xia, Gui-Xian

    2013-01-01

    LIN-11, Isl1 and MEC-3 (LIM)-domain proteins play pivotal roles in a variety of cellular processes in animals, but plant LIM functions remain largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate dual roles of the WLIM1a gene in fiber development in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). WLIM1a is preferentially expressed during the elongation and secondary wall synthesis stages in developing fibers. Overexpression of WLIM1a in cotton led to significant changes in fiber length and secondary wall structure. Compared with the wild type, fibers of WLIM1a-overexpressing plants grew longer and formed a thinner and more compact secondary cell wall, which contributed to improved fiber strength and fineness. Functional studies demonstrated that (1) WLIM1a acts as an actin bundler to facilitate elongation of fiber cells and (2) WLIM1a also functions as a transcription factor to activate expression of Phe ammonia lyase–box genes involved in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis to build up the secondary cell wall. WLIM1a localizes in the cytosol and nucleus and moves into the nucleus in response to hydrogen peroxide. Taken together, these results demonstrate that WLIM1a has dual roles in cotton fiber development, elongation, and secondary wall formation. Moreover, our study shows that lignin/lignin-like phenolics may substantially affect cotton fiber quality; this finding may guide cotton breeding for improved fiber traits. PMID:24220634

  14. Cell counting system by using single fiber interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seung Seok; Kim, Joo Ha; Choi, Eun Seo

    2017-02-01

    We proposed a cell-counting method using optical fiber interferometer and demonstrated the performance of the proposed method. The cell counting means the counting or the quantification of individual cells. Its application ranges from the biological research to practical disease diagnosis. As a conventional approach for cell counting, various methods are employed. Among them, flow cytometry is quite accurate and exact method but it uses bulk and expensive optical equipment. When image-based methods are exploited, the limited field of view obtained by microscope is considered for cell counting. From this reason, problem of time consuming for whole cell counting is to be solved. The proposed method utilized single-mode optical fiber and high-speed spectrometer. Light beam having broad spectral bandwidth over 100 nm at 850-nm central wavelength is irradiated to a flow channel through fiber from top to bottom. Different optical path length differences are made whether the cell is passing though the flow channel across the beam area or not. The difference of optical path lengths in the beam area due to the cell induces interference signal depending on optical thickness of the cell. By measuring a series of interferences, the number of cells can be analyzed. The proposed system can be implemented without any expensive and perform the cell counting in the absence of complex image analysis. Interferometer-based cell counting can be a good alternative to the reported cell-counting methods.

  15. Automated electron microscope tomography of frozen-hydrated chromatin: the irregular three-dimensional zigzag architecture persists in compact, isolated fibers.

    PubMed

    Horowitz, R A; Koster, A J; Walz, J; Woodcock, C L

    1997-12-01

    The potential of electron microscope tomography as a tool for obtaining three-dimensional (3D) information about large macromolecular assemblies is greatly extended by automation of data collection. With the implementation of automated control of tilting, focusing, and digital image recording described here, tilt series of frozen-hydrated specimens can be collected with the requisite low dose. Long chromatin fibers were prepared in 90 mM monovalent ions to maintain a fully compact conformation, and after vitrification were completely contained within the ice layer. Tilt series of this material were recorded at 5 degrees tilt increments between +60 degrees and -60 degrees, with a cumulative dose of approximately 35 e-/A2 for the series. This extremely low dose data was successfully aligned, then reconstructed by weighted backprojection. The underlying architecture of the fibers is an irregular 3D zigzag of interconnected nucleosomes, with the linker DNA between successive nucleosomes in a largely extended conformation. The visualization of this structural motif within long, frozen-hydrated chromatin fibers at relatively high salt extends our previous studies on small fragments at low ionic strength and is in agreement with the observation of this architecture in chromatin fibers in situ in sectioned nuclei.

  16. Efficient high-harmonic generation from a stable and compact ultrafast Yb-fiber laser producing 100 μJ, 350 fs pulses based on bendable photonic crystal fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feehan, James S.; Price, Jonathan H. V.; Butcher, Thomas J.; Brocklesby, William S.; Frey, Jeremy G.; Richardson, David J.

    2017-01-01

    The development of an Yb3+-fiber-based chirped-pulse amplification system and the performance in the generation of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation by high-harmonic generation is reported. The fiber laser produced 100 μJ, 350 fs output pulses with diffraction-limited beam quality at a repetition rate of 16.7 kHz. The system used commercial single-mode, polarization maintaining fiber technology. This included a 40 μm core, easily packaged, bendable final amplifier fiber in order to enable a compact system, to reduce cost, and provide reliable and environmentally stable long-term performance. The system enabled the generation of 0.4 μW of EUV at wavelengths between 27 and 80 nm with a peak at 45 nm using xenon gas. The EUV flux of 1011 photons per second for a driving field power of 1.67 W represents state-of-the-art generation efficiency for single-fiber amplifier CPA systems, corresponding to a maximum calculated energy conversion efficiency of 2.4 × 10-7 from the infrared to the EUV. The potential for high average power operation at increased repetition rates and further suggested technical improvements are discussed. Future applications could include coherent diffractive imaging in the EUV, and high-harmonic spectroscopy.

  17. Cell-autonomous requirements for Dlg-1 for lens epithelial cell structure and fiber cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Charlene; Yamben, Idella F; Shatadal, Shalini; Waldof, Malinda; Robinson, Michael L; Griep, Anne E

    2009-09-01

    Cell polarity and adhesion are thought to be key determinants in organismal development. In Drosophila, discs large (dlg) has emerged as an important regulator of epithelial cell proliferation, adhesion, and polarity. Herein, we investigated the role of the mouse homolog of dlg (Dlg-1) in the development of the mouse ocular lens. Tissue-specific ablation of Dlg-1 throughout the lens early in lens development led to an expansion and disorganization of the epithelium that correlated with changes in the distribution of adhesion and polarity factors. In the fiber cells, differentiation defects were observed. These included alterations in cell structure and the disposition of cell adhesion/cytoskeletal factors, delay in denucleation, and reduced levels of alpha-catenin, pERK1/2, and MIP26. These fiber cell defects were recapitulated when Dlg-1 was disrupted only in fiber cells. These results suggest that Dlg-1 acts in a cell autonomous manner to regulate epithelial cell structure and fiber cell differentiation.

  18. CHARACTERIZATION OF ALVEOLAR EPITHELIAL CELLS CULTURED IN SEMIPERMEABLE HOLLOW FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Grek, Christina L.; Newton, Danforth A.; Qiu, Yonhzhi; Wen, Xuejun; Spyropoulos, Demetri D.; Baatz, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Cell culture methods commonly used to represent alveolar epithelial cells in vivo have lacked airflow, a 3-dimensional air-liquid interface, and dynamic stretching characteristics of native lung tissue—physiological parameters critical for normal phenotypic gene expression and cellular function. Here the authors report the development of a selectively semipermeable hollow fiber culture system that more accurately mimics the in vivo microenvironment experienced by mammalian distal airway cells than in conventional or standard air-liquid interface culture. Murine lung epithelial cells (MLE-15) were cultured within semipermeable polyurethane hollow fibers and introduced to controlled airflow through the microfiber interior. Under these conditions, MLE-15 cells formed confluent monolayers, demonstrated a cuboidal morphology, formed tight junctions, and produced and secreted surfactant proteins. Numerous lamellar bodies and microvilli were present in MLE-15 cells grown in hollow fiber culture. Conversely, these alveolar type II cell characteristics were reduced in MLE-15 cells cultured in conventional 2D static culture systems. These data support the hypothesis that MLE-15 cells grown within our microfiber culture system in the presence of airflow maintain the phenotypic characteristics of type II cells to a higher degree than those grown in standard in vitro cell culture models. Application of our novel model system may prove advantageous for future studies of specific gene and protein expression involving alveolar epithelial or bronchiolar epithelial cells. PMID:19263283

  19. Dual fiber microprobe for mapping elemental distributions in biological cells

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Rodger C [Powell, TN; Martin, Madhavi Z [Powell, TN

    2007-07-31

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is applied on a microscale for in situ elemental analysis and spatial mapping in biological cells. A high power laser beam is focused onto a cell surface using a dual branching optical fiber probe for optical excitation of the cell constituents. Dual spectrometers and ICCD detectors capture the emission spectra from the excited cell(s). Repeated probing or repositioning of the laser beam with respect to the cell can provide 2-D or 3-D mapping of the cell.

  20. Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Human Lens Fiber Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Han, Jun; David, Larry L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The human lens fiber cell insoluble membrane fraction contains important membrane proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, and cytosolic proteins that are strongly associated with the membrane. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens fiber cell membrane proteome and phosphoproteome from human lenses. Methods. HPLC-mass spectrometry–based multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT), without or with phosphopeptide enrichment, was applied to study the proteome and phosphoproteome of lens fiber cell membranes, respectively. Results. In total, 951 proteins were identified, including 379 integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins. Enriched gene categories and pathways based on the proteomic analysis include carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, pyruvate metabolism), proteasome, cell-cell signaling and communication (GTP binding, gap junction, focal adhesion), glutathione metabolism, and actin regulation. The combination of TiO2 phosphopeptide enrichment and MudPIT analysis revealed 855 phosphorylation sites on 271 proteins, including 455 phosphorylation sites that have not been previously identified. PKA, PKC, CKII, p38MAPK, and RSK are predicted as the major kinases for phosphorylation on the sites identified in the human lens membrane fraction. Conclusions. The results presented herein significantly expand the characterized proteome and phosphoproteome of the human lens fiber cell and provide a valuable reference for future research in studies of lens development and disease. PMID:23349431

  1. EM measurements define the dimensions of the “30-nm” chromatin fiber: Evidence for a compact, interdigitated structure

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Philip J. J.; Fairall, Louise; Huynh, Van A. T.; Rhodes, Daniela

    2006-01-01

    Chromatin structure plays a fundamental role in the regulation of nuclear processes such as DNA transcription, replication, recombination, and repair. Despite considerable efforts during three decades, the structure of the 30-nm chromatin fiber remains controversial. To define fiber dimensions accurately, we have produced very long and regularly folded 30-nm fibers from in vitro reconstituted nucleosome arrays containing the linker histone and with increasing nucleosome repeat lengths (10 to 70 bp of linker DNA). EM measurements show that the dimensions of these fully folded fibers do not increase linearly with increasing linker length, a finding that is inconsistent with two-start helix models. Instead, we find that there are two distinct classes of fiber structure, both with unexpectedly high nucleosome density: arrays with 10 to 40 bp of linker DNA all produce fibers with a diameter of 33 nm and 11 nucleosomes per 11 nm, whereas arrays with 50 to 70 bp of linker DNA all produce 44-nm-wide fibers with 15 nucleosomes per 11 nm. Using the physical constraints imposed by these measurements, we have built a model in which tight nucleosome packing is achieved through the interdigitation of nucleosomes from adjacent helical gyres. Importantly, the model closely matches raw image projections of folded chromatin arrays recorded in the solution state by using electron cryo-microscopy. PMID:16617109

  2. Effect of titanium oxide compact layer in dye-sensitized solar cell prepared by liquid-phase deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jung-Jie; Chiu, Shih-Ping; Wu, Menq-Jion; Hsu, Chun-Fa

    2016-11-01

    In this study, titanium dioxide films were deposited on indium tin oxide glass substrates by liquid-phase deposition (LPD) for application as the compact layer in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A deposition solution of ammonium hexafluorotitanate and boric acid was used for TiO2 deposition. Compact layer passivation can improve DSSC performance by decreasing carrier losses from recombination at the ITO/electrolyte interface and improving the electrical contact between the ITO and the TiO2 photo-electrode. The optimum thickness of the compact layer was found to be 48 nm, which resulted in a 50 % increase in the conversion efficiency compared with cells without compact layers. The conversion efficiency can be increased from 3.55 to 5.26 %. Therefore, the LPD-TiO2 compact layer inhibits the dark current and increases the short-circuit current density effectively.

  3. Preparation of ultra-thin and high-quality WO3 compact layers and comparision of WO3 and TiO2 compact layer thickness in planar perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jincheng; Shi, Chengwu; Chen, Junjun; Wang, Yanqing; Li, Mingqian

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the ultra-thin and high-quality WO3 compact layers were successfully prepared by spin-coating-pyrolysis method using the tungsten isopropoxide solution in isopropanol. The influence of WO3 and TiO2 compact layer thickness on the photovoltaic performance of planar perovskite solar cells was systematically compared, and the interface charge transfer and recombination in planar perovskite solar cells with TiO2 compact layer was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results revealed that the optimum thickness of WO3 and TiO2 compact layer was 15 nm and 60 nm. The planar perovskite solar cell with 15 nm WO3 compact layer gave a 9.69% average and 10.14% maximum photoelectric conversion efficiency, whereas the planar perovskite solar cell with 60 nm TiO2 compact layer achieved a 11.79% average and 12.64% maximum photoelectric conversion efficiency.

  4. Chromatin compaction in terminally differentiated avian blood cells: the role of linker histone H5 and non-histone protein MENT.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Andrzej; Pałyga, Jan

    2011-07-01

    Chromatin has a tendency to shift from a relatively decondensed (active) to condensed (inactive) state during cell differentiation due to interactions of specific architectural and/or regulatory proteins with DNA. A promotion of chromatin folding in terminally differentiated avian blood cells requires the presence of either histone H5 in erythrocytes or non-histone protein, myeloid and erythroid nuclear termination stage-specific protein (MENT), in white blood cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes). These highly abundant proteins assist in folding of nucleosome arrays and self-association of chromatin fibers into compacted chromatin structures. Here, we briefly review structural aspects and molecular mode of action by which these unrelated proteins can spread condensed chromatin to form inactivated regions in the genome.

  5. Polymer Solar Cells: Solubility Controls Fiber Network Formation.

    PubMed

    van Franeker, Jacobus J; Heintges, Gaël H L; Schaefer, Charley; Portale, Giuseppe; Li, Weiwei; Wienk, Martijn M; van der Schoot, Paul; Janssen, René A J

    2015-09-16

    The photoactive layer of polymer solar cells is commonly processed from a four-component solution, containing a semiconducting polymer and a fullerene derivative dissolved in a solvent-cosolvent mixture. The nanoscale dimensions of the polymer-fullerene morphology that is formed upon drying determines the solar cell performance, but the fundamental processes that govern the size of the phase-separated polymer and fullerene domains are poorly understood. Here, we investigate morphology formation of an alternating copolymer of diketopyrrolopyrrole and a thiophene-phenyl-thiophene oligomer (PDPPTPT) with relatively long 2-decyltetradecyl (DT) side chains blended with [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester. During solvent evaporation the polymer crystallizes into a fibrous network. The typical width of these fibers is analyzed by quantification of transmission electron microscopic images, and is mainly determined by the solubility of the polymer in the cosolvent and the molecular weight of the polymer. A higher molecular weight corresponds to a lower solubility and film processing results in a smaller fiber width. Surprisingly, the fiber width is not related to the drying rate or the amount of cosolvent. We have made solar cells with fiber widths ranging from 28 to 68 nm and found an inverse relation between fiber width and photocurrent. Finally, by mixing two cosolvents, we develop a ternary solvent system to tune the fiber width. We propose a model based on nucleation-and-growth which can explain these measurements. Our results show that the width of the semicrystalline polymer fibers is not the result of a frozen dynamical state, but determined by the nucleation induced by the polymer solubility.

  6. Dedifferentiated fat cells differentiate into osteoblasts in titanium fiber mesh.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Naotaka; Momota, Yoshihiro; Hashimoto, Yoshiya; Ando, Kayoko; Omasa, Takeshi; Kotani, Junichiro

    2013-01-01

    Mature adipocyte-derived dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells rapidly differentiate into osteoblasts under three-dimensional culture conditions. However, it has not been demonstrated that DFAT cells can differentiate into osteoblasts in a rigid scaffold consisting of titanium fiber mesh (TFM). We examined the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation ability of DFAT cells using TFM as a scaffold. DFAT cells derived from rabbit subcutaneous fat were seeded into TFM and cultured in osteogenic medium containing dexamethasone, L-ascorbic acid 2-phosphate and β-glycerophosphate for 14 days. In scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, well-spread cells covered the titanium fibers on day 3, and appeared to increase in number from day 3 to 7. Numerous globular accretions were found and almost completely covered the fibers on day 14. Cell proliferation, as measured by DNA content in the TFM, was significantly higher on day 7 compared with that of day 1. Osteocalcin and calcium content in the TFM were significantly higher on day 14 compared to those of days 1, 3, and 7, indicating DFAT cells differentiated into osteoblasts. We theorize that globular accretions observed in SEM analysis may be calcified matrix resulting from osteocalcin secreted by osteoblasts binding calcium contained in fetal bovine serum. In this study, we demonstrated that DFAT cells differentiate into osteoblasts and deposit mineralized matrices in TFM. Therefore, the combination of DFAT cells and TFM may be an attractive option for bone tissue engineering.

  7. New insights into the signal transmission from taste cells to gustatory nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2010-01-01

    Taste receptor cells detect chemical compounds in the oral cavity and transfer their messages to gustatory afferent nerve fibers. Considering the coding of taste information, the sensitivity of taste cells and the connection between taste cells and gustatory fibers may be critical in this process. Broadly tuned taste cells and random connections between taste cells and fibers would produce gustatory fibers that have broad sensitivity to multiple taste qualities. Narrowly tuned taste cells and selective connections would yield gustatory nerve fibers that respond to specific taste quality. This review summarizes results showing molecular and morphological aspects of taste bud cells, physiological responses of taste cells, possible connections between taste cells and gustatory fibers, and transmitter release from taste cells, and discusses how taste qualities are encoded among taste bud cells and how taste information is transmitted from taste cells to gustatory nerve fibers. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Satellite cell depletion prevents fiber hypertrophy in skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Egner, Ingrid M; Bruusgaard, Jo C; Gundersen, Kristian

    2016-08-15

    The largest mammalian cells are the muscle fibers, and they have multiple nuclei to support their large cytoplasmic volumes. During hypertrophic growth, new myonuclei are recruited from satellite stem cells into the fiber syncytia, but it was recently suggested that such recruitment is not obligatory: overload hypertrophy after synergist ablation of the plantaris muscle appeared normal in transgenic mice in which most of the satellite cells were abolished. When we essentially repeated these experiments analyzing the muscles by immunohistochemistry and in vivo and ex vivo imaging, we found that overload hypertrophy was prevented in the satellite cell-deficient mice, in both the plantaris and the extensor digitorum longus muscles. We attribute the previous findings to a reliance on muscle mass as a proxy for fiber hypertrophy, and to the inclusion of a significant number of regenerating fibers in the analysis. We discuss that there is currently no model in which functional, sustainable hypertrophy has been unequivocally demonstrated in the absence of satellite cells; an exception is re-growth, which can occur using previously recruited myonuclei without addition of new myonuclei. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  9. An efficient compact 300 mW narrow-linewidth single frequency fiber laser at 1.5 microm.

    PubMed

    Xu, S H; Yang, Z M; Liu, T; Zhang, W N; Feng, Z M; Zhang, Q Y; Jiang, Z H

    2010-01-18

    An efficient single frequency fiber laser by using a newly-developed Er(3+)/Yb(3+) co-doped single mode phosphate glass fiber with the net gain coefficient of 5.2 dB/cm and propagation loss coefficient of 0.04 dB/cm has been demonstrated. Over 300 mW stable continuous -wave single transverse and longitudinal mode seed lasering at 1.5 microm has been achieved from a 2.0 cm-long active fiber. The measured slope efficiency and the calculated quantum efficiency of laser emission are found to be 30.9% and 0.938 +/- 0.081, respectively. It is found that the linewidth of the fiber laser is less than 2 kHz, and the measured relative intensity noise (RIN) is around -120 dB/Hz in the frequency range of 50 to 500 kHz.

  10. Carbon fiber enhanced bioelectricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Wan, Lili; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-11-15

    The soil microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising biotechnology for the bioelectricity recovery as well as the remediation of organics contaminated soil. However, the electricity production and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC are seriously limited by the tremendous internal resistance of soil. Conductive carbon fiber was mixed with petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil and significantly enhanced the performance of soil MFC. The maximum current density, the maximum power density and the accumulated charge output of MFC mixed carbon fiber (MC) were 10, 22 and 16 times as high as those of closed circuit control due to the carbon fiber productively assisted the anode to collect the electron. The internal resistance of MC reduced by 58%, 83% of which owed to the charge transfer resistance, resulting in a high efficiency of electron transfer from soil to anode. The degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbons enhanced by 100% and 329% compared to closed and opened circuit controls without the carbon fiber respectively. The effective range of remediation and the bioelectricity recovery was extended from 6 to 20cm with the same area of air-cathode. The mixed carbon fiber apparently enhanced the bioelectricity generation and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC by means of promoting the electron transfer rate from soil to anode. The use of conductively functional materials (e.g. carbon fiber) is very meaningful for the remediation and bioelectricity recovery in the bioelectrochemical remediation.

  11. Oxide Fiber Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Lithium Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, Catherine E.; Welker, Mark F.

    2008-01-01

    LiCoO2 and LiNiO2 fibers have been investigated as alternatives to LiCoO2 and LiNiO2 powders used as lithium-intercalation compounds in cathodes of rechargeable lithium-ion electrochemical cells. In making such a cathode, LiCoO2 or LiNiO2 powder is mixed with a binder [e.g., poly(vinylidene fluoride)] and an electrically conductive additive (usually carbon) and the mixture is pressed to form a disk. The binder and conductive additive contribute weight and volume, reducing the specific energy and energy density, respectively. In contrast, LiCoO2 or LiNiO2 fibers can be pressed and sintered to form a cathode, without need for a binder or a conductive additive. The inter-grain contacts of the fibers are stronger and have fewer defects than do those of powder particles. These characteristics translate to increased flexibility and greater resilience on cycling and, consequently, to reduced loss of capacity from cycle to cycle. Moreover, in comparison with a powder-based cathode, a fiber-based cathode is expected to exhibit significantly greater ionic and electronic conduction along the axes of the fibers. Results of preliminary charge/discharge-cycling tests suggest that energy densities of LiCoO2- and LiNiO2-fiber cathodes are approximately double those of the corresponding powder-based cathodes.

  12. Autoclave processing for composite material fabrication. 1: An analysis of resin flows and fiber compactions for thin laminate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, T. H.

    1985-01-01

    High quality long fiber reinforced composites, such as those used in aerospace and industrial applications, are commonly processed in autoclaves. An adequate resin flow model for the entire system (laminate/bleeder/breather), which provides a description of the time-dependent laminate consolidation process, is useful in predicting the loss of resin, heat transfer characteristics, fiber volume fraction and part dimension, etc., under a specified set of processing conditions. This could be accomplished by properly analyzing the flow patterns and pressure profiles inside the laminate during processing. A newly formulated resin flow model for composite prepreg lamination process is reported. This model considers viscous resin flows in both directions perpendicular and parallel to the composite plane. In the horizontal direction, a squeezing flow between two nonporous parallel plates is analyzed, while in the vertical direction, a poiseuille type pressure flow through porous media is assumed. Proper force and mass balances have been made and solved for the whole system. The effects of fiber-fiber interactions during lamination are included as well. The unique features of this analysis are: (1) the pressure gradient inside the laminate is assumed to be generated from squeezing action between two adjacent approaching fiber layers, and (2) the behavior of fiber bundles is simulated by a Finitely Extendable Nonlinear Elastic (FENE) spring.

  13. >100-kW linearly polarized pulse fiber amplifier seeded by a compact efficient passively Q-switched Nd:YVO4 Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, W. Z.; Huang, W. C.; Cho, C. Y.; Huang, Y. P.; Huang, J. Y.; Chen, Y. F.

    2012-11-01

    We thoroughly develop compact high-peak-power Nd:YVO4/Cr4+:YAG passively Q-switched lasers (PQS) as the seed source of the fiber amplifier. We exploit a nearly hemispherical cavity to reach the second threshold criterion and systematically consider the thermal lensing effect and the mode-size matching in the overall optimization. Employing a Cr4+:YAG absorber with 70% initial transmission, we obtain a 50-kHz seed pulse train with the pulse duration of 4.8 ns and the pulse energy of 22 μJ at a pump power of 5.4 W. Injecting this seed laser into a polarization maintained Yb-doped fiber, the pulse energy and peak power at a pump power of 16 W are enhanced up to 178 μJ and 37 kW, respectively. We also use an absorber with 40% initial transmission to generate a 25 kHz pulse train with the pulse duration of 1.6 ns and the pulse energy of 36 μJ at a pump power of 5.4 W. With this seed laser, we find that the surface damage of the fiber limits the maximum pulse energy and peak power to be 192 μJ and 120 kW, respectively.

  14. Tropomodulin 1 Constrains Fiber Cell Geometry during Elongation and Maturation in the Lens Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Roberta B.

    2012-01-01

    Lens fiber cells exhibit a high degree of hexagonal packing geometry, determined partly by tropomodulin 1 (Tmod1), which stabilizes the spectrin-actin network on lens fiber cell membranes. To ascertain whether Tmod1 is required during epithelial cell differentiation to fiber cells or during fiber cell elongation and maturation, the authors quantified the extent of fiber cell disorder in the Tmod1-null lens and determined locations of disorder by confocal microscopy and computational image analysis. First, nearest neighbor analysis of fiber cell geometry in Tmod1-null lenses showed that disorder is confined to focal patches. Second, differentiating epithelial cells at the equator aligned into ordered meridional rows in Tmod1-null lenses, with disordered patches first observed in elongating fiber cells. Third, as fiber cells were displaced inward in Tmod1-null lenses, total disordered area increased due to increased sizes (but not numbers) of individual disordered patches. The authors conclude that Tmod1 is required first to coordinate fiber cell shapes and interactions during tip migration and elongation and second to stabilize ordered fiber cell geometry during maturation in the lens cortex. An unstable spectrin-actin network without Tmod1 may result in imbalanced forces along membranes, leading to fiber cell rearrangements during elongation, followed by propagation of disorder as fiber cells mature. PMID:22473940

  15. Transgenic Expression of AQP1 in the Fiber Cells of AQP0 Knockout Mouse: Effects on Lens Transparency

    PubMed Central

    Varadaraj, K.; Kumari, S.S.; Mathias, R.T.

    2010-01-01

    Mutations and knockout of aquaporin 0 (AQP0) result in dominant lens cataract. To date, several functions have been proposed for AQP0; however, two functions, water permeability and cell-to-cell adhesion have been supported by several investigators and only water channel function has been readily authenticated by in vitro and ex vivo studies. Lens shifts protein expression from the more efficient AQP1 in the equatorial epithelial cells to the less efficient water channel, AQP0, in the differentiating secondary fiber cells; perhaps, AQP0 performs a distinctive function. If AQP0 has only water permeability function, can the more efficient water channel AQP1 transgenically expressed in the fiber cells compensate and restore lens transparency in the AQP0 knockout (AQP0-/-) mouse? To investigate, we generated a transgenic wild type mouse line expressing AQP1 in the fiber cells using αA-crystallin promoter. These transgenic mice (TgAQP1+/+) showed increase in fiber cell membrane water permeability without any morphological, anatomical or physiological defects compared to the wild type indicating that the main purpose of the shift in expression from AQP1 to AQP0 may not be to lessen the membrane water permeability. Further, we transgenically expressed AQP1 in the lens fiber cells of AQP0 knockout mouse (TgAQP1+/+/AQP0-/-) to determine whether AQP1 could restore AQP0 water channel function and regain lens transparency. Fiber cells of these mice showed 2.6 times more water permeability than the wild type. Transgene AQP1 reduced the severity of lens cataract and prevented dramatic acceleration of cataractogenesis. However, lens fiber cells showed deformities and lack of compact cellular architecture. Loss of lens transparency due to the absence of AQP0 was not completely restored indicating an additional function for AQP0. In vitro studies showed that AQP0 is capable of cell-to-cell adhesion while AQP1 is not. To our knowledge, this is the first report which uses an animal

  16. Fibrin-fiber architecture influences cell spreading and differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bruekers, Stéphanie M. C.; Jaspers, Maarten; Hendriks, José M. A.; Kurniawan, Nicholas A.; Koenderink, Gijsje H.; Kouwer, Paul H. J.; Rowan, Alan E.; T. S. Huck, Wilhelm

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanical and structural properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play an important role in regulating cell fate. The natural ECM has a complex fibrillar structure and shows nonlinear mechanical properties, which are both difficult to mimic synthetically. Therefore, systematically testing the influence of ECM properties on cellular behavior is very challenging. In this work we show two different approaches to tune the fibrillar structure and mechanical properties of fibrin hydrogels. Addition of extra thrombin before gelation increases the protein density within the fibrin fibers without significantly altering the mechanical properties of the resulting hydrogel. On the other hand, by forming a composite hydrogel with a synthetic biomimetic polyisocyanide network the protein density within the fibrin fibers decreases, and the mechanics of the composite material can be tuned by the PIC/fibrin mass ratio. The effect of the changes in gel structure and mechanics on cellular behavior are investigated, by studying human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) spreading and differentiation on these gels. We find that the trends observed in cell spreading and differentiation cannot be explained by the bulk mechanics of the gels, but correlate to the density of the fibrin fibers the gels are composed of. These findings strongly suggest that the microscopic properties of individual fibers in fibrous networks play an essential role in determining cell behavior. PMID:26910190

  17. Pax6 is essential for lens fiber cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Shaham, Ohad; Smith, April N; Robinson, Michael L; Taketo, Makoto M; Lang, Richard A; Ashery-Padan, Ruth

    2009-08-01

    The developing ocular lens provides an excellent model system with which to study the intrinsic and extrinsic cues governing cell differentiation. Although the transcription factors Pax6 and Sox2 have been shown to be essential for lens induction, their later roles during lens fiber differentiation remain largely unknown. Using Cre/loxP mutagenesis, we somatically inactivated Pax6 and Sox2 in the developing mouse lens during differentiation of the secondary lens fibers and explored the regulatory interactions of these two intrinsic factors with the canonical Wnt pathway. Analysis of the Pax6-deficient lenses revealed a requirement for Pax6 in cell cycle exit and differentiation into lens fiber cells. In addition, Pax6 disruption led to apoptosis of lens epithelial cells. We show that Pax6 regulates the Wnt antagonist Sfrp2 in the lens, and that Sox2 expression is upregulated in the Pax6-deficient lenses. However, our study demonstrates that the failure of differentiation following loss of Pax6 is independent of beta-catenin signaling or Sox2 activity. This study reveals that Pax6 is pivotal for initiation of the lens fiber differentiation program in the mammalian eye.

  18. Fibrin-fiber architecture influences cell spreading and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Bruekers, Stéphanie M C; Jaspers, Maarten; Hendriks, José M A; Kurniawan, Nicholas A; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Kouwer, Paul H J; Rowan, Alan E; T S Huck, Wilhelm

    2016-09-02

    The mechanical and structural properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play an important role in regulating cell fate. The natural ECM has a complex fibrillar structure and shows nonlinear mechanical properties, which are both difficult to mimic synthetically. Therefore, systematically testing the influence of ECM properties on cellular behavior is very challenging. In this work we show two different approaches to tune the fibrillar structure and mechanical properties of fibrin hydrogels. Addition of extra thrombin before gelation increases the protein density within the fibrin fibers without significantly altering the mechanical properties of the resulting hydrogel. On the other hand, by forming a composite hydrogel with a synthetic biomimetic polyisocyanide network the protein density within the fibrin fibers decreases, and the mechanics of the composite material can be tuned by the PIC/fibrin mass ratio. The effect of the changes in gel structure and mechanics on cellular behavior are investigated, by studying human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) spreading and differentiation on these gels. We find that the trends observed in cell spreading and differentiation cannot be explained by the bulk mechanics of the gels, but correlate to the density of the fibrin fibers the gels are composed of. These findings strongly suggest that the microscopic properties of individual fibers in fibrous networks play an essential role in determining cell behavior.

  19. Laser Frequency Stabilization for Coherent Lidar Applications using Novel All-Fiber Gas Reference Cell Fabrication Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meras, Patrick, Jr.; Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Chang, Daniel H.; Levin, Jason; Spiers, Gary D.

    2008-01-01

    Compact hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF)gas frequency reference cell was constructed using a novel packaging technique that relies on torch-sealing a quartz filling tube connected to a mechanical splice between regular and hollow-core fibers. The use of this gas cell for laser frequency stabilization was demonstrated by locking a tunable diode laser to the center of the P9 line from the (nu)1+(nu)3 band of acetylene with RMS frequency error of 2.06 MHz over 2 hours. This effort was performed in support of a task to miniaturize the laser frequency stabilization subsystem of JPL/LMCT Laser Absorption Spectrometer (LAS) instrument.

  20. Compact and field-portable 3D printed shearing digital holographic microscope for automated cell identification.

    PubMed

    Rawat, Siddharth; Komatsu, Satoru; Markman, Adam; Anand, Arun; Javidi, Bahram

    2017-03-20

    We propose a low-cost, compact, and field-portable 3D printed holographic microscope for automated cell identification based on a common path shearing interferometer setup. Once a hologram is captured from the portable setup, a 3D reconstructed height profile of the cell is created. We extract several morphological cell features from the reconstructed 3D height profiles, including mean physical cell thickness, coefficient of variation, optical volume (OV) of the cell, projected area of the cell (PA), ratio of PA to OV, cell thickness kurtosis, cell thickness skewness, and the dry mass of the cell for identification using the random forest (RF) classifier. The 3D printed prototype can serve as a low-cost alternative for the developing world, where access to laboratory facilities for disease diagnosis are limited. Additionally, a cell phone sensor is used to capture the digital holograms. This enables the user to send the acquired holograms over the internet to a computational device located remotely for cellular identification and classification (analysis). The 3D printed system presented in this paper can be used as a low-cost, stable, and field-portable digital holographic microscope as well as an automated cell identification system. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first research paper presenting automatic cell identification using a low-cost 3D printed digital holographic microscopy setup based on common path shearing interferometry.

  1. Electrospun fiber membranes enable proliferation of genetically modified cells

    PubMed Central

    Borjigin, Mandula; Eskridge, Chris; Niamat, Rohina; Strouse, Bryan; Bialk, Pawel; Kmiec, Eric B

    2013-01-01

    Polycaprolactone (PCL) and its blended composites (chitosan, gelatin, and lecithin) are well-established biomaterials that can enrich cell growth and enable tissue engineering. However, their application in the recovery and proliferation of genetically modified cells has not been studied. In the study reported here, we fabricated PCL-biomaterial blended fiber membranes, characterized them using physicochemical techniques, and used them as templates for the growth of genetically modified HCT116-19 colon cancer cells. Our data show that the blended polymers are highly miscible and form homogenous electrospun fiber membranes of uniform texture. The aligned PCL nanofibers support robust cell growth, yielding a 2.5-fold higher proliferation rate than cells plated on standard plastic plate surfaces. PCL-lecithin fiber membranes yielded a 2.7-fold higher rate of proliferation, while PCL-chitosan supported a more modest growth rate (1.5-fold higher). Surprisingly, PCL-gelatin did not enhance cell proliferation when compared to the rate of cell growth on plastic surfaces. PMID:23467983

  2. Preparation of ultra-thin and high-quality WO{sub 3} compact layers and comparision of WO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} compact layer thickness in planar perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jincheng; Shi, Chengwu Chen, Junjun; Wang, Yanqing; Li, Mingqian

    2016-06-15

    In this paper, the ultra-thin and high-quality WO{sub 3} compact layers were successfully prepared by spin-coating-pyrolysis method using the tungsten isopropoxide solution in isopropanol. The influence of WO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} compact layer thickness on the photovoltaic performance of planar perovskite solar cells was systematically compared, and the interface charge transfer and recombination in planar perovskite solar cells with TiO{sub 2} compact layer was analyzed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results revealed that the optimum thickness of WO{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} compact layer was 15 nm and 60 nm. The planar perovskite solar cell with 15 nm WO{sub 3} compact layer gave a 9.69% average and 10.14% maximum photoelectric conversion efficiency, whereas the planar perovskite solar cell with 60 nm TiO{sub 2} compact layer achieved a 11.79% average and 12.64% maximum photoelectric conversion efficiency. - Graphical abstract: The planar perovskite solar cell with 15 nm WO{sub 3} compact layer gave a 9.69% average and 10.14% maximum photoelectric conversion efficiency, whereas the planar perovskite solar cell with 60 nm TiO{sub 2} compact layer achieved a 11.79% average and 12.64% maximum photoelectric conversion efficiency. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Preparation of ultra-thin and high-quality WO{sub 3} compact layers. • Perovskite solar cell with 15 nm-thick WO{sub 3} compact layer achieved PCE of 10.14%. • Perovskite solar cell with 60 nm-thick TiO{sub 2} compact layer achieved PCE of 12.64%.

  3. Compact light-emitting diode optical fiber immobilized TiO2 reactor for photocatalytic water treatment.

    PubMed

    O'Neal Tugaoen, Heather; Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Hristovski, Kiril; Westerhoff, Paul

    2017-09-27

    A key barrier to implementing photocatalysis is delivering light to photocatalysts that are in contact with aqueous pollutants. Slurry photocatalyst systems suffer from poor light penetration and require post-treatment to separate the catalyst. The alternative is to deposit photocatalysts on fixed films and deliver light onto the surface or the backside of the attached catalysts. In this study, TiO2-coated quartz optical fibers were coupled to light emitting diodes (OF/LED) to improve in situ light delivery. Design factors and mechanisms studied for OF/LEDs in a flow-through reactor included: (i) the influence of number of LED sources coupled to fibers and (ii) the use of multiple optical fibers bundled to a single LED. The light delivery mechanism from the optical fibers into the TiO2 coatings is thoroughly discussed. To demonstrate influence of design variables, experiments were conducted in the reactor using the chlorinated pollutant para-chlorobenzoic acid (pCBA). From the degradation kinetics of pCBA, the quantum efficiencies (Φ) of oxidation and electrical energies per order (EEO) were determined. The use of TiO2 coated optical fiber bundles reduced the energy requirements to deliver photons and increased available surface area, which improved Φ and enhanced oxidative pollutant removal performance (EEO). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Compact, stable and efficient all-fibre gas cells using hollow-core photonic crystal fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benabid, F.; Couny, F.; Knight, J. C.; Birks, T. A.; Russell, P. St J.

    2005-03-01

    Gas-phase materials are used in a variety of laser-based applications-for example, in high-precision frequency measurement, quantum optics and nonlinear optics. Their full potential has however not been realized because of the lack of a suitable technology for creating gas cells that can guide light over long lengths in a single transverse mode while still offering a high level of integration in a practical and compact set-up or device. As a result, solid-phase materials are still often favoured, even when their performance compares unfavourably with gas-phase systems. Here we report the development of all-fibre gas cells that meet these challenges. Our structures are based on gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibres, in which we have recently demonstrated substantially enhanced stimulated Raman scattering, and which exhibit high performance, excellent long-term pressure stability and ease of use. To illustrate the practical potential of these structures, we report two different devices: a hydrogen-filled cell for efficient generation of rotational Raman scattering using only quasi-continuous-wave laser pulses; and acetylene-filled cells, which we use for absolute frequency-locking of diode lasers with very high signal-to-noise ratios. The stable performance of these compact gas-phase devices could permit, for example, gas-phase laser devices incorporated in a `credit card' or even in a laser pointer.

  5. Mammalian cell and protein distributions in ultrafiltration hollow fiber bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Piret, J M; Cooney, C L

    1990-11-01

    The heterogeneous nature of hollow fiber reactors for cell cultivation requires special considerations for proper design and operation. Downstream concentration of high-molecular-weight proteins has been measured in the shell side of ultrafiltration hollow fiber bioreactors. This distribution resulted from shell-side convective fluxes which caused a concentration polarization of proteins retained by the ultrafiltration membranes (nominal 3 x 10(4) D cutoff). Measurements of the axial hybridoma cell distribution also revealed a downstream concentration of viable cells during the first month of perfusion operation. This is believed to result from the shell-side convective flow and its influence on the inoculum and high-molecular-weight growth factor distributions. The heterogeneous distribution of cells leads to reduced cell numbers and reactor productivities. The mechanisms responsible for these phenomena have been investigated and their implications in process design and operation are considered. The heterogeneous protein and cell distributions on the shell side of hollow fiber bioreactors have been reduced significantly by periodic alternation of the direction of recycle flow and the reactor antibody productivities have been doubled.

  6. Morphological studies on the culture of kidney epithelial cells in a fiber-in-fiber bioreactor design with hollow fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Fey-Lamprecht, F; Albrecht, W; Groth, T; Weigel, T; Gross, U

    2003-05-01

    A hollow fiber-in-fiber-based bioreactor system was tested for the applicability to host kidney epithelial cells as a model system for a bioartificial kidney. Hollow fibers were prepared from polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polysulfone-polyvinylpyrollidinone (PVP) blend (PSU) and poly(acrylonitrile-N-vinylpyrollidinone) copolymer P(AN-NVP). Hollow fibers with smaller and larger diameters were prepared so that the smaller fitted into the larger, with a distance of 50-100 microm in between. The following material combinations as outer and inner fiber were applied: PAN-PAN; PSU-PSU, PSU-P(AN-NVP). Madin-Darby kidney epithelial cells (MDCK) were seeded in the interfiber space and cultured for a period up to 14 days. Light, scanning, and transmission electron microscopy were used to follow the adhesion and growth of cells, and to characterize their morphology. As a result, we found that MDCK cells were able to grow in the interfiber space in mono- and multilayers without signs of systemic degeneration. Comparison of the different materials showed that PAN and P(AN-NVP) provided the best growth conditions, indicated by a tight attachment of cells on hollow fiber membrane, and subsequent proliferation and development of structural elements of normal epithelia, such as tight junctions and microvilli. In conclusion, the fiber-in-fiber design seems to be an interesting system for the construction of a bioartificial kidney. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. A compact NIR fiber-optic diode laser spectrometer for CO and CO(2): analysis of observed 2f wavelength modulation spectroscopy line shapes.

    PubMed

    Engelbrecht, R

    2004-12-01

    A compact fiber-optic diode laser spectrometer for the measurement of CO and CO(2) gas concentrations in the near infrared around 1580 nm is described. By use of a balanced receiver to suppress diode laser intensity noise a sensitivity of 6.4 x 10(-7) at 1 Hz system bandwidth was achieved. At a reduced pressure of 80 hPa this equals to a detection limit of 5.1 ppm CO and 9.1 ppm CO(2) with 1m absorption path length. The observed line shapes of the 2f wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) scheme are analyzed theoretically and experimentally. Accurate measurements of magnitude and phase of the diode laser frequency and intensity modulation responses were found critically for modeling the observed line shapes. In situ measurements of gas dissociation processes inside of a medium-power carbon dioxide laser are presented as an application example.

  8. Generation of 130 W narrow-linewidth high-peak-power picosecond pulses directly from a compact Yb-doped single-stage fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yaoyao; Yu, Haijuan; Zhang, Jingyuan; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Ling; Lin, Xuechun

    2015-09-01

    We report a compact, 130-W single-stage master oscillator power amplifier with a high peak power of 51.3 kW and a narrow spectral linewidth of 0.1 nm. The seed source is a single-mode, passively mode-locked solid-state laser at 1064 nm with an average power of 2 W. At a repetition rate of 73.5 MHz, the pulse duration is 30 ps. After amplification, it stretches to 34.5 ps. The experiment enables the optical-to-optical conversion efficiency to reach 75%. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of such a high-power, narrow spectral linewidth, high peak power picosecond-pulse fiber amplifier based on a continuous-wave, mode-locked solid-state seeding laser. No amplified spontaneous emission and stimulated Raman scattering were observed when the pump was increased.

  9. Compact interrogator for fiber optic Bragg sensors based on an acousto-optic filter formed by photonic crystal rows of air holes.

    PubMed

    Tsarev, Andrei V; De Leonardis, Francesco; Passaro, Vittorio M N

    2011-10-01

    Fiber optic sensors are typically used with expensive tunable lasers or optical spectrum analyzers for wavelength interrogation. We propose to replace the tunable laser by a broadband optical source incorporated with a novel thin linewidth acousto-optic tunable filter. It utilizes optical beam expanders constituted by photonic crystal rows of air holes in LiNbO(3) waveguide. A new design is numerically studied for a short structure (with 32 photonic crystal rows) by a two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain method. Extrapolation of these results to larger structure sizes (about 1 cm) demonstrates the possibility to develop compact interrogators with 0.4 pm wavelength resolution and 40 nm tunable range around 1550 nm.

  10. DFG-based mid-IR generation using a compact dual-wavelength all-fiber amplifier for laser spectroscopy applications.

    PubMed

    Krzempek, Karol; Sobon, Grzegorz; Abramski, Krzysztof M

    2013-08-26

    We demonstrate a compact mid-infrared (mid-IR) radiation source based on difference frequency generation (DFG) in periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal. The system incorporates a dual-wavelength master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) source capable of simultaneous amplification of 1064 nm and 1548 nm signals in a common active fiber co-doped with erbium and ytterbium ions. Two low-power seed lasers were amplified by a factor of 14.4 dB and 23.7 dB for 1064 nm and 1548 nm, respectively and used in a nonlinear DFG setup to generate 1.14 mW of radiation centered at 3.4 μm. The system allowed for open-path detection of methane (CH(4)) in ambient air with estimated minimum detectable concentration at a level of 26 ppbv.

  11. The pattern of cell wall deterioration in lignocellulose fibers throughout enzymatic cellulose hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinping; Clarke, Kimberley; Li, Kecheng; Chen, Aicheng

    2012-01-01

    Cell wall deterioration throughout enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass is greatly affected by the chemical composition and the ultrastructure of the fiber cell wall. The resulting pattern of cell wall deterioration will reveal information on cellulose activity throughout enzymatic hydrolysis. This study investigates the progression and morphological changes in lignocellulose fibers throughout enzymatic hydrolysis, using (transmission electron microscopy) TEM and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). Softwood thermo-mechanical pulp (STMP) and softwood bleached kraft pulp (SBKP), lignocellulose substrates containing almost all the original fiber composition, and with lignin and some hemicellulose removed, respectively, was compared for morphology changes throughout hydrolysis. The difference of conversion between STMP and SBKP after 48 h of enzymatic hydrolysis is 11 and 88%, respectively. TEM images revealed an even fiber cell wall cross section density, with uneven middle lamella coverage in STMP fibers. SKBP fibers exhibited some spaces between cell wall and lamella layers due to the removal of lignin and some hemicellulose. After 1 h hydrolysis in SBKP fibers, there were more changes in the fiber cross-sectional area than after 10 h hydrolysis in STMP fibers. Cell wall degradation was uneven, and originated in accessible cellulose throughout the fiber cell wall. FE-SEM images illustrated more morphology changes in SBKP fibers than STMP fibers. Enzymatic action of STMP fiber resulted in a smoother fiber surface, along with fiber peeling and the formation of ribbon-disjunction layers. SBKP fibers exhibited structural changes such as fiber erosion, fiber cutting, and fiber splitting throughout enzymatic hydrolysis.

  12. Low-temperature processed SnO2 compact layer for efficient mesostructure perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jinxia; Xiong, Qiu; Feng, Bingjie; Xu, Yang; Zhang, Jun; Wang, Hao

    2017-01-01

    SnO2 nanoparticle film has been synthesized via low- temperature (∼180 °C) solution-processing and proposed as compact layer in mesostructure perovskite-type solar cell (PSC). Low-temperature processed SnO2 compact layer (cl-SnO2) brings perfect crystal-lattice and band-gap matching between electron selective layer and FTO substrate and close interface-contact between cl-SnO2 and mesoporous TiO2 layer (mp-TiO2), which contributes to suppressing carrier recombination and optimizing device performance. In varied thickness cells, 70 nm cl-SnO2 device exhibits maximum power conversion efficiency (PCE). In order to further restrain photoelectron recombination and improve the photovoltaic performance, the surface modification of cl-SnO2 by SnCl4 aqueous solution has been carried out. The recombination behavior in the cell interior is greatly retarded via SnCl4 treatment and champion PSC after SnCl4 treatment has acquire PCE of 15.07%, which is higher than PCE of cl-TiO2 based PSC fabricated with same mp-TiO2 and perovskite procedures (13.3%). The stability of cl-SnO2 PSC via SnCl4 treatment has also been measured and its PCE reduces to 13.0% after 2 weeks in air.

  13. C60 as an Efficient n-Type Compact Layer in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Wojciechowski, Konrad; Leijtens, Tomas; Siprova, Svetlana; Schlueter, Christoph; Hörantner, Maximilian T; Wang, Jacob Tse-Wei; Li, Chang-Zhi; Jen, Alex K-Y; Lee, Tien-Lin; Snaith, Henry J

    2015-06-18

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells have rapidly evolved over the last 3 years. There are still a number of issues and open questions related to the perovskite material, such as the phenomenon of anomalous hysteresis in current-voltage characteristics and long-term stability of the devices. In this work, we focus on the electron selective contact in the perovskite solar cells and physical processes occurring at that heterojunction. We developed efficient devices by replacing the commonly employed TiO2 compact layer with fullerene C60 in a regular n-i-p architecture. Detailed spectroscopic characterization allows us to present further insight into the nature of photocurrent hysteresis and charge extraction limitations arising at the n-type contact in a standard device. Furthermore, we show preliminary stability data of perovskite solar cells under working conditions, suggesting that an n-type organic charge collection layer can increase the long-term performance.

  14. Compact Layer Free Perovskite Solar Cells with a High-Mobility Hole-Transporting Layer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qianqian; Bao, Xichang; Yu, Jianhua; Zhu, Dangqiang; Qiu, Meng; Yang, Renqiang; Dong, Lifeng

    2016-02-03

    A high-mobility diketopyrrolopyrrole-based copolymer (P) was employed in compact layer free CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells as a hole-transporting layer (HTL). By using the P-HTL, the 6.62% device efficiency with conventional poly-3-hexylthiophene was increased to 10.80% in the simple device configuration (ITO/CH3NH3PbI3/HTL/MoO3/Ag). With improved short circuit current density, open circuit voltage, and fill factor, the higher power conversion efficiency of P-HTL device is ascribed to the higher carrier mobility, more suitable energy level, and lower interfacial charge recombination. Advantages of applying P-HTL to perovskite solar cells, such as low cost, low-temperature processing, and excellent performance with simple cell structure, exhibit a possibility for commercial applications.

  15. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2016:chap 213. National Research Council. Dietary reference intakes for energy, carbohydrate, fiber, fat, fatty acids, cholesterol, protein, and amino acids (macronutrients). The National Academies Press. ...

  16. Neuregulin 1 functionalization of organic fibers for Schwann cell guidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonazzini, Ilaria; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario; Cecchini, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The repair of peripheral nerve lesions is a clinical problem where the functional recovery is often far from being satisfactory, although peripheral nerves generally retain good potential for regeneration. Here, we develop a novel scaffold approach based on bioactive fibers of poly(ε-caprolactone) where nanotopographical guidance and neuregulin 1 (NRG1) cues are combined. We interface them with rat primary Schwann cells (SCs), the peripheral glial cells that drive initial regeneration of injured nerves, and found that the combination of NRG1 with parallel nano-fibrous topographies is effective in improving SC growth up to 72 h, alignment to fiber topography, and bipolar differentiation, opening original perspectives for nerve repair applications.

  17. Chromatin Degradation in Differentiating Fiber Cells of the Eye Lens

    PubMed Central

    Bassnett, Steven; Mataic, Danijela

    1997-01-01

    During development, the lens of the eye becomes transparent, in part because of the elimination of nuclei and other organelles from the central lens fiber cells by an apoptotic-like mechanism. Using confocal microscopy we showed that, at the border of the organelle-free zone (OFZ), fiber cell nuclei became suddenly irregular in shape, with marginalized chromatin. Subsequently, holes appeared in the nuclear envelope and underlying laminae, and the nuclei collapsed into condensed, spherical structures. Nuclear remnants, containing DNA, histones, lamin B2, and fragments of nuclear membrane, were detected deep in the OFZ. We used in situ electrophoresis to demonstrate that fragmented DNA was present only in cells bordering the OFZ. Confocal microscopy of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)–labeled lens slices confirmed that DNA fragmentation was a relatively late event in fiber differentiation, occurring after the loss of the nuclear membrane. DNA fragments with 3′-OH or 3′-PO4 ends were not observed elsewhere in the lens under normal conditions, although they could be produced by pretreatment with DNase I or micrococcal nuclease, respectively. Dual labeling with TdT and an antibody against protein disulfide isomerase, an ER-resident protein, revealed a distinct spatial and temporal gap between the disappearance of ER and nuclear membranes and the onset of DNA degradation. Thus, fiber cell chromatin disassembly differs significantly from classical apoptosis, in both the sequence of events and the time course of the process. The fact that DNA degradation occurs only after the disappearance of mitochondrial, ER, and nuclear membranes suggests that damage to intracellular membranes may be an initiating event in nuclear breakdown. PMID:9105035

  18. Hollow fibers - Their applications to the study of mammalian cell function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Angeline, M.; Harkness, J.; Chu, M.; Grindleland, R.

    1984-01-01

    The use of hollow fiber technology in cell culture and transplantation is examined. The morphologies of encapsulated pituitary cells before and after implantation into the rat are defined. Implantation experiments using hollow fibers to study mammalian cell functions are described. Consideration is given to examining somatotroph, prolactin, prostrate, fibroblast, and retinal cell functions. These experiments demonstrate that hollow fiber technology is applicable for studying mammalian cell functions.

  19. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix.

    PubMed

    Stankus, John J; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R

    2006-02-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (p<0.05). Fluorescent imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining further illustrated high cell densities integrated between the elastomeric fibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1,700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues.

  20. Microintegrating smooth muscle cells into a biodegradable, elastomeric fiber matrix

    PubMed Central

    Stankus, John J.; Guan, Jianjun; Fujimoto, Kazuro; Wagner, William R.

    2010-01-01

    Electrospinning permits fabrication of biodegradable elastomers into matrices that can resemble the scale and mechanical behavior of the native extracellular matrix. However, achieving high-cellular density and infiltration with this technique remains challenging and time consuming. We have overcome this limitation by electrospraying vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) concurrently with electrospinning a biodegradable, elastomeric poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU). Trypan blue staining revealed no significant decrease in cell viability from the fabrication process and electrosprayed SMCs spread and proliferated similar to control unprocessed SMCs. The resulting SMC microintegrated PEUU constructs were cultured under static conditions or transmural perfusion. Higher cell numbers resulted with perfusion culture with 131% and 98% more viable cells versus static culture at days 4 and 7 (p < 0.05). Fluorescent imaging and hematoxylin and eosin staining further illustrated high cell densities integrated between the elastomeric fibers after perfusion culture. SMC microintegrated PEUU was strong, flexible and anisotropic with tensile strengths ranging from 2.0 to 6.5 MPa and breaking strains from 850 to 1700% dependent on the material axis. The ability to microintegrate smooth muscle or other cell types into a biodegradable elastomer fiber matrix embodies a novel tissue engineering approach that could be applied to fabricate high cell density elastic tissue mimetics, blood vessels or other cardiovascular tissues. PMID:16095685

  1. Low-Temperature TiOx Compact Layer for Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zonghao; Chen, Qi; Hong, Ziruo; Zhou, Huanping; Xu, Xiaobao; De Marco, Nicholas; Sun, Pengyu; Zhao, Zhixin; Cheng, Yi-Bing; Yang, Yang

    2016-05-04

    Here, we demonstrate an effective low-temperature approach to fabricate a uniform and pinhole-free compact TiO2 layer for enhancing photovoltaic performance of perovskite solar cells. TiCl4 was used to modify TiO2 for efficient charge generation and significantly reduced recombination loss. We found that a TiO2 layer with an appropriate TiCl4 treatment possesses a smooth surface with full coverage of the conductive electrode. Further studies on charge carrier dynamics confirmed that the TiCl4 treatment improves the contact of the TiO2/perovskite interface, facilitating charge extraction and suppressing charge recombination. On the basis of the treatment, we improved the open circuit voltage from 1.01 V of the reference cell to 1.08 V, and achieved a power conversion efficiency of 16.4%.

  2. Ultra-compact TDLAS humidity measurement cell with advanced signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, A.; Strzoda, R.; Schrobenhauser, R.; Weigel, R.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy humidity measurements with an ultra-compact measurement cell are presented. The optical path length is 2 cm. The system uses a vertical cavity surface emitting laser at 1.854 μm. The main limiting factor of the humidity resolution is not the noise but interference fringes produced by reflecting surfaces. Next to the system setup, a novel rejection method to eliminate these fringes, based on Fourier domain analysis of the absorption line, is described. In contrast to other fringe rejection methods, the presented method is able to handle fringes, whose free spectral range is in the range of the half width of the absorption line. The achievable humidity resolution for the presented cell is below 0.25 % relative humidity at room temperature.

  3. Flexible and dynamic nucleosome fiber in living mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Tadasu; Kaizu, Kazunari; Pack, Chan-Gi; Tamura, Sachiko; Tani, Tomomi; Hihara, Saera; Nagai, Takeharu; Takahashi, Koichi; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Genomic DNA is organized three dimensionally within cells as chromatin and is searched and read by various proteins by an unknown mechanism; this mediates diverse cell functions. Recently, several pieces of evidence, including our cryomicroscopy and synchrotron X-ray scattering analyses, have demonstrated that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibers without a 30-nm chromatin fiber (i.e., a polymer melt-like structure). This melt-like structure implies a less physically constrained and locally more dynamic state, which may be crucial for protein factors to scan genomic DNA. Using a combined approach of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, Monte Carlo computer simulations, and single nucleosome imaging, we demonstrated the flexible and dynamic nature of the nucleosome fiber in living mammalian cells. We observed local nucleosome fluctuation (~50 nm movement/30 ms) caused by Brownian motion. Our in vivo/in silico results suggest that local nucleosome dynamics facilitate chromatin accessibility and play a critical role in the scanning of genome information.

  4. A super-compact metamaterial absorber cell in L-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Z. X.; Yuan, F. G.; Li, L. H.

    2014-05-01

    A super-compact metamaterial absorber (SMA) unit cell in L band (1-2 GHz) is proposed, which is composed of a pair of electric ring resonator (ERR) and its complementary ERR (CERR) with a high dielectric substrate sandwiched in between. The CERR has a cross sectional area where approximately the etched copper foil in ERR is now retained, and the remaining region is now etched. In contract with quarter-wavelength (λ /4) thickness which is required for conventional absorbers, the largest in-plane dimension and thickness of the SMA cell are only λ /33 and λ /250, respectively, leading to a super compact cell volume. While traditionally the long straight wire is introduced in electric-LC resonators for increasing inductance, the CERR achieves similar inductance with much shorter lengths. Thus, its cell dimensions can be drastically reduced without compromising its performance. In addition, simulations together with an automated phase correction algorithm show that the SMA is a type of metamaterial possessing simultaneous negative electric permittivity (NEP) and negative magnetic permeability (NMP). Further the SMA has a very large imaginary part of the NEP and NMP, resulting in significantly large imaginary part of the refractive index at resonant frequency. These properties are well suited to design excellent absorbers. In addition, numerical results demonstrate that the maximum absorption coefficient of the SMA can reach greater than 99% at resonant frequency, and the full-width half-maximum is roughly 1% of the operating frequency, and a wide incident angle of ±49° over 90% absorption. Meanwhile, it is pointed out that this type of absorber is rather sensitive to polarization characteristic of the incident electromagnetic wave.

  5. A super-compact metamaterial absorber cell in L-band

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Z. X.; Yuan, F. G.; Li, L. H.

    2014-05-14

    A super-compact metamaterial absorber (SMA) unit cell in L band (1–2 GHz) is proposed, which is composed of a pair of electric ring resonator (ERR) and its complementary ERR (CERR) with a high dielectric substrate sandwiched in between. The CERR has a cross sectional area where approximately the etched copper foil in ERR is now retained, and the remaining region is now etched. In contract with quarter-wavelength (λ/4) thickness which is required for conventional absorbers, the largest in-plane dimension and thickness of the SMA cell are only λ/33 and λ/250, respectively, leading to a super compact cell volume. While traditionally the long straight wire is introduced in electric-LC resonators for increasing inductance, the CERR achieves similar inductance with much shorter lengths. Thus, its cell dimensions can be drastically reduced without compromising its performance. In addition, simulations together with an automated phase correction algorithm show that the SMA is a type of metamaterial possessing simultaneous negative electric permittivity (NEP) and negative magnetic permeability (NMP). Further the SMA has a very large imaginary part of the NEP and NMP, resulting in significantly large imaginary part of the refractive index at resonant frequency. These properties are well suited to design excellent absorbers. In addition, numerical results demonstrate that the maximum absorption coefficient of the SMA can reach greater than 99% at resonant frequency, and the full-width half-maximum is roughly 1% of the operating frequency, and a wide incident angle of ±49° over 90% absorption. Meanwhile, it is pointed out that this type of absorber is rather sensitive to polarization characteristic of the incident electromagnetic wave.

  6. The function of a TiO2 compact layer in dye-sensitized solar cells incorporating "planar" organic dyes.

    PubMed

    Burke, Anthony; Ito, Seigo; Snaith, Henry; Bach, Udo; Kwiatkowski, Joe; Grätzel, Michael

    2008-04-01

    We present a device based study into the operation of liquid electrolyte dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC's) using organic dyes. We find that, for these systems, it is entirely necessary to employ a compact TiO2 layer between the transparent fluorine doped SnO2 (FTO) anode and the electrolyte in order to reduce charge recombination losses. By incorporation of a compact layer, the device efficiency can be increased by over 160% under simulated full sun illumination and more than doubled at lower light intensities. This is strong evidence that the more widely employed ruthenium based sensitizers act as to "insulate" the anode against recombination losses and that many planar organic dyes employed in DSSC's could greatly benefit from the use of a compact TiO2 blocking layer. This is in strong contrast to DSSC's sensitized with ruthenium based systems, where the introduction of compact TiO2 has only marginal effects on conversion efficiencies.

  7. Frequency stabilization of a 2.05 μm laser using hollow-core fiber CO2 frequency reference cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meras, Patrick; Poberezhskiy, Ilya Y.; Chang, Daniel H.; Spiers, Gary D.

    2010-04-01

    We have designed and built a hollow-core fiber frequency reference cell, filled it with CO2, and used it to demonstrate frequency stabilization of a 2.05 μm Tm:Ho:YLF laser using frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy technique. The frequency reference cell is housed in a compact and robust hermetic package that contains a several meter long hollow-core photonic crystal fiber optically coupled to index-guiding fibers with a fusion splice on one end and a mechanical splice on the other end. The package has connectorized fiber pigtails and a valve used to evacuate, refill it, or adjust the gas pressure. We have demonstrated laser frequency standard deviation decreasing from >450MHz (free-running) to <2.4MHz (stabilized). The 2.05 μm laser wavelength is of particular interest for spectroscopic instruments due to the presence of many CO2 and H20 absorption lines in its vicinity. To our knowledge, this is the first reported demonstration of laser frequency stabilization at this wavelength using a hollow-core fiber reference cell. This approach enables all-fiber implementation of the optical portion of laser frequency stabilization system, thus making it dramatically more lightweight, compact, and robust than the traditional free-space version that utilizes glass or metal gas cells. It can also provide much longer interaction length of light with gas and does not require any alignment. The demonstrated frequency reference cell is particularly attractive for use in aircraft and space coherent lidar instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 profile.

  8. E-Spun Composite Fibers of Collagen and Dragline Silk Protein: Fiber Mechanics, Biocompatibility, and Application in Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Biocomposite matrices with high mechanical strength, high stability, and the ability to direct matrix-specific stem cell differentiation are essential for the reconstruction of lesioned tissues in tissue engineering and cell therapeutics. Toward this end, we used the electrospinning technique to fabricate well-aligned composite fibers from collagen and spider dragline silk protein, obtained from the milk of transgenic goats, mimicking the native extracellular matrix (ECM) on a similar scale. Collagen and the dragline silk proteins were found to mix homogeneously at all ratios in the electrospun (E-spun) fibers. As a result, the ultimate tensile strength and elasticity of the fibers increased monotonically with silk percentage, whereas the stretchability was slightly reduced. Strikingly, we found that the incorporation of silk proteins to collagen dramatically increased the matrix stability against excessive fiber swelling and shape deformation in cell culture medium. When human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) were seeded on the collagen–silk matrices, the matrices were found to support cell proliferation at a similar rate as that of the pure collagen matrix, but they provided cell adhesion with reduced strengths and induced cell polarization at varied levels. Matrices containing 15 and 30 wt % silk in collagen (CS15, CS30) were found to induce a level of neural differentiation comparable to that of pure collagen. In particular, CS15 matrix induced the highest extent of cell polarization and promoted the development of extended 1D neural filaments strictly in-line with the aligned fibers. Taking the increased mechanical strength and fiber stability into consideration, CS15 and CS30 E-spun fibers offer better alternatives to pure collagen fibers as scaffolds that can be potentially utilized in neural tissue repair and the development of future nanobiodevices. PMID:25405355

  9. A compact diode laser based all-fiber delivery system for PDT+PTT with integrated temperature sensing capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassino, Riccardo; Kokalari, Ida; Vallan, Alberto; Fenoglio, Ivana; Perrone, Guido

    2017-02-01

    The paper first reviews the main laser based cancer therapies and then presents a new 9xx nm high power laser diode system specifically devised to irradiate carbon graphitic nanoparticles that have shown photodynamic and photo-thermal behavior when exposed to near-IR laser light. The peculiarity of the laser system is that its delivery is through a fiber probe that integrates Bragg gratings to allow monitoring the induced temperature increase without introducing artifacts due to the interaction with the laser beam. Experimental validations through EPR spectrum and temperature measurements on hydroxylated fullerene and carbon nanoparticle samples are provided to assess the effectiveness of the developed system.

  10. High-energy picosecond hybrid fiber/crystal laser for thin films solar cells micromachining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecourt, Jean-Bernard; Boivinet, Simon; Bertrand, Anthony; Lekime, Didier; Hernandez, Yves

    2015-05-01

    We report on an hybrid fiber/crystal ultra-short pulsed laser delivering high pulse energy and high peak power in the picosecond regime. The laser is composed of a mode-lock fiber oscillator, a pulse picker and subsequent fiber amplifiers. The last stage of the laser is a single pass Nd:YVO4 solid-state amplifier. We believe that this combination of both technologies is a very promising approach for making efficient, compact and low cost lasers compatible with industrial requirements.

  11. Cell Attachment to Hydrogel-Electrospun Fiber Mat Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ning; Johnson, Jed K.; Bradley, Patrick A.; Parikh, Kunal S.; Lannutti, John J.; Winter, Jessica O.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels, electrospun fiber mats (EFMs), and their composites have been extensively studied for tissue engineering because of their physical and chemical similarity to native biological systems. However, while chemically similar, hydrogels and electrospun fiber mats display very different topographical features. Here, we examine the influence of surface topography and composition of hydrogels, EFMs, and hydrogel-EFM composites on cell behavior. Materials studied were composed of synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEGPCL) hydrogels and electrospun poly(caprolactone) (PCL) and core/shell PCL/PEGPCL constituent materials. The number of adherent cells and cell circularity were most strongly influenced by the fibrous nature of materials (e.g., topography), whereas cell spreading was more strongly influenced by material composition (e.g., chemistry). These results suggest that cell attachment and proliferation to hydrogel-EFM composites can be tuned by varying these properties to provide important insights for the future design of such composite materials. PMID:24955629

  12. Production of cell-free xanthan fermentation broth by cell adsorption on fibers

    PubMed

    Yang; Lo; Chattopadhyay

    1998-03-01

    Xanthan gum is a microbial polysaccharide widely used in food and oil-drilling industries. Xanthan gum produced from the current commercial fermentation process usually contains cells and cell debris, which lower the filterability of the xanthan solution and limit its applications. The production of cell-free xanthan gum fermentation broth is thus desirable. The feasibility of removing cells from the xanthan fermentation broth by cell adsorption to various woven fibrous materials was studied. It was found that both cotton and polyester fibers could be used to adsorb Xanthomonas campestris cells present in the fermentation broth either during batch fermentation or after the fermentation. Almost all cells were removed from the fermentation broth by adsorption to fibers. Cotton terry cloth had rough surfaces and was the preferred material for cell adsorption. Cell adsorption to cotton was faster than to polyester fibers. The adsorption kinetics can be modeled by a first-order rate equation. The adsorption rate constants were 30-40% higher for cotton than for polyester. Cell adsorption was not efficient in the absence of xanthan gum, suggesting that the exopolysaccharide, xanthan gum, was important for efficient cell adsorption to fibers.

  13. The nuclear envelope in the crystalline lens fiber cell.

    PubMed

    Harding, C V; Susan, S R

    1976-05-01

    Rabbit lenses which have been fixed, dehydrated, and dried by a critical-point drying method, can be fractured through the cytoplasm of the differentiating lens fibers, exposing the cell nuclei. The fracture, under these conditions, causes a complete separation of the two membranes of the nuclear envelope from one another, thus exposing entire membrane surfaces (those which line the perinuclear space). These surfaces are not seen in their entirety in typical freeze-fracture or freeze-etch preparations, and consequently have not been described previously. The exposed membrane surfaces which line the perinuclear space have numerous convex structures of approximately 1,000 A, and some larger more irregularly shaped structures. These appear to be fragments of the nuclear pore complexes. Differences in these structures between young fibers and those nearing completion of differentiation is suggested.

  14. Fiber diameters control osteoblastic cell migration and differentiation in electrospun gelatin.

    PubMed

    Sisson, Kristin; Zhang, Chu; Farach-Carson, Mary C; Chase, D Bruce; Rabolt, John F

    2010-09-15

    Defined electrospinning conditions were used to create scaffolds with different fiber diameters to investigate their interactions with osteoblastic MG63 cells. Nonwoven gelatin scaffolds were electrospun with varied fiber diameters to investigate the effect of fiber size and resultant porosity on cell proliferation, viability, migration, and differentiation. The low toxicity solvent acetic acid:ethyl acetate:water ratio and gelatin concentrations were optimized to create small and large diameter fibers. The fiber diameters obtained by this procedure were 110 +/- 40 nm for the small and 600 +/- 110 nm for the large fibers. Cell viability assays showed that MG63 cells grew similarly on both fibers at the early time point (day 3) but preferred the scaffold with large diameter fibers by the later time points (day 5 and day 7). Confocal microscopic imaging showed that MG63 cells migrated poorly (maximum depth of 18 microm) into the scaffold of small diameter fibers, but readily penetrated (maximum depth of 50 microm) into the scaffold of large diameter fibers. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assays showed that MG63 cells differentiated on scaffolds made from both diameter fibers. In longer term experiments, MG63 cells differentiated to a greater extent on scaffolds made from small diameter fibers compared to large diameter fibers at days 3 and 7, but the ALP levels were the same for both diameter fibers by day 14. These results indicate that cells can perceive differences in the diameter and resultant pore size of electrospun gelatin fibers and that they process this information to alter their behavior.

  15. A compactly integrated flow cell with a chemiluminescent FIA system for determining lactate concentration in serum.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, H; Murakami, Y; Yokoyama, K; Tamiya, E; Karube, I; Suda, M; Uchiyama, S

    2001-01-15

    We have fabricated an integrated flow cell as a total microanalysis system (microTAS). This flow cell (size, 15 x 20 mm; total inner volume, 12.2 microL) was designed for a rational analyzing system of lactate determination for serum. This cell was made by micromachining techniques and consisted of two hollows of a lactate oxidase (LOD) reactor and a mixing cell, a spiral groove, and three penetrated holes. To form the reactor and capillary, these patterns, etched on a silicon wafer, were attached to a glass plate by the anodic bonding method. A photodiode was put under part of the spiral capillary. The compactly accumulated devices were integrated into a flow injection analysis (FIA) system. In the flow cell, lactate was catalyzed to pyruvate and hydrogen peroxide at the LOD reactor; subsequently, hydrogen peroxide reacted with the luminol-ferricyanic reagent at the mixing cell. The resulting chemiluminescent light was detected by the photodiode. Using the miniaturized flow cell, the sample volume for one measurement was greatly reduced to 0.2 microL. The response to lactate was obtained within 30 s and was linear between 0.5 and 5.0 mM (4.5 and 45 mg/dL) lactate with excellent correlative variances of 3.2% (average of three measurements at 5.0 mM). For practical application, the lactate concentration in control human serum was determined using this system. The results showed a good correlation coefficient (r = 0.979) with the results obtained by the spectrophotometric reference method. No difference in sera (normal or pathological) was found. Consequently, this integrated flow cell shows potential as a clinical device for lactate determination in serum. In this article, the effect of the design on the chemiluminescent FIA system is also described.

  16. The control of cell orientation using biodegradable alginate fibers fabricated by near-field electrospinning.

    PubMed

    Fuh, Yiin-Kuen; Wu, Yun-Chung; He, Zhe-Yu; Huang, Zih-Ming; Hu, Wei-Wen

    2016-05-01

    For spatially controlling cell alignment, near field electrospinning (NFES) was developed to direct-write alginate fiber patterns. Compared to randomly electrospun fibers, NFES fibers guided the extension of HEK 293T cells and the levels of cell alignment increased with decreasing fiber distances. However, these guiding fibers were unfavorable for cell adhesion and limited cell growth. To preserve cell alignment ability and improve biocompatibility, the stability of patterned alginate fibers was adjusted by regulating the level of ion crosslinking. These partially crosslinked NFES fibers demonstrated parallel line-patterns in the initial stage while gradually degraded with time. The reduction of fiber density increased the available area for cell growth and enhanced cell viability. On the other hand, aligned cells were still found on these degraded patterns, suggesting that cell morphologies were mainly guided during cell seeding. This dynamically controlled fiber pattern system fulfilled the need of controlling cell orientation and biocompatibility, thus was potential to modify scaffold surfaces for tissue engineering application.

  17. Enhanced Performance of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells with Nanostructure InN Compact Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Cheng-Chiang; Chen, Lung-Chien; Kuo, Shu-Jung

    2013-05-01

    This study presents a dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) with a nanostructured InN compact layer (InN-CPL). The effect of a nanostructured InN-CPL in a DSSC structure prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering was examined. The InN-CPL effectively reduces the back reaction at the interface between the indium tin oxide (ITO) transparent conductive film and the electrolyte in the DSSC. DSSCs fabricated on ITO/InN-CPL/TiO2/D719 exhibited a short-circuit current density (JSC), open-circuit voltage (VOC), and power conversion efficiency (η) of 23.2 mA/cm2, 0.7 V, and 8.9%, respectively.

  18. Compact portable biosensor for arsenic detection in aqueous samples with Escherichia coli bioreporter cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truffer, Frederic; Buffi, Nina; Merulla, Davide; Beggah, Siham; van Lintel, Harald; Renaud, Philippe; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Geiser, Martial

    2014-01-01

    We present a compact portable biosensor to measure arsenic As(III) concentrations in water using Escherichia coli bioreporter cells. Escherichia coli expresses green fluorescent protein in a linearly dependent manner as a function of the arsenic concentration (between 0 and 100 μg/L). The device accommodates a small polydimethylsiloxane microfluidic chip that holds the agarose-encapsulated bacteria, and a complete optical illumination/collection/detection system for automated quantitative fluorescence measurements. The device is capable of sampling water autonomously, controlling the whole measurement, storing and transmitting data over GSM networks. We demonstrate highly reproducible measurements of arsenic in drinking water at 10 and 50 μg/L within 100 and 80 min, respectively.

  19. Cost-effective and compact wide-field fluorescent imaging on a cell-phone.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Su, Ting-Wei; Tseng, Derek; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2011-01-21

    We demonstrate wide-field fluorescent and darkfield imaging on a cell-phone with compact, light-weight and cost-effective optical components that are mechanically attached to the existing camera unit of the cell-phone. For this purpose, we used battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to pump the sample of interest from the side using butt-coupling, where the pump light was guided within the sample cuvette to uniformly excite the specimen. The fluorescent emission from the sample was then imaged using an additional lens that was positioned right in front of the existing lens of the cell-phone camera. Because the excitation occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to our detection path, an inexpensive plastic colour filter was sufficient to create the dark-field background required for fluorescent imaging, without the need for a thin-film interference filter. We validate the performance of this platform by imaging various fluorescent micro-objects in 2 colours (i.e., red and green) over a large field-of-view (FOV) of ∼81 mm(2) with a raw spatial resolution of ∼20 μm. With additional digital processing of the captured cell-phone images, through the use of compressive sampling theory, we demonstrate ∼2 fold improvement in our resolving power, achieving ∼10 μm resolution without a trade-off in our FOV. Further, we also demonstrate darkfield imaging of non-fluorescent specimen using the same interface, where this time the scattered light from the objects is detected without the use of any filters. The capability of imaging a wide FOV would be exceedingly important to probe large sample volumes (e.g., >0.1 mL) of e.g., blood, urine, sputum or water, and for this end we also demonstrate fluorescent imaging of labeled white-blood cells from whole blood samples, as well as water-borne pathogenic protozoan parasites such as Giardia Lamblia cysts. Weighing only ∼28 g (∼1 ounce), this compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform

  20. Cost-effective and compact wide-field fluorescent imaging on a cell-phone†

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hongying; Yaglidere, Oguzhan; Su, Ting-Wei; Tseng, Derek

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate wide-field fluorescent and darkfield imaging on a cell-phone with compact, light-weight and cost-effective optical components that are mechanically attached to the existing camera unit of the cell-phone. For this purpose, we used battery powered light-emitting diodes (LEDs) to pump the sample of interest from the side using butt-coupling, where the pump light was guided within the sample cuvette to uniformly excite the specimen. The fluorescent emission from the sample was then imaged using an additional lens that was positioned right in front of the existing lens of the cell-phone camera. Because the excitation occurs through guided waves that propagate perpendicular to our detection path, an inexpensive plastic colour filter was sufficient to create the dark-field background required for fluorescent imaging, without the need for a thin-film interference filter. We validate the performance of this platform by imaging various fluorescent micro-objects in 2 colours (i.e., red and green) over a large field-of-view (FOV) of ~81 mm2 with a raw spatial resolution of ~20 μm. With additional digital processing of the captured cell-phone images, through the use of compressive sampling theory, we demonstrate ~2 fold improvement in our resolving power, achieving ~10 μm resolution without a trade-off in our FOV. Further, we also demonstrate darkfield imaging of non-fluorescent specimen using the same interface, where this time the scattered light from the objects is detected without the use of any filters. The capability of imaging a wide FOV would be exceedingly important to probe large sample volumes (e.g., >0.1 mL) of e.g., blood, urine, sputum or water, and for this end we also demonstrate fluorescent imaging of labeled white-blood cells from whole blood samples, as well as water-borne pathogenic protozoan parasites such as Giardia Lamblia cysts. Weighing only ~28 g (~1 ounce), this compact and cost-effective fluorescent imaging platform attached to a

  1. Antigens protected functional red blood cells by the membrane grafting of compact hyperbranched polyglycerols.

    PubMed

    Chapanian, Rafi; Constantinescu, Iren; Brooks, Donald E; Scott, Mark D; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran

    2013-01-02

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion is vital for the treatment of a number of acute and chronic medical problems such as thalassemia major and sickle cell anemia. Due to the presence of multitude of antigens on the RBC surface (~308 known antigens), patients in the chronic blood transfusion therapy develop alloantibodies due to the miss match of minor antigens on transfused RBCs. Grafting of hydrophilic polymers such as polyethylene glycol (PEG) and hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) forms an exclusion layer on RBC membrane that prevents the interaction of antibodies with surface antigens without affecting the passage of small molecules such as oxygen, glucose, and ions. At present no method is available for the generation of universal red blood donor cells in part because of the daunting challenge presented by the presence of large number of antigens (protein and carbohydrate based) on the RBC surface and the development of such methods will significantly improve transfusion safety, and dramatically improve the availability and use of RBCs. In this report, the experiments that are used to develop antigen protected functional RBCs by the membrane grafting of HPG and their characterization are presented. HPGs are highly biocompatible compact polymers, and are expected to be located within the cell glycocalyx that surrounds the lipid membrane and mask RBC surface antigens.

  2. Liquid crystal cells and optical fibers in neural network implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domanski, Andrzej W.; Buczynski, Ryszard; Sierakowski, Marek W.

    1995-08-01

    Optical binary computer may be as easy to operate as parallel system. For such configuration Boolean logic is not very convenient and therefore neural networks should be introduced. In works leading to the paper we used liquid crystal cells as a standard system of liquid crystalline layer between to conducting electrodes in 'sandwich' geometry. We have used 25 micrometers display cells filled with nematic 6CHBT working on 'twisted nematic' effect. Based on such elements a mode of a simple Hopfield network was set up. More advanced experiments were carried out on a model of neurone with supervised learning. The model consists of four laser diodes pigtailed to the multimode optical fibers with 50 micrometers core diameter. The directional couplers help to control the level of input optical power. Four liquid crystal cells allow to change the transmission level according to superivised learning requirements. All the signals were detected by one photodiode. The presented results of experiments are in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. An additional study was done to check the possibility to build up a linear neural network with Grossberg layer, a neural network with Kohonen layer, and a counter propagation network with two layers of neurones. We have proved that such models may be set up based on simple liquid crystals cells and optical fiber networks.

  3. Hypoxic stellate cells of pancreatic cancer stroma regulate extracellular matrix fiber organization and cancer cell motility.

    PubMed

    Sada, Masafumi; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Horioka, Kohei; Okumura, Takashi; Moriyama, Taiki; Miyasaka, Yoshihiro; Ohtsuka, Takao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Oda, Yoshinao; Nakamura, Masafumi

    2016-03-28

    Desmoplasia and hypoxia in pancreatic cancer mutually affect each other and create a tumor-supportive microenvironment. Here, we show that microenvironment remodeling by hypoxic pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) promotes cancer cell motility through alteration of extracellular matrix (ECM) fiber architecture. Three-dimensional (3-D) matrices derived from PSCs under hypoxia exhibited highly organized parallel-patterned matrix fibers compared with 3-D matrices derived from PSCs under normoxia, and promoted cancer cell motility by inducing directional migration of cancer cells due to the parallel fiber architecture. Microarray analysis revealed that procollagen-lysine, 2-oxoglutarate 5-dioxygenase 2 (PLOD2) in PSCs was the gene that potentially regulates ECM fiber architecture under hypoxia. Stromal PLOD2 expression in surgical specimens of pancreatic cancer was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. RNA interference-mediated knockdown of PLOD2 in PSCs blocked parallel fiber architecture of 3-D matrices, leading to decreased directional migration of cancer cells within the matrices. In conclusion, these findings indicate that hypoxia-induced PLOD2 expression in PSCs creates a permissive microenvironment for migration of cancer cells through architectural regulation of stromal ECM in pancreatic cancer.

  4. 14-3-3ε Plays a Role in Cardiac Ventricular Compaction by Regulating the Cardiomyocyte Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Cieslik, Katarzyna A.; Li, Ling; Lezin, George; Maguire, Colin T.; Saijoh, Yukio; Toyo-oka, Kazuhito; Gambello, Michael J.; Vatta, Matteo; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Baldini, Antonio; Yost, H. Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Trabecular myocardium accounts for the majority of the ventricles during early cardiogenesis, but compact myocardium is the primary component at later developmental stages. Elucidation of the genes regulating compact myocardium development is essential to increase our understanding of left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC), a cardiomyopathy characterized by increased ratios of trabecular to compact myocardium. 14-3-3ε is an adapter protein expressed in the lateral plate mesoderm, but its in vivo cardiac functions remain to be defined. Here we show that 14-3-3ε is expressed in the developing mouse heart as well as in cardiomyocytes. 14-3-3ε deletion did not appear to induce compensation by other 14-3-3 isoforms but led to ventricular noncompaction, with features similar to LVNC, resulting from a selective reduction in compact myocardium thickness. Abnormal compaction derived from a 50% decrease in cardiac proliferation as a result of a reduced number of cardiomyocytes in G2/M and the accumulation of cardiomyocytes in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle. These defects originated from downregulation of cyclin E1 and upregulation of p27Kip1, possibly through both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. Our work shows that 14-3-3ε regulates cardiogenesis and growth of the compact ventricular myocardium by modulating the cardiomyocyte cell cycle via both cyclin E1 and p27Kip1. These data are consistent with the long-held view that human LVNC may result from compaction arrest, and they implicate 14-3-3ε as a new candidate gene in congenital human cardiomyopathies. PMID:23071090

  5. Electrospinning of unidirectionally and orthogonally aligned thermoplastic polyurethane nanofibers: Fiber orientation and cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Mi, Hao-Yang; Salick, Max R.; Jing, Xin; Crone, Wendy C.; Peng, Xiang-Fang; Turng, Lih-Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Unidirectionally and orthogonally aligned thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) nanofibers were electrospun using a custom-built electrospinning device. The unidirectionally aligned fibers were collected using two parallel copper plates, and the orthogonally aligned fibers were collected using two orthogonal sets of parallel copper plates with alternate negative connections. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) and polyacrylic acid (PAA) were added to modify the polymer solution. It was found that both CNT and PAA were capable of increasing solution conductivity. The TPU/PAA fiber showed the highest degree of fiber orientation with more than 90% of the fibers having an orientation angle between −10° and 10° for unidirectionally aligned fibers, and for orthogonally aligned fibers, the orientation angle of 50% fibers located between −10° and 10° and 48% fibers located between 80° and 100°. Viability assessment of 3T3 fibroblasts cultured on TPU/PAA fibers suggested that the material was cytocompatible. The cells’ orientation and migration direction closely matched the fibers’ orientation. The cell migration velocity and distance were both enhanced with the guidance of fibers compared with cells cultured on random fibers and common tissue culture plastic. Controlling cell migration velocity and directionality may provide ways to influence differentiation and gene expression and systems that would allow further exploration of wound repair and metastatic cell behavior. PMID:24771704

  6. Functional analyses of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) immature fiber (im) mutant reveal that fiber cell wall development is associated with sensitivity to stress.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Cotton fiber maturity refers the degree of fiber cell wall development and is an important factor for determining commercial value of cotton. The molecular mechanism regulating the fiber cell wall development has not been well characterized. Microscopic image analysis of the cross-sect...

  7. Comprehensive prediction in 78 human cell lines reveals rigidity and compactness of transcription factor dimers

    PubMed Central

    Jankowski, Aleksander; Szczurek, Ewa; Jauch, Ralf; Tiuryn, Jerzy; Prabhakar, Shyam

    2013-01-01

    The binding of transcription factors (TFs) to their specific motifs in genomic regulatory regions is commonly studied in isolation. However, in order to elucidate the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation, it is essential to determine which TFs bind DNA cooperatively as dimers and to infer the precise nature of these interactions. So far, only a small number of such dimeric complexes are known. Here, we present an algorithm for predicting cell-type–specific TF–TF dimerization on DNA on a large scale, using DNase I hypersensitivity data from 78 human cell lines. We represented the universe of possible TF complexes by their corresponding motif complexes, and analyzed their occurrence at cell-type–specific DNase I hypersensitive sites. Based on ∼1.4 billion tests for motif complex enrichment, we predicted 603 highly significant cell-type–specific TF dimers, the vast majority of which are novel. Our predictions included 76% (19/25) of the known dimeric complexes and showed significant overlap with an experimental database of protein–protein interactions. They were also independently supported by evolutionary conservation, as well as quantitative variation in DNase I digestion patterns. Notably, the known and predicted TF dimers were almost always highly compact and rigidly spaced, suggesting that TFs dimerize in close proximity to their partners, which results in strict constraints on the structure of the DNA-bound complex. Overall, our results indicate that chromatin openness profiles are highly predictive of cell-type–specific TF–TF interactions. Moreover, cooperative TF dimerization seems to be a widespread phenomenon, with multiple TF complexes predicted in most cell types. PMID:23554463

  8. A compact CO selective oxidation reactor for solid polymer fuel cell powered vehicle application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudfield, C. D.; Chen, R.; Adcock, P. L.

    Solid polymer fuel cells (SPFCs) are attractive as electrical power plants for vehicle applications since they offer the advantages of high efficiency, zero emissions, and mechanical robustness. Hydrogen is the ideal fuel, but is currently disadvantaged for automotive applications by the lack of refuelling infrastructure, bulky on-board storage, and safety concerns. On-board methanol reforming offers an attractive alternative due to its increased energy storage density. Since CO is always present as a by-product during the reforming reaction, it must be reduced to a level less than 20 ppm in order to avoid rapid deactivation of the platinum electro-catalyst in the fuel cells. In this paper, a compact CO selective oxidation unit based upon two coated aluminium heat exchangers, developed at Loughborough University, is reported. The geometric size of the whole unit is 4 litre and experimental results show that the selective oxidation unit can reduce the CO from up to 2% to less than 15 ppm and is suitable for a vehicle fuel cell power plant of 20 kW e.

  9. Organization of lipids in fiber-cell plasma membranes of the eye lens.

    PubMed

    Subczynski, Witold K; Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; O'Brien, William J

    2017-03-01

    The plasma membrane together with the cytoskeleton forms the only supramolecular structure of the matured fiber cell which accounts for mostly all fiber cell lipids. The purpose of this review is to inform researchers about the importance of the lipid bilayer portion of the lens fiber cell plasma membranes in the maintaining lens homeostasis, and thus protecting against cataract development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  11. A FIBER APPARATUS IN THE NUCLEUS OF THE YEAST CELL

    PubMed Central

    Robinow, C. F.; Marak, J.

    1966-01-01

    The structure and mode of division of the nucleus of budding yeast cells have been studied by phase-contrast microscopy during life and by ordinary microscopy after Helly fixation. The components of the nucleus were differentially stained by the Feulgen procedure, with Giemsa solution after hydrolysis, and with iron alum haematoxylin. New information was obtained in cells fixed in Helly's by directly staining them with 0.005% acid fuchsin in 1% acetic acid in water. Electron micrographs have been made of sections of cells that were first fixed with 3% glutaraldehyde, then divested of their walls with snail juice, and postfixed with osmium tetroxide. Light and electron microscopy have given concordant information about the organization of the yeast nucleus. A peripheral segment of the nucleus is occupied by relatively dense matter (the "peripheral cluster" of Mundkur) which is Feulgen negative. The greater part of the nucleus is filled with fine-grained Feulgen-positive matter of low density in which chromosomes could not be identified. Chromosomes become visible in this region under the light microscope at meiosis. In the chromatin lies a short fiber with strong affinity for acid fuchsin. The nucleus divides by elongation and constriction, and during this process the fiber becomes long and thin. Electron microscopy has resolved it into a bundle of dark-edged 150 to 180 A filaments which extends between "centriolar plaques" that are attached to the nuclear envelope. PMID:5331666

  12. Compact optical particulate characterization based on a tapered-fiber bundle using a holographic ring-wedge detector and optical neural network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Martin S.

    1996-03-01

    A high-speed, compact optical correlation system is presented utilizing a tapered-fiber bundle, a holographic ring-wedge detector, and simple optical neural networks. This study includes three standard classes of unclassified military smokes and obscurants, standard liquid aerosol smokes, fibrous obscurants, and brass flakes. Digital and optical implementations of the holographic ring-wedge detector directly coupled into an optical neural network are studied as a means of increasing the speed of the decision process for particle characterization. This method has the ability to simultaneously recognize and distinguish the particle classes included in this study and to give a size range for spherical particles. Experimental data are presented utilizing a holographic ring detector and optical neural network combination for characterizing the particulates included in this study. A single holographic optical element fabricated to perform the same function as a ring detector and a simple two-layer, feedforward optical neural network are evaluated. Future work will include expanding the capabilities of the system to include more particulate types and to develop a field competent system.

  13. The influence of fiber diameter of electrospun substrates on neural stem cell differentiation and proliferation.

    PubMed

    Christopherson, Gregory T; Song, Hongjun; Mao, Hai-Quan

    2009-02-01

    Neural stem/progenitor cells (NSCs) are capable of self-renewal and differentiation into all types of neural lineage under different biochemical and topographical cues. In this study, we cultured rat hippocampus-derived adult NSCs (rNSCs) on laminin-coated electrospun Polyethersulfone (PES) fiber meshes with average fiber diameters of 283+/-45 nm, 749+/-153 nm and 1452+/-312 nm; and demonstrated that fiber diameter of PES mesh significantly influences rNSC differentiation and proliferation. Under the differentiation condition (in the presence of 1 microM retinoic acid and 1% fetal bovine serum), rNSCs showed a 40% increase in oligodendrocyte differentiation on 283-nm fibers and 20% increase in neuronal differentiation on 749-nm fibers, in comparison to tissue culture polystyrene surface. SEM imaging revealed that cells stretched multi-directionally to follow underlying 283-nm fibers, but extended along a single fiber axis on larger fibers. When cultured on fiber meshes in serum free medium in the presence of 20 ng/mL of FGF-2, rNSCs showed lower proliferation and more rounded morphology compared to that cultured on laminin-coated 2D surface. As the fiber diameter decreased, higher degree of proliferation and cell spreading and lower degree of cell aggregation were observed. This collective evidence indicates fiber topography can play a vital role in regulating differentiation and proliferation of rNSCs in culture.

  14. Continual Cell Deformation Induced via Attachment to Oriented Fibers Enhances Fibroblast Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Sisi; Ricotta, Vincent; Simon, Marcia; Clark, Richard A. F.; Rafailovich, Miriam H.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast migration is critical to the wound healing process. In vivo, migration occurs on fibrillar substrates, and previous observations have shown that a significant time lag exists before the onset of granulation tissue. We therefore conducted a series of experiments to understand the impact of both fibrillar morphology and migration time. Substrate topography was first shown to have a profound influence. Fibroblasts preferentially attach to fibrillar surfaces, and orient their cytoplasm for maximal contact with the fiber edge. In the case of en-mass cell migration out of an agarose droplet, fibroblasts on flat surfaces emerged with an enhanced velocity, v = 52μm/h, that decreases to the single cell value, v = 28μm/h within 24 hours and remained constant for at least four days. Fibroblasts emerging on fibrillar surfaces emerged with the single cell velocity, which remained constant for the first 24 hours and then increased reaching a plateau with more than twice the initial velocity within the next three days. The focal adhesions were distributed uniformly in cells on flat surfaces, while on the fibrillar surface they were clustered along the cell periphery. Furthermore, the number of focal adhesions for the cells on the flat surfaces remained constant, while it decreased on the fibrillar surface during the next three days. The deformation of the cell nuclei was found to be 50% larger on the fiber surfaces for the first 24 hours. While the mean deformation remained constant on the flat surface, it increased for the next three days by 24% in cells on fibers. On the fourth day, large actin/myosin fibers formed in cells on fibrillar surfaces only and coincided with a change from the standard migration mechanism involving extension of lamellipodia, and retraction of the rear, to one involving strong contractions oriented along the fibers and centered about the nucleus. PMID:25774792

  15. Cell-mediated fiber recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices (ECM), we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibers, and bulk contraction of the material. While increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation, increasing fiber stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation depending on network architecture. Lower fiber stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibers, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signaling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fiber recruitment as a novel mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices. PMID:26461445

  16. Growth changes of 3T3 cells in the presence of mineral fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Dumas, L.; Page, M.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between exposure to asbestos fibers and the development of mesothelioma or bronchial carcinoma prompted many countries to ban its use from commercial products. The biological mechanism by which asbestos induces or promotes mesothelioma or carcinoma is still unknown. In order to study the influence of fibers on the cell surface, 3T3 fibroblasts were cultured in the presence of various mineral fibers. The acute cytotoxicity produced by mineral fibers was evaluated by the trypan blue dye exclusion method; growth of 3T3 cells was measured as well as the maximum cell density at saturation. It was found that growth of 3T3 cells was slower in the presence of chrysotile while light microscopy revealed an increased cellular chromogenicity and a modification of the cell-cell arrangement in the presence of this fiber. An assay is described in which chrysotile causes an increase in the maximum cell density at saturation.

  17. Cell proliferation on PVA/sodium alginate and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) electrospun fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jen Ming; Yang, Jhe Hao; Tsou, Shu Chun; Ding, Chian Hua; Hsu, Chih Chin; Yang, Kai Chiang; Yang, Chun Chen; Chen, Ko Shao; Chen, Szi Wen; Wang, Jong Shyan

    2016-09-01

    To overcome the obstacles of easy dissolution of PVA nanofibers without crosslinking treatment and the poor electrospinnability of the PVA cross-linked nanofibers via electrospinning process, the PVA based electrospun hydrogel nanofibers are prepared with post-crosslinking method. To expect the electrospun hydrogel fibers might be a promising scaffold for cell culture and tissue engineering applications, the evaluation of cell proliferation on the post-crosslinking electrospun fibers is conducted in this study. At beginning, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), PVA/sodium alginate (PVASA) and PVA/poly(γ-glutamic acid) (PVAPGA) electrospun fibers were prepared by electrospinning method. The electrospun PVA, PVASA and PVAPGA nanofibers were treated with post-cross-linking method with glutaraldehyde (Glu) as crosslinking agent. These electrospun fibers were characterized with thermogravimetry analysis (TGA) and their morphologies were observed with a scanning electron microscope (SEM). To support the evaluation and explanation of cell growth on the fiber, the study of 3T3 mouse fibroblast cell growth on the surface of pure PVA, SA, and PGA thin films is conducted. The proliferation of 3T3 on the electrospun fiber surface of PVA, PVASA, and PVAPGA was evaluated by seeding 3T3 fibroblast cells on these crosslinked electrospun fibers. The cell viability on electrospun fibers was conducted with water-soluble tetrazolium salt-1 assay (Cell Proliferation Reagent WST-1). The morphology of the cells on the fibers was also observed with SEM. The results of WST-1 assay revealed that 3T3 cells cultured on different electrospun fibers had similar viability, and the cell viability increased with time for all electrospun fibers. From the morphology of the cells on electrospun fibers, it is found that 3T3 cells attached on all electrospun fiber after 1day seeded. Cell-cell communication was noticed on day 3 for all electrospun fibers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) productions were found and

  18. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  19. Smooth Muscle-Like Tissue Constructs with Circumferentially Oriented Cells Formed by the Cell Fiber Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Amy Y.; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  20. The Potential to Improve Cell Infiltration in Composite Fiber-Aligned Electrospun Scaffolds by the Selective Removal of Sacrificial Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Gee, Albert O.; Metter, Robert B.; Nathan, Ashwin S.; Marklein, Ross L.; Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Aligned electrospun scaffolds are a promising tool for engineering fibrous musculoskeletal tissues as they reproduce the mechanical anisotropy of these tissues and can direct ordered neo-tissue formation. However, these scaffolds suffer from a slow cellular infiltration rate, likely due in part to their dense fiber packing. We hypothesized that cell ingress could be expedited in scaffolds by increasing porosity, while at the same time preserving overall scaffold anisotropy. To test this hypothesis, poly(ε-caprolactone) (a slow-degrading polyester) and poly(ethylene oxide) (a water-soluble polymer) were co-electrospun from two separate spinnerets to form dual-polymer composite fiber-aligned scaffolds. Adjusting fabrication parameters produced aligned scaffolds with a full range of sacrificial (PEO) fiber contents. Tensile properties of scaffolds were a function of the ratio of PCL to PEO in the composite scaffolds, and were altered in a predictable fashion with removal of the PEO component. When seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), increases in the starting sacrificial fraction (and porosity) improved cell infiltration and distribution after three weeks in culture. In pure PCL scaffolds, cells lined the scaffold periphery, while scaffolds containing >50% sacrificial PEO content had cells present throughout the scaffold. These findings indicate that cell infiltration can be expedited in dense fibrous assemblies with the removal of sacrificial fibers. This strategy may enhance in vitro and in vivo formation and maturation of a functional constructs for fibrous tissue engineering. PMID:18313138

  1. Molecular mechanism of parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse formation.

    PubMed

    Mishina, Masayoshi; Uemura, Takeshi; Yasumura, Misato; Yoshida, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    The cerebellum receives two excitatory afferents, the climbing fiber (CF) and the mossy fiber-parallel fiber (PF) pathway, both converging onto Purkinje cells (PCs) that are the sole neurons sending outputs from the cerebellar cortex. Glutamate receptor δ2 (GluRδ2) is expressed selectively in cerebellar PCs and localized exclusively at the PF-PC synapses. We found that a significant number of PC spines lack synaptic contacts with PF terminals and some of residual PF-PC synapses show mismatching between pre- and postsynaptic specializations in conventional and conditional GluRδ2 knockout mice. Studies with mutant mice revealed that in addition to PF-PC synapse formation, GluRδ2 is essential for synaptic plasticity, motor learning, and the restriction of CF territory. GluRδ2 regulates synapse formation through the amino-terminal domain, while the control of synaptic plasticity, motor learning, and CF territory is mediated through the carboxyl-terminal domain. Thus, GluRδ2 is the molecule that bridges synapse formation and motor learning. We found that the trans-synaptic interaction of postsynaptic GluRδ2 and presynaptic neurexins (NRXNs) through cerebellin 1 (Cbln1) mediates PF-PC synapse formation. The synaptogenic triad is composed of one molecule of tetrameric GluRδ2, two molecules of hexameric Cbln1 and four molecules of monomeric NRXN. Thus, GluRδ2 triggers synapse formation by clustering four NRXNs. These findings provide a molecular insight into the mechanism of synapse formation in the brain.

  2. Multifunctional graded index TiO2 compact layer for performance enhancement in dye sensitized solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, M. H.; Rusop, M.

    2013-11-01

    A specially tailored index TiO2 compact layer (arc-TiO2) has been successfully deposited to serve as photoanode of a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) by radio-frequency magnetron sputtering. The employment of the TiO2 compact layer in the DSSC was systematically investigated by means of UV-absorption spectra, incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE), open-circuit voltage decay (OCVD) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The higher and red-shifted transmittance spectra of the ITO/arc-TiO2 electrode mimic the IPCE spectra of the DSSC, in a specific wavelength region. Furthermore, the blue-shift of the UV-absorption spectra and lower R1 value obtained from EIS measurements implied the decrease of the charge interfacial resistance, and this consequently facilitates the charge transport from the nanocrystalline-TiO2 to the ITO. The integrated effects of the arc-TiO2 compact layer originate the remarkable improvement in this type of DSSC applications. As a result, the arc-TiO2-based DSSC showed higher conversion efficiency of about 4.38%, representing almost 53% increment compared to bare ITO cell. This work also discuss the fundamental insight of the compact layer that determines the origin of such improvement in the DSSC performance.

  3. Adenovirus type 2 expresses fiber in monkey-human hybrids and reconstructed cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zorn, G.A.; Anderson, C.W.

    1981-02-01

    Adenovirus type 2 protein expression was measured by indirect immunofluorescence in monkey-human hybrids and in cells reconstructed from monkey and human cell karyoplasts and cytoplasts. Monkey-human hybrid clones infected with adenovirus type 2 expressed fiber protein, whereas infected monkey cells alone did not. Hybrids constructed after the parental monkey cells were infected with adenovirus type 2 demonstrated that fiber synthesis in these cells could be rescued by fusion to uninfected human cells. Thus, human cells contain a dominant factor that acts in trans and overcomes the inability of monkey cells to synthesize fiber. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the block to adenovirus replication in monkey cells involves a nuclear event that prevents the formation of functional mRNA for some late viral proteins including fiber polypeptide.

  4. Immunodepletion and Hypoxia Preconditioning of Mouse Compact Bone Cells as a Novel Protocol to Isolate Highly Immunosuppressive Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sivanathan, Kisha Nandini; Gronthos, Stan; Grey, Shane T; Rojas-Canales, Darling; Coates, Patrick T

    2017-04-01

    Compact bones (CB) are major reservoirs of mouse mesenchymal stem cells (mMSC). Here, we established a protocol to isolate MSC from CB and tested their immunosuppressive potential. Collagenase type II digestion of BM-flushed CB from C57B/6 mice was performed to liberate mMSC precursors from bone surfaces to establish nondepleted mMSC. CB cells were also immunodepleted based on the expression of CD45 (leukocytes) and TER119 (erythroid cells) to eliminate hematopoietic cells. CD45(-)TER119(-) CB cells were subsequently used to generate depleted mMSC. CB nondepleted and depleted mMSC progenitors were cultured under hypoxic conditions to establish primary mMSC cultures. CB depleted mMSC compared to nondepleted mMSC showed greater cell numbers at subculturing and had increased functional ability to differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts. CB depleted mMSC had high purity and expressed key mMSC markers (>85% Sca-1, CD29, CD90) with no mature hematopoietic contaminating cells (<5% CD45, CD11b) when subcultured to passage 5 (P5). Nondepleted mMSC cultures, however, were less pure and heterogenous with <72% Sca-1(+), CD29(+), and CD90(+) cells at early passages (P1 or P2), along with high percentages of contaminating CD11b(+) (35.6%) and CD45(+) (39.2%) cells that persisted in culture long term. Depleted and nondepleted mMSC nevertheless exhibited similar potency to suppress total (CD3(+)), CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation, in a dendritic cell allostimulatory one-way mixed lymphocyte reaction. CB depleted mMSC, pretreated with proinflammatory cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17A, showed superior suppression of CD8(+) T cell, but not CD4(+) T cell proliferation, relative to untreated-mMSC. In conclusion, CB depleted mMSC established under hypoxic conditions and treated with selective cytokines represent a novel source of potent immunosuppressive MSC. As these cells have enhanced immune modulatory function, they may represent a superior product for use in clinical

  5. Compact and Blinking-Suppressed Quantum Dots for Single-Particle Tracking in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) offer distinct advantages over organic dyes and fluorescent proteins for biological imaging applications because of their brightness, photostability, and tunability. However, a major limitation is that single QDs emit fluorescent light in an intermittent on-and-off fashion called “blinking”. Here we report the development of blinking-suppressed, relatively compact QDs that are able to maintain their favorable optical properties in aqueous solution. Specifically, we show that a linearly graded alloy shell can be grown on a small CdSe core via a precisely controlled layer-by-layer process, and that this graded shell leads to a dramatic suppression of QD blinking in both organic solvents and water. A substantial portion (>25%) of the resulting QDs does not blink (more than 99% of the time in the bright or “on” state). Theoretical modeling studies indicate that this type of linearly graded shell not only can minimize charge carrier access to surface traps but also can reduce lattice defects, both of which are believed to be responsible for carrier trapping and QD blinking. Further, we have evaluated the biological utility of blinking-suppressed QDs coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based ligands and multidentate ligands. The results demonstrate that their optical properties are largely independent of surface coatings and solvating media, and that the blinking-suppressed QDs can provide continuous trajectories in live-cell receptor tracking studies. PMID:25157589

  6. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure.

    PubMed

    LaSarge, Candi L; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C

    2015-03-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offsets the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predict a net increase in granule cell innervation of CA3. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell communication with CA3. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure

    PubMed Central

    LaSarge, Candi L.; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offset the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predicts a net increase in granule cell >> CA3 innervation. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell >> CA3 communication. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:25600212

  8. Selective targeting of human cells by a chimeric adenovirus vector containing a modified fiber protein.

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, S C; Rollence, M; Marshall-Neff, J; McClelland, A

    1997-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is responsible for attachment of the virion to unidentified cell surface receptors. There are at least two distinct adenovirus fiber receptors which interact with the group B (Ad3) and group C (Ad5) adenoviruses. We have previously shown by using expressed adenovirus fiber proteins that it is possible to change the specificity of the fiber protein by exchanging the head domain with another serotype which recognizes a different receptor (S. C. Stevenson et al., J. Virol. 69:2850-2857, 1995). A chimeric fiber cDNA containing the Ad3 fiber head domain fused to the Ad5 fiber tail and shaft was incorporated into the genome of an adenovirus vector with E1 and E3 deleted encoding beta-galactosidase to generate Av9LacZ4, an adenovirus particle which contains a chimeric fiber protein. Western blot analysis of the chimeric fiber vector confirmed expression of the chimeric fiber protein and its association with the adenovirus capsid. Transduction experiments with fiber protein competitors demonstrated the altered receptor tropism of the chimeric fiber vector compared to that of the parental Av1LacZ4 vector. Transduction of a panel of human cell lines with the chimeric and parental vectors provided evidence for a different cellular distribution of the Ad5 and Ad3 receptors. Three cell lines (THP-1, MRC-5, and FaDu) were more efficiently transduced by the vector containing the Ad3 fiber head than by the Ad5 fiber vector. In contrast, human coronary artery endothelial cells were transduced more readily with the vector containing the Ad5 fiber than with the chimeric fiber vector. HeLa and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were transduced at equivalent levels compared with human diploid fibroblasts, which were refractory to transduction with both vectors. These results provide evidence for the differential expression of the Ad5 and Ad3 receptors on human cell lines derived from clinically relevant target tissues. Furthermore, we show that exchange

  9. Dissecting Regional Variations in Stress Fiber Mechanics in Living Cells with Laser Nanosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Tanner, Kandice; Boudreau, Aaron; Bissell, Mina J; Kumar, Sanjay

    2010-03-02

    The ability of a cell to distribute contractile stresses across the extracellular matrix in a spatially heterogeneous fashion underlies many cellular behaviors, including motility and tissue assembly. Here we investigate the biophysical basis of this phenomenon by using femtosecond laser nanosurgery to measure the viscoelastic recoil and cell-shape contributions of contractile stress fibers (SFs) located in specific compartments of living cells. Upon photodisruption and recoil, myosin light chain kinase-dependent SFs located along the cell periphery display much lower effective elasticities and higher plateau retraction distances than Rho-associated kinase-dependent SFs located in the cell center, with severing of peripheral fibers uniquely triggering a dramatic contraction of the entire cell within minutes of fiber irradiation. Image correlation spectroscopy reveals that when one population of SFs is pharmacologically dissipated, actin density flows toward the other population. Furthermore, dissipation of peripheral fibers reduces the elasticity and increases the plateau retraction distance of central fibers, and severing central fibers under these conditions triggers cellular contraction. Together, these findings show that SFs regulated by different myosin activators exhibit different mechanical properties and cell shape contributions. They also suggest that some fibers can absorb components and assume mechanical roles of other fibers to stabilize cell shape.

  10. High temperature battery cell comprising stress-free hollow fiber bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, J.N.; Revak, T.T.; Rossini, F.J.

    1982-06-01

    Thermal stressing of hollow fibers constituting the electrolyteseparator in a high temperature battery cell, and of certain other elements thereof, is avoided by suspending the assembly comprising the anolyte tank, the tubesheet, the hollow fibers and a cathodic current collector-distributing means, within the casing and employing a limp connection between the latter means and the cathode terminal of the cell.

  11. Radial Velocity Fiber-Fed Spectrographs Towards the Discovery of Compact Planets and Pulsations on M Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdiñas, Zaira M.

    2016-11-01

    radial velocity precision limit attained by an spectrograph. In particular, we focus on correcting the distortions caused by illumination instabilities in fiber-fed spectrographs. I describe our first prototype, the Radiance Characterizer in two dimensions (RadiCa2D), which was specifically designed to correct the Doppler measurements of the CAFE spectrograph. The main underlying idea of RadiCa2D consists in simultaneously monitoring the illumination distortions inside the spectrograph, to correct, in real-time, the effects generated in the final radial velocity measurements. This project is still under development and the final performance of the corrector needs yet to be confirmed.

  12. Curvature and Rho activation differentially control the alignment of cells and stress fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bade, Nathan D.; Kamien, Randall D.; Assoian, Richard K.; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    2017-01-01

    In vivo, cells respond to a host of physical cues ranging from substrate stiffness to the organization of micro- and nanoscale fibrous networks. We show that macroscale substrates with radii of curvature from tens to hundreds of micrometers influence cell alignment. In a model system of fibroblasts, isolated cells aligned strongly in the axial direction on cylinders with radii similar to the cell length and more weakly on cylinders of much larger radius. Isolated vascular smooth muscle cells did not align as effectively as fibroblasts. However, both cell types aligned robustly in weak curvature fields when in confluent monolayers. We identified two distinct populations of stress fibers in both cell types: long, apical stress fibers that aligned axially and short, basal stress fibers that aligned circumferentially. Circumferential alignment of the basal stress fibers is in apparent disagreement with a long-standing hypothesis that energetic penalties for bending enforce axial alignment on cylinders. To explore this phenomenon, we manipulated stress fibers by activating Rho, a small guanosine triphosphatase that regulates stress fiber assembly. In response, apical stress fibers disassembled, whereas basal stress fibers thickened and aligned more strongly in the circumferential direction. By activating Rho in confluent monolayers of vascular smooth muscle cells, we recapitulated the circumferential alignment pattern of F-actin within these cells that is observed in cylindrical vessels in vivo. In agreement with recent theory, these results suggest that stress fiber bending penalties are overcome when stress fiber contractility is enhanced and motivate deeper study of the mechanics of these distinct stress fiber populations. PMID:28913421

  13. Curvature and Rho activation differentially control the alignment of cells and stress fibers.

    PubMed

    Bade, Nathan D; Kamien, Randall D; Assoian, Richard K; Stebe, Kathleen J

    2017-09-01

    In vivo, cells respond to a host of physical cues ranging from substrate stiffness to the organization of micro- and nanoscale fibrous networks. We show that macroscale substrates with radii of curvature from tens to hundreds of micrometers influence cell alignment. In a model system of fibroblasts, isolated cells aligned strongly in the axial direction on cylinders with radii similar to the cell length and more weakly on cylinders of much larger radius. Isolated vascular smooth muscle cells did not align as effectively as fibroblasts. However, both cell types aligned robustly in weak curvature fields when in confluent monolayers. We identified two distinct populations of stress fibers in both cell types: long, apical stress fibers that aligned axially and short, basal stress fibers that aligned circumferentially. Circumferential alignment of the basal stress fibers is in apparent disagreement with a long-standing hypothesis that energetic penalties for bending enforce axial alignment on cylinders. To explore this phenomenon, we manipulated stress fibers by activating Rho, a small guanosine triphosphatase that regulates stress fiber assembly. In response, apical stress fibers disassembled, whereas basal stress fibers thickened and aligned more strongly in the circumferential direction. By activating Rho in confluent monolayers of vascular smooth muscle cells, we recapitulated the circumferential alignment pattern of F-actin within these cells that is observed in cylindrical vessels in vivo. In agreement with recent theory, these results suggest that stress fiber bending penalties are overcome when stress fiber contractility is enhanced and motivate deeper study of the mechanics of these distinct stress fiber populations.

  14. In vivo cultivation of tumor cells in hollow fibers.

    PubMed

    Hollingshead, M G; Alley, M C; Camalier, R F; Abbott, B J; Mayo, J G; Malspeis, L; Grever, M R

    1995-01-01

    Advancement of potential anti-cancer agents from "discovery" in an in vitro screen to pre-clinical development requires a demonstration of in vivo efficacy in one or more animal models of neoplastic disease. Most such models require considerable materials in terms of laboratory animals and test compound as well as substantial amounts of time (and cost) to determine whether a given experimental agent or series of agents have even minimal anti-tumor activity. The present study was initiated to assess the feasibility of employing an alternate methodology for preliminary in vivo evaluations of therapeutic efficacy. Results of experimentation to date demonstrate that a hollow fiber encapsulation/implantation methodology provides quantitative indices of drug efficacy with minimum expenditures of time and materials. Following further pharmacologic calibrations, the hollow fiber technique is anticipated (a) to identify compounds having moderate to prominent anti-cancer activity and (b) to facilitate the identification of sensitive tumor cell line "targets" and optimal or near-optimal treatment regimens for subsequent testing using standard in vivo solid tumor models. The potential suitability of this methodology is demonstrated with several standard anti-neoplastic agents.

  15. Adenovirus Vector Pseudotyping in Fiber-Expressing Cell Lines: Improved Transduction of Epstein-Barr Virus-Transformed B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Von Seggern, Dan J.; Huang, Shuang; Fleck, Shonna Kaye; Stevenson, Susan C.; Nemerow, Glen R.

    2000-01-01

    While adenovirus (Ad) gene delivery vectors are useful in many gene therapy applications, their broad tropism means that they cannot be directed to a specific target cell. There are also a number of cell types involved in human disease which are not transducible with standard Ad vectors, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-transformed B lymphocytes. Adenovirus binds to host cells via the viral fiber protein, and Ad vectors have previously been retargeted by modifying the fiber gene on the viral chromosome. This requires that the modified fiber be able to bind to the cell in which the vector is grown, which prevents truly specific vector targeting. We previously reported a gene delivery system based on a fiber gene-deleted Ad type 5 (Ad5) vector (Ad5.βgal.ΔF) and packaging cells that express the viral fiber protein. Expression of different fibers in packaging cells will allow Ad retargeting without modifying the viral chromosome. Importantly, fiber proteins which can no longer bind to the producer cells can also be used. Using this approach, we generated for the first time pseudotyped Ad5.βgal.ΔF particles containing either the wild-type Ad5 fiber protein or a chimeric fiber with the receptor-binding knob domain of the Ad3 fiber. Particles equipped with the chimeric fiber bound to the Ad3 receptor rather than the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor protein used by Ad5. EBV-transformed B lymphocytes were infected efficiently by the Ad3-pseudotyped particles but poorly by virus containing the Ad5 fiber protein. The strategy described here represents a broadly applicable method for targeting gene delivery to specific cell types. PMID:10590124

  16. Fiber-Coupled Acousto-Optical-Filter Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Kenneth H.; Li, Frank Yanan

    1993-01-01

    Fiber-coupled acousto-optical-filter spectrometer steps rapidly through commanded sequence of wavelengths. Sample cell located remotely from monochromator and associated electronic circuitry, connected to them with optical fibers. Optical-fiber coupling makes possible to monitor samples in remote, hazardous, or confined locations. Advantages include compactness, speed, and no moving parts. Potential applications include control of chemical processes, medical diagnoses, spectral imaging, and sampling of atmospheres.

  17. Observation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells retained inside the non-woven fiber matrix of the CellTank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ye; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-12-01

    This data article shows how the recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are located in the interstices of the matrix fibers of a CellTank bioreactor after completion of a perfusion culture, supporting the article entitled "Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor" by Zhang et al. [1]. It provides a visualization of the cell distribution in the non-woven fiber matrix in a deeper view.

  18. Observation of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells retained inside the non-woven fiber matrix of the CellTank bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Chotteau, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    This data article shows how the recombinant Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are located in the interstices of the matrix fibers of a CellTank bioreactor after completion of a perfusion culture, supporting the article entitled “Very high cell density perfusion of CHO cells anchored in a non-woven matrix-based bioreactor” by Zhang et al. [1]. It provides a visualization of the cell distribution in the non-woven fiber matrix in a deeper view. PMID:26958613

  19. Sliding Fibers: Slidable, Injectable, and Gel-like Electrospun Nanofibers as Versatile Cell Carriers.

    PubMed

    Lee, Slgirim; Yun, Seokhwan; Park, Kook In; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2016-03-22

    Designing biomaterial systems that can mimic fibrous, natural extracellular matrix is crucial for enhancing the efficacy of various therapeutic tools. Herein, a smart technology of three-dimensional electrospun fibers that can be injected in a minimally invasive manner was developed. Open surgery is currently the only route of administration of conventional electrospun fibers into the body. Coordinating electrospun fibers with a lubricating hydrogel produced fibrous constructs referred to as slidable, injectable, and gel-like (SLIDING) fibers. These SLIDING fibers could pass smoothly through a catheter and fill any cavity while maintaining their fibrous morphology. Their injectable features were derived from their distinctive rheological characteristics, which were presumably caused by the combinatorial effects of mobile electrospun fibers and lubricating hydrogels. The resulting injectable fibers fostered a highly favorable environment for human neural stem cell (hNSC) proliferation and neurosphere formation within the fibrous structures without compromising hNSC viability. SLIDING fibers demonstrated superior performance as cell carriers in animal stroke models subjected to the middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) stroke model. In this model, SLIDING fiber application extended the survival rate of administered hNSCs by blocking microglial infiltration at the early, acute inflammatory stage. The development of SLIDING fibers will increase the clinical significance of fiber-based scaffolds in many biomedical fields and will broaden their applicability.

  20. [Distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse].

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui-Ping; Wu, Ren-Na; Guo, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Hu

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the distribution of compact bone mesenchymal stem cells(MSC) marked with lentiviral plasmid pGC FU-RFP-LV in lung tissue and bone marrow of mouse. The MSC were infected by lentivirus with infection efficiency 78%, the infected MSC were injected into BALB/c mice via tail veins in concentration of 1×10(6) /mouse. The mice were randomly divided into 4 group according to 4 time points as 1, 2, 5 and 7 days. The lung tissue and bone marrow were taken and made of frozen sections and smears respectively in order to observed the distributions of MSC. The results indicated that the lentiviral infected MSC displayed phenotypes and biological characteristics which conformed to MSC by immunophenotyping analysis and induction differentiation detection. After the MSC were infected with optimal viral titer MOI = 50, the cell growth no significantly changed; the fluorescent microscopy revealed that the distributions of MSC in bone marrow on day 1, 2, 5 and 7 were 0.50 ± 0.20, 0.67 ± 0.23, 0.53 ± 0.14, 0.33 ± 0.16; those in lung tissue were 0.55 ± 0.15, 0.47 ± 0.13, 0.29 ± 0.13, 0.26 ± 0.08. It is concluded that the distribution of MSC in lung tissue reaches a peak on day 1, while distribution of MSC in bone marrow reaches a peak on day 2. The distribution of mouse MSC relates with RFP gene expression and implantation of MSC in lung tissue and bone marrow.

  1. Receptor mobility and the binding of cells to lectin-coated fibers

    PubMed Central

    1975-01-01

    The ability of cells to bind to nylon fibers coated with lectin molecules interspaced with varying numbers of albumin molecules has been analyzed. The cells used were lymphoma cells, normal lymphocytes, myeloid leukemia cells, and normal and transformed fibroblasts, and the fibers were coated with different densities of concanavalin A or the lectins from soybean or wheat germ. Cells fixed with glutaraldehyde did not bind to lectin-coated fibers. The number of cells bound to fibers could be increased by increasing the density of lectin molecules on the fiber, the density of specific receptors on the cell, or the mobility of the receptors. It is suggested that binding of cells to fibers involves alignment and binding of specific cell surface receptors with lectin molecules immobilized on the fibers, and that this alignment requires short-range rapid lateral mobility (RLM) of the receptors. The titration of cell binding to fibers coated with different densities of lectin and albumin has been used to measure the relative RLM of unoccupied cell surface receptors for the lectin. The results indicate a relationship of RLM to lectin-induced cell-to-cell binding. The RLM or receptors for concanavalin A (Con A) was generally found to be higher than that of receptors for the lectins from wheat germ or soybean. Receptor RLM could be decreased by use of metabolic inhibitors or by lowering the temperature. Receptors for Con A had a lower RLM on normal fibroblasts than on SV40-transformed fibroblasts, and trypsinization of normal fibroblasts increased Con A receptor RLM. Normal lymphocytes, lymphoma cells, and lines of myeloid leukemia cells that can be induced to differentiate had a high receptor RLM, whereas lines of myeloid leukemia cells that could not be induced to differentiate had a low receptor RLM. These results suggest that the RLM of Con A receptors is related to the transformation of fibroblasts and the ability of myeloid leukemia cells to undergo differentiation PMID

  2. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Adenovirus type 2 expresses fiber in monkey-human hybrids and reconstructed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Zorn, G A; Anderson, C W

    1981-01-01

    Adenovirus type 2 protein expression was measured by indirect immunofluorescence in monkey-human hybrids and in cells reconstructed from monkey and human cell karyoplasts and cytoplasts. Monkey-human hybrid clones infected with adenovirus type 2 expressed fiber protein, whereas infected monkey cells alone did not. Hybrids constructed after the parental monkey cells were infected with adenovirus type 2 demonstrated that fiber synthesis in these cells could be rescued by fusion to uninfected human cells. Thus, human cells contain a dominant factor that acts in trans and overcomes the inability of monkey cells to synthesize fiber. Cells reconstructed from infected human karyoplasts and monkey cytoplasts expressed fiber, whereas cells reconstructed from infected monkey karyoplasts and human cytoplasts did not. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the block to adenovirus replication in monkey cells involves a nuclear event that prevents the formation of functional mRNA for some late viral proteins including fiber polypeptide. Furthermore, they suggest that the translational apparatus of monkey cells is competent to translate functional fiber mRNA synthesized in human cells. Images PMID:7218436

  4. Engineering cholesterol-based fibers for antibody immobilization and cell capture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohn, Celine

    In 2015, the United States is expected to have nearly 600,000 deaths attributed to cancer. Of these 600,000 deaths, 90% will be a direct result of cancer metastasis, the spread of cancer throughout the body. During cancer metastasis, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are shed from primary tumors and migrate through bodily fluids, establishing secondary cancer sites. As cancer metastasis is incredibly lethal, there is a growing emphasis on developing "liquid biopsies" that can screen peripheral blood, search for and identify CTCs. One popular method for capturing CTCs is the use of a detection platform with antibodies specifically suited to recognize and capture cancer cells. These antibodies are immobilized onto the platform and can then bind and capture cells of interest. However, current means to immobilize antibodies often leave them with drastically reduced function. The antibodies are left poorly suited for cell capture, resulting in low cell capture efficiencies. This body of work investigates the use of lipid-based fibers to immobilize proteins in a way that retains protein function, ultimately leading to increased cell capture efficiencies. The resulting increased efficiencies are thought to arise from the retained three-dimensional structure of the protein as well as having a complete coating of the material surface with antibodies that are capable of interacting with their antigens. It is possible to electrospin cholesterol-based fibers that are similar in design to the natural cell membrane, providing proteins a more natural setting during immobilization. Such fibers have been produced from cholesterol-based cholesteryl succinyl silane (CSS). These fibers have previously illustrated a keen aptitude for retaining protein function and increasing cell capture. Herein the work focuses on three key concepts. First, a model is developed to understand the immobilization mechanism used by electrospun CSS fibers. The antibody immobilization and cell capturing

  5. High performance methanol-oxygen fuel cell with hollow fiber electrode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, Daniel D. (Inventor); Ingham, John D. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A methanol/air-oxygen fuel cell including an electrode formed by open-ended ion-exchange hollow fibers having a layer of catalyst deposited on the inner surface thereof and a first current collector in contact with the catalyst layer. A second current collector external of said fibers is provided which is immersed along with the hollow fiber electrode in an aqueous electrolyte body. Upon passage of air or oxygen through the hollow fiber electrode and introduction of methanol into the aqueous electrolyte, a steady current output is obtained. Two embodiments of the fuel cell are disclosed. In the first embodiment the second metal electrode is displaced away from the hollow fiber in the electrolyte body while in the second embodiment a spiral-wrap electrode is provided about the outer surface of the hollow fiber electrode.

  6. Cotton fiber cell walls of Gossypium hirsutum and Gossypium barbadense have differences related to loosely-bound xyloglucan.

    PubMed

    Avci, Utku; Pattathil, Sivakumar; Singh, Bir; Brown, Virginia L; Hahn, Michael G; Haigler, Candace H

    2013-01-01

    Cotton fiber is an important natural textile fiber due to its exceptional length and thickness. These properties arise largely through primary and secondary cell wall synthesis. The cotton fiber of commerce is a cellulosic secondary wall surrounded by a thin cuticulated primary wall, but there were only sparse details available about the polysaccharides in the fiber cell wall of any cotton species. In addition, Gossypium hirsutum (Gh) fiber was known to have an adhesive cotton fiber middle lamella (CFML) that joins adjacent fibers into tissue-like bundles, but it was unknown whether a CFML existed in other commercially important cotton fibers. We compared the cell wall chemistry over the time course of fiber development in Gh and Gossypium barbadense (Gb), the two most important commercial cotton species, when plants were grown in parallel in a highly controlled greenhouse. Under these growing conditions, the rate of early fiber elongation and the time of onset of secondary wall deposition were similar in fibers of the two species, but as expected the Gb fiber had a prolonged elongation period and developed higher quality compared to Gh fiber. The Gb fibers had a CFML, but it was not directly required for fiber elongation because Gb fiber continued to elongate rapidly after CFML hydrolysis. For both species, fiber at seven ages was extracted with four increasingly strong solvents, followed by analysis of cell wall matrix polysaccharide epitopes using antibody-based Glycome Profiling. Together with immunohistochemistry of fiber cross-sections, the data show that the CFML of Gb fiber contained lower levels of xyloglucan compared to Gh fiber. Xyloglucan endo-hydrolase activity was also higher in Gb fiber. In general, the data provide a rich picture of the similarities and differences in the cell wall structure of the two most important commercial cotton species.

  7. Connexin 50 Regulates Surface Ball-and-Socket Structures and Fiber Cell Organization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Eddie; Geng, Andrew; Maniar, Ankur M.; Mui, Byron W. H.; Gong, Xiaohua

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The roles of gap junction protein connexin 50 (Cx50) encoded by Gja8, during lens development are not fully understood. Connexin 50 knockout (KO) lenses have decreased proliferation of epithelial cells and altered fiber cell denucleation. We further investigated the mechanism for cellular defects in Cx50 KO (Gja8−/−) lenses. Methods Fiber cell morphology and subcellular distribution of various lens membrane/cytoskeleton proteins from wild-type and Cx50 KO mice were visualized by immunofluorescent staining and confocal microscopy. Results We observed multiple morphological defects in the cortical fibers of Cx50 KO lenses, including abnormal fiber cell packing geometry, decreased F-actin enrichment at tricellular vertices, and disrupted ball-and-socket (BS) structures on the long sides of hexagonal fibers. Moreover, only small gap junction plaques consisting of Cx46 (α3 connexin) were detected in cortical fibers and the distributions of the BS-associated beta-dystroglycan and ZO-1 proteins were altered. Conclusions Connexin 50 gap junctions are important for BS structure maturation and cortical fiber cell organization. Connexin 50–based gap junction plaques likely form structural domains with an array of membrane/cytoskeletal proteins to stabilize BS. Loss of Cx50-mediated coupling, BS disruption, and altered F-actin in Cx50 KO fibers, thereby contribute to the small lens and mild cataract phenotypes. PMID:27281269

  8. Climbing fiber synapse elimination in cerebellar Purkinje cells.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masahiko; Kano, Masanobu

    2011-11-01

    Innervation of Purkinje cells (PCs) by multiple climbing fibers (CFs) is refined into mono-innervation during the first three postnatal weeks of rodents' lives. In this review article, we will integrate the current knowledge on developmental process and mechanisms of CF synapse elimination. In the 'creeper' stage of CF innervation (postnatal day 0 (P0)∼), CFs creep among PC somata to form transient synapses on immature dendrites. In the 'pericellular nest' stage (P5∼), CFs densely surround and innervate PC somata. CF innervation is then displaced to the apical portion of PC somata in the 'capuchon' stage (P9∼), and translocate to dendrites in the 'dendritic' (P12∼) stage. Along with the developmental changes in CF wiring, functional and morphological distinctions become larger among CF inputs. PCs are initially innervated by more than five CFs with similar strengths (∼P3). During P3-7 only a single CF is selectively strengthened (functional differentiation), and it undergoes dendritic translocation from P9 on (dendritic translocation). Following the functional differentiation, perisomatic CF synapses are eliminated nonselectively; this proceeds in two distinct phases. The early phase (P7-11) is conducted independently of parallel fiber (PF)-PC synapse formation, while the late phase (P12-17) critically depends on it. The P/Q-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channel in PCs triggers selective strengthening of single CF inputs, promotes dendritic translocation of the strengthened CFs, and drives the early phase of CF synapse elimination. In contrast, the late phase is mediated by the mGluR1-Gαq-PLCβ4-PKCγ signaling cascade in PCs driven at PF-PC synapses, whose structural connectivity is stabilized and maintained by the GluRδ2-Cbln1-neurexin system.

  9. Climbing Fiber Regulation of Spontaneous Purkinje Cell Activity and Cerebellum-Dependent Blink Responses123

    PubMed Central

    Bengtsson, Fredrik

    2016-01-01

    Abstract It has been known for a long time that GABAergic Purkinje cells in the cerebellar cortex, as well as their target neurons in the cerebellar nuclei, are spontaneously active. The cerebellar output will, therefore, depend on how input is integrated into this spontaneous activity. It has been shown that input from climbing fibers originating in the inferior olive controls the spontaneous activity in Purkinje cells. While blocking climbing fiber input to the Purkinje cells causes a dramatic increase in the firing rate, increased climbing fiber activity results in reduced Purkinje cell activity. However, the exact calibration of this regulation has not been examined systematically. Here we examine the relation between climbing fiber stimulation frequency and Purkinje cell activity in unanesthetized decerebrated ferrets. The results revealed a gradual suppression of Purkinje cell activity, starting at climbing fiber stimulation frequencies as low as 0.5 Hz. At 4 Hz, Purkinje cells were completely silenced. This effect lasted an average of 2 min after the stimulation rate was reduced to a lower level. We also examined the effect of sustained climbing fiber stimulation on overt behavior. Specifically, we analyzed conditioned blink responses, which are known to be dependent on the cerebellum, while stimulating the climbing fibers at different frequencies. In accordance with the neurophysiological data, the conditioned blink responses were suppressed at stimulation frequencies of ≥4 Hz. PMID:26839917

  10. Quantitative analysis of granule cell axons and climbing fiber afferents in the turtle cerebellar cortex.

    PubMed

    Tolbert, D L; Conoyer, B; Ariel, M

    2004-11-01

    The turtle cerebellar cortex is a single flat sheet of gray matter that greatly facilitates quantitative analysis of biotylinated dextran amine labeled granule cell and olivocerebellar axons and Nissl-stained granule and Purkinje neurons. On average, ascending granule cell axons are relatively thicker than their parallel fiber branches (mean +/- SD: 0.84 +/- 0.17 vs 0.64 +/- 0.12 microm, respectively). Numerous en passant swellings, the site of presynaptic contact, were present on both ascending and parallel fiber granule cell axons. The swellings on ascending axons (1.82 +/- 0.34 microm, n = 52) were slightly larger than on parallel fibers (1.43 +/- 0.24 microm, n = 430). In addition, per unit length (100 microm) there were more swellings on ascending axons (11.2 +/- 4.2) than on parallel fibers (9.7 +/- 4.2). Each parallel fiber branch from an ascending axon is approximately 1.5 mm long. Olivocerebellar climbing fiber axons followed the highly tortuous dendrites of Purkinje cells in the inner most 15-20% of the molecular layer. Climbing fibers displayed relatively fewer en passant swellings. The spatial perimeter of climbing fiber arbors (area) increased 72% from anteriorly (1797 microm2) to posteriorly (3090 microm2) and 104% from medially (1690 microm2) to laterally (3450 microm2). Differences in the size and spacing of en passant swellings on granule cell axons suggest that ascending axons may have a functionally more significant impact on the excitability of a limited number of radially overlying Purkinje cells than the single contacts by parallel fiber with multiple orthogonally aligned Purkinje cell dendrites. The spatially restricted distribution of climbing fibers to the inner most molecular layer, the paucity of en passant swellings, and different terminal arbor areas are enigmatic. Nevertheless, these finding provide important anatomical information for future optical imaging and electrophysiological experiments.

  11. Light Weight Design Nickel-Alkaline Cells Using Fiber Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, David F.; Willis, Bob; Britton, Doris; Saelens, Johan

    2005-01-01

    Using fiber electrode technology, currently produced by Bekaert Corporation (Bekaert), Electro Energy, Inc., (EEI) Mobile Energy Products Group (formerly, Eagle-Picher Technologies, LLC., Power Systems Department) in Colorado Springs, CO has demonstrated that it is feasible to manufacture flight weight nickel-hydrogen cells having about twice the specific energy (80 vs. 40 watt-hr/kg) as state-of-the-art nickel-hydrogen cells that are flown on geosynchronous communications satellites. Although lithium-ion battery technology has made large in-roads to replace the nickel-alkaline technology (nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride), the technology offered here competes with lithium-ion weight and offers alternatives not present in the lithium-ion chemistry such as ability to undergo continuous overcharge, reversal on discharge and sustain rate capability sufficient to start automotive and aircraft engines at subzero temperatures. In development to date seven 50 ampere-hour nickel-hydrogen have been constructed, acceptance tested and briefly tested in a low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime. The effort was jointly funded by Electro Energy, Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH. Five of the seven cells have been shipped to NASA GRC for further cycle testing. Two of the cells experienced failure due to internal short circuits during initial cycle testing at EEL Destructive Physical Analysis (DPA) of one of the cells has shown the failure mode to be due to inadequate hydrogen catalyst electrodes that were not capacity balanced with the higher energy density nickel oxide electrodes. In the investigators opinion, rebuild of the cells using proper electrode balance would result in cells that could sustain over 30,000 cycles at moderate depths-of-discharge in a LEO regime or endure over 20 years of geosynchronous orbit (GEO) cycling while realizing a two-fold increase in specific energy for the battery or a 1.1 kg weight savings per 50 ampere-hour cell. Additional

  12. Light Weight Design Nickel-Alkaline Cells Using Fiber Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pickett, David F.; Willis, Bob; Britton, Doris; Saelens, Johan

    2005-01-01

    Using fiber electrode technology, currently produced by Bekaert Corporation (Bekaert), Electro Energy, Inc., (EEI) Mobile Energy Products Group (formerly, Eagle-Picher Technologies, LLC., Power Systems Department) in Colorado Springs, CO has demonstrated that it is feasible to manufacture flight weight nickel-hydrogen cells having about twice the specific energy (80 vs. 40 watt-hr/kg) as state-of-the-art nickel-hydrogen cells that are flown on geosynchronous communications satellites. Although lithium-ion battery technology has made large in-roads to replace the nickel-alkaline technology (nickel-cadmium, nickel-metal hydride), the technology offered here competes with lithium-ion weight and offers alternatives not present in the lithium-ion chemistry such as ability to undergo continuous overcharge, reversal on discharge and sustain rate capability sufficient to start automotive and aircraft engines at subzero temperatures. In development to date seven 50 ampere-hour nickel-hydrogen have been constructed, acceptance tested and briefly tested in a low earth orbit (LEO) cycle regime. The effort was jointly funded by Electro Energy, Inc. and NASA Glenn Research Center, Cleveland, OH. Five of the seven cells have been shipped to NASA GRC for further cycle testing. Two of the cells experienced failure due to internal short circuits during initial cycle testing at EEL Destructive Physical Analysis (DPA) of one of the cells has shown the failure mode to be due to inadequate hydrogen catalyst electrodes that were not capacity balanced with the higher energy density nickel oxide electrodes. In the investigators opinion, rebuild of the cells using proper electrode balance would result in cells that could sustain over 30,000 cycles at moderate depths-of-discharge in a LEO regime or endure over 20 years of geosynchronous orbit (GEO) cycling while realizing a two-fold increase in specific energy for the battery or a 1.1 kg weight savings per 50 ampere-hour cell. Additional

  13. Effectiveness of two synthetic fiber filters for removing white cells from AS-1 red cells.

    PubMed

    Pikul, F J; Farrar, R P; Boris, M B; Estok, L; Marlo, D; Wildgen, M; Chaplin, H

    1989-09-01

    Two commercially available synthetic fiber filters were studied for their effectiveness at removing white cells (WBCs) from AS-1-preserved red cells (RBCs) stored less than or equal to 14 days. In all, 65 filtrations were performed. An automated microprocessor-controlled hydraulic system designed for use with cellulose acetate fiber filters was employed to prepare filtered RBCs before release for transfusion. Studies were also carried out on polyester fiber filters, which are designed to be used in-line during transfusion. Residual WBCs were below the accurate counting range of Coulter counters and of conventional manual chamber counts. An isosmotic ammonium chloride RBC lysis method, plus a modified chamber counting technique, permitted a 270-fold increase over the number of WBCs counted by the conventional manual method. For the polyester fiber-filtered products, residual WBCs per unit were not affected by speed of filtration, prior length of storage, or mechanical tapping during filtration. The effectiveness of WBC removal (mean 99.7%), total residual WBCs (means, 4.8 and 5.5 x 10(6], and RBC recovery (mean, 93%) was the same for both filters. The majority of residual WBCs were lymphocytes. WBC removal and RBC recovery were strikingly superior to results reported with nonfiltration methods.

  14. Effects of asbestos fibers on cell division, cell survival, and formation of thioguanine-resistant mutants in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kenne, K.; Ljungquist, S.; Ringertz, N.R.

    1986-04-01

    The ability of crocidolite fibers to induce point mutations and mitotic abnormalities in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells was examined in cell cultures. The purpose has been to study the possibilities for establishing in vitro test methods to quantify genetic damage induced by asbestos and other mineral fibers. Results obtained with the CHO/hypoxanthine guanine phosphoribosyl transferase system indicated that crocidolite fibers per se do not significantly increase the number of thioguanine-resistant mutants. Crocidolite fibers also failed to potentiate the mutagenicity of benzo(a)pyrene. Time-lapse cinematography and microscopy showed that asbestos (crocidolite) fibers were markedly cytotoxic. Among surviving cells some underwent abnormal cell divisions which resulted in multi- and micronucleate cells. Many cells that contained a few asbestos fibers, however, underwent mitosis and successfully formed two mononucleate daughter cells capable of further divisions. Individual, fiber-containing cells were examined by time-lapse television recordings for 4-5 days. During this time period some cells underwent six divisions and generated an almost normal number of daughter cells. Cells which contained fibers that were longer or equivalent to the diameter of the mitotic cell (20 ..mu..m), showed different forms of mitotic abnormalities. The frequency of multinucleate cells was drastically increased following exposure to asbestos fibers. Only rarely, however, did these cells divide to produce viable daughter cells capable of continued cell multiplication. The frequency of multinucleate cells was dependent on the dose of exposure to asbestos fibers and could possible be used as an index of the degree of mitotic disturbances induced by mineral fibers.

  15. Comparative transcriptome analysis of epithelial and fiber cells in newborn mouse lenses with RNA sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hoang, Thanh V.; Kumar, Praveen Kumar Raj; Sutharzan, Sreeskandarajan; Tsonis, Panagiotis A.; Liang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The ocular lens contains only two cell types: epithelial cells and fiber cells. The epithelial cells lining the anterior hemisphere have the capacity to continuously proliferate and differentiate into lens fiber cells that make up the large proportion of the lens mass. To understand the transcriptional changes that take place during the differentiation process, high-throughput RNA-Seq of newborn mouse lens epithelial cells and lens fiber cells was conducted to comprehensively compare the transcriptomes of these two cell types. Methods RNA from three biologic replicate samples of epithelial and fiber cells from newborn FVB/N mouse lenses was isolated and sequenced to yield more than 24 million reads per sample. Sequence reads that passed quality filtering were mapped to the reference genome using Genomic Short-read Nucleotide Alignment Program (GSNAP). Transcript abundance and differential gene expression were estimated using the Cufflinks and DESeq packages, respectively. Gene Ontology enrichment was analyzed using GOseq. RNA-Seq results were compared with previously published microarray data. The differential expression of several biologically important genes was confirmed using reverse transcription (RT)-quantitative PCR (qPCR). Results Here, we present the first application of RNA-Seq to understand the transcriptional changes underlying the differentiation of epithelial cells into fiber cells in the newborn mouse lens. In total, 6,022 protein-coding genes exhibited differential expression between lens epithelial cells and lens fiber cells. To our knowledge, this is the first study identifying the expression of 254 long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) in the lens, of which 86 lincRNAs displayed differential expression between the two cell types. We found that RNA-Seq identified more differentially expressed genes and correlated with RT-qPCR quantification better than previously published microarray data. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes

  16. A model for cell density effect on stress fiber alignment and collective directional migration.

    PubMed

    Abeddoust, Mohammad; Shamloo, Amir

    2015-12-31

    In this study, numerical simulation of collective cell migration is presented in order to mimic the group migration of endothelial cells subjected to the concentration gradients of a biochemical factor. The developed 2D model incorporates basic elements of the cell, including both the cell membrane and the cell cytoskeleton, based on a viscoelastic cell mechanic model. Various cell processes--including cell random walk, cell-cell interactions, cell chemotaxis, and cellular cytoskeleton rearrangements--are considered and analyzed in our developed model. After validating the model by using available experimental data, the model is used to investigate various important parameters during collective cell chemotaxis, such as cell density, cytoskeleton organization, stress fiber reorientations, and intracellular forces. The results suggest that increasing the cell density causes the cell-cell interactions to affect the orientation of stress fibers throughout the cytoskeleton and makes the stress fibers more aligned in the direction of the imposed concentration gradient. This improved alignment of the stress fibers correlates with the intensification of the intracellular forces transferred in the gradient direction; this improves the cell group migration. Comparison of the obtained results with available experimental observations of collective chemotaxis of endothelial cells shows an interesting agreement.

  17. A model for cell density effect on stress fiber alignment and collective directional migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeddoust, Mohammad; Shamloo, Amir

    2015-12-01

    In this study, numerical simulation of collective cell migration is presented in order to mimic the group migration of endothelial cells subjected to the concentration gradients of a biochemical factor. The developed 2D model incorporates basic elements of the cell, including both the cell membrane and the cell cytoskeleton, based on a viscoelastic cell mechanic model. Various cell processes—including cell random walk, cell-cell interactions, cell chemotaxis, and cellular cytoskeleton rearrangements—are considered and analyzed in our developed model. After validating the model by using available experimental data, the model is used to investigate various important parameters during collective cell chemotaxis, such as cell density, cytoskeleton organization, stress fiber reorientations, and intracellular forces. The results suggest that increasing the cell density causes the cell-cell interactions to affect the orientation of stress fibers throughout the cytoskeleton and makes the stress fibers more aligned in the direction of the imposed concentration gradient. This improved alignment of the stress fibers correlates with the intensification of the intracellular forces transferred in the gradient direction; this improves the cell group migration. Comparison of the obtained results with available experimental observations of collective chemotaxis of endothelial cells shows an interesting agreement.

  18. Development of secondary cell wall in cotton fibers as examined with Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our presentation will focus on continuing efforts to examine secondary cell wall development in cotton fibers using infrared Spectroscopy. Cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering were examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-...

  19. Extent of mossy fiber sprouting in patients with mesiotemporal lobe epilepsy correlates with neuronal cell loss and granule cell dispersion.

    PubMed

    Schmeiser, Barbara; Zentner, Josef; Prinz, Marco; Brandt, Armin; Freiman, Thomas M

    2017-01-01

    The most frequent finding in temporal lobe epilepsy is hippocampal sclerosis, characterized by selective cell loss of hippocampal subregions CA1 and CA4 as well as mossy fiber sprouting (MFS) towards the supragranular region and granule cell dispersion. Although selective cell loss is well described, its impact on mossy fiber sprouting and granule cell dispersion remains unclear. In a single center series, we examined 319 human hippocampal specimens, collected in a 15-years period. Hippocampal specimens were stained for neuronal loss, granule cell dispersion (Wyler scale I-IV, Neu-N, HE) and mossy fiber sprouting (synaptoporin-immunohistochemistry). For seizure outcome Engel score I-IV was applied. In Wyler I and II specimens, mossy fibers were found along their natural projection exclusively in CA4 and CA3. In Wyler III and IV, sprouting of mossy fibers into the molecular layer and a decrease of mossy fibers in CA4 and CA3 was detected. Mean granule cell dispersion was extended from 121μm to 185μm and correlated with Wyler III-IV as well as mossy fiber sprouting into the molecular layer. Wyler grade, mossy fiber sprouting and granule cell dispersion correlated with longer epilepsy duration, late surgery and higher preoperative seizure frequency. Parameters analyzed above did not correlate with postoperative seizure outcome. Mossy fiber sprouting might be a compensatory phenomenon of cell death of the target neurons in CA4 and CA3 in Wyler III-IV. Axonal reorganization of granule cells is accompanied by their migration and is correlated with the severity of cell loss and epilepsy duration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Engineered Microvessels with Strong Alignment and High Lumen Density Via Cell-Induced Fibrin Gel Compaction and Interstitial Flow

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Kristen T.; Dries-Devlin, Jessica L.

    2014-01-01

    The development of engineered microvessels with clinically relevant characteristics is a critical step toward the creation of engineered myocardium. Alignment is one such characteristic that must be achieved, as it both mimics native capillary beds and provides natural inlet and outlet sides for perfusion. A second characteristic that is currently deficient is cross-sectional lumen density, typically under 100 lumens/mm2; the equivalent value for human myocardium is 2000 lumens/mm2. Therefore, this study examined the effects of gel compaction and interstitial flow on microvessel alignment and lumen density. Strong microvessel alignment was achieved via mechanically constrained cell-induced fibrin gel compaction following vasculogenesis, and high lumen density (650 lumens/mm2) was achieved by the subsequent application of low levels of interstitial flow. Low interstitial flow also conferred microvessel barrier function. PMID:24083839

  1. Topographical effects on fiber-mediated microRNA delivery to control oligodendroglial precursor cells development.

    PubMed

    Diao, Hua Jia; Low, Wei Ching; Lu, Q Richard; Chew, Sing Yian

    2015-11-01

    Effective remyelination in the central nervous system (CNS) facilitates the reversal of disability in patients with demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis. Unfortunately until now, effective strategies of controlling oligodendrocyte (OL) differentiation and maturation remain limited. It is well known that topographical and biochemical signals play crucial roles in modulating cell fate commitment. Therefore, in this study, we explored the combined effects of scaffold topography and sustained gene silencing on oligodendroglial precursor cell (OPC) development. Specifically, microRNAs (miRs) were incorporated onto electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) fiber scaffolds with different fiber diameters and orientations. Regardless of fiber diameter and orientation, efficient knockdown of differentiation inhibitory factors were achieved by either topography alone (up to 70%) or fibers integrated with miR-219 and miR-338 (up to 80%, p < 0.05). Small fiber promoted OPC differentiation by inducing more RIP(+) cells (p < 0.05) while large fiber promoted OL maturation by inducing more MBP(+) cells (p < 0.05). Random fiber enhanced more RIP(+) cells than aligned fibers (p < 0.05), regardless of fiber diameter. Upon miR-219/miR-338 incorporation, 2 μm aligned fibers supported the most MBP(+) cells (∼17%). These findings indicated that the coupling of substrate topographic cues with efficient gene silencing by sustained microRNA delivery is a promising way for directing OPC maturation in neural tissue engineering and controlling remyelination in the CNS.

  2. Differentiation of pluripotent stem cells to muscle fiber to model Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Chal, Jérome; Oginuma, Masayuki; Al Tanoury, Ziad; Gobert, Bénédicte; Sumara, Olga; Hick, Aurore; Bousson, Fanny; Zidouni, Yasmine; Mursch, Caroline; Moncuquet, Philippe; Tassy, Olivier; Vincent, Stéphane; Miyanari, Ayako; Bera, Agata; Garnier, Jean-Marie; Guevara, Getzabel; Hestin, Marie; Kennedy, Leif; Hayashi, Shinichiro; Drayton, Bernadette; Cherrier, Thomas; Gayraud-Morel, Barbara; Gussoni, Emanuela; Relaix, Frédéric; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Pourquié, Olivier

    2015-09-01

    During embryonic development, skeletal muscles arise from somites, which derive from the presomitic mesoderm (PSM). Using PSM development as a guide, we establish conditions for the differentiation of monolayer cultures of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells into PSM-like cells without the introduction of transgenes or cell sorting. We show that primary and secondary skeletal myogenesis can be recapitulated in vitro from the PSM-like cells, providing an efficient, serum-free protocol for the generation of striated, contractile fibers from mouse and human pluripotent cells. The mouse ES cells also differentiate into Pax7(+) cells with satellite cell characteristics, including the ability to form dystrophin(+) fibers when grafted into muscles of dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, a model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Fibers derived from ES cells of mdx mice exhibit an abnormal branched phenotype resembling that described in vivo, thus providing an attractive model to study the origin of the pathological defects associated with DMD.

  3. Fiber diffraction patterns for general unit cells: the cylindrically projected reciprocal lattice

    PubMed

    Finkenstadt; Millane

    1998-03-01

    The positions of reflections on the diffraction pattern from a polycrystalline fiber are described by a cylindrical projection of the reciprocal lattice. The characteristics of the projection depend on the crystal system and the orientation of the fiber axis relative to the unit-cell axes. Expressions describing the cylindrically projected reciprocal lattice for a general triclinic system and any orientation of the fiber axis are derived. Calculations using these expressions illustrate characteristics of the projected reciprocal lattice and aid in the interpretation of fiber diffraction patterns.

  4. Cell Attachment and Viability Study of PCL Nano-fiber Modified by Cold Atmospheric Plasma.

    PubMed

    Atyabi, Seyed Mohammad; Sharifi, Fereshteh; Irani, Shiva; Zandi, Mojgan; Mivehchi, Houri; Nagheh, Zahra

    2016-06-01

    The field of tissue engineering is an emerging discipline which applies the basic principles of life sciences and engineering to repair and restore living tissues and organs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of cold and non-thermal plasma surface modification of poly (ϵ-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds on fibroblast cell behavior. Nano-fiber PCL was fabricated through electrospinning technique, and some fibers were then treated by cold and non-thermal plasma. The cell-biomaterial interactions were studied by culturing the fibroblast cells on nano-fiber PCL. Scaffold biocompatibility test was assessed using an inverted microscope. The growth and proliferation of fibroblast cells on nano-fiber PCL were analyzed by MTT viability assay. Cellular attachment on the nano-fiber and their morphology were evaluated using scanning electron microscope. The result of cell culture showed that nano-fiber could support the cellular growth and proliferation by developing three-dimensional topography. The present study demonstrated that the nano-fiber surface modification with cold plasma sharply enhanced the fibroblast cell attachment. Thus, cold plasma surface modification greatly raised the bioactivity of scaffolds.

  5. Mesothelial cell proliferation after instillation of long or short asbestos fibers into mouse lung.

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, I. Y.; Bakowska, J.; Bowden, D. H.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship of asbestos deposition in the lung to subsequent cell proliferation at the pleural surface is not clear. The present study examines DNA synthesis by various pulmonary cells, particularly those at the pleura after intratracheal injection of 0.1 mg crocidolite to mice using: 1) long fibers (> 20 mu), which are deposited in bronchiolar regions and induce fibrosis; 2) short fibers (< 1 mu), which reach alveoli but do not induce fibrosis. Mice also received 2 microCi/g tritiated thymidine 1 hour before death at intervals to 16 weeks. Short fibers induced only a small increase in labeling of bronchiolar epithelial and interstitial cells, which subsided by 5 days, when a small increase in labeled mesothelial and subpleural cells was seen. In contrast, long fibers damaged the bronchiolar epithelium and became incorporated into connective tissue. During regeneration, 12% of cells were labeled at 3 days and labeling was greater than controls to 4 weeks. Increased peribronchiolar labeling of fibroblasts and interstitial macrophages was seen around long fibers, and increased DNA synthesis by mesothelial and subpleural cells was found. Up to 2% of mesothelial cells were labeled 1 week after long fibers compared to near zero in controls. No long fibers were found at the pleura. Activation of interstitial macrophages in response to long crocidolite fibers is associated with fibroblast proliferation. It is now suggested that mesothelial cells may also be stimulated by cytokines from activated interstitial macrophages that diffuse across the interstitium, without requiring actual fiber translocation to the pleura. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 11 PMID:8475994

  6. Stromal fibers in oral squamous cell carcinoma: A possible new prognostic indicator?

    PubMed Central

    Kardam, Priyanka; Mehendiratta, Monica; Rehani, Shweta; Kumra, Madhumani; Sahay, Khushboo; Jain, Kanu

    2016-01-01

    Background: Many studies have been carried out to study the role of extracellular matrix proteins, growth factors and matrix metalloproteinases on tumor invasion. However, literature related to the analysis of connective tissue fibers in varying grades of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is very limited. Aim: To analyze the changes in collagen and elastic fibers in varying grades of (OSCC). Settings and Design: This retrospective study was carried out using a light and polarizing microscope. Materials and Methods: Three sections each were cut from fifty samples of varying grades of OSCC and ten samples of control followed by staining with H and E, Picrosirius-Red and Verhoeff–Van Gieson. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of collagen and elastic fibers were accomplished using set criteria. Statistical Analysis: Data were entered into the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13.5 for analysis. Results: A change in colors of collagen fibers was seen on progressing from well to poorly differentiated OSCC. Thin collagen fibers predominantly exhibited greenish yellow, but the thick fibers exhibited a variety of colors. As the grade of OSCC progressed, collagen fibers were loosely packed haphazardly arranged. Statistically insignificant results were obtained for quantitative analysis of collagen and qualitative analysis of elastic fibers. Conclusion: The collagen fibers undergo a change in color, orientation and packing in the stroma of varying grades of OSCC. The uniqueness of this study lies in the exploration of elastic fibers in OSCC which has not been done so far. PMID:27721605

  7. Fiber-based optical trapping for cell mechanics study and microrheology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ti, Chaoyang; Thomas, Gawain M.; Yu, Xiaokong; Wen, Qi; Tao, Mingjiang; Liu, Yuxiang

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we developed fiber based optical trapping system and explored its applications in biology and physics. We aim to replace objective lenses with optical fibers, both for optical trapping and particle position detection. Compared with objective lens based counterparts, fiber based optical trapping systems are small, low-cost, integratable, independent of objective lenses, and can work in turbid mediums. These advantages make fiber optical trapping systems ideal for applications in tightly confined spaces as well as integration with various microscopy techniques. We demonstrate the applications of fiber optical trapping systems in both single-cell mechanics and microrheology study of asphalt binders. Fiber optical trapping system is being used to study mechanical properties of viscoelastic hydrogel, as an important extra cellular matrix (ECM) material that is used to understand the force propagation on cell membranes on 2D substrates or in 3D compartments. Moreover, the fiber optical trapping system has also been demonstrated to measure the cellular response to the external mechanical stimuli. Direct measurements of cellular traction forces in 3D compartments are underway. In addition, fiber optical trapping systems are used to measure the microscale viscoelastic properties of asphalt binders, in order to improve the fundamental understanding of the relationship between mechanical and chemical properties of asphalt binders. This fundamental understanding could help targeted asphalt recycling and pavement maintenance. Fiber optical trapping systems are versatile and highly potential tools that can find applications in various areas ranging from mechanobiology to complex fluids.

  8. Gibberellin Overproduction Promotes Sucrose Synthase Expression and Secondary Cell Wall Deposition in Cotton Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juan; Song, Shui-Qing; Hu, Lin; Zeng, Jian-Yan; Li, Xian-Bi; Hou, Lei; Luo, Ming; Li, De-Mou; Pei, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive gibberellins (GAs) comprise an important class of natural plant growth regulators and play essential roles in cotton fiber development. To date, the molecular base of GAs' functions in fiber development is largely unclear. To address this question, the endogenous bioactive GA levels in cotton developing fibers were elevated by specifically up-regulating GA 20-oxidase and suppressing GA 2-oxidase via transgenic methods. Higher GA levels in transgenic cotton fibers significantly increased micronaire values, 1000-fiber weight, cell wall thickness and cellulose contents of mature fibers. Quantitative RT-PCR and biochemical analysis revealed that the transcription of sucrose synthase gene GhSusA1 and sucrose synthase activities were significantly enhanced in GA overproducing transgenic fibers, compared to the wild-type cotton. In addition, exogenous application of bioactive GA could promote GhSusA1 expression in cultured fibers, as well as in cotton hypocotyls. Our results suggested that bioactive GAs promoted secondary cell wall deposition in cotton fibers by enhancing sucrose synthase expression. PMID:24816840

  9. GluD2 Endows Parallel Fiber-Purkinje Cell Synapses with a High Regenerative Capacity.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, Ryoichi; Sakimura, Kenji; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2016-04-27

    Although injured axons usually do not regenerate in the adult CNS, parallel fibers (PFs) regenerate synaptic connections onto cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). In this study, we investigated the role of GluD2 in this regenerative process after PF transection using GluD2-knock-out (KO) mice. All dendritic spines on distal dendrites were innervated by PFs in sham-operated wild-type controls, whereas one-third were devoid of innervation in GluD2-KO mice. In both genotypes, a steep drop in the number of PF synapses occurred with a reciprocal surge in the number of free spines on postlesion day 1, when the PF territory aberrantly expanded toward the proximal dendrites. In wild-type mice, the territory and number of PF synapses were nearly fully restored to normal on postlesion day 7, although PF density remained low. Moreover, presynaptic and postsynaptic elements were markedly enlarged, and the PF terminal-to-PC spine contact ratio increased from 1:1 to 1:2 at most synapses. On postlesion day 30, the size and contact ratio of PF synapses returned to sham-operated control values and PF density recovered through the sprouting and elongation of PF collaterals. However, GluD2-KO mice showed neither a hypertrophic response nor territorial restoration 7 d postlesion, nor the recovery of PF axons or synapses on postlesion day 30. This suggests that PF wiring regenerates initially by inducing hypertrophic responses in surviving synaptic elements (hypertrophic phase), followed by collateral formation by PF axons and retraction of PF synapses (remodeling phase). Without GluD2, no transition to these regenerative phases occurs. The glutamate receptor GluD2 expressed at parallel fiber (PF)-Purkinje cell (PC) synapses regulates the formation and maintenance of the synapses. To investigate the role of GluD2 in their extraordinarily high regenerative capacity, the process after surgical transection of PFs was compared between wild-type and GluD2-knock-out mice. We discovered that, in

  10. Fiber biology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cotton fiber cells arising from seed epidermis is the most important agricultural textile commodity in the world. To produce fully mature fibers, approximately two months of fiber developmental process are required. The timing of four distinctive fiber development stages consisting of initiation, ...

  11. Compact optical cell system for vacuum ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy and its application to aqueous solution sample.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masahito; Yagi-Watanabe, Kazutoshi; Kaneko, Fusae; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2008-09-01

    We have designed a compact optical cell for studying the absorption and circular dichroism (CD) of a solution sample in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region using a temperature control unit. The cell size was 34 mm in diameter and 14 mm in length. Such compactness was obtained by coating the VUV scintillator onto the outside of the back window. Because this scintillator converts the transmitted VUV light to visible light, the outside of this cell is operated under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the sample solution was maintained in the range of 5 degrees C to 80 degrees C using a temperature control unit with a Peltier thermoelectric element. Changes in the sample temperature were observed by monitoring the absorption intensity of water. Through the study of VUV-CD spectra of ammonium camphor-10-sulfonate aqueous solutions and the transmitted spectrum of an empty cell, it was concluded that this cell unit has sufficient performance for use in VUV spectroscopy. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  12. Rho and Rab Small G Proteins Coordinately Reorganize Stress Fibers and Focal Adhesions in MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Hiroshi; Takaishi, Kenji; Nakano, Katsutoshi; Kodama, Atsuko; Oishi, Hideto; Shiozaki, Hitoshi; Monden, Morito; Sasaki, Takuya; Takai, Yoshimi

    1998-01-01

    The Rho subfamily of the Rho small G protein family (Rho) regulates formation of stress fibers and focal adhesions in many types of cultured cells. In moving cells, dynamic and coordinate disassembly and reassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions are observed, but the precise mechanisms in the regulation of these processes are poorly understood. We previously showed that 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) first induced disassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions followed by their reassembly in MDCK cells. The reassembled stress fibers showed radial-like morphology that was apparently different from the original. We analyzed here the mechanisms of these TPA-induced processes. Rho inactivation and activation were necessary for the TPA-induced disassembly and reassembly, respectively, of stress fibers and focal adhesions. Both inactivation and activation of the Rac subfamily of the Rho family (Rac) inhibited the TPA-induced reassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions but not their TPA-induced disassembly. Moreover, microinjection or transient expression of Rab GDI, a regulator of all the Rab small G protein family members, inhibited the TPA-induced reassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions but not their TPA-induced disassembly, indicating that, furthermore, activation of some Rab family members is necessary for their TPA-induced reassembly. Of the Rab family members, at least Rab5 activation was necessary for the TPA-induced reassembly of stress fibers and focal adhesions. The TPA-induced, small G protein-mediated reorganization of stress fibers and focal adhesions was closely related to the TPA-induced cell motility. These results indicate that the Rho and Rab family members coordinately regulate the TPA-induced reorganization of stress fibers and focal adhesions that may cause cell motility. PMID:9725912

  13. The Hagfish Gland Thread Cell: A Fiber-Producing Cell Involved in Predator Defense

    PubMed Central

    Fudge, Douglas S.; Schorno, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Fibers are ubiquitous in biology, and include tensile materials produced by specialized glands (such as silks), extracellular fibrils that reinforce exoskeletons and connective tissues (such as chitin and collagen), as well as intracellular filaments that make up the metazoan cytoskeleton (such as F-actin, microtubules, and intermediate filaments). Hagfish gland thread cells are unique in that they produce a high aspect ratio fiber from cytoskeletal building blocks within the confines of their cytoplasm. These threads are elaborately coiled into structures that readily unravel when they are ejected into seawater from the slime glands. In this review we summarize what is currently known about the structure and function of gland thread cells and we speculate about the mechanism that these cells use to produce a mechanically robust fiber that is almost one hundred thousand times longer than it is wide. We propose that a key feature of this mechanism involves the unidirectional rotation of the cell’s nucleus, which would serve to twist disorganized filaments into a coherent thread and impart a torsional stress on the thread that would both facilitate coiling and drive energetic unravelling in seawater. PMID:27258313

  14. A fast platform for simulating semi-flexible fiber suspensions applied to cell mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazockdast, Ehssan; Rahimian, Abtin; Zorin, Denis; Shelley, Michael

    2017-01-01

    We present a novel platform for the large-scale simulation of three-dimensional fibrous structures immersed in a Stokesian fluid and evolving under confinement or in free-space in three dimensions. One of the main motivations for this work is to study the dynamics of fiber assemblies within biological cells. For this, we also incorporate the key biophysical elements that determine the dynamics of these assemblies, which include the polymerization and depolymerization kinetics of fibers, their interactions with molecular motors and other objects, their flexibility, and hydrodynamic coupling. This work, to our knowledge, is the first technique to include many-body hydrodynamic interactions (HIs), and the resulting fluid flows, in cellular assemblies of flexible fibers. We use non-local slender body theory to compute the fluid-structure interactions of the fibers and a second-kind boundary integral formulation for other rigid bodies and the confining boundary. A kernel-independent implementation of the fast multipole method is utilized for efficient evaluation of HIs. The deformation of the fibers is described by nonlinear Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and their polymerization is modeled by the reparametrization of the dynamic equations in the appropriate non-Lagrangian frame. We use a pseudo-spectral representation of fiber positions and implicit time-stepping to resolve large fiber deformations, and to allow time-steps not excessively constrained by temporal stiffness or fiber-fiber interactions. The entire computational scheme is parallelized, which enables simulating assemblies of thousands of fibers. We use our method to investigate two important questions in the mechanics of cell division: (i) the effect of confinement on the hydrodynamic mobility of microtubule asters; and (ii) the dynamics of the positioning of mitotic spindle in complex cell geometries. Finally to demonstrate the general applicability of the method, we simulate the sedimentation of a cloud of

  15. Mesoscopic Adaptive Resolution Scheme toward Understanding of Interactions between Sickle Cell Fibers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Li, He; Bian, Xin; Li, Xuejin; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-07-11

    Understanding of intracellular polymerization of sickle hemoglobin (HbS) and subsequent interaction with the membrane of a red blood cell (RBC) is important to predict the altered morphologies and mechanical properties of sickle RBCs in sickle cell anemia. However, modeling the integrated processes of HbS nucleation, polymerization, HbS fiber interaction, and subsequent distortion of RBCs is challenging as they occur at multispatial scales, ranging from nanometers to micrometers. To make progress toward simulating the integrated processes, we propose a hybrid HbS fiber model, which couples fine-grained and coarse-grained HbS fiber models through a mesoscopic adaptive resolution scheme (MARS). To this end, we apply a microscopic model to capture the dynamic process of polymerization of HbS fibers, while maintaining the mechanical properties of polymerized HbS fibers by the mesoscopic model, thus providing a means of bridging the subcellular and cellular phenomena in sickle cell disease. At the subcellular level, this model can simulate HbS polymerization with preexisting HbS nuclei. At the cellular level, if combined with RBC models, the generated HbS fibers could be applied to study the morphologies and membrane stiffening of sickle RBCs. One important feature of the MARS is that it can be easily employed in other particle-based multiscale simulations where a dynamic coarse-graining and force-blending method is required. As demonstrations, we first apply the hybrid HbS fiber model to simulate the interactions of two growing fibers and find that their final configurations depend on the orientation and interaction distance between two fibers, in good agreement with experimental observations. We also model the formation of fiber bundles and domains so that we explore the mechanism that causes fiber branching. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Enhanced performance of ZnO-based dye-sensitized solar cells using TiO2/graphene nanocomposite compact layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chun-Ying; Chen, Po-Hao; Wu, Yeun-Jung; Chiang, Hai-Pang; Hwang, Jih-Shang; Lin, Pei-Te; Lai, Kuan-Yu; Shih-Sen Chien, Forest; Lin, Tai-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    The applications of TiO2/graphene nanocomposite as a compact layer for ZnO-based dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) have been studied. It was shown that the role of bifunctional graphene flakes in TiO2 compact layer not only suppressed the electron recombination between indium-doped tin oxide and electrolyte, but also reduced the resistance of compact layer. In addition, compared to typical compact layers, TiO2/graphene nanocomposite without blocking effect in optical transmittance could further boost the power conversion efficiency in DSSC. TiO2/graphene nanocomposite was demonstrated the potential to be an alternative of compact layer to typical dense TiO2 for ZnO-based DSSCs.

  17. Kinetochore fiber formation in animal somatic cells: dueling mechanisms come to a draw

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The attachment to and movement of a chromosome on the mitotic spindle are mediated by the formation of a bundle of microtubules (MTs) that tethers the kinetochore on the chromosome to a spindle pole. The origin of these “kinetochore fibers” (K fibers) has been investigated for over 125 years. As noted in 1944 by Schrader [Mitosis, Columbia University Press, New York, 110 pp.], there are three possible ways to form a K fiber: (a) it grows from the pole until it contacts the kinetochore, (b) it grows directly from the kinetochore, or (c) it forms as a result of an interaction between the pole and the chromosome. Since Schrader's time, it has been firmly established that K fibers in centrosome-containing animal somatic cells form as kinetochores capture MTs growing from the spindle pole (route a). It is now similarly clear that in cells lacking centrosomes, including higher plants and many animal oocytes, K fibers “self-assemble” from MTs generated by the chromosomes (route b). Can animal somatic cells form K fibers in the absence of centrosomes by the “self-assembly” pathway? In 2000, the answer to this question was shown to be a resounding “yes.” With this result, the next question became whether the presence of a centrosome normally suppresses K fiber self-assembly or if this route works concurrently with centrosome-mediated K-fiber formation. This question, too, has recently been answered: observations on untreated live animal cells expressing green fluorescent protein-tagged tubulin clearly show that kinetochores can nucleate the formation of their associated MTs in a unique manner in the presence of functional centrosomes. The concurrent operation of these two “dueling” routes for forming K fibers in animal cells helps explain why the attachment of kinetochores and the maturation of K fibers occur as quickly as they do on all chromosomes within a cell. PMID:16270218

  18. Compact 3-8  μm supercontinuum generation in a low-loss As2Se3 step-index fiber.

    PubMed

    Robichaud, Louis-Rafaël; Fortin, Vincent; Gauthier, Jean-Christophe; Châtigny, Stéphane; Couillard, Jean-François; Delarosbil, Jean-Luc; Vallée, Réal; Bernier, Martin

    2016-10-15

    A mid-infrared supercontinuum source spanning from 3 to 8 μm is demonstrated using a low-loss As2Se3 commercial step-index fiber. A maximum average output power of 1.5 mW is obtained at a low repetition rate of 2 kHz. Thanks to the low NA step-index fiber, the output is single mode for wavelengths above ∼5  μm. The pump source consists of an erbium-doped ZrF4-based in-amplifier supercontinuum source spanning from 3 to 4.2 μm. The effects of both the pump power and As2Se3 fiber length on the output characteristics are studied. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first compact supercontinuum source ever reported to reach 8 μm in a standard step-index fiber.

  19. Effects of extracellular fiber architecture on cell membrane shear stress in a 3D fibrous matrix.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, John A; Boschetti, Federica; Swartz, Melody A

    2007-01-01

    Interstitial fluid flow has been shown to affect the organization and behavior of cells in 3D environments in vivo and in vitro, yet the forces driving such responses are not clear. Due to the complex architecture of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and the difficulty of measuring fluid flow near cells embedded in it, the levels of shear stress experienced by cells in this environment are typically estimated using bulk-averaged matrix parameters such as hydraulic permeability. While this is useful for estimating average stresses, it cannot yield insight into how local matrix fiber architecture-which is cell-controlled in the immediate pericellular environment-affects the local stresses imposed on the cell surface. To address this, we used computational fluid dynamics to study flow through an idealized mesh constructed of a cubic lattice of fibers simulating a typical in vitro collagen gel. We found that, in such high porosity matrices, the fibers strongly affect the flow fields near the cell, with peak shear stresses up to five times higher than those predicted by the Brinkman equation. We also found that minor remodeling of the fibers near the cell surface had major effects on the shear stress profile on the cell. These findings demonstrate the importance of fiber architecture to the fluid forces on a cell embedded in a 3D matrix, and also show how small modifications in the local ECM can lead to large changes in the mechanical environment of the cell.

  20. Fiber-optic Raman sensing of cell proliferation probes and molecular vibrations: Brain-imaging perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-09-01

    Optical fibers are employed to sense fingerprint molecular vibrations in ex vivo experiments on the whole brain and detect cell proliferation probes in a model study on a quantitatively controlled solution. A specifically adapted spectral filtering procedure is shown to allow the Raman signal from molecular vibrations of interest to be discriminated against the background from the fiber, allowing a highly sensitive Raman detection of the recently demonstrated EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) labels of DNA synthesis in cells.

  1. N-cadherin regulates signaling mechanisms required for lens fiber cell elongation and lens morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Logan, Caitlin M; Rajakaruna, Suren; Bowen, Caitlin; Radice, Glenn L; Robinson, Michael L; Menko, A Sue

    2017-08-01

    Tissue development and regeneration involve high-ordered morphogenetic processes that are governed by elements of the cytoskeleton in conjunction with cell adhesion molecules. Such processes are particularly important in the lens whose structure dictates its function. Studies of our lens-specific N-cadherin conditional knockout mouse (N-cadcKO) revealed an essential role for N-cadherin in the migration of the apical tips of differentiating lens fiber cells along the apical surfaces of the epithelium, a region termed the Epithelial Fiber Interface (EFI), that is necessary for normal fiber cell elongation and the morphogenesis. Studies of the N-cadcKO lens suggest that N-cadherin function in fiber cell morphogenesis is linked to the activation of Rac1 and myosin II, both signaling pathways central to the regulation of cell motility including determining the directionality of cellular movement. The absence of N-cadherin did not disrupt lateral contacts between fiber cells during development, and the maintenance of Aquaporin-0 and increased expression of EphA2 at cell-cell interfaces suggests that these molecules may function in this role. E-cadherin was maintained in newly differentiating fiber cells without interfering with expression of lens-specific differentiation proteins but was not able to replace N-cadherin function in these cells. The dependence of migration of the fiber cell apical domains along the EFI for lens morphogenesis on N-cadherin provides new insight into the process of tissue development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Nucleolar Targeting by Platinum: p53-Independent Apoptosis Follows rRNA Inhibition, Cell-Cycle Arrest, and DNA Compaction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    TriplatinNC is a highly positively charged, substitution-inert derivative of the phase II clinical anticancer drug, BBR3464. Such substitution-inert complexes form a distinct subset of polynuclear platinum complexes (PPCs) interacting with DNA and other biomolecules through noncovalent interactions. Rapid cellular entry is facilitated via interaction with cell surface glycosoaminoglycans and is a mechanism unique to PPCs. Nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (nanoSIMS) showed rapid distribution within cytoplasmic and nucleolar compartments, but not the nucleus. In this article, the downstream effects of nucleolar localization are described. In human colon carcinoma cells, HCT116, the production rate of 47S rRNA precursor transcripts was dramatically reduced as an early event after drug treatment. Transcriptional inhibition of rRNA was followed by a robust G1 arrest, and activation of apoptotic proteins caspase-8, -9, and -3 and PARP-1 in a p53-independent manner. Using cell synchronization and flow cytometry, it was determined that cells treated while in G1 arrest immediately, but cells treated in S or G2 successfully complete mitosis. Twenty-four hours after treatment, the majority of cells finally arrest in G1, but nearly one-third contained highly compacted DNA; a distinct biological feature that cannot be associated with mitosis, senescence, or apoptosis. This unique effect mirrored the efficient condensation of tRNA and DNA in cell-free systems. The combination of DNA compaction and apoptosis by TriplatinNC treatment conferred striking activity in platinum-resistant and/or p53 mutant or null cell lines. Taken together, our results support that the biological activity of TriplatinNC reflects reduced metabolic deactivation (substitution-inert compound not reactive to sulfur nucleophiles), high cellular accumulation, and novel consequences of high-affinity noncovalent DNA binding, producing a new profile and a further shift in the structure

  3. Purkinje cell stripes and long-term depression at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapse

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The cerebellar cortex comprises a stereotyped array of transverse zones and parasagittal stripes, built around multiple Purkinje cell subtypes, which is highly conserved across birds and mammals. This architecture is revealed in the restricted expression patterns of numerous molecules, in the terminal fields of the afferent projections, in the distribution of interneurons, and in the functional organization. This review provides an overview of cerebellar architecture with an emphasis on attempts to relate molecular architecture to the expression of long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber-Purkinje cell (pf-PC) synapse. PMID:24734006

  4. Removing PAH`s with cells on fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Clyde, R.

    1996-12-31

    There are over 1,500 sites contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from coal gas plants. White rot fungi degrade PAH`s in soil, but the problem is to supply oxygen needed for growth of the fungus. When old cardboard boxes are buried with the fungus, oxygen is entrapped in the corrugations. A method for growing the fungus quickly is also described. Pseudomonade also degrade PAH and several strains of this bacterium have been grown on fibers. The fibers have high area, and when Celite is entrapped in the fibers, more area is provided.

  5. Molecular markers associated with the immature fiber (im) gene affecting the degree of fiber cell wall thickening in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jin; Moon, Hong S; Delhom, Christopher D; Zeng, Linghe; Fang, David D

    2013-01-01

    Cotton fiber fineness and maturity measured indirectly as micronaire (MIC) are important properties of determining fiber grades in the textile market. To understand the genetic control and molecular mechanisms of fiber fineness and maturity, we studied two near isogenic lines, Gossypium hirsutum, Texas Marker-1 wild type (TM-1) and immature fiber (im) mutant showing a significant difference in MIC values. The fibers from im mutant plants were finer and less mature with lower MIC values than those from the recurrent parent, TM-1. A comprehensive fiber property analysis of TM-1 and im mutant showed that the lower MIC of fibers in im mutant was due to the lower degree of fiber cell wall thickening as compared to the TM-1 fibers. Using an F(2) population comprising 366 progenies derived from a cross between TM-1 and im mutant, we confirmed that the immature fiber phenotype present in a mutant plant was controlled by one single recessive gene im. Furthermore, we identified 13 simple sequence repeat markers that were closely linked to the im gene located on chromosome 3. Molecular markers associated with the im gene will lay the foundation to further investigate genetic information required for improving cotton fiber fineness and maturity.

  6. Compact diffraction phase microscopy for quantitative visualization of cells in biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talaikova, N. A.; Ryabukho, V. P.

    2016-08-01

    We consider a simplified and compact scheme of interference phase microscopy using a diffraction grating and spatial filtering of the diffracted field, i.e., diffraction phase microscopy. The scheme and the parameters of the device with the possibility of using the optical system of a smartphone and its software are analysed. The results of experimental determination of the spatial structure parameters of erythrocytes are presented.

  7. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  8. Solid-state, polymer-based fiber solar cells with carbon nanotube electrodes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dianyi; Zhao, Mingyan; Li, Yan; Bian, Zuqiang; Zhang, Luhui; Shang, Yuanyuan; Xia, Xinyuan; Zhang, Sen; Yun, Daqin; Liu, Zhiwei; Cao, Anyuan; Huang, Chunhui

    2012-12-21

    Most previous fiber-shaped solar cells were based on photoelectrochemical systems involving liquid electrolytes, which had issues such as device encapsulation and stability. Here, we deposited classical semiconducting polymer-based bulk heterojunction layers onto stainless steel wires to form primary electrodes and adopted carbon nanotube thin films or densified yarns to replace conventional metal counter electrodes. The polymer-based fiber cells with nanotube film or yarn electrodes showed power conversion efficiencies in the range 1.4% to 2.3%, with stable performance upon rotation and large-angle bending and during long-time storage without further encapsulation. Our fiber solar cells consisting of a polymeric active layer sandwiched between steel and carbon electrodes have potential in the manufacturing of low-cost, liquid-free, and flexible fiber-based photovoltaics.

  9. Disassembly of the lens fiber cell nucleus to create a clear lens: the p27 descent

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The eye lens is unique among tissues: it is transparent, does not form tumors, and the majority of its cells degrade their organelles, including their cell nuclei. A mystery for over a century, there has been considerable recent progress in elucidating mechanisms of lens fiber cell denucleation (LFC...

  10. Beta-1 integrin is important for the structural maintenance and homeostasis of differentiating fiber cells

    PubMed Central

    Scheiblin, David A.; Gao, Junyuan; Caplan, Jeffrey L.; Simirskii, Vladimir N.; Czymmek, Kirk J.; Mathias, Richard T.; Duncan, Melinda K.

    2014-01-01

    β1-integrin is a heterodimeric transmembrane protein that has roles in both cell-extracellular matrix and cell-cell interactions. Conditional deletion of β1-integrin from all lens cells during embryonic development results in profound lens defects, however, it is less clear whether this reflects functions in the lens epithelium alone or whether this protein plays a role in lens fibers. Thus, a conditional approach was used to delete β1-integrin solely from the lens fiber cells. This deletion resulted in two distinct phenotypes with some lenses exhibiting cataracts while others were clear, albeit with refractive defects. Analysis of “clear” conditional knockout lenses revealed that they had profound defects in fiber cell morphology associated with the loss of the F-actin network. Physiological measurements found that the lens fiber cells had a two-fold increase in gap junctional coupling, perhaps due to differential localization of connexins 46 and 50, as well as increased water permeability. This would presumably facilitate transport of ions and nutrients through the lens, and may partially explain how lenses with profound structural abnormalities can maintain transparency. In summary, β1-integrin plays a role in maintaining the cellular morphology and homeostasis of the lens fiber cells. PMID:24607497

  11. Coding channels for taste perception: information transmission from taste cells to gustatory nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Ryusuke; Yasumatsu, Keiko; Shigemura, Noriatsu; Ninomiya, Yuzo

    2006-12-01

    Taste signals are first detected by the taste receptor cells, which are located in taste buds existing in the tongue, soft palate, larynx and epiglottis. Taste receptor cells contact with the chemical compounds in oral cavity through the apical processes which protrude into the taste pore. Interaction between chemical compounds and the taste receptor produces activation of taste receptor cells directly or indirectly. Then the signals are transmitted to gustatory nerve fibers and higher order neurons. A recent study demonstrated many similarities between response properties of taste receptor cells with action potentials and those of the gustatory nerve fibers innervating them, suggesting information derived from receptor cells generating action potentials may form a major component of taste information that is transmitted to gustatory nerve fibers. These findings may also indicate that there is no major modification of taste information sampled by taste receptor cells in synaptic transmission from taste cells to nerve fibers although there is indirect evidence. In the peripheral taste system, gustatory nerve fibers may selectively contact with taste receptor cells that have similar response properties and convey constant taste information to the higher order neurons.

  12. Unique and Analogous Functions of Aquaporin 0 for Fiber Cell Architecture and Ocular Lens Transparency

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, S. Sindhu; Eswaramoorthy, Subramaniam; Mathias, Richard T.; Varadaraj, Kulandaiappan

    2011-01-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) 1 and AQP0 water channels are expressed in lens epithelial and fiber cells, respectively, facilitating fluid circulation for nourishing the avascular lens to maintain transparency. Even though AQP0 water permeability is 40-fold less than AQP1, AQP0 is selectively expressed in the fibers. Delimited AQP0 fiber expression is attributed to a unique structural role as an adhesion protein. To validate this notion, we determined if wild type (WT) lens ultrastructure and fiber cell adhesion are different in AQP0−/−, and TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− mice that transgenically express AQP1 (TgAQP1) in fiber cells without AQP0 (AQP0−/−). In WT, lenses were transparent with ‘Y’ sutures. Fibers contained opposite end curvature, lateral interdigitations and hexagonal shape, and were arranged as concentric growth shells. AQP0−/− lenses were cataractous, lacked ‘Y’ sutures, ordered packing and well-defined lateral interdigitations. TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− lenses showed improvement in transparency and lateral interdigitations in the outer cortex while inner cortex and nuclear fibers were severely disintegrated. Transmission electron micrographs exhibited tightly packed fiber cells in WT whereas AQP0−/− and TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− lenses had wide extracellular spaces. Fibers were easily separable by teasing in AQP0−/− and TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− lenses compared to WT. Our data suggest that the increased water permeability through AQP1 does not compensate for loss of AQP0 expression in TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− mice. Fiber cell AQP0 expression is required to maintain their organization, which is a requisite for lens transparency. AQP0 appears necessary for cell-to-cell adhesion and thereby to minimize light scattering since in the AQP0−/− and TgAQP1+/+/AQP0−/− lenses, fiber cell disorganization was evident. PMID:21511033

  13. Induction of heme oxygenase in mammalian cells by mineral fibers: distinctive effect of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, K; Hei, T K

    1996-04-01

    Exponentially growing human-hamster hybrid [AL] cells treated with a 40 micrograms/ml (8 micrograms/cm2) dose of UICC standard reference chrysotile fibers induced heme oxygenase (HO) protein with a maximum expression level at 8 h post-treatment. While the constitutive HO expression was detectable in non-treated AL cells, the protein level was increased approximately 4.5-fold in fiber-treated cells. The induction was dose-dependent at fiber concentration between 2.5 micrograms/ml (0.5 microgram/cm2) and 40 micrograms/ml (8 micrograms/cm2) with the induced HO concentrated mostly in the cytoplasm as shown by immunostaining. Several other types of mineral fibers examined including crocidolites, tremolites, and erionites also induced HO synthesis with varying degree of efficiency. In general, chrysotile and crocidolite were more efficient inducers of HO than tremolite and erionite when compared at fiber doses that resulted in approximately 50% survival (LD50) level. The effects of antioxidant enzymes on HO induction were examined by concurrent treatment of fiber-exposed cultures with SOD and catalase. Although addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase inhibited HO induction in a dose-dependent manner, they offered no protection on fiber-mediated clonogenic toxicity in the same population of treated cells. These results suggest that reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by asbestos fibers play an essential role in the induction of HO and that different mineral fibers, when applied at equitoxic doses, often result in different oxidative stress status as determined by the induction of HO proteins.

  14. Heteromannan and Heteroxylan Cell Wall Polysaccharides Display Different Dynamics During the Elongation and Secondary Cell Wall Deposition Phases of Cotton Fiber Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Gomez, Mercedes C.; Runavot, Jean-Luc; Guo, Xiaoyuan; Bourot, Stéphane; Benians, Thomas A.S.; Willats, William G.T.; Meulewaeter, Frank; Knox, J. Paul

    2015-01-01

    The roles of non-cellulosic polysaccharides in cotton fiber development are poorly understood. Combining glycan microarrays and in situ analyses with monoclonal antibodies, polysaccharide linkage analyses and transcript profiling, the occurrence of heteromannan and heteroxylan polysaccharides and related genes in developing and mature cotton (Gossypium spp.) fibers has been determined. Comparative analyses on cotton fibers at selected days post-anthesis indicate different temporal and spatial regulation of heteromannan and heteroxylan during fiber development. The LM21 heteromannan epitope was more abundant during the fiber elongation phase and localized mainly in the primary cell wall. In contrast, the AX1 heteroxylan epitope occurred at the transition phase and during secondary cell wall deposition, and localized in both the primary and the secondary cell walls of the cotton fiber. These developmental dynamics were supported by transcript profiling of biosynthetic genes. Whereas our data suggest a role for heteromannan in fiber elongation, heteroxylan is likely to be involved in the regulation of cellulose deposition of secondary cell walls. In addition, the relative abundance of these epitopes during fiber development varied between cotton lines with contrasting fiber characteristics from four species (G. hirsutum, G. barbadense, G. arboreum and G. herbaceum), suggesting that these non-cellulosic polysaccharides may be involved in determining final fiber quality and suitability for industrial processing. PMID:26187898

  15. [Modulatory Effect of Mouse Compact Bone-derived Suspending MSC on T Cells and It's Related Mechanisms].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Wu, Wen-Qing; Ding, Li; Liu, Yuan-Lin; Mao, Ning; Zhang, Yi; Zhu, Heng; Ning, Shou-Bin

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the modulatory effect of the MSC derived from low attaching culture systems (suspending MSC) on T lymphocytes and the related mechanisms. The suspending MSC were generated from mouse compact bones by using low attaching plates and adherent cell culture flasks, respectively. The morphology of suspending MSC was observed under the inverted microscope and the cells were induced to differentiate into osteoblasts and adipocytes. Further, the surface antigen profile of MSC was analyzed with flow cytometry. In addition, the culture medium (CM) of suspending MSC and adherent MSC was collected and added into the activated T cell cultures before detection of the proliferation by CFSE assay. Moreover, the modulaory effects of the CM on the T cell-derived cytokines were detected by quantitative PCR. Also, the mRNA expression of cytokines of MSC was detected. The suspending MSC grew in floating cell spheres and differentiated into osteoblasts and adipocytes in the induction medium. Furthermore, the suspending MSC shared the typical immuno-phenotype with their adherent counterparts. In addition, the results of CFSE assay demonstrated that suspending MSC derived CM suppressed ConA induced T cell proliferation. The results of quantitative PCR revealed that suspending MSC expressed transforming factor β1 and interleukin-6 at a higher level and suppressed the T cell expressing interferon γ and interleukine-17A. The suspending MSC exerted an unique modulatoy effect on T cells, which is quite different to adherent MSC.

  16. Improve efficiency of perovskite solar cells by using Magnesium doped ZnO and TiO2 compact layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baktash, Ardeshir; Amiri, Omid; Sasani, Alireza

    2016-05-01

    Here the effect of Magnesium doped TiO2 and ZnO as hole blocking layers (HBLs) are investigated by using solar cell capacitance simulator (SCAPS). The Impact of Magnesium concentration into the TiO2 and ZnO and effect of operating temperature on the performance of the perovskite solar cell are investigated. Best cell performance for both TiO2 and ZnO HBLs (with cell efficiencies of 19.86% and 19.57% respectively) are concluded for the doping level of 10% of Mg into the structure of HBLs. Increase in operating temperature from 300 K to 400 K are decreased the performance of the perovskite solar cell with both pure and Mg-doped HBLs. However, the cells with pure ZnO layer and with Zn0.9 Mg0.1O layer show the highest (with a decline of 8.88% in efficiency) and the lowest stability (with a decline of 50.49% in efficiency) at higher temperatures respectively. Moreover, the cell with Ti0.9 Mg0.1O2 layer shows better stability (with 21.85% reduction in efficiency) than the cell with pure TiO2 compact layer (with 23.28% reduction in efficiency) at higher operating temperatures.

  17. Preparation of adult muscle fiber-associated stem/precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Conboy, Michael J; Conboy, Irina M

    2010-01-01

    In our studies of muscle regeneration we have developed, modified, and optimized techniques to isolate and study the stem and precursor cells to muscle tissue. Our goals have been to obtain for study muscle fibers in bulk, or the fiber-associated cells, separately from the other cells found in muscle. Using these techniques, myofiber-associated cells may be isolated from neonatal through adult muscle, from resting or from regenerating muscle, thus allowing one to investigate the cellular populations participating during the time course of these events. The protocol is applicable to any age and condition of muscle and may be adapted for other tissues.

  18. Eccentric exercise increases satellite cell content in type II muscle fibers.

    PubMed

    Cermak, Naomi M; Snijders, Tim; McKay, Bryon R; Parise, Gianni; Verdijk, Lex B; Tarnopolsky, Mark A; Gibala, Martin J; Van Loon, Luc J C

    2013-02-01

    Satellite cells (SCs) are of key importance in skeletal muscle tissue growth, repair, and regeneration. A single bout of high-force eccentric exercise has been demonstrated to increase mixed muscle SC content after 1-7 d of postexercise recovery. However, little is known about fiber type-specific changes in SC content and their activation status within 24 h of postexercise recovery. Nine recreationally active young men (23 ± 1 yr) performed 300 eccentric actions of the knee extensors on an isokinetic dynamometer. Skeletal muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were collected preexercise and 24 h postexercise. Muscle fiber type-specific SC content and the number of activated SCs were determined by immunohistochemical analyses. There was no difference between Type I and Type II muscle fiber SC content before exercise. SC content significantly increased 24 h postexercise in Type II muscle fibers (from 0.085 ± 0.012 to 0.133 ± 0.016 SCs per fiber, respectively; P < 0.05), whereas there was no change in Type I fibers. In accordance, activation status increased from preexercise to 24 h postexercise as demonstrated by the increase in the number of DLK1+ SCs in Type II muscle fibers (from 0.027 ± 0.008 to 0.070 ± 0.017 SCs per muscle fiber P < 0.05). Although no significant changes were observed in the number of Ki-67+ SCs, we did observe an increase in the number of proliferating cell nuclear antigen-positive SCs after 24 h of postexercise recovery. A single bout of high-force eccentric exercise increases muscle fiber SC content and activation status in Type II but not Type I muscle fibers.

  19. Retinal flat cells are a substrate that facilitates retinal neuron growth and fiber formation.

    PubMed

    Li, H P; Sheffield, J B

    1986-03-01

    When embryonic chick neural retinas are dissociated into a suspension of single cells and plated in stationary cultures, "flat cells" spread out and form a monolayer to which the neuronal cells attach. It has been shown previously that the flat cells are related to the Müller cell population of the retina. The neuronal cells form aggregates interconnected by bundles of axon-like fibers. The authors have been able to isolate relatively pure flat cells by shaking off the neuronal aggregates after 5 or 6 days of culture. In order to determine if the flat cells have a unique relationship with the neuronal cells, freshly dissociated neural retina cells were added to monolayers of flat cells and their behavior compared to that on chick embryo mesodermal cells. It has been observed by phase contrast and scanning electron microscopy that the growth behavior of the retina cells on flat cells is significantly different from that on mesodermal cells. On flat cells, neuronal retina cells form flat patches in which new growing flat cells fuse with the monolayer, and neuronal cells attach as single cells or small clusters. Axon-like fibers are present several hours after plating, and by day 4 an extensive network of fibers connects single cells and clusters on the surface of the monolayer. When retina cells are plated onto mesodermal cells, the cells form aggregates which are organized along the long axis of the mesodermal cells. The flat cells provide a unique substrate for the differentiation and neurite extension of neuronal cells from embryonic chick retina.

  20. Cell-type-dependent enzymatic hydrolysis of palm residues: chemical and surface characterization of fibers and parenchyma cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ning; Liu, Hao; Fu, Shiyu; Chen, Shicheng

    2013-02-01

    Chemical and surface characteristics of sulfite-pretreated royal palm sheath (RPS) fibers and parenchyma cells were investigated in order to study cell-type-dependent biomass hydrolysis by cellulase. Size, chemical composition, cellulose crystallinity and the exposure of cellulose microfibrils in pretreated RPS biomass affected the enzymatic accessibility and digestibility of different cell-type substrates.

  1. Rechargeable lithium-ion cells using graphitized mesophase-pitch-based carbon fiber anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Takami, Norio; Satoh, Asako; Hara, Michikazu; Ohsaki, Takahisa

    1995-08-01

    The electrochemistry of lithium intercalation into a graphitized mesophase-pitch-based carbon fiber with a radial-like texture used as the anode material in rechargeable lithium-ion cells was characterized. The radial-like texture in the cross section of the carbon fiber contributed to the rapid diffusion of lithium ions, resulting in the high rate capability. The anode performance of the graphitized carbon fiber was superior to that of the graphite. Experimental flat-plate C/LiCoO{sub 2} lithium-ion cells using the graphitized carbon fiber anode exhibited a high mid-discharge voltage of 3.7 V, a high rate capability, and a long cycle life of more than 400 cycles at 2 mA/cm{sup 2} mA/cm{sup 2} during charge-discharge cycling between 4.2 and 2.7 V. The long cycle life obtained for the cell was due to no significant change in resistance associated with the passivating films on the graphitized carbon fiber with extended cycles. It was also demonstrated that A size C/LiCoO{sub 2} cells using the graphitized carbon fiber anode have excellent rate performance at discharge currents between 0.25 and 3 A, a large discharge capacity of 0.95 Ah, and a high energy density of 310 Wh/dm{sup 3} and 120 Wh/kg.

  2. A compact bellows-driven diamond anvil cell for high-pressure, low-temperature magnetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yejun; Silevitch, D M; Rosenbaum, T F

    2014-03-01

    We present the design of an efficient bellows-controlled diamond anvil cell that is optimized for use inside the bores of high-field superconducting magnets in helium-3 cryostats, dilution refrigerators, and commercial physical property measurement systems. Design of this non-magnetic pressure cell focuses on in situ pressure tuning and measurement by means of a helium-filled bellows actuator and fiber-coupled ruby fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. We demonstrate the utility of this pressure cell with ac susceptibility measurements of superconducting, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic phase transitions to pressures exceeding 8 GPa. This cell provides an opportunity to probe charge and magnetic order continuously and with high resolution in the three-dimensional Magnetic Field-Pressure-Temperature parameter space.

  3. A compact bellows-driven diamond anvil cell for high-pressure, low-temperature magnetic measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Yejun; Silevitch, D. M.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2014-03-15

    We present the design of an efficient bellows-controlled diamond anvil cell that is optimized for use inside the bores of high-field superconducting magnets in helium-3 cryostats, dilution refrigerators, and commercial physical property measurement systems. Design of this non-magnetic pressure cell focuses on in situ pressure tuning and measurement by means of a helium-filled bellows actuator and fiber-coupled ruby fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. We demonstrate the utility of this pressure cell with ac susceptibility measurements of superconducting, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic phase transitions to pressures exceeding 8 GPa. This cell provides an opportunity to probe charge and magnetic order continuously and with high resolution in the three-dimensional Magnetic Field–Pressure–Temperature parameter space.

  4. A compact bellows-driven diamond anvil cell for high-pressure, low-temperature magnetic measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yejun; Silevitch, D. M.; Rosenbaum, T. F.

    2014-03-01

    We present the design of an efficient bellows-controlled diamond anvil cell that is optimized for use inside the bores of high-field superconducting magnets in helium-3 cryostats, dilution refrigerators, and commercial physical property measurement systems. Design of this non-magnetic pressure cell focuses on in situ pressure tuning and measurement by means of a helium-filled bellows actuator and fiber-coupled ruby fluorescence spectroscopy, respectively. We demonstrate the utility of this pressure cell with ac susceptibility measurements of superconducting, ferromagnetic, and antiferromagnetic phase transitions to pressures exceeding 8 GPa. This cell provides an opportunity to probe charge and magnetic order continuously and with high resolution in the three-dimensional Magnetic Field-Pressure-Temperature parameter space.

  5. Effect of dietary fibers on losartan uptake and transport in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Iwazaki, Ayano; Takahashi, Naho; Miyake, Reiko; Hiroshima, Yuka; Abe, Mariko; Yasui, Airi; Imai, Kimie

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of dietary fibers on the transport of losartan, an angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, in small intestinal cells. Using Caco-2 cells in vitro, losartan uptake and transport were evaluated in the presence of various fibers (cellulose, chitosan, sodium alginate and glucomannan). Dietary fibers caused a decrease in the uptake of losartan, with chitosan causing a significant reduction. Chitosan and glucomannan significantly reduced the transport of losartan, while cellulose or sodium alginate did not. Dietary fibers also reduced the level of free losartan; however, this did not correlate with the observed reduction in losartan uptake and transport. In summary, chitosan had the greatest inhibitory effect on losartan uptake and transport, and this potential interaction should be considered in patients taking losartan. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Local alignment vectors reveal cancer cell-induced ECM fiber remodeling dynamics.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Konen, Jessica; Wilkinson, Scott; Marcus, Adam I; Jiang, Yi

    2017-01-03

    Invasive cancer cells interact with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), remodeling ECM fiber network structure by condensing, degrading, and aligning these fibers. We developed a novel local alignment vector analysis method to quantitatively measure collagen fiber alignment as a vector field using Circular Statistics. This method was applied to human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, embedded as spheroids in a collagen gel. Collagen remodeling was monitored using second harmonic generation imaging under normal conditions and when the LKB1-MARK1 pathway was disrupted through RNAi-based approaches. The results showed that inhibiting LKB1 or MARK1 in NSCLC increases the collagen fiber alignment and captures outward alignment vectors from the tumor spheroid, corresponding to high invasiveness of LKB1 mutant cancer cells. With time-lapse imaging of ECM micro-fiber morphology, the local alignment vector can measure the dynamic signature of invasive cancer cell activity and cell-migration-induced ECM and collagen remodeling and realigning dynamics.

  7. Local alignment vectors reveal cancer cell-induced ECM fiber remodeling dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Byoungkoo; Konen, Jessica; Wilkinson, Scott; Marcus, Adam I.; Jiang, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Invasive cancer cells interact with the surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM), remodeling ECM fiber network structure by condensing, degrading, and aligning these fibers. We developed a novel local alignment vector analysis method to quantitatively measure collagen fiber alignment as a vector field using Circular Statistics. This method was applied to human non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines, embedded as spheroids in a collagen gel. Collagen remodeling was monitored using second harmonic generation imaging under normal conditions and when the LKB1-MARK1 pathway was disrupted through RNAi-based approaches. The results showed that inhibiting LKB1 or MARK1 in NSCLC increases the collagen fiber alignment and captures outward alignment vectors from the tumor spheroid, corresponding to high invasiveness of LKB1 mutant cancer cells. With time-lapse imaging of ECM micro-fiber morphology, the local alignment vector can measure the dynamic signature of invasive cancer cell activity and cell-migration-induced ECM and collagen remodeling and realigning dynamics. PMID:28045069

  8. Sorbitol and gluconic acid production using permeabilized zymomonas mobilis cells confined by hollow-fiber membranes.

    PubMed

    Ferraz, H C; Borges, C P; Alves, T L

    2000-10-01

    Immobilization of Zymomonas mobilis by different methods was investigated. Experiments were performed in order to choose the most appropriate support for the immobilization of the cells. The most advantageous option was to use permeabilized cells in the bore of microporous hollow fibers. Whereas the reaction rate was about 33 g of gluconate/(g of protein x h) using hollow fibers, which is comparable to that observed by using free cells, the calcium alginate immobilized cells presented a reaction rate of 4 g of gluconate/(g of protein x h). These results can be explained by the mass transfer resistance effect, which, indeed, was much lower in the case of hollow-fiber membranes than in the alginate gel beads. A loss of enzymatic activity during the reaction was observed in all experiments, which was attributed to the lactone produced as an intermediate of the reaction.

  9. Processing and properties of multiscale cellular thermoplastic fiber reinforced composite (CellFRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrentino, L.; Cafiero, L.; D'Auria, M.; Iannace, S.

    2015-12-01

    High performance fiber reinforced polymer composites are made by embedding high strength/modulus fibers in a polymeric matrix. They are a class of materials that owe its success to the impressive specific mechanical properties with respect to metals. In many weight-sensitive applications, where high mechanical properties and low mass are required, properties per unit of mass are more important than absolute properties and further weight reduction is desirable. A route to reach this goal could be the controlled induction of porosity into the polymeric matrix, while still ensuring load transfer to the reinforcing fibers and fiber protection from the environment. Cellular lightweight fiber reinforced composites (CellFRC) were prepared embedding gas bubbles of controlled size within a high performance thermoplastic matrix reinforced with continuous fibers. Pores were induced after the composite was first saturated with CO2 and then foamed by using an in situ foaming/shaping technology based on compression moulding with adjustable mould cavities. The presence of micro- or submicro-sized cells in the new CellFRC reduced the apparent density of the structure and led to significant improvements of its impact properties. Both structural and functional performances were further improved through the use of a platelet-like nanofiller (Expanded Graphite) dispersed into the matrix.

  10. Effect of polyvinylidene fluoride electrospun fiber orientation on neural stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lins, Luanda C; Wianny, Florence; Livi, Sebastien; Dehay, Colette; Duchet-Rumeau, Jannick; Gérard, Jean-François

    2016-08-29

    Electrospun polymer piezoelectric fibers can be used in neural tissue engineering (NTE) to mimic the physical, biological, and material properties of the native extracellular matrix. In this work, we have developed scaffolds based on polymer fiber architectures for application in NTE. To study the role of such three-dimensional scaffolds, a rotating drum collector was used for electrospinning poly(vinylidene) fluoride (PVDF) polymer at various rotation speeds. The morphology, orientation, polymorphism, as well as the mechanical behavior of the nonaligned and aligned fiber-based architectures were characterized. We have demonstrated that the jet flow and the electrostatic forces generated by electrospinning of PVDF induced local conformation changes which promote the generation of the β-phase. Fiber anisotropy could be a critical feature for the design of suitable scaffolds for NTEs. We thus assessed the impact of PVDF fiber alignment on the behavior of monkey neural stem cells (NSCs). NSCs were seeded on nonaligned and aligned scaffolds and their morphology, adhesion, and differentiation capacities into the neuronal and glial pathways were studied using microscopic techniques. Significant changes in the growth and differentiation capacities of NSCs into neuronal and glial cells as a function of the fiber alignment were evidenced. These results demonstrate that PVDF scaffolds may serve as instructive scaffolds for NSC survival and differentiation, and may be valuable tools for the development of cell- and scaffold-based strategies for neural repair. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Aligned fibers direct collective cell migration to engineer closing and nonclosing wound gaps.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Puja; Ng, Colin; Jana, Aniket; Padhi, Abinash; Szymanski, Paige; Lee, Jerry S H; Behkam, Bahareh; Nain, Amrinder S

    2017-09-15

    Cell emergence onto damaged or organized fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM) is a crucial precursor to collective cell migration in wound closure and cancer metastasis, respectively. However, there is a fundamental gap in our quantitative understanding of the role of local ECM size and arrangement in cell emergence-based migration and local gap closure. Here, using ECM-mimicking nanofibers bridging cell monolayers, we describe a method to recapitulate and quantitatively describe these in vivo behaviors over multispatial (single cell to cell sheets) and temporal (minutes to weeks) scales. On fiber arrays with large interfiber spacing, cells emerge (invade) either singularly by breaking cell-cell junctions analogous to release of a stretched rubber band (recoil), or in groups of few cells (chains), whereas on closely spaced fibers, multiple chains emerge collectively. Advancing cells on fibers form cell streams, which support suspended cell sheets (SCS) of various sizes and curvatures. SCS converge to form local gaps that close based on both the gap size and shape. We document that cell stream spacing of 375 µm and larger hinders SCS advancement, thus providing abilities to engineer closing and nonclosing gaps. Altogether we highlight the importance of studying cell-fiber interactions and matrix structural remodeling in fundamental and translational cell biology. © 2017 Sharma et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  12. Polymeric optical fiber tweezers as a tool for single cell micro manipulation and sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues Ribeiro, R. S.; Soppera, O.; Guerreiro, A.; Jorge, P. A...

    2015-09-01

    In this paper a new type of polymeric fiber optic tweezers for single cell manipulation is reported. The optical trapping of a yeast cell using a polymeric micro lens fabricated by guided photo polymerization at the fiber tip is demonstrated. The 2D trapping of the yeast cells is analyzed and maximum optical forces on the pN range are calculated. The experimental results are supported by computational simulations using a FDTD method. Moreover, new insights on the potential for simultaneous sensing and optical trapping, are presented.

  13. Three-dimensional hierarchical cultivation of human skin cells on bio-adaptive hybrid fibers.

    PubMed

    Planz, Viktoria; Seif, Salem; Atchison, Jennifer S; Vukosavljevic, Branko; Sparenberg, Lisa; Kroner, Elmar; Windbergs, Maike

    2016-07-11

    The human skin comprises a complex multi-scale layered structure with hierarchical organization of different cells within the extracellular matrix (ECM). This supportive fiber-reinforced structure provides a dynamically changing microenvironment with specific topographical, mechanical and biochemical cell recognition sites to facilitate cell attachment and proliferation. Current advances in developing artificial matrices for cultivation of human cells concentrate on surface functionalizing of biocompatible materials with different biomolecules like growth factors to enhance cell attachment. However, an often neglected aspect for efficient modulation of cell-matrix interactions is posed by the mechanical characteristics of such artificial matrices. To address this issue, we fabricated biocompatible hybrid fibers simulating the complex biomechanical characteristics of native ECM in human skin. Subsequently, we analyzed interactions of such fibers with human skin cells focusing on the identification of key fiber characteristics for optimized cell-matrix interactions. We successfully identified the mediating effect of bio-adaptive elasto-plastic stiffness paired with hydrophilic surface properties as key factors for cell attachment and proliferation, thus elucidating the synergistic role of these parameters to induce cellular responses. Co-cultivation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes on such fiber mats representing the specific cells in dermis and epidermis resulted in a hierarchical organization of dermal and epidermal tissue layers. In addition, terminal differentiation of keratinocytes at the air interface was observed. These findings provide valuable new insights into cell behaviour in three-dimensional structures and cell-material interactions which can be used for rational development of bio-inspired functional materials for advanced biomedical applications.

  14. Cotton fiber tips have diverse morphologies and show evidence of apical cell wall synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Stiff , Michael R.; Haigler, Candace H.

    2016-01-01

    Cotton fibers arise through highly anisotropic expansion of a single seed epidermal cell. We obtained evidence that apical cell wall synthesis occurs through examining the tips of young elongating Gossypium hirsutum (Gh) and G. barbadense (Gb) fibers. We characterized two tip types in Gh fiber (hemisphere and tapered), each with distinct apical diameter, central vacuole location, and distribution of cell wall components. The apex of Gh hemisphere tips was enriched in homogalacturonan epitopes, including a relatively high methyl-esterified form associated with cell wall pliability. Other wall components increased behind the apex including cellulose and the α-Fuc-(1,2)-β-Gal epitope predominantly found in xyloglucan. Gb fibers had only one narrow tip type featuring characters found in each Gh tip type. Pulse-labeling of cell wall glucans indicated wall synthesis at the apex of both Gh tip types and in distal zones. Living Gh hemisphere and Gb tips ruptured preferentially at the apex upon treatment with wall degrading enzymes, consistent with newly synthesized wall at the apex. Gh tapered tips ruptured either at the apex or distantly. Overall, the results reveal diverse cotton fiber tip morphologies and support primary wall synthesis occurring at the apex and discrete distal regions of the tip. PMID:27301434

  15. The performance of primary human renal cells in hollow fiber bioreactors for bioartificial kidneys.

    PubMed

    Oo, Zay Yar; Deng, Rensheng; Hu, Min; Ni, Ming; Kandasamy, Karthikeyan; bin Ibrahim, Mohammed Shahrudin; Ying, Jackie Y; Zink, Daniele

    2011-12-01

    Bioartificial kidneys (BAKs) containing human primary renal proximal tubule cells (HPTCs) have been applied in clinical trials. The results were encouraging, but also showed that more research is required. Animal cells or cell lines are not suitable for clinical applications, but have been mainly used in studies on BAK development as large numbers of such cells could be easily obtained. It is difficult to predict HPTC performance based on data obtained with other cell types. To enable more extensive studies on HPTCs, we have developed a bioreactor containing single hollow fiber membranes that requires relatively small amounts of cells. Special hollow fiber membranes with the skin layer on the outer surface and consisting of polyethersulfone/polyvinylpyrrolidone were developed. The results suggested that such hollow fiber membranes were more suitable for the bioreactor unit of BAKs than membranes with an inner skin layer. An HPTC-compatible double coating was applied to the insides of the hollow fiber membranes, which sustained the formation of functional epithelia under bioreactor conditions. Nevertheless, the state of differentiation of the primary human cells remained a critical issue and should be further addressed. The bioreactor system described here will facilitate further studies on the relevant human cell type.

  16. Evaluation of various seeding techniques for culturing osteogenic cells on titanium fiber mesh.

    PubMed

    van den Dolder, Juliette; Spauwen, Paul H M; Jansen, John A

    2003-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to learn more about the effect of seeding and loading techniques on the osteogenic differentiation in vitro of rat bone marrow cells into titanium fiber mesh. This material was used as received or subjected to glow discharge treatment (RFGD). The seeding methods that were used included a so-called droplet, cell suspension (high and low cell density), and rotating plate method. Osteogenic cells were cultured for 4, 8, and 16 days into titanium fiber mesh. DNA, osteocalcin, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis, and calcium measurements were used to determine cellular proliferation and differentiation. DNA analysis of the differently seeded specimens showed that proliferation proceeded faster in the first versus second run for droplet and cell suspension samples. No clear and distinct additional effect was found when RFGD treatment was used. Statistical analyses revealed that high cell density and low rotational speed resulted always in a significantly higher DNA content. Calcium measurements and osteocalcin analysis showed that using high cell densities during inoculation of the scaffolds prevented the occurrence of differences between experimental runs. SEM examination showed that for droplet and cell suspension samples cells were present at only one side of the mesh. The mesh side where the cell sheet was observed depended on the additional use of glow discharge treatment. On these materials, the cells had penetrated through the meshes and formed a cell sheet at the bottom side. When rotation was used, no cell sheet was formed and cells had invaded the meshes and were growing around the titanium fibers. On the basis of our results, we conclude that (1). titanium fiber mesh is indeed suitable to support the osteogenic expression of bone marrow cells, and (2). changing the initial cell density as well as the use of dynamic seeding methods can influence the osteogenic capacity of the scaffold.

  17. Novel Combination of Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells with Low Temperature Processed Compact TiO2 Layer via Anodic Oxidation.

    PubMed

    Du, Yangyang; Cai, Hongkun; Wen, Hongbin; Wu, Yuxiang; Huang, Like; Ni, Jian; Li, Juan; Zhang, Jianjun

    2016-05-25

    In this work, a facile and low temperature processed anodic oxidation approach is proposed for fabricating compact and homogeneous titanium dioxide film (AO-TiO2). In order to realize morphology and thickness control of AO-TiO2, the theory concerning anodic oxidation (AO) is unveiled and the influence of relevant parameters during the process of AO such as electrolyte ingredient and oxidation voltage on AO-TiO2 formation is observed as well. Meanwhile, we demonstrate that the planar perovskite solar cells (p-PSCs) fabricated in ambient air and utilizing optimized AO-TiO2 as electron transport layer (ETL) can deliver repeatable power conversion efficiency (PCE) over 13%, which possess superior open-circuit voltage (Voc) and higher fill factor (FF) compared to its counterpart utilizing conventional high temperature processed compact TiO2 (c-TiO2) as ETL. Through a further comparative study, it is indicated that the improvement of device performance should be attributed to more effective electron collection from perovskite layer to AO-TiO2 and the decrease of device series resistance. Furthermore, hysteresis effect about current density-voltage (J-V) curves in TiO2-based p-PSCs is also unveiled.

  18. All-nano-TiO2 compact film for high-performance dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zanoni, Kassio P S; Amaral, Ronaldo C; Murakami Iha, Neyde Y

    2014-07-09

    An innovative all-nano-TiO2 thin film capable of enhancing dye-sensitized solar cell (DSC) photoefficiencies was prepared by a layer-by-layer method beneath the meso-TiO2 film, employing acid and basic nano-TiO2 sols as cations and anions, respectively. TiO2 syntheses were performed under absolute control to lead to appropriate morphological and optical properties to yield high-quality compact films using profilometry, tuning, and scanning electron microscopy. A detailed study by photoelectrochemical parameters, incident photon-to-current efficiency, electron lifetime, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy demonstrates that the physical contact between FTO and the electrolyte is prevented and the role of the compact film has been elucidated. DSCs with TiO2 bilayers on top of FTO improved the conversion efficiency up to 62%, mainly because of the prevention of FTO/I3(-) charge recombination and an improved contact between FTO and TiO2.

  19. Ultraefficient Cap-Exchange Protocol To Compact Biofunctional Quantum Dots for Sensitive Ratiometric Biosensing and Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    An ultraefficient cap-exchange protocol (UCEP) that can convert hydrophobic quantum dots (QDs) into stable, biocompatible, and aggregation-free water-dispersed ones at a ligand:QD molar ratio (LQMR) as low as 500, some 20–200-fold less than most literature methods, has been developed. The UCEP works conveniently with air-stable lipoic acid (LA)-based ligands by exploiting tris(2-carboxylethyl phosphine)-based rapid in situ reduction. The resulting QDs are compact (hydrodynamic radius, Rh, < 4.5 nm) and bright (retaining > 90% of original fluorescence), resist nonspecific adsorption of proteins, and display good stability in biological buffers even with high salt content (e.g., 2 M NaCl). These advantageous properties make them well suited for cellular imaging and ratiometric biosensing applications. The QDs prepared by UCEP using dihydrolipoic acid (DHLA)-zwitterion ligand can be readily conjugated with octa-histidine (His8)-tagged antibody mimetic proteins (known as Affimers). These QDs allow rapid, ratiometric detection of the Affimer target protein down to 10 pM via a QD-sensitized Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) readout signal. Moreover, compact biotinylated QDs can be readily prepared by UCEP in a facile, one-step process. The resulting QDs have been further employed for ratiometric detection of protein, exemplified by neutravidin, down to 5 pM, as well as for fluorescence imaging of target cancer cells. PMID:28421739

  20. Effects of asbestos and man-made vitreous fibers on cell division in cultured human mesothelial cells in comparison to rodent cells.

    PubMed

    Pelin, K; Kivipensas, P; Linnainmaa, K

    1995-01-01

    We report the effects of chrysotile and crocidolite asbestos, and glass and rock wool fibers (man-made vitreous fibers, MMVF) on the induction of binucleate cells in vitro. The response of human mesothelial cells (target cells in fiber carcinogenesis) and rodent cells was compared. Human primary mesothelial cells, MeT-5A cells (an immortalized human mesothelial cell line), and rat liver epithelial (RLE) cells were exposed to asbestos and MMVF samples of similar size range. Milled glass wool, milled rock wool, and titanium dioxide were used as non-fibrous particle controls. All four fiber types caused statistically significant increases in the amount of binucleate cells in human primary mesothelial cells and MeT-5A cells (in the dose range 0.5-5.0 micrograms/cm2). Chrysotile and crocidolite asbestos were more effective (1.3-3.0-fold increases) than thin glass wool and thin rock wool fibers (1.3-2.2-fold increases). However, when the fiber doses were expressed as the number of fibers per culture area, the asbestos and MMVF appeared equally effective in human mesothelial cells. In RLE cells, chrysotile was the most potent inducer of binucleation (2.9-5.0-fold increases), but the response of the RLE cells to crocidolite, thin glass wool, and thin rock wool fibers was similar to the response of the human mesothelial cells. No statistically significant increases in the number of bi- or multinucleate cells were observed in human primary mesothelial cells or RLE cells exposed to the non-fibrous dusts. In MeT-5A cells exposed to 5 micrograms/cm2 of milled glass wool and milled rock wool, as well as in cultures exposed to 2 and 5 micrograms/cm2 of TiO2, significant increases were, however, observed. Our results show that rodent cells respond differently to mineral fibers than human cells. The results also add evidence to the suggested importance of disturbed cell division in fiber carcinogenesis.

  1. Compact Wireless Microscope for In-Situ Time Course Study of Large Scale Cell Dynamics within an Incubator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Di; Wong, Dennis; Li, Junxiang; Luo, Zhang; Guo, Yiran; Liu, Bifeng; Wu, Qiong; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2015-12-01

    Imaging of live cells in a region of interest is essential to life science research. Unlike the traditional way that mounts CO2 incubator onto a bulky microscope for observation, here we propose a wireless microscope (termed w-SCOPE) that is based on the “microscope-in-incubator” concept and can be easily housed into a standard CO2 incubator for prolonged on-site observation of the cells. The w-SCOPE is capable of tunable magnification, remote control and wireless image transmission. At the same time, it is compact, measuring only ~10 cm in each dimension, and cost-effective. With the enhancement of compressive sensing computation, the acquired images can achieve a wide field of view (FOV) of ~113 mm2 as well as a cellular resolution of ~3 μm, which enables various forms of follow-up image-based cell analysis. We performed 12 hours time-lapse study on paclitaxel-treated MCF-7 and HEK293T cell lines using w-SCOPE. The analytic results, such as the calculated viability and therapeutic window, from our device were validated by standard cell detection assays and imaging-based cytometer. In addition to those end-point detection methods, w-SCOPE further uncovered the time course of the cell’s response to the drug treatment over the whole period of drug exposure.

  2. Compact Wireless Microscope for In-Situ Time Course Study of Large Scale Cell Dynamics within an Incubator

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Di; Wong, Dennis; Li, Junxiang; Luo, Zhang; Guo, Yiran; Liu, Bifeng; Wu, Qiong; Ho, Chih-Ming; Fei, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Imaging of live cells in a region of interest is essential to life science research. Unlike the traditional way that mounts CO2 incubator onto a bulky microscope for observation, here we propose a wireless microscope (termed w-SCOPE) that is based on the “microscope-in-incubator” concept and can be easily housed into a standard CO2 incubator for prolonged on-site observation of the cells. The w-SCOPE is capable of tunable magnification, remote control and wireless image transmission. At the same time, it is compact, measuring only ~10 cm in each dimension, and cost-effective. With the enhancement of compressive sensing computation, the acquired images can achieve a wide field of view (FOV) of ~113 mm2 as well as a cellular resolution of ~3 μm, which enables various forms of follow-up image-based cell analysis. We performed 12 hours time-lapse study on paclitaxel-treated MCF-7 and HEK293T cell lines using w-SCOPE. The analytic results, such as the calculated viability and therapeutic window, from our device were validated by standard cell detection assays and imaging-based cytometer. In addition to those end-point detection methods, w-SCOPE further uncovered the time course of the cell’s response to the drug treatment over the whole period of drug exposure. PMID:26681552

  3. Effect of CNT on collagen fiber structure, stiffness assembly kinetics and stem cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; Sridharan, Indumathi; Zhu, Bofan; Orgel, Joseph; Wang, Rong

    2015-04-01

    Collagen is a native one-dimensional nanomaterial. Carbon nanotube (CNT) was found to interface with biological materials and show promising applications in creating reinforced scaffolds for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. In this study, we examined the unique role of CNT in collagen fiber structure, mechanical strength and assembly kinetics. The results imply that CNT interacts with collagen at the molecular level. It relaxes the helical coil of collagen fibrils and has the effect of flattening the fibers leading to the elongation of D-period, the characteristic banding feature of collagen fibers. The surface charge of oxidized CNT leads to enhanced local ionic strength during collagen fibrillogenesis, accounting for the slower kinetics of collagen-CNT (COL-CNT) fiber assembly and the formation of thicker fibers. Due to the rigidity of CNT, the addition of CNT increases the fiber stiffness significantly. When applied as a matrix for human decidua parietalis placental stem cells (hdpPSCs) differentiation, COL-CNT was found to support fast and efficient neural differentiation ascribed to the elongated D-period. These results highlight the superiority of CNT to modulate collagen fiber assembly at the molecular level. The study also exemplifies the use of CNT to enhance the functionality of collagen for biological and biomedical applications.

  4. Cell compaction influences the regenerative potential of passaged bovine articular chondrocytes in an ex vivo cartilage defect model.

    PubMed

    Schmutzer, Michael; Aszodi, Attila

    2017-04-01

    The loss and degradation of articular cartilage tissue matrix play central roles in the process of osteoarthritis (OA). New models for evaluating cartilage repair/regeneration are thus of great value for transferring various culture systems into clinically relevant situations. The repair process can be better monitored in ex vivo systems than in in vitro cell cultures. I have therefore established an ex vivo defect model prepared from bovine femoral condyles for evaluating cartilage repair by the implantation of cells cultured in various ways, e.g., monolayer-cultured cells or suspension or pellet cultures of articular bovine chondrocytes representing different cell compactions with variable densities of chondrocytes. I report that the integrin subunit α10 was significantly upregulated in suspension-cultured bovine chondrocytes at passage P2 compared with monolayer-cultured cells at P1 (p = 0.0083) and P2 (p < 0.05). Suspension-cultured cells did not promote cartilage repair when compared with implanted monolayer-cultured chondrocytes and pellets: 24.0 ± 0.66% for suspension cells, 46.4 ± 2.9% for monolayer cells, and 127.64 ± 0.90% for pellets (p < 0.0001) of the original defect volume (percentage of defect). Additional cultivation with chondrogenesis-promoting growth factors TGF-β1 and BMP-2 revealed an enhancing effect on cartilage repair in all settings. The advantage and innovation of this system over in vitro differentiation (e.g., micromass, pellet) assays is the possibility of examining and evaluating cartilage regeneration in an environment in which implanted cells are embedded within native surrounding tissue at the defect site. Such ex vivo explants might serve as a better model system to mimic clinical situations.

  5. Phytosterol content and the campesterol:sitosterol ratio influence cotton fiber development: role of phytosterols in cell elongation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shasha; Wei, Ting; Tan, Kunling; Hu, Mingyu; Li, Fang; Zhai, Yunlan; Ye, Shue; Xiao, Yuehua; Hou, Lei; Pei, Yan; Luo, Ming

    2016-02-01

    Phytosterols play an important role in plant growth and development, including cell division, cell elongation, embryogenesis, cellulose biosynthesis, and cell wall formation. Cotton fiber, which undergoes synchronous cell elongation and a large amount of cellulose synthesis, is an ideal model for the study of plant cell elongation and cell wall biogenesis. The role of phytosterols in fiber growth was investigated by treating the fibers with tridemorph, a sterol biosynthetic inhibitor. The inhibition of phytosterol biosynthesis resulted in an apparent suppression of fiber elongation in vitro or in planta. The determination of phytosterol quantity indicated that sitosterol and campesterol were the major phytosterols in cotton fibers; moreover, higher concentrations of these phytosterols were observed during the period of rapid elongation of fibers. Furthermore, the decrease and increase in campesterol:sitosterol ratio was associated with the increase and decease in speed of elongation, respectively, during the elongation stage. The increase in the ratio was associated with the transition from cell elongation to secondary cell wall synthesis. In addition, a number of phytosterol biosynthetic genes were down-regulated in the short fibers of ligon lintless-1 mutant, compared to its near-isogenic wild-type TM-1. These results demonstrated that phytosterols play a crucial role in cotton fiber development, and particularly in fiber elongation.

  6. Shape-memory-actuated change in scaffold fiber alignment directs stem cell morphology.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ling-Fang; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2013-11-01

    Tissue engineering scaffolds have traditionally been static physical structures poorly suited to mimicking the complex dynamic behavior of in vivo microenvironments. Here we present a thermoresponsive scaffold that can be programmed to change macroscopic shape and microscopic architecture during cell culture. The scaffold, which was prepared by electrospinning a shape memory polymer (SMP), was used to test the hypothesis that a shape-memory-actuated change in scaffold fiber alignment could be used to control the behavior of attached and viable cells. To test this hypothesis, we stretched an SMP scaffold of randomly oriented fibers and fixed the scaffold in a temporary but stable elongated shape in which fibers were aligned by the strain. Following seeding and culture of human adipose-derived stem cells on the strain-aligned scaffold, the scaffold was triggered to transition back to its initial shape and random fiber orientation via shape memory actuation using a cytocompatible temperature increase. We found that cells preferentially aligned along the fiber direction of the strain-aligned scaffold before shape memory actuation. After shape memory actuation, cells remained attached and viable but lost preferential alignment. These results demonstrate that shape-memory-actuated changes in scaffold fiber alignment can be achieved with attached and viable cells and can control cell morphological behavior. The incorporation of shape memory into cytocompatible scaffolds is anticipated to facilitate the development, delivery and functionality of tissue engineering scaffolds and the in vitro and in vivo study and application of mechanobiology. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Damage to lens fiber cells causes TRPV4-dependent Src family kinase activation in the epithelium.

    PubMed

    Shahidullah, M; Mandal, A; Delamere, N A

    2015-11-01

    The bulk of the lens consists of tightly packed fiber cells. Because mature lens fibers lack mitochondria and other organelles, lens homeostasis relies on a monolayer of epithelial cells at the anterior surface. The detection of various signaling pathways in lens epithelial cells suggests they respond to stimuli that influence lens function. Focusing on Src Family Kinases (SFKs) and Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid 4 (TRPV4), we tested whether the epithelium can sense and respond to an event that occurs in fiber mass. The pig lens was subjected to localized freeze-thaw (FT) damage to fibers at posterior pole then the lens was incubated for 1-10 min in Krebs solution at 37 °C. Transient SFK activation in the epithelium was detectable at 1 min. Using a western blot approach, the ion channel TRPV4 was detected in the epithelium but was sparse or absent in fiber cells. Even though TRPV4 expression appears low at the actual site of FT damage to the fibers, SFK activation in the epithelium was suppressed in lenses subjected to FT damage then incubated with the TRPV4 antagonist HC067047 (10 μM). Na,K-ATPase activity was examined because previous studies report changes of Na,K-ATPase activity associated with SFK activation. Na,K-ATPase activity doubled in the epithelium removed from FT-damaged lenses and the response was prevented by HC067047 or the SFK inhibitor PP2 (10 μM). Similar changes were observed in response to fiber damage caused by injection of 5 μl hyperosmotic NaCl or mannitol solution beneath the surface of the posterior pole. The findings point to a TRPV4-dependent mechanism that enables the epithelial cells to detect remote damage in the fiber mass and respond within minutes by activating SFK and increasing Na,K-ATPase activity. Because TRPV4 channels are mechanosensitive, we speculate they may be stimulated by swelling of the lens structure caused by damage to the fibers. Increased Na,K-ATPase activity gives the lens greater capacity to

  8. Spider Silk Fibers Spun from Soluble Recombinant Silk Produced in Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazaris, Anthoula; Arcidiacono, Steven; Huang, Yue; Zhou, Jiang-Feng; Duguay, François; Chretien, Nathalie; Welsh, Elizabeth A.; Soares, Jason W.; Karatzas, Costas N.

    2002-01-01

    Spider silks are protein-based ``biopolymer'' filaments or threads secreted by specialized epithelial cells as concentrated soluble precursors of highly repetitive primary sequences. Spider dragline silk is a flexible, lightweight fiber of extraordinary strength and toughness comparable to that of synthetic high-performance fibers. We sought to ``biomimic'' the process of spider silk production by expressing in mammalian cells the dragline silk genes (ADF-3/MaSpII and MaSpI) of two spider species. We produced soluble recombinant (rc)-dragline silk proteins with molecular masses of 60 to 140 kilodaltons. We demonstrated the wet spinning of silk monofilaments spun from a concentrated aqueous solution of soluble rc-spider silk protein (ADF-3; 60 kilodaltons) under modest shear and coagulation conditions. The spun fibers were water insoluble with a fine diameter (10 to 40 micrometers) and exhibited toughness and modulus values comparable to those of native dragline silks but with lower tenacity. Dope solutions with rc-silk protein concentrations >20% and postspinning draw were necessary to achieve improved mechanical properties of the spun fibers. Fiber properties correlated with finer fiber diameter and increased birefringence.

  9. Modulation of Dendritic-Epithelial Cell Responses against Sphingomonas Paucimobilis by Dietary Fibers.

    PubMed

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-07-25

    Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli, such as Sphingomonas paucimobilis (S.paucimobilis), are among the most widespread causes of nosocomial infections. Up to now, no definitive guidelines exist for antimicrobial therapy for S. paucimobilis infections. As we have shown that some dietary fibers exhibit pronounced immune-regulatory properties, we hypothesized that specific immune active dietary fibers might modulate the responses against S. paucimobilis. We studied the immunomodulatory effects of dietary fibers against S. paucimobilis on cytokine release and maturation of human dendritic cells (DCs) in co-cultures of DCs and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). S. paucimobilis infection resulted in increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by DCs/IECs; these effects were strongly attenuated by specific dietary fibers. Chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, and both starches had the strongest regulatory effects. IL-12 and TNF-α were drastically diminished upon exposure to chicory inulin and sugar beet pectin, or both starches. High-maize 260, was more effective in the reduction of chemokine release than the others fibers tested. In summary, chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, High-maize 260, and Novelose 330 attenuate S. paucimobilis-induced cytokines. These results demonstrate that dietary fibers with a specific chemical composition can be used to manage immune responses against pathogens such as S. paucimobilis.

  10. Modulation of Dendritic-Epithelial Cell Responses against Sphingomonas Paucimobilis by Dietary Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Faas, Marijke M; de Vos, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-fermenting Gram-negative bacilli, such as Sphingomonas paucimobilis (S.paucimobilis), are among the most widespread causes of nosocomial infections. Up to now, no definitive guidelines exist for antimicrobial therapy for S. paucimobilis infections. As we have shown that some dietary fibers exhibit pronounced immune-regulatory properties, we hypothesized that specific immune active dietary fibers might modulate the responses against S. paucimobilis. We studied the immunomodulatory effects of dietary fibers against S. paucimobilis on cytokine release and maturation of human dendritic cells (DCs) in co-cultures of DCs and intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). S. paucimobilis infection resulted in increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines by DCs/IECs; these effects were strongly attenuated by specific dietary fibers. Chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, and both starches had the strongest regulatory effects. IL-12 and TNF-α were drastically diminished upon exposure to chicory inulin and sugar beet pectin, or both starches. High-maize 260, was more effective in the reduction of chemokine release than the others fibers tested. In summary, chicory inulin, sugar beet pectin, High-maize 260, and Novelose 330 attenuate S. paucimobilis-induced cytokines. These results demonstrate that dietary fibers with a specific chemical composition can be used to manage immune responses against pathogens such as S. paucimobilis. PMID:27452116

  11. Complexity and health functionality of plant cell wall fibers from fruits and vegetables.

    PubMed

    Padayachee, A; Day, L; Howell, K; Gidley, M J

    2017-01-02

    The prevalence of lifestyle-related diseases is increasing in developing countries with the causes for death starting to follow the same pattern in the developed world. Lifestyle factors including inadequate dietary intake of fruits and vegetables and over consumption of nutrient-poor processed foods, are considered to be major causal risk factors associated with increased susceptibility to developing certain diseases (Alldrick, 1998 ; Kiani, 2007 ). Recent epidemiological evidence confirms a strong association between dietary fiber and reduced all-cause mortality risk, as well as a risk reduction for a number of non-communicable diseases (Chuang et al., 2012 ). The relationship between dietary fiber and mortality has been described as "convincing observations that call for mechanistic investigations" (Landberg, 2012 ). In particular, the health protective roles played by dietary fibers of different origin are not well understood. Whilst Hippocrates was the earliest known physician to study the health benefits of fiber derived from grains (Burkitt, 1987 ), the functionality of fruit and vegetable fiber, especially in association with other compounds such as polyphenols and carotenoids, is an area of more recent interest. Hence the objective of this review is to assess the complexity and health-related functional role of plant cell wall (PCW) fibers from fruits and vegetables with a particular emphasis on interactions between cell walls and phytonutrients.

  12. Compact, passively Q-switched, all-solid-state master oscillator-power amplifier-optical parametric oscillator (MOPA-OPO) system pumped by a fiber-coupled diode laser generating high-brightness, tunable, ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Peuser, Peter; Platz, Willi; Fix, Andreas; Ehret, Gerhard; Meister, Alexander; Haag, Matthias; Zolichowski, Paul

    2009-07-01

    We report on a compact, tunable ultraviolet laser system that consists of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and a longitudinally diode-pumped Nd:YAG master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA). The pump energy for the whole laser system is supplied via a single delivery fiber. Nanosecond pulses are produced by an oscillator that is passively Q-switched by a Cr(4+):YAG crystal. The OPO is pumped by the second harmonic of the Nd:YAG MOPA. Continuously tunable radiation is generated by an intracavity sum-frequency mixing process within the OPO in the range of 245-260 nm with high beam quality. Maximum pulse energies of 1.2 mJ were achieved, which correspond to an optical efficiency of 3.75%, relating to the pulse energy of the MOPA at 1064 nm.

  13. Unique and analogous functions of aquaporin O for fiber cell architecture and ocular lens transparency

    SciTech Connect

    Kumari, S.S.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Mathias, R. T.; Varadaraj, K.

    2011-09-01

    Aquaporin (AQP) 1 and AQP0 water channels are expressed in lens epithelial and fiber cells, respectively, facilitating fluid circulation for nourishing the avascular lens to maintain transparency. Even though AQP0 water permeability is 40-fold less than AQP1, AQP0 is selectively expressed in the fibers. Delimited AQP0 fiber expression is attributed to a unique structural role as an adhesion protein. To validate this notion, we determined if wild type (WT) lens ultrastructure and fibercell adhesion are different in AQP0{sup -/-}, and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} mice that transgenically express AQP1 (TgAQP1) in fibercells without AQP0 (AQP0{sup -/-}). In WT, lenses were transparent with 'Y' sutures. Fibers contained opposite end curvature, lateral interdigitations, hexagonal shape, and were arranged as concentric growth shells. AQP0{sup -/-}lenses were cataractous, lacked 'Y' sutures, ordered packing and well-defined lateral interdigitations. TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} lenses showed improvement in transparency and lateral interdigitations in the outer cortex while inner cortex and nuclear fibers were severely disintegrated. Transmission electron micrographs exhibited tightly packed fibercells in WT whereas AQP0{sup -/-} and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-}lenses had wide extracellular spaces. Fibers were easily separable by teasing in AQP0{sup -/-} and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-}lenses compared to WT. Our data suggest that the increased water permeability through AQP1 does not compensate for loss of AQP0 expression in TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} mice. Fibercell AQP0 expression is required to maintain their organization, which is a requisite for lenstransparency. AQP0 appears necessary for cell-to-cell adhesion and thereby to minimize light scattering since in the AQP0{sup -/-} and TgAQP1{sup +/+}/AQP0{sup -/-} lenses, fiber cell disorganization was evident.

  14. Tropomodulin1 is required for membrane skeleton organization and hexagonal geometry of fiber cells in the mouse lens

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Roberta B.; Fischer, Robert S.; Zoltoski, Rebecca K.; Kuszak, Jerome R.

    2009-01-01

    Hexagonal packing geometry is a hallmark of close-packed epithelial cells in metazoans. Here, we used fiber cells of the vertebrate eye lens as a model system to determine how the membrane skeleton controls hexagonal packing of post-mitotic cells. The membrane skeleton consists of spectrin tetramers linked to actin filaments (F-actin), which are capped by tropomodulin1 (Tmod1) and stabilized by tropomyosin (TM). In mouse lenses lacking Tmod1, initial fiber cell morphogenesis is normal, but fiber cell hexagonal shapes and packing geometry are not maintained as fiber cells mature. Absence of Tmod1 leads to decreased γTM levels, loss of F-actin from membranes, and disrupted distribution of β2-spectrin along fiber cell membranes. Regular interlocking membrane protrusions on fiber cells are replaced by irregularly spaced and misshapen protrusions. We conclude that Tmod1 and γTM regulation of F-actin stability on fiber cell membranes is critical for the long-range connectivity of the spectrin–actin network, which functions to maintain regular fiber cell hexagonal morphology and packing geometry. PMID:19752024

  15. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  16. Ultra-compact Watt-level flat supercontinuum source pumped by noise-like pulse from an all-fiber oscillator.

    PubMed

    Chen, He; Zhou, Xuanfeng; Chen, Sheng-Ping; Jiang, Zong-Fu; Hou, Jing

    2015-12-28

    We demonstrate Watt-level flat visible supercontinuum (SC) generation in photonic crystal fibers, which is directly pumped by broadband noise-like pulses from an Yb-doped all-fiber oscillator. The novel SC generator is featured with elegant all-fiber-integrated architecture, high spectral flatness and high efficiency. Wide optical spectrum spanning from 500 nm to 2300 nm with 1.02 W optical power is obtained under the pump of 1.4 W noise-like pulse. The flatness of the spectrum in the range of 700 nm~1600 nm is less than 5 dB (including the pump residue). The exceptional simplicity, economical efficiency and the comparable performances make the noise-like pulse oscillator a competitive candidate to the widely used cascade amplified coherent pulse as the pump source of broadband SC. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of SC generation which is directly pumped by an all-fiber noise-like pulse oscillator.

  17. Bioartificial Renal Epithelial Cell System (BRECS): A Compact, Cryopreservable Extracorporeal Renal Replacement Device

    PubMed Central

    Buffington, Deborah A.; Pino, Christopher J.; Chen, Lijun; Westover, Angela J.; Hageman, Gretchen; Humes, H. David

    2012-01-01

    Renal cell therapy has shown clinical efficacy in the treatment of acute renal failure (ARF) and promise for treatment of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) by supplementing conventional small solute clearance (hemodialysis or hemofiltration) with endocrine and metabolic function provided by cells maintained in an extracorporeal circuit. A major obstacle in the widespread adoption of this therapeutic approach is the lack of a cryopreservable system to enable distribution, storage, and therapeutic use at point of care facilities. This report details the design, fabrication, and assessment of a Bioartificial Renal Epithelial Cell System (BRECS), the first all-in-one culture vessel, cryostorage device, and cell therapy delivery system. The BRECS was loaded with up to 20 cell-seeded porous disks, which were maintained by perfusion culture. Once cells reached over 5×106 cells/disk for a total therapeutic dose of approximately 108 cells, the BRECS was cryopreserved for storage at −80°C or −140°C. The BRECS was rapidly thawed, and perfusion culture was resumed. Near precryopreservation values of cell viability, metabolic activity, and differentiated phenotype of functional renal cells were confirmed postreconstitution. This technology could be extended to administer other cell-based therapies where metabolic, regulatory, or secretion functions can be leveraged in an immunoisolated extracorporeal circuit. PMID:24575327

  18. In Situ Liquid Cell Observations of Asbestos Fiber Diffusion in Water

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Lei; Ortiz, Carlos; Xu, Ye; Willenbring, Jane; Jerolmack, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    We present real-time observations of the diffusion of individual asbestos fibers in water. We first scaled up a technique for fluorescent tagging and imaging of chrysotile asbestos fibers and prepared samples with a distribution of fiber lengths ranging from 1 to 20 μm. Experiments were then conducted by placing a 20, 100, or 150 ppm solution of these fibers in a liquid cell mounted on a spinning-disk confocal microscope. Using automated elliptical-particle detection methods, we determined the translation and rotation and two-dimensional (2D) trajectories of thousands of diffusing chrysotile fibers. We find that fiber diffusion is size-dependent and in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions for the Brownian motion of rods. This agreement is remarkable given that experiments involved non-idealized particles at environmentally relevant concentrations in a confined cell, in which particle–particle and particle–wall interactions might be expected to cause deviations from theory. Experiments also confirmed that highly elongated chrysotile fibers exhibit anisotropic diffusion at short time scales, a predicted effect that may have consequences for aggregate formation and transport of asbestos in confined spaces. The examined fibers vary greatly in their lengths and were prepared from natural chrysotile. Our findings thus indicate that the diffusion rates of a wide range of natural colloidal particles can be predicted from theory, so long as the particle aspect ratio is properly taken into account. This is an important first step for understanding aggregate formation and transport of non-spherical contaminant particles, in the environment and in vivo. PMID:26461183

  19. In Situ Liquid Cell Observations of Asbestos Fiber Diffusion in Water.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lei; Ortiz, Carlos; Xu, Ye; Willenbring, Jane; Jerolmack, Douglas

    2015-11-17

    We present real-time observations of the diffusion of individual asbestos fibers in water. We first scaled up a technique for fluorescent tagging and imaging of chrysotile asbestos fibers and prepared samples with a distribution of fiber lengths ranging from 1 to 20 μm. Experiments were then conducted by placing a 20, 100, or 150 ppm solution of these fibers in a liquid cell mounted on a spinning-disk confocal microscope. Using automated elliptical-particle detection methods, we determined the translation and rotation and two-dimensional (2D) trajectories of thousands of diffusing chrysotile fibers. We find that fiber diffusion is size-dependent and in reasonable agreement with theoretical predictions for the Brownian motion of rods. This agreement is remarkable given that experiments involved non-idealized particles at environmentally relevant concentrations in a confined cell, in which particle-particle and particle-wall interactions might be expected to cause deviations from theory. Experiments also confirmed that highly elongated chrysotile fibers exhibit anisotropic diffusion at short time scales, a predicted effect that may have consequences for aggregate formation and transport of asbestos in confined spaces. The examined fibers vary greatly in their lengths and were prepared from natural chrysotile. Our findings thus indicate that the diffusion rates of a wide range of natural colloidal particles can be predicted from theory, so long as the particle aspect ratio is properly taken into account. This is an important first step for understanding aggregate formation and transport of non-spherical contaminant particles, in the environment and in vivo.

  20. Interactions between lens epithelial and fiber cells reveal an intrinsic self-assembly mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dawes, LJ; Sugiyama, Y; Lovicu, FJ; Harris, C; Shelley, EJ; McAvoy, JW

    2013-01-01

    How tissues and organs develop and maintain their characteristic three-dimensional cellular architecture is often a poorly understood part of their developmental program; yet, as is clearly the case for the eye lens, precise regulation of these features can be critical for function. During lens morphogenesis cells become organized into a polarized, spheroidal structure with a monolayer of epithelial cells overlying the apical tips of elongated fiber cells. Epithelial cells proliferate and progeny that shift below the lens equator differentiate into new fibers that are progressively added to the fiber mass. It is now known that FGF induces epithelial to fiber differentiation; however, it is not fully understood how these two forms of cells assemble into their characteristic polarized arrangement. Here we show that in FGF-treated epithelial explants, elongating fibers become polarized/oriented towards islands of epithelial cells and mimic their polarized arrangement in vivo. Epithelial explants secrete Wnt5 into the culture medium and we show that Wnt5 can promote directed behaviour of lens cells. We also show that these explants replicate aspects of the Notch/Jagged signaling activity that has been shown to regulate proliferation of epithelial cells in vivo. Thus, our in vitro study identifies a novel mechanism, intrinsic to the two forms of lens cells, that facilitates self-assembly into the polarized arrangement characteristic of the lens in vivo. In this way the lens, with its relatively simple cellular composition, serves as a useful model to highlight the importance of such intrinsic self-assembly mechanisms in tissue developmental and regenerative processes. PMID:24211762

  1. Cell flow analysis with a two-photon fluorescence fiber probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yu-Chung; Ye, Jing Yong; Thomas, Thommey P.; Baker, James R., Jr.; Norris, Theodore B.

    2010-11-01

    We report the use of a sensitive double-clad fiber (DCF) probe for in situ cell flow velocity measurements and cell analysis by means of two-photon excited fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). We have demonstrated the feasibility to use this fiber probe for in vivo two-photon flow cytometry previously. However, because of the viscosity of blood and the non-uniform flow nature in vivo, it is problematic to use the detected cell numbers to estimate the sampled blood volume. To precisely calibrate the sampled blood volume, it is necessary to conduct real time flow velocity measurement. We propose to use FCS technique to measure the flow velocity. The ability to measure the flow velocities of labeled cells in whole blood has been demonstrated. Our two-photon fluorescence fiber probe has the ability to monitor multiple fluorescent biomarkers simultaneously. We demonstrate that we can distinguish differently labeled cells by their distinct features on the correlation curves. The ability to conduct in situ cell flow analysis using the fiber probe may be useful in disease diagnosis or further comprehension of the circulation system.

  2. Hollow fiber membrane diffusive permeability regulates encapsulated cell line biomass, proliferation, and small molecule release.

    PubMed

    Broadhead, Kelly W; Biran, Roy; Tresco, Patrick A

    2002-12-01

    Using histological and HPLC methods, we examined the influence of hollow fiber membrane transport properties on encapsulated PC12 cell biomass, proliferation and the release of dopamine over 4 weeks in culture. Our data indicated that encapsulated cell biomass, the number of proliferating cells, and the quantity of dopamine released increased as a function of increasing hollow fiber encapsulation membrane diffusive permeability. Overall the percentage of viable cells and the biomass architecture, however, was not significantly affected by differences in membrane transport. When compared to membrane sieving properties, membrane diffusive transport and membrane hydraulic permeability were better indicators of biomass size, proliferating cell number, and dopamine release from encapsulated cells. Studies examining the sustained release of DA from membranes of differing permeability suggest that membrane diffusive permeability can be used to regulate the quantity of small molecules released per unit time at steady state, and should be considered when dosing is an important determinant of implant efficacy. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  3. An isolated compact galaxy triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuai; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I.; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Fang-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of an isolated compact galaxy triplet SDSS J084843.45+164417.3, which is first detected by the LAMOST spectral survey and then confirmed by a spectroscopic observation of the BFOSC mounted on the 2.16 meter telescope located at Xinglong Station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is found that this triplet is an isolated and extremely compact system, which has an aligned configuration and very small radial velocity dispersion. The member galaxies have similar colors and show marginal star formation activities. These results support the opinion that the compact triplets are well-evolved systems rather than hierarchically forming structures. This serendipitous discovery reveals the limitations of fiber spectral redshift surveys in studying such a compact system, and demonstrates the necessity of additional observations to complete the current redshift sample.

  4. Performance enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cell with a TiCl4-treated TiO2 compact layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jisuk; Lee, Myeongkyu

    2015-03-01

    We here show that an effective blocking layer for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) can be formed by spin coating a commercial TiO2 paste onto a conducting glass substrate. The spin-coated TiO2 layer was made more compact than the main absorption layer by TiCl4 treatment. DSSCs employing a compact layer exhibited an average current density and an efficiency of 19.09 mA/cm2 and 9.10%, respectively, while 16.91 mA/cm2 and 8.33% were obtained from unblocked reference cells. The enhanced DSSC performance is attributed to the increased electron lifetime. Intensity-modulated photovoltage spectroscopy and open-circuit voltage decay analysis showed that a TiCl4-treated compact layer substantially suppresses the charge recombination at the TiO2/substrate interface, thereby increasing the electron lifetime. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  5. Microfluidic cell counter with embedded optical fibers fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation and anodic bonding.

    PubMed

    Schafer, Dawn; Gibson, Emily A; Salim, Evan A; Palmer, Amy E; Jimenez, Ralph; Squier, Jeff

    2009-04-13

    A simple fabrication technique to create all silicon/glass microfluidic devices is demonstrated using femtosecond laser ablation and anodic bonding. In a first application, we constructed a cell counting device based on small angle light scattering. The counter featured embedded optical fibers for multiangle excitation and detection of scattered light and/or fluorescence. The performance of the microfluidic cell counter was benchmarked against a commercial fluorescence-activated cell sorter.

  6. Microfluidic cell counter with embedded optical fibers fabricated by femtosecond laser ablation and anodic bonding

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Dawn; Gibson, Emily A.; Salim, Evan A.; Palmer, Amy E.; Jimenez, Ralph; Squier, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    A simple fabrication technique to create all silicon/glass microfluidic devices is demonstrated using femtosecond laser ablation and anodic bonding. In a first application, we constructed a cell counting device based on small angle light scattering. The counter featured embedded optical fibers for multiangle excitation and detection of scattered light and/or fluorescence. The performance of the microfluidic cell counter was benchmarked against a commercial fluorescence-activated cell sorter. PMID:19365429

  7. Isolation of satellite cells from single muscle fibers from young, aged, or dystrophic muscles.

    PubMed

    Di Foggia, Valentina; Robson, Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle contains an identified resident stem cell population called the satellite cells. This cell is responsible for the majority of the postnatal growth and regenerative potential of skeletal muscle. Other cells do contribute to skeletal muscle regeneration and in cultures of minced whole muscle these cells are cultured along with the satellite cells and it is impossible to dissect out their contribution compared to the satellite cells. Therefore, a method to culture pure satellite cells has been developed to study the signaling pathways that control their proliferation and differentiation. In our studies into the role of the resident myogenic stem cells in regeneration, myopathic conditions, and aging, we have optimized the established techniques that already exist to isolate pure satellite cell cultures from single muscle fibers. We have successfully isolated satellite cells from young adults through to 24-month-old muscles and obtained populations of cells that we are studying for the signaling events that regulate their proliferative potential.

  8. Fiber-optic control and thermometry of single-cell thermosensation logic.

    PubMed

    Fedotov, I V; Safronov, N A; Ermakova, Yu G; Matlashov, M E; Sidorov-Biryukov, D A; Fedotov, A B; Belousov, V V; Zheltikov, A M

    2015-11-13

    Thermal activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels is one of the most striking examples of temperature-controlled processes in cell biology. As the evidence indicating the fundamental role of such processes in thermosensation builds at a fast pace, adequately accurate tools that would allow heat receptor logic behind thermosensation to be examined on a single-cell level are in great demand. Here, we demonstrate a specifically designed fiber-optic probe that enables thermal activation with simultaneous online thermometry of individual cells expressing genetically encoded TRP channels. This probe integrates a fiber-optic tract for the delivery of laser light with a two-wire microwave transmission line. A diamond microcrystal fixed on the fiber tip is heated by laser radiation transmitted through the fiber, providing a local heating of a cell culture, enabling a well-controlled TRP-assisted thermal activation of cells. Online local temperature measurements are performed by using the temperature-dependent frequency shift of optically detected magnetic resonance, induced by coupling the microwave field, delivered by the microwave transmission line, to nitrogen--vacancy centers in the diamond microcrystal. Activation of TRP channels is verified by using genetically encoded fluorescence indicators, visualizing an increase in the calcium flow through activated TRP channels.

  9. Fiber-optic control and thermometry of single-cell thermosensation logic

    PubMed Central

    Fedotov, I.V.; Safronov, N.A.; Ermakova, Yu.G.; Matlashov, M.E.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D.A.; Fedotov, A.B.; Belousov, V.V.; Zheltikov, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Thermal activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels is one of the most striking examples of temperature-controlled processes in cell biology. As the evidence indicating the fundamental role of such processes in thermosensation builds at a fast pace, adequately accurate tools that would allow heat receptor logic behind thermosensation to be examined on a single-cell level are in great demand. Here, we demonstrate a specifically designed fiber-optic probe that enables thermal activation with simultaneous online thermometry of individual cells expressing genetically encoded TRP channels. This probe integrates a fiber-optic tract for the delivery of laser light with a two-wire microwave transmission line. A diamond microcrystal fixed on the fiber tip is heated by laser radiation transmitted through the fiber, providing a local heating of a cell culture, enabling a well-controlled TRP-assisted thermal activation of cells. Online local temperature measurements are performed by using the temperature-dependent frequency shift of optically detected magnetic resonance, induced by coupling the microwave field, delivered by the microwave transmission line, to nitrogen—vacancy centers in the diamond microcrystal. Activation of TRP channels is verified by using genetically encoded fluorescence indicators, visualizing an increase in the calcium flow through activated TRP channels. PMID:26563494

  10. Vitronectin adsorption to chrysotile asbestos increases fiber phagocytosis and toxicity for mesothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, J; Liu, W; Koenig, K; Idell, S; Broaddus, V C

    2000-11-01

    Biological modification of asbestos fibers can alter their interaction with target cells. We have shown that vitronectin (VN), a major adhesive protein in serum, adsorbs to crocidolite asbestos and increases fiber phagocytosis by mesothelial cells via integrins. Because chrysotile asbestos differs significantly from crocidolite in charge and shape, we asked whether VN would also adsorb to chrysotile asbestos and increase its toxicity for mesothelial cells. We found that VN, either from purified solutions or from serum, adsorbed to chrysotile but at a lower amount per surface area than to crocidolite. Nevertheless, VN coating increased the phagocytosis of chrysotile as well as of crocidolite asbestos. VN coating of both chrysotile and crocidolite, but not of glass beads, increased intracellular oxidation and apoptosis of mesothelial cells. The additional apoptosis could be blocked by integrin-ligand blockade with arginine-glycine-aspartic acid peptides, confirming a role for integrins in the fiber-induced toxicity. We conclude that VN increases the phagocytosis of chrysotile as well as of crocidolite asbestos and that phagocytosis is important in fiber-induced toxicity for mesothelial cells.

  11. Fiber-optic control and thermometry of single-cell thermosensation logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedotov, I. V.; Safronov, N. A.; Ermakova, Yu. G.; Matlashov, M. E.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Belousov, V. V.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    Thermal activation of transient receptor potential (TRP) cation channels is one of the most striking examples of temperature-controlled processes in cell biology. As the evidence indicating the fundamental role of such processes in thermosensation builds at a fast pace, adequately accurate tools that would allow heat receptor logic behind thermosensation to be examined on a single-cell level are in great demand. Here, we demonstrate a specifically designed fiber-optic probe that enables thermal activation with simultaneous online thermometry of individual cells expressing genetically encoded TRP channels. This probe integrates a fiber-optic tract for the delivery of laser light with a two-wire microwave transmission line. A diamond microcrystal fixed on the fiber tip is heated by laser radiation transmitted through the fiber, providing a local heating of a cell culture, enabling a well-controlled TRP-assisted thermal activation of cells. Online local temperature measurements are performed by using the temperature-dependent frequency shift of optically detected magnetic resonance, induced by coupling the microwave field, delivered by the microwave transmission line, to nitrogen—vacancy centers in the diamond microcrystal. Activation of TRP channels is verified by using genetically encoded fluorescence indicators, visualizing an increase in the calcium flow through activated TRP channels.

  12. Chemical bath deposited rutile TiO2 compact layer toward efficient planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Chao; Wu, Zhenhua; Li, Pengwei; Fan, Jiajie; Zhang, Yiqiang; Shao, Guosheng

    2017-01-01

    TiO2 is a best choice of electron transport layers in perovskite solar cells, due to its high electron mobility and stability. However, traditional TiO2 processing method requires rather high annealing temperature (>500 °C), preventing it from application to flexible devices. Here, we show that TiO2 thin films can be synthesized via chemical bath deposition below 100 °C. Typically, a compact layer of rutile TiO2 is deposited onto fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO) coated substrates, in an aqueous TiCl4 solution at 70 °C. Through the optimization of precursor concentration and ultraviolet-ozone surface modification, over 12% power conversion efficiency can be achieved for CH3NH3PbI3 based perovskite solar cells. These findings offer a potential low-temperature technical solution in using TiO2 thin film as an effective transport layer for flexible perovskite solar cells.

  13. Compact, highly efficient, athermal, 25W, 2051nm Tm-fiber based MOPA for CO2 trace-gas laser space transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engin, Doruk; Chuang, Ti; Storm, Mark

    2017-02-01

    A cladding-pumped polarization maintaining (PM) Thulium (Tm) fiber-based amplifier optimized for high efficiency and high power operation at 2051 nm is presented. The two-stage amplifier has been demonstrated to achieve 25 W average power, >16 dB polarization extinction ratio (PER) out of a single-mode PM fiber using a <500 kHz linewidth Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) distributed feedback (DFB) laser1-3 and 43 dB gain. The power amplifier's optical conversion efficiency is 53%. An internal efficiency of 58% is calculated after correcting for passive losses. The two-stage amplifier sustains its highly efficient operation for a temperature range of 5-40°C. The absence of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) for the narrow linewidth amplification shows promise for further power scaling.

  14. Dual membrane hollow fiber fuel cell and method of operating same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingham, J. D.; Lawson, D. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A gaseous fuel cell is described which includes a pair of electrodes formed by open-ended, ion-exchange hollow fibers, each having a layer of metal catalyst deposited on the inner surface and large surface area current collectors such as braided metal mesh in contact with the metal catalyst layer. A fuel cell results when the electrodes are immersed in electrolytes and electrically connected. As hydrogen and oxygen flow through the bore of the fibers, oxidation and reduction reactions develop an electrical potential. Since the hollow fiber configuration provides large electrode area per unit volume and intimate contact between fuel and oxidizer at the interface, and due to the low internal resistance of the electrolyte, high power densities can be obtained.

  15. Ultraviolet spectroscopic breath analysis using hollow-optical fiber as gas cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwata, T.; Katagiri, T.; Matsuura, Y.

    2017-02-01

    For breath analysis on ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy, an analysis system using a hollow optical fiber as gas cell is developed. The hollow optical fiber functions as a long path and extremely small volume gas cell. Firstly, the measurement sensitivity of the system is evaluated by using NO gas as a gas sample. The result shows that NO gas with 50 ppb concentration is measured by using a system with a laser-driven, high intensity light source and a 3-meter long, aluminum-coated hollow optical fiber. Then an absorption spectrum of breath sample is measured in the wavelength region of around 200-300 nm and from the spectrum, it is found that the main absorbing components in breath were H2O, isoprene, and O3 converted from O2 by radiation of ultraviolet light. Then the concentration of isoprene in breath is estimated by using multiple linear regression analysis.

  16. Somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and fibers in the medulla oblongata et spinalis.

    PubMed

    Forssmann, W G; Burnweit, C; Shehab, T; Triepel, J

    1979-10-01

    Complete serial sectioning of the medulla oblongata in monkey, cat, guinea pig, and japanese dancing mouse and incubation for somatostatin-immunoreaction was carried out. Numerous regions of the medulla oblongata such as the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis, nucleus cuneatus et gracillis, nucleus raphe magnus, nucleus tractus solitarius, nucleus vestibularis, and parts of the oliva contain dense networks of somatostatin-immunoreactive nerve fibers. Cell bodies were seen in the nucleus reticularis medullae oblongatae. In the spinal cord the sections from each segment were analyzed, showing the highest concentrations of somatostatinergic fibers in the substantia gelantinosa of the columna dorsalis. Cell bodies were seen in the zona intermedia centralis, especially in the upper cervical segments. Many positive fibers were also seen in the entire zona intermedia and the columna ventralis. Especially prominent was the immunoreactivity in the zona intermediolateralis of the thoracic segments and the columna ventralis of the lower lumbar and sacral segments.

  17. Extracellular Recordings of Patterned Human Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes on Aligned Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Minami, Itsunari; Yu, Leqian; Nakajima, Minako; Qiao, Jing; Shimono, Ken; Nakatsuji, Norio; Kotera, Hitetoshi; Chen, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derived cardiomyocytes (CMs) hold high potential for use in drug assessment and myocardial regeneration. To create tissue-like constructs of CMs for extracellular monitoring, we placed aligned fibers (AFs) on the surface of a microelectrode array and then seeded hiPSC-CMs for subsequent monitoring for 14 days. As expected, the CMs organized into anisotropic and matured tissue and the extracellular recordings showed reduced premature beating higher signal amplitude and a higher probability of T-wave detection as compared to the culture without fibers. The CMs on the aligned fibers samples also exhibited anisotropic propagation of the field potential. These results therefore suggest that the hiPSC-CMs cultured on AFs can be used more reliably for cell based assays. PMID:27446217

  18. Dietary fiber intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma: evidence from a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Tian-bao; Ding, Pei-pei; Chen, Jian-feng; Yan, Yang; Zhang, Long; Liu, Huan; Liu, Peng-cheng; Che, Jian-ping; Zheng, Jun-hua; Yao, Xu-dong

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible relationships between dietary fiber intake and risk of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Electronic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE and Web of Science were searched to find eligible studies. Random-effects relative risk (RR) and its corresponding 95 % confidence interval (CI) were used. Besides, random-effects dose-response analyses were also performed to clarify the dose-response relations. Finally, publication bias was assessed by Egger's test and Begg's test. All p values were two tailed. Seven studies, including two cohort studies and five case-control studies, were eligible and included in this meta-analysis. Overall analysis in highest versus lowest level revealed that total dietary fiber intake was associated with reduced RCC risk (RR 0.84, 95 % CI 0.74-0.96). In addition, pooled estimated data showed that risk of RCC was significantly associated with vegetable and legume fiber intake (RR 0.70, RR 0.80, respectively), but not with fruit and cereal fiber intake (RR 0.92, RR 1.04, respectively). However, in dose-response analysis, no significant association was reported. Finally, no publication bias was detected by Egger's or Begg's test. The dietary fiber intake, especially vegetable and legume fiber, may be associated with reduced RCC risk. Considering the limitations of the included studies, more well-designed prospective studies will be needed to confirm our findings.

  19. A novel, compact disk-like centrifugal microfluidics system for cell lysis and sample homogenization.

    PubMed

    Kido, Horacio; Micic, Miodrag; Smith, David; Zoval, Jim; Norton, Jim; Madou, Marc

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, we present the design and characterization of a novel platform for mechanical cell lysis of even the most difficult to lyse cell types on a micro or nanoscale (maximum 70 microL total volume). The system incorporates a machined plastic circular disk assembly, magnetic field actuated microfluidics, centrifugal cells and tissue homogenizer and centrifugation system. The mechanism of tissue disruption of this novel cell homogenization apparatus derives from the relative motion of ferromagnetic metal disks and grinding matrices in a liquid medium within individual chambers of the disk in the presence of an oscillating magnetic field. The oscillation of the ferromagnetic disks or blades produces mechanical impaction and shear forces capable of disrupting cells within the chamber both by direct action of the blade and by the motion of the surrounding lysis matrix, and by motion induced vortexing of buffer fluid. Glass beads or other grinding media are integrated into each lysis chamber within the disk to enhance the transfer of energy from the oscillating metal blade to the cells. The system also achieves the centrifugal elimination of solids from each liquid sample and allows the elution of clarified supernatants via siphoning into a collection chamber fabricated into the plastic disk assembly. This article describes system design, implementation and validation of proof of concept on two samples--Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae representing model systems for cells that are easy and difficult to lyse, respectively.

  20. Supraependymal cells and fibers during the early stages of chick rhombencephalic development.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, J L; Piedra, S

    1998-09-01

    Supraependymal cellular elements are a constant feature in the adult cerebroventricular system. However, there has been no analysis of their distribution and morphology during the embryonic stages of the chick brain. The ultrastructural features of the rhombencephalic luminal surface of chick embryos ranging from stage 10 to 22 were studied with both scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In addition, immunocytochemistry and confocal laser microscopy were used to examine the presence of 68 kD neurofilaments in supraependymal elements. The ultrastructural observations revealed significant morphological differences in the apical cell surface between the cells at rhombomere boundaries and those in the rhombomere bodies. These differences support the idea that the boundary and the body of rhombomeres contain two morphologically distinct cell types. Supraependymal (SE) cells and SE fibers were present in the rhombencephalon of all embryos studied from stage 12 to 22. The cells were bipolar spindle-shaped. The SE fibers showed a characteristic spatial pattern within the rhombencephalon, following a straight course parallel to the rhombomere boundaries. The SE fibers showed varicosities and their endings contained small vesicles. Both SE cells and SE fibers were positive for 68 kD neurofilaments. Their morphology and reactivity for neurofilaments indicate a neuronal function. The constant presence of SE cells and SE fibers on the surface of the developing rhombencephalon, their special pattern and close relationship with the neural tube fluid (NTF) suggest that these supraependymal elements may be involved in a neuronal signalling pathway between different parts of the same rhombomere and also in chemical communication and integration within the ventricular system, linking distant parts of the developing central nervous system by means of NTF.

  1. Chromatin fibers are formed by heterogeneous groups of nucleosomes in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Maria Aurelia; Manzo, Carlo; García-Parajo, María Filomena; Lakadamyali, Melike; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2015-03-12

    Nucleosomes help structure chromosomes by compacting DNA into fibers. To gain insight into how nucleosomes are arranged in vivo, we combined quantitative super-resolution nanoscopy with computer simulations to visualize and count nucleosomes along the chromatin fiber in single nuclei. Nucleosomes assembled in heterogeneous groups of varying sizes, here termed "clutches," and these were interspersed with nucleosome-depleted regions. The median number of nucleosomes inside clutches and their compaction defined as nucleosome density were cell-type-specific. Ground-state pluripotent stem cells had, on average, less dense clutches containing fewer nucleosomes and clutch size strongly correlated with the pluripotency potential of induced pluripotent stem cells. RNA polymerase II preferentially associated with the smallest clutches while linker histone H1 and heterochromatin were enriched in the largest ones. Our results reveal how the chromatin fiber is formed at nanoscale level and link chromatin fiber architecture to stem cell state.

  2. Multi-cell disk-and-ring tapered structure for compact RF linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. V.; Boucher, S.; Kutsaev, S.; Hartzell, J.; Savin, E.

    2016-09-01

    A tubular disk-and-ring, tapered accelerating structure for small electron linacs and MicroLinacs is considered. It consists of metal and dielectric elements inserted into a metallic tube to eliminate multi-cell, multi-step brazing. The structure enables a wide range of phase velocities (including non-relativistic), a wide bandwidth allowing large number of cells (for standing wave mode) or short filling time (for traveling wave mode), combination of compensated and purely π-mode cells, alternative periodic focusing built-in to the RF structure (the disks), and combining of RF and vacuum windows. RF and accelerating performance of such a long structure having up to four dozens cells is analyzed. Some of beam dynamics, thermal, and vacuum aspects of the structure and MicroLinac performance are considered as well.

  3. Air Entrainment in a Liquid Cell due to Fiber Drawing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simpkins, P. G.; Kuck, V. J.

    1997-11-01

    Preliminary observations of air entrainment into a liquid bath of viscous Newtonian fluid are described. The motion generated by an optical fiber moving vertically through the bath gives rise to a free surface that is cusp-like. Photomicrographs of the contact region, however, illustrate that the free surface profile becomes conical with a small included angle that is draw speed dependent. There is some evidence to suggest that tip-streaming ( Taylor, G. I. 1934 The Formation of Emulsions in Definable Fields of Flow. Proc. Roy. Soc. Lond. A146, 501-523.) footnote Sherwood, J. D. 1984 Tip Streaming from Slender Drops in a Nonlinear Extensional Flow. J. Fluid Mech. 144, 281-295. filaments of air emanate from the contact zone to give rise to minute ( 10mm) bubbles via Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Continuous operation after the onset of tip-streaming results in the creation of larger bubbles from the small ones via coalescence during recirculation in the bath. Eventually the occurrence of very large bubbles can lead to break out and the absence of any coating on the fiber.

  4. A suspended carbon fiber culture to model myelination by human Schwann cells.

    PubMed

    Merolli, Antonio; Mao, Yong; Kohn, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    Understanding of myelination/remyelination process is essential to guide tissue engineering for nerve regeneration. In vitro models currently used are limited to cell population studies and cannot easily identify individual cell contribution to the process. We established a novel model to study the contribution of human Schwann cells to the myelination process. The model avoids the presence of neurons in culture; Schwann cells respond solely to the biophysical properties of an artificial axon. The model uses a single carbon fiber suspended in culture media far from the floor of the well. The fiber provides an elongated structure of defined diameter with 360-degree of surface available for human Schwann cells to wrap around. This model enabled us to spatially and temporally track the myelination by individual Schwann cells along the fiber. We observed cell attachment, elongation and wrapping over a period of 9 days. Cells remained alive and expressed Myelin Basic Protein and Myelin Associated Glycoprotein as expected. Natural and artificial molecules, and external physical factors (e.g., p atterned electrical impulses), may be tested with this model as possible regulators of myelination.

  5. Interactions between endothelial cells and electrospun methacrylic terpolymer fibers for engineered vascular replacements.

    PubMed

    Veleva, A N; Heath, D E; Johnson, J K; Nam, J; Patterson, C; Lannutti, J J; Cooper, S L

    2009-12-15

    A compliant terpolymer made of hexylmethacrylate (HMA), methylmethacrylate (MMA), and methacrylic acid (MAA) intended for use in small diameter vascular graft applications has been developed. The mechanical properties and in vitro biostability of this terpolymer have been previously characterized. The goal of this investigation was to examine the interactions between endothelial cells and the new terpolymer and to evaluate endothelial cell function. Electrospinning was used to produce both oriented and random terpolymer fiber scaffolds. Smooth solution cast films and tissue culture polystyrene were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Human blood outgrowth endothelial cells and human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with the test and control samples and characterized with respect to initial cell attachment, proliferation, viability, and maintenance of the endothelial cell phenotype. It was found that the terpolymer is cytocompatible allowing endothelial cell growth, with random fibers being more effective in promoting enhanced cellular activities than oriented fibers. In addition, endothelial cells cultured on these substrates appeared to maintain their phenotype. The results from this study demonstrate that electrospun HMA:MMA:MAA terpolymer has the potential to be used successfully in fabricating small diameter blood vessel replacements.

  6. Air-bubbling, hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration.

    PubMed

    Nishii, K; Sode, K; Karube, I

    1990-05-01

    Continuous asymmetric reduction of dyhydrooxoisophorone (DOIP) to 4-hydroxy-2,2,6-trimethylcyclo-hexanone (4-HTMCH) was achieved by a thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus NK86-0151. Three reactors were used: an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor with cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration, an air-lift reactor, and a CSTR with PAA immobilized cells. The maximum cell concentration of 11.1 g dry wt L(-1) was obtained in an air-bubbling hollow-fiber reactor, while in the other reactors the cell densities were between 3.5 and 4.1 g dry wt L(-1) The optimum bleed ratio was 0.1 at the dilution rate 0.3 h(-1) in the hollow-fiber reactor. The highest viable cell concentration was maintained in the dilution range of 0.4-0.7 h(-1) by a combination of proper cell bleeding and cross-flow filtration. The maximum volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH reached 826 mg L(-1) h(-1) at the dilution rate 0.54 h(-1). This value was 4 and 2 times higher than those in the air-lift reactor and CSTR, respectively. The increasing viable cell concentration increased the volumetric productivity of 4-HTMCH. A cell free product solution was continuously obtained by cross-flow filtration.

  7. Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blanding highly enriched uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    McLean, II, William; Miller, Philip E.; Horton, James A.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gasses into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gasses from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gasses into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell.

  8. Compact reaction cell for homogenizing and down-blending highly enriched uranium metal

    DOEpatents

    McLean, W. II; Miller, P.E.; Horton, J.A.

    1995-05-02

    The invention is a specialized reaction cell for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide. In a preferred form, the reaction cell comprises a reaction chamber with increasing diameter along its length (e.g. a cylindrical chamber having a diameter of about 2 inches in a lower portion and having a diameter of from about 4 to about 12 inches in an upper portion). Such dimensions are important to achieve the necessary conversion while at the same time affording criticality control and transportability of the cell and product. The reaction chamber further comprises an upper port and a lower port, the lower port allowing for the entry of reactant gases into the reaction chamber, the upper port allowing for the exit of gases from the reaction chamber. A diffuser plate is attached to the lower port of the reaction chamber and serves to shape the flow of gas into the reaction chamber. The reaction cell further comprises means for introducing gases into the reaction chamber and a heating means capable of heating the contents of the reaction chamber. The present invention also relates to a method for converting uranium metal to uranium oxide in the reaction cell of the present invention. The invention is useful for down-blending highly enriched uranium metal by the simultaneous conversion of highly enriched uranium metal and natural or depleted uranium metal to uranium oxide within the reaction cell. 4 figs.

  9. Vitamin C supplementation enhances compact morulae formation but reduces the hatching blastocyst rate of bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos.

    PubMed

    Li, Qian; Wang, Yong-Sheng; Wang, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hui; Li, Rui-Zhe; Cui, Chen-Chen; Li, Wen-Zhe; Zhang, Yong; Jin, Ya-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Vitamin C, an antioxidant that reduces reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cells, is capable of significantly improving the developmental competence of porcine and mouse somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryos, both in vitro and in vivo. In the present study, the effects of vitamin C on the developmental competence of bovine SCNT embryos were investigated. The results indicated that vitamin C (40 μg/mL) positively affected the scavenging of intracellular ROS, cleavage rate at 24 h (76.67 vs. 68.26%, p<0.05), compact morulae formation (60.83 vs. 51.30%, p<0.05), and the blastomere apoptosis index (3.70 ± 1.41 vs. 4.43% ± 1.65, p<0.05) of bovine SCNT embryos. However, vitamin C supplementation did not significantly affect the blastocyst formation rate and proportion of inner cell mass over total cells per blastocyst on day 7. Moreover, vitamin C supplementation obviously impaired the total cell numbers per blastocyst (97.20 ± 11.35 vs. 88.57 ± 10.43, p<0.05) on day 7 and the hatching blastocysts formation rate on day 9 (26.51 vs. 50.65%, p<0.05) compared with that of the untreated group. Vitamin C supplementation preferentially improved the viability of bovine SCNT embryos prior to the blastocyst stage, but did not enhance the formation and quality of blastocysts in vitro. In conclusion, the effect of vitamin C on the development of bovine SCNT embryos is complex, and vitamin C is not a suitable antioxidant chemical for the in vitro culture of bovine SCNT embryos.

  10. Fermentable dietary fiber potentiates the localization of immune cells in the rat large intestinal crypts.

    PubMed

    Ishizuka, Satoshi; Tanaka, Seiji; Xu, Hong; Hara, Hiroshi

    2004-10-01

    Intestinal crypts are composed of a well-defined hierarchy of epithelial cells, and proliferating epithelial cells reside close to the bottom of the crypts-even in the large intestine. We investigated whether CD8(+)and CD4(+)intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) and CD161(+) natural killer (NK) cells localized in proliferating or differentiated epithelial region of cecum and colon. Both proliferating epithelial layer cells and the immune cells along the longitudinal crypt axis of the large intestine were measured histochemically. Dietary intervention revealed that the physiological localization of the immune cells in the longitudinal crypt axis depended on the immune cell type. CD8(+) IELs were preferentially located among differentiated epithelial cells. In contrast, CD161(+) NK cells were located adjacent to the epithelial cells at the bottom of crypt. Cecal crypts contained significantly larger numbers of CD8(+) IELs than did colonic crypts. However, there was only a minor population of CD4(+) IEL in the cecal and colonic epithelia. Some dietary fibers increased the densities of CD8(+) IELs and CD161(+) NK cells in the cecum, with the magnitude of response varying among the types of fiber. There was a significant relationship between SCFA and the localization of immune cells, especially CD8(+) IEL and CD161(+) NK cells, which are considered to be involved in the maintenance of epithelial homeostasis.

  11. Proteomic Analysis of Lipid Raft-Like Detergent-Resistant Membranes of Lens Fiber Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Schey, Kevin L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Plasma membranes of lens fiber cells have high levels of long-chain saturated fatty acids, cholesterol, and sphingolipids—key components of lipid rafts. Thus, lipid rafts are expected to constitute a significant portion of fiber cell membranes and play important roles in lens biology. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens lipid raft proteome. Methods Quantitative proteomics, both label-free and iTRAQ methods, were used to characterize lens fiber cell lipid raft proteins. Detergent-resistant, lipid raft membrane (DRM) fractions were isolated by sucrose gradient centrifugation. To confirm protein localization to lipid rafts, protein sensitivity to cholesterol removal by methyl-β-cyclodextrin was quantified by iTRAQ analysis. Results A total of 506 proteins were identified in raft-like detergent-resistant membranes. Proteins identified support important functions of raft domains in fiber cells, including trafficking, signal transduction, and cytoskeletal organization. In cholesterol-sensitivity studies, 200 proteins were quantified and 71 proteins were strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Lipid raft markers flotillin-1 and flotillin-2 and a significant fraction of AQP0, MP20, and AQP5 were found in the DRM fraction and were highly sensitive to cholesterol removal. Connexins 46 and 50 were more abundant in nonraft fractions, but a small fraction of each was found in the DRM fraction and was strongly affected by cholesterol removal. Quantification of modified AQP0 confirmed that fatty acylation targeted this protein to membrane raft domains. Conclusions These data represent the first comprehensive profile of the lipid raft proteome of lens fiber cells and provide information on membrane protein organization in these cells. PMID:26747763

  12. Long Life Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Cells: Fiber Substrates Nickel Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Howard H.

    2000-01-01

    Samples of nickel fiber mat electrodes were investigated over a wide range of fiber diameters, electrode thickness, porosity and active material loading levels. Thickness' were 0.040, 0.060 and 0.080 inches for the plaque: fiber diameters were primarily 2, 4, and 8 micron and porosity was 85, 90, and 95%. Capacities of 3.5 in. diameter electrodes were determined in the flooded condition with both 26 and 31% potassium hydroxide solution. These capacity tests indicated that the highest capacities per unit weight were obtained at the 90% porosity level with a 4 micron diameter fiber plaque. It appeared that the thinner electrodes had somewhat better performance, consistent with sintered electrode history. Limited testing with two-positive-electrode boiler plate cells was also carried out. Considerable difficulty with constructing the cells was encountered with short circuits the major problem. Nevertheless, four cells were tested. The cell with 95% porosity electrodes failed during conditioning cycling due to high voltage during charge. Discharge showed that this cell had lost nearly all of its capacity. The other three cells after 20 conditioning cycles showed capacities consistent with the flooded capacities of the electrodes. Positive electrodes made from fiber substrates may well show a weight advantage of standard sintered electrodes, but need considerably more work to prove this statement. A major problem to be investigated is the lower strength of the substrate compared to standard sintered electrodes. Problems with welding of leads were significant and implications that the electrodes would expand more than sintered electrodes need to be investigated. Loading levels were lower than had been expected based on sintered electrode experiences and the lower loading led to lower capacity values. However, lower loading causes less expansion and contraction during cycling so that stress on the substrate is reduced.

  13. Primary cultures of embryonic chick lens cells as a model system to study lens gap junctions and fiber cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Musil, Linda S

    2012-07-01

    A major limitation in lens gap junction research has been the lack of experimentally tractable ex vivo systems to study the formation and regulation of fiber-type gap junctions. Although immortalized lens-derived cell lines are amenable to both gene transfection and siRNA-mediated knockdown, to our knowledge none are capable of undergoing appreciable epithelial-to-fiber differentiation. Lens central epithelial explants have the converse limitation. A key advance in the field was the development of a primary embryonic chick lens cell culture system by Drs. Sue Menko and Ross Johnson. Unlike central epithelial explants, these cultures also include cells from the peripheral (preequatorial and equatorial) epithelium, which is the most physiologically relevant population for the study of fiber-type gap junction formation. We have modified the Menko/Johnson system and refer to our cultures as dissociated cell-derived monolayer cultures (DCDMLs). We culture DCDMLs without serum to mimic the avascular lens environment and on laminin, the major matrix component of the lens capsule. Here, I review the features of the DCDML system and how we have used it to study lens gap junctions and fiber cell differentiation. Our results demonstrate the power of DCDMLs to generate new findings germane to the mammalian lens and how these cultures can be exploited to conduct experiments that would be impossible, prohibitively expensive and/or difficult to interpret using transgenic animals in vivo.

  14. Fiber-Shaped Perovskite Solar Cells with High Power Conversion Efficiency.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Longbin; He, Sisi; Yang, Jiahua; Deng, Jue; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-05-01

    A perovskite solar cell fiber is created with a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% through a controllable deposition method. A combination of aligned TiO2 nanotubes, a uniform perovskite layer, and transparent aligned carbon nanotube sheet contributes to the high photovoltaic performance. It is flexible and stable, and can be woven into smart clothes for wearable applications.

  15. FT-IR examination of the development of secondary cell wall in cotton fibers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The secondary cell wall development of cotton fibers harvested at 18, 20, 24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 days after flowering was examined using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform-infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectroscopy. Generally, a progressive intensity increase for bands assigned to cellulose Iß was ...

  16. Structural Plasticity of Dentate Granule Cell Mossy Fibers During the Development of Limbic Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Danzer, Steve C.; He, Xiaoping; Loepke, Andreas W.; McNamara, James O.

    2009-01-01

    Altered granule cell≫CA3 pyramidal cell synaptic connectivity may contribute to the development of limbic epilepsy. To explore this possibility, granule cell giant mossy fiber bouton plasticity was examined in the kindling and pilocarpine models of epilepsy using green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic mice. These studies revealed significant increases in the frequency of giant boutons with satellite boutons 2 days and 1 month after pilocarpine status epilepticus, and increases in giant bouton area at 1 month. Similar increases in giant bouton area were observed shortly after kindling. Finally, both models exhibited plasticity of mossy fiber giant bouton filopodia, which contact GABAergic interneurons mediating feedforward inhibition of CA3 pyramids. In the kindling model, however, all changes were fleeting, having resolved by 1 month after the last evoked seizure. Together, these findings demonstrate striking structural plasticity of granule cell mossy fiber synaptic terminal structure in two distinct models of adult limbic epileptogenesis. We suggest that these plasticities modify local connectivities between individual mossy fiber terminals and their targets, inhibitory interneurons, and CA3 pyramidal cells potentially altering the balance of excitation and inhibition during the development of epilepsy. PMID:19294647

  17. Compact vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; Zafalan, I.

    2017-02-01

    We study a family of Maxwell-Higgs models, described by the inclusion of a function of the scalar field that represent generalized magnetic permeability. We search for vortex configurations which obey first-order differential equations that solve the equations of motion. We first deal with the asymptotic behavior of the field configurations, and then implement a numerical study of the solutions, the energy density and the magnetic field. We work with the generalized permeability having distinct profiles, giving rise to new models, and we investigate how the vortices behave, compared with the solutions of the corresponding standard models. In particular, we show how to build compact vortices, that is, vortex solutions with the energy density and magnetic field vanishing outside a compact region of the plane.

  18. Compact HPD

    SciTech Connect

    Suyama, M.; Kawai, Y.; Kimura, S.

    1996-12-31

    In order to be utilized in such application fields as high energy physics or medical imaging, where a huge number of photodetectors are assembled in designated small area, the world`s smallest HPD, the compact BFD, has been developed. The overall diameter and the length of the tube are 16mm and 15mm, respectively. The effective photocathode area is 8mm in diameter. At applied voltage of -8kV to the photocathode, the electron multiplication gain of a PD incorporated HPD (PD-BPD) is 1,600, and that of an APD (APD-BPD) is 65,000. In the pulse height distribution measurement, photoelectron peaks up to 6 photoelectrons are clearly distinguishable with the APD-BPD. Experiments established that there was no degradation of gain in magnetic fields up to 1.5T, an important performance characteristic of the compact BPD for application in high energy physics.

  19. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  20. Increased Adipogenesis of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells on Polycaprolactone Fiber Matrices

    PubMed Central

    Brännmark, Cecilia; Paul, Alexandra; Ribeiro, Diana; Magnusson, Björn; Brolén, Gabriella; Enejder, Annika; Forslöw, Anna

    2014-01-01

    With accelerating rates of obesity and type 2 diabetes world-wide, interest in studying the adipocyte and adipose tissue is increasing. Human adipose derived stem cells - differentiated to adipocytes in vitro - are frequently used as a model system for white adipocytes, as most of their pathways and functions resemble mature adipocytes in vivo. However, these cells are not completely like in vivo mature adipocytes. Hosting the cells in a more physiologically relevant environment compared to conventional two-dimensional cell culturing on plastic surfaces, can produce spatial cues that drive the cells towards a more mature state. We investigated the adipogenesis of adipose derived stem cells on electro spun polycaprolactone matrices and compared functionality to conventional two-dimensional cultures as well as to human primary mature adipocytes. To assess the degree of adipogenesis we measured cellular glucose-uptake and lipolysis and used a range of different methods to evaluate lipid accumulation. We compared the averaged results from a whole population with the single cell characteristics – studied by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy - to gain a comprehensive picture of the cell phenotypes. In adipose derived stem cells differentiated on a polycaprolactone-fiber matrix; an increased sensitivity in insulin-stimulated glucose uptake was detected when cells were grown on either aligned or random matrices. Furthermore, comparing differentiation of adipose derived stem cells on aligned polycaprolactone-fiber matrixes, to those differentiated in two-dimensional cultures showed, an increase in the cellular lipid accumulation, and hormone sensitive lipase content. In conclusion, we propose an adipocyte cell model created by differentiation of adipose derived stem cells on aligned polycaprolactone-fiber matrices which demonstrates increased maturity, compared to 2D cultured cells. PMID:25419971

  1. Tracking of Cells with a Compact Microscope Imaging System with Intelligent Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) with intelligent controls is disclosed that provides techniques for scanning, identifying, detecting and tracking microscopic changes in selected characteristics or features of various surfaces including, but not limited to, cells, spheres, and manufactured products subject to difficult-to-see imperfections. The practice of the present invention provides applications that include colloidal hard spheres experiments, biological cell detection for patch clamping, cell movement and tracking, as well as defect identification in products, such as semiconductor devices, where surface damage can be significant, but difficult to detect. The CMIS system is a machine vision system, which combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities and provides the ability to autofocus on a microscope sample, automatically scan an image, and perform machine vision analysis on multiple samples simultaneously

  2. Tracking of cells with a compact microscope imaging system with intelligent controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) with intelligent controls is disclosed that provides techniques for scanning, identifying, detecting and tracking microscopic changes in selected characteristics or features of various surfaces including, but not limited to, cells, spheres, and manufactured products subject to difficult-to-see imperfections. The practice of the present invention provides applications that include colloidal hard spheres experiments, biological cell detection for patch clamping, cell movement and tracking, as well as defect identification in products, such as semiconductor devices, where surface damage can be significant, but difficult to detect. The CMIS system is a machine vision system, which combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities and provides the ability to auto-focus on a microscope sample, automatically scan an image, and perform machine vision analysis on multiple samples simultaneously.

  3. Identification Of Cells With A Compact Microscope Imaging System With Intelligent Controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) with intelligent controls is disclosed that provides techniques for scanning, identifying, detecting and tracking mic?oscopic changes in selected characteristics or features of various surfaces including, but not limited to, cells, spheres, and manufactured products subject to difficult-to-see imperfections. The practice of the present invention provides applications that include colloidal hard spheres experiments, biological cell detection for patch clamping, cell movement and tracking, as well as defect identification in products, such as semiconductor devices, where surface damage can be significant, but difficult to detect. The CMIS system is a machine vision system, which combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities and provides the ability to autofocus on a microscope sample, automatically scan an image, and perform machine vision analysis on multiple samples simultaneously.

  4. Cell fiber-based three-dimensional culture system for highly efficient expansion of human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Nagata, Shogo; Okitsu, Teru; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2017-06-06

    Human pluripotent stem cells are a potentially powerful cellular resource for application in regenerative medicine. Because such applications require large numbers of human pluripotent stem cell-derived cells, a scalable culture system of human pluripotent stem cell needs to be developed. Several suspension culture systems for human pluripotent stem cell expansion exist; however, it is difficult to control the thickness of cell aggregations in these systems, leading to increased cell death likely caused by limited diffusion of gases and nutrients into the aggregations. Here, we describe a scalable culture system using the cell fiber technology for the expansion of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The cells were encapsulated and cultured within the core region of core-shell hydrogel microfibers, resulting in the formation of rod-shaped or fiber-shaped cell aggregations with sustained thickness and high viability. By encapsulating the cells with type I collagen, we demonstrated a long-term culture of the cells by serial passaging at a high expansion rate (14-fold in four days) while retaining its pluripotency. Therefore, our culture system could be used for large-scale expansion of human pluripotent stem cells for use in regenerative medicine.

  5. Distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the monkey temporal lobe: the hippocampal formation.

    PubMed

    Pitkänen, A; Amaral, D G

    1993-05-01

    The distribution of parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells and fibers in the various fields of the hippocampal formation was studied in the macaque monkey. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons had aspiny or sparsely spiny dendrites that often had a beaded appearance; most resembled classically identified interneurons. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive fibers and terminals were confined to certain laminae in each field and generally had a pericellular distribution. In the dentate gyrus, there was a dense pericellular plexus of immunoreactive terminals in the granule cell layer. Except for a narrow supragranular zone, there was a marked paucity of terminals in the molecular and polymorphic cell layers. Immunoreactive neurons were mainly located immediately subjacent to the granule cell layer and comprised a variety of morphological cell types. The three fields of the hippocampus proper (CA3, CA2, and CA1) demonstrated differences in their parvalbumin staining characteristics. In CA3, there was a prominent pericellular terminal plexus in the pyramidal cell layer that was densest distally (closer to CA2). Immunoreactive cells were located either in the pyramidal cell layer, where many had a pyramidal shape and prominent apical and basal dendrites, or in stratum oriens. CA2 had a staining pattern similar to that in CA3, though both the number of labeled cells and the density of the pericellular terminal plexus were greater in CA2. In CA1, there was a markedly lower number of parvalbumin-labeled cells than in CA3 and CA2 and the cells tended to be located in the deep part of the pyramidal cell layer or in stratum oriens. The pyramidal cell layer of CA1 contained a pericellular terminal plexus that was substantially less dense than in CA3 and CA2. At the border between CA1 and the subiculum there was a marked increase in the number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons. The positive cells were scattered throughout the pyramidal cell layer of the subiculum and comprised a variety of

  6. Cells that emerge from embryonic explants produce fibers of type IV collagen

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Double immunofluorescence staining experiments designed to examine the synthesis and deposition of collagen types I and IV in cultured explants of embryonic mouse lung revealed the presence of connective tissue-like fibers that were immunoreactive with anti-type IV collagen antibodies. This observation is contrary to the widely accepted belief that type IV collagen is found only in sheet-like arrangements beneath epithelia or as a sheath-like layer enveloping bundles of nerve or muscle cells. The extracellular matrix produced by cells that migrate from embryonic mouse lung rudiments in vitro was examined by double indirect immunofluorescence microscopy. Affinity-purified monospecific polyclonal antibodies were used to examine cells after growth on glass or native collagen substrata. The data show that embryonic mesenchymal cells can produce organized fibers of type IV collagen that are not contained within a basement membrane, and that embryonic epithelial cells deposit fibers and strands of type IV collagen beneath their basal surface when grown on glass; however, when grown on a rat tail collagen substratum the epithelial cells produce a fine meshwork. To our knowledge this work represents the first report that type IV collagen can be organized by cells into a fibrous extracellular matrix that is not a basement membrane. PMID:3900085

  7. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells in Hollow Fiber Bioreactors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Matthew; Tilles, Arno W.; Milwid, Jack M.; Hammad, Mohamed; Lee, Jungwoo; Yarmush, Martin L.; Parekkadan, Biju

    2011-01-01

    The transplantation of human bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) is a novel immunotherapeutic approach that is currently being explored in many clinical settings. Evidence suggests that the efficacy of cell transplantation is directly associated with soluble factors released by human BMSCs. In order to harness these secreted factors, we integrated BMSCs into large-scale hollow-fiber bioreactor devices in which the cells (separated by a semipermeable polyethersulfone (PES) membrane) can directly and continuously release therapeutic factors into the blood stream. BMSCs were found to be rapidly adherent and exhibited long-term viability on PES fibers. The cells also preserved their immunophenotype under physiologic fluid flow rates in the bioreactor, and exhibited no signs of differentiation during device operation, but still retained the capacity to differentiate into osteoblastic lineages. BMSC devices released growth factors and cytokines at comparable levels on a per cell basis to conventional cell culture platforms. Finally, we utilized a potency assay to demonstrate the therapeutic potential of the collected secreted factors from the BMSC devices. In summary, we have shown that culturing BMSCs in a large-scale hollow fiber bioreactor is feasible without deleterious effects on phenotype, thus providing a platform for collecting and delivering the paracrine secretions of these cells. PMID:21710576

  8. Biological effects of asbestos fibers on human cells in vitro--especially on lymphocytes and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Ueki, A

    2001-04-01

    Biological effects of asbestos fibers were reviewed in relation to the polyclonal activation of human lymphocytes and to the release of free radicals from human neutrophils in vitro. Chrysotile, crocidolite, and amosite asbestos activate CD4+ T lymphocytes polyclonally, followed by activation-induced cell death (a type of apoptosis). The activation is HLA class II dependent, and certain Vbeta repertoire, e.g. Vbeta 5.3, are detected among the fractionated T cells with a high Ca++ level that had been stimulated by asbestos fibers. These observations support the possibility that asbestos acts as a superantigen, and that asbestos stimulate lymphocytes repeatedly in vivo. It has been reported that asbestos-induced cytotoxicity can be suppressed by the scavengers of superoxide or hydroxyl radical. Some of these scavengers such as dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) or retinoic acid are known as inducers of cell differentiation. The biological functions of DMSO for cell differentiation of HL-60 cells to neutrophils are suppressed by co-culturing of crocidolite asbestos, because DMSO reacts with the hydroxyl radical released after the stimulation with crocidolite and spent itself. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) inhibited the effects of crocidolite, reacting rapidly with *O2- before the secondary release of *OH. It seems to be probable that asbestos fibers, especially crocidolite, suppress the tissue cell differentiation by releasing free radicals and by wasting inducers of cell differentiation as radical scavengers.

  9. Low thermal budget, photonic-cured compact TiO2 layers for high-efficiency perovskite solar cells

    DOE PAGES

    Das, Sanjib; Gu, Gong; Joshi, Pooran C.; ...

    2016-05-25

    Rapid advances in organometallic trihalide perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have positioned them to be one of the leading next generation photovoltaic technologies. However, most of the high-performance PSCs, particularly those using compact TiO2 as an electron transport layer, require a high-temperature sintering step, which is not compatible with flexible polymer-based substrates. Considering the materials of interest for PSCs and corresponding device configurations, it is technologically imperative to fabricate high-efficiency cells at low thermal budget so that they can be realized on low-temperature plastic substrates. In this paper, we report on a new photonic curing technique that produces crystalline anatase-phase TiO2more » films on indium tin oxide-coated glass and flexible polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates. Finally, the planar PSCs, using photonic-cured TiO2 films, exhibit PCEs as high as 15.0% and 11.2% on glass and flexible PET substrates, respectively, comparable to the device performance of PSCs incorporating furnace annealed TiO2 films.« less

  10. Cells on fibers to degrade PAH and upgrade coal

    SciTech Connect

    Clyde, R.

    1997-12-31

    There are over 2000 sites contaminated with PAH`s from coal burning plants. White rot fungus degrades phenanthrene and anthracene, but the fungus needs air to grow. When grown on old cardboard boxes and buried, air is entrapped in the corrugations for growth of the fungus. When holes are put in the valleys of the corrugations and rotated in a half full reactor, drops are formed. Mass transfer to drops is much faster than to a flat surface, as described in Patent 5,256,570, so the fungus grows faster. Low rank coal can be upgraded to more valuable products with the fungus, say some Australians, but the problem is supplying oxygen. Celite can be entrapped in the fibers to ferment coal derived synthesis gas. The paper describes these processes.

  11. Consideration of coordinated solar tracking of an array of compact solar-pumped lasers combined with photovoltaic cells for electricity generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motohiro, Tomoyoshi; Ichiki, Akihisa; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Ito, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Kazuo; Mizuno, Shintaro; Ito, Tadashi; Kajino, Tsutomu; Takeda, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Kazuo

    2015-08-01

    A monochromatic laser light with a photon energy just above the band edge of photovoltaic cells can be converted into electricity with minimal thermal loss. To attain efficient conversion of sunlight to laser light, a coordinated solar tracking system for an array of originally designed compact solar-pumped lasers of 50 mm aperture diameter is being constructed. As for the feasibility of this system, a prototype with a holding capacity of 25 compact solar-pumped lasers has been fabricated. The primary requisite of this system is that the angular accuracy of tracking should be below 1 mrad for all 25 compact solar-pumped lasers to sustain their continuous lasing. To realize this, imperative challenges have been elucidated including thermal expansion under sunlight. A prototype fabricated with its main frame made of Super Invar alloy was found to fulfill the requisite by measurement using a three-dimensional coordinate measuring machine.

  12. Modeling the formation of cell-matrix adhesions on a single 3D matrix fiber.

    PubMed

    Escribano, J; Sánchez, M T; García-Aznar, J M

    2015-11-07

    Cell-matrix adhesions are crucial in different biological processes like tissue morphogenesis, cell motility, and extracellular matrix remodeling. These interactions that link cell cytoskeleton and matrix fibers are built through protein clutches, generally known as adhesion complexes. The adhesion formation process has been deeply studied in two-dimensional (2D) cases; however, the knowledge is limited for three-dimensional (3D) cases. In this work, we simulate different local extracellular matrix properties in order to unravel the fundamental mechanisms that regulate the formation of cell-matrix adhesions in 3D. We aim to study the mechanical interaction of these biological structures through a three dimensional discrete approach, reproducing the transmission pattern force between the cytoskeleton and a single extracellular matrix fiber. This numerical model provides a discrete analysis of the proteins involved including spatial distribution, interaction between them, and study of the different phenomena, such as protein clutches unbinding or protein unfolding.

  13. Efficient and compact intracavity-frequency-doubled Nd:LuVO4/LBO laser at 538 nm end-pumped by a fiber-coupled laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, B.; Li, Y. L.; Jiang, H. L.

    2011-10-01

    We report a diode-pumped Nd:LuVO4 laser emitting at 1076 nm, based on the 4 F 3/2-4 I 11/2 transition, generally used for a 1066 nm emission. A power of 689 mW at 1076 nm has been achieved in continuous-wave (CW) operation with a fiber-coupled laser diode emitting 17.8 W at 809 nm. Intracavity second-harmonic generation (SHG) in CW mode has also been demonstrated with a power of 105 mW at 538 nm by using a LiB3O5 (LBO) nonlinear crystal.

  14. SUBCRITICAL CRACK PROPAGATION STUDIES IN HI-NICALON AND HI-NICALON TYPE-S FIBER SiC/SiC COMPOSITES USING COMPACT TENSION SPECIMENS

    SciTech Connect

    Henager, Charles H.

    2007-10-02

    PNNL has performed subcritical crack growth tests under constant applied load at various elevated temperatures in inert environments using subscale compact tension (CT) specimens of two types of SiC-composite materials. The use of CT specimens is preferred over the usual dingle-edge notched beam (SENB) specimens due to more uniform applied stresses over the crack growth region. This study will compare crack growth data taken between two materials as well as specimen geometry types, CT compared to SENB. Plain weave [0/90] Hi-Nicalon CT specimens were tested in argon atmospheres and compared to similar tests of 5-harness satin weave [0/90] Hi-Nicalon Type-S composites. We report here some of the preliminary fractographic examinations of the two materials and an initial assessment of the crack growth data. Additional information on this study will be presented later and also at ICFRM-13 in December.

  15. Agent-based modeling traction force mediated compaction of cell-populated collagen gels using physically realistic fibril mechanics.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, James W; Gooch, Keith J

    2014-02-01

    Agent-based modeling was used to model collagen fibrils, composed of a string of nodes serially connected by links that act as Hookean springs. Bending mechanics are implemented as torsional springs that act upon each set of three serially connected nodes as a linear function of angular deflection about the central node. These fibrils were evaluated under conditions that simulated axial extension, simple three-point bending and an end-loaded cantilever. The deformation of fibrils under axial loading varied <0.001% from the analytical solution for linearly elastic fibrils. For fibrils between 100 μm and 200 μm in length experiencing small deflections, differences between simulated deflections and their analytical solutions were <1% for fibrils experiencing three-point bending and <7% for fibrils experiencing cantilever bending. When these new rules for fibril mechanics were introduced into a model that allowed for cross-linking of fibrils to form a network and the application of cell traction force, the fibrous network underwent macroscopic compaction and aligned between cells. Further, fibril density increased between cells to a greater extent than that observed macroscopically and appeared similar to matrical tracks that have been observed experimentally in cell-populated collagen gels. This behavior is consistent with observations in previous versions of the model that did not allow for the physically realistic simulation of fibril mechanics. The significance of the torsional spring constant value was then explored to determine its impact on remodeling of the simulated fibrous network. Although a stronger torsional spring constant reduced the degree of quantitative remodeling that occurred, the inclusion of torsional springs in the model was not necessary for the model to reproduce key qualitative aspects of remodeling, indicating that the presence of Hookean springs is essential for this behavior. These results suggest that traction force mediated

  16. Necrotic regions are absent in fiber-shaped cell aggregates, approximately 100 μm in diameter.

    PubMed

    Takei, Takayuki; Kitazono, Jyunpei; Tanaka, Sadao; Nishimata, Hiroto; Yoshida, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Microscopic, fiber-shaped cell aggregates, have been used as building blocks for fabricating macroscopic three-dimensional tissue architectures, in the field of tissue engineering. In this study, we examined the occurrence of necrotic regions in the most widely used, fiber-shaped cell aggregates, approximately 100 μm in diameter. Alginate hydrogel hollow microfibers were used as templates for the cell aggregates. We demonstrated negligible necrotic region formation occurred in the cell aggregates formed in the hollow microfibers. Furthermore, we improved on previously-reported methods for preparing the hollow microfibers to avoid common microfiber tangling during the fiber preparation process.

  17. Tmem2 regulates cell-matrix interactions that are essential for muscle fiber attachment

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle morphogenesis depends upon interactions between developing muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix (ECM) that anchors fibers to the myotendinous junction (MTJ). The pathways that organize the ECM and regulate its engagement by cell-matrix adhesion complexes (CMACs) are therefore essential for muscle integrity. Here, we demonstrate the impact of transmembrane protein 2 (tmem2) on cell-matrix interactions during muscle morphogenesis in zebrafish. Maternal-zygotic tmem2 mutants (MZtmem2) exhibit muscle fiber detachment, in association with impaired laminin organization and ineffective fibronectin degradation at the MTJ. Similarly, disorganized laminin and fibronectin surround MZtmem2 cardiomyocytes, which could account for their hindered movement during cardiac morphogenesis. In addition to ECM defects, MZtmem2 mutants display hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan within the CMAC, which could contribute to the observed fiber detachment. Expression of the Tmem2 ectodomain can rescue aspects of the MZtmem2 phenotype, consistent with a possible extracellular function of Tmem2. Together, our results suggest that Tmem2 regulates cell-matrix interactions by affecting both ECM organization and CMAC activity. These findings evoke possible connections between the functions of Tmem2 and the etiologies of congenital muscular dystrophies, particularly dystroglycanopathies. PMID:27471259

  18. Tmem2 regulates cell-matrix interactions that are essential for muscle fiber attachment.

    PubMed

    Ryckebüsch, Lucile; Hernandez, Lydia; Wang, Carole; Phan, Jenny; Yelon, Deborah

    2016-08-15

    Skeletal muscle morphogenesis depends upon interactions between developing muscle fibers and the extracellular matrix (ECM) that anchors fibers to the myotendinous junction (MTJ). The pathways that organize the ECM and regulate its engagement by cell-matrix adhesion complexes (CMACs) are therefore essential for muscle integrity. Here, we demonstrate the impact of transmembrane protein 2 (tmem2) on cell-matrix interactions during muscle morphogenesis in zebrafish. Maternal-zygotic tmem2 mutants (MZtmem2) exhibit muscle fiber detachment, in association with impaired laminin organization and ineffective fibronectin degradation at the MTJ. Similarly, disorganized laminin and fibronectin surround MZtmem2 cardiomyocytes, which could account for their hindered movement during cardiac morphogenesis. In addition to ECM defects, MZtmem2 mutants display hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan within the CMAC, which could contribute to the observed fiber detachment. Expression of the Tmem2 ectodomain can rescue aspects of the MZtmem2 phenotype, consistent with a possible extracellular function of Tmem2. Together, our results suggest that Tmem2 regulates cell-matrix interactions by affecting both ECM organization and CMAC activity. These findings evoke possible connections between the functions of Tmem2 and the etiologies of congenital muscular dystrophies, particularly dystroglycanopathies. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  19. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-01-01

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  20. Retinal flat cells participate in the formation of fibers by retinal neuroblasts in vitro. Time lapse video studies.

    PubMed

    Li, H P; Sheffield, J B

    1986-03-01

    Freshly dissociated cells from embryonic chick neural retinas grow in characteristic patterns on flat cells or on chick embryo mesodermal cells. A striking difference between the two patterns is that the cells grown on flat cells are interconnected by a complex network of fibers, whereas those grown on mesodermal cells are aggregated into clusters that remain relatively isolated within the mesodermal monolayer. Analysis by time-lapse video microscopy indicates that two processes produce the fibers. (1) Fibers grow out by the extension of growth cones from cells within aggregates. (2) Neuronal cell aggregates that attach to two flat cells are pulled apart by the movement of the cells beneath them. As the aggregate is pulled apart, portions of the cells remain attached to the two halves, and their cytoplasm is drawn into thin fibers. The lack of fibers on a mesodermal substrate is due to two factors: (1) Aggregates are widely spaced on the substrate surface and do not come into contact often. (2) On those occasions when they do come into contact, the movement of the monolayer is so vigorous that emerging fibers are torn.

  1. Compact fuel cell system utilizing a combination of hydrogen storage materials for optimized performance.

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Jennifer P.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Gross, Karl J.; Ng, Greg L.

    2004-12-01

    An entirely new class of light-weight reversible hydrides was recently discovered (the Ti-doped alanates)[1]. These NaAIH{sub 4}-based materials have demonstrated reversible hydrogen storage capacities of up to 5 wt%, nearly 4 times the gravimetrically density of commercial metal hydrides. For this reason, they have been considered a breakthrough for hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles. This project is the first to publish the use of alanates for the generation of electrical power and the first demonstration of a hydride-fueled elevated-temperature PEM Fuel Cell. Because the kinetics of hydrogen uptake and release by the alanate improves with elevated temperatures, novel concepts were tested for the purpose of developing a highly efficient stand-alone power system. A major focus of this work was on the modeling, design, construction and testing of an integrated fuel cell stack and hydrogen storage system that eliminates the need of complicated heat transfer systems and media. After extensive modeling efforts, a proof-of-concept system was built that employs an integrated fuel cell stack and hydride beds that balancing the generation of fuel cell waste heat with the endothermic release of hydrogen from the alanates. Our demonstration unit was capable of greater than one hour of operation on a single charge of hydrogen from the integrated 173 gram alanate bed. In addition, composite hydride materials with synergistic reaction heats were evaluated and tested to enhance the operational performance of the alanates. The composites provide a unique opportunity to utilize the heat produced from hydriding classic metal hydrides to improve both absorption and desorption rates of the alanates. A particular focus of the mixed storage materials work was to balance the thermodynamics and kinetics of the hydrides for start-up conditions. Modeling of the sorption properties proved invaluable in evaluating the optimum composition of hydrides. The modeling efforts were followed

  2. Characteristics of mesophase pitch-based carbon fibers as anode materials for lithium secondary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, Toshio

    1995-12-31

    Mesophase pitch-based Carbon Fibers (MPCF) have been investigated as anode materials for lithium secondary cells by examining their physical and electrochemical properties. Discharge capacity and initial charge-discharge efficiency of the materials were studied in relation to the heat treatment temperatures of MPCF. Carbon fiber which was heat treated at about 3,000 C gave the highest discharge capacity (over 300 mAh/g), good efficiency (92%) and superior current capability (600 mA/g). Carbon fiber heat treated at less than 1,000 C, also has superior discharge capacity (over 500 mAh/g) at the first cycle, however efficiency was relatively low. Some of the relationships between structure of MPCF and electrochemical properties are discussed.

  3. The development of a potassium-sulfide glass fiber cell and studies on impurities in alkali metal-sulfur cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsang, F. Y.

    1977-01-01

    Potassium sulfur rechargeable cells, having as the electrolyte the thin walls of hollow glass fibers made from permeable glass, were developed. The cells had short lives, probably due to the construction materials and impurities in the potassium. The effect of the impurities in the analogous NA-S system was studied. Calcium, potassium, and NaOH/oxide impurities caused increased resistance or corrosion of the glass fibers. For long lived cell operation, the Na must contain less than 1 ppm Ca and less than a few ppm of hydroxide/oxide. Up to 150 ppm K can be tolerated. After purification of the Na anolyte, cell lifetimes in excess of 1000 deep charge-discharge cycles or over 8 months on continuous cycling at 10-30 percent depth of discharge were obtained.

  4. Biomimics of fungal cell-cell recognition by use of lectin-coated nylon fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Inbar, J; Chet, I

    1992-01-01

    When the mycoparasitic, biocontrol fungus Trichoderma harzianum was allowed to grow on nylon fibers treated with concanavalin A or Sclerotium rolfsii lectin, it coiled around the nylon fibers and produced hooks in a pattern similar to that observed with the real host hyphae. The incidence of interaction between T. harzianum and S. rolfsii lectin-treated fibers was significantly higher than that of the controls (untreated or blocked activated fibers). These findings provide direct evidence for the role of lectins in mycoparasitism. Images PMID:1732197

  5. GABAergic cells are the major postsynaptic targets of mossy fibers in the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Acsády, L; Kamondi, A; Sík, A; Freund, T; Buzsáki, G

    1998-05-01

    Dentate granule cells communicate with their postsynaptic targets by three distinct terminal types. These include the large mossy terminals, filopodial extensions of the mossy terminals, and smaller en passant synaptic varicosities. We examined the postsynaptic targets of mossy fibers by combining in vivo intracellular labeling of granule cells, immunocytochemistry, and electron microscopy. Single granule cells formed large, complex "mossy" synapses on 11-15 CA3 pyramidal cells and 7-12 hilar mossy cells. In contrast, GABAergic interneurons, identified with immunostaining for substance P-receptor, parvalbumin, and mGluR1a-receptor, were selectively innervated by very thin (filopodial) extensions of the mossy terminals and by small en passant boutons in both the hilar and CA3 regions. These terminals formed single, often perforated, asymmetric synapses on the cell bodies, dendrites, and spines of GABAergic interneurons. The number of filopodial extensions and small terminals was 10 times larger than the number of mossy terminals. These findings show that in contrast to cortical pyramidal neurons, (1) granule cells developed distinct types of terminals to affect interneurons and pyramidal cells and (2) they innervated more inhibitory than excitatory cells. These findings may explain the physiological observations that increased activity of granule cells suppresses the overall excitability of the CA3 recurrent system and may form the structural basis of the target-dependent regulation of glutamate release in the mossy fiber system.

  6. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  7. Sacral Neural Crest-Derived Cells Enter the Aganglionic Colon of Ednrb−/− Mice Along Extrinsic Nerve Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Christopher S.; Zaitoun, Ismail; Haberman, Kathryn M.; Gosain, Ankush; Druckenbrod, Noah R.; Epstein, Miles L.

    2012-01-01

    Both vagal and sacral neural crest cells contribute to the enteric nervous system in the hindgut. Because it is difficult to visualize sacral crest cells independently of vagal crest, the nature and extent of the sacral crest contribution to the enteric nervous system are not well established in rodents. To overcome this problem we generated mice in which only the fluorescent protein-labeled sacral crest are present in the terminal colon. We found that sacral crest cells were associated with extrinsic nerve fibers. We investigated the source, time of appearance, and characteristics of the extrinsic nerve fibers found in the aganglionic colon. We observed that the pelvic ganglion neurons contributed a number of extrinsic fibers that travel within the hindgut between circular and longitudinal muscles and within the submucosa and serosa. Sacral crest-derived cells along these fibers diminished in number from fetal to post-natal stages. A small number of sacral crest-derived cells were found between the muscle layers and expressed the neuronal marker Hu. We conclude that sacral crest cells enter the hindgut by advancing on extrinsic fibers and, in aganglionic preparations, they form a small number of neurons at sites normally occupied by myenteric ganglia. We also examined the colons of ganglionated preparations and found sacral crest-derived cells associated with both extrinsic nerve fibers and nascent ganglia. Extrinsic nerve fibers serve as a route of entry for both rodent and avian sacral crest into the hindgut. PMID:21858821

  8. Sacral neural crest-derived cells enter the aganglionic colon of Ednrb-/- mice along extrinsic nerve fibers.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Christopher S; Zaitoun, Ismail; Haberman, Kathryn M; Gosain, Ankush; Druckenbrod, Noah R; Epstein, Miles L

    2012-02-15

    Both vagal and sacral neural crest cells contribute to the enteric nervous system in the hindgut. Because it is difficult to visualize sacral crest cells independently of vagal crest, the nature and extent of the sacral crest contribution to the enteric nervous system are not well established in rodents. To overcome this problem we generated mice in which only the fluorescent protein-labeled sacral crest are present in the terminal colon. We found that sacral crest cells were associated with extrinsic nerve fibers. We investigated the source, time of appearance, and characteristics of the extrinsic nerve fibers found in the aganglionic colon. We observed that the pelvic ganglion neurons contributed a number of extrinsic fibers that travel within the hindgut between circular and longitudinal muscles and within the submucosa and serosa. Sacral crest-derived cells along these fibers diminished in number from fetal to postnatal stages. A small number of sacral crest-derived cells were found between the muscle layers and expressed the neuronal marker Hu. We conclude that sacral crest cells enter the hindgut by advancing on extrinsic fibers and, in aganglionic preparations, they form a small number of neurons at sites normally occupied by myenteric ganglia. We also examined the colons of ganglionated preparations and found sacral crest-derived cells associated with both extrinsic nerve fibers and nascent ganglia. Extrinsic nerve fibers serve as a route of entry for both rodent and avian sacral crest into the hindgut.

  9. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  10. Programmable broadband radio-frequency transversal filter with compact fiber-optics and digital microelectromechanical system-based optical spectral control.

    PubMed

    Riza, Nabeel A; Arain, Muzammil A

    2004-05-20

    To the best of our knowledge, for the first time a programmable broadband rf transversal filter is proposed that operates on the principle of broadband optical spectral control implemented with a spatial light modulator input rf signal time delay and weight selection over a near-continuous signal space. Specifically, the filter uses a chirped fiber Bragg grating in combination with a two-dimensional digital micromirror device to enable a programmable rf filter. As a first step, a two-tap rf notch filter is demonstrated with a tuning range of 0.563-6.032 GHz with a 25-dB notch depth at test notch frequencies of 845 and 905 MHz. The proposed filter can find applications in diverse fields such as radar, communications, medicine, and test and measurement.

  11. Compact and cost-effective temperature-insensitive bio-sensor based on long-period fiber gratings for accurate detection of E. coli bacteria in water.

    PubMed

    Dandapat, Krishnendu; Tripathi, Saurabh Mani; Chinifooroshan, Yasser; Bock, Wojtek J; Mikulic, Predrag

    2016-09-15

    We propose and demonstrate a novel temperature-insensitive bio-sensor for accurate and quantitative detection of Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria in water. Surface sensitivity is maximized by operating the long-period fiber grating (LPFG) closest to its turnaround wavelength, and the temperature insensitivity is achieved by selectively exciting a pair of cladding modes with opposite dispersion characteristics. Our sensor shows a nominal temperature sensitivity of ∼1.25  pm/°C, which can be further reduced by properly adjusting the LPFG lengths, while maintaining a high refractive index sensitivity of 1929 nm/RIU. The overall length of the sensor is ∼3.6  cm, making it ideally suitable for bio-sensing applications. As an example, we also show the sensor's capability for reliable, quantitative detection of E. coli bacteria in water over a temperature fluctuation of room temperature to 40°C.

  12. Design of compact surface optical coupler based on vertically curved silicon waveguide for high-numerical-aperture single-mode optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atsumi, Yuki; Yoshida, Tomoya; Omoda, Emiko; Sakakibara, Youichi

    2017-09-01

    A surface optical coupler based on a vertically curved Si waveguide was designed for coupling with high-numerical aperture single-mode optical fibers with a mode-field diameter of 5 µm. This coupler has a quite small device size, with a height of approximately 12 µm, achieved by introducing an effective spot-size converter configured with the combination of an extremely short Si exponential-inverse taper and a dome-structured SiO2 lens formed on the coupler top. The designed coupler shows high-efficiency optical coupling, with a loss of 0.8 dB for TE polarized light, as well as broad-band coupling with a 0.5-dB-loss band of 420 nm.

  13. High-capacity lithium-ion cells using graphitized mesophase-pitch-based carbon fiber anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsaki, Takahisa; Kanda, Motoya; Aoki, Yoshiyasu; Shiroki, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Shintaro

    We have developed high-capacity lithium-ion cells using graphitized mesophase-pitch-based carbon fiber (MCF) as an anode material. The graphitized MCF is a highly graphitized carbon fiber with a radial-like texture in the cross section. This structure contributes to the rapid diffusion of lithium ions inside the carbon fiber. The diffusion coefficient of lithium ions in the graphitized MCF was one order of magnitude larger than those for graphite, resulting in an excellent high-rate performance of the carbon electrode. The graphitized MCF anode showed larger capacity, a higher rate capability, and better reversibility than the graphite anode. The 863448 size (8.6 mm × 34 mm × 48 mm) prismatic cell with the graphitized MCF anode exhibited a large capacity of > 1000 mAh. At 3 A discharge, the prismatic cell had 95% of its capacity at 0.5 A discharge with a mid-discharge voltage of 3.35 V. The cell maintained > 85% of its initial capacity after 500 cycles and showed high capacity at -20 °C. It has thus been demonstrated that the prismatic cell using the graphitized MCF anode has excellent performance, and is an attractive choice for the power sources of cellular phones and other appliances.

  14. Distributed fiber-optic sensing in a high-temperature solid-oxide fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buric, M.; Ohodnicki, P.; Yan, A.; Huang, S.; Chen, K. P.

    2016-09-01

    High temperature solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) present a challenging harsh environment for sensor systems with temperatures above 800C and ambient hydrogen concentration potentially ranging from 0-100% across the cell's anode. A strong gradient exists in both gas concentration and temperature from the fuel-inlet to outlet as fuel is consumed across the cell. We report a technique for measuring the spatial distribution of temperature along a solid-oxide fuel-cell interconnect channel using a distributed interrogation system coupled with a single-mode fiber optic thin-film evanescent wave absorption sensor. These sensors are to be operated inside an operating fuel-cell stack yielding spatially distributed measurements with sub-millimeter accuracy. Details are presented pertinent to the stable operation of silica optical fibers in the presence of high hydrogen concentration which can induce optical fiber losses. The stability of Rayleigh scattering centers is discussed with regard to the operational environment. The potential for extension of the approach to chemical (i.e. hydrogen) sensing as well as dual hydrogen/temperature sensor fabrication and stabilization are also briefly discussed.

  15. T Cell Receptor Engagement Triggers Its CD3ε and CD3ζ Subunits to Adopt a Compact, Locked Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Risueño, Ruth M.; Schamel, Wolfgang W. A.; Alarcón, Balbino

    2008-01-01

    How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) discriminates between molecularly related peptide/Major Histocompatibility Complex (pMHC) ligands and converts this information into different possible signaling outcomes is still not understood. One current model proposes that strong pMHC ligands, but not weak ones, induce a conformational change in the TCR. Evidence supporting this comes from a pull-down assay that detects ligand-induced binding of the TCR to the N-terminal SH3 domain of the adapter protein Nck, and also from studies with a neoepitope-specific antibody. Both methods rely on the exposure of a polyproline sequence in the CD3ε subunit of the TCR, and neither indicates whether the conformational change is transmitted to other CD3 subunits. Using a protease-sensitivity assay, we now show that the cytoplasmic tails of CD3ε and CD3ζ subunits become fully protected from degradation upon TCR triggering. These results suggest that the TCR conformational change is transmitted to the tails of CD3ε and CD3ζ, and perhaps all CD3 subunits. Furthermore, the resistance to protease digestion suggests that CD3 cytoplasmic tails adopt a compact structure in the triggered TCR. These results are consistent with a model in which transduction of the conformational change induced upon TCR triggering promotes condensation and shielding of the CD3 cytoplasmic tails. PMID:18320063

  16. A compact and highly efficient natural gas fuel processor for 1-kW residential polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Doohwan; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lee, Kang Hee; Kim, Soonho

    A compact and highly efficient natural gas fuel processor for 1-kW residential polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) has been developed at the Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT). The fuel processor, referred to as SFP-2, consists of a natural gas reformer, a water-gas shift reactor, a heat-exchanger and a burner, in which the overall integrated volume including insulation is exceptionally small, namely, about 14 l. The SFP-2 produces hydrogen at 1000 l h -1 (STP) at full load with the carbon monoxide concentration in the process gas below 7000 ppmv (dry gas base). The maximum thermal efficiency is ∼78% (lower heating value) at full load and even ∼72% at 25% partial load. This fuel processor of small size with high thermal efficiency is one of the best such technologies for the above given H 2 throughputs. The time required for starting up the SFP-2 is within 20 min with the addition of external heating for the shift reactor. No additional medium, such as nitrogen, is required either for start-up or for shut down of the SFP-2, which is an advantage for application in residential PEMFC co-generations systems.

  17. Fully passive-alignment pluggable compact parallel optical interconnection modules based on a direct-butt-coupling structure for fiber-optic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kwon-Seob; Park, Hyoung-Jun; Kang, Hyun Seo; Kim, Young Sun; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2016-02-01

    A low-cost packaging method utilizing a fully passive optical alignment and surface-mounting method is demonstrated for pluggable compact and slim multichannel optical interconnection modules using a VCSEL/PIN-PD chip array. The modules are based on a nonplanar bent right-angle electrical signal path on a silicon platform and direct-butt-optical coupling without a bulky and expensive microlens array. The measured optical direct-butt-coupling efficiencies of each channel without any bulky optics are as high as 33% and 95% for the transmitter and receiver, respectively. Excellent lateral optical alignment tolerance of larger than 60 μm for both the transmitter and receiver module significantly reduces the manufacturing and material costs as well as the packaging time. The clear eye diagrams, extinction ratios higher than 8 dB at 10.3 Gbps for the transmitter module, and receiver sensitivity of better than -13.1 dBm at 10.3 Gbps and a bit error rate of 10-12 for all channels are demonstrated. Considering that the optical output power of the transmitter is greater than 0 dBm, the module has a sufficient power margin of about 13 dB for 10.3 Gbps operations for all channels.

  18. Three-dimensional fiber deposition of cell-laden, viable, patterned constructs for bone tissue printing.

    PubMed

    Fedorovich, Natalja E; De Wijn, Joost R; Verbout, Abraham J; Alblas, Jacqueline; Dhert, Wouter J A

    2008-01-01

    Organ or tissue printing, a novel approach in tissue engineering, creates layered, cell-laden hydrogel scaffolds with a defined three-dimensional (3D) structure and organized cell placement. In applying the concept of tissue printing for the development of vascularized bone grafts, the primary focus lies on combining endothelial progenitors and bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Here we characterize the applicability of 3D fiber deposition with a plotting device, Bioplotter, for the fabrication of spatially organized, cell-laden hydrogel constructs. The viability of printed BMSCs was studied in time, in several hydrogels, and extruded from different needle diameters. Our findings indicate that cells survive the extrusion and that their subsequent viability was not different from that of unprinted cells. The applied extrusion conditions did not affect cell survival, and BMSCs could subsequently differentiate along the osteoblast lineage. Furthermore, we were able to combine two distinct cell populations within a single scaffold by exchanging the printing syringe during deposition, indicating that this 3D fiber deposition system is suited for the development of bone grafts containing multiple cell types.

  19. Overcharge studies of carbon fiber composite-based lithium-ion cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, S.; Kim, Y.-K.; Saleh, Y.; Loutfy, R.

    Prototype lithium-ion pouch cells of 5.5 Ah have been fabricated with carbon fiber composite anodes, LiCoO 2 cathodes, and LiPF 6 electrolyte to investigate the overcharge characteristics of these cells at the 1 C rate. The cells were made with anode to cathode capacity (A/C) ratios of 1.0 and 1.1. The cells were first examined for charge-discharge characteristics at different rates in order to determine the delivered capacity, specific energy and energy density and rate capability, and to ensure that the cells are suitable for overcharge studies. The current, voltage, and temperature responses during overcharge to 12 V were recorded. Maximum temperatures of 65 and 85 °C were observed with the cells with A/C equal to 1.1 and 1.0, respectively. The overcharged cells were dissected in an inert atmosphere and their components were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy. It is believed that a relatively low amount of heat is generated with carbon fiber composi