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Sample records for fiber technology center

  1. Fiber Optics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  2. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) Fiber Optic Sensing System (FOSS) Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick; Hamory, Phil; Pena, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Attached is a power point presentation created to assist the Tech Transfer Office and the FOSS project team members in responding to inquiries from the public about the capabilities of the Fiber Optic Sensing System.

  3. Improvement of the accuracy of the aircraft center of gravity by employing optical fiber Bragg grating technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongtao; Wang, Pengfei; Fan, LingLing; Guan, Liang; Zhao, Qiming; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2010-04-01

    Safety flight of aircrafts requires that the aircraft center of gravity (CG) must fall within specified limits established by the manufacturer. However, the aircraft CG depends not only on the structure of planes, but also on the passengers and their luggage. The current method of estimating the weight of passengers and luggage by the average weight may result in a violation of this requirement. To reduce the discrepancy between the actual weight and estimated weight, we propose a method of improving the accuracy of calculating the CG of the plane by weighing the passengers and their personal luggage. This method is realized by a Weigh-In-Motion (WIM) system installed at boarding gates based on optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) technology. One prototype of WIM is fabricated and tested at lab. The resolution of this system is 2 kg and can be further improved by advanced manufacture technology. With the accurate weight of passengers and luggage coming from the WIM system and the locations of passengers and luggage obtained from boarding cards, the aircraft CG can be calculated correctly. This method can be applied into other fields, such as escalators, boarding gates for ferries.

  4. Automated fiber pigtailing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strand, O. T.; Lowry, M. E.; Lu, S. Y.; Nelson, D. C.; Nikkel, D. J.; Pocha, M. D.; Young, K. D.

    1994-02-01

    The high cost of optoelectronic (OE) devices is due mainly to the labor-intensive packaging process. Manually pigtailing such devices as single-mode laser diodes and modulators is very time consuming with poor quality control. The Photonics Program and the Engineering Research Division at LLNL are addressing several issues associated with automatically packaging OE devices. A furry automated system must include high-precision fiber alignment, fiber attachment techniques, in-situ quality control, and parts handling and feeding. This paper will present on-going work at LLNL in the areas of automated fiber alignment and fiber attachment. For the fiber alignment, we are building an automated fiber pigtailing machine (AFPM) which combines computer vision and object recognition algorithms with active feedback to perform sub-micron alignments of single-mode fibers to modulators and laser diodes. We expect to perform sub-micron alignments in less than five minutes with this technology. For fiber attachment, we are building various geometries of silicon microbenches which include on-board heaters to solder metal-coated fibers and other components in place; these designs are completely compatible with an automated process of OE packaging. We have manually attached a laser diode, a thermistor, and a thermo-electric heater to one of our microbenches in less than 15 minutes using the on-board heaters for solder reflow; an automated process could perform this same exercise in only a few minutes. Automated packaging techniques such as these will help lower the costs of OE devices.

  5. Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, M.; Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

    1996-10-24

    This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

  6. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  7. Science and Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Danilov, Victor J.

    Science and technology centers, which are relative newcomers to the museum field, differ from traditional museums in a number of respects. They are concerned with furthering public understanding and appreciation of the physical and biological sciences, engineering, technology, and health and seek to accomplish this goal by making museums both…

  8. Silica optical fibers: technology update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, David A.; McCann, Brian P.

    1995-05-01

    Silica-core optical fibers have long been the standard delivery medium for medical laser delivery systems. Their high strength, excellent flexibility, and low cost continue to make them the fiber of choice for systems operating from 300 to 2200 nm. An overview of the current fiber constructions available to the industry is reviewed. Silicone-clad fibers, hard- fluoropolymer clad fibers and silica-clad fibers are briefly compared in terms of mechanical and optical properties. The variety of fiber coatings available is also discussed. A significant product development of silica fiber delivery systems has been in side-firing laser delivery systems for Urology. These devices utilize silica-core fibers to project the laser energy at a substantial lateral angle to the conventional delivery system, typically 40 to 100 degrees off axis. Many unique distal tips have been designed to meet the needs of this potentially enormous application. There are three primary technologies employed in side-firing laser delivery systems: reflection off of an attached medium; reflection within an angle-polished fiber through total internal reflection; and reflection from both an angle-polished fiber and an outside medium. Each technology is presented and compared on the basis of operation modality, transmission efficiency, and power-handling performance.

  9. "Infotonics Technology Center"

    SciTech Connect

    Fritzemeier, L.; Boysel, M. B.; Smith, D. R.

    2004-09-30

    During this grant period July 15, 2002 thru September 30, 2004, the Infotonics Technology Center developed the critical infrastructure and technical expertise necessary to accelerate the development of sensors, alternative lighting and power sources, and other specific subtopics of interest to Department of Energy. Infotonics fosters collaboration among industry, universities and government and operates as a national center of excellence to drive photonics and microsystems development and commercialization. A main goal of the Center is to establish a unique, world-class research and development facility. A state-of-the-art microsystems prototype and pilot fabrication facility was established to enable rapid commercialization of new products of particular interest to DOE. The Center has three primary areas of photonics and microsystems competency: device research and engineering, packaging and assembly, and prototype and pilot-scale fabrication. Center activities focused on next generation optical communication networks, advanced imaging and information sensors and systems, micro-fluidic systems, assembly and packaging technologies, and biochemical sensors. With targeted research programs guided by the wealth of expertise of Infotonics business and scientific staff, the fabrication and packaging facility supports and accelerates innovative technology development of special interest to DOE in support of its mission and strategic defense, energy, and science goals.

  10. Center for Healthcare Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Carrano, A.V.

    1994-03-01

    In the U.S., we now spend about 13% of the gross domestic product (CDP) on healthcare. This figure represents nearly $3000 per year per man, woman, and child. Moreover, this expenditure is projected to grow to about 20% of the GDP by the year 2000. Medical research and development accounts for only about 3% of national healthcare spending, and technology development represents only a small fraction of that 3%. New technologies that are far more cost-effective than previous ones - such as minimally invasive surgical procedures, advanced automated diagnostics, and better information systems - could save the nation billions of dollars per year to say nothing of the potential reductions in pain and suffering. A center is described that will coordinate ongoing Laboratory research aimed at developing more cost-effective tools for use by the healthcare community. The new Center for Healthcare Technologies will have many long-term benefits for the region and the nation.

  11. Control Center Technology Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Conference papers and presentations are compiled and cover evolving architectures and technologies applicable to flight control centers. Advances by NASA Centers and the aerospace industry are presented.

  12. The Savannah River Technology Center, a leader in sensor technology

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, W.C.

    1993-12-01

    This publication highlights the capabilities and achievements of the Savannah River Technology Center in the field of sensor technology. Sensors are developed to provide solutions for environmental and chemical analysis. Most of their sensor systems are based upon fiber optics. Fiber optic probes function in three main modes: as a reflected light probe, from opaque samples; as a transreflectance probe, which sample light reflected back from samples which can pass light; and a flow cell, which monitors light transmitted through a path which passes the process stream being tested. The sensor group has developed fiber optic based temperature probes, has combined fiber optics with sol-gel technology to monitor process streams using chemical indicators, has done development work on slip stream on-line sampling of chemical process streams, has developed software to aid in the analysis of chemical solutions, and has applied this technology in a wide range of emerging areas.

  13. Solar Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, Bob

    2011-04-27

    The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

  14. Technology Development Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Ujihara, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) is developing and testing VLBI technologies and conducts observations with this new equipment. This report gives an overview of the Technology Development Center (TDC) at NICT and summarizes recent activities.

  15. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  16. New development in optical fibers for data center applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi; Shubochkin, Roman; Zhu, Benyuan

    2015-01-01

    VCSEL-multimode optical fiber based links is the most successful optical technology in Data Centers. Laser-optimized multimode optical fibers, OM3 and OM4, have been the primary choice of physical media for 10 G serial, 4 x 10 G parallel, 10 x 10 G parallel, and 4 x 25 G parallel optical solutions in IEEE 802.3 standards. As the transition of high-end servers from 10 Gb/s to 40 Gb/s is driving the aggregation of speeds to 40 Gb/s now, and to 100 Gb/s and 400 Gb/s in near future, industry experts are coming together in IEEE 802.3bs 400 Gb/s study group and preliminary discussion of Terabit transmission for datacom applications has also been commenced. To meet the requirement of speed, capacity, density, power consumption and cost for next generation datacom applications, optical fiber design concepts beyond the standard OM3 and OM4 MMFs have a revived research and developmental interest, for example, wide band multimode optical fiber using multiple dopants for coarse wavelength division multiplexing; multicore multimode optical fiber using plural multimode cores in a single fiber strand to improve spatial density; and perhaps 50 Gb/s per lane and few mode fiber in spatial division multiplexing for ultimate capacity increase in far future. This talk reviews the multitude of fiber optic media being developed in the industry to address the upcoming challenges of datacom growth. We conclude that multimode transmission using low cost VCSEL technology will continue to be a viable solution for datacom applications.

  17. Development of China's fiber optic technology discussed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Q.

    1986-04-01

    Fiber optic technology is a new transmission technology having the outstanding advantages of low loss, high capacity, no magnetic interference, all-dielectric transmission, small size, and light weight. Research into fiber optic technology began in the mid-1970's in China. The scope of applications for fiber optic communications systems is divided into three categories: junction lines, trunk lines, and subscriber lines. Each of the categories are briefly discussed. The advantages and economic suitability of fiber optics are discussed.

  18. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The 1990 technical report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center during 1990. The report lists 130 publications, 226 presentations, and 87 new technology reports and patents.

  19. Center for space microelectronics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The 1992 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center during the past year. The report lists 187 publications, 253 presentations, and 111 new technology reports and patents in the areas of solid-state devices, photonics, advanced computing, and custom microcircuits.

  20. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 193 publications, 211 presentations, and 125 new technology reports and patents.

  1. A novel fiber-based adsorbent technology

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T.A.

    1997-10-01

    In this Phase I Small Business Innovation Research program, Chemica Technologies, Inc. is developing an economical, robust, fiber-based adsorbent technology for removal of heavy metals from contaminated water. The key innovation is the development of regenerable adsorbent fibers and adsorbent fiber cloths that have high capacity and selectivity for heavy metals and are chemically robust. The process has the potential for widespread use at DOE facilities, mining operations, and the chemical process industry.

  2. Fiber composite materials technology development

    SciTech Connect

    Chiao, T.T.

    1980-10-23

    The FY1980 technical accomplishments from the Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the Fiber Composite Materials Technology Development Task fo the MEST project are summarized. The task is divided into three areas: Engineering data base for flywheel design (Washington University will report this part separately), new materials evaluation, and time-dependent behavior of Kevlar composite strands. An epoxy matrix was formulated which can be used in composites for 120/sup 0/C service with good processing and mechanical properties. Preliminary results on the time-dependent properties of the Kevlar 49/epoxy strands indicate: Fatigue loading, as compared to sustained loading, drastically reduces the lifetime of a Kevlar composie; the more the number of on-off load cycles, the less the lifetime; and dynamic fatigue of the Kevlar composite can not be predicted by current damage theories such as Miner's Rule.

  3. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-10-31

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

  4. Morgantown Energy Technology Center, technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. METC`s R&D programs are focused on commercialization of technologies that will be carried out in the private sector. META has solicited two PRDAs for EM. The first, in the area of groundwater and soil technologies, resulted in twenty-one contact awards to private sector and university technology developers. The second PRDA solicited novel decontamination and decommissioning technologies and resulted in eighteen contract awards. In addition to the PRDAs, METC solicited the first EM ROA in 1993. The ROA solicited research in a broad range of EM-related topics including in situ remediation, characterization, sensors, and monitoring technologies, efficient separation technologies, mixed waste treatment technologies, and robotics. This document describes these technology development activities.

  5. An International Development Technology Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Robert P.

    1969-01-01

    Main focus of the Center is "the application of science and technology to the solution of problems faced by people in less-developed areas of the world. Adapted from paper presented at ASEE Annual Meeting, The Pennsylvania State University, June, 1969. (Author/WM)

  6. Center for Advanced Computational Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.

    2000-01-01

    The Center for Advanced Computational Technology (ACT) was established to serve as a focal point for diverse research activities pertaining to application of advanced computational technology to future aerospace systems. These activities include the use of numerical simulations, artificial intelligence methods, multimedia and synthetic environments, and computational intelligence, in the modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, optimization, design and operation of future aerospace systems. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The Center has four specific objectives: 1) conduct innovative research on applications of advanced computational technology to aerospace systems; 2) act as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); 3) help in identifying future directions of research in support of the aeronautical and space missions of the twenty-first century; and 4) help in the rapid transfer of research results to industry and in broadening awareness among researchers and engineers of the state-of-the-art in applications of advanced computational technology to the analysis, design prototyping and operations of aerospace and other high-performance engineering systems. In addition to research, Center activities include helping in the planning and coordination of the activities of a multi-center team of NASA and JPL researchers who are developing an intelligent synthesis environment for future aerospace systems; organizing workshops and national symposia; as well as writing state-of-the-art monographs and NASA special publications on timely topics.

  7. Process Engineering Technology Center Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centeno, Martha A.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is developing as a world-class Spaceport Technology Center (STC). From a process engineering (PE) perspective, the facilities used for flight hardware processing at KSC are NASA's premier factories. The products of these factories are safe, successful shuttle and expendable vehicle launches carrying state-of-the-art payloads. PE is devoted to process design, process management, and process improvement, rather than product design. PE also emphasizes the relationships of workers with systems and processes. Thus, it is difficult to speak of having a laboratory for PE at KSC because the entire facility is practically a laboratory when observed from a macro level perspective. However, it becomes necessary, at times, to show and display how KSC has benefited from PE and how KSC has contributed to the development of PE; hence, it has been proposed that a Process Engineering Technology Center (PETC) be developed to offer a place with a centralized focus on PE projects, and a place where KSC's PE capabilities can be showcased, and a venue where new Process Engineering technologies can be investigated and tested. Graphics for showcasing PE capabilities have been designed, and two initial test beds for PE technology research have been identified. Specifically, one test bed will look into the use of wearable computers with head mounted displays to deliver work instructions; the other test bed will look into developing simulation models that can be assembled into one to create a hierarchical model.

  8. Fiber Optic Communications Technology. A Status Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, Joseph A.

    Fiber optic communications (communications over very pure glass transmission channels of diameter comparable to a human hair) is an emerging technology which promises most improvements in communications capacity at reasonable cost. The fiber transmission system offers many desirable characteristics representing improvements over conventional…

  9. Center for Computational Structures Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noor, Ahmed K.; Perry, Ferman W.

    1995-01-01

    The Center for Computational Structures Technology (CST) is intended to serve as a focal point for the diverse CST research activities. The CST activities include the use of numerical simulation and artificial intelligence methods in modeling, analysis, sensitivity studies, and optimization of flight-vehicle structures. The Center is located at NASA Langley and is an integral part of the School of Engineering and Applied Science of the University of Virginia. The key elements of the Center are: (1) conducting innovative research on advanced topics of CST; (2) acting as pathfinder by demonstrating to the research community what can be done (high-potential, high-risk research); (3) strong collaboration with NASA scientists and researchers from universities and other government laboratories; and (4) rapid dissemination of CST to industry, through integration of industrial personnel into the ongoing research efforts.

  10. Process Engineering Technology Center Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Centeno, Martha A.

    2002-01-01

    NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is developing as a world-class Spaceport Technology Center (STC). From a process engineering (PE) perspective, the facilities used for flight hardware processing at KSC are NASA's premier factories. The products of these factories are safe, successful shuttle and expendable vehicle launches carrying state-of-the-art payloads. PE is devoted to process design, process management, and process improvement, rather than product design. PE also emphasizes the relationships of workers with systems and processes. Thus, it is difficult to speak of having a laboratory for PE at K.S.C. because the entire facility is practically a laboratory when observed from a macro level perspective. However, it becomes necessary, at times, to show and display how K.S.C. has benefited from PE and how K.S.C. has contributed to the development of PE; hence, it has been proposed that a Process Engineering Technology Center (PETC) be developed to offer a place with a centralized focus on PE projects, and a place where K.S.C.'s PE capabilities can be showcased, and a venue where new Process Engineering technologies can be investigated and tested. Graphics for showcasing PE capabilities have been designed, and two initial test beds for PE technology research have been identified. Specifically, one test bed will look into the use of wearable computers with head mounted displays to deliver work instructions; the other test bed will look into developing simulation models that can be assembled into one to create a hierarchical model.

  11. Center for Advanced Separation Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Honaker, Rick

    2013-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, CAST is now a five-university consortium – Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah and Montana Tech, - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FE0000699, Center for Advanced Separation Technology. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in two broad areas: Advanced Pre-Combustion Clean Coal Technologies and Gas-Gas Separations. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the five member universities. These were reviewed and the selected proposals were forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed below by category, along with abstracts from their final reports.

  12. Carbon fiber manufacturing via plasma technology

    DOEpatents

    Paulauskas, Felix L.; Yarborough, Kenneth D.; Meek, Thomas T.

    2002-01-01

    The disclosed invention introduces a novel method of manufacturing carbon and/or graphite fibers that avoids the high costs associated with conventional carbonization processes. The method of the present invention avoids these costs by utilizing plasma technology in connection with electromagnetic radiation to produce carbon and/or graphite fibers from fully or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors. In general, the stabilized or partially stabilized carbon fiber precursors are placed under slight tension, in an oxygen-free atmosphere, and carbonized using a plasma and electromagnetic radiation having a power input which is increased as the fibers become more carbonized and progress towards a final carbon or graphite product. In an additional step, the final carbon or graphite product may be surface treated with an oxygen-plasma treatment to enhance adhesion to matrix materials.

  13. Center for Assistive Technology & Environmental Access

    MedlinePlus

    ... through the application of assistive and universally designed technologies in real world environments, products and devices. More ... address and college name * The Center for Assistive Technology and Environmental Access Georgia Institute of Technology (GT) ...

  14. Development of silica glass microstructured optical fibers technology in Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, J.; Janoszczyk, B.; Poturaj, K.; Makara, M.; Walewski, A.; Mergo, P.; Klimek, J.; Skorupski, K.; Czyżewska, L.

    2007-04-01

    Paper presents the state of advance of the silica glass microstructured optical fibers technology n Poland especially in Department of Optical Fibers Technology Maria Curie Sklodowska University. Only in this Department there are the technological apparatus for advanced investigations on the technology of the silica glass optical fibers. In paper was describe the technology of optical fiber photonic structure manufacturing, high silica glass synthesis from vapor phase with MCVD and OVD methods. Next was describe some kinds of microstructured optical fibers witch technologies elaborated in UMCS in support of own and received from cooperated research teams optical fibers structures, modeling and measurements results.

  15. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2011-11-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  16. Technology and applications of ultrafast fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Marion; Hellerer, Thomas; Stuhler, Juergen

    2012-03-01

    We briefly review the key technology of modern fiber based femtosecond laser sources summarizing advantages and disadvantages of different mode-locking solutions. A description of possible extensions of a FemtoFiber-type modelocked Er-doped fiber laser oscillator (1560 nm) reveals the flexibility with respect to wavelength coverage (488 nm .. 2200 nm) and pulse duration (10 fs .. 10 ps). The resulting FemtoFiber family and its versions for instrument integration allow one to use these state-of-the-art light sources in many important applications, e.g. THz spectroscopy and microscopy. We show that, depending on the fiber laser model and the THz emitter, THz radiation can be produced with 4-10 THz bandwidth and detected with up to 60 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Electronically controlled optical scanning (ECOPS) - a unique method for fast, precise and comfortable sampling of the THz pulse or other pump-probe experiments - is described and recommended for efficient data acquisition. As examples for modern microscopy with ultrafast fiber lasers we present results of two-photon fluorescence, coherent microscopy techniques (SHG/THG/CARS) and fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM).

  17. Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology (Program website, free access)   Currently there is no database matching your keyword search, but the NIST Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology website may be of interest. The Center for Nanoscale Science and Technology enables science and industry by providing essential measurement methods, instrumentation, and standards to support all phases of nanotechnology development, from discovery to production.

  18. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Kristie Cooper; Gary Pickrell; Anbo Wang

    2003-04-01

    This report summarizes technical progress over the fourth year of the ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'' program, funded by the Federal Energy Technology Center of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech. During the reporting period, research efforts under the program were focused on the development and evaluation of the fiber optic flow sensor system, and field testing in Tulsa, OK and the second field test of the pressure and temperature sensors in Coalinga, CA. The feasibility of a self-compensating fiber optic flow sensor based on a cantilever beam and interferometer for real-time flow rate measurements in the fluid filled pipes of oil field was clearly demonstrated. In addition, field testing of the pressure and temperature sensors deployed downhole continued. These accomplishments are summarized here: (1) Theoretical analysis and simulations were performed to ensure performance of the design. (2) The sensor fabrication and packaging techniques were investigated and improved. (3) Prototype flow sensors were fabricated based on the fabrication experience of hundreds of test sensors. (4) A lab-scale flow testing system was constructed and used for sensor evaluation. (5) Field-testing was performed in both the indoor and outdoor flow testing facility at the University of Tulsa, OK. (6) Testing of a multimode white light pressure and temperature sensor system continued at the oil site of Chevron/Texaco Company (Coalinga CA).

  19. Join TTC! | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) offers a unique opportunity for training through the NCI TTC Fellowship program. TTC also has a unit dedicated to marketing these research opportunities and their underlying technologies to potential collaborators and licensees.

  20. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    Anbo Wang; Kristie L. Cooper; Gary R. Pickrell

    2003-06-01

    Efficient recovery of petroleum reserves from existing oil wells has been proven to be difficult due to the lack of robust instrumentation that can accurately and reliably monitor processes in the downhole environment. Commercially available sensors for measurement of pressure, temperature, and fluid flow exhibit shortened lifetimes in the harsh downhole conditions, which are characterized by high pressures (up to 20 kpsi), temperatures up to 250 C, and exposure to chemically reactive fluids. Development of robust sensors that deliver continuous, real-time data on reservoir performance and petroleum flow pathways will facilitate application of advanced recovery technologies, including horizontal and multilateral wells. This is the final report for the four-year program ''Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery'', funded by the National Petroleum Technology Office of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology of the Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Virginia Tech from October 1, 1999 to March 31, 2003. The main objective of this research program was to develop cost-effective, reliable optical fiber sensor instrumentation for real-time monitoring of various key parameters crucial to efficient and economical oil production. During the program, optical fiber sensors were demonstrated for the measurement of temperature, pressure, flow, and acoustic waves, including three successful field tests in the Chevron/Texaco oil fields in Coalinga, California, and at the world-class oil flow simulation facilities in Tulsa, Oklahoma. Research efforts included the design and fabrication of sensor probes, development of signal processing algorithms, construction of test systems, development and testing of strategies for the protection of optical fibers and sensors in the downhole environment, development of remote monitoring capabilities allowing real-time monitoring of the field

  1. Responding to Industry Demands: Advanced Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Elizabeth Brient

    1991-01-01

    Discusses characteristics identified by the Center for Occupational Research and Development as indicative of fully functioning advanced technology centers, including the provision of training and retraining in such areas as design, manufacturing, materials science, and electro-optics; technology transfer; demonstration sites; needs assessment;…

  2. The Savannah River Technology Center Research and Development Climatology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Kurzeja, R.J.

    1995-12-31

    The Environmental Technology Section (ETS) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) built and has operated the Climatology Site (CS) for almost 10 years. The Climatology Site provides a wide variety of meteorological support functions for Savannah River Site (SRS) operations and research. This document describes the Climatology Site facility to familiarize present and potential users with its capabilities.

  3. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-04-30

    The final data package has been completed for the Mississippi State University, DIAL FTP Wall Depth Removal Characterization Technology. The package has been sent to DIAL for comments. Work is progressing on completing the transfer of glove boxes and tanks from Rocky Flats to FIU-HCET for the purpose of performing size reduction technology assessments. Vendors are being identified and security measures are being put in place to meet the High Risk Property criteria required by Rocky Flats. The FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program has been included as one of 11 verification programs across the US and Canada described in the Interstate Technology Regulatory Cooperation (ITRC) document, ''Multi-state Evaluation of Elements Important to the Verification of Remediation Technologies'', dated January 1999. FIU-HCET will also participate in a panel discussion on technology verification programs at the International Environmental Technology Expo '99.

  4. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-05-31

    The programming and website for the advanced Technology Information System (TIS) have been completed. Over and above the LSDDP-TIS, the new system provides information on DOE's baseline technologies, technology data contained in DOE's databases, technologies assessed at FIU-HCET Technology Assessment Program (TAP), as well as links to other selected D&D sites with valuable technology information. The new name for the website is Gateway for Environmental Technology (GET). A super-vacuum type blasting system was tested for decontamination of 12-in pipe internal surfaces. The system operates on compressed air and propels grit media at high speed at wall surfaces. It is equipped with a vacuum system for collecting grit, dust, and debris. This technology was selected for further development. The electret ion chamber (EIC) system for measurement of alpha contamination on surfaces has been calibrated and is ready for demonstration and deployment. FIU-HCET is working with representatives from Fernald, Oak Ridge, Rocky Flats, and Savannah River to procure a demonstration and deployment site. Final arrangements are ongoing for the mock-up design for the glove box and tank size reduction technology assessments, including designing of support bases for tanks, a piping support system, and a mobilization plan for glove boxes and tanks from storage site to the PermaCon.

  5. Research and technology at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on the Center's research and technology program. In addition to strengthening those areas of engineering and operations technology that contribute to safer, more efficient, and more economical execution of current mission, the technical tools are developed needed to execute Center's mission relative to future programs. The Engineering Development Directorate encompasses most of the laboratories and other Center resources that are key elements of research and technology program implementation and is responsible for implementation of the majority of the projects in this Kennedy Space Center 1989 Annual Report.

  6. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-01-31

    FIU-HCET participated in an ICT meeting at Mound during the second week of December and presented a brief videotape of the testing of the Robotic Climber technology. During this meeting, FIU-HCET proposed the TechXtract technology for possible testing at Mound and agreed to develop a five-page proposal for review by team members. FIU-HCET provided assistance to Bartlett Inc. and General Lasertronics Corporation in developing a proposal for a Program Opportunity Notice (PON). The proposal was submitted by these companies on January 5, 1999. The search for new equipment dismantlement technologies is continuing. The following vendors have responded to requests for demonstration: LUMONICS, Laser Solutions technology; CRYO-BEAM, Cryogenic cutting technology; Waterjet Technology Association, Waterjet Cutting technology; and DIAJET, Waterjet Cutting technology. Based on the tasks done in FY98, FIU-HCET is working closely with Numatec Hanford Corporation (NHC) and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to revise the plan and scope of work of the pipeline plugging project in FY99, which involves activities of lab-scale flow loop experiments and a large-scale demonstration test bed.

  7. Center for Instructional Technology: A Strategic Imperative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volzer, Debra; Weaver, Mark

    2004-01-01

    Ohio Dominican University, a small traditional Catholic Liberal Arts University steeped in the Dominican tradition, is in the midst of a technological metamorphosis. At the forefront of the change is the Center for Instructional Technology. Charged with supporting the development of technology enhanced, hybrid, and totally online curriculum, the…

  8. Promoting Technology in the Media Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    Media specialists are now in charge of computers, printers, software programs and every other technological advancement, as technology have become an important aspect of education. The key points to be kept in mind while promoting technology in the media center are stated.

  9. Advanced technologies for Mission Control Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dalton, John T.; Hughes, Peter M.

    1991-01-01

    Advance technologies for Mission Control Centers are presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: technology needs; current technology efforts at GSFC (human-machine interface development, object oriented software development, expert systems, knowledge-based software engineering environments, and high performance VLSI telemetry systems); and test beds.

  10. Haystack Observatory Technology Development Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudoin, Chris; Corey, Brian; Niell, Arthur; Cappallo, Roger; Whitney, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Technology development at MIT Haystack Observatory were focused on four areas in 2012: VGOS developments at GGAO; Digital backend developments and workshop; RFI compatibility at VLBI stations; Mark 6 VLBI data system development.

  11. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-07-31

    FIU-HCET personnel visited the Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) for discussions with the Principal Investigator (PI) of Laser Induced Fluorescence Imaging (LIFI) and for training in LIFI. Mr. Peter Gibbons, Tanks Retrieval Technology Integration Manager, visited FIU-HCET on July 20, 1999. Mr. Gibbons inspected the pipeline unplugging experimental facility at the HCET testing field. The detailed test bed construction, testing plan, and plugging material specifications were discussed.

  12. The Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST Center)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The following is a technical report of the progress made under Cooperative Agreement NCC5494, the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST). The period covered by this report is October 1, 2001 through December 31, 2001. GEST is a consortium of scientists and engineers, led by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), to conduct scientific research in Earth and information sciences and related technologies in collaboration with the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). GEST was established through a cooperative agreement signed May 11, 2000, following a competitive procurement process initiated by GSFC.

  13. NASA(Field Center Based) Technology Commercialization Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Under the direction of the IC(sup 2) Institute, the Johnson Technology Commercialization Center has met or exceeded all planned milestones and metrics during the first two and a half years of the NTCC program. The Center has established itself as an agent for technology transfer and economic development in- the Clear Lake community, and is positioned to continue as a stand-alone operation. This report presents data on the experimental JTCC program, including all objective measures tracked over its duration. While the metrics are all positive, the data indicates a shortage of NASA technologies with strong commercial potential, barriers to the identification and transfer of technologies which may have potential, and small financial return to NASA via royalty-bearing licenses. The Center has not yet reached the goal of self-sufficiency based on rental income, and remains dependent on NASA funding. The most important issues raised by the report are the need for broader and deeper community participation in the Center, technology sourcing beyond JSC, and the form of future funding which will be appropriate.

  14. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-03-30

    A vendor was selected for the diamond wire technology demonstration scheduled for this summer at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). A team consisting of personnel from FIU-HCET, PPPL, and AEA Technology reviewed the submitted bids. FIU-HCET will contract this vendor. At the SRS Ninth ICT teleconference, the ICT team discussed the status of the following demonstrations: LRAD; x-ray, K-edge; Strippable Coatings; Thermal Spray Vitrification; Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction; and Electrets. The LRAD demo is complete, and the x-ray/K-edge, Strippable Coatings, and Electrets demos are ongoing. The Asbestos and Thermal Spray Vitrification demos require more laboratory testing. The Cutting/Shearing/Dismantlement/Size Reduction demo is undergoing procurement. Five FIU-HCET staff members took the 1S0 14000 environmental auditor training course February 22-26, 1999, given by ASC. The test plan for the Facility Dismantlement Technology Assessment is finished and ready for internal review.

  15. Savannah River Technology Center, monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    This is the monthly report to detail the research currently being conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center. The areas of research are in Tritium, Seperation processes, Environmental Engineering, and Waste Management.

  16. Savannah River Technology Center monthly report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This document contains many small reports from personnel at the technology center under the umbrella topics of reactors, tritium, separations, environment, waste management, and general engineering. Progress and accomplishments are given.

  17. Rock Port Celebrates New Technology Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grones, Freda

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the advantages dome architecture gave to a new school technology center in Rock Port, Missouri. Advantages cover energy cost savings, lighting, storage space, aesthetics, accessibility, and convenience. (GR)

  18. Center for Computer Sciences and Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    Functions of the Center for Computer Sciences and Technology (CCST), a national center for computer research and development for the United States government, are described. CCST provides computer and related services to the National Bureau of Standards of which it is a part and to other government agencies on a cost-reimbursable basis. The Office…

  19. The Learning Technology Center at Vanderbilt University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bransford, John

    1994-01-01

    Describes the Vanderbilt University (Tennessee) Learning Technology Center, including profile of the center's personnel; description of representative projects, such as the Jasper-Woodbury Problem Solving Series, a multimedia literacy program for grades K-3, and the Adult Literacy Program; and a list of 14 representative publications by center…

  20. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-06-30

    To enhance the measurement capability of EICs to alpha spectrometry, measurements at FIU-HCET were performed on different energy alpha sources, and response factors of ST electrets in 960-mL chamber were determined. Earlier, EIC was considered as only a charge-integrating device without spectrometric capability. This is a potentially significant development accomplished by FIU-HCET. It could appreciably lower the current cost of spectral characterization. FIU-HCET has been invited to participate in the Operating Engineers' National Hazmat program's assessment of the Mini Mitter, commercially known as the VitalSense{trademark} Telemetric Monitoring System. This evaluation is scheduled for early July 1999. Additional health and safety technology evaluations, in which FIU-HCET will also participate, are also scheduled for later in the summer. The Technology Information System (TIS), MISD, and DASD are now complete and accessible through the Internet website http://www.DandD.org/tis.

  1. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A.Ebadian

    1999-02-28

    Search for decontamination technologies to be assessed at FIU-HCET continues. Bartlett Nuclear Inc. returned to FIU-HCET on February 15-19, 1999, to complete the demonstration of coating removal from concrete ceiling and aggressive contamination removal on uncoated concrete wall using their Robotic Climber. The design of test beds for large-scale technology demonstration of blockage locating and pipe unplugging has undergone major revision. The lab-scale test loop is also under modification. A new sampling system using isokinetic principles and consisting of thermistors, flow controller, and Wheatstone bridge will be installed on the flow loop. FIU-HCET International Coordinator attended the VII Steering Committee meeting in Lima, Peru, on February 11-12, 1999, and successfully introduced the Interactive Communication Website. Additional agenda items on the Website were proposed by the Steering Committee for upcoming committee meetings and working groups.

  2. Satisloh centering technology developments past to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitz, Ernst Michael; Moos, Steffen

    2015-10-01

    The centering of an optical lens is the grinding of its edge profile or contour in relationship to its optical axis. This is required to ensure that the lens vertex and radial centers are accurately positioned within an optical system. Centering influences the imaging performance and contrast of an optical system. Historically, lens centering has been a purely manual process. Along its 62 years of assembling centering machines, Satisloh introduced several technological milestones to improve the accuracy and quality of this process. During this time more than 2.500 centering machines were assembled. The development went from bell clamping and diamond grinding to Laser alignment, exchange chuckor -spindle systems, to multi axis CNC machines with integrated metrology and automatic loading systems. With the new centering machine C300, several improvements for the clamping and grinding process were introduced. These improvements include a user friendly software to support the operator, a coolant manifold and "force grinding" technology to ensure excellent grinding quality and process stability. They also include an air bearing directly driven centering spindle to provide a large working range of lenses made of all optical materials and diameters from below 10 mm to 300 mm. The clamping force can be programmed between 7 N and 1200 N to safely center lenses made of delicate materials. The smaller C50 centering machine for lenses below 50 mm diameter is available with an optional CNC loading system for automated production.

  3. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-09-30

    The Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) demonstration of the diamond wire cutting technology on the surrogate of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR), Figure 1, was performed from August 23-September 3, 1999. The plated diamond wire, Figure 2, was successful in cutting through all components of the TFTR surrogate including stainless steel, inconel and graphite. The demonstration tested three different void fill materials (mortar with sand, Rheocell-15, and foam) and three cooling systems (water, air, and liquid nitrogen). The optimum combination was determined to be the use of the low-density concrete void fill, Rheocell-15 with an average density of 52 lbs/ft{sup 3}, using a water coolant. However, the liquid nitrogen performed better than expected with only minor problems and was considered to be a successful demonstration of the Bluegrass Concrete Cutting, Inc. proprietary liquid-nitrogen coolant system. Data from the demonstration is being calculated and a summary of the technology demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. An ITSR will be written comparing the diamond wire saw to the plasma arc (baseline) technology. The MTR Chemical Protective Suit, a proprietary new suit from Kimberly Clark, was evaluated from 8/9/99 to 8/12/99 at Beaver, WV. This particular suit was tested on subjects performing three different tasks: climbing through a horizontal confined space, vertical confined space (pit), and loading and unloading material using a wheel barrow. Multiple test subjects performed each task for 20 minutes each. Performance of the innovative suit was compared to two commonly used types of protective clothing. Vital statistics, including body temperature and heart rate, were continuously monitored and recorded by an authorized physician. A summary of the demonstration will be included in the October monthly report. Along with the MTR Chemical Protective Suit, the VitalSense{trademark} Telemetric Monitoring System from Mini Mitter

  4. Educational Technology Center Third Year Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Educational Technology Center, Cambridge, MA.

    The Educational Technology Center (ETC) was established by the National Institute of Education in October, 1983, in order to find ways of using the computer and other information technologies to teach science, mathematics, and computing more effectively. This report describes the ETC, presents its framework for research, and summarizes work on 11…

  5. Technologies for Learner-Centered Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costello, Jane; Crane, Daph

    2013-01-01

    As the number, type, and use of technologies to support learning increases, so do the opportunities for using these technologies for feedback. Learner-centered feedback is a core to the teaching-learning process. It is related to assessment in describing how learners perform in their learning, their gain in knowledge, skills, and attitudes.…

  6. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian

    2000-01-31

    The Online Measurement of Decontamination project team received a commitment for a demonstration in May from the Sacramento (California) Municipal Utility District (SMUD) Rancho Seco site. Since this site is a member of the DOE Commercial Utilities Consortium, the demonstration will fulfill the DOE and commercial technology demonstration requirements. Discussion on deployment of the Integrated Vertical and Overhead Decontamination (IVOD) System at Rancho Seco was conducted; date for deployment tentatively scheduled for early spring. Based upon fictional requirements from SRS for a shiny monitor in a high-level waste tank, FIU-HCET developed and delivered a draft slurry monitor design and draft test plan. Experiments measuring slurry settling time for SRS slurry simulant at 10 wt% have been completed on FIU-HCET'S flow loop with SRS dip. The completed design package of the test mockup for evaluating Non-Intrusive Location of Buried Items Technologies was sent to Fluor Fernald and the Operating Engineers National Hazmat Program for review. Comments are due at the end of January. Preliminary experiments to determine size distribution of aerosols generated during metal cutting were performed. A 1/4-inch-thick iron plate was cut using a plasma arc torch, and the size distribution of airborne particles was measured using a multistage impactor. Per request of DOE-Ohio, FIU-HCET participated in a weeklong value engineering study for the characterization, decontamination, and dismantlement of their critical path facility.

  7. Fiber Sensor Systems Based on Fiber Laser and Microwave Photonic Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongyan; Chen, Daru; Cai, Zhiping

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensors, especially fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors are very attractive due to their numerous advantages over traditional sensors, such as light weight, high sensitivity, cost-effectiveness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, ease of multiplexing and so on. Therefore, fiber-optic sensors have been intensively studied during the last several decades. Nowadays, with the development of novel fiber technology, more and more newly invented fiber technologies bring better and superior performance to fiber-optic sensing networks. In this paper, the applications of some advanced photonic technologies including fiber lasers and microwave photonic technologies for fiber sensing applications are reviewed. FBG interrogations based on several kinds of fiber lasers, especially the novel Fourier domain mode locking fiber laser, have been introduced; for the application of microwave photonic technology, examples of microwave photonic filtering utilized as a FBG sensing interrogator and microwave signal generation acting as a transversal loading sensor have been given. Both theoretical analysis and experimental demonstrations have been carried out. The comparison of these advanced photonic technologies for the applications of fiber sensing is carried out and important issues related to the applications have been addressed and the suitable and potential application examples have also been discussed in this paper. PMID:22778591

  8. Next-generation wideband multimode fibers for data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balemarthy, Kasyapa; Shubochkin, Roman; Sun, Yi

    2016-03-01

    Short-reach optical links such as those used in data centers pre-dominantly employ VCSELs together with laser- optimized OM4 and OM3 multimode fiber (MMF), mainly due to their reliability, energy-efficiency and low end-to-end system cost. The IEEE 802.3bm specification for 100Gbps Ethernet utilizes four parallel MMFs each operating at a serial data rate of 25Gbps. Due to the rapidly increasing internet traffic, the IEEE P802.3bs Task Force is working towards a 400Gbps Ethernet standard requiring a commensurate increase in the number of parallel fibers deployed. Using 16 parallel lanes, while feasible, is not the most efficient use of cabling. One solution to the data rate - cable density problem is the use of shortwave wavelength division multiplexing (SWDM) near 850nm. For example, employing four wavelengths separated by ~30nm (with an operational window of ~840-950nm) results in a four-fold increase in the per-fiber data rate. Furthermore, SWDM can be combined with the parallel solution to support 400Gbps with the same cable density as the current 100Gbps Ethernet solution using OM4 fiber. Conventional laser-optimized OM4 gives diminished performance at the longer wavelengths compared to 850nm. Shifting the OM4 optimization wavelength to longer wavelengths sacrifices the 850nm performance. In this paper, we present next-generation wideband multimode fibers (NG-WBMMF) that are optimized for SWDM operation using a novel design approach employing multiple dopants. We have fabricated and characterized a wideband MMF that is OM4 compliant over the 850-950nm wavelength window. BER measurements demonstrate that this next-generation WB MMF satisfies the pre-FEC requirement of 5 × 10-5 even after transmission over 300m.

  9. Critical reviews of fiber-optic communication technology Optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapron, F. P.

    The review begins with brief highlights of the history of fiber optics, followed by a discussion of the attributes of shortwave and longwave transmission. This leads to an investigation of various fiber types, short-haul considerations, and then single-mode aspects. Specialty fiber is briefly covered, followed by a survey of several research trends today that will lead to new systems capabilities in the future. No references are given, since hundreds would be necessary to make the list even partially complete.

  10. Developments in Hollow Graphite Fiber Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Brantley, Lott W., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Hollow graphite fibers will be lighter than standard solid graphite fibers and, thus, will save weight in optical components. This program will optimize the processing and properties of hollow carbon fibers developed by MER and to scale-up the processing to produce sufficient fiber for fabricating a large ultra-lightweight mirror for delivery to NASA.

  11. Bridge SHM system based on fiber optical sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Fan, Dian; Fu, Jiang-hua; Huang, Xing; Jiang, De-sheng

    2015-09-01

    The latest progress of our lab in recent 10 years on the area of bridge structural health monitoring (SHM) based on optical fiber sensing technology is introduced. Firstly, in the part of sensing technology, optical fiber force test-ring, optical fiber vibration sensor, optical fiber smart cable, optical fiber prestressing loss monitoring method and optical fiber continuous curve mode inspection system are developed, which not only rich the sensor types, but also provides new monitoring means that are needed for the bridge health monitoring system. Secondly, in the optical fiber sensing network and computer system platform, the monitoring system architecture model is designed to effectively meet the integration scale and effect requirement of engineering application, especially the bridge expert system proposed integration of sensing information and informatization manual inspection to realize the mode of multi index intelligence and practical monitoring, diagnosis and evaluation. Finally, the Jingyue bridge monitoring system as the representative, the research on the technology of engineering applications are given.

  12. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Hodgson; David Irick

    2005-09-30

    The Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville has completed its sixth year of operation. During this period the Center has involved thirteen GATE Fellows and ten GATE Research Assistants in preparing them to contribute to advanced automotive technologies in the center's focus area: hybrid drive trains and control systems. Eighteen GATE students have graduated, and three have completed their course work requirements. Nine faculty members from three departments in the College of Engineering have been involved in the GATE Center. In addition to the impact that the Center has had on the students and faculty involved, the presence of the center has led to the acquisition of resources that probably would not have been obtained if the GATE Center had not existed. Significant industry interaction such as internships, equipment donations, and support for GATE students has been realized. The value of the total resources brought to the university (including related research contracts) exceeds $4,000,000. Problem areas are discussed in the hope that future activities may benefit from the operation of the current program.

  13. Ultrathin fiber-taper coupling with nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamonds at cryogenic temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Masazumi; Zhao, Hong-Quan; Noda, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2016-03-01

    We demonstrate successful cooling of ultrathin fiber tapers and their coupling with nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds at cryogenic temperatures. Nanodiamonds containing multiple NV centers are deposited on ultrathin fiber tapers with diameters ranging from 450-500 nm. The fiber tapers were successfully cooled down to 9 K with our special fiber mount and an optimization of cooling speed. The fluorescence coupled with the fiber tapers showed characteristic sharp zero-phonon lines of neutral and negatively charged NV centers. The present demonstration is important for the future NV-based quantum information devices and sensitive nanoscale cryogenic magnetometry.

  14. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2005-11-04

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  15. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-05-15

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  16. Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-09-30

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the twenty nine subprojects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  17. Johnson Space Center Research and Technology Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pido, Kelle; Davis, Henry L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    As the principle center for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) leads NASA's development of human spacecraft, human support systems, and human spacecraft operations. To implement this mission, JSC has focused on developing the infrastructure and partnerships that enable the technology development for future NASA programs. In our efforts to develop key technologies, we have found that collaborative relationships with private industry and academia strengthen our capabilities, infuse innovative ideas, and provide alternative applications for our development projects. The American public has entrusted NASA with the responsibility for space--technology development, and JSC is committed to the transfer of the technologies that we develop to the private sector for further development and application. It is our belief that commercialization of NASA technologies benefits both American industry and NASA through technology innovation and continued partnering. To this end, we present the 1998-1999 JSC Research and Technology Report. As your guide to the current JSC technologies, this report showcases the projects in work at JSC that may be of interest to U.S. industry, academia, and other government agencies (federal, state, and local). For each project, potential alternative uses and commercial applications are described.

  18. About TTC | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Technology Transfer Center (TTC) facilitates partnerships between the NIH research laboratories and external partners, and helping to accelerate development of cutting-edge research by connecting our partners to NIH’s world-class facilities, resources, and discoveries. Contact us to learn more.

  19. License Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    Since the government cannot engage in the development, manufacture, and sale of products, the NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) makes its discoveries (and discoveries from nine other NIH Institutes) available to organizations that can assist in the further development and commercialization of these basic science discoveries, to convert them into public health benefits.

  20. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This document summarizes the activities of the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST), a consortium of scientists and engineers led by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), during the contract reporting period. Topics covered include: new programs, eligibility and selection criteria, Goddard Coastal Research Graduate Fellowship Program and staffing changes.

  1. Research and technology, 1989: Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Langley Research Center is to increase the knowledge and capability of the United States in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights of the major accomplishments and applications that were made during the past year are presented. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology activities at NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  2. Research and technology, 1991. Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The mission of the NASA Langley Research Center is to increase the knowledge and capability of the United States in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be accomplished by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and Agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other United States Government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights are given of the major accomplishments and applications that have been made during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology (R&T) activities at NASA Langley Research Center and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  3. Mission & Role | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI TTC serves as the focal point for implementing the Federal Technology Transfer Act to utilize patents as incentive for commercial development of technologies and to establish research collaborations and licensing among academia, federal laboratories, non-profit organizations, and industry. The TTC supports technology development activities for the National Cancer Institute and nine other NIH Institutes and Centers. TTC staff negotiate co-development agreements and licenses with universities, non-profit organizations, and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies to ensure compliance with Federal statutes, regulations and the policies of the National Institutes of Health. TTC also reviews employee invention reports and makes recommendations concerning filing of domestic and foreign patent applications.

  4. Technologies for the Energy Efficient Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    Cader, Tahir; Westra, Levi; Marquez, Andres

    2007-07-17

    Although semiconductor manufacturers have provided temporary relief with lower-power multi-core microprocessors, OEMs and data center operators continue to push the limits for individual rack power densities. It is not uncommon today for data center operators to deploy multiple 20 kW racks in a facility. Such rack densities are exacerbating the major issues of power and cooling in data centers. Data center operators are now forced to take a hard look at the efficiencies of their data centers. Malone and Belady (2006) have proposed three metrics, i.e., Power Usage Effectiveness (PUE), Data Center Efficiency (DCE), and the Energy-to-Acquisition Cost ratio (EAC), to help data center operators quickly quantify the efficiency of their data centers. In their paper, Malone and Belady present nominal values of PUE across a broad crosssection of data centers. PUE values are presented for data centers at four levels of optimization. One of these optimizations involves the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). In the current paper, CFD is used to conduct an in-depth investigation of a liquid-cooled data center that would potentially be housed at the Pacific Northwest National Labs (PNNL). The boundary conditions used in the CFD model are based upon actual measurements on a rack of liquid-cooled servers housed at PNNL. The analysis shows that the liquid-cooled facility could achieve a PUE of 1.57 as compared to a PUE of 3.0 for a typical data center (the lower the PUE, the better, with values below 1.6 approaching ideal). The increase in data center efficiency is also translated into an increase in the amount of IT equipment that can be deployed. At a PUE of 1.57, the analysis shows that 91% more IT equipment can be deployed as compared to the typical data center. The paper will discuss the analysis of the PUE, and will also explore the impact of the raising data center efficiency via the use of multiple cooling technologies and CFD analysis. Complete results of the

  5. Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Investments Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Mike

    2014-01-01

    NASA is moving forward with prioritized technology investments that will support NASA's exploration and science missions, while benefiting other Government agencies and the U.S. aerospace enterprise. center dotThe plan provides the guidance for NASA's space technology investments during the next four years, within the context of a 20-year horizon center dotThis plan will help ensure that NASA develops technologies that enable its 4 goals to: 1.Sustain and extend human activities in space, 2.Explore the structure, origin, and evolution of the solar system, and search for life past and present, 3.Expand our understanding of the Earth and the universe and have a direct and measurable impact on how we work and live, and 4.Energize domestic space enterprise and extend benefits of space for the Nation.

  6. The 1994 Fiber Optic Sensors for Aerospace Technology (FOSAT) Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumbick, Robert (Compiler); Adamovsky, Grigory (Compiler); Tuma, Meg (Compiler); Beheim, Glenn (Compiler); Sotomayor, Jorge (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center conducted a workshop on fiber optic technology on October 18-20, 1994. The workshop objective was to discuss the future direction of fiber optics and optical sensor research, especially in the aerospace arena. The workshop was separated into four sections: (1) a Systems Section which dealt specifically with top level overall architectures for the aircraft and engine; (2) a Subsystems Section considered the parts and pieces that made up the subsystems of the overall systems; (3) a Sensor/Actuators section considered the status of research on passive optical sensors and optical powered actuators; and (4) Components Section which addressed the interconnects for the optical systems (e.g., optical connectors, optical fibers, etc.). This report contains the minutes of the discussion on the workshop, both in each section and in the plenary sessions. The slides used by a limited number of presenters are also included as presented. No attempt was made to homogenize this report. The view of most of the attendees was: (1) the government must do a better job of disseminating technical information in a more timely fashion; (2) enough work has been done on the components, and system level architecture definition must dictate what work should be done on components; (3) a Photonics Steering Committee should be formed to coordinate the efforts of government and industry in the photonics area, to make sure that programs complimented each other and that technology transferred from one program was used in other programs to the best advantage of the government and industry.

  7. Development of optical fiber technology in Poland: 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorosz, Jan; Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, the authors, chairs of the 15th Conference on Optical Fibers and Their Applications OFTA2014, and editors of the conference proceedings summarize the developments of optical fiber technology in Poland (during the period of 2012-2014) on the basis of papers presented there and consecutively published in this volume. The digest covers the periodically presented work results every 18 months during the meetings on optical fibers in Białystok - Lipowy Most (with emphasis on technology and applications) and Lublin - Nałęczow (with emphasis on materials and technologies). The XVth Conference on Optical Fibers and Their Applications was held in Białystok and Lipowy Most on 29.01-01.02.2014. The first conference from this cycle was organized in Jabłonna in 1976. Conference topics were: optical fiber technology, materials for optoelectronics and photonics, rare earth doped and luminescent materials, metrology of optical fibers, components and optoelectronic circuits, applications of optical fibers, waveguides and optical fiber sensors, and lighting technology. The conference was attended by 120 participants, including international guests, and 90 papers were presented. Conference papers are traditionally published in Proceedings SPIE.

  8. Integrated Technology Assessment Center (ITAC) Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. L.; Neely, M. A.; Curran, F. M.; Christensen, E. R.; Escher, D.; Lovell, N.; Morris, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Integrated Technology Assessment Center (ITAC) has developed a flexible systems analysis framework to identify long-term technology needs, quantify payoffs for technology investments, and assess the progress of ASTP-sponsored technology programs in the hypersonics area. For this, ITAC has assembled an experienced team representing a broad sector of the aerospace community and developed a systematic assessment process complete with supporting tools. Concepts for transportation systems are selected based on relevance to the ASTP and integrated concept models (ICM) of these concepts are developed. Key technologies of interest are identified and projections are made of their characteristics with respect to their impacts on key aspects of the specific concepts of interest. Both the models and technology projections are then fed into the ITAC's probabilistic systems analysis framework in ModelCenter. This framework permits rapid sensitivity analysis, single point design assessment, and a full probabilistic assessment of each concept with respect to both embedded and enhancing technologies. Probabilistic outputs are weighed against metrics of interest to ASTP using a multivariate decision making process to provide inputs for technology prioritization within the ASTP. ITAC program is currently finishing the assessment of a two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO), rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) concept and a TSTO turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) concept developed by the team with inputs from NASA. A baseline all rocket TSTO concept is also being developed for comparison. Boeing has recently submitted a performance model for their Flexible Aerospace System Solution for Tomorrow (FASST) concept and the ISAT program will provide inputs for a single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) TBCC based concept in the near-term. Both of these latter concepts will be analyzed within the ITAC framework over the summer. This paper provides a status update of the ITAC program.

  9. Interrogating adhesion using fiber Bragg grating sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasberry, Roger D.; Rohr, Garth D.; Miller, William K.; Udd, Eric; Blach, Noah T.; Davis, Ryan A.; Olson, Walter R.; Calkins, David; Roach, Allen R.; Walsh, David S.; McElhanon, James R.

    2015-05-01

    The assurance of the integrity of adhesive bonding at substrate interfaces is paramount to the longevity and sustainability of encapsulated components. Unfortunately, it is often difficult to non-destructively evaluate these materials to determine the adequacy of bonding after manufacturing and then later in service. A particularly difficult problem in this regard is the reliable detection/monitoring of regions of weak bonding that may result from poor adhesion or poor cohesive strength, or degradation in service. One promising and perhaps less explored avenue we have recently begun to investigate for this purpose centers on the use of (chirped) fiber Bragg grating sensing technology. In this scenario, a grating is patterned into a fiber optic such that a (broadband) spectral reflectance is observed. The sensor is highly sensitive to local and uniform changes across the length of the grating. Initial efforts to evaluate this approach for measuring adhesive bonding defects at substrate interfaces are discussed. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  10. NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, James P.

    2001-01-01

    This report is a summary of the primary activities and metrics for the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center, operated by the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC). This report covers the contract period January 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001. This report includes a summary of the overall CTC Metrics, a summary of the Major Outreach Events, an overview of the NASA Business Outreach Program, a summary of the Activities and Results of the Technology into the Zone program, and a Summary of the Major Activities and Initiatives performed by CTC in supporting this contract. Between January 1, 2000 and March 31, 2001, CTC has facilitated 10 license agreements, established 35 partnerships, provided assistance 517 times to companies, and performed 593 outreach activities including participation in 57 outreach events. CTC also assisted Goddard in executing a successful 'Technology into the Zone' program.' CTC is pleased to have performed this contract, and looks forward to continue providing their specialized services in support of the new 5 year RTTC Contract for the Northeast region.

  11. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    This overview fact sheet is one in a series of information fact sheets for the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC). Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), the nation's premier wind energy technology research facility, fosters innovative wind energy technologies in land-based and offshore wind through its research and testing facilities and extends these capabilities to marine hydrokinetic water power. Research and testing conducted at the NWTC offers specialized facilities and personnel and provides technical support critical to the development of advanced wind energy systems. From the base of a system's tower to the tips of its blades, NREL researchers work side-by-side with wind industry partners to increase system reliability and reduce wind energy costs. The NWTC's centrally located research and test facilities at the foot of the Colorado Rockies experience diverse and robust wind patterns ideal for testing. The NWTC tests wind turbine components, complete wind energy systems and prototypes from 400 watts to multiple megawatts in power rating.

  12. Research and technology, Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's research and technology accomplishments for fiscal year 1985 are summarized. The report is organized into five major sections covering aeronautics, aerospace technology, spaceflight systems, space station systems, and computational technology support. This organization of the report roughly parallels the organization of the Center into directorates. Where appropriate, subheadings are used to identify special topics under the major headings. Results of all research and technology work performed during the fiscal year are contained in Lewis-published technical reports and presentations prepared either by Lewis scientists and engineers or by contractor personnel. In addition, significant results are presented by university faculty or graduate students in technical sessions and in journals of the technical societies. For the reader who desires more information about a particular subject, the Lewis contact will provide that information or references. In 1985, five Lewis products were selected by Research and Development Magazine for IR-100 awards. All are described and identified. In addition, the Lewis Distinguished Paper for 1984 to 1985, which was selected by the Chief Scientist and a research advisory board, is included and so identified.

  13. NASA Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program Technology Innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishen, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Program increases opportunities for small businesses to participate in research and development (R&D), increases employment, and improves U.S. competitiveness. Specifically the program stimulates U.S. technological innovation by using small businesses to meet federal R&D needs, increasing private-sector commercialization of innovations derived from federal R&D, and fostering and encouraging the participation of socially disadvantaged businesses. In 2000, the Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Program extended and strengthened the SBIR Program, increasing its emphasis on pursuing commercial applications by awarding contracts to small business concerns for cooperative R&D with a nonprofit research institution. Modeled after the SBIR Program, STTR is nevertheless a separately funded activity. Technologies that have resulted from the Johnson Space Center SBIR STTR Program include: a device for regenerating iodinated resin beds; laser-assisted in-situ keratomileusis or LASIK; a miniature physiological monitoring device capable of collecting and analyzing a multitude of real-time signals to transmit medical data from remote locations to medical centers for diagnosis and intervention; a new thermal management system for fibers and fabrics giving rise to new line of garments and thermal-enhancing environments; and a highly electropositive material that attracts and retains electronegative particles in water.

  14. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2004-05-12

    This Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the seventeen subprojects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of project activity only. The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium--Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno--that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation (2) Solid-liquid separation (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction (4) Modeling and Control, and (5) Environmental Control.

  15. Research and Technology, 1987, Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerny, Gene (Editor); Moe, Karen (Editor); Paddack, Steven (Editor); Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Ballard, Jan (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    Research at Goddard Space Flight Center during 1987 is summarized. Topics addressed include space and earth sciences, technology, flight projects and mission definition studies, and institutional technology.

  16. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology 1988-1989 technical report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Peggy

    1990-01-01

    The 1988 to 1989 Technical Report of the JPL Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the center. Listed are 321 publications, 282 presentations, and 140 new technology reports and patents.

  17. Microgel photonics and lab on fiber technology for advanced label-free fiber optic nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaquinto, M.; Micco, A.; Aliberti, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Ruvo, M.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2016-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a novel optical fiber label free optrode platform resulting from the integration between two rapidly emerging technologies such as Lab-on-Fiber Technology (LOFT) and Microgel Photonics (MPs). The device consists of a microgel (MG) layer painted on a metallic slabs supporting plasmonic resonances, directly integrated on the optical fiber tip. A molecular binding event induces significant changes in the MG layer thickness (and consequently in its 'equivalent' refractive index) resulting in an evident wavelength shift of the resonant feature. As a case of study, glucose-responsive MGs have been synthesized by incorporating into the gel matrix boronic acid moieties, whose interaction with glucose rules the driving forces for gel swelling. Our results pave the way for new technological routes aimed to develop advanced label free fiber optic nanoprobes.

  18. US long distance fiber optic networks: Technology, evolution and advanced concepts. Volume 2: Fiber optic technology and long distance networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The study projects until 2000 the evolution of long distance fiber optic networks in the U.S. Volume 1 is the Executive Summary. Volume 2 focuses on fiber optic components and systems that are directly related to the operation of long-haul networks. Optimistic, pessimistic and most likely scenarios of technology development are presented. The activities of national and regional companies implementing fiber long haul networks are also highlighted, along with an analysis of the market and regulatory forces affecting network evolution. Volume 3 presents advanced fiber optic network concept definitions. Inter-LATA traffic is quantified and forms the basis for the construction of 11-, 15-, 17-, and 23-node networks. Using the technology projections from Volume 2, a financial model identifies cost drivers and determines circuit mile costs between any two LATAs. A comparison of fiber optics with alternative transmission concludes the report.

  19. Research and Technology 1990, Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The mission of NASA-Langley is to increase the knowledge and capability of the U.S. in a full range of aeronautics disciplines and in selected space disciplines. This mission will be executed by performing innovative research relevant to national needs and agency goals, transferring technology to users in a timely manner, and providing development support to other U.S. government agencies, industry, and other NASA centers. Highlights are presented of the major accomplishments and applications that were made during the past year. The highlights illustrate both the broad range of the research and technology activitives at NASA-Langley and the contributions of this work toward maintaining U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research.

  20. CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGY (CAST) PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Roe-Hoan; Hull, Christopher

    2014-09-30

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2011, U.S. mining operations contributed a total of $232 billion to the nation’s GDP plus $138 billion in labor income. Of this the coal mining industry contributed a total of $97.5 billion to GDP plus $53 billion in labor income. Despite these contributions, the industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations.

  1. Procurement function at Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-21

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC), is an US Department of Energy (DOE) facility in Morgantown, West Virginia. It is responsible for conducting research and managing research contracts dealing with coal and gas technology. The purpose of the audit was to evaluate the effectiveness of METC's internal control systems for major contracts and small purchases. Improved internal controls are needed over major contracts and small purchases. Specifically, METC's contracting officer's representatives were not formally approving invoices prior to payment to document that the contracted services or materials were received. Additionally, METC's systems of internal controls for small purchases was not effective in the areas of funding authorization, acquisition planning, and invoice processing. These internal control weaknesses precluded METC from assuring that (1) its small purchase needs were fully funded and satisfied requirements most effectively and economically, and (2) its major contracts and small purchases were received and correctly paid. The audit recommends improved internal controls over these functions.

  2. The Morgantown Energy Technology Center`s particulate cleanup program

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, R.A.

    1995-12-01

    The development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) power systems has made it possible to use coal while still protecting the environment. Such power systems significantly reduce the pollutants associated with coal-fired plants built before the 1970s. This superior environmental performance and related high system efficiency is possible, in part, because particulate gas-stream cleanup is conducted at high-temperature and high-pressure process conditions. A main objective of the Particulate Cleanup Program at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is to ensure the success of the CCT demonstration projects. METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program supports research, development, and demonstration in three areas: (1) filter-system development, (2) barrier-filter component development, and (3) ash and char characterization. The support is through contracted research, cooperative agreements, Cooperative Research And Development Agreements (CRADAs), and METC`s own in-house research. This paper describes METC`s Particulate Cleanup Program.

  3. Technology Validation of Optical Fiber Cables for Space Flight Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, Melanie N.; Friedberg, Patricia; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Periodically, commercially available (COTS) optical fiber cable assemblies are characterized for space flight usage under the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging Program (NEPP). The purpose of this is to provide a family of optical fiber cable options to a variety of different harsh environments typical to space flight missions. The optical fiber cables under test are evaluated to bring out known failure mechanisms that are expected to occur during a typical mission. The tests used to characterize COTS cables include: (1) vacuum exposure, (2) thermal cycling, and (3) radiation exposure. Presented here are the results of the testing conducted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on COTS optical fiber cables over this past year. Several optical fiber cables were characterized for their thermal stability both during and after thermal cycling. The results show how much preconditioning is necessary for a variety of available cables to remain thermally stable in a space flight environment. Several optical fibers of dimensions 100/140/172 microns were characterized for their radiation effects at -125 C using the dose rate requirements of International Space Station. One optical fiber cable in particular was tested for outgassing to verify whether an acrylate coated fiber could be used in a space flight optical cable configuration.

  4. National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers Proposal to the Nation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers, Waco, TX.

    In 1988, nine institutions operating advanced technology centers (ATC's) to provide workers with up-to-date technical skills formed the National Coalition of Advanced Technology Centers (NCATC). The center was established to increase awareness of ATC's, serve as a forum for the discussion and demonstration of new and underused technologies,…

  5. Tiger Team Assessment, Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The Office Special Projects within the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) has the responsibility to conduct Tiger Team Assessments for the Secretary of Energy. This report presents the assessment of the buildings, facilities, and activities under the DOE/Rockwell Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700 for the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) and of other DOE-owned buildings and facilities at the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) site in southeastern Ventura County, California, not covered under Contract No. DE-AM03-76SF00700, but constructed over the years under various other contracts between DOE and Rockwell International. ETEC is an engineering development complex operated for DOE by the Rocketdyne Division of Rockwell International Corporation. ETEC is located within SSFL on land owned by Rockwell. The balance of the SSFL complex is owned and operated by Rocketdyne, with the exception of a 42-acre parcel owned by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The primary mission of ETEC is to provide engineering, testing, and development of components related to liquid metals technology and to conduct applied engineering development of emerging energy technologies.

  6. The Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, G. R.; Willcoxon, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA is building the Advanced Technology Development Center (ATDC) to provide a 'national resource' for the research, development, demonstration, testing, and qualification of Spaceport and Range Technologies. The ATDC will be located at Space Launch Complex 20 (SLC-20) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida. SLC-20 currently provides a processing and launch capability for small-scale rockets; this capability will be augmented with additional ATDC facilities to provide a comprehensive and integrated in situ environment. Examples of Spaceport Technologies that will be supported by ATDC infrastructure include densified cryogenic systems, intelligent automated umbilicals, integrated vehicle health management systems, next-generation safety systems, and advanced range systems. The ATDC can be thought of as a prototype spaceport where industry, government, and academia, in partnership, can work together to improve safety of future space initiatives. The ATDC is being deployed in five separate phases. Major ATDC facilities will include a Liquid Oxygen Area; a Liquid Hydrogen Area, a Liquid Nitrogen Area, and a multipurpose Launch Mount; 'Iron Rocket' Test Demonstrator; a Processing Facility with a Checkout and Control System; and Future Infrastructure Developments. Initial ATDC development will be completed in 2006.

  7. Technology transfer needs and experiences: The NASA Research Center perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer needs and experiences - the NASA Research Center perspective are provided. Topics covered include: functions of NASA, incentives and benefits, technology transfer mechanisms, economics of technology commercialization, examples, and conclusions.

  8. Scientific Data Management Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Vouk, Mladen A.

    2013-01-15

    Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Fortunately, the data management problems encountered by most scientific domains are common enough to be addressed through shared technology solutions. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation, analysis, or visualization engine. These processes are complicated by the fact that scientific data are structured differently for specific application domains, and are stored in specialized file formats. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Specialized feature discovery and statistical analysis techniques are needed before the data can be understood or visualized. Furthermore, interactive analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Finally, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration. The SDM center was established under the SciDAC program to address these issues. The SciDAC-1 Scientific Data Management (SDM) Center succeeded in bringing an initial set of advanced

  9. Technology transfer within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plotkin, Henry H.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer within the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center presented to Civil Space Technology Development workshop on technology transfer and effectiveness are provided. Topics covered include: obstacles to technology transfer; technology transfer improvement program at GSFC: communication between technology developers and users; and user feedback to technologists.

  10. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2005-01-20

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/Biological Extraction; (4) Modeling and Control; and (5) Environmental Control.

  11. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  12. Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher Hull

    2009-10-31

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 2003, U.S. mining operations produced $57 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $564 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Originally set up by Virginia Tech and West Virginia University, this endeavor has been expanded into a seven-university consortium -- Virginia Tech, West Virginia University, University of Kentucky, University of Utah, Montana Tech, New Mexico Tech and University of Nevada, Reno - that is supported through U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-02NT41607: Crosscutting Technology Development at the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (1) Solid-solid separation; (2) Solid-liquid separation; (3) Chemical/biological extraction; (4) Modeling and control; and (5) Environmental control. Distribution of funds is handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. The successful projects are listed by category, along with brief abstracts of their aims and objectives.

  13. Influence of fluorine on the fiber resistance studied through the nonbridging oxygen hole center related luminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccaro, L.; Cannas, M.; Alessi, A.; Boscaino, R.; Girard, S.; Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y.; Morana, A.

    2013-05-21

    The distribution of Non-Bridging Oxygen Hole Centers (NBOHCs) in fluorine doped optical fibers was investigated by confocal microluminescence spectroscopy, monitoring their characteristic 1.9 eV luminescence band. The results show that these defects are generated by the fiber drawing and their concentration further increases after {gamma} irradiation. The NBOHC concentration profile along the fiber provides evidence for an exponential decay with the fluorine content. This finding agrees with the role of fluorine in the fiber resistance and is discussed, from the microscopic point of view, by looking at the conversion mechanisms from strained bonds acting as precursors.

  14. Fiber Surface Modification Technology for Fiber-Optic Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Xue, Chenyang; Yuan, Yanling; Lee, Junyang; Sun, Dong; Xiong, Jijun

    2012-01-01

    Considerable studies have been performed on the development of optical fiber sensors modified by gold nanoparticles based on the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) technique. The current paper presents a new approach in fiber surface modification technology for biosensors. Star-shaped gold nanoparticles obtained through the seed-mediated solution growth method were found to self-assemble on the surface of tapered optical fibers via amino- and mercapto-silane coupling agents. Transmitted power spectra of 3-aminopropyltrimethoxy silane (APTMS)-modified fiber were obtained, which can verify that the silane coupling agent surface modification method is successful. Transmission spectra are characterized in different concentrations of ethanol and gentian violet solutions to validate the sensitivity of the modified fiber. Assembly using star-shaped gold nanoparticles and amino/mercapto silane coupling agent are analyzed and compared. The transmission spectra of the gold nanoparticles show that the nanoparticles are sensitive to the dielectric properties of the surrounding medium. After the fibers are treated in t-dodecylmercaptan to obtain their transmission spectra, APTMS-modified fiber becomes less sensitive to different media, except that modified by 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxy silane (MPTMS). Experimental results of the transmission spectra show that the surface modified by the gold nanoparticles using MPTMS is firmer compared to that obtained using APTMS. PMID:22736974

  15. fibmeasure: Python/Cython module to find the center of back-illuminated optical fibers in metrology images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, James

    2016-03-01

    fibmeasure finds the precise locations of the centers of back-illuminated optical fibers in images. It was developed for astronomical fiber positioning feedback via machine vision cameras and is optimized for high-magnification images where fibers appear as resolvable circles. It was originally written during the design of the WEAVE pick-and-place fiber positioner for the William Herschel Telescope.

  16. Ultrathin fiber-taper coupling with nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamonds at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masazumi; Zhao, Hong-Quan; Noda, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2015-12-15

    We demonstrate cooling of ultrathin fiber tapers coupled with nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds to cryogenic temperatures. Nanodiamonds containing multiple NV centers are deposited on the subwavelength 480-nm-diameter nanofiber region of fiber tapers. The fiber tapers are successfully cooled to 9 K using our home-built mounting holder and an optimized cooling speed. The fluorescence from the nanodiamond NV centers is efficiently channeled into a single guided mode and shows characteristic sharp zero-phonon lines (ZPLs) of both neutral and negatively charged NV centers. The present nanofiber/nanodiamond hybrid systems at cryogenic temperatures can be used as NV-based quantum information devices and for highly sensitive nanoscale magnetometry in a cryogenic environment. PMID:26670490

  17. Ultrathin fiber-taper coupling with nitrogen vacancy centers in nanodiamonds at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Masazumi; Zhao, Hong-Quan; Noda, Tetsuya; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Sumiya, Hitoshi; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2015-12-15

    We demonstrate cooling of ultrathin fiber tapers coupled with nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in nanodiamonds to cryogenic temperatures. Nanodiamonds containing multiple NV centers are deposited on the subwavelength 480-nm-diameter nanofiber region of fiber tapers. The fiber tapers are successfully cooled to 9 K using our home-built mounting holder and an optimized cooling speed. The fluorescence from the nanodiamond NV centers is efficiently channeled into a single guided mode and shows characteristic sharp zero-phonon lines (ZPLs) of both neutral and negatively charged NV centers. The present nanofiber/nanodiamond hybrid systems at cryogenic temperatures can be used as NV-based quantum information devices and for highly sensitive nanoscale magnetometry in a cryogenic environment.

  18. Center for Space Microelectronics Technology. 1993 Technical Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The 1993 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 170 publications, 193 presentations, and 84 New Technology Reports and patents. The 1993 Technical Report of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Center for Space Microelectronics Technology summarizes the technical accomplishments, publications, presentations, and patents of the Center during the past year. The report lists 170 publications, 193 presentations, and 84 New Technology Reports and patents.

  19. Advances in the Echidna fiber-positioning technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheinis, Andrew; Saunders, Will; Gillingham, Peter; Farrell, Tony J.; Muller, Rolf; Smedley, Scott; Brzeski, Jurek; Waller, Lewis G.; Gilbert, James; Smith, Greg

    2014-07-01

    We present advances in the patented Echidna 'tilting spine' fiber positioner technology that has been in operation since 2007 on the SUBARU telescope in the FMOS system. The new Echidna technology is proposed to be implemented on two large fiber surveys: the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) (5000 fibers) as well the Australian ESO Positioner (AESOP) for 4MOST, a spectroscopic survey instrument for the VISTA telescope (~2500 fibers). The new 'superspine' actuators are stiffer, longer and more accurate than their predecessors. They have been prototyped at AAO, demonstrating reconfiguration times of ~15s for errors of <5 microns RMS. Laboratory testing of the prortotype shows accurate operation at temperatures of -10 to +30C, with an average heat output of 200 microwatts per actuator during reconfiguration. Throughput comparisons to other positioner types are presented, and we find that losses due to tilt will in general be outweighed by increased allocation yield and reduced fiber stress FRD. The losses from spine tilt are compensated by the gain in allocation yield coming from the greater patrol area, and quantified elsewhere in these proceedings. For typical tilts, f-ratios and collimator overspeeds, Echidna offers a clear efficiency gain versus current r-that or theta-phi positioners.

  20. Toward a statewide health information technology center (abbreviated version).

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Joe, John C

    2010-11-01

    With the passage of The American Reinvestment and Recovery Act of 2009 that includes the Health Care Information Technology for Economic & Clinical Health Act, the opportunity for states to develop a Health Information Technology Center (THITC) has emerged. The Center provides the intellectual, financial, and technical leadership along with the governance and oversight for all health information technology-related activities in the state. This Center would be a free-standing, not-for-profit, public-private partnership that would be responsible for operating one or more (in large states) Regional Health Information Technology Extension Centers (Extension Centers) along with several Regional Health Information Exchanges (HIEs) and one or more Regional Health Information Data Centers (Data Centers). We believe that if these features and functions could be developed, deployed, and integrated statewide, the health and welfare of the citizens of the state could be improved while simultaneously reducing the costs associated with the provision of care.

  1. Center for Global Health announces grants to support portable technologies

    Cancer.gov

    NCI’s Center for Global Health announced grants that will support the development and validation of low-cost, portable technologies. These technologies have the potential to improve early detection, diagnosis, and non-invasive or minimally invasive treatm

  2. Thin film technologies for optoelectronic components in fiber optic communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perinati, Agostino

    1998-02-01

    'The Asian Routes Towards the Global Information Society' and 'Towards a Strategic Planning for the Global Information Society' will be the forum themes of 'Asia Telecom 97' and 'Telecom Interactice 97' events respectively, to be held by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) in order to further telecommunication development around the world. International telecommunications network affects our life by keeping us in touch, bringing us world news and underpinning the global economy. Global tele-economy, global information infrastructure, global information society terms are more and more used to indicate the evolution towards an information- driven world where the access to information, communication and technologies is essential to the economic and social development in every country. Telecommunication industry can strongly contribute to this evolution together with broadcasting and computer industry, and fiber optic communications are expected to continue to grow up and share a relevant part of the total telecom market. In 1995 telecom market shown a 3.8 percent worldwide investment growth reaching a 545 billion value. According to 'Kessler Marketing Intelligence (KMI) Corp.' analysis of fiberoptics and multimedia market the amount of cabled fiber installed in U.S. will be around 11 million fiber-km in 1997 and 15 million fiber-km are predicted in the year 2000. Between 1995 and 1998 the undersea industry is estimated to deal with 13.9 billion as additional undersea cable systems investment in the global telecom network. In China beside satellite telecom stations and digital microwave systems 22 fiber optic backbones have been realized and another 23 systems are expected to be built in the Ninth Five-Year National Plan (1996 to approximately 2000) with a total length of nearly 30,000 sheat-km. The study, Fiber and Fiberoptic Cable Markets in China, recently released by KMI Corp. shows that fiber optic cable installation by MPT and other network operators

  3. New trends and applications of optical fiber sensing technologies at the NEL-FOST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghong; Huang, Chujia; Yuan, Yinquan; Ding, Liyun; Zhou, Ciming

    2015-07-01

    This paper reviews the recent development of optical fiber sensors at the National Engineering Laboratory for Optic Fiber Sensing Technologies (NEL-FOST) at Wuhan University of Technology. Integration of optical fiber with sensitive thin films will new possibilities for industry application, such as optical fiber hydrogen sensors based on Pt-doped WO3 coatings, fiber humidity sensors with porous oxide coating and high-temperature sapphire fiber sensors based on multilayer coating on fiber tip. Ultra-weak FBG array with thousand of FBGs with on-line draw tower technology will enable FBG sensing network with large capacity, also improved sensing performance and mechanical stability.

  4. Technological hurdles to the application of intercalated graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1988-01-01

    Before intercalated graphite fibers can be developed as an effective power material, there are several technological hurdles which must be overcome. These include the environmental stability, homogeneity and bulk properties, connection procedures, and costs. Strides were made within the last several years in stability and homogeneity of intercalated graphite fibers. Bulk properties and connection procedures are areas of active research now. Costs are still prohibitive for all but the most demanding applications. None of these problems, however, appear to be unsolvable, and their solution may result in wide spread GOC application. The development of a relatively simple technology application, such as EMI shielding, would stimulate the solution of scale-up problems. Once this technology is developed, then more demanding applications, such as power bus bars, may be possible.

  5. Applied technology center business plan and market survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodgin, Robert F.; Marchesini, Roberto

    1990-01-01

    Business plan and market survey for the Applied Technology Center (ATC), computer technology transfer and development non-profit corporation, is presented. The mission of the ATC is to stimulate innovation in state-of-the-art and leading edge computer based technology. The ATC encourages the practical utilization of late-breaking computer technologies by firms of all variety.

  6. A Network Solution. Technology Center Prepares Texans for the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pullias, Dave

    1991-01-01

    Richardson (Texas) Independent School District's Technology Center uses computer workstations in a local area network to support its technology education program. The curriculum features communications, electronics, manufacturing, and technology systems; manufacturing and construction graphics; and research and development in technology. (SK)

  7. Johnson Space Center Research and Technology 1997 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This report highlights key projects and technologies at Johnson Space Center for 1997. The report focuses on the commercial potential of the projects and technologies and is arranged by CorpTech Major Products Groups. Emerging technologies in these major disciplines we summarized: solar system sciences, life sciences, technology transfer, computer sciences, space technology, and human support technology. Them NASA advances have a range of potential commercial applications, from a school internet manager for networks to a liquid metal mirror for optical measurements.

  8. The Learner-Centered Paradigm of Education: Roles for Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reigeluth, Charles M.

    2014-01-01

    The learner-centered paradigm of education requires very different roles for technology, as well as for teachers and students, compared with the teacher-centered paradigm. Rather than almost exclusively serving the teacher for teaching, technology primarily serves the student for learning. It does so through four major roles: (1) keeping records…

  9. Information and Library Programs at the Technology Application Center (TAC).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burch, Eugene

    The Technology Application Center (TAC) at the University of New Mexico is one of six National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) regional dissemination centers originally established to disseminate NASA technology to private industry on a regional basis. A fee is charged for TAC's services so it has been market oriented and has sought to…

  10. Research and technology, 1984: Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorehead, T. W. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center conducts research programs in space sciences, materials processing in space, and atmospheric sciences, as well as technology programs in such areas as propulsion, materials, processes, and space power. This Marshall Space Flight Center 1984 Annual Report on Research and Technology contains summaries of the more significant scientific and technical results obtained during FY-84.

  11. Validating a Technology Enhanced Student-Centered Learning Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Myunghee; Hahn, Jungsun; Chung, Warren

    2015-01-01

    The Technology Enhanced Student Centered Learning (TESCL) Model in this study presents the core factors that ensure the quality of learning in a technology-supported environment. Although the model was conceptually constructed using a student-centered learning framework and drawing upon previous studies, it should be validated through real-world…

  12. Self-centering fiber alignment structures for high-precision field installable single-mode fiber connectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Erps, Jürgen; Ebraert, Evert; Gao, Fei; Vervaeke, Michael; Berghmans, Francis; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    There is a steady increase in the demand for internet bandwidth, primarily driven by cloud services and high-definition video streaming. Europe's Digital Agenda states the ambitious objective that by 2020 all Europeans should have access to internet at speeds of 30Mb/s or above, with 50% or more of households subscribing to connections of 100Mb/s. Today however, internet access in Europe is mainly based on the first generation of broadband, meaning internet accessed over legacy telephone copper and TV cable networks. In recent years, Fiber-To-The-Home (FTTH) networks have been adopted as a replacement of traditional electrical connections for the `last mile' transmission of information at bandwidths over 1Gb/s. However, FTTH penetration is still very low (< 5%) in most major Western economies. The main reason for this is the high deployment cost of FTTH networks. Indeed, the success and adoption of optical access networks critically depend on the quality and reliability of connections between optical fibers. In particular a further reduction of insertion loss of field- installable connectors must be achieved without a significant increase in component cost. This requires precise alignment of fibers that can differ in terms of ellipticity, eccentricity or diameter and seems hardly achievable using today's widespread ferrule-based alignment systems. In this paper, we present a field-installable connector based on deflectable/compressible spring structures, providing a self-centering functionality for the fiber. This way, it can accommodate for possible fiber cladding diameter variations (the tolerance on the cladding diameter of G.652 fiber is typically +/-0.7μm). The mechanical properties of the cantilever are derived through an analytical approximation and a mathematical model of the spring constant, and finite element-based simulations are carried out to find the maximum first principal stress as well as the stress distribution distribution in the fiber alignment

  13. Lab-on-fiber technology: toward multifunctional optical nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Consales, Marco; Ricciardi, Armando; Crescitelli, Alessio; Esposito, Emanuela; Cutolo, Antonello; Cusano, Andrea

    2012-04-24

    We propose a reliable fabrication process enabling the integration of dielectric and metallic nanostructures on the tip of optical fibers, thus representing a further step in the "lab-on-fiber" technology roadmap. The proposed fabrication procedure involves conventional deposition and nanopatterning techniques, typically used for planar devices, but here adapted to directly operate on optical fiber tip. Following this approach, we demonstrate a first technological platform based on the integration onto the optical fiber tip of two-dimensional hybrid metallo-dielectric nanostructures supporting localized surface plasmon resonances. By means of experimental measurements and full-wave numerical simulations, we characterize these resonant phenomena and investigate the underlying physics. We show that resonances can be easily tuned by acting on the physical and geometrical parameters of the structure. Moreover, with a view toward possible applications, we present some preliminary results demonstrating how the proposed device can work effectively as an optical probe for label-free chemical and biological sensing as well as a microphone for acoustic wave detection.

  14. Short fiber-reinforced cementitious composites manufactured by extrusion technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Bin

    The use of short fibers in the cement-based composites is more preferable due to the simplicity and economic nature in fabrication. The short fiber-reinforced cementitious composite (SFRCC) manufactured by the extrusion method show a great improvement in both strength and toughness as compared to the fiber-reinforced composites made by traditional casting methods. This improvement can be attributed to the achievement of low porosity and good interfacial bond in SFRCC under high shear and compressive stress during the extrusion process. In the present study, products of cylinders, sheets, pipes and honeycomb panels incorporating various mineral admixtures such as slag, silica fume, and metakaolin have been manufactured by the extrusion technology. Two kinds of short fibers, ductile polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibers and stronger but less ductile glass fibers, were used as the reinforcement in the products. After the specimens were extruded, tension, bending and impact tests were performed to study the mechanical properties of these products. The rheology test was performed for each mix to determine its viscoelastic properties. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) technology were employed to get an insight view of the mechanism. A freezing and thawing experiment (ASTM C666) was also carried to investigate the durability of the specimens. Based on these experimental results, the reinforcing behaviors of these two short fibers were investigated. The enhancing effects of silica fume and metakaolin on the extrudates were compared and discussed. Finally, the optimum amount of silica fume and slag was proposed. Since the key point for a successful extrusion is the properly designed rheology which controls both internal and external flow properties of extrudate, a nonlinear viscoelastic model was applied to investigate the rheological behavior of a movable fresh cementitious composite in an extruder channel. The velocity profile of the

  15. Cognitive fiber Bragg grating sensors system based on fiber Fabry-Perot tunable filter technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongtao; Wang, Pengfei; Zou, Jilin; Xie, Jing; Cui, Hong-Liang

    2011-05-01

    The wavelength demodulation based on a Fiber Fabry-Pérot Tunable Filter (FFP-TF) is a common method for multiplexing Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors. But this method cannot be used to detect high frequency signals due to the limitation by the highest scanning rate that the FFP-TF can achieve. To overcome this disadvantage, in this paper we present a scheme of cognitive sensors network based on FFP-TF technology. By perceiving the sensing environment, system can automatically switch into monitoring signals in two modes to obtain better measurement results: multi measurement points, low frequency (<1 KHz) signal, and few measurement points but high frequency (~50 KHz) signals. This cognitive sensors network can be realized in current technology and satisfy current most industrial requirements.

  16. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber Distributed Data Interface, more commonly known as FDDI, is the name of the standard that describes a new local area network (LAN) technology for the 90`s. This technology is based on fiber optics communications and, at a data transmission rate of 100 million bits per second (mbps), provides a full order of magnitude improvement over previous LAN standards such as Ethernet and Token Ring. FDDI as a standard has been accepted by all major computer manufacturers and is a national standard as defined by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). FDDI will become part of the US Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile (GOSIP) under Version 3 GOSIP and will become an international standard promoted by the International Standards Organization (ISO). It is important to note that there are no competing standards for high performance LAN`s so that FDDI acceptance is nearly universal. This technology report describes FDDI as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examine the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management (IRM) department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  17. Reviews of computing technology: Fiber distributed data interface

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, A.J.

    1991-12-01

    Fiber Distributed Data Interface, more commonly known as FDDI, is the name of the standard that describes a new local area network (LAN) technology for the 90's. This technology is based on fiber optics communications and, at a data transmission rate of 100 million bits per second (mbps), provides a full order of magnitude improvement over previous LAN standards such as Ethernet and Token Ring. FDDI as a standard has been accepted by all major computer manufacturers and is a national standard as defined by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI). FDDI will become part of the US Government Open Systems Interconnection Profile (GOSIP) under Version 3 GOSIP and will become an international standard promoted by the International Standards Organization (ISO). It is important to note that there are no competing standards for high performance LAN's so that FDDI acceptance is nearly universal. This technology report describes FDDI as a technology, looks at the applications of this technology, examine the current economics of using it, and describe activities and plans by the Information Resource Management (IRM) department to implement this technology at the Savannah River Site.

  18. Natural gas technologies at Kennedy Space Center

    SciTech Connect

    Sirmons, R.L.

    1997-06-01

    In 1994 Kennedy Space Center`s local gas distribution company (LDC), City Gas Company of Florida, undertook the construction of over 25 miles of high pressure natural gas piping to provide natural gas service to Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The Space Center, originally constructed in the 1960`s had used various grades of fuel oil throughout its history. But in the 1990`s concern about sulfur oxide emissions from hot water boilers, fuel spills, fuel prices, energy security, and federal mandates to use alternative fuels prompted KSC to investigate using natural gas as its primary fuel. Since completion of the pipeline in mid 1994, almost 4.5 million therms of natural gas have been used, displacing 2.9 million gallons of No. 2 fuel oil, and avoiding over 140 tons of air pollution. Another indicator of KSC`s effective switch to natural gas is that in 1993, KSC was by far the largest single consumer of petroleum fuel in NASA consuming 341 billion BTU`s, over 37% of all the petroleum fuel used by all NASA sites combined. In 1995, KSC petroleum fuel use had dropped to only 29 billion BTU`s while natural gas consumption was 308 billion BTU`s. These successes have encouraged KSC to explore other options for the use of natural gas at the Space Center. Under study at the present is natural gas cooling, fuel cells, and off road equipment fueling.

  19. The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA);Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. This photo shows the completed center with the additional arnex (right of building) that added an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to the already existent NSSTC, nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At

  20. CROSSCUTTING TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT AT THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2003-11-15

    The U.S. is the largest producer of mining products in the world. In 1999, U.S. mining operations produced $66.7 billion worth of raw materials that contributed a total of $533 billion to the nation's wealth. Despite these contributions, the mining industry has not been well supported with research and development funds as compared to mining industries in other countries. To overcome this problem, the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies (CAST) was established to develop technologies that can be used by the U.S. mining industry to create new products, reduce production costs, and meet environmental regulations. Much of the research to be conducted with Cooperative Agreement funds will be longer-term, high-risk, basic research and will be carried out in five broad areas: (a) Solid-solid separation (b) Solid-liquid separation (c) Chemical/Biological Extraction (d) Modeling and Control, and (e) Environmental Control. Distribution of funds is being handled via competitive solicitation of research proposals through Site Coordinators at the seven member universities. The first of these solicitations, referred to as the CAST II-Round 1 RFP, was issued on October 28, 2002. Thirty-eight proposals were received by the December 10, 2002 deadline for this RFP-eleven (11) Solid-Solid Separation, seven (7) Solid-Liquid Separation, ten (10) Chemical/Biological Extraction, six (6) Modeling & Control and four (4) Environmental Control. These were first reviewed and ranked by a group of technical reviewers (selected primarily from industry). Based on these reviews, and an assessment of overall program requirements, the CAST Technical Committee made an initial selection/ranking of proposals and forwarded these to the DOE/NETL Project Officer for final review and approval. This process took some 7 months to complete but 17 projects (one joint) were in place at the constituent universities (three at Virginia Tech, two at West Virginia University, three at University of Kentucky

  1. Emerging Technologies: Applications and Implications for School Library Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Craver, Kathleen W.

    This paper examines emerging information technologies and their implications for school library media centers. Because of the fluctuating situation regarding new innovations, only emerging technologies that specialists believe will occur within the next 5 to 10 years are discussed. For each technology mentioned, a brief description is given…

  2. Effect of radiation-induced color centers absorption in optical fibers on fiber optic gyroscope for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Li, Ya; Zhang, Zu-Chen; Wu, Chun-Xiao; Song, Ning-Fang

    2016-08-01

    The effects of color centers’ absorption on fibers and interferometric fiber optical gyroscopes (IFOGs) are studied in the paper. The irradiation induced attenuation (RIA) spectra of three types of polarization-maintaining fibers (PMFs), i.e., P-doped, Ge-doped, and pure silica, irradiated at 100 Gy and 1000 Gy are measured in a wavelength range from 1100 nm to 1600 nm and decomposed according to the Gaussian model. The relationship of the color centers absorption intensity with radiation dose is investigated based on a power model. Furthermore, the effects of all color centers’ absorption on RIA and mean wavelength shifts (MWS) at 1300 nm and 1550 nm are discussed respectively. Finally, the random walk coefficient (RWC) degradation induced from RIA and the scale factor error induced by MWS of the IFOG are simulated and tested at a wavelength of 1300 nm. This research will contribute to the applications of the fibers in radiation environments. Project supported by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry, China.

  3. Biological Semiconductors | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Cancer Diagnostic Program and the Food and Drug Administration's Center for Devices and Radiological Health is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize biological semiconductors as diagnostic sensors.

  4. Johnson Space Center research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The accomplishments of JSC during FY 1991 are presented. The report serves to communicate within and outside of NASA significant R&T JSC activities and identifies principle researchers and technologists as contacts for further information. The topics are covered in five sections: life sciences, human support technology, solar system sciences, space systems technology, and space transportation technology. Each of these sections is comprised of a summary followed by detailed descriptions of significant tasks. A listing of project descriptions, along with funding code and principle investigators, is provided in the index.

  5. Interferometric fiber optic gyro (IFOG) technology achievements at Draper Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laznicka, Oldrich M., Jr.; Freier, Larry J.; Gilmore, Jerold P.; Fontanella, Mark D.

    1994-11-01

    Draper Laboratory's experience with Interferometer Fiber Optic Gyro (IFOG) technology started via an Internal Research and Development effort in 1978. This work led to developing fiber optic gyros in which significant advances in IFOG component technologies, assembly, integration, and test were achieved. In excess of 30 patents have been issued to Draper as a result of this pioneering effort. More recently, Draper collaborated with JPL to transition their fiber optic breadboard gyro to a space qualifiable instrument for interplanetary long duration missions. During the initial phase, brassboard gyros were designed and fabricated that demonstrated performance that bettered NASA's CRAF-Cassini spacecraft objectives. In the second phase, the Engineering Model gyro was developed to meet mission qualification tests. Concurrent with this later phase, analysis, tests and qualification activities were performed to validate that gyro components would realize the required 16 year life. Two major inventions (patent pending) were conceived; one provides for continuous adaptive scale factor stability and the other integrates the optical source and photodetector into a single component [Source Integrated Detector (SID)], thereby eliminating a coupler and several splices thus reducing loss by 6 db. Using the above technologies and the implementation of common mode rejection of laser noise, Draper has defined a low noise high performance gyro in which rate power spectral density (PSD) is projected to be < 7 X 10-7 (deg/hr)2/Hz. In those applications, where the PSD < 4 X 10-5 (deg/hr)2/Hz is sought, a small size three component (SID, integrated optics circuit and fiber coil) gyro is easily implemented.

  6. Ames Research Center Research and Technology 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This report highlights the challenging work accomplished during fiscal year 2000 by Ames research scientists,engineers, and technologists. It discusses research and technologies that enable the Information Age, that expand the frontiers of knowledge for aeronautics and space, and that help to maintain U.S. leadership in aeronautics and space research and technology development. The accomplishments are grouped into four categories based on four of NASA's Strategic Enterprises: Aerospace Technology, Space Science, Biological and Physical Research, and Earth Science. The primary purpose of this report is to communicate knowledge-to inform our stakeholders, customer, and partners, and the people of the United States about the scope and diversity of Ames' mission,the nature of Ames' research and technolog) activities,and the stimulating challenges ahead. The accomplishments cited illustrate the contributions that Ames is willing to improve the quality of life for our citizens and the economic position of the United States in the world marketplace.

  7. The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA); Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. An arnex, scheduled for completion by summer 2002, will add an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to NSSTC nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At full capacity, the completed NSSTC will top 200

  8. 78 FR 17187 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation, a revocable, nonassignable, exclusive... its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a revocable,...

  9. The Manned Spacecraft Center and medical technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, R. S.; Pool, S. L.

    1974-01-01

    A number of medically oriented research and hardware development programs in support of manned space flights have been sponsored by NASA. Blood pressure measuring systems for use in spacecraft are considered. In some cases, complete new bioinstrumentation systems were necessary to accomplish a specific physiological study. Plans for medical research during the Skylab program are discussed along with general questions regarding space-borne health service systems and details concerning the Health Services Support Control Center.

  10. Research and technology of the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Descriptions of the research and technology activities at the Langley Research Center are given. Topics include laser development, aircraft design, aircraft engines, aerodynamics, remote sensing, space transportation systems, and composite materials.

  11. SAVANNAH RIVER TECHNOLOGY CENTER MONTHLY REPORT AUGUST 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrell, J.M.

    1999-06-21

    'This monthly report summarizes Programs and Accomplishments of the Savannah River Technology Center in support of activities at the Savannah River Site. The following categories are addressed: Reactor, Tritium, Separations, Environmental, Waste Management, General, and Items of Interest.'

  12. Multi-core fiber technology for highly reliable optical network in access areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Ken-ichi; Lee, Yong; Nomoto, Etsuko; Arimoto, Hideo; Sugawara, Toshiki

    2015-03-01

    A failure recovery system utilizing a multi-core fiber (MCF) link with field programmable gate array-based optical switch units was developed to achieve high capacity and highly reliable optical networks in access areas. We describe the novel MCF link based on a multi-ring structure and a protection scheme to prevent link failures. Fan-in/ -out devices and connectors are also presented to demonstrate the development status of the MCF connection technology for the link. We demonstrated path recovery by switching operation within a sufficiently short time, which is required by ITU-T. The selection of a protecting path as a failure working path was also optimized as the minimum passage of units for low loss transmission. The results we obtained indicate that our proposed link has potential for the network design of highly reliable network topologies in access areas such as data centers, systems in business areas, and fiber to the home systems in residential areas.

  13. Research and technology of the Lyndon Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1988 are highlighted. This year, reports are grouped in sections Space System Technology, Solar System Sciences, Space Transportation Technology, and Medical Sciences. Summary sections describing the role of Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by descriptions of significant tasks. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

  14. The 1991 Marshall Space Flight Center research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A compilation of 194 articles addressing research and technology activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is given. Activities are divided into three major areas: advanced studies addressing transportation systems, space systems, and space science activities conducted primarily in the Program Development Directorate; research tasks carried out in the Space Science Laboratory; and technology programs hosted by a wide array of organizations at the Center. The theme for this year's report is 'Building for the Future'.

  15. Reexamining Technology's Role in Learner-Centered Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polly, Drew; Hannafin, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The American Psychological Association's "Learner-Centered Principles" provide empirically-based approaches to improving teaching and learning. However, in order to facilitate learner-centered, technology-rich instruction to K-12 students, teachers must be afforded opportunities to develop key understandings and skills, rarely evident in most…

  16. A feasibility study for a manufacturing technology deployment center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-10-31

    The Automation & Robotics Research Institute (ARRI) and the Texas Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) were funded by the U.S. Department of Energy to determine the feasibility of a regional industrial technology institute to be located at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Central Facility in Waxahachie, Texas. In response to this opportunity, ARRI and TEEX teamed with the DOE Kansas City Plant (managed by Allied Signal, Inc.), Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California), Vought Aircraft Company, National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS), SSC Laboratory, KPMG Peat Marwick, Dallas County Community College, Navarro Community College, Texas Department of Commerce (TDOC), Texas Manufacturing Assistance Center (TMAC), Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology, Arkansas Science and Technology Authority, Louisiana Productivity Center, and the NASA Mid-Continent Technology Transfer Center (MCTTC) to develop a series of options, perform the feasibility analysis and secure industrial reviews of the selected concepts. The final report for this study is presented in three sections: Executive Summary, Business Plan, and Technical Plan. The results from the analysis of the proposed concept support the recommendation of creating a regional technology alliance formed by the states of Texas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas and Louisiana through the conversion of the SSC Central facility into a Manufacturing Technology Deployment Center (MTDC).

  17. Research & Technology Report Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald A. (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Maran, Stephen (Editor); Walter, Lou (Editor); Brown, Mitch (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    The main theme of this edition of the annual Research and Technology Report is Mission Operations and Data Systems. Shifting from centralized to distributed mission operations, and from human interactive operations to highly automated operations is reported. The following aspects are addressed: Mission planning and operations; TDRSS, Positioning Systems, and orbit determination; hardware and software associated with Ground System and Networks; data processing and analysis; and World Wide Web. Flight projects are described along with the achievements in space sciences and earth sciences. Spacecraft subsystems, cryogenic developments, and new tools and capabilities are also discussed.

  18. Wind Energy at NREL's National Wind Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-01

    It is a pure, plentiful natural resource. Right now wind is in high demand and it holds the potential to transform the way we power our homes and businesses. NREL is at the forefront of wind energy research and development. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is a world-class facility dedicated to accelerating and deploying wind technology.

  19. Student Technology Use in a Self-Access Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castellano, Joachim; Mynard, Jo; Rubesch, Troy

    2011-01-01

    Technology has played an increasingly vital role in self-access learning over the past twenty years or so, yet little research has been conducted into learners' actual use of the technology both for self-directed learning and as part of everyday life. This paper describes an ongoing action research project at a self-access learning center (SALC)…

  20. Wind Energy at NREL's National Wind Technology Center

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    It is a pure, plentiful natural resource. Right now wind is in high demand and it holds the potential to transform the way we power our homes and businesses. NREL is at the forefront of wind energy research and development. NREL's National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) is a world-class facility dedicated to accelerating and deploying wind technology.

  1. Research and technology highlights of the Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Highlights of research accomplishments of the Lewis Research Center for fiscal year 1984 are presented. The report is divided into four major sections covering aeronautics, space communications, space technology, and materials and structures. Six articles on energy are included in the space technology section.

  2. The Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center Summer Fellows Institute.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Depken, Diane E.; Zeman, Catherine L.; Lensch, Ellen Kabat; Brown, Edward J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the background, activities, and outcomes of the Advanced Technology Environmental Education Center (ATEEC) and its Summer Fellows Institutes as a model for disciplinary and cross-disciplinary infusion of environmental science and technology content, curriculum, and methods into the classroom. Presents experiences, themes, and activities…

  3. An Educational Technology Center: A Proposed Organizational Structure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelden, D. L.

    The proposed organizational and activity structure for an Educational Technology Center would provide opportunities for educational research, hardware/software/courseware services, and training programs to prepare professionals in the field. Advances in industrial, communications, and educational technologies necessitate the implementation of an…

  4. Center of excellence for atomically controlled fabrication technology.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, Yuji; Saito, Akira; Arima, Kenta; Ohmi, Hiromasa

    2011-04-01

    This short review aims to show the introduction of the educational and research program of "Center of excellence of atomically controlled fabrication technology" supported ministry of education, culture, sports, science and technology--Japan. We would like to introduce research activity and a unique trait of educational system.

  5. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, Kenneth I.

    2014-09-14

    This project focuses on leveraging scientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technology have resulted in an "information big bang," which in turn has created a significant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporary science. The vision for our Center is to respond directly to that challenge by adapting, extending, creating when necessary and deploying visualization and data understanding technologies for our science stakeholders. Using an organizational model as a Visualization and Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET), we are well positioned to be responsive to the needs of a diverse set of scientific stakeholders in a coordinated fashion using a range of visualization, mathematics, statistics, computer and computational science and data management technologies.

  6. GHG MITIGATION TECHNOLOGY PERFORMANCE EVALUATIONS UNDERWAY AT THE GHG TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper outlines the verification approach and activities of the Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Technology Verification Center, one of 12 independent verification entities operating under the U.S. EPA-sponsored Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. (NOTE: The ETV program...

  7. Technology Transfer Center to Assume Patenting and Licensing Responsibilities | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    The NCI Technology Transfer Center (TTC) is undergoing a reorganization that will bring patenting and licensing responsibilities to the Shady Grove and Frederick offices by October 2015. The reorganization is a result of an effort begun in 2014 by NIH to improve the organizational structure of technology transfer at NIH to meet the rapid rate of change within science, technology, and industry, and to better align the science and laboratory goals with the licensing and patenting process.

  8. Application and the key technology on high power fiber-optic laser in laser weapon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Zhou; Li, Qiushi; Meng, Haihong; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhai, Xuhua

    2014-12-01

    The soft-killing laser weapon plays an important role in photoelectric defense technology. It can be used for photoelectric detection, search, blinding of photoelectric sensor and other devices on fire control and guidance devices, therefore it draws more and more attentions by many scholars. High power fiber-optic laser has many virtues such as small volume, simple structure, nimble handling, high efficiency, qualified light beam, easy thermal management, leading to blinding. Consequently, it may be used as the key device of soft-killing laser weapon. The present study introduced the development of high power fiber-optic laser and its main features. Meanwhile the key technology of large mode area (LMA) optical fiber design, the beam combination technology, double-clad fiber technology and pumping optical coupling technology was stated. The present study is aimed to design high doping LMA fiber, ensure single mode output by increasing core diameter and decrease NA. By means of reducing the spontaneous emission particle absorbed by fiber core and Increasing the power density in the optical fiber, the threshold power of nonlinear effect can increase, and the power of single fiber will be improved. Meantime, high power will be obtained by the beam combination technology. Application prospect of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology was also set forth. Lastly, the present study explored the advantages of high power fiber laser in photoelectric defense technology.

  9. All-fiber passively mode-locked thulium/holmium laser with two center wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Kadel, Rajesh; Washburn, Brian R

    2012-09-20

    We have demonstrated a self-starting, passively mode-locked Tm/Ho codoped fiber laser that lases at one of two center wavelengths. An amplified 1.56 μm distributed feedback laser pumps a ring laser cavity which contains 1 m of Tm/Ho codoped silica fiber. Mode locking is obtained via nonlinear polarization rotation using a c-band polarization sensitive isolator with two polarization controllers. The laser is able to pulse separately at either 1.97 or 2.04 μm by altering the intracavity polarization during the initiation of mode locking. The codoped fiber permits pulsing at one of two wavelengths, where the shorter is due to the Tm(3+) emission and the longer due to the Ho(3+) emission. The laser produces a stable pulse train at 28.4 MHz with 25 mW average power, and a pulse duration of 966 fs with 9 nm bandwidth.

  10. Tapered fiber coupling of single photons emitted by a deterministically positioned single nitrogen vacancy center

    SciTech Connect

    Liebermeister, Lars Petersen, Fabian; Münchow, Asmus v.; Burchardt, Daniel; Hermelbracht, Juliane; Tashima, Toshiyuki; Schell, Andreas W.; Benson, Oliver; Meinhardt, Thomas; Krueger, Anke; Stiebeiner, Ariane; Rauschenbeutel, Arno; Weinfurter, Harald; Weber, Markus

    2014-01-20

    A diamond nano-crystal hosting a single nitrogen vacancy (NV) center is optically selected with a confocal scanning microscope and positioned deterministically onto the subwavelength-diameter waist of a tapered optical fiber (TOF) with the help of an atomic force microscope. Based on this nano-manipulation technique, we experimentally demonstrate the evanescent coupling of single fluorescence photons emitted by a single NV-center to the guided mode of the TOF. By comparing photon count rates of the fiber-guided and the free-space modes and with the help of numerical finite-difference time domain simulations, we determine a lower and upper bound for the coupling efficiency of (9.5 ± 0.6)% and (10.4 ± 0.7)%, respectively. Our results are a promising starting point for future integration of single photon sources into photonic quantum networks and applications in quantum information science.

  11. Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-Reinforced-Foam (FRF) Core Composite Sandwich Panel Concept for Advanced Composites Technologies Project - Preliminary Manufacturing Demonstration Articles for Ares V Payload Shroud Barrel Acreage Structure

  12. The Over-Selling of Fiber Optics? Cable Planning for Educational Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Robert E.

    1993-01-01

    Describes fiber optic cables and coaxial cables and considers when each would be appropriate for educational technology. Single mode versus multimode fiber optics are explained, advantages and disadvantages of each type of cable are discussed, and guidelines for choosing fiber optic cables and coaxial cables are offered. (LRW)

  13. 77 FR 73456 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-10

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a... described in U.S. Patent No. 7,020,354: Intensity Modulated Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No....

  14. 75 FR 34988 - Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... Department of the Navy Notice of Intent To Grant Exclusive Patent License; Fiber Optic Sensor Systems... Navy hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Fiber Optic Sensor Systems Technology Corporation a.... Patent No. 7,149,374: Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor, Navy Case No. 84,557.//U.S. Patent No....

  15. Center Wavelength Adoption Techniques for Supercontinuum Generating Highly Nonlinear Noncircular Core Photonic Crystal Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Anwar; Namihira, Yoshinori

    2013-05-01

    A supercontinuum (SC) light source is designed using a highly nonlinear noncircular core photonic crystal fiber (HNL-NcPCF) with all-normal group velocity dispersion (GVD) to demonstrate how simply an SC can be generated at different center wavelengths in a normal GVD regime. Using the finite element method (FEM) with a perfectly matched layer (PML), the design of two or more PCF-based light sources at different neighboring center wavelengths is demonstrated numerically. Moreover, SC generations are demonstrated numerically at 1.06, 1.31, and 1.55 µm in a normal dispersion regime using picosecond optical pulses.

  16. GREENHOUSE GAS (GHG) MITIGATION AND MONITORING TECHNOLOGY PERFORMANCE: ACTIVITIES OF THE GHG TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation and monitoring technology performance activities of the GHG Technology Verification Center. The Center is a public/private partnership between Southern Research Institute and the U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development. It...

  17. Enhanced environmental performance of fiber optic gyroscope by an adhesive potting technology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Ding, Nengwen; Li, Zhifeng; Wang, Wei

    2015-09-10

    An adhesive potting technology for fiber coils of a fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is proposed. The fiber coil is immersed in liquid adhesive with superior mechanical properties. The internal air is first removed completely by vacuum pumping, and the adhesive is then evenly pressed into the fiber coil under pressure. The potted fiber core is prepared by ladder-type temperature curing and a stress-release process. With this potting technology, the vibration performance of an FOG is greatly improved and, at the same time, will not lead to degradation of its temperature performance. Using this potting technique of adhesive impregnation, the adaptability of FOGs will be enhanced.

  18. The potential of RFID technology in Blood Center processes.

    PubMed

    Kebo, V; Klement, P; Cermáková, Z; Gottfried, J; Sommerová, M; Palecek, A

    2010-01-01

    Current RFID technology deployment is limited by safety, procedural and physical limitations in healthcare field. It is important to define and ensure safe operation of technologies without actual deployment in real operation. Potential problems could arise due to the consequences of technical and physical characteristics of RFID technology and its improper location. This article deals with manipulation of blood products and the definition of suitable places for radio identification. Each suitable place must undergo laboratory experiments and tests. The results can provide a convenient base for defining efficient and safe deployment of RFID technology in Blood Centers with substantial financial savings for Czech healthcare.

  19. Savannah River Site Radiological Technology Center's Efforts Supporting Waste Minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberger, K. H.; Smith, L. S.; Bates, R. L.

    2003-02-25

    This paper describes the efforts of the newly formed Radiological Technology Center (RTC) at the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS) to support waste minimization. The formation of the RTC was based upon the highly successful ALARA Center at the DOE Hanford Site. The RTC is tasked with evaluation and dissemination of new technologies and techniques for radiological hazard reduction and waste minimization. Initial waste minimization efforts have focused on the promotion of SRS containment fabrication capabilities, new personal protective equipment and use of recyclable versus disposable materials.

  20. Manufacturing Technology Information Analysis Center: Knowledge is strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safar, Michal

    1992-04-01

    The Center's primary function is to facilitate technology transfer within DoD, other government agencies and industry. The DoD has recognized the importance of technology transfer, not only to support specific weapon system manufacture, but to strengthen the industrial base that sustains DoD. MTIAC uses an experienced technical staff of engineers and information specialists to acquire, analyze, and disseminate technical information. Besides ManTech project data, MTIAC collects manufacturing technology from other government agencies, commercial publications, proceedings, and various international sources. MTIAC has various means of disseminating this information. Much of the technical data is on user accessible data bases. The Center researches and writes a number of technical reports each year and publishes a newsletter monthly. Customized research is performed in response to specific inquiries from government and industry. MTIAC serves as a link between Government and Industry to strengthen the manufacturing technology base through the dissemination of advanced manufacturing information.

  1. Langley Research Center contributions in advancing active control technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, I.; Newsom, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    The application of active control technology to reduce aeroelastic response of aircraft structures offers a potential for significant payoffs in terms of aerodynamic efficiency and weight savings. Some of the contributions of the Langley Research Center in advancing active control technology are described. Contributions are categorized into the development of appropriate analysis tools, control law synthesis methodology, and experimental investigations aimed at verifying both analysis and synthesis methodology.

  2. Overview of Stirling Technology Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Williams, Zachary D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.

    2015-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS) are under development to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, flyby, land or rove using less than a quarter of the plutonium the currently available RPS uses to produce about the same power. Glenn Research Center's (GRC's) newly formulated Stirling Cycle Technology Development Project (SCTDP) continues development of Stirling-based systems and subsystems, which include a flight-like generator and related housing assembly, controller, and convertors. The project also develops less mature technologies under Stirling Technology Research, with a focus on demonstration in representative environments to increase the technology readiness level (TRL). Matured technologies are evaluated for selection in future generator designs. Stirling Technology Research tasks focus on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, reducing generator mass and/or size, improving reliability or system fault tolerance, and developing alternative designs. The task objectives and status are summarized.

  3. Overview of Stirling Technology Research at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Scott D.; Schifer, Nicholas A.; Williams, Zachary D.; Metscher, Jonathan F.

    2016-01-01

    Stirling Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) are under development to provide power on future space science missions where robotic spacecraft will orbit, fly by, land, or rove using less than a quarter of the plutonium the currently available RPS uses to produce about the same power. NASA Glenn Research Center's newly formulated Stirling Cycle Technology Development Project (SCTDP) continues development of Stirling-based systems and subsystems, which include a flight-like generator and related housing assembly, controller, and convertors. The project also develops less mature technologies under Stirling Technology Research, with a focus on demonstration in representative environments to increase the technology readiness level (TRL). Matured technologies are evaluated for selection in future generator designs. Stirling Technology Research tasks focus on a wide variety of objectives, including increasing temperature capability to enable new environments, reducing generator mass and/or size, improving reliability and system fault tolerance, and developing alternative designs. The task objectives and status are summarized.

  4. Formation and conversion of defect centers in low water peak single mode optical fiber induced by gamma rays irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, J. X.; Luo, W. Y.; Xiao, Z. Y.; Wang, T. Y.; Chen, Z. Y.; Zeng, X. L.

    2010-02-15

    The formation and conversion processes of defect centers in low water peak single mode optical (LWPSM) fiber irradiated with gamma rays were investigated at room temperature using electron spin resonance. Germanium electron center (GEC) and self-trapped hole center (STH) occur when the fibers are irradiated with 1 and 5 kGy cumulative doses, respectively. With the increase in irradiation doses, the GEC defect centers disappear, and new defect centers such as E{sup '} centers (Si and Ge) and nonbridge oxygen hole centers (NBOHCs) generate. The generation of GEC and STH is attributed to the electron transfer, which is completely balanced. This is the main reason that radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) of the LWPSM fiber is only 10 dB/km at communication window. The new defect centers come from the conversion of GEC and STH to E{sup '} centers and NBOHC, and the conversion processes cause bond cleavage, which is the root cause that the RIA of the LWPSM fiber significantly increases up to 180 dB/km at working window. Furthermore, the concentration of new defect centers is saturated easily even by increasing cumulative doses.

  5. The Role of Community Technology Centers in Promoting Youth Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London, Rebecca A.; Pastor, Manuel, Jr.; Servon, Lisa J.; Rosner, Rachel; Wallace, Antwuan

    2010-01-01

    Recent data suggest that the digital divide between White and minority youth persists, particularly in terms of home access to computers and the Internet. Community technology centers (CTCs) are an important alternative access point, especially for low-income youth of color. Such institutions, however, do much more, providing not just access, but…

  6. Centers for manufacturing technology: Industrial Advisory Committee Review

    SciTech Connect

    1995-10-01

    An advisory committee, composed of senior managers form industrial- sector companies and major manufacturing trade associations and representatives from appropriate educational institutions, meets semi-annually to review and advise the Oak Ridge Centers for Manufacturing Technology (ORCMT) on its economic security program. Individual papers have been indexed separately for the database.

  7. CET; Center for Educational Technology, Trenton, N.J.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Educational Technology, Trenton, NJ.

    The New Jersey Center for Educational Technology (CET) has three basic priorities: to disseminate information, to coordinate effort, and to reorient school personnel. In its dissemination efforts, CET has published a series of "consumer" newsletters which define the assets and liabilities of different educational media. In addition, it is…

  8. Research and technology report of the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Highlights of major accomplishments and applications made during the past year at the Langley Research Center are reported. The activities and the contributions of this work toward maintaining United States leadership in aeronautics and space research are also discussed. Accomplishments in the fields of aeronautics and space technology, space science and applications and space transportation systems are discussed.

  9. NASA. Lewis Research Center materials research and technology: An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grisaffe, Salvatore J.

    1990-01-01

    The Materials Division at the Lewis Research Center has a long record of contributions to both materials and process technology as well as to the understanding of key high-temperature phenomena. This paper overviews the division staff, facilities, past history, recent progress, and future interests.

  10. Teaching with Technology: Creating Student Centered Classrooms. Book Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Badger, William; Reilly, Rosemary C.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews "Teaching with Technology: Creating Student Centered Classrooms" by J. Haymore Sandholtz, C. Ringstaff, and D.C. Dwyer, a report on the Apple Classrooms Of Tomorrow Project. Notes that strengths of the book include its accessibility for teachers and administrators, use of quotations from teachers to illustrate the change processes involved…

  11. Creating an X Window Terminal-Based Information Technology Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klassen, Tim W.

    1997-01-01

    The creation of an information technology center at the University of Oregon Science Library is described. Goals included providing access to Internet-based resources and multimedia software, platforms for running science-oriented software, and resources so students can create multimedia materials. A mixed-lab platform was created with Unix-based…

  12. Timber Lane Tales: Problem-Centered Learning and Technology Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norton, Priscilla; Sprague, Debra

    This exploratory study examined a field-based project in which preservice teacher candidates and faculty collaborated to implement a problem-centered, technology integrated curriculum for a multiage (4th, 5th, and 6th grade) intersession at Timber Lane Elementary School. Content included detective skills such as fingerprinting and handwriting…

  13. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Plasma Fusion Center, Technical Research Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, Ronald C.

    1980-08-01

    A review is given of the technical programs carried out by the Plasma Fusion Center. The major divisions of work areas are applied plasma research, confinement experiments, fusion technology and engineering, and fusion systems. Some objectives and results of each program are described. (MOW)

  14. Johnson Space Center Research and Technology 1993 Annual Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Johnson Space Center research and technology accomplishments during fiscal year 1993 are described and principle researchers and technologists are identified as contacts for further information. Each of the four sections gives a summary of overall progress in a major discipline, followed by detailed, illustrated descriptions of significant tasks. The four disciplines are Life Sciences, Human Support Technology, Solar Systems Sciences, and Space Systems Technology. The report is intended for technical and management audiences throughout the NASA and worldwide aerospace community. An index lists project titles, funding codes, and principal investigators.

  15. Establishing technology development centers at closing California bases

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, P.J.

    1994-12-31

    The challenges posed by remediating closing bases offers a special opportunity for California`s environmental technology companies, former defense contractors and Californians in general. One of the most important factors in the successful remediation and reuse of closing bases is the development of new cleanup technologies. At present, there is no method for effectively remediating some kinds of contamination found at military bases. Cal/EPA is in the process of working with the Western Governors` Association Wastes at Military Bases Workgroup to create a strategic plan that will integrate federal, state and local technology development programs. The proposed strategic plan will include a blueprint to help guide proposed technology development centers in California to a portion of the market yet to be addressed by other centers within the state, thus eliminating intra-state competition for the same market. By addressing this issue in a proactive manner, California will demonstrate to the federal government that tax dollars utilized to support technology development centers sited at closing California bases will be present in an efficient and cost effective manner.

  16. Spatial Information Technology Center at Fulton-Montgomery Community College

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Spatial Information Technology Center (SITC) at Fulton-Montgomery Community College (FMCC) continued to fulfill its mission and charter by successfully completing its fourth year of operations under Congressional funding and NASA sponsorship. Fourth year operations (01 Oct 03 - 30 Sep 04) have been funded and conducted utilizing an authorized Research Grant NAG 13-02053 (via a one-year no-cost extension expiring Sep 04). Drawdown and reporting of fiscal activities for SITC operations passes through the Institute for the Application of Geo-spatial Technology (IAGT) at Cayuga Community College in Auburn, New York. Fiscal activity of the Center is reported quarterly via SF 272 to IAGT, this report contains an overview and expenditures for the remaining funds of NAG 13-02053. NAG 13-02053, slated for operating costs for the fiscal year FY02-03, received a one-year no-cost extension. SITC also received permission to use remaining funds for salaries and benefits through December 31,2004. The IAGT receives no compensation for administrative costs. This report includes addendums for the NAG award as required by federal guidelines. Attached are the signed Report of New Technology/Inventions and a Final Property Report. As an academic, economic, and workforce development program, the Center has made significant strides in bringing the technology, knowledge and applications of the spatial information technology field to the region it serves. Through the mission of the Center, the region's communities have become increasingly aware of the benefits of Geospatial technology, particularly in the region s K-12 arena. SITC continues to positively affect the region's education, employment and economic development, while expanding its services and operations.

  17. Audio networking at the Center for Art and Media Technology Karlsruhe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutilleux, Pierre

    1993-01-01

    The Center for Art and Media Technology is dedicated to art and its relationship to new media. The Center supports music as well as graphic art. It also will house museums. The Center will be fully operational by the middle of 1996. The audio network will interconnect five recording studios and a large theater with three control rooms. With the additional facilities, the number of 40 interconnected rooms is reached. As to the quality and the versatility, the network can be compared, to some extent, to that of a broadcast-building. Traditional networking techniques involve many kilometers of high quality audio-cables and bulky automated patch-bays. Still, we wish even more freedom in the way the rooms are interconnected. Digital audio and computer network technology are promising. Although digital audio technology is spreading, the size of the totally digital systems is still limited. Fiber optic and large capacity optical disks offer attractive alternatives to traditional techniques (cabling, multitrack recorders, sound archives, routing). The digital audio standards are evolving from point to point communication to network communication. A 1 Gbit/s network could be the backbone of a solution.

  18. Numerical simulations of nanodiamond nitrogen-vacancy centers coupled with tapered optical fibers as hybrid quantum nanophotonic devices.

    PubMed

    Almokhtar, Mohamed; Fujiwara, Masazumi; Takashima, Hideaki; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2014-08-25

    Tapered optical fibers are promising one-dimensional nanophotonic waveguides that can provide efficient coupling between their fundamental mode and quantum nanoemitters placed inside them. Here, we present numerical studies on the coupling of single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers (single point dipoles) in nanodiamonds with tapered fibers. Our results lead to two important conclusions: (1) A maximum coupling efficiency of 53.4% can be realized for the two fiber ends when the NV bare dipole is located at the center of the tapered fiber. (2) NV centers even in 100-nm-sized nanodiamonds where bulk-like optical properties were reported show a coupling efficiency of 22% at the taper surface, with the coupling efficiency monotonically decreasing as the nanodiamond size increases. These results will be helpful in guiding the development of hybrid quantum devices for applications in quantum information science. PMID:25321215

  19. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  20. Mid-Atlantic Technology Applications Center. Quarters 1-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mid-atlantic Technology Application Center (MTAC) pursued a number of initiatives designed to enhance the strategic position of the Langley Research Center (LaRC) and NASA in industry. Among these was a closer association with the ISA, International Society for Measurement and Control. During 1997, MTAC placed articles regarding NASA-developed technologies in each In Tech magazine. The monthly magazine is sent to 46,000 sensors and instrumentation professionals. In addition, MTAC coordinated NASXs participation in the ISA Tech 97 Conference, securing $112,000 of free exhibit space, 1500 NASA sensors posters at no cost to NASA, and thousands of dollars of free publicity. MTAC was awarded a contract by ISA to operate its Technical Resource Center (TRC). The goal of this project is to determine what user needs are in order to identify opportunities for collaboration between NASA centers and companies. In addition, the TRC work will lay the groundwork for the Technology Development Consortium (TDC) proposed by MTAC. The purpose of the TDC is to: match current industry needs with NASA technologies available now, and to identify future needs of NASA and industry which may lead to dual use projects. The goal of these activities is twofold: to infuse NASA technologies into the sensors and instrumentation industry and to secure industry funds to support NASA technology development projects. The instrumentation and sensors industry is valued at $30 billion worldwide, with $12 billion in sales in the United States. The growth rate averages 13.5%, so that by the year 2000, the industry will produce products worth $49 billion. More than 80% of instruments, sensors and control systems are currently manufactured in the United States. NASA and the industry do not have a history of collaborative projects; MTAC's initiatives in this area are designed to foster working relationships between the two parties that will help maintain U.S. leadership in this field. Mid-atlantic Technology

  1. Energy-efficient technologies for point-to-point fiber access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ka-Lun; Li, Jie; Chan, Chien Aun; Anthapadmanabhan, N. Prasanth; Chow, Hungkei (Keith)

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses the fundamental issues and the technologies to achieve an energy-efficient Gigabit-Ethernet point-to-point (PtP) fiber access network. To minimize the power consumption of PtP fiber access for long-term development, it is essential to optimize each of the network components such as optical transceiver, user network interface, Ethernet aggregator and also their modes of operation. Our analysis shows that the energy consumption of a PtP fiber access network using our proposed technologies can be up to 7.5 times lower than that of the 2010 technologies when a combination of appropriate technologies is applied.

  2. Research and technology, Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1984 are highlighted. Included are research funded by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology; Advanced Programs tasks funded by the Office of Space Flight; and Solar System Exploration and Life Sciences research funded by the Office of Space Sciences and Applications. Summary sections describing the role of the Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by one page descriptions of significant projects. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

  3. Research and technology of the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1987 are highlighted. Included are research projects funded by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology, Solar System Exploration and Life Sciences research funded by the Office of Space Sciences and Applications, and advanced Programs tasks funded by the Office of Space Flight. Summary sections describing the role of the Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by descriptions of significant projects. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

  4. Research and technology at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1983 are highlighted. Included are research funded by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology; Advanced Programs tasks funded by the Office of Space Flight; and Solar System Explorations, Life Sciences, and Earth Sciences and Applications research funded by the Office of Space Sciences and Applications. Summary sections describing the role of the Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by one-page descriptions of significant projects. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

  5. Two Micron Laser Technology Advancements at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    An Independent Laser Review Panel set up to examine NASA s space-based lidar missions and the technology readiness of lasers appropriate for space-based lidars indicated a critical need for an integrated research and development strategy to move laser transmitter technology from low technical readiness levels to the higher levels required for space missions. Based on the review, a multiyear Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) was initiated by NASA in 2002 to develop technologies that ensure the successful development of the broad range of lidar missions envisioned by NASA. This presentation will provide an overview of the development of pulsed 2-micron solid-state laser technologies at NASA Langley Research Center for enabling space-based measurement of wind and carbon dioxide.

  6. A future perspective on technological obsolescenceat NASA, Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcintyre, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    The present research effort was the first phase of a study to forecast whether technological obsolescence will be a problem for the engineers, scientists, and technicians at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). There were four goals of the research: to review the literature on technological obsolescence; to determine through interviews of division chiefs and branch heads Langley's perspective on future technological obsolescence; to begin making contacts with outside industries to find out how they view the possibility of technological obsolescence; and to make preliminary recommendations for dealing with the problem. A complete description of the findings of this research can be reviewed in a technical report in preparation. The following are a small subset of the key findings of the study: NASA's centers and divisions vary in their missions and because of this, in their capability to control obsolescence; research-oriented organizations within NASA are believed by respondents to keep up to date more than the project-oriented organizations; asked what are the signs of a professional's technological obsolescence, respondents had a variety of responses; top performing scientists were viewed as continuous learners, keeping up to date by a variety of means; when asked what incentives were available to aerospace technologists for keeping up to data, respondents specified a number of ideas; respondents identified many obstacles to professionals' keeping up to date in the future; and most respondents expressed some concern for the future of the professionals at NASA vis a vis the issue of professional obsolescence.

  7. Savannah River Technology Center. Monthly report, May 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    This report covers the progress and accomplishments made at the Savannah River Technology Center for the month of May 1993. Progress is reported for projects in the following areas: reactors, tritium, separations, environmental, waste management, and general. General projects are: an eight week tutorial of the Los Alamos National Laboratory developed Monte Carlo Neutron Photon (MCNP) code; development of materials and fabrication technologies for the spallation and tritium targets for the accelerator production of tritium; and a program to develop welding methods to repair stainless steel containing helium.

  8. NASA Stennis Space Center Test Technology Branch Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solano, Wanda M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides a short history of NASA Stennis Space Center's Test Technology Laboratory and briefly describes the variety of engine test technology activities and developmental project initiatives. Theoretical rocket exhaust plume modeling, acoustic monitoring and analysis, hand held fire imaging, heat flux radiometry, thermal imaging and exhaust plume spectroscopy are all examples of current and past test activities that are briefly described. In addition, recent efforts and visions focused on accomodating second, third, and fourth generation flight vehicle engine test requirements are discussed.

  9. NOAA Interdisciplinary Scientific Environmental Technology Cooperative Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bililign, Solomon

    2008-10-01

    ISETCS is led by North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University in collaboration with thirty one scientists and engineers in nine academic departments in seven academic partnering institutions. The focus of the ISET Cooperative Science Center (ISETCSC) is to conduct research on sensor science and sensor technology for oceanic and atmospheric applications; perform analysis of global observing systems that include numerical and physical research and analysis of hurricanes; and, develop information technology tools for data fusion, data mining and geospatial modeling and analysis. In collaboration with Keith Schimmel and Abdollah Homaifar, North Carolina A&T State University; Frederick Semazzi, North Carolina State University; and Samir Ahmed, City University of New York.

  10. Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT)

    SciTech Connect

    Mackin, Thomas

    2012-06-30

    The Center for Renewable Energy and Alternative Transportation Technologies (CREATT) was established to advance the state of the art in knowledge and education on critical technologies that support a renewable energy future. Our research and education efforts have focused on alternative energy systems, energy storage systems, and research on battery and hybrid energy storage systems.This report details the Center's progress in the following specific areas: Development of a battery laboratory; Development of a demonstration system for compressed air energy storage; Development of electric propulsion test systems; Battery storage systems; Thermal management of battery packs; and Construction of a micro-grid to support real-world performance monitoring of a renewable energy system.

  11. Accomplishments at NASA Langley Research Center in rotorcraft aerodynamics technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John C.

    1988-01-01

    In recent years, the development of aerodynamic technology for rotorcraft has continued successfully at NASA LaRC. Though the NASA Langley Research Center is not the lead NASA center in this area, the activity was continued due to facilities and individual capabilities which are recognized as contributing to helicopter research needs of industry and government. Noteworthy accomplishments which contribute to advancing the state of rotorcraft technology in the areas of rotor design, airfoil research, rotor aerodynamics, and rotor/fuselage interaction aerodynamics are described. Rotor designs were defined for current helicopters and evaluated in wind tunnel testing. These designs have incorporated advanced airfoils defined analytically and also proven in wind tunnel tests. A laser velocimetry system has become a productive tool for experimental definition of rotor inflow/wake and is providing data for rotorcraft aerodynamic code validation.

  12. Technologies for the marketplace from the Centers for Disease Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid-Sanden, Frances L.; Greene, R. Eric; Malvitz, Dolores M.

    1991-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control, a Public Health Service agency, is responsible for the prevention and control of disease and injury. Programs range from surveillance and prevention of chronic and infectious diseases to occupational health and injury control. These programs have produced technologies in a variety of fields, including vaccine development, new methods of disease diagnosis, and new tools to ensure a safer work environment.

  13. ESTABLISHMENT OF THE CENTER FOR ADVANCED SEPARATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh W. Rimmer

    2003-07-01

    Technical Progress Report describes progress made on the eight sub-projects awarded in the first year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41091: Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices. Due to the time taken up by the solicitation/selection process, these cover the initial 6-month period of activity only.

  14. A Comparison of Lead Abatement Technologies at Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeziorowski, Luz Y.; Calla, Joanne

    1997-01-01

    In 1995, Lewis participated in a pilot test of Lead Specifications. The Specifications were sponsored by the Center to Protect Worker's Rights (CPWR). Entitled "Model Specifications for the Protection of Worker's from Lead on Steel Structures", one aspect of this endeavor was to test and compare several lead abatement technologies. The project overview, objectives, team, and requirements as well as abatement methods and materials are outlined.

  15. Career and Technology Center Honors Julie Hartman | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer On May 7, Julie Hartman was honored by the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC) for her support of the CTC’s Biomedical Sciences Program. As an education program specialist for Outreach and Special Programs at NCI at Frederick, Hartman is responsible for NCI at Frederick’s participation in the program, which is designed to offer Frederick County high school students hands-on, practical laboratory experience beyond the typical classroom setting. 

  16. Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher E. Hull

    2006-09-30

    This Final Technical Report covers the eight sub-projects awarded in the first year and the five projects awarded in the second year of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41091: Establishment of the Center for Advanced Separation Technologies. This work is summarized in the body of the main report: the individual sub-project Technical Progress Reports are attached as Appendices.

  17. Establishment of the Center for Biomedical Technology Innovation

    SciTech Connect

    2001-12-15

    The report discussed the following topics: (1) Orthopedic Devices; (2) Hybrid Vector and Method Resulting in Protein Overproduction by Eukaryotic Cells; (3) Surgical Simulator; (4) CBTI (Center for Biomedical Technology Innovation) as an Incubator for Start-up Companies; (5) Voice-activated, computer-assisted surgical robotics; (6) Through transmission ultrasonic 3-D holography for diagnostic imaging; (7) CBTI's Scibermed{trademark} Virtual Institute (SVI); and (8) Laser Oxygenation Tomography.

  18. Spatial Information Technology Center at Fulton-Montgomery Community College

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flinton, Michael E.

    2004-01-01

    The Spatial Information Technology Center (SITC) at Fulton-Montgomery Community College (FMCC) continued to fulfill its mission and charter by successfully completing its third year of operations under Congressional funding and NASA sponsorship. Third year operations (01 Oct 02 - 30 Sep 03) have been funded and conducted utilizing two authorized Research Grants NAG 13-00043 (via a one-year no-cost extension expiring Sep 03) and NAG 13-02053 (one-year no-cost extension expiring Sep 04). Drawdowns and reporting of fiscal activities for SlTC operations continues to pass through the Institute for the Application of Geo-spatial Technology (IAGT) at Cayuga Community College in Auburn, New York. Fiscal activity of the Center is reported quarterly via SF 272 to IAGT, thus this report contains only a budgetary overview and forecast of future expenditures for the remaining funds of NAG 13 - 02053. Funds from NAG 13 - 00043 were exhausted during the fourth quarter of fiscal year FY02 - 03, which necessitated initial draw down of NAG 13 - 02053. The IAGT receives no compensation for administrative costs as authorized and approved by NASA in each award budget. This report also includes the necessary addendums for each NAG award, as required by federal guidelines, though no reportable activities took place within this report period. Attached are the signed Report of New Technology/lnventions and a Final Property Report identifying qualifying equipment purchased by the Center. As an academic, economic and workforce development oriented program, the Center has made significant strides in bringing the technology, knowledge and applications of the spatial information technology field to the region it serves. Through the mission of the Center, the region's educational, economic development and work force communities have become increasingly educated to the benefits of spatial (Geospatial) technology, particularly in the region's K-12 arena. SlTC continues to positively affect the

  19. Center for BioBased Binders and Pollution Reduction Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Thiel, Jerry

    2013-07-01

    Funding will support the continuation of the Center for Advanced Bio-based Binders and Pollution Reduction Technology Center (CABB) in the development of bio-based polymers and emission reduction technologies for the metal casting industry. Since the formation of the center several new polymers based on agricultural materials have been developed. These new materials have show decreases in hazardous air pollutants, phenol and formaldehyde as much as 50 to 80% respectively. The polymers termed bio-polymers show a great potential to utilize current renewable agricultural resources to replace petroleum based products and reduce our dependence on importing of foreign oil. The agricultural technology has shown drastic reductions in the emission of hazardous air pollutants and volatile organic compounds and requires further development to maintain competitive costs and productivity. The project will also research new and improved inorganic binders that promise to eliminate hazardous emissions from foundry casting operations and allow for the beneficial reuse of the materials and avoiding the burdening of overcrowded landfills.

  20. Teaching Technology with Technology. An Off-the-Shelf Robotics Course Builds Technical Center Enrollment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hannemann, Jim; Rice, Thomas R.

    1991-01-01

    At the Oakland Technical Center, which provides vocational programs for nine Michigan high schools, a one-semester course in Foundations of Technology Systems uses a computer-simulated manufacturing environment to teach applied math, science, language arts, communication skills, problem solving, and teamwork in the context of technology education.…

  1. Research on distributed strain separation technology of fiber Brillouin sensing system combining an electric power optical fiber cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yuqing; Chen, Xi; Li, Jihui; Tong, Jie

    2013-12-01

    Brillouin-based optical fiber sensing system has been taken more and more attentions in power transmission line in recent years. However, there exists a temperature cross sensitivity problem in sensing system. Hence, researching on strain separation technology of fiber brillouin sensing system is an urgent requirement in its practical area. In this paper, a real-time online distributed strain separation calculation technology of fiber Brillouin sensing combining an electric power optical fiber cable is proposed. The technology is mainly composed of the Brillouin temperature-strain distributed measurement system and the Raman temperature distributed measurement system. In this technology, the electric power optical fiber cable is a special optical phase conductor (OPPC); the Brillouin sensing system uses the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) method. The optical unit of the OPPC includes single-mode and multimode fibers which can be used as sensing channel for Brillouin sensing system and Raman sensing system respectively. In the system networking aspect, the data processor of fiber Brillouin sensing system works as the host processor and the data processor of fiber Raman sensing system works as the auxiliary processor. And the auxiliary processor transfers the data to the host processor via the Ethernet interface. In the experiment, the BOTDA monitoring system and the Raman monitoring system work on the same optical unit of the OPPC simultaneously; In the data processing aspect, the auxiliary processor of Raman transfers the temperature data to the host processor of Brillouin via the Ethernet interface, and then the host processor of Brillouin uses the temperature data combining itself strain-temperature data to achieve the high sampling rate and high-precision strain separation via data decoupling calculation. The data decoupling calculation is achieved through the interpolation, filtering, feature point alignment, and the singular point prediction

  2. OPTICAL FIBER SENSOR TECHNOLOGIES FOR EFFICIENT AND ECONOMICAL OIL RECOVERY

    SciTech Connect

    A. Wang; H. Xiao; R. May

    1999-10-29

    Efficient and complete recovery of petroleum reserves from existing oil wells has proven difficult due to a lack of robust instrumentation that can monitor processes in the downhole environment. Commercially available sensors for measurement of pressure, temperature, and fluid flow exhibit shortened lifetimes in the harsh downhole conditions, which are characterized by high pressures (up to 20 kpsi), temperatures up to 250 C, and exposure to chemically reactive fluids. Development of robust sensors that deliver continuous, real-time data on reservoir performance and petroleum flow pathways will facilitate application of advanced recovery technologies, including horizontal and multi-lateral wells. The main objective of the research program is to develop cost-effective, reliable fiber sensor instrumentation for real-time monitoring and /or control of various key parameters crucial to efficient and economical oil production. This report presents the detailed research work and technical progress from October 1, 1998 to September 30, 1999. The research performed over the first year of the program has followed the schedule as proposed, and solid research progress has been made in specification of the technical requirements, design and fabrication of the SCIIB sensor probes, development of the sensor systems, development of DSP-based signal processing techniques, and construction of the test systems. These technical achievements will significantly help to advance continued research on sensor tests and evaluation during the second year of the program.

  3. Continuous culture of Cryptosporidium parvum using hollow fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Morada, Mary; Lee, Sangun; Gunther-Cummins, Leslie; Weiss, Louis M; Widmer, Giovanni; Tzipori, Saul; Yarlett, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Diarrheal disease is a leading cause of pediatric death in economically low resource countries. Cryptosporidium spp. are the second largest member of this group and the only member for which no treatment exists. One of the handicaps to developing chemotherapy is the lack of a reproducible long-term culture method permitting in vitro drug screening beyond 48 h. We have adapted the well-established hollow fiber technology to provide an environment that mimics the gut by delivering nutrients and oxygen from the basal layer upwards while allowing separate redox and nutrient control of the lumen for parasite development. Using this technique, oocyst production was maintained for >6 months, producing approximately 1×10(8)oocysts ml(-1)day(-1), compared with 48 h with a yield of 1×10(6)oocysts ml(-1) in two-dimensional cultures. Oocysts, after 4 and 20 weeks in culture, produced a chronic infection in a TCR-α-deficient mouse model. In vivo infectivity of oocysts was confirmed using oocysts from a 6 week culture in a dexamethasone immunosuppressed mouse model. PMID:26341006

  4. Pressure measurement with fiber-optic sensors: commercial technologies and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinet, Éric

    2011-05-01

    Mainly three technologies are presently commercially available for pressure measurement with fiber-optic sensors: intensity-based, fiber Bragg gratings and Fabry-Pérot. The first one is probably the simplest and the cheapest but it is limited to applications where having 2 fixed or up to 4 flexible fibers is not an issue, whereas the two other technologies require only one fiber. With generally low sensitivity to pressure and prohibitive cost for non multiplexed measurements, fiber Bragg grating pressure sensors are still limited to marginal applications. Fabry-Pérot technology is the best compromise offering at affordable price a great flexibility in terms of pressure ranges, high sensitivity and miniature size suitable for most applications including disposable medical devices.

  5. US long distance fiber optic networks: Technology, evolution and advanced concepts. Volume 1: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Over the past two decades, fiber optics has emerged as a highly practical and cost-efficient communications technology. Its competitiveness vis-a-vis other transmission media, especially satellite, has become a critical question. This report studies the likely evolution and application of fiber optic networks in the United States to the end of the century. The outlook for the technology of fiber systems is assessed and forecast, scenarios of the evolution of fiber optic network development are constructed, and costs to provide service are determined and examined parametrically as a function of network size and traffic carried. Volume 1 consists of the Executive Summary. Volume 2 focuses on fiber optic technology and long distance fiber optic networks. Volume 3 develops a traffic and financial model of a nationwide long distance transmission network. Among the study's most important conclusions are: revenue requirements per circuit for LATA-to-LATA fiber optic links are less than one cent per call minute; multiplex equipment, which is likely to be required in any competing system, is the largest contributor to circuit costs; the potential capacity of fiber optic cable is very large and as yet undefined; and fiber optic transmission combined with other network optimization schemes can lead to even lower costs than those identified in this study.

  6. Distance Learning With NASA Lewis Research Center's Learning Technologies Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's Learning Technologies Project (LTP) has responded to requests from local school district technology coordinators to provide content for videoconferencing workshops. Over the past year we have offered three teacher professional development workshops that showcase NASA Lewis-developed educational products and NASA educational Internet sites. In order to determine the direction of our involvement with distance learning, the LTP staff conducted a survey of 500 U.S. schools. We received responses from 72 schools that either currently use distance learning or will be using distance learning in 98-99 school year. The results of the survey are summarized in the article. In addition, the article provides information on distance learners, distance learning technologies, and the NASA Lewis LTP videoconferencing workshops. The LTP staff will continue to offer teacher development workshops through videoconferencing during the 98-99 school year. We hope to add workshops on new educational products as they are developed at NASA Lewis.

  7. Laser Communications and Fiber Optics Lab Manual. High-Technology Training Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biddick, Robert

    This laboratory training manual on laser communications and fiber optics may be used in a general technology-communications course for ninth graders. Upon completion of this exercise, students achieve the following goals: match concepts with laser communication system parts; explain advantages of fiber optic cable over conventional copper wire;…

  8. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    PubMed

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed.

  9. Armstrong Flight Research Center Research Technology and Engineering Report 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voracek, David F.

    2016-01-01

    I am honored to endorse the 2015 Neil A. Armstrong Flight Research Center’s Research, Technology, and Engineering Report. The talented researchers, engineers, and scientists at Armstrong are continuing a long, rich legacy of creating innovative approaches to solving some of the difficult problems and challenges facing NASA and the aerospace community.Projects at NASA Armstrong advance technologies that will improve aerodynamic efficiency, increase fuel economy, reduce emissions and aircraft noise, and enable the integration of unmanned aircraft into the national airspace. The work represented in this report highlights the Center’s agility to develop technologies supporting each of NASA’s core missions and, more importantly, technologies that are preparing us for the future of aviation and space exploration.We are excited about our role in NASA’s mission to develop transformative aviation capabilities and open new markets for industry. One of our key strengths is the ability to rapidly move emerging techniques and technologies into flight evaluation so that we can quickly identify their strengths, shortcomings, and potential applications.This report presents a brief summary of the technology work of the Center. It also contains contact information for the associated technologists responsible for the work. Don’t hesitate to contact them for more information or for collaboration ideas.

  10. Publications in academic medical centers: technology-facilitated culture clash.

    PubMed

    Berner, Eta S

    2014-05-01

    Academic culture has a set of norms, expectations, and values that are sometimes tacit and sometimes very explicit. In medical school and other health professions educational settings, probably the most common norm includes placing a high value on peer-reviewed research publications, which are seen as the major evidence of scholarly productivity. Other features of academic culture include encouraging junior faculty and graduate students to share their research results at professional conferences and lecturing with slides as a major way to convey information. Major values that faculty share with journal editors include responsible conduct of research and proper attribution of others' words and ideas. Medical school faculty also value technology and are often quick to embrace technological advances that can assist them in their teaching and research. This article addresses the effects of technology on three aspects of academic culture: education, presentations at professional meetings, and research publications.The technologies discussed include online instruction, dissemination of conference proceedings on the Internet, plagiarism-detection software, and new technologies deployed by the National Center for Biotechnology Information, the home of PubMed. The author describes how the ease of deploying new technologies without faculty changing their norms and behavior in the areas of teaching and research can lead to conflicts of values among key stakeholders in the academic medical community, including faculty, journal editors, and professional associations. The implications of these conflicts and strategies for managing them are discussed. PMID:24667517

  11. Hollow fiber bioreactor technology for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Eghbali, Hadis; Nava, Michele M; Mohebbi-Kalhori, Davod; Raimondi, Manuela T

    2016-01-01

    Hollow fiber bioreactors are the focus of scientific research aiming to mimic physiological vascular networks and engineer organs and tissues in vitro. The reason for this lies in the interesting features of this bioreactor type, including excellent mass transport properties. Indeed, hollow fiber bioreactors allow limitations to be overcome in nutrient transport by diffusion, which is often an obstacle to engineer sizable constructs in vitro. This work reviews the existing literature relevant to hollow fiber bioreactors in organ and tissue engineering applications. To this purpose, we first classify the hollow fiber bioreactors into 2 categories: cylindrical and rectangular. For each category, we summarize their main applications both at the tissue and at the organ level, focusing on experimental models and computational studies as predictive tools for designing innovative, dynamic culture systems. Finally, we discuss future perspectives on hollow fiber bioreactors as in vitro models for tissue and organ engineering applications.

  12. The research of high efficient optical fiber coupling technology in space laser communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao-zeng; Tong, Shou-feng; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Hong-kun

    2013-08-01

    With the development of optical fiber communications, especially the maturity of the optical amplifiers and the WDM technology, space optical communication at 1550 nm becomes a promising solution for future high speed satellite communication. Receiving technology with optical amplifiers and coupling space light into single mode fiber are key technologies in space optical communication at 1550 nm. Free-space-to-fiber coupling technique investigated in this paper is the first challenge of applying fiber communication techniques to free space optical communications. We analyzed the factors that affect the efficiency of free-space-to single-mode-fiber coupling based on mode-matching theory of electromagnetic fields. On this objective, in this paper, the theoretical analysis of the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the space light-single mode fiber coupling efficiency is discussed. On this basis, the short-distance experiment coupling space light into single mode fiber is carried out. 1. The main factors affecting the process coupling space light into single mode fiber are analyzed. This paper introduced the statistical theory of atmospheric turbulence and gave out the main turbulence parameters and meteyard based on the theory of the space light-single mode fiber coupling efficiency under ideal conditions. 2. The influence of atmospheric turbulence on the space light-single mode fiber coupling efficiency is analyzed and simulated. In the weak turbulence condition, mathematical model of the mean coupling efficiency and its fluctuation variance was given. And the fluctuation variance of coupling efficiency was simulated studied under the atmospheric conditions. The influences on the average coupling efficiency was theoretically studied, which were induced by the structure constant of atmospheric refractive index, the diameter of coupling lens and the single-mode fiber mode field radius. 3. Validating the theoretical model by a experiment under a short link coupling

  13. Basalt fiber manufacturing technology and the possibility of its use in dentistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karavaeva, E.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Nikitin, V.; Cherepennikov, Yu; Lysakov, A.

    2015-11-01

    The article touches upon the technology of basalt fiber manufacturing and prospects of its use in dental practice. Two kinds of construction using basalt fiber have been proposed. The first one is a splinting construction for mobile teeth and the second one is the reinforced base for removable plate-denture. The work presents the results of the investigation of physical and mechanical properties of the constructions based on basalt fiber. It also describes the aspects of biomechanical modeling of such constructions in the ANSYS software package. The results of the investigation have proved that applying constructions using basalt fiber is highly promising for prosthetic dentistry practice.

  14. Design and prototyping of self-centering optical single-mode fiber alignment structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Gao, Fei; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    The European Commission’s goal of providing each European household with at least a 30 Mb s‑1 Internet connection by 2020 would be facilitated by a widespread deployment of fibre-to-the-home, which would in turn be sped up by the development of connector essential components, such as high-precision alignment features. Currently, the performance of state-of-the-art physical contact optical fiber connectors is limited by the tolerance on the cladding of standard telecom-grade single-mode fiber (SMF), which is typically smaller than  ±1 μm. We propose to overcome this limit by developing micro-spring-based self-centering alignment structures (SCAS) for SMF-connectors. We design these alignment structures with robustness and low-cost replication in mind, allowing for large-scale deployment. Both theoretical and finite element analysis (FEA) models are used to determine the optimal dimensions of the beams of which the micro-springs of the SCAS are comprised. Two topologies of the SCAS, consisting of three and four micro-springs respectively, are investigated for two materials: polysulfone (PSU) and polyetherimide (PEI). These materials hold great potential for high-performance fiber connectors while being compatible with low-cost production and with the harsh environmental operation conditions of those connectors. The theory and FEA agree well (<3% difference) for a simple micro-spring. When including a pedestal on the micro-spring (to bring it further away from the fiber) and for shorter spring lengths the agreement worsens. This is due to spring compression effects not being taken into account in our theoretical model. Prototypes are successfully fabricated using deep proton writing and subsequently characterized. The controlled insertion of an SMF in the SCAS is investigated and we determine that a force of 0.11 N is required. The fiber insertion also causes an out-of-plane deformation of the micro-springs in the SCAS of about 7 μm, which is no problem

  15. Design and prototyping of self-centering optical single-mode fiber alignment structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Gao, Fei; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    The European Commission’s goal of providing each European household with at least a 30 Mb s-1 Internet connection by 2020 would be facilitated by a widespread deployment of fibre-to-the-home, which would in turn be sped up by the development of connector essential components, such as high-precision alignment features. Currently, the performance of state-of-the-art physical contact optical fiber connectors is limited by the tolerance on the cladding of standard telecom-grade single-mode fiber (SMF), which is typically smaller than  ±1 μm. We propose to overcome this limit by developing micro-spring-based self-centering alignment structures (SCAS) for SMF-connectors. We design these alignment structures with robustness and low-cost replication in mind, allowing for large-scale deployment. Both theoretical and finite element analysis (FEA) models are used to determine the optimal dimensions of the beams of which the micro-springs of the SCAS are comprised. Two topologies of the SCAS, consisting of three and four micro-springs respectively, are investigated for two materials: polysulfone (PSU) and polyetherimide (PEI). These materials hold great potential for high-performance fiber connectors while being compatible with low-cost production and with the harsh environmental operation conditions of those connectors. The theory and FEA agree well (<3% difference) for a simple micro-spring. When including a pedestal on the micro-spring (to bring it further away from the fiber) and for shorter spring lengths the agreement worsens. This is due to spring compression effects not being taken into account in our theoretical model. Prototypes are successfully fabricated using deep proton writing and subsequently characterized. The controlled insertion of an SMF in the SCAS is investigated and we determine that a force of 0.11 N is required. The fiber insertion also causes an out-of-plane deformation of the micro-springs in the SCAS of about 7 μm, which is no problem for

  16. All Fiber Technology for High-Energy Petawatt Front End Laser Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, J W; Liao, Z M; Jovanovic, I; Wattellier, B; Beach, R; Payne, S A; Barty, C P J

    2003-09-05

    We are developing an all fiber front end for the next generation high-energy petawatt (HEPW) laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The ultimate goal of the LLNL HEPW effort is to generate 5-kJ pulses capable of compression to 5ps at 1053nm, enabling advanced x-ray backlighters and possible demonstration of fast ignition. We discuss the front-end of the laser design from the fiber master oscillator, which generates the mode-locked 20nm bandwidth initial pulses through the 10mJ output of the large flattened mode (LFM) fiber amplifier. Development of an all fiber front end requires technological breakthroughs in the key areas of the master oscillator and fiber amplification. Chirped pulse amplification in optical fibers has been demonstrated to 1mJ. Further increase is limited by the onset of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). We have recently demonstrated a new flattened mode fiber technology, which reduces peak power for a given energy and thus the onset of SRS. Controlled experiments with 1st generation fibers yielded 0.5mJ of energy while significantly increasing the point at which nonlinear optical effects degrade the amplified pulse. In this paper we will discuss our efforts to extend this work to greater than 20mJ using our large flattened mode fiber amplifier.

  17. Picosecond pulses compression at 1053-nm center wavelength by using a gas-filled hollow-core fiber compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Ding; Leng, Yu-Xin; Dai, Ye

    2015-01-01

    We theoretically study the nonlinear compression of picosecond pulses with 10-mJ of input energy at the 1053-nm center wavelength by using a one-meter-long gas-filled hollow-core fiber (HCF) compressor and considering the third-order dispersion (TOD) effect. It is found that when the input pulse is about 1 ps/10 mJ, it can be compressed down to less than 20 fs with a high transmission efficiency. The gas for optimal compression is krypton gas which is filled in a HCF with a 400-μm inner diameter. When the input pulse duration is increased to 5 ps, it can also be compressed down to less than 100 fs efficiently under proper conditions. The results show that the TOD effect has little impact on picosecond pulse compression and the HCF compressor can be applied on compressing picosecond pulses efficiently with a high compression ratio, which will benefit the research of high-field laser physics. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204328, 61221064, 61078037, 11127901, and 11134010), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2011CB808101), the Commission of Science and Technology of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 12dz1100700), the Natural Science Foundation of Shanghai, China (Grant No. 13ZR1414800), and the International Science and Technology Cooperation Program of China (Grant No. 2011DFA11300).

  18. Fiber optic sensor technology - An opportunity for smart aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, J. S.; Rogowski, R. S.; Claus, R. O.

    1988-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors provide the opportunity for fabricating materials with internal sensors which can serve as lifetime health monitors, analogous to a central nervous system. The embedded fiber optic sensors can be interrogated by various techniques to measure internal strain, temperature, pressure, acoustic waves and other parameters indicative of structural integrity. Experiments have been conducted with composite samples with embedded sensors to measure strain using optical time domain reflectometry, modal interference and an optical phase locked loop. Fiber optic sensors have been developed to detect acoustic emission and impact damage and have been demonstrated for cure monitoring. These sensors have the potential for lifetime monitoring of structural properties, providing real time nondestructive evaluation.

  19. Application of microscopy technology in mathematical modeling of hollow fiber membrane system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lock, S. S. M.; Lau, K. K.; Tan, E. K.; Shariff, A. M.; Mei, Irene Lock Sow

    2015-07-01

    Mathematical modeling becomes an indispensable tool in the design process of membrane system by predicting the required module specification and membrane characteristic that are optimum according to various operating conditions. However, challenges are often encountered in determining the effective separation area for mathematical modeling of the hollow fiber membrane system, which are associated with many fine hollow fibers. In this work, the microscopy technology has been adapted to determine the specification of the hollow fiber and packing fraction of the membrane system, before being applied alongside numerical solution to describe the separation performance of a countercurrent hollow fiber membrane system. The accuracy of the methodology has been validated through experimental work. The promising result enables further application of the methodology in industrial scale hollow fiber membrane module design with approximately ten to hundreds of thousands of extremely fine hollow fibers.

  20. Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  1. The 1991 research and technology report, Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Montgomery, Harry (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Sullivan, Walter (Editor); Boyle, Charles (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The 1991 Research and Technology Report for Goddard Space Flight Center is presented. Research covered areas such as (1) earth sciences including upper atmosphere, lower atmosphere, oceans, hydrology, and global studies; (2) space sciences including solar studies, planetary studies, Astro-1, gamma ray investigations, and astrophysics; (3) flight projects; (4) engineering including robotics, mechanical engineering, electronics, imaging and optics, thermal and cryogenic studies, and balloons; and (5) ground systems, networks, and communications including data and networks, TDRSS, mission planning and scheduling, and software development and test.

  2. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeff; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature SiO2 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  3. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeff; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature Si02 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  4. Technology for independence: a community-based resource center.

    PubMed

    Blanck, Peter; Ritchie, Heather; Schmeling, James; Klein, David

    2003-01-01

    Despite the prominence of the disability civil rights model--with its values of inclusion and empowerment--the majority of social and policy research conducted to date has not sufficiently included the perspective of persons with disabilities in the research process and as uniquely qualified researchers themselves. This article describes a new project, "Technology for Independence: A Community-Based Resource Center" (CBRC). Over a five-year period, the CBRC will attempt to enhance community and consumer-directed disability organizations to design, implement, and disseminate research that promotes access to and use of assistive technology (AT). The CBRC will use strategies such as leadership training, participatory action research, technical assistance, web-assisted training, and annual symposia. A primary goal of the CBRC is to increase the capacity of community organizations to conduct research on AT that is scientifically rigorous and relevant to disability services, policy, and law.

  5. The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) robotics technology testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schnurr, Rick; Obrien, Maureen; Cofer, Sue

    1989-01-01

    Much of the technology planned for use in NASA's Flight Telerobotic Servicer (FTS) and the Demonstration Test Flight (DTF) is relatively new and untested. To provide the answers needed to design safe, reliable, and fully functional robotics for flight, NASA/GSFC is developing a robotics technology testbed for research of issues such as zero-g robot control, dual arm teleoperation, simulations, and hierarchical control using a high level programming language. The testbed will be used to investigate these high risk technologies required for the FTS and DTF projects. The robotics technology testbed is centered around the dual arm teleoperation of a pair of 7 degree-of-freedom (DOF) manipulators, each with their own 6-DOF mini-master hand controllers. Several levels of safety are implemented using the control processor, a separate watchdog computer, and other low level features. High speed input/output ports allow the control processor to interface to a simulation workstation: all or part of the testbed hardware can be used in real time dynamic simulation of the testbed operations, allowing a quick and safe means for testing new control strategies. The NASA/National Bureau of Standards Standard Reference Model for Telerobot Control System Architecture (NASREM) hierarchical control scheme, is being used as the reference standard for system design. All software developed for the testbed, excluding some of simulation workstation software, is being developed in Ada. The testbed is being developed in phases. The first phase, which is nearing completion, and highlights future developments is described.

  6. The Savannah River Technology Center environmental monitoring field test platform

    SciTech Connect

    Rossabi, J.

    1993-03-05

    Nearly all industrial facilities have been responsible for introducing synthetic chemicals into the environment. The Savannah River Site is no exception. Several areas at the site have been contaminated by chlorinated volatile organic chemicals. Because of the persistence and refractory nature of these contaminants, a complete clean up of the site will take many years. A major focus of the mission of the Environmental Sciences Section of the Savannah River Technology Center is to develop better, faster, and less expensive methods for characterizing, monitoring, and remediating the subsurface. These new methods can then be applied directly at the Savannah River Site and at other contaminated areas in the United States and throughout the world. The Environmental Sciences Section has hosted field testing of many different monitoring technologies over the past two years primarily as a result of the Integrated Demonstration Program sponsored by the Department of Energy`s Office of Technology Development. This paper provides an overview of some of the technologies that have been demonstrated at the site and briefly discusses the applicability of these techniques.

  7. National Wind Technology Center sitewide, Golden, CO: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the nation`s primary solar and renewable energy research laboratory, proposes to expand its wind technology research and development program activities at its National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) near Golden, Colorado. NWTC is an existing wind energy research facility operated by NREL for the US Department of Energy (DOE). Proposed activities include the construction and reuse of buildings and facilities, installation of up to 20 wind turbine test sites, improvements in infrastructure, and subsequent research activities, technology testing, and site operations. In addition to wind turbine test activities, NWTC may be used to support other NREL program activities and small-scale demonstration projects. This document assesses potential consequences to resources within the physical, biological, and human environment, including potential impacts to: air quality, geology and soils, water resources, biological resources, cultural and historic resources, socioeconomic resources, land use, visual resources, noise environment, hazardous materials and waste management, and health and safety conditions. Comment letters were received from several agencies in response to the scoping and predecisional draft reviews. The comments have been incorporated as appropriate into the document with full text of the letters contained in the Appendices. Additionally, information from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site on going sitewide assessment of potential environmental impacts has been reviewed and discussed by representatives of both parties and incorporated into the document as appropriate.

  8. Trends and future of fiber Bragg grating sensing technologies: tailored draw tower gratings (DTGs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, E.; Hartung, A.; Hoh, D.; Chojetzki, C.; Schuster, K.; Bierlich, J.; Rothhardt, M.

    2014-05-01

    Today fiber Bragg gratings are commonly used in sensing technology as well as in telecommunications. Numerous requirements must be satisfied for their application as a sensor such as the number of sensors per system, the measurement resolution and repeatability, the sensor reusability as well as the sensor costs. In addition current challenges need to be met in the near future for sensing fibers to keep and extend their marketability such as the suitability for sterilization, hydrogen darkening or the separation of strain and temperature (or pressure and temperature). In this contribution we will give an outlook about trends and future of the fiber Bragg gratings in sensing technologies. Specifically, we will discuss how the use of draw tower grating technology enables the production of tailored Bragg grating sensing fibers, and we will present a method of separating strain and temperature by the use of a single Bragg grating only, avoiding the need for additional sensors to realize the commonly applied temperature compensation.

  9. Effects of color centers absorption on the spectrum of the temperature-dependent radiation-induced attenuation in fiber.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Hou, Yunxia; Liu, Chunjing

    2015-02-01

    Spectra ranging from 800 to 1650 nm of the temperature-dependent radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) in the irradiated and sufficiently annealed fiber with germanium and phosphorous dopant has been measured. These RIA spectra were investigated based on the mechanism of color centers absorption. With the configurational coordinate model, these RIA spectra were decomposed by the absorption bands of three kinds of color centers. The effects of color centers absorption on the spectrum of temperature-dependent RIA is discussed by comparing the absorption intensity of different color centers at a same wavelength. Moreover, the temperature-dependent RIA of the fiber has been measured separately at 850, 1310, and 1550 nm. The measured results agreed well with the analysis of RIA spectra.

  10. Communication technology in trauma centers: a national survey.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Kim, Young-Ju; Gardner, Sharyn D; Faraj, Samer; MacKenzie, Colin F

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between information and communication technology (ICT) and trauma work coordination has long been recognized. The purpose of the study was to investigate the type and frequency of use of various ICTs to activate and organize trauma teams in level I/II trauma centers. In a cross-sectional survey, questionnaires were mailed to trauma directors and clinicians in 457 trauma centers in the United States. Responses were received from 254 directors and 767 clinicians. Communication with pre-hospital care providers was conducted predominantly via shortwave radio (67.3%). The primary communication methods used to reach trauma surgeons were manual (56.7%) and computerized group page (36.6%). Computerized group page (53.7%) and regular telephone (49.8%) were cited as the most advantageous devices; e-mail (52.3%) and dry erase whiteboard (52.1%) were selected as the least advantageous. Attending surgeons preferred less overhead paging and more cellular phone communication than did emergency medicine physicians and nurses. Cellular phones have become an important part of hospital-field communication. In high-volume trauma centers, there is a need for more accurate methods of communicating with field personnel and among hospital care providers. PMID:16434331

  11. Scientific and educational center "space systems and technology"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, I. V.; Loginov, Y. Y.; Zelenkov, P. V.

    2015-10-01

    The issues of engineers training in the aerospace university on the base of Scientific and Educational Center "Space Systems and Technology" are discussed. In order to improve the quality of education in the Siberian State Aerospace University the research work of students, as well as the practice- oriented training of engineers are introduced in the educational process. It was made possible as a result of joint efforts of university with research institutes of the Russian Academy of Science and industrial enterprises. The university experience in this area promotes the development of a new methods and forms of educational activities, including the project-oriented learning technologies, identifying promising areas of specialization and training of highly skilled engineers for aerospace industry and other institutions. It also allows you to coordinate the work of departments and other units of the university to provide the educational process in workshops and departments of the industrial enterprises in accordance with the needs of the target training. Within the framework of scientific and education center the students perform researches, diploma works and master's theses; the postgraduates are trained in advanced scientific and technical areas of enterprise development.

  12. Research and technology, fiscal year 1986, Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is continuing its vigorous efforts in space-related research and technology. Extensive activities in advanced studies have led to the approval of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle as a new start. Significant progress was made in definition studies of liquid rocket engine systems for future space transportation needs and the conceptualization of advanced laucnch vehicles. The space systems definition studies have brought the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Gravity Probe-B to a high degree of maturity. Both are ready for project implementation. Also discussed include significant advances in low gravity sciences, solar terrestrial physics, high energy astrophysics, atmospheric sciences, propulsion systems, and on the critical element of the Space Shuttle Main Engine in particular. The goals of improving the productivity of high-cost repetitive operations on reusable transportation systems, and extending the useful life of such systems are examined. The research and technology highlighted provides a foundation for progress on the Hubble Space Telescope, the Space Station, all elements of the Space Transportation System, and the many other projects assigned to this Center.

  13. Center for development technology and program in technology and human affairs. [emphasizing technology-based networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, M. D.

    1974-01-01

    The role of technology in nontraditional higher education with particular emphasis on technology-based networks is analyzed nontraditional programs, institutions, and consortia are briefly reviewed. Nontraditional programs which utilize technology are studied. Technology-based networks are surveyed and analyzed with regard to kinds of students, learning locations, technology utilization, interinstitutional relationships, cost aspects, problems, and future outlook.

  14. Research progress in the key device and technology for fiber optic sensor network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Deming; Sun, Qizhen; Lu, Ping; Xia, Li; Sima, Chaotan

    2016-03-01

    The recent research progress in the key device and technology of the fiber optic sensor network (FOSN) is introduced in this paper. An architecture of the sensor optical passive network (SPON), by employing hybrid wavelength division multiplexing/time division multiplexing (WDM/TDM) techniques similar to the fiber communication passive optical network (PON), is proposed. The network topology scheme of a hybrid TDM/WDM/FDM (frequency division multiplexing) three-dimension fiber optic sensing system for achieving ultra-large capacity, long distance, and high resolution sensing performance is performed and analyzed. As the most important device of the FOSN, several kinds of light source are developed, including the wideband multi-wavelength fiber laser operating at C band, switchable and tunable 2 μm multi-wavelength fiber lasers, ultra-fast mode-locked fiber laser, as well as the optical wideband chaos source, which have very good application prospects in the FOSN. Meanwhile, intelligent management techniques for the FOSN including wideband spectrum demodulation of the sensing signals and real-time fault monitoring of fiber links are presented. Moreover, several typical applications of the FOSN are also discussed, such as the fiber optic gas sensing network, fiber optic acoustic sensing network, and strain/dynamic strain sensing network.

  15. Fiber-based, trace-gas, laser transmitter technology development for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephen, Mark; Yu, Anthony; Chen, Jeffrey; Nicholson, Jeffrey; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Wu, Stewart; Allan, Graham; Hasselbrack, William; Gonzales, Brayler; Han, Lawrence; Numata, Kenji; Storm, Mark; Abshire, James

    2015-09-01

    NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is working on maturing the technology readiness of a laser transmitter designed for use in atmospheric CO2 remote-sensing. GSFC has been developing an airplane-based CO2 lidar instrument over several years to demonstrate the efficacy of the instrumentation and measurement technique and to link the science models to the instrument performance. The ultimate goal is to make space-based satellite measurements with global coverage. In order to accomplish this, we must demonstrate the technology readiness and performance of the components as well as demonstrate the required power-scaling to make the link with the required signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). To date, all the instrument components have been shown to have the required performance with the exception of the laser transmitter. In this program we are working on a fiber-based master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter architecture where we will develop a ruggedized package and perform the relevant environmental tests to demonstrate TRL-6. In this paper we will review our transmitter architecture and progress on the performance and packaging of the laser transmitter.

  16. Fiber-Based, Trace-Gas, Laser Transmitter Technology Development for Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephen, Mark; Yu, Anthony; Chen, Jeffrey; Nicholson, Jeffrey; Engin, Doruk; Mathason, Brian; Wu, Stewart; Allan, Graham; Hasselbrack, William; Gonzalez, Brayler; Han, Lawrence; Numata, Kenji; Storm, Mark; Abshire, James

    2015-01-01

    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is working on maturing the technology readiness of a laser transmitter designed for use in atmospheric CO2 remote-sensing. GSFC has been developing an airplane-based CO2 lidar instrument over several years to demonstrate the efficacy of the instrumentation and measurement technique and to link the science models to the instrument performance. The ultimate goal is to make space-based satellite measurements with global coverage. In order to accomplish this, we must demonstrate the technology readiness and performance of the components as well as demonstrate the required power-scaling to make the link with the required signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR). To date, all the instrument components have been shown to have the required performance with the exception of the laser transmitter.In this program we are working on a fiber-based master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) laser transmitter architecture where we will develop a ruggedized package and perform the relevant environmental tests to demonstrate TRL-6. In this paper we will review our transmitter architecture and progress on the performance and packaging of the laser transmitter.

  17. Mars Pathfinder Rover-Lewis Research Center Technology Experiments Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Mars Pathfinder Program is given and the development and role of three technology experiments from NASA's Lewis Research Center and carried on the Mars Pathfinder rover is described. Two recent missions to Mars were developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and launched late last year: Mars Global Surveyor in November 1996 and Mars Pathfinder in December 1996. Mars Global Surveyor is an orbiter which will survey the planet with a number of different instruments, and will arrive in September 1997, and Mars Pathfinder which consists of a lander and a small rover, landing on Mars July 4, 1997. These are the first two missions of the Mars Exploration Program consisting of a ten year series of small robotic martian probes to be launched every 26 months. The Pathfinder rover will perform a number of technology and operational experiments which will provide the engineering information necessary to design and operate more complex, scientifically oriented surface missions involving roving vehicles and other machinery operating in the martian environment. Because of its expertise in space power systems and technologies, space mechanisms and tribology, Lewis Research Center was asked by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is heading the Mars Pathfinder Program, to contribute three experiments concerning the effects of the martian environment on surface solar power systems and the abrasive qualities of the Mars surface material. In addition, rover static charging was investigated and a static discharge system of several fine Tungsten points was developed and fixed to the rover. These experiments and current findings are described herein.

  18. Research progress of the resonant fiber optic gyroscope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Linglan; Yan, Yuchao; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2015-10-01

    The resonant fiber optic gyro (RFOG) is a high accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. The existence of various noises, including the nonreciprocal noises such as the polarization noise and the Kerr noise as well as the reciprocal circuit noise, limits the performance improvement of the RFOG. An improved scheme by inserting two in-line polarizers in the polarization maintaining fiber transmission-type resonator has been proposed to suppress the polarization-fluctuation induced drift. Furthermore, the adoption of the air-core photonic bandgap fibers (PBFs) offers a novel solution to reduce the optical Kerr effect. In addition, A digital signal processor is designed to reduce the reciprocal noises and detect the rotation information. A minimum actual rotation of 0.001°/s is achieved. The dynamic range is improved by a factor of 7 and the scale factor nonlinearity is decreased by a factor of 60.

  19. Intellectual parachute and balloon systems based on fiber optic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolaev, Alexander M.; Nikolaev, Pavel M.; Nikolaev, Yuri M.; Morozov, Oleg G.; Zastela, Mikhail Yu.; Morozov, Gennady A.

    2014-04-01

    For any parachute system, it is important to predict the opening forces it will experience in order to make a safe and economic choice of materials to be used. Developed fiber optic sensors on two twisted fibers with the locked ends and variable twisting step have been used for creation of intellectual knots of perspective vehicles, in particular, parachute canopies and slings. We decided to change our measuring procedure from measuring of transmitted power or its Raleigh scattering in different ends of twisted fibers onto Brillouin scattering characterization. For this situation we offered the kind of method of frequency variation to get the information about the frequency shift and Q-factor of the Brillouin scattering in each sensor.

  20. Enhanced Product Generation at NASA Data Centers Through Grid Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barkstrom, Bruce R.; Hinke, Thomas H.; Gavali, Shradha; Seufzer, William J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes how grid technology can support the ability of NASA data centers to provide customized data products. A combination of grid technology and commodity processors are proposed to provide the bandwidth necessary to perform customized processing of data, with customized data subsetting providing the initial example. This customized subsetting engine can be used to support a new type of subsetting, called phenomena-based subsetting, where data is subsetted based on its association with some phenomena, such as mesoscale convective systems or hurricanes. This concept is expanded to allow the phenomena to be detected in one type of data, with the subsetting requirements transmitted to the subsetting engine to subset a different type of data. The subsetting requirements are generated by a data mining system and transmitted to the subsetter in the form of an XML feature index that describes the spatial and temporal extent of the phenomena. For this work, a grid-based mining system called the Grid Miner is used to identify the phenomena and generate the feature index. This paper discusses the value of grid technology in facilitating the development of a high performance customized product processing and the coupling of a grid mining system to support phenomena-based subsetting.

  1. Advanced Stirling Technology Development at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaltens, Richard K.; Wong, Wayne A.

    2007-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been developing advanced energy-conversion technologies for use with both radioisotope power systems and fission surface power systems for many decades. Under NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Planetary Science Theme, Technology Program, Glenn is developing the next generation of advanced Stirling convertors (ASCs) for use in the Department of Energy/Lockheed Martin Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). The next-generation power-conversion technologies require high efficiency and high specific power (watts electric per kilogram) to meet future mission requirements to use less of the Department of Energy's plutonium-fueled general-purpose heat source modules and reduce system mass. Important goals include long-life (greater than 14-yr) reliability and scalability so that these systems can be considered for a variety of future applications and missions including outer-planet missions and continual operation on the surface of Mars. This paper provides an update of the history and status of the ASC being developed for Glenn by Sunpower Inc. of Athens, Ohio.

  2. The Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center: A business incubator concept adapted to federal laboratory technology transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Wittig, T.; Greenfield, J.

    1996-10-01

    In recent years, the US defense industrial base spawned the aerospace industry, among other successes, and served as the nation`s technology seed bed. However, as the defense industrial base shrinks and public and private resources become scarcer, the merging of the commercial and defense communities becomes necessary to maintain national technological competencies. Cooperative efforts such as technology transfer provide an attractive, cost-effective, well-leveraged alternative to independently funded research and development (R and D). The sharing of knowledge, resources, and innovation among defense contractors and other public sector firms, academia, and other organizations has become exceedingly attractive. Recent legislation involving technology transfer provides for the sharing of federal laboratory resources with the private sector. The Army Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC), Picatinny Arsenal, NJ, a designer of weapons systems, is one of the nation`s major laboratories with this requirement. To achieve its important technology transfer mission, ARDEC reviewed its capabilities, resources, intellectual property, and products with commercial potential. The purpose of the review was to develop a viable plan for effecting a technology transfer cultural change within the ARDEC, Picatinny Arsenal and with the private sector. This report highlights the issues identified, discussed, and resolved prior to the transformation of a temporarily vacant federal building on the Picatinny installation into a business incubator. ARDEC`s discussions and rationale for the decisions and actions that led to the implementation of the Picatinny Technology Transfer Innovation Center are discussed.

  3. Electric Power Research Institute: environmental Control Technology Center.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-04

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved continued investigations into the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process for the production of Anhydrous Calcium Sulfate (Anhydrite). The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. From May 3-18, the NYSEG Kintigh Station and the ECTC were off-line for a two-week scheduled Station outage. During the ECTC outage, the major systems of the Center were inspected, and several preventive maintenance activities were completed. A listing of the major O&M outage activities completed during this period is presented in the Pilot/Mini-Pilot section of this report. In May 1997, an extension to the Anhydrite Production test block was started following the NYSEG outage. The extension to the Anhydrite Production test block is being funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) after promising results from the original test program. Both EPRI and the Department of Energy (DOE) funded the original test program as part of the DOE`s Advanced Power Systems Program, whose mission is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high- efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. While the pilot portion of the Anhydrite project was conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) in Barker, New York, the extension mainly used the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot wet FGD unit to reduce operating costs. The project is designed to develop an advanced FGD process that produces a useable byproduct, anhydrite (anhydrous calcium sulfate). The original CLS/Anhydrite process included three steps: chloride removal, clear liquor scrubbing, and anhydrite production. The final step in the process involved

  4. Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructure Using Optical Fiber Sensing Technology: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Ye, X. W.; Su, Y. H.; Han, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure. PMID:25133250

  5. Structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure using optical fiber sensing technology: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ye, X W; Su, Y H; Han, J P

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure.

  6. Structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure using optical fiber sensing technology: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Ye, X W; Su, Y H; Han, J P

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure. PMID:25133250

  7. Distance Learning Using Digital Fiber Optics: Applications, Technologies, and Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currer, Joanne M.

    Distance learning provides special or advanced classes in rural schools where declining population has led to decreased funding and fewer classes. With full-motion video using digital fiber, two or more sites are connected into a two-way, full-motion, video conference. The teacher can see and hear the students, and the students can see and hear…

  8. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  9. Draw tower fiber Bragg gratings and their use in sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, E.; Mörbitz, J.; Chojetzki, C.; Becker, M.; Brückner, S.; Schuster, K.; Rothhardt, M.; Bartelt, H.

    2011-06-01

    The idea of fabricating fiber Bragg gratings already during the drawing of a fiber dates back almost 20 years. The application of a transverse holographic writing method on a draw tower offers a promising solution for a highly effective Bragg grating production. Because of the high technology requirements it took more than 10 years to develop the method into a reliable process. During the last five years the improvements in the technical development enables cost effective industrial production of draw tower gratings (1DTG®). In this paper we report about new possibilities of the improved process with respect to the grating type (type I gratings, type II gratings), the coating type (2ORMOCER®, metals) and the fiber type and diameter (125μm, 80μm and below). Furthermore, we present examples for the application of draw tower fiber Bragg gratings in sensing technologies for medical applications.

  10. [Activities of Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, Maryland University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is recognized as a world leader in the application of remote sensing and modeling aimed at improving knowledge of the Earth system. The Goddard Earth Sciences Directorate plays a central role in NASA's Earth Observing System and the U.S. Global Change Research Program. Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) is organized as a cooperative agreement with the GSFC to promote excellence in the Earth sciences, and is a consortium of universities and corporations (University of Maryland Baltimore County, Howard University, Hampton University, Caelum Research Corporation and Northrop Grumman Corporation). The aim of this new program is to attract and introduce promising students in their first or second year of graduate studies to Oceanography and Earth system science career options through hands-on instrumentation research experiences on coastal processes at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Eastern Shore of Virginia.

  11. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1997-03-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month continued with the DOE/PRDA Phase I investigation of the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process with Anhydrite Production. The DOE/PRDA Phase I testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CH) was completed this month. This one-year tube wear analysis investigation was completed on 3/10/97, and a final inspection of the unit was made on 3/21/97. The CH unit and its related equipment are currently being removed from the ECTC test configuration, disassembled, and returned to B&W and CH Corp. for additional analyses. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly.

  12. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Damevski, Kostadin

    2009-03-30

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discover through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedened computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS) tackles these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative hig-performance scientific computing.

  13. An Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture;'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCA also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. 9 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communication, employee commitment to ETEC, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, and overall job satisfaction. A description of each of the scales used to assess these subjects is discussed below. The primary purpose of administering the survey was to attempt to measure, in a more quantitative and objective way the notion of organizational culture,'' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In particular, those aspects of the working environment which are believed to be important influences on the operations of a facility and on the safety issues relevant to the organization were assessed. This document describes the results of this survey. 9 refs., 22 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. An organizational survey of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, D.A.; Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-09-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administrated at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture''; that is, the values attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization.

  16. An organizational survey of the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, D.A.; Shurberg, D.A.; Haber, S.B.

    1991-09-01

    An Organizational Survey (OS) was administrated at the Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of ``culture``; that is, the values attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OS also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can then be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization.

  17. Organizational Cultural Assessment of the Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-06-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various aspects of communications, employee commitment, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety, and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, safety and overall job satisfaction. The purpose of the OCS is to measure in a quantitative and objective way the notion of culture; '' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In addition, through the OCS, a broad sample of individuals can be reached that would probably not be interviewed or observed during the course of a typical assessment. The OCA also provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time that can than be compared to a profile taken at a different point in time to assess changes in the culture of the organization. 9 refs., 33 figs., 6 tabs.

  18. National Wind Technology Center Dynamic 5-Megawatt Dynamometer

    ScienceCinema

    Felker, Fort

    2016-07-12

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) offers wind industry engineers a unique opportunity to conduct a wide range of tests. Its custom-designed dynamometers can test wind turbine systems from 1 kilowatt (kW) to 5 megawatts (MW). The NWTC's new dynamometer facility simulates operating field conditions to assess the reliability and performance of wind turbine prototypes and commercial machines, thereby reducing deployment time, failures, and maintenance or replacement costs. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds, the 5-MW dynamometer will provide the ability to test wind turbine drivetrains and connect those drivetrains directly to the electricity grid or through a controllable grid interface (CGI). The CGI tests the low-voltage ride-through capability of a drivetrain as well as its response to faults and other abnormal grid conditions.

  19. National Wind Technology Center Dynamic 5-Megawatt Dynamometer

    SciTech Connect

    Felker, Fort

    2013-11-13

    The National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) offers wind industry engineers a unique opportunity to conduct a wide range of tests. Its custom-designed dynamometers can test wind turbine systems from 1 kilowatt (kW) to 5 megawatts (MW). The NWTC's new dynamometer facility simulates operating field conditions to assess the reliability and performance of wind turbine prototypes and commercial machines, thereby reducing deployment time, failures, and maintenance or replacement costs. Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds, the 5-MW dynamometer will provide the ability to test wind turbine drivetrains and connect those drivetrains directly to the electricity grid or through a controllable grid interface (CGI). The CGI tests the low-voltage ride-through capability of a drivetrain as well as its response to faults and other abnormal grid conditions.

  20. 75 FR 80830 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Technology Transfer Center External Customer Satisfaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Technology Transfer... Budget (OMB) for review and approval. Proposed Collection: Title: Technology Transfer Center External... companies engaging in collaborations and alliances with the NIH. The needs of external technology...

  1. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  2. Center for Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Kostadin, Damevski

    2015-01-25

    A resounding success of the Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program is that high-performance computational science is now universally recognized as a critical aspect of scientific discovery [71], complementing both theoretical and experimental research. As scientific communities prepare to exploit unprecedented computing capabilities of emerging leadership-class machines for multi-model simulations at the extreme scale [72], it is more important than ever to address the technical and social challenges of geographically distributed teams that combine expertise in domain science, applied mathematics, and computer science to build robust and flexible codes that can incorporate changes over time. The Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)1 tackles these these issues by exploiting component-based software development to facilitate collaborative high-performance scientific computing.

  3. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block was conducted using the Carbon Injection System (the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber and the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter). Testing also continued across the B&W/CHX Heat Exchanger this month as the effects of increased particulate loading are being studied. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. Testing in October at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) included tests from the Pilot Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block as part of EPRI`s overall program to develop control technology options for reduction of trace element emissions. This experimental program investigates mercury removal and mercury speciation under different operating conditions. The 1996 program is being performed on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit and the spray dryer/pulse jet fabric filter (SDA/PJFF) pilot units. The 1996 Trace Elements Removal (TER) test block is a continuation of the 1995 TER test block and will focus on up to five research areas, depending on experimental results. These areas are: (1) Mercury speciation methods; (2) Effect of FGD system operating variables on mercury removal; (3) Novel methods for elemental mercury control; (4) Catalytic methods for converting elemental mercury to oxidized mercury; and (5) Electrostatic charging of particulate material in the FGD inlet flue gas stream. The work during October continued to focus on catalytic oxidation of elemental mercury. These tests included the evaluation of two different loadings of catalyst CT-9 (carbon-based material) over extended periods (8-10 days) and an evaluation of FAB-2B (bulk bituminous fly ash taken from the first hopper of the

  4. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month continued with the Phase I DOE/PRDA investigation of the Clear Liquor Scrubbing Process with Anhydrite Production and Chloride Control. The Phase I DOE/PRDA testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHE) also continued this month as the inlet particulate control system (installed September 1996) is maintaining the inlet particulate mass loading to the unit at an average value of 0.2 lb./MMBTU. The one-year tube wear analysis project conducted across this unit will be completed in the early part of March. At the completion of testing, a final inspection will be conducted before the unit is cleaned, disassembled, and returned to B&W and CH Corp. for additional analysis. Once the unit is removed from the ECTC, the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber unit will be assembled and configured back into the flue gas path for future testing. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the Carbon Injection System (the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter configuration) remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. In February 1997, the Clear Liquor Scrubbing with Anhydrite Production test block continued. This PRDA project is being jointly funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and the Department of Energy and is part of the DOE`s Advanced Power Systems Program, whose mission is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The pilot portion of the CLS/Anhydrite project is being conducted on the 4.0 MW wet FGD pilot unit at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). The project is designed to develop an advanced FGD process incorporating chloride control, clear liquor scrubbing, and anhydrite (anhydrous calcium sulfate) production. While the three areas of the

  5. Electric Power Research Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center.

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the completion of the Clear Liquor Scrubbing with Anhydrite Production test block extension. Also, the test plan for July (Dry Sorbent Injection with the Carbon Injection System) was developed and reconfiguration activities were initiated. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 0.4 MW Mini-Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future project work is identified. In June 1997, the extension to the Anhydrite Production test block was completed. The extended Anhydrite test block was funded by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) after reviewing the promising results from the original test program. Both EPRI and the Department of Energy (DOE) funded the original PRDA test program as part of the DOE`s Advanced Power Systems Program, whose mission is to accelerate the commercialization of affordable, high-efficiency, low-emission, coal-fueled electric generating technologies. The project is designed to develop an advanced FGD process that produces a usable byproduct, anhydrite (anhydrous calcium sulfate). While the pilot portion of the Anhydrite PRDA project was conducted on the 4-MW wet FGD pilot unit at EPRI`s Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC) in Barker, New York, the extension testing mainly used the 0.4 MW wet FGD pilot unit to reduce operating costs. As discussed in previous progress reports, the original CLS/Anhydrite process included three steps: chloride removal, clear liquor scrubbing, and anhydrite production. The final step in the process involved sending the calcium sulfite slurry from the sludge bed reactor to the anhydrite reaction tank for conversion to anhydrous calcium sulfate (anhydrite). The original objective in the PRDA

  6. Intelligent processing equipment developments within the Navy's Manufacturing Technology Centers of Excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanzetta, Philip

    1992-04-01

    The U.S. Navy has had an active Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program aimed at developing advanced production processes and equipment since the late-1960's. During the past decade, however, the resources of the MANTECH program were concentrated in Centers of Excellence. Today, the Navy sponsors four manufacturing technology Centers of Excellence: the Automated Manufacturing Research Facility (AMRF); the Electronics Manufacturing Productivity Facility (EMPF); the National Center for Excellence in Metalworking Technology (NCEMT); and the Center of Excellence for Composites Manufacturing Technology (CECMT). This paper briefly describes each of the centers and summarizes typical Intelligent Equipment Processing (IEP) projects that were undertaken.

  7. Intelligent Processing Equipment Developments Within the Navy's Manufacturing Technology Centers of Excellence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nanzetta, Philip

    1992-01-01

    The U.S. Navy has had an active Manufacturing Technology (MANTECH) Program aimed at developing advanced production processes and equipment since the late-1960's. During the past decade, however, the resources of the MANTECH program were concentrated in Centers of Excellence. Today, the Navy sponsors four manufacturing technology Centers of Excellence: the Automated Manufacturing Research Facility (AMRF); the Electronics Manufacturing Productivity Facility (EMPF); the National Center for Excellence in Metalworking Technology (NCEMT); and the Center of Excellence for Composites Manufacturing Technology (CECMT). This paper briefly describes each of the centers and summarizes typical Intelligent Equipment Processing (IEP) projects that were undertaken.

  8. Compact distributed fiber SPR sensor based on TDM and WDM technology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihai; Wei, Yong; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Chunlan; Zhang, Yaxun; Zhao, Enming; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-01

    By using a twin-core fiber (TCF), we propose and demonstrate a novel distributed SPR sensor, which employs both the time division multiplexing (TDM) technology and the wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) technology together. The proposed sensor has two sensing passages with four sensing channels (and there are two sensing channels in each sensing passage). We employ the TDM technology to realize the two passage distributed sensing, which are parallel-connection; and we employ the WDM technology to realize the distributed sensing of two channels in a sensing passage, which are series-connected. In order to realize the TDM technology, we employ a two-core fiber, which has two cores in a same cladding, being equal to dividing the traditional single core into two independent sensing zones; in order to realize the WDM technology, we employ a fiber end polishing-connecting method to adjust the resonance angle/wavelength to realize the dynamic range separation. This twin-passage four-channel twin-core fiber SPR sensor is suitable for applying in fields of the multi-channel liquid refractive index and temperature self-reference measurement. PMID:26368491

  9. Technology Transfer from University-Based Research Centers: The University of New Mexico Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Everett M.; Hall, Brad; Hashimoto, Michio; Steffensen, Morten; Speakman, Kristen L.; Timko, Molly K.

    1999-01-01

    A study of 55 research centers at the University of New Mexico investigated the nature of the typical center, why funding has risen during the 1990s, reasons for founding the centers, the director's role, how university-based research centers transfer technology to private companies and other organizations, and what determines program…

  10. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... broccoli, spinach, and artichokes legumes (split peas, soy, lentils, etc.) almonds Look for the fiber content of ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to your favorite soups. ...

  11. Fiber-optic technologies in laser-based therapeutics: threads for a cure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Chocat, Noémie

    2010-06-01

    In the past decade, novel fiber structures and material compositions have led to the introduction of new diagnostic and therapeutic tools. We review the structure, the material composition and the fabrication processes behind these novel fiber systems. Because of their structural flexibility, their compatibility with endoscopic appliances and their efficiency in laser delivery, these fiber systems have greatly extended the reach of a wide range of surgical lasers in minimally invasive procedures. Much research in novel fiber-optics delivery systems has been focused on the accommodation of higher optical powers and the extension to a broader wavelength range. Until recently, CO2 laser surgery, renowned for its precision and efficiency, was limited to open surgeries by the lack of delivery fibers. Hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers are assessed for their ability to transmit CO2 laser at surgical power level and for their applications in a range of clinical areas. Current fiber-delivery technologies for a number of laser surgery modalities and wavelengths are compared.

  12. Laser ultrasound technology for fault detection on carbon fiber composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyrkammer, Robert; Reitinger, Bernhard; Grün, Hubert; Sekelja, Jakov; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    The marching in of carbon fiber reinforced polymers (CFRPs) to mass production in the aeronautic and automotive industry requires reliable quality assurance methods. Laser ultrasound (LUS) is a promising nondestructive testing technique for sample inspection. The benefits compared to conventional ultrasound (US) testing are couplant free measurements and an easy access to complex shapes due to remote optical excitation and detection. Here the potential of LUS is present on composite test panels with relevant testing scenarios for industry. The results are evaluated in comparison to conventional ultrasound used in the aeronautic industry.

  13. Replication of self-centering optical fiber alignment structures using hot embossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Wissmann, Markus; Barié, Nicole; Guttmann, Markus; Schneider, Marc; Kolew, Alexander; Worgull, Matthias; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    With the demand for broadband connectivity on the rise due to various services like video-on-demand and cloud computing becoming more popular, the need for better connectivity infrastructure is high. The only future- proof option to supply this infrastructure is to deploy "fiber to the home" (FTTH) networks. One of the main difficulties with the deployment of FTTH is the vast amount of single-mode fiber (SMF) connections that need to be made. Hence there is a strong need for components which enable high performance, robust and easy-to- use SMF connectors. Since large-scale deployment is the goal, these components should be mass-producible at low cost. We discuss a rapid prototyping process on the basis of hot embossing replication of a self-centering alignment system (SCAS) based on three micro-springs, which can position a SMF independently of its diameter. This is beneficial since there is a fabrication tolerance of up to +/-1 μm on a standard G.652 SMF's diameter that can lead to losses if the outer diameter is used as a reference for alignment. The SCAS is first prototyped with deep proton writing (DPW) in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) after which it is glued to a copper substrate with an adhesive. Using an electroforming process, a nickel block is grown over the PMMA prototype followed by mechanical finishing to fabricate a structured nickel mould insert. Even though the mould insert shows non- ideal and rounded features it is used to create PMMA replicas of the SCAS by means of hot embossing. The SCAS possesses a central opening in which a bare SMF can be clamped, which is designed with a diameter of 121 μm. PMMA replicas are dimensionally characterized using a multisensor coordinate measurement machine and show a central opening diameter of 128.3 +/- 2.8 μm. This should be compared to the central opening diameter of the DPW prototype used for mould formation which was measured to be 120.5 μm. This shows that the electroforming and subsequent replication

  14. Automation of Oklahoma School Library Media Centers: A Plan for the Development of Technology in Library Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Education, Oklahoma City. Library and Learning Resources Section.

    This training manual and statewide plan begins by describing the role of the Oklahoma State Department of Education, Library Resources/Technology Section as one of providing leadership, consultation, communication, and coordination in the systematic development of technology in Oklahoma school library media centers. Information about the Oklahoma…

  15. Fiber lasers and amplifiers for science and exploration at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Abshire, James; Allan, Graham R.; Stephen Mark

    2005-01-01

    We discuss present and near-term uses for high-power fiber lasers and amplifiers for NASA- specific applications including planetary topography and atmospheric spectroscopy. Fiber lasers and amplifiers offer numerous advantages for both near-term and future deployment of instruments on exploration and science remote sensing orbiting satellites. Ground-based and airborne systems provide an evolutionary path to space and a means for calibration and verification of space-borne systems. We present experimental progress on both the fiber transmitters and instrument prototypes for ongoing development efforts. These near-infrared instruments are laser sounders and lidars for measuring atmospheric carbon dioxide, oxygen, water vapor and methane and a pseudo-noise (PN) code laser ranging system. The associated fiber transmitters include high-power erbium, ytterbium, neodymium and Raman fiber amplifiers. In addition, we will discuss near-term fiber laser and amplifier requirements and programs for NASA free space optical communications, planetary topography and atmospheric spectroscopy.

  16. An innovative approach to achieve re-centering and ductility of cement mortar beams through randomly distributed pseudo-elastic shape memory alloy fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajil, N.; Srinivasan, S. M.; Santhanam, M.

    2012-04-01

    Fibers can play a major role in post cracking behavior of concrete members, because of their ability to bridge cracks and distribute the stress across the crack. Addition of steel fibers in mortar and concrete can improve toughness of the structural member and impart significant energy dissipation through slow pull out. However, steel fibers undergo plastic deformation at low strain levels, and cannot regain their shape upon unloading. This is a major disadvantage in strong cyclic loading conditions, such as those caused by earthquakes, where self-centering ability of the fibers is a desired characteristic in addition to ductility of the reinforced cement concrete. Fibers made from an alternative material such as shape memory alloy (SMA) could offer a scope for re-centering, thus improving performance especially after a severe loading has occurred. In this study, the load-deformation characteristics of SMA fiber reinforced cement mortar beams under cyclic loading conditions were investigated to assess the re-centering performance. This study involved experiments on prismatic members, and related analysis for the assessment and prediction of re-centering. The performances of NiTi fiber reinforced mortars are compared with mortars with same volume fraction of steel fibers. Since re-entrant corners and beam columns joints are prone to failure during a strong ground motion, a study was conducted to determine the behavior of these reinforced with NiTi fiber. Comparison is made with the results of steel fiber reinforced cases. NiTi fibers showed significantly improved re-centering and energy dissipation characteristics compared to the steel fibers.

  17. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-04-13

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest.

  18. Medical smart textiles based on fiber optic technology: an overview.

    PubMed

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. PMID:25871010

  19. Medical Smart Textiles Based on Fiber Optic Technology: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Massaroni, Carlo; Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano

    2015-01-01

    The growing interest in the development of smart textiles for medical applications is driven by the aim to increase the mobility of patients who need a continuous monitoring of such physiological parameters. At the same time, the use of fiber optic sensors (FOSs) is gaining large acceptance as an alternative to traditional electrical and mechanical sensors for the monitoring of thermal and mechanical parameters. The potential impact of FOSs is related to their good metrological properties, their small size and their flexibility, as well as to their immunity from electromagnetic field. Their main advantage is the possibility to use textile based on fiber optic in a magnetic resonance imaging environment, where standard electronic sensors cannot be employed. This last feature makes FOSs suitable for monitoring biological parameters (e.g., respiratory and heartbeat monitoring) during magnetic resonance procedures. Research interest in combining FOSs and textiles into a single structure to develop wearable sensors is rapidly growing. In this review we provide an overview of the state-of-the-art of textiles, which use FOSs for monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. In particular we briefly describe the working principle of FOSs employed in this field and their relevant advantages and disadvantages. Also reviewed are their applications for the monitoring of mechanical parameters of physiological interest. PMID:25871010

  20. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC) conducted December 7--11, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with PETC. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at PETC, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis (S A) Plan to assist in further assessing certain environmental problems identified during its on-site Survey activities at PETC. The S A Plan will be executed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). When completed, the Plan's results will be incorporated into the PETC Survey findings for inclusion into the Environmental Survey Summary Report. 64 refs., 23 figs., 29 tabs.

  1. Electric Power Esearch Institute: Environmental Control Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    1996-11-01

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute`s (EPRI`s) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process, the DOE PRDA testing of the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), and support for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. The test configuration utilized in the EPRI Integrated SO{sub x}/NO{sub x} removal process included the 4.0 MW Spray Dryer Absorber (SDA), the Pulse-jet Fabric Filter (PJFF), and a new Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) reactor installed at the ECTC. During this testing, O&M support was also required to conclude the test efforts under the EPRI Hazardous Air Pollutant (HAP) test block. This included the on-site development efforts for the Semi-Continuous On-line Mercury Analyzer. In the DOE PRDA project with the B&W/Condensing Heat Exchanger (CHX), the effects of the increased particulate loading to the unit were monitored throughout the month. Also, the 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly.

  2. Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J.

    2012-01-01

    Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results shown that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

  3. Turbine Inflow Characterization at the National Wind Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Clifton, A.; Schreck, S.; Scott, G.; Kelley, N.; Lundquist, J. K.

    2012-01-01

    Utility-scale wind turbines operate in dynamic flows that can vary significantly over timescales from less than a second to several years. To better understand the inflow to utility-scale turbines, two inflow towers were installed and commissioned at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) National Wind Technology Center near Boulder, Colorado, in 2011. These towers are 135 m tall and instrumented with a combination of sonic anemometers, cup anemometers, wind vanes, and temperature measurements to characterize the inflow wind speed and direction, turbulence, stability and thermal stratification to two utility-scale turbines. Herein, we present variations in mean and turbulent wind parameters with height, atmospheric stability, and as a function of wind direction that could be important for turbine operation as well as persistence of turbine wakes. Wind speed, turbulence intensity, and dissipation are all factors that affect turbine performance. Our results show that these all vary with height across the rotor disk, demonstrating the importance of measuring atmospheric conditions that influence wind turbine performance at multiple heights in the rotor disk, rather than relying on extrapolation from lower levels.

  4. Glass fiber processing for the Moon/Mars program: Center director's discretionary fund final report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, D. S.; Ethridge, E.; Curreri, P.

    1992-01-01

    Glass fiber has been produced from two lunar soil simulants. These two materials simulate lunar mare soil and lunar highland soil compositions, respectively. Short fibers containing recrystallized areas were produced from the as-received simulants. Doping the highland simulant with 8 weight percent B2-O3 yielded a material which could be spun continuously. The effects of lunar gravity on glass fiber formation were studied utilizing NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Gravity was found to play a major role in final fiber diameter.

  5. Technology utilization in a non-urban region: Further impact and technique of the Technology Use Studies Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Updated information is given pertaining to Technology Use Studies Center (TUSC) clients who are those that receive/use information as disseminated by the center. The client information is presented as a continuation of client data as set forth in the center's previous annual report.

  6. High-power fused assemblies enabled by advances in fiber-processing technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, Robert; Clark, Brett

    2011-02-01

    The power handling capabilities of fiber lasers are limited by the technologies available to fabricate and assemble the key optical system components. Previous tools for the assembly, tapering, and fusion of fiber laser elements have had drawbacks with regard to temperature range, alignment capability, assembly flexibility and surface contamination. To provide expanded capabilities for fiber laser assembly, a wide-area electrical plasma heat source was used in conjunction with an optimized image analysis method and a flexible alignment system, integrated according to mechatronic principles. High-resolution imaging and vision-based measurement provided feedback to adjust assembly, fusion, and tapering process parameters. The system was used to perform assembly steps including dissimilar-fiber splicing, tapering, bundling, capillary bundling, and fusion of fibers to bulk optic devices up to several mm in diameter. A wide range of fiber types and diameters were tested, including extremely large diameters and photonic crystal fibers. The assemblies were evaluated for conformation to optical and mechanical design criteria, such as taper geometry and splice loss. The completed assemblies met the performance targets and exhibited reduced surface contamination compared to assemblies prepared on previously existing equipment. The imaging system and image analysis algorithms provided in situ fiber geometry measurement data that agreed well with external measurement. The ability to adjust operating parameters dynamically based on imaging was shown to provide substantial performance benefits, particularly in the tapering of fibers and bundles. The integrated design approach was shown to provide sufficient flexibility to perform all required operations with a minimum of reconfiguration.

  7. Advances in fibers and transmission line technology for long haul submarine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peckham, David W.; Kim, Jinkee; Sun, Yi; Lingle, Robert L., Jr.; Levring, Ole

    2007-11-01

    The 7.1-magnitude earthquake on December 26, 2006 in the Strait of Luzon resulted in the failure of several submarine cable systems. Seven of the nine cables that pass through the strait were damaged, disrupting communications to China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea and Singapore. This recent event highlighted the dependence of international communications on submarine fiber optic transmission systems. This paper will review the evolution of optical fiber transmission line technology that has been deployed in the long haul undersea telecommunications network. It will start with a discussion of the chronological evolution of the optical fiber transmission line architecture in section one, then give more detail regarding the technology that is still being deployed today.

  8. Optical Fiber Sensor Technologies for Efficient and Economical Oil Recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, a.; Pickrell, G.; Xiao, H.; May, r.

    2003-02-27

    The overall goal of this project was to develop reliable cost effective sensors for application in the down-hole environment. The physical parameters measured by these sensors were temperature, pressure, flow and acoustic signals. Sensor head configurations for each of the physical measurands were optimized to increase the sensitivity to the particular measurand of interest while decreasing the cross-sensitivity to the other physical measurands and to environmental influences. In addition, the optical signal demodulation electronics was designed to be insensitive to environmental influences while maintaining the required resolution, precision and accuracy of the parameter being sensed. The influence of potentially detrimental agents such as water in the down-hole environment was investigated as well as methods to protect both the optical fiber and the sensor from these detrimental effects.

  9. Bridge continuous deformation measurement technology based on fiber optic gyro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Weibing; Hu, Wenbin; Liu, Fang; Tang, Jianguang; Li, Sheng; Yang, Yan

    2016-03-01

    Bridge is an important part of modern transportation systems and deformation is a key index for bridge's safety evaluation. To achieve the long span bridge curve measurement rapidly and timely and accurately locate the bridge maximum deformation, the continuous deformation measurement system (CDMS) based on inertial platform is presented and validated in this paper. Firstly, based on various bridge deformation measurement methods, the method of deformation measurement based on the fiber optic gyro (FOG) is introduced. Secondly, the basic measurement principle based on FOG is presented and the continuous curve trajectory is derived by the formula. Then the measurement accuracy is analyzed in theory and the relevant factors are presented to ensure the measurement accuracy. Finally, the deformation measurement experiments are conducted on a bridge across the Yangtze River. Experimental results show that the presented deformation measurement method is feasible, practical, and reliable; the system can accurately and quickly locate the maximum deformation and has extensive and broad application prospects.

  10. Teaching fiber-optic communications in engineering technology programs by virtual collaboration with industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mynbaev, Djafar K.

    2003-10-01

    A fiber-optic communications course requires a deep understanding of the physical processes of the components and systems. Unfortunately, many students in engineering technology programs lack the scientific background for such a course. Another challenge is that these students need to be trained as maintenance and control personnel. To resolve these problems, we focus our teaching on the use of corporate technical documentation.

  11. Advanced Fiber Optic-Based Sensing Technology for Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Ko, William L.; Chan, Patrick; Bakalyar, John

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of fiber optic sensing technology development activities performed at NASA Dryden in support of Unmanned Aircraft Systems. Examples of current and previous work are presented in the following categories: algorithm development, system development, instrumentation installation, ground R&D, and flight testing. Examples of current research and development activities are provided.

  12. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center Research and Technology Report 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, A. S. (Compiler); Tinker, M. L. (Compiler); Sivak, A. D. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    Many of NASA's missions would not be possible if it were not for the investments made in research advancements and technology development efforts. The technologies developed at Marshall Space Flight Center contribute to NASA's strategic array of missions through technology development and accomplishments. The scientists, researchers, and technologists of Marshall Space Flight Center who are working these enabling technology efforts are facilitating NASA's ability to fulfill the ambitious goals of innovation, exploration, and discovery.

  13. An organizational cultural assessment of the Energy Technology Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, S.B.; Crouch, D.A.

    1991-04-01

    An Organizational Cultural Assessment (OCA) was performed at the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC) by administering an Organizational Culture Survey (OCS) that queried employees on the subjects of organizational culture, various species of communication, employee commitment to ETEC, work group cohesion, coordination of work, environmental, safety and health concerns, hazardous nature of work, and overall job satisfaction. A description of each of the scales used to assess these subjects is discussed. The primary purpose of administering the survey was to attempt to measure, in a more quantitative and objective way the notion of organizational culture, '' that is, the values, attitudes, and beliefs of the individuals working within the organization. In particular, those aspects of the working environment which are believed to be important influences on the operations of a facility and on the safety issues relevant to the organization were assessed. In addition, by conducting a survey, a broad sampling of the individuals in the organization can be obtained. This is especially important when the survey is utilized in conjunction with an assessment or inspection team which typically has only a limited amount of resources to address many issues. The OCS provides a broad, but more comprehensive picture of the organization by querying a much larger number of individuals than could be reached through the assessment team alone. Finally, the OCS provides a descriptive profile of the organization at one point in time. This profile can then can be used as a baseline point against which comparisons of other points in time can be made. Such comparisons may prove valuable and would help to assess changes in the organizational culture. Comparisons of the profiles can also be made across similar facilities. 9 refs., 22 figs., 6 tabs.

  14. Assessment of fiber optic sensors and other advanced sensing technologies for nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Hashemian, H.M.

    1996-03-01

    As a result of problems such as calibration drift in nuclear plant pressure sensors and the recent oil loss syndrome in some models of Rosemount pressure transmitters, the nuclear industry has become interested in fiber optic pressure sensors. Fiber optic sensing technologies have been considered for the development of advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) systems for the next generation of reactors and in older plants which are retrofitted with new I&C systems. This paper presents the results of a six-month Phase I study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. This initial Phase I study has recently been granted a two-year extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The next phase will evaluate fiber optic pressure sensors in specific nuclear plant applications in addition to other advanced methods for monitoring critical nuclear plant equipment.

  15. The Effect of Optic Disc Center Displacement on Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Measurement Determined by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Uhm, Ki Bang; Sung, Kyung Rim; Kang, Min Ho; Cho, Hee Yoon; Seong, Mincheol

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effect of optic disc center displacement on retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) measurement determined by spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods The optic disc center was manipulated at 1-pixel intervals in horizontal, vertical, and diagonal directions. According to the manipulated optic disc center location, the RNFL thickness data were resampled: (1) at a 3.46-mm diameter circle; and (2) between a 2.5-mm diameter circle and 5.4-mm square. Error was calculated between the original and resampled RNFL measurements. The tolerable error threshold of the optic disc center displacement was determined by considering test-retest variability of SD-OCT. The unreliable zone was defined as an area with 10% or more variability. Results The maximum tolerable error thresholds of optic disc center displacement on the RNFL thickness map were distributed from 0.042 to 0.09 mm in 8 directions. The threshold shape was vertically elongated. Clinically important unreliable zones were located: (1) at superior and inferior region in the vertical displacement; (2) at inferotemporal region in the horizontal displacement, and (3) at superotemporal or inferotemporal region in the diagonal displacement. The unreliable zone pattern and threshold limit varied according to the direction of optic disc displacement. Conclusions Optic disc center displacement had a considerable impact on whole RNFL thickness measurements. Understanding the effect of optic disc center displacement could contribute to reliable RNFL measurements. PMID:27783663

  16. Development of optical fiber technology in Poland 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Wójcik, Waldemar

    2015-12-01

    The paper is a digest of works presented during the XVIth National Symposium on Optical Fibres and Their Applications. The Symposium is organized since 1976. OFTA 2015 was organized by Optical Fibre Laboratory of the Faculty of Chemistry at University of Maria Curie Skłodowska, and Institute of Electronics and Information Technology of Lublin University of Technology, in Nałęczów on 22-25 September 2015. The meeting has gathered around 120 participants who presented 85 research and technical papers. The Symposium organized every 18 months is a good portrait of optical fibre technology development in Poland at university laboratories, governmental institutes, company R&D laboratories, etc. Topical tracks of the Symposium were: optical and photonic materials, technology of classical, tailored and structural photonic optical fibres, light propagation physics in optical fibres, passive and active optical fibre components, optical fibre sensors, passive and active optical fibre networks, optical fibre amplifiers and lasers, optical fibre network issues: modulation, architectures, economy, etc.

  17. Lab-on-fiber technology: a new vision for chemical and biological sensing.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Armando; Crescitelli, Alessio; Vaiano, Patrizio; Quero, Giuseppe; Consales, Marco; Pisco, Marco; Esposito, Emanuela; Cusano, Andrea

    2015-12-21

    The integration of microfluidics and photonic biosensors has allowed achievement of several laboratory functions in a single chip, leading to the development of photonic lab-on-a-chip technology. Although a lot of progress has been made to implement such sensors in small and easy-to-use systems, many applications such as point-of-care diagnostics and in vivo biosensing still require a sensor probe able to perform measurements at precise locations that are often hard to reach. The intrinsic property of optical fibers to conduct light to a remote location makes them an ideal platform to meet this demand. The motivation to combine the good performance of photonic biosensors on chips with the unique advantages of optical fibers has thus led to the development of the so-called lab-on-fiber technology. This emerging technology envisages the integration of functionalized materials on micro- and nano-scales (i.e. the labs) with optical fibers to realize miniaturized and advanced all-in-fiber probes, especially useful for (but not limited to) label-free chemical and biological applications. This review presents a broad overview of lab-on-fiber biosensors, with particular reference to lab-on-tip platforms, where the labs are integrated on the optical fiber facet. Light-matter interaction on the fiber tip is achieved through the integration of thin layers of nanoparticles or nanostructures supporting resonant modes, both plasmonic and photonic, highly sensitive to local modifications of the surrounding environment. According to the physical principle that is exploited, different configurations - such as localized plasmon resonance probes, surface enhanced Raman scattering probes and photonic probes - are classified, while various applications are presented in context throughout. For each device, the surface chemistry and the related functionalization protocols are reviewed. Moreover, the implementation strategies and fabrication processes, either based on bottom-up or top

  18. Temperature-insensitive pressure or strain sensing technology with fiber optic hybrid Sagnac interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yuanhong; Lu, Lin; Liu, Shuo; Jin, Wei; Han, Zonghu; Cao, Yaohui

    2016-05-01

    The transmission spectrum characteristic of two-segment polarization maintaining fibers Sagnac interferometer was investigated and simulated in detail and a temperature-insensitive pressure or strain sensing technology was proposed. An experimental hybrid Sagnac interferometer was built and the solid core polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber was taken as the sensing probe. The side pressure sensitive coefficients and the temperature crosstalk drift were measured and compared. The experimental results show that the side pressure sensitive coefficient was ~0.2877 nm/N and the temperature drift was less than 0.1 pm/°C.

  19. Lab-on-fiber technology: a new vision for chemical and biological sensing.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, Armando; Crescitelli, Alessio; Vaiano, Patrizio; Quero, Giuseppe; Consales, Marco; Pisco, Marco; Esposito, Emanuela; Cusano, Andrea

    2015-12-21

    The integration of microfluidics and photonic biosensors has allowed achievement of several laboratory functions in a single chip, leading to the development of photonic lab-on-a-chip technology. Although a lot of progress has been made to implement such sensors in small and easy-to-use systems, many applications such as point-of-care diagnostics and in vivo biosensing still require a sensor probe able to perform measurements at precise locations that are often hard to reach. The intrinsic property of optical fibers to conduct light to a remote location makes them an ideal platform to meet this demand. The motivation to combine the good performance of photonic biosensors on chips with the unique advantages of optical fibers has thus led to the development of the so-called lab-on-fiber technology. This emerging technology envisages the integration of functionalized materials on micro- and nano-scales (i.e. the labs) with optical fibers to realize miniaturized and advanced all-in-fiber probes, especially useful for (but not limited to) label-free chemical and biological applications. This review presents a broad overview of lab-on-fiber biosensors, with particular reference to lab-on-tip platforms, where the labs are integrated on the optical fiber facet. Light-matter interaction on the fiber tip is achieved through the integration of thin layers of nanoparticles or nanostructures supporting resonant modes, both plasmonic and photonic, highly sensitive to local modifications of the surrounding environment. According to the physical principle that is exploited, different configurations - such as localized plasmon resonance probes, surface enhanced Raman scattering probes and photonic probes - are classified, while various applications are presented in context throughout. For each device, the surface chemistry and the related functionalization protocols are reviewed. Moreover, the implementation strategies and fabrication processes, either based on bottom-up or top

  20. Assessing Community Informatics: A Review of Methodological Approaches for Evaluating Community Networks and Community Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neil, Dara

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes the emerging community informatics evaluation literature to develop an understanding of the indicators used to gauge project impacts in community networks and community technology centers. The study finds that community networks and community technology center assessments fall into five key areas: strong democracy; social capital;…

  1. 76 FR 11498 - Submission for OMB Review; Comment Request; Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... Submission of Technology Transfer Center (TTC) External Customer Satisfaction Surveys (NCI) SUMMARY: Under... information collection was previously published in the Federal Register on December 23, 2010 (75 FR 80830) and... control number. Proposed Collection: Title: Generic Submission of Technology Transfer Center...

  2. 77 FR 43131 - Designation of the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 1701-1706) (``IEEPA''), issued Executive Order 13382 (70 FR 38567... Designation of the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry Industries (PCI... of the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry Industries...

  3. 78 FR 13142 - Designation of the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    .... 1701-1706) (``IEEPA''), issued Executive Order 13382 (70 FR 38567, July 1, 2005) (the ``Order... Designation of the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry Industries (PCI... of the Center for Innovation and Technology Cooperation (CITC), Pentane Chemistry Industries...

  4. Research and technology 1987 annual report of the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on the Center's research and technology program. In addition to strengthening those areas of engineering and operations technology that contribute to safer, more efficient, and more economical execution of our current mission, we are developing the technological tools needed to execute the Center's mission relative to future programs. The Engineering Development Directorate encompasses most of the laboratories and other Center resources that are key elements of research and technology program implementation, and is responsible for implementation of the majority of the projects of this Kennedy Space Center 1987 Annual Report.

  5. Enabling patient-centered care through health information technology.

    PubMed Central

    Finkelstein, Joseph; Knight, Amy; Marinopoulos, Spyridon; Gibbons, M Christopher; Berger, Zackary; Aboumatar, Hanan; Wilson, Renee F; Lau, Brandyn D; Sharma, Ritu; Bass, Eric B

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES The main objective of the report is to review the evidence on the impact of health information technology (IT) that supports patient-centered care (PCC) on: health care processes; clinical outcomes; intermediate outcomes (patient or provider satisfaction, health knowledge and behavior, and cost); responsiveness to needs and preferences of patients; shared decisionmaking and patient-clinician communication; and access to information. Additional objectives were to identify barriers and facilitators for using health IT to deliver PCC, and to identify gaps in evidence and information needed by patients, providers, payers, and policymakers. DATA SOURCES MEDLINE®, Embase®, Cochrane Library, Scopus, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, INSPEC, and Compendex databases through July 31, 2010. METHODS Paired members of our team reviewed citations to identify randomized controlled trials of PCC-related health IT interventions and studies that addressed barriers and facilitators for health IT for delivery of PCC. Independent assessors rated studies for quality. Paired reviewers abstracted data. RESULTS The search identified 327 eligible articles, including 184 articles on the impact of health IT applications implemented to support PCC and 206 articles addressing barriers or facilitators for such health IT applications. Sixty-three articles addressed both questions. The study results suggested positive effects of PCC-related health IT interventions on health care process outcomes, disease-specific clinical outcomes (for diabetes mellitus, heart disease, cancer, and other health conditions), intermediate outcomes, responsiveness to the needs and preferences of patients, shared decisionmaking, patient-clinician communication, and access to medical information. Studies reported a number of barriers and facilitators for using health IT applications to enable PCC. Barriers included: lack of usability; problems with access to the health IT

  6. Fiber-optic technologies for advanced thermo-therapy applied ex vivo to liver tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, D.; Perrone, G.; Vallan, A.; Braglia, A.; Liu, Y.; Macchi, E. G.; Braschi, G.; Gallati, M.; Cigada, A.; Poeggel, S.; Duraibabu, D. B.; Leen, G.; Lewis, E.

    2015-07-01

    Thermal ablation, using radiofrequency, microwave, and laser sources, is a common treatment for hepatic tumors. Sensors allow monitoring, at the point of treatment, the evolution of thermal ablation procedures. We present optical fiber sensors that allow advanced capabilities for recording the biophysical phenomena occurring in the tissue in real time. Distributed or quasi-distributed thermal sensors allow recording temperature with spatial resolution ranging from 0.1 mm to 5 mm. In addition, a thermally insensitive pressure sensor allows recording pressure rise, supporting advanced treatment of encapsulated tumors. Our investigation is focused on two case studies: (1) radiofrequency ablation of hepatic tissue, performed on a phantom with a stem-shaped applicator; (2) laser ablation of a liver phantom, performed with a fiber laser. The main measurement results are discussed, comparing the technologies used for the investigation, and drawing the potential for using optical fiber sensors for "smart"-ablation.

  7. Silicon-on-sapphire fiber optic transceiver technology for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznia, C. P.; Ahadian, J. F.; Pommer, R. J.; Hagan, R.

    2007-09-01

    We present Single Event Upset (SEU) testing of a parallel fiber optic transceiver designed for communicating data using commercial Fibre Channel and GbE protocols at data rates up to 2.5 Gbps per channel (on eight parallel channels). This transceiver was developed for aircraft applications, such as the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF), Raptor and F/A-18 aircraft, that deploy fiber optic networks using multi-mode fiber operating at 850 nm wavelength. However, this transceiver may also have applications in space environments. This paper describes the underlying transceiver component technology, which utilizes complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) silicon-onsapphire circuitry and GaAs VCSEL and PIN devices. We also present results of SEU testing of this transceiver using heavy ions at Brookhaven National Labs.

  8. Application of fiber optic temperature and strain sensing technology to gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect

    Ulrich, Shannon M; Madden, Megan Elwood; Rawn, Claudia J; Szymcek, Phillip; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2008-01-01

    Gas hydrates may have a significant influence on global carbon cycles due to their large carbon storage capacity in the form of greenhouse gases and their sensitivity to small perturbations in local conditions. Characterizing existing gas hydrate and the formation of new hydrate within sediment systems and their response to small changes in temperature and pressure is imperative to understanding how this dynamic system functions. Fiber optic sensing technology offers a way to measure precisely temperature and strain in harsh environments such as the seafloor. Recent large-scale experiments using Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Seafloor Process Simulator were designed to evaluate the potential of fiber optic sensors to study the formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in 4-D within natural sediments. Results indicate that the fiber optic sensors are so sensitive to experimental perturbations (e.g. refrigeration cycles) that small changes due to hydrate formation or dissociation can be overshadowed.

  9. Hot-embossing replication of self-centering optical fiber alignment structures prototyped by deep proton writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebraert, Evert; Wissmann, Markus; Guttmann, Markus; Kolew, Alexander; Worgull, Matthias; Barié, Nicole; Schneider, Marc; Hofmann, Andreas; Beri, Stefano; Watté, Jan; Thienpont, Hugo; Van Erps, Jürgen

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the hot-embossing replication of self-centering fiber alignment structures for high-precision, single-mode optical fiber connectors. To this end, a metal mold insert was fabricated by electroforming a polymer prototype patterned by means of deep proton writing (DPW). To achieve through-hole structures, we developed a postembossing process step to remove the residual layer inherently present in hot-embossed structures. The geometrical characteristics of the hot-embossed replicas are compared, before and after removal of the residual layer, with the DPW prototypes. Initial measurements on the optical performance of the replicas are performed. The successful replication of these components paves the way toward low-cost mass replication of DPW-fabricated prototypes in a variety of high-tech plastics.

  10. Emerging fiber optic endomicroscopy technologies towards noninvasive real-time visualization of histology in situ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Jiefeng; Zhang, Yuying; Huo, Li; Chen, Yongping; Jabbour, Toufic; Li, Ming-Jun; Li, Xingde

    2010-09-01

    This paper reviews our recent developments of ultrathin fiber-optic endomicroscopy technologies for transforming high-resolution noninvasive optical imaging techniques to in vivo and clinical applications such as early disease detection and guidance of interventions. Specifically we describe an all-fiber-optic scanning endomicroscopy technology, which miniaturizes a conventional bench-top scanning laser microscope down to a flexible fiber-optic probe of a small footprint (i.e. ~2-2.5 mm in diameter), capable of performing two-photon fluorescence and second harmonic generation microscopy in real time. This technology aims to enable realtime visualization of histology in situ without the need for tissue removal. We will also present a balloon OCT endoscopy technology which permits high-resolution 3D imaging of the entire esophagus for detection of neoplasia, guidance of biopsy and assessment of therapeutic outcome. In addition we will discuss the development of functional polymeric fluorescent nanocapsules, which use only FAD approved materials and potentially enable fast track clinical translation of optical molecular imaging and targeted therapy.

  11. Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Program: Center of Automotive Technology Excellence in Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology at West Virginia University

    SciTech Connect

    Nigle N. Clark

    2006-12-31

    This report summarizes the technical and educational achievements of the Graduate Automotive Technology Education (GATE) Center at West Virginia University (WVU), which was created to emphasize Advanced Hybrid Vehicle Technology. The Center has supported the graduate studies of 17 students in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and the Lane Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering. These students have addressed topics such as hybrid modeling, construction of a hybrid sport utility vehicle (in conjunction with the FutureTruck program), a MEMS-based sensor, on-board data acquisition for hybrid design optimization, linear engine design and engine emissions. Courses have been developed in Hybrid Vehicle Design, Mobile Source Powerplants, Advanced Vehicle Propulsion, Power Electronics for Automotive Applications and Sensors for Automotive Applications, and have been responsible for 396 hours of graduate student coursework. The GATE program also enhanced the WVU participation in the U.S. Department of Energy Student Design Competitions, in particular FutureTruck and Challenge X. The GATE support for hybrid vehicle technology enhanced understanding of hybrid vehicle design and testing at WVU and encouraged the development of a research agenda in heavy-duty hybrid vehicles. As a result, WVU has now completed three programs in hybrid transit bus emissions characterization, and WVU faculty are leading the Transportation Research Board effort to define life cycle costs for hybrid transit buses. Research and enrollment records show that approximately 100 graduate students have benefited substantially from the hybrid vehicle GATE program at WVU.

  12. Narrow-band single photon emission at room temperature based on a single nitrogen-vacancy center coupled to an all-fiber-cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Albrecht, Roland; Bommer, Alexander; Becher, Christoph; Pauly, Christoph; Mücklich, Frank; Schell, Andreas W.; Engel, Philip; Benson, Oliver; Schröder, Tim; Reichel, Jakob

    2014-08-18

    We report the realization of a device based on a single Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) center in diamond coupled to a fiber-cavity for use as single photon source (SPS). The device consists of two concave mirrors each directly fabricated on the facets of two optical fibers and a preselected nanodiamond containing a single NV center deposited onto one of these mirrors. Both, cavity in- and out-put are directly fiber-coupled, and the emission wavelength is easily tunable by variation of the separation of the two mirrors with a piezo-electric crystal. By coupling to the cavity, we achieve an increase of the spectral photon rate density by two orders of magnitude compared to free-space emission of the NV center. With this work, we establish a simple all-fiber based SPS with promising prospects for the integration into photonic quantum networks.

  13. Impact Goals of Research and Development Technology on the Business Strategy of NTT's Fiber-to-the-Home Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hideaki

    2013-03-01

    Huge investment is needed for introducing a fiber-to-the-home system, so research and development strategy is very important. Requirements for fiber-to-the-home systems have been increased because communication systems have been recognized as one of the lifelines along with water, electricity, and gas. Furthermore, low energy consumption and recyclable eco-friendliness are required for products. NTT has been challenged to reduce capital expenditure, reduce operational expenditure, and create new applications for expanding the number of fiber-to-the-home subscribers from the viewpoint of a technological approach, including access infrastructure, fiber, transmission, and wireless technologies. Due to continuous and strategic technological development, the number of NTT's fiber-to-the-home subscribers is now over 17 million.

  14. Museum of Science Builds National Center for Technological Literacy (NCTL)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Research indicates that most Americans don't understand the technologies that surround them--the products and systems designed to fill a specific need. From water filtration to wheelchairs, from pens to PDAs, people use technology, often without fully comprehending how these tools are designed, developed, and function. In response, the Museum of…

  15. Welcome to Ames Research Center (1987 forum on Federal technology transfer)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballhaus, William F., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center has a long and distinguished history of technology development and transfer. Recently, in a welcoming speech to the Forum on Federal Technology Transfer, Director Ballhouse of Ames described significant technologies which have been transferred from Ames to the private sector and identifies future opportunities.

  16. SSME testing technology at the John C. Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kynard, Mike; Dill, Glenn

    1991-01-01

    An effective capability for testing the Space Shuttle Main Engine is described. The test complex utilizes a number of sophisticated test stands, test support facilities, and control centers to conduct development testing and flight acceptance testing at both nominal and off-nominal conditions.

  17. Research and Technology Report. Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soffen, Gerald (Editor); Truszkowski, Walter (Editor); Ottenstein, Howard (Editor); Frost, Kenneth (Editor); Maran, Stephen (Editor); Walter, Lou (Editor); Brown, Mitch (Editor)

    1996-01-01

    This issue of Goddard Space Flight Center's annual report highlights the importance of mission operations and data systems covering mission planning and operations; TDRSS, positioning systems, and orbit determination; ground system and networks, hardware and software; data processing and analysis; and World Wide Web use. The report also includes flight projects, space sciences, Earth system science, and engineering and materials.

  18. Facilitating Learner-Centered Instruction: Technology, Simulation, and Scans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, Michael H.

    Recent shifts toward collaborative learning and learner-centered language indicates that: (1) student diversity is increasing; (2) delivery, interaction, and assessment must occur across an expanding range of contexts, cultures, and knowledge parameters; and (3) learners must be empowered to accept responsibility for their learning and also to…

  19. What Differences Technology Makes for a High School Career Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskell, Kathleen Shelton; Haskell, Thomas Owen

    2008-01-01

    Over the last 8 years, the steady integration of new media has facilitated the senior project for College Tech Prep students at the Tri-County Career Center. Through the implementation of a student laptop program, campus-wide Internet access, and the availability of information networks and online research management tools, students have…

  20. Results from Organizational Development Interventions in a Technology Call Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workman, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Call center staff answered calls in 4 treatments: alignment job design (n=35), autonomous work teams (n=35), high-involvement work processes (n=43), and controls (n=36). Job satisfaction improved in alignment job design and high-involvement treatments, most significantly in the latter. Skill level and attitude toward autonomous work might have…

  1. Instructional Technology and Learning Resource Center-Based Community Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, James W.

    A survey of nonformal community education activities was conducted to determine specific use of media for identified educational and informational purposes. The results presented in this report are intended to provide resource information to professionals and paraprofessionals who ultimately may be employed in Learning Resource Center-Based…

  2. ADVANCED COMPOSITES TECHNOLOGY CASE STUDY AT NASA LANGLEY RESEARCH CENTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report summarizes work conducted at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Langley Research Center (NASA-LaRC) in Hampton, VA, under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Waste Reduction Evaluations at Federal Sites (WREAFS) Program. Support for...

  3. Critical Human Factors in Emerging Library Technology Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamont, Melissa

    1999-01-01

    Discusses new services that academic librarians are offering to users involving digital data, such as geographic information systems laboratories and electronic text centers. Suggests that human factors, such as management, organizational climate among the staff, and the development of a user community will determine the success or failure of the…

  4. Co-Development Agreements | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's TTC uses three different co-development agreements to help industry and academia interact and partner with National Institutes of Health laboratories and scientists to support technology development activities.

  5. Renal Cancer Biomarkers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Laboratory of Proteomics and Analytical Technologies is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize diagnostic, therapeutic and prognostic cancer biomarkers from clinical specimens.

  6. Research and technology at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Cryogenic engineering, hypergolic engineering, hazardous warning, structures and mechanics, computer sciences, communications, meteorology, technology applications, safety engineering, materials analysis, biomedicine, and engineering management and training aids research are reviewed.

  7. Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Componet Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Govindaraju, Madhusudhan

    2010-10-31

    Advanced Scientific Computing Research Computer Science FY 2010Report Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software: Distributed CCA State University of New York, Binghamton, NY, 13902 Summary The overall objective of Binghamton's involvement is to work on enhancements of the CCA environment, motivated by the applications and research initiatives discussed in the proposal. This year we are working on re-focusing our design and development efforts to develop proof-of-concept implementations that have the potential to significantly impact scientific components. We worked on developing parallel implementations for non-hydrostatic code and worked on a model coupling interface for biogeochemical computations coded in MATLAB. We also worked on the design and implementation modules that will be required for the emerging MapReduce model to be effective for scientific applications. Finally, we focused on optimizing the processing of scientific datasets on multi-core processors. Research Details We worked on the following research projects that we are working on applying to CCA-based scientific applications. 1. Non-Hydrostatic Hydrodynamics: Non-static hydrodynamics are significantly more accurate at modeling internal waves that may be important in lake ecosystems. Non-hydrostatic codes, however, are significantly more computationally expensive, often prohibitively so. We have worked with Chin Wu at the University of Wisconsin to parallelize non-hydrostatic code. We have obtained a speed up of about 26 times maximum. Although this is significant progress, we hope to improve the performance further, such that it becomes a practical alternative to hydrostatic codes. 2. Model-coupling for water-based ecosystems: To answer pressing questions about water resources requires that physical models (hydrodynamics) be coupled with biological and chemical models. Most hydrodynamics codes are written in Fortran, however, while most ecologists work in MATLAB. This

  8. Developing US EPA`s environmental technology cooperation center: A new approach to Foster technology transfer partnerships

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, C.J.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents a conceptual framework and approach for establishing the US Environmental Protections Agency`s (EPA) environmental technology cooperation center. The topic is introduced with background information on events leading to the development and implementation of the center and brief overviews of the domestic and global environmental industries. The paper assesses several US environmental technology transfer programs and identifies significant, innovative, and instructive technology transfer methods which offer constructive models for the center. This examination focuses on several modes of public-private interaction required to facilitate the transfer of US environmental technologies into the international marketplace. Specific case studies of environmental technology cooperation initiatives include: the US-Asian Environmental Partnership (AEP), the US Environmental Training Institute (US ETI) and the recent International Environmental Technology Business Action Conference, which took place in Moscow last month. This information forms a basis for defining the needs, gaps and opportunities for the technology cooperation center. Technology transfer and cooperation programs must respond to a range of changing needs and requirements in the increasingly competitive and sophisticated global economy of the 1990`s. The environmental technology cooperation center concept developed by the US EPA offers an approach for enhancing public-private sector partnerships to improve domestic industry collaborations and enhance trans-national team-building. An innovative approach by EPA, in collaboration with other agencies and the private sector, can lead to the rapid introduction of a global network of national and regional centers to foster international environmental cooperation and team-building in the years ahead.

  9. Research and technology: 1994 annual report of the John F. Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, the John F. Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the Engineering Development Directorate laboratories, most of the KSC operations contractors, academia, and selected commercial industries - all working in a team effort within their own areas of expertise. This edition of the Kennedy Space Center Research and Technology 1994 Annual Report covers efforts of all these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. The Technology Programs and Commercialization Office (DE-TPO), (407) 867-3017, is responsible for publication of this report and should be contacted for any desired information regarding the advanced technology program.

  10. High heralding-efficiency of near-IR fiber coupled photon pairs for quantum technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, P. Ben; Murphy, Ryan; Rosenberg, Danna; Grein, Matthew E.; Stelmakh, Veronika; Bennink, Ryan S; Wong, Franco N. C.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the development and use of a high heralding-efficiency, single-mode-fiber coupled telecom-band source of entangled photons for quantum technology applications. The source development efforts consisted of theoretical and experimental efforts and we demonstrated a correlated-mode coupling efficiency of 97% 2%, the highest efficiency yet achieved for this type of system. We then incorporated these beneficial source development techniques in a Sagnac configured telecom-band entangled photon source that generates photon pairs entangled in both time/energy and polarization degrees of freedom. We made use of these highly desirable entangled states to investigate several promising quantum technologies.

  11. Fiber optic vibration sensor for high-power electric machines realized using 3D printing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igrec, Bojan; Bosiljevac, Marko; Sipus, Zvonimir; Babic, Dubravko; Rudan, Smiljko

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this work was to demonstrate a lightweight and inexpensive fiber-optic vibration sensor, built using 3D printing technology, for high-power electric machines and similar applications. The working principle is based on modulating the light intensity using a blade attached to a bendable membrane. The sensor prototype was manufactured using PolyJet Matrix technology with DM 8515 Grey 35 Polymer. The sensor shows linear response, expected bandwidth (< 150 Hz), and from our measurements we estimated the damping ratio for used polymer to be ζ ≍ 0.019. The developed prototype is simple to assemble, adjust, calibrate and repair.

  12. Technology Development of a Fiber Optic-Coupled Laser Ignition System for Multi-Combustor Rocket Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P.; Early, Jim; Osborne, Robin; Thomas, Matthew E.; Bossard, John A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the progress of technology development of a laser ignition system at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The first two years of the project focus on comprehensive assessments and evaluations of a novel dual-pulse laser concept, flight- qualified laser system, and the technology required to integrate the laser ignition system to a rocket chamber. With collaborations of the Department of Energy/Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC), MSFC has conducted 26 hot fire ignition tests with lab-scale laser systems. These tests demonstrate the concept feasibility of dual-pulse laser ignition to initiate gaseous oxygen (GOX)/liquid kerosene (RP-1) combustion in a rocket chamber. Presently, a fiber optic- coupled miniaturized laser ignition prototype is being implemented at the rocket chamber test rig for future testing. Future work is guided by a technology road map that outlines the work required for maturing a laser ignition system. This road map defines activities for the next six years, with the goal of developing a flight-ready laser ignition system.

  13. 76 FR 39811 - International Center for Technology Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... Assessment and the Center for Food Safety; Noxious Weed Status of Kentucky Bluegrass Genetically Engineered... engineered for tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate should not be listed as a Federal noxious weed and... noxious weeds. Our decision is based on our analysis of available scientific data, our weed...

  14. Research and Technology: 2003 Annual Report of the John F Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is America's Spaceport Technology Center. The KSC technology development program encompasses the efforts of the entire KSC team, consisting of Government and contractor personnel, working in partnership with academic institutions and commercial industry. KSC's assigned mission areas are space launch operations and spaceport and range technologies. KSC's technology development customers include current space transportation programs, future space transportation programs / initiatives, and enabling technical programs. The KSC Research and Technology 2003 Annual Report encompasses the efforts of contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program and KSC technology transfer activities. Dr. Dave Bartine, KSC Chief Technologist, (321) 867-7069, is responsible for publication of this report and should be contacted for any desired information regarding KSC's research and technology development activities.

  15. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges (standing, center) poses with members of the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG), which is holding the 1999 Technology Fair Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  16. Fabrication of fiber-optic broadband ultrasound emitters by micro-opto-mechanical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belsito, L.; Vannacci, E.; Mancarella, F.; Ferri, M.; Veronese, G. P.; Biagi, E.; Roncaglia, A.

    2014-08-01

    A micro-opto-mechanical system (MOMS) technology for the fabrication of fiber-optic optoacoustic emitters is presented. The described devices are based on the thermoelastic generation of ultrasonic waves from patterned carbon films obtained by the controlled pyrolysis of photoresist layers and fabricated on miniaturized single-crystal silicon frames used to mount the emitters on the tip of an optical fiber. Thanks to the micromachining process adopted, high miniaturization levels are reached in the fabrication of the emitters, and self-standing devices on optical fiber with diameter around 350 µm are demonstrated, potentially suited to minimally invasive medical applications. The functional testing of fiber-optic emitter prototypes in water performed by using a 1064 nm Q-switched Nd-YAG excitation laser source is also presented, yielding broadband emission spectra extended from low frequencies up to more than 40 MHz, and focused emission fields with a maximum peak-to-peak pressure level of about 1.2 MPa at a distance of 1 mm from the devices.

  17. Fiber Optic Sensing Technology for Detecting Gas Hydrate Formation and Decomposition

    SciTech Connect

    Rawn, Claudia J; Leeman, John R; Ulrich, Shannon M; Alford, Jonathan E; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Madden, Megan Elwood

    2011-01-01

    A fiber optic-based distributed sensing system (DSS) has been integrated with a large volume (72 L) pressure vessel providing high spatial resolution, time resolved, 3-D measurement of hybrid temperature-strain (TS) values within experimental sediment gas hydrate systems. Areas of gas hydrate formation (exothermic) and decomposition (endothermic) can be characterized through this proxy by time series analysis of discrete data points collected along the length of optical fibers placed within a sediment system. Data is visualized as a 'movie' of TS values along the length of each fiber over time. Experiments conducted in the Seafloor Processing Simulator (SPS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory show clear indications of hydrate formation and dissociation events at expected P-T conditions given the thermodynamics of the CH4-H2O system. The high spatial resolution achieved with fiber optic technology makes the DSS a useful tool for visualizing time resolved formation and dissociation of gas hydrates in large-scale sediment experiments.

  18. High Sensitivity Refractometer Based on TiO₂-Coated Adiabatic Tapered Optical Fiber via ALD Technology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shan; Pang, Fufei; Huang, Sujuan; Zou, Fang; Guo, Qiang; Wen, Jianxiang; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-08-15

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is introduced to fabricate a high sensitivity refractometer based on an adiabatic tapered optical fiber. Different thicknesses of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanofilm were coated around the tapered fiber precisely and uniformly under different deposition cycles. Attributed to the higher refractive index of the TiO₂ nanofilm compared to that of silica, an asymmetric Fabry-Perot (F-P) resonator could be constructed along the fiber taper. The central wavelength of the F-P resonator could be controlled by adjusting the thickness of the TiO₂ nanofilm. Such a F-P resonator is sensitive to changes in the surrounding refractive index (SRI), which is utilized to realize a high sensitivity refractometer. The refractometer developed by depositing 50.9-nm-thickness TiO₂ on the tapered fiber shows SRI sensitivity as high as 7096 nm/RIU in the SRI range of 1.3373-1.3500. Due to TiO₂'s advantages of high refractive index, lack of toxicity, and good biocompatibility, this refractometer is expected to have wide applications in the biochemical sensing field.

  19. High Sensitivity Refractometer Based on TiO₂-Coated Adiabatic Tapered Optical Fiber via ALD Technology.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shan; Pang, Fufei; Huang, Sujuan; Zou, Fang; Guo, Qiang; Wen, Jianxiang; Wang, Tingyun

    2016-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is introduced to fabricate a high sensitivity refractometer based on an adiabatic tapered optical fiber. Different thicknesses of titanium dioxide (TiO₂) nanofilm were coated around the tapered fiber precisely and uniformly under different deposition cycles. Attributed to the higher refractive index of the TiO₂ nanofilm compared to that of silica, an asymmetric Fabry-Perot (F-P) resonator could be constructed along the fiber taper. The central wavelength of the F-P resonator could be controlled by adjusting the thickness of the TiO₂ nanofilm. Such a F-P resonator is sensitive to changes in the surrounding refractive index (SRI), which is utilized to realize a high sensitivity refractometer. The refractometer developed by depositing 50.9-nm-thickness TiO₂ on the tapered fiber shows SRI sensitivity as high as 7096 nm/RIU in the SRI range of 1.3373-1.3500. Due to TiO₂'s advantages of high refractive index, lack of toxicity, and good biocompatibility, this refractometer is expected to have wide applications in the biochemical sensing field. PMID:27537885

  20. Marshall Space Flight Center Research and Technology Report 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, A. S. (Compiler); Tinker, M. L. (Compiler); Sivak, A. D. (Compiler); Morris, H. C. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The investments in technology development we made in 2015 not only support the Agency's current missions, but they will also enable new missions. Some of these projects will allow us to develop an in-space architecture for human space exploration; Marshall employees are developing and testing cutting-edge propulsion solutions that will propel humans in-space and land them on Mars. Others are working on technologies that could support a deep space habitat, which will be critical to enable humans to live and work in deep space and on other worlds. Still others are maturing technologies that will help new scientific instruments study the outer edge of the universe-instruments that will provide valuable information as we seek to explore the outer planets and search for life.

  1. Development of New Materials and Technologies for Welding and Surfacing at Research and Production Center "Welding Processes and Technologies"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, N. A.; Kryukov, R. E.; Galevsky, G. V.; Titov, D. A.; Shurupov, V. M.

    2015-09-01

    The paper provides description of research into the influence of new materials and technologies on quality parameters of welds and added metal carried out at research and production center «Welding processes and technologies». New welding technologies of tanks for northern conditions are considered, as well as technologies of submerged arc welding involving fluxing agents AN - 348, AN - 60, AN - 67, OK. 10.71 and carbon-fluorine containing additives, new flux cored wires and surfacing technologies, teaching programs and a trainer for welders are designed.

  2. Technology requirements to be addressed by the NASA Lewis Research Center Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Rudland, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center is responsible for the planning and execution of a scientific program which will provide advance in space cryogenic fluid management technology. A number of future space missions were identified that require or could benefit from this technology. These fluid management technology needs were prioritized and a shuttle attached reuseable test bed, the cryogenic fluid management facility (CFMF), is being designed to provide the experimental data necessary for the technology development effort.

  3. Technology for libraries and information centers: A seminar in Greece, Portugal, and Turkey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, Gladys A.

    1992-01-01

    Information technologies are evolving at a rapid pace in today's world. But the electronic technologies needed to transform today's libraries and information centers into electronic 'libraries without walls', where an end-user has instantaneous access to all the information needed from a desktop workstation, have not yet arrived. Even so, there are many technologies available today that can be applied in the library/information center environment to yield increased productivity. However, not all technologies are right for or successful in every environment. Mission, budget, infrastructure, client profiles, and staff skills are a few of the 'environmental' issues that must be considered when selecting and introducing new technologies into a particular information center. Key technologies used in libraries today are reviewed; it can be used as background for targeting technologies that could be successfully implemented in your own environment to further service goals. Before focusing on a selection of technologies, you must first focus on the strategic goal of your organization. The same technology is not right for every library/information center. An overview of technologies that are readily available and can be applied today is presented.

  4. Project of space research and technology center in Engelhardt astronomical observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefedyev, Y.; Gusev, A.; Sherstukov, O.; Kascheev, R.; Zagretdinov, R.

    2012-09-01

    Today on the basis of Engelhardt astronomical observatory (EAO) is created Space research and technology center as consistent with Program for expansion of the Kazan University. The Centre has the following missions: • EDUCATION • SCIENCE • ASTRONOMICAL TOURISM

  5. National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC); (NREL) National Renewable Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, Jennifer; Sprik, Sam

    2014-03-11

    This presentation gives an overview of the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC), describes how NFCTEC benefits the hydrogen and fuel cell community, and introduces a new fuel cell cost/price aggregation project.

  6. OHIO INTERNATIONAL TELEVISION AND VIDEO FESTIVAL AWARD WINNERS FROM THE IMAGING TECHNOLOGY CENTER IT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    OHIO INTERNATIONAL TELEVISION AND VIDEO FESTIVAL AWARD WINNERS FROM THE IMAGING TECHNOLOGY CENTER ITC KEVIN BURKE - BILL FLETCHER - GARY NOLAN - EMERY ADANICH FOR THE VIDEO ENTITLED ICING FOR REGIONAL AND CORPORATE PILOTS

  7. US long distance fiber optic networks: Technology, evolution and advanced concepts. Volume 3: Advanced networks and economics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    This study projects until 2000 the evolution of long distance fiber optic networks in the U.S. Volume 1 is the executive Summary. Volume 2 focuses on fiber optic components and systems that are directly related to the operation of long-haul networks. Optimistic, pessimistic and most likely scenarios of technology development are presented. The activities of national and regional companies implementing fiber long haul networks are also highlighted, along with an analysis of the market and regulatory forces affecting network evolution. Volume 3 presents advanced fiber optic network concept definitions. Inter-LATA traffic is quantified and forms the basis for the construction of 11-, 15-, 17-, and 23-node networks. Using the technology projections from Volume 2, a financial model identifies cost drivers and determines circuit mile costs between any two LATAs. A comparison of fiber optics with alternative transmission concludes the report.

  8. Active Control Technology at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antcliff, Richard R.; McGowan, Anna-Marie R.

    2000-01-01

    NASA Langley has a long history of attacking important technical opportunities from a broad base of supporting disciplines. The research and development at Langley in this subject area range from the test tube to the test flight. The information covered here will range from the development of innovative new materials, sensors and actuators, to the incorporation of smart sensors and actuators in practical devices, to the optimization of the location of these devices, to, finally, a wide variety of applications of these devices utilizing Langley's facilities and expertise. Advanced materials are being developed for sensors and actuators, as well as polymers for integrating smart devices into composite structures. Contributions reside in three key areas: computational materials; advanced piezoelectric materials; and integrated composite structures. The computational materials effort is focused on developing predictive tools for the efficient design of new materials with the appropriate combination of properties for next generation smart airframe systems. Research in the area of advanced piezoelectrics includes optimizing the efficiency, force output, use temperature, and energy transfer between the structure and device for both ceramic and polymeric materials. For structural health monitoring, advanced non-destructive techniques including fiber optics are being developed for detection of delaminations, cracks and environmental deterioration in aircraft structures. The computational materials effort is focused on developing predictive tools for the efficient design of new materials with the appropriate combination of properties for next generation smart airframe system. Innovative fabrication techniques processing structural composites with sensor and actuator integration are being developed.

  9. Collaborative Information Technology Center (CITC) for Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontenot, Dean; Driskill, David A.

    The digital divide remains a formidable issue in rural areas where the only broadband access to the Internet may be at public schools or city governments. As the only locations in rural areas with adequate technological resources, schools, libraries, health facilities, and agricultural extension facilities can be places where citizens learn about…

  10. TEC Center: Linking Technology, Education and Cultural Diversity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoter, Elaine; Shonfeld, Miri; Asmaa, N. Ganayem

    2012-01-01

    To many people, "Israel" is perceived as a "high-tech" nation, but in the same breath, as a "nation in conflict." So why not apply Israel's technological advantage to battle the multicultural conflict within? In this article, we will review the multicultural segregation in Israel, the traditional attempts to bring…

  11. Family-Centered Decision Making in Assistive Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parette, Phil; VanBiervliet, Alan; Hourcade, Jack J.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of family and cultural issues relevant to planning for assistive technology (AT) for students with disabilities. The potential for interactive multimedia in helping teams and families make AT decisions is reviewed. It describes a newly available interactive CD-ROM designed to provide basic information for…

  12. The Employee Invention Report (EIR) | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    After making such a discovery, NCI researchers should immediately contact their Laboratory or Branch Chief and inform him or her of a possible invention and consult with your NCI TTC Technology Transfer Specialist about submitting an Employee Invention Report (EIR) Form.

  13. Managing Information Technology in Academic Medical Centers: A "Multicultural" Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Charles P.; Corn, Milton; Krumrey, Arthur; Perry, David R.; Stevens, Ronald H.

    1998-01-01

    Examines how beliefs and concerns of academic medicine's diverse professional cultures affect management of information technology. Two scenarios, one dealing with standardization of desktop personal computers and the other with publication of syllabi on an institutional intranet, form the basis for an exercise in which four prototypical members…

  14. Solid State Technology Branch of NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A collection of papers written by the members of the Solid State Technology Branch of NASA LeRC from Jun. 1991 - Jun. 1992 is presented. A range of topics relating to superconductivity, Monolithic Microwave Circuits (MMIC's), coplanar waveguides, and material characterization is covered.

  15. Mouse Xenograft Model for Mesothelioma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to co-develop, evaluate, or commercialize a new mouse model for monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates that target malignant mesotheliomas. Applications of the technology include models for screening compounds as potential therapeutics for mesothelioma and for studying the pathology of mesothelioma.

  16. Hemispheric center for environmental technology: research and development capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Boudreaux, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    Contains vugraphs: decontamination and decommissioning, Latin America`s D&D needs, metal decontamination, concrete decontamination, structural demolition and dust suppression, melting/solidification/remelting/separation of glass and metals, demonstrations, decision making, information systems, waste processing, tank waste treatment, characterization/monitoring/sensor technology, metal recycling, etc.

  17. Integrating Technology into Classroom: The Learner-Centered Instructional Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezer, Baris; Karaoglan Yilmaz, Fatma Gizem; Yilmaz, Ramazan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, to present an instructional model by considering the existing models of instructional design (ARCS, ADDIE, ASSURE, Dick and Carey, Seels and Glasgow, Smith and Ragan etc.) with the nature of technology-based education and to reveal analysis, design, development, implementation, evaluation, and to revise levels with lower levels of…

  18. Developing a Technology Resource Center: The OSU Tech Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hensley, S. Michael

    In order to help meet the economic development needs of the state, Oklahoma State University Technical Branch at Okmulgee (OSU Tech) has developed two initiatives. First, OSU Tech has focussed student training on degree programs in advancing technologies, such as avionics, electronics, and robotics. Second, the college has developed a Technology…

  19. Developing a University's Construction Technology and Mgt's Computer Learning Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Richard; Kramer, Scott

    1994-01-01

    Provides working blueprints for a university technology lab built specifically for construction science students and faculty. More than just housing for computer workstations, the facility is intentionally designed as a medium for better communication and instruction. A future in which distance learning is the norm is addressed. (KRN)

  20. Striatum-Centered Fiber Connectivity Is Associated with the Personality Trait of Cooperativeness

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chuansheng; Chen, Chunhui; He, Qinghua; Moyzis, Robert K.; Xue, Gui; Dong, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Cooperativeness is an essential behavioral trait evolved to facilitate group living. Social and cognitive mechanisms involved in cooperation (e.g., motivation, reward encoding, action evaluation, and executive functions) are sub-served by the striatal-projected circuits, whose physical existence has been confirmed by animal studies, human postmortem studies, and in vivo human brain studies. The current study investigated the associations between Cooperativeness and fiber connectivities from the striatum to nine subcortical and cortical regions, including the amygdala, hippocampus, medial orbitofrontal cortex, lateral orbitofrontal cortex, ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, posterior cingulate cortex/retrosplenial cortex, dorsal cingulate cortex, and rostral cingulate cortex. Results showed that Cooperativeness was negatively correlated with fiber connectivity for the cognitive control system (from the dorsal caudate to the rostral cingulate cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex), but not with fiber connectivity for the social cognitive system (e.g., connectivity with the medial prefrontal cortex and amygdala). These results partially supported Declerck et al.’s (2013) cognitive neural model of the role of cognitive control and social cognition in cooperation. PMID:27755551

  1. Between Technological Endorsement and Resistance: The State of Online Writing Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neaderhiser, Stephen; Wolfe, Joanna

    2009-01-01

    Over the past two decades, writing centers have steadily been expanding services and materials they offer online. The way students write and communicate about their writing continues to change, and the writing center has increasingly been looked upon as a site through which technology and writing have the ability to converge in the form of…

  2. The Efficiency and Effectiveness of the K-12 Energy Technology Education Promotion Centers in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Lung-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    In order to promote energy literacy for graders K-12, the Ministry of Education (MOE) in Taiwan initiated a K-12 Energy Technology Education Project in September 2010. This 40-month project has one project office affiliated to a university, and 18 promotion centers affiliated to 18 schools--including 5 regional centers for upper-secondary schools…

  3. Technology-Based Biliteracy Centers for the 21st Century Learner

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercuri, Sandra; Ramos, Laura

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this reflective article is to present an alternative that incorporates the four language skills in all content areas through technology-based dual-language centers for emergent bilinguals at the elementary level. The authors propose a matrix to plan the centers and include three examples to facilitate language transfer in English…

  4. Personalized Integrated Educational System: Technology Functions for the Learner- Centered Paradigm of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reigeluth, Charles M.; Aslan, Sinem; Chen, Zengguan; Dutta, Pratima; Huh, Yeol; Lee, Dabae; Lin, Chun-Yi; Lu, Ya-Huei; Min, Mina; Tan, Verily; Watson, Sunnie Lee; Watson, William R.

    2015-01-01

    The learner-centered paradigm of instruction differs in such fundamental ways from the teacher-centered paradigm that it requires technology to serve very different functions. In 2006, a research team at Indiana University began to work on identifying those functions and published their results in 2008. Subsequently, the team elaborated and…

  5. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  6. Smooth muscle-like tissue constructs with circumferentially oriented cells formed by the cell fiber technology.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Amy Y; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments.

  7. Study and design of a liquid level meter based on fiber optic sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhongdong; Wang, Yutian; Hou, Peiguo; Wang, Yanju

    2005-02-01

    At present, many floater-type measurement equipments whose readings are recorded by manpower are still in use in petrol-chemical industries. With regard to their low efficiency, great errors and their improbability in realization in automation management and remote control, in this instance, a new liquid-level meter system using the advanced fiber-optic sensing technology based on the floater-type level meter is developed. In principle, it measures the liquid level of the oil tank by using the principle of force balance, captures and transmits the light signals by means of the fiber-optic sensing technology, adjusts the light signals from continuous impulse signals to the discontinuous by the light-code disc, then converts light impulses into voltage impulses by photoelectric elements. In configuration, it adopts a twin light source and a twin optical-channel, utilizes twin fiber detectors to record the size of the liquid level and judge the direction of the liquid level respectively. Moreover, the measuring system has been tested practically in a chemical plant, the results indicate that the measuring errors are Less than or equal to +/-6mm, relative errors are <2% when its measuring range is within 0 and 1000mm.It is proved that the various indexes of the system satisfies the demand of the industries and the capability is credible.

  8. Smooth Muscle-Like Tissue Constructs with Circumferentially Oriented Cells Formed by the Cell Fiber Technology

    PubMed Central

    Hsiao, Amy Y.; Okitsu, Teru; Onoe, Hiroaki; Kiyosawa, Mahiro; Teramae, Hiroki; Iwanaga, Shintaroh; Kazama, Tomohiko; Matsumoto, Taro; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    The proper functioning of many organs and tissues containing smooth muscles greatly depends on the intricate organization of the smooth muscle cells oriented in appropriate directions. Consequently controlling the cellular orientation in three-dimensional (3D) cellular constructs is an important issue in engineering tissues of smooth muscles. However, the ability to precisely control the cellular orientation at the microscale cannot be achieved by various commonly used 3D tissue engineering building blocks such as spheroids. This paper presents the formation of coiled spring-shaped 3D cellular constructs containing circumferentially oriented smooth muscle-like cells differentiated from dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells. By using the cell fiber technology, DFAT cells suspended in a mixture of extracellular proteins possessing an optimized stiffness were encapsulated in the core region of alginate shell microfibers and uniformly aligned to the longitudinal direction. Upon differentiation induction to the smooth muscle lineage, DFAT cell fibers self-assembled to coiled spring structures where the cells became circumferentially oriented. By changing the initial core-shell microfiber diameter, we demonstrated that the spring pitch and diameter could be controlled. 21 days after differentiation induction, the cell fibers contained high percentages of ASMA-positive and calponin-positive cells. Our technology to create these smooth muscle-like spring constructs enabled precise control of cellular alignment and orientation in 3D. These constructs can further serve as tissue engineering building blocks for larger organs and cellular implants used in clinical treatments. PMID:25734774

  9. CD-ROM technology at the EROS data center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Madigan, Michael E.; Weinheimer, Mary C.

    1993-01-01

    The vast amount of digital spatial data often required by a single user has created a demand for media alternatives to 1/2" magnetic tape. One such medium that has been recently adopted at the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Data Center is the compact disc (CD). CD's are a versatile, dynamic, and low-cost method for providing a variety of data on a single media device and are compatible with various computer platforms. CD drives are available for personal computers, UNIX workstations, and mainframe systems, either directly connected, or through a network. This medium furnishes a quick method of reproducing and distributing large amounts of data on a single CD. Several data sets are already available on CD's, including collections of historical Landsat multispectral scanner data and biweekly composites of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer data for the conterminous United States. The EROS Data Center intends to provide even more data sets on CD's. Plans include specific data sets on a customized disc to fulfill individual requests, and mass production of unique data sets for large-scale distribution. Requests for a single compact disc-read only memory (CD-ROM) containing a large volume of data either for archiving or for one-time distribution can be addressed with a CD-write once (CD-WO) unit. Mass production and large-scale distribution will require CD-ROM replication and mastering.

  10. Factors Predicting the Use of Technology: Findings From the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE)

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Sara J.; Charness, Neil; Fisk, Arthur D.; Hertzog, Christopher; Nair, Sankaran N.; Rogers, Wendy A.; Sharit, Joseph

    2006-01-01

    The successful adoption of technology is becoming increasingly important to functional independence. The present article reports findings from the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE) on the use of technology among community-dwelling adults. The sample included 1,204 individuals ranging in age from 18–91 years. All participants completed a battery that included measures of demographic characteristics, self-rated health, experience with technology, attitudes toward computers, and component cognitive abilities. Findings indicate that the older adults were less likely than younger adults to use technology in general, computers, and the World Wide Web. The results also indicate that computer anxiety, fluid intelligence, and crystallized intelligence were important predictors of the use of technology. The relationship between age and adoption of technology was mediated by cognitive abilities, computer self-efficacy, and computer anxiety. These findings are discussed in terms of training strategies to promote technology adoption. PMID:16768579

  11. Factors predicting the use of technology: findings from the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE).

    PubMed

    Czaja, Sara J; Charness, Neil; Fisk, Arthur D; Hertzog, Christopher; Nair, Sankaran N; Rogers, Wendy A; Sharit, Joseph

    2006-06-01

    The successful adoption of technology is becoming increasingly important to functional independence. The present article reports findings from the Center for Research and Education on Aging and Technology Enhancement (CREATE) on the use of technology among community-dwelling adults. The sample included 1,204 individuals ranging in age from 18-91 years. All participants completed a battery that included measures of demographic characteristics, self-rated health, experience with technology, attitudes toward computers, and component cognitive abilities. Findings indicate that the older adults were less likely than younger adults to use technology in general, computers, and the World Wide Web. The results also indicate that computer anxiety, fluid intelligence, and crystallized intelligence were important predictors of the use of technology. The relationship between age and adoption of technology was mediated by cognitive abilities, computer self-efficacy, and computer anxiety. These findings are discussed in terms of training strategies to promote technology adoption.

  12. Research and Technology at the John F. Kennedy Space Center 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for assembly, checkout, servicing, launch, recovery, and operational support of Space Transportation System elements and payloads, the John F. Kennedy Space Center is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the Engineering Development Directorate laboratories, most of the KSC operations contractors, academia, and selected commercial industries - all working in a team effort within their own areas of expertise. This edition of the Kennedy Space Center Research and Technology 1993 Annual Report covers efforts of all these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. Major areas of research include material science, advanced software, industrial engineering, nondestructive evaluation, life sciences, atmospheric sciences, environmental technology, robotics, and electronics and instrumentation.

  13. Activities, accomplishments and research progress of the Center for Theoretical Geoplasma Physics, Center for Space Research, Massachusetts Inst. of Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Tom

    1992-02-01

    This annual report contains a detailed description of the activities, accomplishments, and research progress of the MIT Center for Theoretical Geoplasma Physics established under the University Research Initiative Program by AFOSR. During this second phase of the program, the Center has made definite strides toward the goals prescribed in the renewal proposal. The Center now has a staff of twenty-five (25) faculty, research scientists, postdoctoral, graduate and undergraduate students and visiting scientists. Members of the Center published forty-eight (48) scientific papers and five (5) books and proceedings, delivered forty (40) invited lectures and fifty-one (51) contributed papers. We have initiated a number of new research activities to complement our other ongoing research programs. Some of our research efforts have already been utilized by Dr. J. R. Jasperse's group at the Geophysics Directorate of the Phillips Laboratory in practical space technology applications relevant to the missions of the Air Force. In addition to the Phillips Laboratory, the Center has interacted with numerous research organizations and universities. The research publications are generally the direct product of such interactions.

  14. Characterization of thermal inkjet technology TNT deposits by fiber optic-grazing angle probe FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Pacheco-Londono, Leonardo; Ruiz, Orlando; Ramirez, Michael; Soto-Feliciano, Yadira M.; De La Torre-Quintana, Luis F.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2005-05-01

    Fiber Optic Coupled/Grazing Angle Probe Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy has made possible to develop new methods for detection of traces of chemical compounds on surfaces. Thermal Inkjet Technology is able to deposit very small amounts of chemical compounds, including energetic materials, in a specific location on a surface. Aliquots of TNT solutions were deposited on stainless steel film. A thin coating of TNT can be produced by controlling the concentration of TNT, the number of drops dispensed and the distribution of drops over the surface. A Vector 22, a Bruker Optics FTIR fiber coupled to a Remspec Corp. grazing angle head was used for the experiments. The spectra were recorded at 4 cm-1 resolution and 50 scans. The results of the experiments gave intense absorption bands in the fingerprint region of the infrared spectra that were used for quantification. Chemometrics routines were applied in the enhancement of the quantitative analysis.

  15. Refractive index sensitivity enhancement of optical fiber cladding mode by depositing nanofilm via ALD technology.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Pang, Fufei; Dong, Yanhua; Wen, Jianxiang; Chen, Zhenyi; Wang, Tingyun

    2013-11-01

    The atomic layer deposition (ALD) technology is introduced to enhance the sensitivity of optical fiber cladding mode to surrounding refractive index (SRI) variation. The highly uniform Al2O nanofilm was deposited around the double cladding fiber (DCF) which presents cladding mode resonant feature. With the high refractive index coating, the cladding mode resonant spectrum was tuned. And the sensitivity enhancement for SRI sensor was demonstrated. Through adjusting the deposition cycles, a maximum sensitivity of 723 nm/RIU was demonstrated in the DCF with 2500 deposition cycles at the SRI of 1.34. Based on the analysis of cladding modes reorganization, the cladding modes transition of the coated DCF was investigated theoretically. With the high performance nanofilm coating, the proposed SRI sensor is expected to have wide applications in chemical sensors and biosensors.

  16. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Jay C. Almlie; Bruce Wood; Rich Schlupp

    2007-03-01

    In November 2005, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), ePowerSynergies, Inc. (ePSI), and Resurfice Corporation teamed to develop, produce, and demonstrate the world's first and only fuel cell-powered ice resurfacer. The goals of this project were: {sm_bullet} To educate the public on the readiness, practicality, and safety of fuel cells powered by hydrogen fuel and {sm_bullet} To establish a commercialization pathway in an early-adopter, niche market. The vehicle was developed and produced in a short 3-month span. The vehicle made its world debut at U.S. Senator Byron Dorgan's (D-ND) 2005 Hydrogen Energy Action Summit. Subsequently, the vehicle toured North America appearing at numerous public events and conferences, receiving much attention from international media outlets.

  17. Crossing the Great Divide: Adoption of New Technologies, Therapeutics and Diagnostics at Academic Medical Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMonaco, Harold J.; Koski, Greg

    2007-01-01

    The role of new technology in healthcare continues to expand from both the clinical and financial perspectives. Despite the importance of innovation, most academic medical centers do not have a clearly defined process for technology assessment. Recognizing the importance of new drugs, diagnostics and procedures in the care of patients and in the…

  18. Spatial interpretation of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Payload Operations Control Center using virtual reality technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1993-01-01

    In its search for higher level computer interfaces and more realistic electronic simulations for measurement and spatial analysis in human factors design, NASA at MSFC is evaluating the functionality of virtual reality (VR) technology. Virtual reality simulation generates a three dimensional environment in which the participant appears to be enveloped. It is a type of interactive simulation in which humans are not only involved, but included. Virtual reality technology is still in the experimental phase, but it appears to be the next logical step after computer aided three-dimensional animation in transferring the viewer from a passive to an active role in experiencing and evaluating an environment. There is great potential for using this new technology when designing environments for more successful interaction, both with the environment and with another participant in a remote location. At the University of North Carolina, a VR simulation of a the planned Sitterson Hall, revealed a flaw in the building's design that had not been observed during examination of the more traditional building plan simulation methods on paper and on computer aided design (CAD) work station. The virtual environment enables multiple participants in remote locations to come together and interact with one another and with the environment. Each participant is capable of seeing herself and the other participants and of interacting with them within the simulated environment.

  19. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to talk to one of the vendors at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. With him at the far left is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG, and Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair; at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  20. Temperature-Insensitive Bend Sensor Using Entirely Centered Erbium Doping in the Fiber Core

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Harith; Zulkifli, Mohd Zamani; Muhammad, Farah Diana; Samangun, Julian Md; Abdul-Rashid, Hairul Azhar; Harun, Sulaiman Wadi

    2013-01-01

    A fiber based bend sensor using a uniquely designed Bend-Sensitive Erbium Doped Fiber (BSEDF) is proposed and demonstrated. The BSEDF has two core regions, namely an undoped outer region with a diameter of about 9.38 μm encompassing a doped, inner core region with a diameter of 4.00 μm. The doped core region has about 400 ppm of an Er2O3 dopant. Pumping the BSEDF with a conventional 980 nm laser diode gives an Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) spectrum spanning from 1,510 nm to over 1,560 nm at the output power level of about −58 dBm. The ASE spectrum has a peak power of −52 dBm at a central wavelength of 1,533 nm when not spooled. Spooling the BSEDF with diameters of 10 cm to 2 cm yields decreasing peak powers from −57.0 dBm to −61.8 dBm, while the central wavelength remains unchanged. The output is highly stable over time, with a low temperature sensitivity of around ∼0.005 dBm/°C, thus allowing for the development of a highly stable sensor system based in the change of the peak power alone. PMID:23881146

  1. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  2. Zigbee networking technology and its application in Lamost optical fiber positioning and control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yi; Zhai, Chao; Gu, Yonggang; Zhou, Zengxiang; Gai, Xiaofeng

    2010-07-01

    4,000 fiber positioning units need to be positioned precisely in LAMOST(Large Sky Area Multi-object Optical Spectroscopic Telescope) optical fiber positioning & control system, and every fiber positioning unit needs two stepper motors for its driven, so 8,000 stepper motors need to be controlled in the entire system. Wireless communication mode is adopted to save the installing space on the back of the focal panel, and can save more than 95% external wires compared to the traditional cable control mode. This paper studies how to use the ZigBee technology to group these 8000 nodes, explores the pros and cons of star network and tree network in order to search the stars quickly and efficiently. ZigBee technology is a short distance, low-complexity, low power, low data rate, low-cost two-way wireless communication technology based on the IEEE 802.15.4 protocol. It based on standard Open Systems Interconnection (OSI): The 802.15.4 standard specifies the lower protocol layers-the physical layer (PHY), and the media access control (MAC). ZigBee Alliance defined on this basis, the rest layers such as the network layer and application layer, and is responsible for high-level applications, testing and marketing. The network layer used here, based on ad hoc network protocols, includes the following functions: construction and maintenance of the topological structure, nomenclature and associated businesses which involves addressing, routing and security and a self-organizing-self-maintenance functions which will minimize consumer spending and maintenance costs. In this paper, freescale's 802.15.4 protocol was used to configure the network layer. A star network and a tree network topology is realized, which can build network, maintenance network and create a routing function automatically. A concise tree network address allocate algorithm is present to assign the network ID automatically.

  3. Manufacturing methods and technology program for ruggedized tactical fiber optic cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, J.; Hand, C.

    1981-04-01

    This report covers manufacturing methods and technology program for ruggedized tactical fiber optic cable. The scope of this effort, as reported herein, includes the following tasks and achievements: (a) Cable process optimization -- (1) Produce trial runs of confirmatory; (2) Complete lay length samples (two lays); (3) Perform optical and mechanical tests on trial confirmatory samples; and (4) Produce samples and evaluate polyurethanes (three types). (b) Use of facilities -- (1) Operate high speed strander, Kevlar braider, and extruder at production speeds. (c) Secondary performance -- (1) Evaluate low temperature performance.

  4. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-15

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements.

  5. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements. PMID:26784192

  6. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements. PMID:26784192

  7. Heidegger in the Hands-on Science and Technology Center: Philosophical Reflections on Learning in Informal Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walton, Richard

    2000-01-01

    Uses interactive science and technology centers as an example of the application of Heidegger's ideas about technology. Discuses Heidegger's concerns about uncritical acceptance of technology. (Contains 27 references.) (SK)

  8. The Scientific Data Management Center: Available Technologies and Highlights

    SciTech Connect

    Shoshani, Arie; Altintas, Ilkay; Chen, Jin; Chin, George; Choudhary, Alok; Crawl, Daniel; Critchlow, Terence J.; Gao, K.; Grimm, B.; Iyer, H.; Kamath, Chandrika; Khan, Ayla; Klasky, S.; Koehler, Sven; Lang, Rob; Latham, Robert J.; Li, J. W.; Liao, Wei-keng; Ligon, J.; Liu, Q.; Ludaescher, Bertram T.; Mouallem, Pierre; Nagappan, Mie; Podhorszki, Norbert; Ross, Rob; Rotem, Doron; Samatova, Nagiza F.; Silva, C.; Sim, A.; Tchoua, Roselynne; Thakur, R.; Vouk, M.; Wu, J.; Yu, Weikuan

    2011-09-30

    Managing scientific data has been identified by the scientific community as one of the most important emerging needs because of the sheer volume and increasing complexity of data being collected. Effectively generating, managing, and analyzing this information requires a comprehensive, end-to-end approach to data management that encompasses all of the stages from the initial data acquisition to the final analysis of the data. Based on community input, we have identified three significant requirements. First, more efficient access to storage systems is needed. In particular, parallel file system and I/O system improvements are needed to write and read large volumes of data without slowing a simulation. Second, scientists require technologies to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis and searches over extremely large data sets. Furthermore, exploratory analysis requires techniques for efficiently selecting subsets of the data. Third, generating the data, collecting and storing the results, keeping track of data provenance, data post-processing, and analysis of results is a tedious, fragmented process. Tools for automation of this process in a robust, tractable, and recoverable fashion are required to enhance scientific exploration.

  9. Development of ultra-precision centering and leveling turntable using aerostatic bearing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Maosheng; Tian, Yanrong; Ji, Lin; Wang, Longxiao; Liu, Jiaqi; Zhao, Weiqian

    2015-02-01

    To perform the ultra-precision centering and leveling operation of large surface under test in optical and mechanical precision measurements, a novel automatic centering and leveling turntable based on the aerostatic bearing technology is developed. In the functional module of centering, a planar aerostatic bearing and two micro-displacement actuators are utilized to achieve centering operation, and in the leveling functional module, a spherical aerostatic bearing, two microdisplacement actuators and a spring pivot are employed to realize the leveling operation. In the paper, the mathematical models of centering and leveling operation are obtained using coordinate transformation, and coupling between the centering and leveling operation is also analyzed. Furthermore, by using distance-measuring interferometer and autocollimator, the resolutions of centering and leveling operation are measured. Finally, errors of the centering and leveling operation are analyzed and the performance evaluation of the turntable is given. The experimental results show that, with 50Kg load, the leveling operation resolution is better than 1.2″; leveling operation range is +/-1° the centering operation resolution is better than 0.05μm centering operation range is about +/-5mm. The developed turntable can satisfy the requirements of ultra-precision, high resolution, wide range, frictionless, high load stiffness, stabilization and small driving force.

  10. VACET: Proposed SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center forEnabling Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, W.; Johnson, Chris; Hansen, Charles; Parker, Steve; Sanderson, Allen; Silva, Claudio; Tricoche, Xavier; Pascucci, Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathon; Duchaineau, Mark; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom,Peter; Ahern, Sean; Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George; Joy, Ken; Hamann, Bernd

    2006-06-19

    This paper accompanies a poster that is being presented atthe SciDAC 2006 meeting in Denver, CO. This project focuses on leveragingscientific visualization and analytics software technology as an enablingtechnology for increasing scientific productivity and insight. Advancesincomputational technology have resultedin an "information big bang,"which in turn has createda significant data understanding challenge. Thischallenge is widely acknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks incontemporary science. The vision for our Center is to respond directly tothat challenge by adapting, extending, creating when necessary anddeploying visualization and data understanding technologies for ourscience stakeholders. Using an organizational model as a Visualizationand Analytics Center for Enabling Technologies (VACET), we are wellpositioned to be responsive to the needs of a diverse set of scientificstakeholders in a coordinated fashion using a range of visualization,mathematics, statistics, computer and computational science and datamanagement technologies.

  11. The feasibility of a unified role for NASA regional dissemination centers and technology application teams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Insights and recommendations arising from a study of the feasibility of combining the NASA Regional Dissemination Center (RDC) and Technology Application Team (Tateam) roles to form Regional Application Centers (RADC's) are presented. The apparent convergence of the functions of RDC's and Tateams is demonstrated and strongly supportive of the primary recommendation that an applications function be added to those already being performed by the RDC's. The basis of a national network for technology transfer and public and private sector problem solving is shown to exist, the skeleton of which is an interactive network of Regional Application Centers and NASA Field Centers. The feasibility of developing and extending this network is considered and the detailed ramifications of so doing are discussed and the imperatives emphasized. It is hypothesized that such a national network could become relatively independent of NASA funding within five years.

  12. Effect of four types of dietary fiber on the technological quality of pasta.

    PubMed

    Bustos, M C; Pérez, G T; León, A E

    2011-06-01

    The development of dietary fiber-enriched foods permits to obtain products with functional properties but can cause several problems in technological quality. The aim of this study was to study the quality of pasta obtained by replacing bread wheat flour with resistant starch II (RSII), resistant starch IV (RSIV), oat bran (OB) and inulin (IN) with the purpose of improving their nutritional quality. RSII, RSIV, OB and IN were substituted for a portion of bread wheat flour at levels 2.5%, 5.0%, 7.5% and 10.0%. Cooking properties, amylose and inulin losses, color and texture were measured. Finally, nutritional quality of enriched pasta was evaluated by protein losses during cooking and total dietary fiber. Microstructure of pasta was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Addition of RSII into pasta formulation improved the quality of the final product. RSIV-enriched pasta presented an improvement in textural characteristics and OB affected cooking properties positively up to 5% of substitution. Inulin was lost during cooking; besides, its addition negatively affected the technological quality of pasta. The results obtained in this study prove that it is possible to elaborate pasta with acceptable cooking quality and with improved nutritional characteristics by adding 10% of RSII and RSIV and 5% of OB. PMID:21593287

  13. A regional technology transfer program. [North Carolina Industrial Applications Center for the Southeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The proliferation of online searching capabilities among its industrial clients, changes in marketing staff and direction, use of Dun and Bradstreet marketing service files, growth of the Annual Service Package program, and services delivered to clients at the NASA funded North Carolina Science and Technology Research Center are described. The library search service was reactivated and enlarged, and a survey was conducted on the NC/STRC Technical Bulletin's effectiveness. Several quotations from clients assess the overall value of the Center's services.

  14. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnology

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Johnson, Chris; Joy, Ken; Ahern, Sean; Pascucci,Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark; Hamann, Bernd; Hansen, Charles; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom, Peter; Meredith, Jeremy; Ostrouchov, George; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier

    2006-11-28

    The SciDAC2 Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) began operation on 10/1/2006. This document, dated11/27/2006, is the first version of the VACET project management plan. Itwas requested by and delivered to ASCR/DOE. It outlines the Center'saccomplishments in the first six weeks of operation along with broadobjectives for the upcoming future (12-24 months).

  15. ALTEC (Advanced Learning Technologies Center): Promoting Faculty Use of Instructional Technology at Arizona State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sager, Harvey; Konomos, Philip

    The first of two parts of this paper, "From Computer Literacy to Technological Literacy: The Challenge for Faculty Development," traces some of the problems and solutions associated with faculty development issues surrounding computers and telecommunications technologies. It is argued that although the need for technological literacy among higher…

  16. NASA Earth Science Mission Control Center Enterprise Emerging Technology Study Study (MCC Technology Study)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dan; Horan, Stephen; Royer, Don; Sullivan, Don; Moe, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports on the results of the study to identify technologies that could have a significant impact on Earth Science mission operations when looking out at the 5-15 year horizon (through 2025). The potential benefits of the new technologies will be discussed, as well as recommendations for early research and development, prototyping, or analysis for these technologies.

  17. The roles and functions of a lunar base Nuclear Technology Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buden, D.; Angelo, J. A., Jr.

    This paper describes the roles and functions of a special Nuclear Technology Center which is developed as an integral part of a permanent lunar base. Numerous contemporary studies clearly point out that nuclear energy technology will play a major role in any successful lunar/Mars initiative program and in the overall establishment of humanity's solar system civilization. The key role of nuclear energy in the providing power has been recognized. A Nuclear Technology Center developed as part of a permanent lunar base can also help bring about many other nuclear technology applications, such as producing radioisotopes for self-illumination, food preservation, waste sterilization, and medical treatment; providing thermal energy for mining, materials processing and agricultural; and as a source of emergency habitat power. Designing such a center will involve the deployment, operation, servicing and waste product management and disposal of megawatt class reactor power plants. This challenge must be met with a minimum of direct human support at the facility. Furthermore, to support the timely, efficient integration of this Nuclear Technology Center in the evolving lunar base infrastructure, an analog of such a facility will be needed here on Earth.

  18. The roles and functions of a lunar base Nuclear Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Buden, D. ); Angelo, J.A. Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the roles and functions of a special Nuclear Technology Center which is developed as an integral part of a permanent lunar base. Numerous contemporary studies clearly point out that nuclear energy technology will play a major role in any successful lunar/Mars initiative program and in the overall establishment of humanity's solar system civilization. The key role of nuclear energy in the providing power has been recognized. A Nuclear Technology Center developed as part of of a permanent lunar base can also help bring about many other nuclear technology applications, such as producing radioisotopes for self-illumination, food preservation, waste sterilization, and medical treatment; providing thermal energy for mining, materials processing and agricultural; and as a source of emergency habitat power. Designing such a center will involve the deployment, operation, servicing and waste product management and disposal of megawatt class reactor power plants. This challenge must be met with a minimum of direct human support at the facility. Furthermore, to support the timely, efficient integration of this Nuclear Technology Center in the evolving lunar base infrastructure, an analog of such a facility will be needed here on Earth. 12 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Gasification and hot gas cleanup at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Strickland, L.D.

    1995-03-01

    The Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) is a Government-owned and Government-operated research center located in Morgantown, West Virginia. Since its opening in 1955, METC has been a Fossil Energy research laboratory focused on the development of advanced Fossil Energy technologies. METC is currently an organizational unit of Fossil Energy which is, in turn, a part of the U.S. Department of Energy. METC pursues the development of fossil energy technologies through contracts with industrial/commercial partners, through Cooperative Research and Development Agreements, and through a relatively small in-house hands-on research program which is coordinated with customer/program needs associated with the major technologies. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) concept for power generation and to review the METC in-house activities related to this concept.

  20. SciDAC Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies

    SciTech Connect

    Bethel, E. Wes; Johnson, Chris; Joy, Ken; Ahern, Sean; Pascucci,Valerio; Childs, Hank; Cohen, Jonathan; Duchaineau, Mark; Hamann, Bernd; Hansen, Charles; Laney, Dan; Lindstrom, Peter; Meredith, Jermey; Ostrouchov, George; Parker, Steven; Silva, Claudio; Sanderson, Allen; Tricoche, Xavier.

    2007-06-30

    The Visualization and Analytics Center for EnablingTechnologies (VACET) focuses on leveraging scientific visualization andanalytics software technology as an enabling technology for increasingscientific productivity and insight. Advances in computational technologyhave resulted in an 'information big bang,' which in turn has created asignificant data understanding challenge. This challenge is widelyacknowledged to be one of the primary bottlenecks in contemporaryscience. The vision of VACET is to adapt, extend, create when necessary,and deploy visual data analysis solutions that are responsive to theneeds of DOE'scomputational and experimental scientists. Our center isengineered to be directly responsive to those needs and to deliversolutions for use in DOE's large open computing facilities. The researchand development directly target data understanding problems provided byour scientific application stakeholders. VACET draws from a diverse setof visualization technology ranging from production quality applicationsand application frameworks to state-of-the-art algorithms forvisualization, analysis, analytics, data manipulation, and datamanagement.

  1. Research and Technology 1998 Annual Report of the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As the NASA Center responsible for preparing and launching space missions, the John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is placing increasing emphasis on its advanced technology development program. This program encompasses the efforts of the entire KSC team, consisting of Government and contractor personnel, working in partnership with academic institutions and commercial industry. This edition of the KSC Research and Technology 1998 Annual Report covers the efforts of these contributors to the KSC advanced technology development program, as well as our technology transfer activities. The following research areas are covered: Life Sciences; Mechanical Engineering; Environmental Engineering; Advanced Software; Atmospheric Science; Materials Science; Nondestructive Evaluation; Process/Industrial Engineering; Automation and Robotics; and Electronics and Instrumentation.

  2. Final Report for "Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software"

    SciTech Connect

    Svetlana Shasharina

    2010-12-01

    The goal of the Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software is to fundamentally changing the way scientific software is developed and used by bringing component-based software development technologies to high-performance scientific and engineering computing. The role of Tech-X work in TASCS project is to provide an outreach to accelerator physics and fusion applications by introducing TASCS tools into applications, testing tools in the applications and modifying the tools to be more usable.

  3. Creating Interoperable Meshing and Discretization Software: The Terascale Simulation Tools and Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, D.; Freitag, L.; Glimm, J.

    2002-03-28

    We present an overview of the technical objectives of the Terascale Simulation Tools and Technologies center. The primary goal of this multi-institution collaboration is to develop technologies that enable application scientists to easily use multiple mesh and discretization strategies within a single simulation on terascale computers. The discussion focuses on our efforts to create interoperable mesh generation tools, high-order discretization techniques, and adaptive meshing strategies.

  4. Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology. A Summary Report of Activities Completed at the National Center for Hydrogen Technology - Year 6

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael

    2012-08-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology (NCHT) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research on hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding for hydrogen-related projects ($24 million for projects in the NCHT, which includes federal and corporate partner development funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT Program's nine activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan that refers to realistic testing of technologies at adequate scale, process intensification, and contaminant control. A number of projects have been completed that range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in Year 6 of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  5. The development and technology transfer of software engineering technology at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitman, C. L.; Erb, D. M.; Izygon, M. E.; Fridge, E. M., III; Roush, G. B.; Braley, D. M.; Savely, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    The United State's big space projects of the next decades, such as Space Station and the Human Exploration Initiative, will need the development of many millions of lines of mission critical software. NASA-Johnson (JSC) is identifying and developing some of the Computer Aided Software Engineering (CASE) technology that NASA will need to build these future software systems. The goal is to improve the quality and the productivity of large software development projects. New trends are outlined in CASE technology and how the Software Technology Branch (STB) at JSC is endeavoring to provide some of these CASE solutions for NASA is described. Key software technology components include knowledge-based systems, software reusability, user interface technology, reengineering environments, management systems for the software development process, software cost models, repository technology, and open, integrated CASE environment frameworks. The paper presents the status and long-term expectations for CASE products. The STB's Reengineering Application Project (REAP), Advanced Software Development Workstation (ASDW) project, and software development cost model (COSTMODL) project are then discussed. Some of the general difficulties of technology transfer are introduced, and a process developed by STB for CASE technology insertion is described.

  6. National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC): Advancing the frontiers of computational science and technology

    SciTech Connect

    Hules, J.

    1996-11-01

    National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) provides researchers with high-performance computing tools to tackle science`s biggest and most challenging problems. Founded in 1974 by DOE/ER, the Controlled Thermonuclear Research Computer Center was the first unclassified supercomputer center and was the model for those that followed. Over the years the center`s name was changed to the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center and then to NERSC; it was relocated to LBNL. NERSC, one of the largest unclassified scientific computing resources in the world, is the principal provider of general-purpose computing services to DOE/ER programs: Magnetic Fusion Energy, High Energy and Nuclear Physics, Basic Energy Sciences, Health and Environmental Research, and the Office of Computational and Technology Research. NERSC users are a diverse community located throughout US and in several foreign countries. This brochure describes: the NERSC advantage, its computational resources and services, future technologies, scientific resources, and computational science of scale (interdisciplinary research over a decade or longer; examples: combustion in engines, waste management chemistry, global climate change modeling).

  7. Research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martello, N.

    1985-01-01

    Various research and technology activities at Ames Research Center's Biomedical Research Division are described. Contributions to the Space Administration's goals in the life sciences include descriptions of research in operational medicine, cardiovascular deconditioning, motion sickness, bone alterations, muscle atrophy, fluid and electrolyte changes, radiation effects and protection, behavior and performance, gravitational biology, and life sciences flight experiments.

  8. Lend an Ear....And Other Technological Challenges at the Tsongas Industrial History Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maher, Philip; Anderson, Mary

    1992-01-01

    Describes some experiences of 30 teachers who met at the Tsongas Industrial History Center in Lowell, Massachusetts, to develop motivating, interdisciplinary activities for middle school students around science, technology, and industry. Discusses interdisciplinary problem solving using the design loop and presents six problems related to corn and…

  9. Community College Advanced Technology Centers: Meeting America's Need for Integrated, Comprehensive Economic Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinckley, Richard; And Others

    By entering into partnerships with business and industry, community colleges are able to offset the high cost of remaining current with training techniques, job market skill requirements, and state-of-the-art hardware. The construction of advanced technology centers (ATCs) located on community college campuses is one key element supporting these…

  10. Space Science Research and Technology at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the various projects and programs managed in the Space Science Programs and Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Projects in the portfolio include NASA's Chandra X-Ray telescope, Hinode solar physics satellite, various advanced space propulsion technologies, including solar sails and tethers, as well as NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs.

  11. Solid State Technology Branch of NASA Lewis Research Center: Fifth Annual Digest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The digest is a collection of papers written by the members of the Solid State Technology Branch of NASA Lewis Research Center from June 1992-June 1993. The papers cover a range of topics relating to superconductivity, monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC's), coplanar waveguide, and material characterization.

  12. Military aircraft and missile technology at the Langley Research Center: A selected bibliography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maddalon, D. V.

    1980-01-01

    A compilation of reference material is presented on the Langley Research Center's efforts in developing advanced military aircraft and missile technology over the past twenty years. Reference material includes research made in aerodynamics, performance, stability, control, stall-spin, propulsion integration, flutter, materials, and structures.

  13. Planning and Using Language Learning Centers. Applications of Technology, Volume 1, Summer 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Jerry W., Ed.

    This collection of articles offers advice on concerns and decisions in planning or remodeling a language learning center, incorporation of satellite reception in the language lab, coping with different television standards and technologies in the language lab, testing language skills, and the role of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in language…

  14. Standards, Firewalls, and General Classroom Mayhem: Implementing Student-Centered Technology Projects in the Elementary Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Mark; Swan, Kathleen Owings

    2006-01-01

    Educators are simultaneously bombarded with both calls to integrate technology in meaningful ways into their teaching and to promote more student-centered activities which combine both content learning and higher-order thinking. This is no small task given the range of student abilities and interests, the increasing emphasis on state standards and…

  15. Advanced Telecommunications and Computer Technologies in Georgia Public Elementary School Library Media Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jackie L.

    The purpose of this study was to determine what recent progress had been made in Georgia public elementary school library media centers regarding access to advanced telecommunications and computer technologies as a result of special funding. A questionnaire addressed the following areas: automation and networking of the school library media center…

  16. Calcined Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    M. D. Staiger M. C. Swenson

    2007-06-01

    This report provides a quantitative inventory and composition (chemical and radioactivity) of calcined waste stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. From December 1963 through May 2000, liquid radioactive wastes generated by spent nuclear fuel reprocessing were converted into a solid, granular form called calcine. This report also contains a description of the calcine storage bins.

  17. NASA Lewis Research Center low-gravity fluid management technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aydelott, J. C.; Carney, M. J.; Hochstein, J. I.

    1985-01-01

    A history of the Lewis Research Center in space fluid management technology program is presented. Current programs which include numerical modeling of fluid systems, heat exchanger/radiator concept studies, and the design of the Cryogenic Fluid Management Facility are discussed. Recent analytical and experimental activities performed to support the Shuttle/Centaur development activity are highlighted.

  18. The National Center to Improve Practice: Promoting the Use of Technology in Special Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorfass, Judith; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Describes the products and services available from the National Center to Improve Practice (NCIP), which exists to promote change within schools and local districts to increase the use of educational technology with students with disabilities. NCIP's awareness materials, telecommunications network, video conferences, technical assistance services…

  19. Selected Topics in Overset Technology Development and Applications At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview of overset technology development and applications at NASA Ames Research Center. The topics include: 1) Overview of overset activities at NASA Ames; 2) Recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools; 3) A general framework for multiple component dynamics; 4) A general script module for automating liquid rocket sub-systems simulations; and 5) Critical future work.

  20. Technology Can Help Young Children Succeed. PACER Center ACTion Information Sheets: PHP-c70

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PACER Center, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Parents of young children with disabilities are discovering that carefully selected computer software and mobile apps can provide many benefits such as improved self-esteem, a longer attention span, and inclusion among family and other children that help their children succeed at home and in school. PACER's Simon Technology Center (STC) can help…

  1. 78 FR 65300 - Notice of Availability (NOA) for General Purpose Warehouse and Information Technology Center...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Technology Center Construction (GPW/IT)--Tracy Site-- Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Defense Logistics Agency, DoD. ACTION: Notice of Availability (NOA) for GPW/IT--Tracy Site-- Environmental Assessment. SUMMARY: The Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) announces the availability of an environmental assessment...

  2. Mobilizing Learning Resources in a Transnational Classroom: Translocal and Digital Resources in a Community Technology Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noguerón-Liu, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Drawing from transnational and activity theory frameworks, this study analyzes the ways translocal flows shape learning in a community technology center serving adult immigrants in the US Southwest. It also explores students' constructions of the transnational nature of the courses they took, where they had access to both online and…

  3. Examining Health Information Technology Implementations: Case of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Behkami, Nima A.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that the use of Health Information Technology (HIT) is associated with reduced cost and increased quality of care. This dissertation examined the use of registries in Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) practices. A survey questionnaire was sent to a nationwide group of clinics certified for being a PCMH. They were asked to…

  4. An optical fiber Fabry-Perot flow measurement technology based on partial bend structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Huijia; Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Xuezhi; Pan, Yuheng; Zhu, Wanshan; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Tiegen

    2016-08-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) flow measurement technology is presented, which is based on partial bend structure. A 90° partial bend structure is designed to achieve the non-probe flow measurement with a pressure difference. The fluid simulation results of partial bend structure show that the error of the pressure difference is below 0.05 kPa during steady flow. The optical fiber F-P sensor mounted on the elbow with pressure test accuracy of 1% full scale is used to measure the fluid flow. Flow test results show that when the flow varies from 1 m3/h to 6.5 m3/h at ambient temperature of 25 °C, the response time is 1 s and the flow test accuracy is 4.5% of the F-P flow test system, proving that the F-P flow test method based on partial bend structure can be used in fluid flow measurement.

  5. An optical fiber Fabry-Perot flow measurement technology based on partial bend structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijia; Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Xuezhi; Pan, Yuheng; Zhu, Wanshan; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Tiegen

    2016-08-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) flow measurement technology is presented, which is based on partial bend structure. A 90° partial bend structure is designed to achieve the non-probe flow measurement with a pressure difference. The fluid simulation results of partial bend structure show that the error of the pressure difference is below 0.05 kPa during steady flow. The optical fiber F-P sensor mounted on the elbow with pressure test accuracy of 1% full scale is used to measure the fluid flow. Flow test results show that when the flow varies from 1 m(3)/h to 6.5 m(3)/h at ambient temperature of 25 °C, the response time is 1 s and the flow test accuracy is 4.5% of the F-P flow test system, proving that the F-P flow test method based on partial bend structure can be used in fluid flow measurement.

  6. Wide field fluorescence imaging in narrow passageways using scanning fiber endoscope technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cameron M.; Chandler, John E.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2010-02-01

    An ultrathin scanning fiber endoscope (SFE) has been developed for high resolution imaging of regions in the body that are commonly inaccessible. The SFE produces 500 line color images at 30 Hz frame rate while maintaining a 1.2-1.7 mm outer diameter. The distal tip of the SFE houses a 9 mm rigid scan engine attached to a highly flexible tether (minimum bend radius < 8 mm) comprised of optical fibers and electrical wires within a protective sheath. Unlike other ultrathin technologies, the unique characteristics of this system have allowed the SFE to navigate narrow passages without sacrificing image quality. To date, the SFE has been used for in vivo imaging of the bile duct, esophagus and peripheral airways. In this study, the standard SFE operation was tailored to capture wide field fluorescence images and spectra. Green (523 nm) and blue (440 nm) lasers were used as illumination sources, while the white balance gain values were adjusted to accentuate red fluorescence signal. To demonstrate wide field fluorescence imaging of small lumens, the SFE was inserted into a phantom model of a human pancreatobiliary tract and navigated to a custom fluorescent target. Both wide field fluorescence and standard color images of the target were captured to demonstrate multimodal imaging.

  7. Deformation monitoring of long GFRP bar soil nails using distributed optical fiber sensing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Cheng-Yu; Yin, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Yi-Fan

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a new measurement technology characterized by the use of distributed optical fiber sensor (OFSs) for monitoring the strain and temperature distribution of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bar soil nails. Laboratory tension tests were used to verify the performance of the OFSs for strain and elongation monitoring of GFRP bars. The measured strain data from the OFSs agree fairly well with the data from strain gauges in calibration tests. In field monitoring tests, two GFRP bar soil nails were installed with OFSs and pure strain data were used to evaluate the performance of GFRP bar soil nails after installation in a practical slope. Both the strain and temperature distributions measured by the OFSs show symmetric features. A Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) measurement unit was used to collect temperature and strain data from the OFSs. The monitoring data show that the accumulative elongations of the soil nails present a continuous but limited increase with time in the field. The achieved maximum elongations of soil nails were less than 0.4 mm. The measured axial elongations of the soil nails were also validated using corresponding data predicted by a theoretical model. The test results from the present study prove that BOTDA based sensors are useful for the investigation of the average strain distributions (or elongation) of long soil nails and these data are useful for the estimation of the potential sliding surface of the entire soil nailing system.

  8. An optical fiber Fabry-Perot flow measurement technology based on partial bend structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijia; Jiang, Junfeng; Zhang, Xuezhi; Pan, Yuheng; Zhu, Wanshan; Zhou, Xiang; Liu, Tiegen

    2016-08-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot (F-P) flow measurement technology is presented, which is based on partial bend structure. A 90° partial bend structure is designed to achieve the non-probe flow measurement with a pressure difference. The fluid simulation results of partial bend structure show that the error of the pressure difference is below 0.05 kPa during steady flow. The optical fiber F-P sensor mounted on the elbow with pressure test accuracy of 1% full scale is used to measure the fluid flow. Flow test results show that when the flow varies from 1 m(3)/h to 6.5 m(3)/h at ambient temperature of 25 °C, the response time is 1 s and the flow test accuracy is 4.5% of the F-P flow test system, proving that the F-P flow test method based on partial bend structure can be used in fluid flow measurement. PMID:27587096

  9. Polypropylene/glass fiber hierarchical composites incorporating inorganic fullerene-like nanoparticles for advanced technological applications.

    PubMed

    Díez-Pascual, Ana M; Naffakh, Mohammed

    2013-10-01

    Novel isotactic polypropylene (iPP)/glass fiber (GF) laminates reinforced with inorganic fullerene-like tungsten disulfide (IF-WS2) nanoparticles as environmentally friendly fillers have been successfully fabricated by simple melt-blending and fiber impregnation in a hot-press without the addition of any compatibilizer. The influence of IF-WS2 concentration on the morphology, viscosity. and thermal and mechanical behavior of the hierarchical composites has been investigated. Results revealed an unprecedented 62 °C increase in the degradation temperature of iPP/GF upon addition of only 4.0 wt % IF-WS2. The coexistence of both micro- and nanoscale fillers resulted in synergistic effects on enhancing the stiffness, strength, crystallinity, thermal stability, glass transition (Tg) and heat distortion temperature (HDT) of the matrix. The approach used in this work is an efficient, versatile, scalable and economic strategy to improve the mechanical and thermal behavior of GF-reinforced thermoplastics with a view to extend their use in advanced technological applications. This new type of composite materials shows great potential to improve the efficiency and sustainability of many forms of transport. PMID:24015820

  10. Recent advances in Ni-H2 technology at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalezsanabria, O. D.; Britton, D. L.; Smithrick, J. J.; Reid, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has concentrated its efforts on advancing the Ni-H2 system technology for low Earth orbit applications. Component technology as well as the design principles were studied in an effort to understand the system behavior and failure mechanisms in order to increase performance and extend cycle life. The design principles were previously addressed. The component development is discussed, in particular the separator and nickel electrode and how these efforts will advance the Ni-H2 system technology.

  11. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    A. K. Herbst; J. A. McCray; R. J. Kirkham; J. Pao; S. H. Hinckley

    1999-09-30

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  12. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-99 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    1999-10-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1999, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed on radionuclide leaching, microbial degradation, waste neutralization, and a small mockup for grouting the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  13. Technology utilization in a non-urban region: Further impact and technique of the Technology Use Studies Center, 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, H. C. (Editor); Moore, A. M.; Dodd, B.; Dittmar, V.

    1971-01-01

    The clientele served by the Technology Use Studies Center (TUSC) is updated. Manufacturing leads the list of client firms. The standard industrial classification (SIC) range of these firms is broad. Substantial numbers of college and university faculties are using TUSC services. Field operations inherent in the functions of dissemination and assistance are reviewed. Increasing emphasis among clientele is on environmental concerns and management. A record is provided of the institutions contacted and the extent of TUSC involvement with them, as well as TUSC's cooperation with agencies and organizations. The impact of TUSC and the NASA-sponsored Technology Utilization Program on other public agencies is discussed.

  14. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, Alan Keith; Mc Cray, John Alan; Kirkham, Robert John; Pao, Jenn Hai; Argyle, Mark Don; Lauerhass, Lance; Bendixsen, Carl Lee; Hinckley, Steve Harold

    2000-11-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  15. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-2000 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Kirkham, R.J.; Pao, J.; Argyle, M.D.; Lauerhass, L.; Bendixsen, C.L.; Hinckley, S.H.

    2000-10-31

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program anticipated that grouting will be used for disposal of low-level and transuranic wastes generated at the Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC). During fiscal year 2000, grout formulations were studied for transuranic waste derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste and for projected newly generated low-level liquid waste. Additional studies were completed using silica gel and other absorbents to solidify sodium-bearing wastes. A feasibility study and conceptual design were completed for the construction of a grout pilot plant for simulated wastes and demonstration facility for actual wastes.

  16. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program FY-98 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.; McCray, J.A.; Rogers, A.Z.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethrope, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  17. Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program, FY-98 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Herbst, A.K.; Rogers, A.Z.; McCray, J.A.; Simmons, R.F.; Palethorpe, S.J.

    1999-03-01

    The Low-Activity Waste Process Technology Program at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) anticipates that large volumes of low-level/low-activity wastes will need to be grouted prior to near-surface disposal. During fiscal year 1998, three grout formulations were studied for low-activity wastes derived from INTEC liquid sodium-bearing waste. Compressive strength and leach results are presented for phosphate bonding cement, acidic grout, and alkaline grout formulations. In an additional study, grout formulations are recommended for stabilization of the INTEC underground storage tank residual heels.

  18. Development of a national center for hydrogen technology. A summary report of activities completed at the national center hydrogen technology from 2005 to 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Michael J.

    2011-06-01

    The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) located in Grand Forks, North Dakota, has operated the National Center for Hydrogen Technology® (NCHT®) since 2005 under a Cooperative Agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The EERC has a long history of hydrogen generation and utilization from fossil fuels, and under the NCHT Program, the EERC has accelerated its research of hydrogen generation and utilization topics. Since the NCHT's inception, the EERC has received more than $65 million in funding of hydrogen-related projects ($20 million for the NCHT project which includes federal and corporate development partner funds) involving more than 85 partners (27 with the NCHT). The NCHT project's 19 activities span a broad range of technologies that align well with the Advanced Fuels Program goals and, specifically, those described in the Hydrogen from Coal Program research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) plan. A number of projects have been completed which range from technical feasibility of several hydrogen generation and utilization technologies to public and technical education and outreach tools. Projects under the NCHT have produced hydrogen from natural gas, coal, liquid hydrocarbons, and biomass. The hydrogen or syngas generated by these processes has also been purified to transportation-grade quality in many of these instances or burned directly for power generation. Also, several activities are still undergoing research, development, demonstration, and commercialization at the NCHT. This report provides a summary overview of the projects completed in the first 5 years of the NCHT. Individual activity reports are referenced as a source of detailed information on each activity.

  19. The Earth System Grid Center for Enabling Technologies: Focusing Technologies on Climate Datasets and Resource Needs

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Dean N.

    2007-09-26

    This report discusses a project that used prototyping technology to access and analyze climate data. This project was initially funded under the DOE’s Next Generation Internet (NGI) program, with follow-on support from BER and the Mathematical, Information, and Computational Sciences (MICS) office. In this prototype, we developed Data Grid technologies for managing the movement and replication of large datasets, and applied these technologies in a practical setting (i.e., an ESG-enabled data browser based on current climate data analysis tools), achieving cross-country transfer rates of more than 500 Mb/s. Having demonstrated the potential for remotely accessing and analyzing climate data located at sites across the U.S., we won the “Hottest Infrastructure” award in the Network Challenge event. While the ESG I prototype project substantiated a proof of concept (“Turning Climate Datasets into Community Resources”), the SciDAC Earth System Grid (ESG) II project made this a reality. Our efforts targeted the development of metadata technologies (standard schema, XML metadata extraction based on netCDF, and a Metadata Catalog Service), security technologies (Web-based user registration and authentication, and community authorization), data transport technologies (GridFTPenabled OPeNDAP-G for high-performance access, robust multiple file transport and integration with mass storage systems, and support for dataset aggregation and subsetting), as well as web portal technologies to provide interactive access to climate data holdings. At this point, the technology was in place and assembled, and ESG II was poised to make a substantial impact on the climate modelling community.

  20. The rehabilitation engineering research center for the advancement of cognitive technologies.

    PubMed

    Heyn, Patricia Cristine; Cassidy, Joy Lucille; Bodine, Cathy

    2015-02-01

    Barring few exceptions, allied health professionals, engineers, manufacturers of assistive technologies (ATs), and consumer product manufacturers have developed few technologies for individuals with cognitive impairments (CIs). In 2004, the National Institute on Disability Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR) recognized the need to support research in this emergent field. They funded the first Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center for the Advancement of Cognitive Technologies (RERC-ACT). The RERC-ACT has since designed and evaluated existing and emerging technologies through rigorous research, improving upon existing AT devices, and creating new technologies for individuals with CIs. The RERC-ACT has contributed to the development and testing of AT products that assist persons with CIs to actively engage in tasks of daily living at home, school, work, and in the community. This article highlights the RERC-ACT's engineering development and research projects and discusses how current research may impact the quality of life for an aging population.

  1. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops to pet one of the dogs that serves with Canine Companions for Independence, a vendor displaying its capabilities at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) 1999 Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. Standing at the right is Carol Cavanaugh, with KSC Public Services; behind Bridges is Nancie Strott (left), a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair, and Sterling Walker (right), director of Engineering Development and chairman of DAAWG. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the other vendors participating are Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  2. Center Director Bridges visits Disability Awareness and Action working Group Technology Fair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Center Director Roy Bridges stops at the Stewart Eye Institute table at the Disability Awareness and Action Working Group (DAAWG) 1999 Technology Fair being held Oct. 20-21 at Kennedy Space Center. Behind Bridges is Sterling Walker, director of Engineering Development at KSC and chairman of DAAWG. At the near right are George and Marian Hall, who are with the Institute. At the left is Nancie Strott, a multi-media specialist with Dynacs and chairperson of the Fair. The Fair is highlighting vendors demonstrating mobility, hearing, vision and silent disability assistive technology. The purpose is to create an awareness of the types of technology currently available to assist people with various disabilities in the workplace. The theme is that of this year's National Disability Employment Awareness Month, 'Opening Doors to Ability.' Some of the vendors participating are Canine Companions for Independence, Goodwill Industries, Accessible Structures, Division of Blind Services, Space Coast Center for Independent Living, KSC Fitness Center and Delaware North Parks Services.

  3. Health Information Technology Coordination to Support Patient-centered Care Coordination

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, W.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Objective To select papers published in 2014, illustrating how information technology can contribute to and improve patient-centered care coordination. Method The two section editors performed a literature review from Medline and Web of Science to select a list of candidate best papers on the use of information technology for patient-centered care coordination. These papers were peer-reviewed by external reviewers and three of them were selected as “best papers”. Results The first selected paper reports a qualitative study exploring the gap between current practices of care coordination in various settings and idealized longitudinal care plans. The second selected paper illustrates several unintended consequences of HIT designed to improve care coordination. The third selected paper shows that advanced analytic techniques in medical informatics can be instrumental in studying patient-centered care coordination. Conclusions The realization of true patient-centered care coordination is dependent upon a number of factors. Standardization of clinical documentation and HIT interoperability across organization and settings is a critical prerequisite for HIT to support patient-centered care coordination. Enabling patient involvement is an efficient means for goal setting and health information sharing. Additionally, unintended consequences of HIT tools (both positive and negative) must be measured and taken into account for quality improvement. PMID:26293848

  4. Nondestructive thickness measurement system for multiple layers of paint based on femtosecond fiber laser technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Masaaki; Takayanagi, Jun; Ohtake, Hideyuki

    2016-11-01

    Because optical fiber-based optical systems are generally robust against external interference, they can be used as reliable systems in industrial applications in various fields. This paper describes fiber lasers generating femtosecond pulses that use optical fibers as gain media and optical paths. Additionally, the nondestructive paint multilayer thickness measurement of automotive parts using terahertz waves generated and detected by femtosecond fiber laser systems was conducted.

  5. Nondestructive thickness measurement system for multiple layers of paint based on femtosecond fiber laser technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sudo, Masaaki; Takayanagi, Jun; Ohtake, Hideyuki

    2016-09-01

    Because optical fiber-based optical systems are generally robust against external interference, they can be used as reliable systems in industrial applications in various fields. This paper describes fiber lasers generating femtosecond pulses that use optical fibers as gain media and optical paths. Additionally, the nondestructive paint multilayer thickness measurement of automotive parts using terahertz waves generated and detected by femtosecond fiber laser systems was conducted.

  6. GOES SXI Monthly Project Status Report Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center Month of October 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Mons D.

    2004-01-01

    The Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space Advanced Technology Center (LMATC) is developing three Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) instruments. Two are being built for flights on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) N and O, and one will be a flight spare. The SXI development is being managed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. The SXI will image the full sun at wavelengths between approximately 6 and 60 A with a detector having 5 arcsec pixels. The launch of the first SXI will be on GOES N and the second SXI is to be launched on on GOES O or P.

  7. Pre-Implementation and Performance Plan for the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center

    SciTech Connect

    Quiroga, Marcelo

    2007-03-30

    This report discusses the Latino Development and Technology Accelerator Center (Center) and its innovative economic development program. The chapters describe the organization and the operations of a two-pillar model for training and business acceleration and how the program focuses on the economic development of a disadvantaged Chicago, Illinois, Hispanic community located in Humboldt Park. The Humboldt Park community is located 3 miles west of Chicago's affluent downtown. Humboldt Park residents have income levels below the poverty line and unemployment rates twice the national average.

  8. Research and technology: 1985 annual report of the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1985 are highlighted. Included are research funded by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology; Solar System Exploration and Life Sciences research funded by the Office of Space Sciences and Applications; and Advanced Programs tasks funded by the Office of Space Flight. Summary sections describing the role of the Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by one-page descriptions of significant projects. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

  9. Research and technology: 1986 annual report of the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Johnson Space Center accomplishments in new and advanced concepts during 1986 are highlighted. Included are research funded by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology; Solar System Exploration and Life Sciences research funded by the Office of Space Sciences and Applications; and Advanced Programs tasks funded by the Office of Space Flight. Summary sections describing the role of the Johnson Space Center in each program are followed by one-page descriptions of significant projects. Descriptions are suitable for external consumption, free of technical jargon, and illustrated to increase ease of comprehension.

  10. MFOX-Technology, transceiver design and performance. [Multipurpose Fiber Optic Transceiver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Channin, Donald J.

    1987-01-01

    The multipurpose fiber optic transceiver (MFOX) family of fiber-optic transceivers will provide standard, military-qualified off-the-shelf transmitters and receivers for ground-based tactical fiber-optic communications. The author describes these units and their capabilities for diverse military applications.

  11. Technology and Harmony with Nature. Technology Studies Resource Center, Working Papers Series, Volume 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutcliffe, Stephen H., Ed.

    A non-anthropocentric view of humankind's relationship with nature is addressed in these essays which are a part of an ongoing series of working papers on technology. The first essay, "Extremist Conceptions of Man and Nature" by Eric Katz critiques three popular philosophies regarding nature and the environment that are believed to be misguided…

  12. Integration of data systems and technology improves research and collaboration for a superfund research center.

    PubMed

    Hobbie, Kevin A; Peterson, Elena S; Barton, Michael L; Waters, Katrina M; Anderson, Kim A

    2012-08-01

    Large collaborative centers are a common model for accomplishing integrated environmental health research. These centers often include various types of scientific domains (e.g., chemistry, biology, bioinformatics) that are integrated to solve some of the nation's key economic or public health concerns. The Superfund Research Center (SRP) at Oregon State University (OSU) is one such center established in 2008 to study the emerging health risks of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons while using new technologies both in the field and laboratory. With outside collaboration at remote institutions, success for the center as a whole depends on the ability to effectively integrate data across all research projects and support cores. Therefore, the OSU SRP center developed a system that integrates environmental monitoring data with analytical chemistry data and downstream bioinformatics and statistics to enable complete "source-to-outcome" data modeling and information management. This article describes the development of this integrated information management system that includes commercial software for operational laboratory management and sample management in addition to open-source custom-built software for bioinformatics and experimental data management.

  13. The Use of DOE Technologies at The World Trade Center Incident: Lessons Learned

    SciTech Connect

    McCabe, B.; Kovach, J.; Carpenter, C.; Blair, D.

    2003-02-25

    In response to the attack of the World Trade Center (WTC) on September 11, 2001, the International Union of Operating Engineers (IUOE) National Hazmat Program (OENHP) assembled and deployed a HAZMAT Emergency Management Team (Team) to the disaster site (Site). The response team consisted of a Certified Industrial Hygienist and a rotating team of industrial hygienists, safety professionals, and certified HAZMAT instructors. Through research funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) and managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the IUOE conducted human factors assessments on baseline and innovative technologies during real-world conditions and served as an advocate at the WTC disaster site to identify opportunities for the use and evaluation of DOE technologies. From this work, it is clear that opportunities exist for more DOE technologies to be made readily available for use in future emergencies.

  14. A project to transfer technology from NASA centers in support of industrial innovation in the midwest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barr, B. G.

    1986-01-01

    A technology transfer program utilizing graduate students in mechanical engineering at the University of Kansas was initiated in early 1981. The objective of the program was to encourage industrial innovation in the Midwest through improved industry/university cooperation and the utilization of NASA technology. A related and important aspect of the program was the improvement of graduate engineering education through the involvement of students in the identification and accomplishment of technological objectives in cooperation with scientists at NASA centers and engineers in industry. The pilot NASA/University Industrial Innovation Program was an outstanding success based on its ability to: attract top graduate students; secure industry support; and stimulate industry/university cooperation leading to enhanced university capability and utilization of advanced technology by industry.

  15. Waste Processing Research and Technology Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Kliss, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The current "store and return" approach for handling waste products generated during low Earth orbit missions will not meet the requirements for future human missions identified in NASA s new Exploration vision. The objective is to develop appropriate reliable waste management systems that minimize maintenance and crew time, while maintaining crew health and safety, as well as providing protection of planetary surfaces. Solid waste management requirements for these missions include waste volume reduction, stabilization and storage, water recovery, and ultimately recovery of carbon dioxide, nutrients and other resources from a fully regenerative food production life support system. This paper identifies the key drivers for waste management technology development within NASA, and provides a roadmap for the developmental sequence and progression of technologies. Recent results of research and technology development activities at NASA Ames Research Center on candidate waste management technologies with emphasis on compaction, lyophilization, and incineration are discussed.

  16. Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzi, L.M.; Norkus, J.K.; Paik, I.K.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-08-19

    The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D&D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D&D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D&D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D&D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D&D will be made available on request.

  17. Available decontamination and decommissioning capabilities at the Savannah River Technology Center

    SciTech Connect

    Polizzi, L.M.; Norkus, J.K.; Paik, I.K.; Wooten, L.A.

    1992-08-19

    The Safety Analysis and Engineering Services Group has performed a survey of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) technical capabilities, skills, and experience in Decontamination and Decommissioning (D D) activities. The goal of this survey is to enhance the integration of the SRTC capabilities with the technical needs of the Environmental Restoration Department D D program and the DOE Office of Technology Development through the Integrated Demonstration Program. This survey has identified technical capabilities, skills, and experience in the following D D areas: Characterization, Decontamination, Dismantlement, Material Disposal, Remote Systems, and support on Safety Technology for D D. This review demonstrates the depth and wealth of technical capability resident in the SRTC in relation to these activities, and the unique qualifications of the SRTC to supply technical support in the area of DOE facility D D. Additional details on specific technologies and applications to D D will be made available on request.

  18. Advanced technology needs for a global change science program: Perspective of the Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowell, Lawrence F.; Swissler, Thomas J.

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the NASA program in remote sensing is primarily the Earth system science and the monitoring of the Earth global changes. One of NASA's roles is the identification and development of advanced sensing techniques, operational spacecraft, and the many supporting technologies necessary to meet the stringent science requirements. Langley Research Center has identified the elements of its current and proposed advanced technology development program that are relevant to global change science according to three categories: sensors, spacecraft, and information system technologies. These technology proposals are presented as one-page synopses covering scope, objective, approach, readiness timeline, deliverables, and estimated funding. In addition, the global change science requirements and their measurement histories are briefly discussed.

  19. A Review of User-Centered Design for Diabetes-Related Consumer Health Informatics Technologies

    PubMed Central

    LeRouge, Cynthia; Wickramasinghe, Nilmini

    2013-01-01

    User-centered design (UCD) is well recognized as an effective human factor engineering strategy for designing ease of use in the total customer experience with products and information technology that has been applied specifically to health care information technology systems. We conducted a literature review to analyze the current research regarding the use of UCD methods and principles to support the development or evaluation of diabetes-related consumer health informatics technology (CHIT) initiatives. Findings indicate that (1) UCD activities have been applied across the technology development life cycle stages, (2) there are benefits to incorporating UCD to better inform CHIT development in this area, and (3) the degree of adoption of the UCD process is quite uneven across diabetes CHIT studies. In addition, few to no studies report on methods used across all phases of the life cycle with process detail. To address that void, the Appendix provides an illustrative case study example of UCD techniques across development stages. PMID:23911188

  20. Johnson Space Center Research and Technology Annual Report 1998-1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbey, George W. S.

    2004-01-01

    As the principle center for NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) leads NASA development of human spacecraft, human support systems, and human spacecraft operations. An important element in implementing this mission, JSC has focused on developing the infrastructure and partnerships that enable the technology development for future NASA programs. In our efforts to develop key technologies, we have found that collaborative relationships with private industry and academia strengthen our capabilities, infuse innovative ideas, and provide alternative applications for our development projects. The American public has entrusted NASA with the responsibility for space technology development, and JSC is committed to the transfer of the technologies that we develop to the private sector for further development and application. It is our belief that commercialization of NASA technologies benefits both American industry and NASA through technology innovation and continued partnering. To this end, we present the 1998-1999 JSC Research and Technology Report. As your guide to the current JSC technologies, this report showcases the projects in work at JSC that may be of interest to U.S. industry, academia, and other government agencies (federal, state, and local). For each project, potential alternative uses and commercial applications are described. To aid in your search, projects are arranged according to the Major Product Groups used by CorpTech to classify and index types of industry. Some projects fall into multiple categories and are placed under the predominant category, for example, an artificial intelligence project is listed under the Computer Software category, while its function is to automate a process (Automation category).

  1. Goddard's New Approach to Information Technology: The Information Systems Center an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kea, Howard E.

    1994-01-01

    The Information Center (ISC) at Goddard was created as part of the Goddard reorganization and was located within the Applied Engineering and Technology (AET) Directorate. The creation of ISC was to: (1) focus expertise and leadership in information system development; (2) Promote organizational collaboration, partnerships, and resource sharing; (3) Stimulate design/development of seamless end-to-end flight and ground systems; (4) Enable flexibility to effectively support many simultaneous projects by improved access to critical mass of discipline expertise; (5) Enhance career growth and opportunities including multi-disciplinary opportunities; and (6) to improve communications among information system professionals. This paper presents a general overview of the Information Systems Center as well as the role of the Software Engineering Laboratory within the center.

  2. Demonstration house and resource center for appropriate technology. Final report, October 1, 1981-June 30, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-18

    The Thoreau Center was developed as an effective demonstration for appropriate technology in Des Moines, Iowa. Efforts included: (1) physical improvements for which funding was granted: insulation of walls of the brick house from inside, and painting of walls with vapor-barrier paint; construction of a batch-type or breadbox solar hot water pre-heating system; construction of a variety of window insulation treatments for all windows; evaluation of the Center's energy use over a three year (4th year included as well) period; insulation of basement (office) space using several alternative methods; investigation of various projects, such as the originally proposed greywater system and ceiling fans; and continued emphasis on winterization and low-cost conservation methods such as caulking, weatherstripping, waterheater insulation, lowered thermostat, etc. Services of the Resource Center Library which were supported through grant funds are summarized.

  3. Electrical Power Research Institute Environmental Control Technology Center Report to the Steering Committee

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    1998-02-18

    Operations and maintenance continued this month at the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) Environmental Control Technology Center (ECTC). Testing for the month involved the EPRI/ADA Technologies dry sorbent sampling unit and the testing of Hg catalysts/sorbents in this low-flow, temperature controlled system. The 1.0 MW Cold-Side Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) unit, the 0.4 MW Mini Pilot Wet Scrubber, and the 4.0 MW Pilot Wet Scrubber remained idle this month in a cold-standby mode and were inspected regularly. These units remain available for testing as future work is identified.

  4. Career and Technology Center Guides Students in Real-Life Careers | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Carolynne Keenan, Contributing Writer Frederick County Public School students have a unique opportunity—a chance to get a real-world, hands-on experience in biomedical science and biotechnology before they even graduate from high school, thanks to the Frederick County Career and Technology Center (CTC). Several years ago, the CTC established its biomedical sciences program with a curriculum from Project Lead the Way (PLTW), a nonprofit, nationwide developer of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education in elementary, middle, and high schools.

  5. BioServe space technologies: A NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    BioServe Space Technologies, a NASA Center for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS), was established in 1987. As is characteristic of each CCDS designated by NASA, the goals of this commercial center are aimed at stimulating high technology research that takes advantage of the space environment and at leading in the development of new products and services which have commercial potential or that contribute to possible new commercial ventures. BioServe's efforts in these areas focus upon space life science studies and the development of enabling devices that will facilitate ground-based experiments as well as the conversion of such to the microgravity environment. A direct result of BioServe's hardware development and life sciences studies is the training of the next generation of bioengineers who will be knowledgeable and comfortable working with the challenges of the space frontier.

  6. Calcine Waste Storage at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center

    SciTech Connect

    Staiger, Merle Daniel; M. C. Swenson

    2005-01-01

    This report documents an inventory of calcined waste produced at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center during the period from December 1963 to May 2000. The report was prepared based on calciner runs, operation of the calcined solids storage facilities, and miscellaneous operational information that establishes the range of chemical compositions of calcined waste stored at Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The report will be used to support obtaining permits for the calcined solids storage facilities, possible treatment of the calcined waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, and to ship the waste to an off-site facility including a geologic repository. The information in this report was compiled from calciner operating data, waste solution analyses and volumes calcined, calciner operating schedules, calcine temperature monitoring records, and facility design of the calcined solids storage facilities. A compact disk copy of this report is provided to facilitate future data manipulations and analysis.

  7. ALARA Center of Technology promotes good radiological work practices at Hanford

    SciTech Connect

    Waggoner, L.O., Westinghouse Hanford, Richland, WA

    1997-10-31

    The central Radiological Control Organization, originally under the previous Management and Operations contractor (Westinghouse Hanford Company) decided that a significant improvement in ALARA implementation would result if examples of engineered controls used for radiological work were assembled in one location to provide a ``showcase`` for workers and managers. The facility would be named the ALARA Center of Technology (ACT) and would include the latest technologies used to accomplish radiological work, as well as proven techniques, tools, and equipment. A location for the Center was selected in the 200 East Area of Hanford in a central location to be easily accessible to all facilities and contractors. Since there was little money available for this project, a decision was made to contact several vendors and request loans of their tools, equipment, and materials. In return, the center would help market products on site and assist with product demonstrations when the vendors visited Hanford. Out of 28 vendors originally contacted, 16 responded with offers to loan products. This included a containment tent, several glove bags, BEPA filtered vacuum cleaners, portable ventilation systems, fixatives, temporary shielding, pumps, and several special tools. Vendors who could not provide products sent videos and brochures. Westinghouse Hanford Company began using the ACT in June 1996. Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc., the present Management and Integrating Contractor for the Hanford Site, held the formal opening ceremony of the ALARA Center of Technology on October 1, 1996. The Center now has about 1200 ft{sup 2} of floor space fi Iled with tools, equipment and material used to perform radiological work.

  8. Thermal Technology Development Activities at the Goddard Space Flight Center - 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Dan

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of thermal technology development activities carried out at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center during 2001. Specific topics covered include: two-phase systems (heat pipes, capillary pumped loops, vapor compression systems and phase change materials), variable emittance systems, advanced coatings, high conductivity materials and electrohydrodynamic (EHD) thermal coatings. The application of these activities to specific space missions is also discussed.

  9. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, Alan

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  10. Patient safety goals for the proposed Federal Health Information Technology Safety Center.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Classen, David C; Singh, Hardeep

    2015-03-01

    The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology is expected to oversee creation of a Health Information Technology (HIT) Safety Center. While its functions are still being defined, the center is envisioned as a public-private entity focusing on promotion of HIT related patient safety. We propose that the HIT Safety Center leverages its unique position to work with key administrative and policy stakeholders, healthcare organizations (HCOs), and HIT vendors to achieve four goals: (1) facilitate creation of a nationwide 'post-marketing' surveillance system to monitor HIT related safety events; (2) develop methods and governance structures to support investigation of major HIT related safety events; (3) create the infrastructure and methods needed to carry out random assessments of HIT related safety in complex HCOs; and (4) advocate for HIT safety with government and private entities. The convening ability of a federally supported HIT Safety Center could be critically important to our transformation to a safe and effective HIT enabled healthcare system. PMID:25332353

  11. Patient safety goals for the proposed Federal Health Information Technology Safety Center.

    PubMed

    Sittig, Dean F; Classen, David C; Singh, Hardeep

    2015-03-01

    The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology is expected to oversee creation of a Health Information Technology (HIT) Safety Center. While its functions are still being defined, the center is envisioned as a public-private entity focusing on promotion of HIT related patient safety. We propose that the HIT Safety Center leverages its unique position to work with key administrative and policy stakeholders, healthcare organizations (HCOs), and HIT vendors to achieve four goals: (1) facilitate creation of a nationwide 'post-marketing' surveillance system to monitor HIT related safety events; (2) develop methods and governance structures to support investigation of major HIT related safety events; (3) create the infrastructure and methods needed to carry out random assessments of HIT related safety in complex HCOs; and (4) advocate for HIT safety with government and private entities. The convening ability of a federally supported HIT Safety Center could be critically important to our transformation to a safe and effective HIT enabled healthcare system.

  12. Legacy and Emergence of Spaceport Technology Development at the Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starr, Stanley; Voska, Ned (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has a long and successful legacy in the checkout and launch of missiles and space vehicles. These operations have become significantly more complex, and their evolution has driven the need for many technology developments. Unanticipated events have also underscored the need for a local, highly responsive technology development and testing capability. This evolution is briefly described, as well as the increasing level of technology capability at KSC. The importance of these technologies in achieving past national space goals suggests that the accomplishment of low-cost and reliable access to space will depend critically upon KSC's future success in developing spaceport technologies. This paper concludes with a description KSC's current organizational approach and major thrust areas in technology development. The first phase of our historical review focuses on the development and testing of field- deployable short- and intermediate-range ballistic missiles (1953 to 1958). These vehicles are later pressed into service as space launchers. The second phase involves the development of large space lift vehicles culminating in the Saturn V launches (1959 to 1975). The third phase addresses the development and operations of the partially reusable launch vehicle, Space Shuttle (1976 to 2000). In the current era, KSC is teaming with the U.S. Air Force (AF), industry, academia, and other partners to identify and develop Spaceport and Range Technologies necessary to achieve national space goals of lower-cost and higher-reliability space flight.

  13. Technology utilization in a non-urban region: Further impact and technique of the Technology Use Studies Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gold, C. H.; Moore, A. M.; Dodd, B.; Dittmar, V.

    1974-01-01

    Updated information pertaining to clients who receive and use information disseminated by the Technology Use Studies Center (TUSC) is reported. Charts are provided which indicate TUSC's performance in information dissemination and technical assistance in terms of quantities of searches accomplished during several contract years. The faculty information service is described, along with details of cooperation with other agencies. Specific searches are listed according to subject, client, and client location, and a measure of client response to services provided is indicated by the included selection of transfer and impact reports. The impetus behind the formation of the general aviation news letter is also described.

  14. Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of technology focuses on instructional technology. Topics include inquiry and technology; curriculum development; reflection and curriculum evaluation; criteria for technological innovations that will increase student motivation; standards; impact of new technologies on library media centers; software; and future trends. (LRW)

  15. Wireless fiber laser sensor combining photonic generation beat frequency demodulation technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shengchun; Gu, Rong; Yu, Xiujuan; Yin, Zuowei; Chen, Xiangfei

    2011-12-01

    A simple wireless-fiber laser sensor is proposed base on directly photonic generation of microwave beat signal. In this scheme, a multi-longitudinal modes fiber laser is formed by two fiber Bragg gratings and a section of erbium-doped fiber. Two same 2G-GSM mobile antennas are used as wireless transmitter and receiver. By this method, the real-time monitoring of fiber laser sensors can be achieved through over ultra-long distance. This technique offers a simple, all-electrical and cheap way for fiber sensor information accessing wireless net. The experiment result shows the root mean square deviations of the sensor are about 4.7 μɛ and 6.7 μɛ at 2.38 GHz before and after wireless transmission, respectively.

  16. Technology Transfer Challenges: A Case Study of User-Centered Design in NASA's Systems Engineering Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quick, Jason

    2009-01-01

    The Upper Stage (US) section of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Ares I rocket will require internal access platforms for maintenance tasks performed by humans inside the vehicle. Tasks will occur during expensive critical path operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) including vehicle stacking and launch preparation activities. Platforms must be translated through a small human access hatch, installed in an enclosed worksite environment, support the weight of ground operators and be removed before flight - and their design must minimize additional vehicle mass at attachment points. This paper describes the application of a user-centered conceptual design process and the unique challenges encountered within NASA's systems engineering culture focused on requirements and "heritage hardware". The NASA design team at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) initiated the user-centered design process by studying heritage internal access kits and proposing new design concepts during brainstorming sessions. Simultaneously, they partnered with the Technology Transfer/Innovative Partnerships Program to research inflatable structures and dynamic scaffolding solutions that could enable ground operator access. While this creative, technology-oriented exploration was encouraged by upper management, some design stakeholders consistently opposed ideas utilizing novel, untested equipment. Subsequent collaboration with an engineering consulting firm improved the technical credibility of several options, however, there was continued resistance from team members focused on meeting system requirements with pre-certified hardware. After a six-month idea-generating phase, an intensive six-week effort produced viable design concepts that justified additional vehicle mass while optimizing the human factors of platform installation and use. Although these selected final concepts closely resemble heritage internal access platforms, challenges from the application of the

  17. Activities of the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center pump stage technology team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R.; Mcconnaughey, P.; Eastland, A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to advance rocket propulsion technology, the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology has been formed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Consortium consists of three Teams: the turbine stage team, the pump stage team (PST), and the combustion devices team. The PST has formulated and is implementing a plan for pump technology development whose end product will be validated CFD codes suitable for application to pump components, test data suitable for validating CFD codes, and advanced pump components optimized using CFD codes. The PST's work during the fall of 1991 and the winter and spring of 1992 is discussed in this paper. This work is highlighted by CFD analyses of an advanced impeller design and collection of laser two-focus velocimeter data for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Pump impeller.

  18. Application of fiber Bragg grating sensing technology in long-distance detection of temperature in weapon depots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jianguo; Zhang, ZhiLi; Zhao, Bing; Fu, Zhulin

    2010-10-01

    Incessantly long-term real-time detection of temperature is demanded in weapon depots, where the weapon equipment is stored in, to realize the self-regulation of temperature. Long-Distance intellectualized control can be actualized by setting sensor-net which is composed by several temperature sensors to simultaneously detect multi-point and multi- parameter. The temperature sensors based on Fiber Bragg Grating Technology are more suitable for long-term detection for their preponderance in high sensitivity, small volume, anti-jamming and so on. The temperature sensing system, which is composed by several Fiber Bragg Grating sensors in one light-cable, can accomplish Quasi-Distributed measurement and is suitable for multi-point and multi- parameter detection. Basal principle of Fiber Bragg Grating sensing technology is expounded in the article, with a sensing system applied to the long-distance detection of temperature in the depots is designed based on F-P Scanning Method. Besides, DSP and FPGA are adopted pre-treat the transformed data from AD such as filter and determine threshold. The main modules of this demodulation system such as 1550nm exact photoelectric detection module and trigonal wave voltage scan module are designed in this paper to realize demodulation. Proved by the analysis of the testing data, the Fiber Bragg Grating temperature sensing system, whose testing precision achieved the design purpose, has advantages of real-time measure and long-term stability. The system, which provides guarantee to realize the auto-control of temperature, can be generalized and will provide favorable foundation for the broad using of Fiber Bragg Grating sensing technology in the army.

  19. The World Wide Web and Technology Transfer at NASA Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.; Bianco, David J.

    1994-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) began using the World Wide Web (WWW) in the summer of 1993, becoming the first NASA installation to provide a Center-wide home page. This coincided with a reorganization of LaRC to provide a more concentrated focus on technology transfer to both aerospace and non-aerospace industry. Use of the WWW and NCSA Mosaic not only provides automated information dissemination, but also allows for the implementation, evolution and integration of many technology transfer applications. This paper describes several of these innovative applications, including the on-line presentation of the entire Technology Opportunities Showcase (TOPS), an industrial partnering showcase that exists on the Web long after the actual 3-day event ended. During its first year on the Web, LaRC also developed several WWW-based information repositories. The Langley Technical Report Server (LTRS), a technical paper delivery system with integrated searching and retrieval, has proved to be quite popular. The NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS), an outgrowth of LTRS, provides uniform access to many logically similar, yet physically distributed NASA report servers. WWW is also the foundation of the Langley Software Server (LSS), an experimental software distribution system which will distribute LaRC-developed software with the possible phase-out of NASA's COSMIC program. In addition to the more formal technology distribution projects, WWW has been successful in connecting people with technologies and people with other people. With the completion of the LaRC reorganization, the Technology Applications Group, charged with interfacing with non-aerospace companies, opened for business with a popular home page.

  20. Optical fiber chemical sensors with sol-gel derived nanomaterials for monitoring high temperature/high pressure reactions in clean energy technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Shiquan

    2010-04-01

    The development of sensor technologies for in situ, real time monitoring the high temperature/high pressure (HTP) chemical processes used in clean energy technologies is a tough challenge, due to the HTP, high dust and corrosive chemical environment of the reaction systems. A silica optical fiber is corrosive resistance, and can work in HTP conditions. This paper presents our effort in developing fiber optic sensors for in situ, real time monitoring the concentration of trace ammonia and hydrogen in high temperature gas samples. Preliminary test results illustrate the feasibility of using fiber optic sensor technologies for monitoring HTP processes for next generation energy industry.