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Sample records for fibroblasts self-direct multicellular

  1. Cardiac Fibroblasts Support Endothelial Cell Proliferation and Sprout Formation but not the Development of Multicellular Sprouts in a Fibrin Gel Co-Culture Model

    PubMed Central

    Twardowski, Rachel L.; Black, Lauren D.

    2014-01-01

    A primary impediment to cardiac tissue engineering lies in the inability to adequately vascularize the constructs to optimize survival upon implantation. During normal angiogenesis, endothelial cells (ECs) require a support cell to form mature patent lumens and it has been demonstrated that pericytes, vascular smooth muscle cells and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are all able to support the formation of mature vessels. In the heart, cardiac fibroblasts (CFs) provide important electrical and mechanical functions, but to date have not been sufficiently studied for their role in angiogenesis. To study CFs role in angiogenesis, we co-cultured different concentrations of various cell types in fibrin hemispheres with appropriate combinations of their specific media, to determine the optimal conditions for EC growth and sprout formation through DNA analysis, flow cytometry and immunohistology. ECs proliferated best when co-cultured with CFs and analysis of immunohistological images demonstrated that ECs formed the longest and most numerous sprouts with CFs as compared to MSCs. However, ECs were able to produce more multicellular sprouts when in culture with the MSCs. Moreover, these effects were dependent on the ratio of support cell to EC in co-culture. Overall, CFs provide a good support system for EC proliferation and sprout formation; however, MSCs allow for more multicellular sprouts, which is more indicative of the in vivo process. PMID:24435656

  2. Self-Directed Workplace Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    This document contains four papers from a symposium on self-directed workplace learning. "Self-Directed Work Teams: Implementation and Performance" (Marcel van der Klink, Hilde ter Horst) discusses the results of a study examining the implementation and effects of self-directed work teams in a land register office and the role of the department's…

  3. Stabilizing multicellularity through ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Libby, Eric; Conlin, Peter L; Kerr, Ben; Ratcliff, William C

    2016-08-19

    The evolutionary transition to multicellularity probably began with the formation of simple undifferentiated cellular groups. Such groups evolve readily in diverse lineages of extant unicellular taxa, suggesting that there are few genetic barriers to this first key step. This may act as a double-edged sword: labile transitions between unicellular and multicellular states may facilitate the evolution of simple multicellularity, but reversion to a unicellular state may inhibit the evolution of increased complexity. In this paper, we examine how multicellular adaptations can act as evolutionary 'ratchets', limiting the potential for reversion to unicellularity. We consider a nascent multicellular lineage growing in an environment that varies between favouring multicellularity and favouring unicellularity. The first type of ratcheting mutations increase cell-level fitness in a multicellular context but are costly in a single-celled context, reducing the fitness of revertants. The second type of ratcheting mutations directly decrease the probability that a mutation will result in reversion (either as a pleiotropic consequence or via direct modification of switch rates). We show that both types of ratcheting mutations act to stabilize the multicellular state. We also identify synergistic effects between the two types of ratcheting mutations in which the presence of one creates the selective conditions favouring the other. Ratcheting mutations may play a key role in diverse evolutionary transitions in individuality, sustaining selection on the new higher-level organism by constraining evolutionary reversion.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. PMID:27431522

  4. Stabilizing multicellularity through ratcheting.

    PubMed

    Libby, Eric; Conlin, Peter L; Kerr, Ben; Ratcliff, William C

    2016-08-19

    The evolutionary transition to multicellularity probably began with the formation of simple undifferentiated cellular groups. Such groups evolve readily in diverse lineages of extant unicellular taxa, suggesting that there are few genetic barriers to this first key step. This may act as a double-edged sword: labile transitions between unicellular and multicellular states may facilitate the evolution of simple multicellularity, but reversion to a unicellular state may inhibit the evolution of increased complexity. In this paper, we examine how multicellular adaptations can act as evolutionary 'ratchets', limiting the potential for reversion to unicellularity. We consider a nascent multicellular lineage growing in an environment that varies between favouring multicellularity and favouring unicellularity. The first type of ratcheting mutations increase cell-level fitness in a multicellular context but are costly in a single-celled context, reducing the fitness of revertants. The second type of ratcheting mutations directly decrease the probability that a mutation will result in reversion (either as a pleiotropic consequence or via direct modification of switch rates). We show that both types of ratcheting mutations act to stabilize the multicellular state. We also identify synergistic effects between the two types of ratcheting mutations in which the presence of one creates the selective conditions favouring the other. Ratcheting mutations may play a key role in diverse evolutionary transitions in individuality, sustaining selection on the new higher-level organism by constraining evolutionary reversion.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'.

  5. Stabilizing multicellularity through ratcheting

    PubMed Central

    Libby, Eric; Conlin, Peter L.; Kerr, Ben; Ratcliff, William C.

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary transition to multicellularity probably began with the formation of simple undifferentiated cellular groups. Such groups evolve readily in diverse lineages of extant unicellular taxa, suggesting that there are few genetic barriers to this first key step. This may act as a double-edged sword: labile transitions between unicellular and multicellular states may facilitate the evolution of simple multicellularity, but reversion to a unicellular state may inhibit the evolution of increased complexity. In this paper, we examine how multicellular adaptations can act as evolutionary ‘ratchets’, limiting the potential for reversion to unicellularity. We consider a nascent multicellular lineage growing in an environment that varies between favouring multicellularity and favouring unicellularity. The first type of ratcheting mutations increase cell-level fitness in a multicellular context but are costly in a single-celled context, reducing the fitness of revertants. The second type of ratcheting mutations directly decrease the probability that a mutation will result in reversion (either as a pleiotropic consequence or via direct modification of switch rates). We show that both types of ratcheting mutations act to stabilize the multicellular state. We also identify synergistic effects between the two types of ratcheting mutations in which the presence of one creates the selective conditions favouring the other. Ratcheting mutations may play a key role in diverse evolutionary transitions in individuality, sustaining selection on the new higher-level organism by constraining evolutionary reversion. This article is part of the themed issue ‘The major synthetic evolutionary transitions’. PMID:27431522

  6. Current Developments in Self-Directed Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.; And Others

    This document contains the following papers examining current developments in self-directed learning: "Self-Directed Learning: Challenges and Opportunities" (Huey B. Long); "Examination of Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Selected Demographic Variables of Top Female Executives" (Lucy M. Guglielmino); "Enhancing Self-Directed Learning in the…

  7. Expanding Horizons in Self-Directed Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.; And Others

    The following papers are included: "Preface" (Huey B. Long); "Self-Directed Learning: Smoke and Mirrors?" (Huey B. Long); "From Self-Culture to Self-Direction: An Historical Analysis of Self-Directed Learning" (Amy D. Rose); "The Link between Self-Directed and Transformative Learning" (Jane Pilling-Cormick); "Learner Orientations among Baby…

  8. Emerging Perspectives of Self-Directed Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.; And Others

    These 17 papers attest to the deepening and broadening interest in self-directed learning as one solution to the lifelong learning needs of men and women in an increasingly dynamic society. The papers include the following: "Self-Directed Learning Knowledge: Some Issues" (Long); "Development of Self-Directed Learning Readiness: A Longitudinal…

  9. Self-Directed Learning: Application and Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.; And Others

    These 23 papers provide as complete a picture as possible of the current efforts in self-directed learning application and research. The papers are: "Learning about Self-Directed Learning" (Long); "Philosophical, Psychological, and Practical Justifications for Studying Self-Direction in Learning" (Long); "In Search of Consensus in the Study of…

  10. Self Directed Learning and Self Management. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on self-directed learning and self-management. "Validating a More-Dimensional Conception of Self-Directed Learning" (Gerald A. Straka, Cornelia Schaefer) discusses the development and validation of a conception of self-directed learning as a dynamic interplay between behavior, information,…

  11. New Ideas about Self-Directed Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.; And Others

    These 16 papers provide as complete a picture as possible of the current efforts in self-directed learning (SDL) application and research. The papers are: "Challenging Some Myths about Self-Directed Learning Research" (Long); "Childhood Experiences as Origins of Self-Directed Learning Experiences" (Long, Stubblefield); "Self-Confidence and…

  12. Collective Calcium Signaling of Defective Multicellular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potter, Garrett; Sun, Bo

    2015-03-01

    A communicating multicellular network processes environmental cues into collective cellular dynamics. We have previously demonstrated that, when excited by extracellular ATP, fibroblast monolayers generate correlated calcium dynamics modulated by both the stimuli and gap junction communication between the cells. However, just as a well-connected neural network may be compromised by abnormal neurons, a tissue monolayer can also be defective with cancer cells, which typically have down regulated gap junctions. To understand the collective cellular dynamics in a defective multicellular network we have studied the calcium signaling of co-cultured breast cancer cells and fibroblast cells in various concentrations of ATP delivered through microfluidic devices. Our results demonstrate that cancer cells respond faster, generate singular spikes, and are more synchronous across all stimuli concentrations. Additionally, fibroblast cells exhibit persistent calcium oscillations that increase in regularity with greater stimuli. To interpret these results we quantitatively analyzed the immunostaining of purigenic receptors and gap junction channels. The results confirm our hypothesis that collective dynamics are mainly determined by the availability of gap junction communications.

  13. Games of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Kaveh, Kamran; Veller, Carl; Nowak, Martin A

    2016-08-21

    Evolutionary game dynamics are often studied in the context of different population structures. Here we propose a new population structure that is inspired by simple multicellular life forms. In our model, cells reproduce but can stay together after reproduction. They reach complexes of a certain size, n, before producing single cells again. The cells within a complex derive payoff from an evolutionary game by interacting with each other. The reproductive rate of cells is proportional to their payoff. We consider all two-strategy games. We study deterministic evolutionary dynamics with mutations, and derive exact conditions for selection to favor one strategy over another. Our main result has the same symmetry as the well-known sigma condition, which has been proven for stochastic game dynamics and weak selection. For a maximum complex size of n=2 our result holds for any intensity of selection. For n≥3 it holds for weak selection. As specific examples we study the prisoner's dilemma and hawk-dove games. Our model advances theoretical work on multicellularity by allowing for frequency-dependent interactions within groups. PMID:27179461

  14. Moving Toward Self-directed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Mae L.

    1973-01-01

    Independent learning and self direction is emphasized in an upper-grade classroom in Eugene, Oregon. The children take part in activities like spinning thread, role-playing, and constructing picture-story books for kindergarteners. (ST)

  15. Biological soliton in multicellular movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwayama, Hidekazu; Ishida, Shuji

    2013-07-01

    Solitons have been observed in various physical phenomena. Here, we show that the distinct characteristics of solitons are present in the mass cell movement of non-chemotactic mutants of the cellular slime mould Dictyostelium discoideum. During starvation, D. discoideum forms multicellular structures that differentiate into spore or stalk cells and, eventually, a fruiting body. Non-chemotactic mutant cells do not form multicellular structures; however, they do undergo mass cell movement in the form of a pulsatile soliton-like structure (SLS). We also found that SLS induction is mediated by adhesive cell-cell interactions. These observations provide novel insights into the mechanisms of biological solitons in multicellular movement.

  16. Communication theory and multicellular biology.

    PubMed

    Mian, I S; Rose, C

    2011-04-01

    In this Perspective, we propose that communication theory--a field of mathematics concerned with the problems of signal transmission, reception and processing--provides a new quantitative lens for investigating multicellular biology, ancient and modern. What underpins the cohesive organisation and collective behaviour of multicellular ecosystems such as microbial colonies and communities (microbiomes) and multicellular organisms such as plants and animals, whether built of simple tissue layers (sponges) or of complex differentiated cells arranged in tissues and organs (members of the 35 or so phyla of the subkingdom Metazoa)? How do mammalian tissues and organs develop, maintain their architecture, become subverted in disease, and decline with age? How did single-celled organisms coalesce to produce many-celled forms that evolved and diversified into the varied multicellular organisms in existence today? Some answers can be found in the blueprints or recipes encoded in (epi)genomes, yet others lie in the generic physical properties of biological matter such as the ability of cell aggregates to attain a certain complexity in size, shape, and pattern. We suggest that Lasswell's maxim "Who says what to whom in what channel with what effect" provides a foundation for understanding not only the emergence and evolution of multicellularity, but also the assembly and sculpting of multicellular ecosystems and many-celled structures, whether of natural or human-engineered origin. We explore how the abstraction of communication theory as an organising principle for multicellular biology could be realised. We highlight the inherent ability of communication theory to be blind to molecular and/or genetic mechanisms. We describe selected applications that analyse the physics of communication and use energy efficiency as a central tenet. Whilst communication theory has and could contribute to understanding a myriad of problems in biology, investigations of multicellular biology

  17. Principal Development: Self-Directed Project Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piggot-Irvine, Eileen

    2011-01-01

    The inclusion of self-directed projects as an element within a New Zealand principal development programme was designed to reflect increasing support internationally for such a context-specific "inquiry" approach. The results reported in this article suggest that considerable clarity is required for such projects if they are to realize the…

  18. Self-Directed Learning and Lifespan Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kasworm, Carol

    1983-01-01

    The mission of lifelong learning encompasses a holistic, universal, educative framework embedded in acts of self-directed, self-initiated learning. Key to these lifelong learning actions are both facilitative environments and resources for individual learning activities, as well as the development of individual structures and processes to create,…

  19. Cinegrams for Self-Directed Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischer, Detlev; Richards, Clive

    1995-01-01

    Presents potential uses of cinegrams for self-directed learning; shows how these interactive animated diagrams for technical documentation and training serve as browsing tools for the exploration of interrelated engine subsystems. Describes the development of a cinegram prototype implemented in HyperCard that shows the oil system of a Rolls Royce…

  20. Fostering Self-Directed Learners through Competitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafrenz, Lu Ann; Murray, Bernadine

    2005-01-01

    Educational programs are continually seeking ways to encourage students' independence, personal growth, and self-directed learning. Graduates should enter the fashion industry with the ability to engage in lifelong learning in order to ensure competence in professional practice. Competition experiences help students to achieve these goals. The…

  1. 42 CFR 441.452 - Self-direction: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Optional Self-Directed Personal Assistance Services Program § 441.452 Self-direction: General. (a) States must have in place, before electing the self-directed PAS option, personal care services through the... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Self-direction: General. 441.452 Section...

  2. Communication shapes sensory response in multicellular networks.

    PubMed

    Potter, Garrett D; Byrd, Tommy A; Mugler, Andrew; Sun, Bo

    2016-09-13

    Collective sensing by interacting cells is observed in a variety of biological systems, and yet, a quantitative understanding of how sensory information is collectively encoded is lacking. Here, we investigate the ATP-induced calcium dynamics of monolayers of fibroblast cells that communicate via gap junctions. Combining experiments and stochastic modeling, we find that increasing the ATP stimulus increases the propensity for calcium oscillations, despite large cell-to-cell variability. The model further predicts that the oscillation propensity increases with not only the stimulus, but also the cell density due to increased communication. Experiments confirm this prediction, showing that cell density modulates the collective sensory response. We further implicate cell-cell communication by coculturing the fibroblasts with cancer cells, which we show act as "defects" in the communication network, thereby reducing the oscillation propensity. These results suggest that multicellular networks sit at a point in parameter space where cell-cell communication has a significant effect on the sensory response, allowing cells to simultaneously respond to a sensory input and the presence of neighbors.

  3. Protein families in multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Copley, R R; Schultz, J; Ponting, C P; Bork, P

    1999-06-01

    The complete sequence of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans contains the genetic machinery that is required to undertake the core biological processes of single cells. However, the genome also encodes proteins that are associated with multicellularity, as well as others that are lineage-specific expansions of phylogenetically widespread families and yet more that are absent in non-nematodes. Ongoing analysis is beginning to illuminate the similarities and differences among human proteins and proteins that are encoded by the genomes of the multicellular worm and the unicellular yeast, and will be essential in determining the reliability of transferring experimental data among phylogenetically distant species. PMID:10361098

  4. Advances in Research and Practice in Self-Directed Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Huey B.; And Others

    Selected papers presented in this book are: "Changing Concepts of Self-Direction in Learning" (Long); "The Transition from Learner-Control to Autodidaxy: More than Meets the Eye" (Candy); "Self-Directed Learning and the Theory of Adult Education" (Jarvis); "On the Theme and Variations of Self-Directed Learning" (Gerstner); "Self-Directed…

  5. On The Evolution of Bacterial Multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Lyons, Nicholas A.; Kolter, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity is one of the most prevalent evolutionary innovations and nowhere is this more apparent than in the bacterial world, which contains many examples of multicellular organisms in a surprising array of forms. Due to their experimental accessibility and the large and diverse genomic data available, bacteria enable us to probe fundamental aspects of the origins of multicellularity. Here we discuss examples of multicellular behaviors in bacteria, the selective pressures that may have led to their evolution, possible origins and intermediate stages, and whether the ubiquity of apparently convergent multicellular forms argues for its inevitability. PMID:25597443

  6. Conceptions of Self-Directed Learning: Theoretical and Conceptual Considerations. LOS, Learning Organized Self-Directed Researchgroup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, Gerald A., Ed.

    This book consists of 15 papers addressing issues and conceptions of self-directed learning. The following are included: "Self-Directed Learning as a Political Idea" (Stephen D. Brookfield); "Social Influences on Individual Commitment to Self-Directed Learning at Work" (Alan J. Brown); "Goals of Self-Learning" (Rosemary S. Caffarella); "From…

  7. European Views of Self-Directed Learning: Historical, Conceptual, Empirical, Practical, Vocational. LOS, Learning Organized Self-Directed Researchgroup.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Straka, Gerald A., Ed.

    Following an Introduction by editor Gerald A. Straka that posits various definitions of self-directed learning and discusses the views of the various authors in the text, this book consists of nine papers addressing issues and conceptions of self-directed learning in Europe. The following are included: "Self-Directed Learning in Continuing…

  8. Constraint Based Modeling Going Multicellular

    PubMed Central

    Martins Conde, Patricia do Rosario; Sauter, Thomas; Pfau, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Constraint based modeling has seen applications in many microorganisms. For example, there are now established methods to determine potential genetic modifications and external interventions to increase the efficiency of microbial strains in chemical production pipelines. In addition, multiple models of multicellular organisms have been created including plants and humans. While initially the focus here was on modeling individual cell types of the multicellular organism, this focus recently started to switch. Models of microbial communities, as well as multi-tissue models of higher organisms have been constructed. These models thereby can include different parts of a plant, like root, stem, or different tissue types in the same organ. Such models can elucidate details of the interplay between symbiotic organisms, as well as the concerted efforts of multiple tissues and can be applied to analyse the effects of drugs or mutations on a more systemic level. In this review we give an overview of the recent development of multi-tissue models using constraint based techniques and the methods employed when investigating these models. We further highlight advances in combining constraint based models with dynamic and regulatory information and give an overview of these types of hybrid or multi-level approaches. PMID:26904548

  9. A Synthetic Multicellular Memory Device.

    PubMed

    Urrios, Arturo; Macia, Javier; Manzoni, Romilde; Conde, Núria; Bonforti, Adriano; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Posas, Francesc; Solé, Ricard

    2016-08-19

    Changing environments pose a challenge to living organisms. Cells need to gather and process incoming information, adapting to changes in predictable ways. This requires in particular the presence of memory, which allows different internal states to be stored. Biological memory can be stored by switches that retain information on past and present events. Synthetic biologists have implemented a number of memory devices for biological applications, mostly in single cells. It has been shown that the use of multicellular consortia provides interesting advantages to implement biological circuits. Here we show how to build a synthetic biological memory switch using an eukaryotic consortium. We engineered yeast cells that can communicate and retain memory of changes in the extracellular environment. These cells were able to produce and secrete a pheromone and sense a different pheromone following NOT logic. When the two strains were cocultured, they behaved as a double-negative-feedback motif with memory. In addition, we showed that memory can be effectively changed by the use of external inputs. Further optimization of these modules and addition of other cells could lead to new multicellular circuits that exhibit memory over a broad range of biological inputs. PMID:27439436

  10. Constraint Based Modeling Going Multicellular.

    PubMed

    Martins Conde, Patricia do Rosario; Sauter, Thomas; Pfau, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Constraint based modeling has seen applications in many microorganisms. For example, there are now established methods to determine potential genetic modifications and external interventions to increase the efficiency of microbial strains in chemical production pipelines. In addition, multiple models of multicellular organisms have been created including plants and humans. While initially the focus here was on modeling individual cell types of the multicellular organism, this focus recently started to switch. Models of microbial communities, as well as multi-tissue models of higher organisms have been constructed. These models thereby can include different parts of a plant, like root, stem, or different tissue types in the same organ. Such models can elucidate details of the interplay between symbiotic organisms, as well as the concerted efforts of multiple tissues and can be applied to analyse the effects of drugs or mutations on a more systemic level. In this review we give an overview of the recent development of multi-tissue models using constraint based techniques and the methods employed when investigating these models. We further highlight advances in combining constraint based models with dynamic and regulatory information and give an overview of these types of hybrid or multi-level approaches.

  11. Constraint Based Modeling Going Multicellular.

    PubMed

    Martins Conde, Patricia do Rosario; Sauter, Thomas; Pfau, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Constraint based modeling has seen applications in many microorganisms. For example, there are now established methods to determine potential genetic modifications and external interventions to increase the efficiency of microbial strains in chemical production pipelines. In addition, multiple models of multicellular organisms have been created including plants and humans. While initially the focus here was on modeling individual cell types of the multicellular organism, this focus recently started to switch. Models of microbial communities, as well as multi-tissue models of higher organisms have been constructed. These models thereby can include different parts of a plant, like root, stem, or different tissue types in the same organ. Such models can elucidate details of the interplay between symbiotic organisms, as well as the concerted efforts of multiple tissues and can be applied to analyse the effects of drugs or mutations on a more systemic level. In this review we give an overview of the recent development of multi-tissue models using constraint based techniques and the methods employed when investigating these models. We further highlight advances in combining constraint based models with dynamic and regulatory information and give an overview of these types of hybrid or multi-level approaches. PMID:26904548

  12. Resistance to Self-Direction in Learning Can Be Overcome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hiemstra, Roger; Brockett, Ralph G.

    1994-01-01

    Summarizes the special issue on resistance to self-direction in learning by enumerating sources of resistance (learners, facilitators, institutions) and presenting strategies for overcoming barriers. (SK)

  13. The origin of multicellularity in cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cyanobacteria are one of the oldest and morphologically most diverse prokaryotic phyla on our planet. The early development of an oxygen-containing atmosphere approximately 2.45 - 2.22 billion years ago is attributed to the photosynthetic activity of cyanobacteria. Furthermore, they are one of the few prokaryotic phyla where multicellularity has evolved. Understanding when and how multicellularity evolved in these ancient organisms would provide fundamental information on the early history of life and further our knowledge of complex life forms. Results We conducted and compared phylogenetic analyses of 16S rDNA sequences from a large sample of taxa representing the morphological and genetic diversity of cyanobacteria. We reconstructed ancestral character states on 10,000 phylogenetic trees. The results suggest that the majority of extant cyanobacteria descend from multicellular ancestors. Reversals to unicellularity occurred at least 5 times. Multicellularity was established again at least once within a single-celled clade. Comparison to the fossil record supports an early origin of multicellularity, possibly as early as the "Great Oxygenation Event" that occurred 2.45 - 2.22 billion years ago. Conclusions The results indicate that a multicellular morphotype evolved early in the cyanobacterial lineage and was regained at least once after a previous loss. Most of the morphological diversity exhibited in cyanobacteria today —including the majority of single-celled species— arose from ancient multicellular lineages. Multicellularity could have conferred a considerable advantage for exploring new niches and hence facilitated the diversification of new lineages. PMID:21320320

  14. Antimicrobial peptides of multicellular organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zasloff, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Multicellular organisms live, by and large, harmoniously with microbes. The cornea of the eye of an animal is almost always free of signs of infection. The insect flourishes without lymphocytes or antibodies. A plant seed germinates successfully in the midst of soil microbes. How is this accomplished? Both animals and plants possess potent, broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides, which they use to fend off a wide range of microbes, including bacteria, fungi, viruses and protozoa. What sorts of molecules are they? How are they employed by animals in their defence? As our need for new antibiotics becomes more pressing, could we design anti-infective drugs based on the design principles these molecules teach us?

  15. Processes of Change in Self-Directed Couple Relationship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Keithia L.; Halford, W. Kim

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined the learning processes involved in professionally supported self-directed couple relationship education (CRE). Fifty-nine couples completed Couple CARE, a systematic, self-directed CRE program designed in flexible delivery mode to be completed at home. Couples watched a DVD introducing key relationship ideas and skills…

  16. Development of the Self-Directed Learning Skills Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayyildiz, Yildizay; Tarhan, Leman

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable scale for assessing high school students' self-directed learning skills. Based on a literature review and data obtained from similar instruments, all skills related to self-directed learning were identified. Next, an item pool was prepared and administered to 255 students from various…

  17. 42 CFR 441.740 - Self-directed services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... State Plan Home and Community-Based Services for the Elderly and Individuals with Disabilities § 441.740... for facilitating voluntary and involuntary transition from self-direction including any circumstances under which transition out of self-direction is involuntary. There must be state procedures to...

  18. Self-Directed Learning Readiness at General Motors Japan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitler, Michael A.

    Although self-directed learning (SDL) has been promoted by businesses as being needed by managers, traditional business schools have not promoted this type of learning. In addition, some adult learners are not ready for SDL, and some subjects (such as accounting) are not suitable for SDL. The concept of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) can…

  19. Modeling Spaces for Self-Directed Learning at University Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pata, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This paper conceptualizes the theoretical framework of modeling learning spaces for self-directed learning at university courses. It binds together two ideas: (a) self-directed learners' common learning spaces may be characterized as abstract niches, (b) niche characteristics are collectively determined through individually perceived affordances.…

  20. Physician Attitudes toward Structured Self-Directed Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Younghouse, Robert H., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A study examined physicians' attitudes toward structured self-directed learning. Responses to questionnaire items indicated respondents' attitudes toward the practice; scores were compared using the variables of age and hours spent at self-directed learning. Data indicated a predominantly neutral or indifferent attitude. (Author/CH)

  1. The multicellularity genes of dictyostelid social amoebas.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Gernot; Lawal, Hajara M; Felder, Marius; Singh, Reema; Singer, Gail; Weijer, Cornelis J; Schaap, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity enabled specialization of cells, but required novel signalling mechanisms for regulating cell differentiation. Early multicellular organisms are mostly extinct and the origins of these mechanisms are unknown. Here using comparative genome and transcriptome analysis across eight uni- and multicellular amoebozoan genomes, we find that 80% of proteins essential for the development of multicellular Dictyostelia are already present in their unicellular relatives. This set is enriched in cytosolic and nuclear proteins, and protein kinases. The remaining 20%, unique to Dictyostelia, mostly consists of extracellularly exposed and secreted proteins, with roles in sensing and recognition, while several genes for synthesis of signals that induce cell-type specialization were acquired by lateral gene transfer. Across Dictyostelia, changes in gene expression correspond more strongly with phenotypic innovation than changes in protein functional domains. We conclude that the transition to multicellularity required novel signals and sensors rather than novel signal processing mechanisms. PMID:27357338

  2. The multicellularity genes of dictyostelid social amoebas.

    PubMed

    Glöckner, Gernot; Lawal, Hajara M; Felder, Marius; Singh, Reema; Singer, Gail; Weijer, Cornelis J; Schaap, Pauline

    2016-06-30

    The evolution of multicellularity enabled specialization of cells, but required novel signalling mechanisms for regulating cell differentiation. Early multicellular organisms are mostly extinct and the origins of these mechanisms are unknown. Here using comparative genome and transcriptome analysis across eight uni- and multicellular amoebozoan genomes, we find that 80% of proteins essential for the development of multicellular Dictyostelia are already present in their unicellular relatives. This set is enriched in cytosolic and nuclear proteins, and protein kinases. The remaining 20%, unique to Dictyostelia, mostly consists of extracellularly exposed and secreted proteins, with roles in sensing and recognition, while several genes for synthesis of signals that induce cell-type specialization were acquired by lateral gene transfer. Across Dictyostelia, changes in gene expression correspond more strongly with phenotypic innovation than changes in protein functional domains. We conclude that the transition to multicellularity required novel signals and sensors rather than novel signal processing mechanisms.

  3. The multicellularity genes of dictyostelid social amoebas

    PubMed Central

    Glöckner, Gernot; Lawal, Hajara M.; Felder, Marius; Singh, Reema; Singer, Gail; Weijer, Cornelis J.; Schaap, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity enabled specialization of cells, but required novel signalling mechanisms for regulating cell differentiation. Early multicellular organisms are mostly extinct and the origins of these mechanisms are unknown. Here using comparative genome and transcriptome analysis across eight uni- and multicellular amoebozoan genomes, we find that 80% of proteins essential for the development of multicellular Dictyostelia are already present in their unicellular relatives. This set is enriched in cytosolic and nuclear proteins, and protein kinases. The remaining 20%, unique to Dictyostelia, mostly consists of extracellularly exposed and secreted proteins, with roles in sensing and recognition, while several genes for synthesis of signals that induce cell-type specialization were acquired by lateral gene transfer. Across Dictyostelia, changes in gene expression correspond more strongly with phenotypic innovation than changes in protein functional domains. We conclude that the transition to multicellularity required novel signals and sensors rather than novel signal processing mechanisms. PMID:27357338

  4. Iranian Clinical Nurses’ Readiness for Self-Directed Learning

    PubMed Central

    Malekian, Morteza; Ghiyasvandian, Sharzad; Cheraghi, Mohammad Ali; Hassanzadeh, Akbar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Clinical nurses are in need of being able to adapt to the ever-changing environment of clinical settings. The prerequisite for their successful adaptation is to be lifelong learners. An approach for making nurses lifelong learners is self-directed learning. Aims: This study was undertaken to evaluate a group of Iranian clinical nurses’ readiness for self-directed learning and its relationship with some of their personal characteristics. Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in 2014. A random sample of 314 nurses working in three hospitals affiliated to Isfahan Social Security Organization, Isfahan, Iran, was recruited to complete the Fisher’s Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale. Findings: In total, 279 nurses filled the scale completely. The mean of their readiness for self-directed learning was 162.50±14.11 (120–196). The correlation of self-directed learning readiness with age, gender, marital status, and university degree was not statistically significant. Conclusion: Most nurses had great readiness for self-directed learning. Accordingly, nursing policy-makers need to develop strategies for promoting their self-directed learning. Moreover, innovative teaching methods such as problem solving and problem-based learning should be employed to prepare nurses for effectively managing the complexities of their ever-changing work environment. PMID:26234971

  5. Multicellularity makes somatic differentiation evolutionarily stable

    PubMed Central

    Wahl, Mary E.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    Many multicellular organisms produce two cell lineages: germ cells, whose descendants produce the next generation, and somatic cells, which support, protect, and disperse the germ cells. This germ-soma demarcation has evolved independently in dozens of multicellular taxa but is absent in unicellular species. A common explanation holds that in these organisms, inefficient intercellular nutrient exchange compels the fitness cost of producing nonreproductive somatic cells to outweigh any potential benefits. We propose instead that the absence of unicellular, soma-producing populations reflects their susceptibility to invasion by nondifferentiating mutants that ultimately eradicate the soma-producing lineage. We argue that multicellularity can prevent the victory of such mutants by giving germ cells preferential access to the benefits conferred by somatic cells. The absence of natural unicellular, soma-producing species previously prevented these hypotheses from being directly tested in vivo: to overcome this obstacle, we engineered strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that differ only in the presence or absence of multicellularity and somatic differentiation, permitting direct comparisons between organisms with different lifestyles. Our strains implement the essential features of irreversible conversion from germ line to soma, reproductive division of labor, and clonal multicellularity while maintaining sufficient generality to permit broad extension of our conclusions. Our somatic cells can provide fitness benefits that exceed the reproductive costs of their production, even in unicellular strains. We find that nondifferentiating mutants overtake unicellular populations but are outcompeted by multicellular, soma-producing strains, suggesting that multicellularity confers evolutionary stability to somatic differentiation. PMID:27402737

  6. Multicellularity makes somatic differentiation evolutionarily stable.

    PubMed

    Wahl, Mary E; Murray, Andrew W

    2016-07-26

    Many multicellular organisms produce two cell lineages: germ cells, whose descendants produce the next generation, and somatic cells, which support, protect, and disperse the germ cells. This germ-soma demarcation has evolved independently in dozens of multicellular taxa but is absent in unicellular species. A common explanation holds that in these organisms, inefficient intercellular nutrient exchange compels the fitness cost of producing nonreproductive somatic cells to outweigh any potential benefits. We propose instead that the absence of unicellular, soma-producing populations reflects their susceptibility to invasion by nondifferentiating mutants that ultimately eradicate the soma-producing lineage. We argue that multicellularity can prevent the victory of such mutants by giving germ cells preferential access to the benefits conferred by somatic cells. The absence of natural unicellular, soma-producing species previously prevented these hypotheses from being directly tested in vivo: to overcome this obstacle, we engineered strains of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that differ only in the presence or absence of multicellularity and somatic differentiation, permitting direct comparisons between organisms with different lifestyles. Our strains implement the essential features of irreversible conversion from germ line to soma, reproductive division of labor, and clonal multicellularity while maintaining sufficient generality to permit broad extension of our conclusions. Our somatic cells can provide fitness benefits that exceed the reproductive costs of their production, even in unicellular strains. We find that nondifferentiating mutants overtake unicellular populations but are outcompeted by multicellular, soma-producing strains, suggesting that multicellularity confers evolutionary stability to somatic differentiation. PMID:27402737

  7. Bacterial Ventures into Multicellularity: Collectivism through Individuality

    PubMed Central

    van Vliet, Simon; Ackermann, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Multicellular eukaryotes can perform functions that exceed the possibilities of an individual cell. These functions emerge through interactions between differentiated cells that are precisely arranged in space. Bacteria also form multicellular collectives that consist of differentiated but genetically identical cells. How does the functionality of these collectives depend on the spatial arrangement of the differentiated bacteria? In a previous issue of PLOS Biology, van Gestel and colleagues reported an elegant example of how the spatial arrangement of differentiated cells gives rise to collective behavior in Bacillus subtilus colonies, further demonstrating the similarity of bacterial collectives to higher multicellular organisms. PMID:26038821

  8. Self-directed work teams in marketing organizations.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, T F

    1999-01-01

    As marketing organizations move toward the 21st century they are becoming concerned with the development of self-directed work teams. Marketing organizations that have informed, motivated, skilled, trained, and committed employees will out perform organizations which operate in the traditional manner. Many self-directed work teams have grown out of the quality circles. The goal of these teams is to increase employee involvement in decisions of the organization to the greatest extent that employees' knowledge and training allow. In fact, today's marketing organizations need to be able to respond quickly to change driven by internal and external customers. The winning organizations will be able to produce more product with better quality in less time by staying lean, flexible, and implementing self-directed work teams. Marketing organizations that can commit to self-directed work teams will benefit by having customer and employee satisfaction, money saved, and excessive bureaucracy eliminated.

  9. Making Choices: Self-Directed Teams or Total Quality Management?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holpp, Lawrence

    1992-01-01

    Describes differences between total quality management and self-directed teams in terms of job design, decision making, flexibility, supervision, labor relations, quality, customers, and training. Offers suggestions for which method to choose when. (SK)

  10. Medical Students' Strategies for Self-Directed Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert D.; West, Russell F.

    1984-01-01

    Examined the personality factors and perceived benefits associated with different strategies of medical students regarding self-directed learning projects. Indicated that certain personality attributes are predictive of the type of strategy. (JOW)

  11. The Evolution of Multicellular Plants and Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Traces the evolution of unicellular organisms to the multi-cellular plants and animals in existence today. Major events are depicted in a geologic timetable. Organisms, extinct and recent, are classified by taxonomic group. (MA)

  12. Receptor tyrosine kinase targeting in multicellular spheroids.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Susan; O'Driscoll, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    While growing cells as a monolayer is the traditional method for cell culture, the incorporation of multicellular spheroids into experimental design is becoming increasingly popular. This is due to the understanding that cells grown as spheroids tend to replicate the in vivo situation more reliably than monolayer cells. Thus, the use of multicellular spheroids may be more clinically relevant than monolayer cell cultures. Here, we describe methods for multicellular 3D spheroid generation that may be used to provide samples for receptor tyrosine kinase (and other protein) detection. Methods described include the forced-floating poly-HEMA method, the hanging-drop method, and the use of ECM to form multicellular 3D spheroids. PMID:25319898

  13. Beyond the classroom: self-direction in professional learning.

    PubMed Central

    Mayfield, M K

    1993-01-01

    Against the backdrop of a rapidly changing profession, the context for professional thinking among medical librarians is changing. Competent performance increasingly is linked with the educational efforts of self-directed adult learners. This paper examines strategies that facilitate self-direction, including skills development, organizational learning, learner-based decision making, and alternative teaching models. The analysis provides the basis for a recommended agenda for redesign and development of educational programs. PMID:8251979

  14. The Simplest Integrated Multicellular Organism Unveiled

    PubMed Central

    Arakaki, Yoko; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Hamamura, Yuki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Noga, Akira; Hirono, Masafumi; Olson, Bradley J. S. C.; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Volvocine green algae represent the “evolutionary time machine” model lineage for studying multicellularity, because they encompass the whole range of evolutionary transition of multicellularity from unicellular Chlamydomonas to >500-celled Volvox. Multicellular volvocalean species including Gonium pectorale and Volvox carteri generally have several common morphological features to survive as integrated multicellular organisms such as “rotational asymmetry of cells” so that the cells become components of the individual and “cytoplasmic bridges between protoplasts in developing embryos” to maintain the species-specific form of the multicellular individual before secretion of new extracellular matrix (ECM). However, these morphological features have not been studied in the four-celled colonial volvocine species Tetrabaena socialis that is positioned in the most basal lineage within the colonial or multicellular volvocine greens. Here we established synchronous cultures of T. socialis and carried out immunofluorescence microscopic and ultrastructural observations to elucidate these two morphological attributes. Based on immunofluorescence microscopy, four cells of the mature T. socialis colony were identical in morphology but had rotational asymmetry in arrangement of microtubular rootlets and separation of basal bodies like G. pectorale and V. carteri. Ultrastructural observations clearly confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic bridges between protoplasts in developing embryos of T. socialis even after the formation of new flagella in each daughter protoplast within the parental ECM. Therefore, these two morphological attributes might have evolved in the common four-celled ancestor of the colonial volvocine algae and contributed to the further increase in cell number and complexity of the multicellular individuals of this model lineage. T. socialis is one of the simplest integrated multicellular organisms in which four identical cells constitute the

  15. The simplest integrated multicellular organism unveiled.

    PubMed

    Arakaki, Yoko; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Hamamura, Yuki; Higashiyama, Tetsuya; Noga, Akira; Hirono, Masafumi; Olson, Bradley J S C; Nozaki, Hisayoshi

    2013-01-01

    Volvocine green algae represent the "evolutionary time machine" model lineage for studying multicellularity, because they encompass the whole range of evolutionary transition of multicellularity from unicellular Chlamydomonas to >500-celled Volvox. Multicellular volvocalean species including Gonium pectorale and Volvox carteri generally have several common morphological features to survive as integrated multicellular organisms such as "rotational asymmetry of cells" so that the cells become components of the individual and "cytoplasmic bridges between protoplasts in developing embryos" to maintain the species-specific form of the multicellular individual before secretion of new extracellular matrix (ECM). However, these morphological features have not been studied in the four-celled colonial volvocine species Tetrabaena socialis that is positioned in the most basal lineage within the colonial or multicellular volvocine greens. Here we established synchronous cultures of T. socialis and carried out immunofluorescence microscopic and ultrastructural observations to elucidate these two morphological attributes. Based on immunofluorescence microscopy, four cells of the mature T. socialis colony were identical in morphology but had rotational asymmetry in arrangement of microtubular rootlets and separation of basal bodies like G. pectorale and V. carteri. Ultrastructural observations clearly confirmed the presence of cytoplasmic bridges between protoplasts in developing embryos of T. socialis even after the formation of new flagella in each daughter protoplast within the parental ECM. Therefore, these two morphological attributes might have evolved in the common four-celled ancestor of the colonial volvocine algae and contributed to the further increase in cell number and complexity of the multicellular individuals of this model lineage. T. socialis is one of the simplest integrated multicellular organisms in which four identical cells constitute the individual. PMID

  16. Self-directed practice schedule enhances learning of suturing skills

    PubMed Central

    Safir, Oleg; Williams, Camille K.; Dubrowski, Adam; Backstein, David; Carnahan, Heather

    2013-01-01

    Background Most preoperative surgical training programs experience challenges with the availability of expert surgeons to teach trainees. Some research suggests that trainees may benefit from being allowed to actively shape their learning environments, which could alleviate some of the time and resource pressures in surgical training. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of self-directed or prescribed practice schedules (random or blocked) on learning suturing skills. Methods Participants watched an instructional video for simple interrupted, vertical mattress and horizontal mattress suturing then completed a pretest to assess baseline skills. Participants were assigned to 1 of 4 practice groups: self-directed practice schedule, prescribed blocked practice schedule, prescribed random practice schedule or matched to the self-directed group (control). Practice of the skill was followed by a delayed (1 h) posttest. Improvement from pretest to posttest was determined based on differences in performance time and expert-based assessments. Results Analyses revealed a significant effect of group for difference in performance time of the simple interrupted suture. Random practice did not show the expected advantage for skill learning, but there was an advantage of self-directed practice. Conclusion Self-directed practice schedules may be desirable for optimal learning of simple technical skills, even when expert instruction is available. Instructors must also take into account the interaction between task difficulty and conditions of practice to develop ideal training environments. PMID:24284153

  17. Multicellular life cycle of magnetotactic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Keim, Carolina N; Martins, Juliana L; Abreu, Fernanda; Rosado, Alexandre Soares; de Barros, Henrique Lins; Borojevic, Radovan; Lins, Ulysses; Farina, Marcos

    2004-11-15

    Most multicellular organisms, prokaryotes as well as animals, plants, and algae have a unicellular stage in their life cycle. Here, we describe an uncultured prokaryotic magnetotactic multicellular organism that reproduces by binary fission. It is multicellular in all the stages of its life cycle, and during most of the life cycle the cells organize into a hollow sphere formed by a functionally coordinated and polarized single-cell layer that grows by increasing the cell size. Subsequently, all the cells divide synchronously; the organism becomes elliptical, and separates into two equal spheres with a torsional movement in the equatorial plane. Unicellular bacteria similar to the cells that compose these organisms have not been found. Molecular biology analysis showed that all the organisms studied belong to a single genetic population phylogenetically related to many-celled magnetotactic prokaryotes in the delta sub-group of the proteobacteria. This appears to be the first report of a multicellular prokaryotic organism that proliferates by dividing into two equal multicellular organisms each similar to the parent one. PMID:15522508

  18. Reorienting Self-Directed Learning for the Creative Digital Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karakas, Fahri; Manisaligil, Alperen

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify the new role that human resource developers play in the globally connected workplace. Towards that end, this paper explores the changing landscape of self-directed learning (SDL) within the digital ecosystem based on the concept of World 2.0. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reviews and…

  19. A Study of Self-Directed Professionals of High Attainment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouchard, Paul

    The determinants of self-directed learning (SDL) among professionals of high attainment were examined through open-ended, semidirected interviews with a purposeful sample of eight professional men and women who have acquired identifiable, high-level professional knowledge/skills typically taught in postsecondary learning institutions without ever…

  20. Portfolio: A Tool for Self-Directed Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Nona; Evans, Linda

    The Portfolio Project was conducted to promote lifelong, self-directed learning in the workplace. The project, which offered courses on basic skills, supervisory communications, and English as a second language, was initiated as a literacy demonstration project by the Casco Bay Partnership (CBP), which brought together government, educators, and…

  1. Self-Directed Support Policy: Challenges and Possible Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkes, Mary A.; Brown, Michael; Horsburgh, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    A systematic literature review was conducted between September 2010 and April 2011 and published earlier in this journal, paper 1. The findings indicated that few studies of Self-Directed Support focused specifically on people with intellectual disabilities. The range of individuals' ability and distinction between adults with or without…

  2. Implementing Self-Directed Work Teams at a College Newspaper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Pillis, Emmeline; Parsons, Blake

    2013-01-01

    The problem: Motivating and retaining staff had become an ongoing problem at the student newspaper. Student staffers would quit abruptly when overwhelmed or dissatisfied, leaving the newspaper with critical positions vacant. This affected the performance of the newspaper. Method: The newspaper was organized into self directed work teams (SDWTs).…

  3. A Personal Growth Program for Self-Directed Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Lawrence N.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    Vocational rehabilitation clients met in self-directed groups, using a set of program materials recorded on audiotape. The materials were designed to enhance opportunities for self exploration by presenting a series of interpersonal exercises. Results indicate that the subjects using the program materials became more open while control subjects…

  4. Self-Directed Learning: A Tool for Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyer, Stefanie L.; Edmondson, Diane R.; Artis, Andrew B.; Fleming, David

    2014-01-01

    A meta-analytic review of self-directed learning (SDL) research over 30 years, five countries, and across multiple academic disciplines is used to explore its relationships with five key nomologically related constructs for effective workplace learning. The meta-analysis revealed positive relationships between SDL and internal locus of control,…

  5. Physician Assistant Self-Directed Search Holland Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaBarbera, Dawn M.

    2005-01-01

    A mailed survey was used to identify the vocational interests of physician assistants (PAs) as measured by Holland's Self-Directed Search (SDS) Form R. A random sample of 2,323 PAs from the American Academy of Physician Assistants' mailing list was sent a survey to identify a pool of practicing PAs satisfied with their career choices for further…

  6. The Educational Affordances of Blogs for Self-Directed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Judy

    2011-01-01

    To be successful university learners, students need to develop skills in self-directed learning. This encompasses a range of cognitive and meta-cognitive skills including generating one's own learning goals, planning how to tackle a problem, evaluating whether learning goals have been met, and re-planning based on this evaluation. The educational…

  7. The Self-Directed Learning Process of Older, Rural Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.; Merriam, Sharan B.

    2005-01-01

    Medical advances and lifestyle changes have resulted in older adults living longer and healthier lives. Nevertheless, older adulthood, as other life stages, requires change in work, family, and health. Self-directed learning (SDL) is one way of negotiating these transitions. The purpose of this study was to understand this process of learning.…

  8. Competencies Acquisition through Self-Directed Learning among Malaysian Managers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hashim, Junaidah

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how Malaysian managers acquire job competencies through self-directed learning activities at their workplace. Specifically it aims to investigate what types of job competencies are required for the managers, how they learn to acquire those competencies, and whether the managers have the…

  9. Personal Learning Environments: A Solution for Self-Directed Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haworth, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I discuss "personal learning environments" and their diverse benefits, uses, and implications for life-long learning. Personal Learning Environments (PLEs) are Web 2.0 and social media technologies that enable individual learners the ability to manage their own learning. Self-directed learning is explored as a foundation…

  10. Self-Directed Learning in Adulthood: A Literature Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, T. Ross

    Self-directed learning (SDL) is among the most productive areas of research in adult education. Malcolm S. Knowles is credited with a comprehensive synthesis of adult teaching and adult learning principles. Andragogy, the art and science of helping adults learn, lies at the heart of Knowles' work. Lucy M. Guglielmino theorized regarding the…

  11. Fabrication of 3-dimensional multicellular microvascular structures

    PubMed Central

    Barreto-Ortiz, Sebastian F.; Fradkin, Jamie; Eoh, Joon; Trivero, Jacqueline; Davenport, Matthew; Ginn, Brian; Mao, Hai-Quan; Gerecht, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Despite current advances in engineering blood vessels over 1 mm in diameter and the existing wealth of knowledge regarding capillary bed formation, studies for the development of microvasculature, the connecting bridge between them, have been extremely limited so far. Here, we evaluate the use of 3-dimensional (3D) microfibers fabricated by hydrogel electrospinning as templates for microvascular structure formation. We hypothesize that 3D microfibers improve extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition from vascular cells, enabling the formation of freestanding luminal multicellular microvasculature. Compared to 2-dimensional cultures, we demonstrate with confocal microscopy and RT-PCR that fibrin microfibers induce an increased ECM protein deposition by vascular cells, specifically endothelial colony-forming cells, pericytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells. These ECM proteins comprise different layers of the vascular wall including collagen types I, III, and IV, as well as elastin, fibronectin, and laminin. We further demonstrate the achievement of multicellular microvascular structures with an organized endothelium and a robust multicellular perivascular tunica media. This, along with the increased ECM deposition, allowed for the creation of self-supporting multilayered microvasculature with a distinct circular lumen following fibrin microfiber core removal. This approach presents an advancement toward the development of human microvasculature for basic and translational studies.—Barreto-Ortiz, S. F., Fradkin, J., Eoh, J., Trivero, J., Davenport, M., Ginn, B., Mao, H.-Q., Gerecht, S. Fabrication of 3-dimensional multicellular microvascular structures. PMID:25900808

  12. Limits to Chemically Guided Multicellular Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varennes, Julien; Han, Bumsoo; Mugler, Andrew

    Collective cell migration in response to a chemical cue requires both multicellular sensing of chemical gradients and coordinated mechanical action. Examples from morphogenesis and cancer metastasis demonstrate that clusters of migratory cells are extremely sensitive, responding to gradients of less than 1% difference in chemical concentration across a cell body. While the limits to multicellular sensing are becoming known, the ensuing consequences for coherent migration remain poorly understood. We develop a model of multicellular sensing and migration based on the cellular Potts model. Multicellular sensing of noisy chemical gradients is modeled as a process of local excitation and global inhibition (LEGI) among communicating cells. The output of the sensing process is coupled to individual cells' polarization to model migratory behavior. We find that larger clusters of cells detect the gradient direction with higher precision and thus achieve stronger polarization bias. At the same time, larger clusters are also accompanied by less coherent collective motion. The trade-off between these two effects leads to an optimally efficient cluster size. We discuss how our results relate to cancer metastasis.

  13. Bridging the Theory-Practice Gap in Self-Directed Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Ralph G.; Hiemstra, Roger

    1985-01-01

    This article focuses on four issues: the learner's readiness for self-direction in learning, the teaching and learning process advocated for work with self-directed learners, policy considerations related to self-directed learning, and ethical issues relative to the implementation of self-directed learning concepts. (CT)

  14. Self-directed Learning to Educate Medical Educators. Part 1: How Do We Use Self-directed Learning?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Merryl; Collins, Rob

    1987-01-01

    Described are seven steps used to help self-directed learners to work through the Diploma in Primary Health Care (Education) course at the University of Witwatersrand. The steps are: situation analysis; compilation of a competency profile; self-assessment of learning needs; writing learning objectives; compilation of a learning agreement;…

  15. Increasing Readiness for Self-Directed Learning: A Facilitator's Manual for Ten Self-Directed Learning Group Modules for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutland, Adonna M.; Guglielmino, Lucy M.

    This manual was prepared for use by adult education teachers in facilitating a self-directed learning (SDL) group for students based on the modules described in the manual. The SDL group involves 10 sessions with specific objectives and activities for each session. Following an introduction, the manual is organized in five additional sections. The…

  16. Developing the Self-Directed Learning Instructional Model to Enhance English Reading Ability and Self-Directed Learning of Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wichadee, Saovapa

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to develop the instructional model for enhancing self-directed learning skills of Bangkok University students, study the impacts of the model on their English reading comprehension and self-directed learning ability as well as explore their opinion towards self-directed learning. The model development process…

  17. Lifelong learning in otolaryngology: self-directed learning.

    PubMed

    Schweinfurth, John M

    2007-12-01

    Although nothing in didactic form approaches the learning experience of the real world, the educational process up to graduation is based on a teacher-directed model of learning. Active engagement in self-planned learning activities tends to be more effective than passive learning. Lifelong learning involves finding and implementing solutions to everyday problems encountered in the clinic, emergency room, and operating room and on the wards. The process by which much of this education occurs is via self-directed learning, in which learners challenge themselves to pursue activities that arise from their own experiences using their own emerging styles. The acquisition of self-directed learning is a complex process that involves numerous skills and competencies relied upon to complete challenges. PMID:18021843

  18. Promoting self-directed learning for continuing medical education.

    PubMed

    Mamary, Edward; Charles, Patricia

    2003-03-01

    Self-directed delivery modes for continuing medical education (CME) are the most effective approaches for improving physician performance. However, instructor-directed programs are still the most popular methods used for CME. The purpose of the study was to assess the utilization, preferences and barriers to use of nine different CME delivery methods by physicians. A self-administered survey of all licensed physicians in Nevada was conducted over a three-month period. Results were analyzed using SPSS for windows (version 10). In-person conferences (92%) and journal review (64%) were the most frequently utilized modes of instruction. Rural physicians were more likely to use interactive video. The top three ranked preferences were in-person conference, print-based self-study and CD-ROM. It is concluded that computer training, dedicated time in the workplace for self-directed methods, and the development of more interactive CD-ROM and Internet programs will encourage the use of self-directed CME.

  19. Ontogenetic growth of multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, C. A.; Menchón, S. A.

    2006-11-01

    In ontogenetic growth models, the basal metabolic rate is usually assumed to depend on the individual mass following a power law. Here it is shown that, in the case of multicellular tumor spheroids, the emergence of a necrotic core invalidates this assumption. The implications of this result for spheroid growth are discussed, and a procedure to determine the growth parameters using macroscopic measurements is proposed.

  20. Hydrodynamic simulation of multicellular embryo invagination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pouille, Philippe-Alexandre; Farge, Emmanuel

    2008-03-01

    The mechanical aspects of embryonic morphogenesis have been widely analysed by numerical simulations of invagination in sea urchins and Drosophila gastrulation. Finite element models, which describe the tissue as a continuous medium, lead to the global invagination morphogenesis observed in vivo. Here we develop a simulation of multicellular embryo invagination that allows access to both cellular and multicellular mechanical behaviours of the embryo. In this model, the tissue is composed of adhesive individual cells, in which shape change dynamics is governed by internal acto-myosin forces and the hydrodynamic flow associated with membrane movements. We investigated the minimal structural and force elements sufficient to phenocopy mesoderm invagination. The minimal structures are cell membranes characterized by an acto-myosin cortical tension and connected by apical and basal junctions and an acto-myosin contractile ring connected to the apical junctions. An increase in the apical-cortical surface tension is the only control parameter change required to phenocopy most known multicellular and cellular shape changes of Drosophila gastrulation. Specifically, behaviours observed in vivo, including apical junction movements at the onset of gastrulation, cell elongation and subsequent shortening during invagination, and the development of a dorso-ventral gradient of thickness of the embryo, are predicted by this model as passive mechanical consequences of the genetically controlled increase in the apical surface tension in invaginating mesoderm cells, thus demonstrating the accurate description of structures at both global and single cell scales.

  1. Cooperation, clumping and the evolution of multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Biernaskie, Jay M.; West, Stuart A.

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms represents one of the major evolutionary transitions in the history of life. A potential advantage of forming multicellular clumps is that it provides an efficiency benefit to pre-existing cooperation, such as the production of extracellular ‘public goods’. However, this is complicated by the fact that cooperation could jointly evolve with clumping, and clumping could have multiple consequences for the evolution of cooperation. We model the evolution of clumping and a cooperative public good, showing that (i) when considered separately, both clumping and public goods production gradually increase with increasing genetic relatedness; (ii) in contrast, when the traits evolve jointly, a small increase in relatedness can lead to a major shift in evolutionary outcome—from a non-clumping state with low public goods production to a cooperative clumping state with high values of both traits; (iii) high relatedness makes it easier to get to the cooperative clumping state and (iv) clumping can be inhibited when it increases the number of cells that the benefits of cooperation must be shared with, but promoted when it increases relatedness between those cells. Overall, our results suggest that public goods sharing can facilitate the formation of well-integrated cooperative clumps as a first step in the evolution of multicellularity. PMID:26246549

  2. Collective Chemotaxis through Noisy Multicellular Gradient Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varennes, Julien; Han, Bumsoo; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Collective cell migration in response to a chemical cue occurs in many biological processes such as morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Clusters of migratory cells in these systems are capable of responding to gradients of less than 1% difference in chemical concentration across a cell length. Multicellular systems are extremely sensitive to their environment and while the limits to multicellular sensing are becoming known, how this information leads to coherent migration remains poorly understood. We develop a computational model of multicellular sensing and migration in which groups of cells collectively measure noisy chemical gradients. The output of the sensing process is coupled to individual cells polarization to model migratory behavior. Through the use of numerical simulations, we find that larger clusters of cells detect the gradient direction with higher precision and thus achieve stronger polarization bias, but larger clusters also induce more drag on collective motion. The trade-off between these two effects leads to an optimal cluster size for most efficient migration. We discuss how our model could be validated using simple, phenomenological experiments.

  3. Cooperation, clumping and the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Biernaskie, Jay M; West, Stuart A

    2015-08-22

    The evolution of multicellular organisms represents one of the major evolutionary transitions in the history of life. A potential advantage of forming multicellular clumps is that it provides an efficiency benefit to pre-existing cooperation, such as the production of extracellular 'public goods'. However, this is complicated by the fact that cooperation could jointly evolve with clumping, and clumping could have multiple consequences for the evolution of cooperation. We model the evolution of clumping and a cooperative public good, showing that (i) when considered separately, both clumping and public goods production gradually increase with increasing genetic relatedness; (ii) in contrast, when the traits evolve jointly, a small increase in relatedness can lead to a major shift in evolutionary outcome—from a non-clumping state with low public goods production to a cooperative clumping state with high values of both traits; (iii) high relatedness makes it easier to get to the cooperative clumping state and (iv) clumping can be inhibited when it increases the number of cells that the benefits of cooperation must be shared with, but promoted when it increases relatedness between those cells. Overall, our results suggest that public goods sharing can facilitate the formation of well-integrated cooperative clumps as a first step in the evolution of multicellularity.

  4. Collective Chemotaxis through Noisy Multicellular Gradient Sensing.

    PubMed

    Varennes, Julien; Han, Bumsoo; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Collective cell migration in response to a chemical cue occurs in many biological processes such as morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Clusters of migratory cells in these systems are capable of responding to gradients of <1% difference in chemical concentration across a cell length. Multicellular systems are extremely sensitive to their environment, and although the limits to multicellular sensing are becoming known, how this information leads to coherent migration remains poorly understood. We develop a computational model of multicellular sensing and migration in which groups of cells collectively measure noisy chemical gradients. The output of the sensing process is coupled to the polarization of individual cells to model migratory behavior. Through the use of numerical simulations, we find that larger clusters of cells detect the gradient direction with higher precision and thus achieve stronger polarization bias, but larger clusters also induce more drag on collective motion. The trade-off between these two effects leads to an optimal cluster size for most efficient migration. We discuss how our model could be validated using simple, phenomenological experiments.

  5. Collective Chemotaxis through Noisy Multicellular Gradient Sensing.

    PubMed

    Varennes, Julien; Han, Bumsoo; Mugler, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Collective cell migration in response to a chemical cue occurs in many biological processes such as morphogenesis and cancer metastasis. Clusters of migratory cells in these systems are capable of responding to gradients of <1% difference in chemical concentration across a cell length. Multicellular systems are extremely sensitive to their environment, and although the limits to multicellular sensing are becoming known, how this information leads to coherent migration remains poorly understood. We develop a computational model of multicellular sensing and migration in which groups of cells collectively measure noisy chemical gradients. The output of the sensing process is coupled to the polarization of individual cells to model migratory behavior. Through the use of numerical simulations, we find that larger clusters of cells detect the gradient direction with higher precision and thus achieve stronger polarization bias, but larger clusters also induce more drag on collective motion. The trade-off between these two effects leads to an optimal cluster size for most efficient migration. We discuss how our model could be validated using simple, phenomenological experiments. PMID:27508447

  6. Development of Three-Dimensional Multicellular Tissue-Like Constructs for Mutational Analysis Using Macroporous Microcarriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Jacqueline A.; Fraga, Denise N.; Gonda, Steve R.

    2002-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D), tissue-like model was developed for the genotoxic assessment of space environment. In previous experiments, we found that culturing mammalian cells in a NASA-designed bioreactor, using Cytodex-3 beads as a scaffold, generated 3-D multicellular spheroids. In an effort to generate scaffold-free spheroids, we developed a new 3-D tissue-like model by coculturing fibroblast and epithelial cell in a NASA bioreactor using macroporous Cultispher-S(TradeMark) microcarriers. Big Blue(Registered Trademark) Rat 2(Lambda) fibroblasts, genetically engineered to contain multiple copies (>60 copies/cell) of the Lac I target gene, were cocultured with radio-sensitive human epithelial cells, H184F5. Over an 8-day period, samples were periodically examined by microscopy and histology to confirm cell attachment, growth, and viability. Immunohistochemistry and western analysis were used to evaluate the expression of specific cytoskeletal and adhesion proteins. Key cell culture parameters (glucose, pH, and lactate concentrations) were monitored daily. Controls were two-dimensional mono layers of fibroblast or epithelial cells cultured in T-flasks. Analysis of 3-D spheroids from the bioreactor suggests fibroblast cells attached to and completely covered the bead surface and inner channels by day 3 in the bioreactor. Treatment of the 3-day spheroids with dispase II dissolved the Cultisphers(TradeMark) and produced multicellular, bead-less constructs. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of vi.mentin, cytokeratin and E-cadherin in treated spheroids. Examination of the dispase II treated spheroids with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) also showed the presence of desmosomes. These results suggest that the controlled enzymatic degradation of an artificial matrix in the low shear environment of the NASA-designed bioreactor can produce 3-D tissue-like spheroids. 2

  7. Progress in self-directed growth of molecular assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolkow, Robert

    2004-03-01

    Nanowires, if synthesized in solution or in a CVD reactor need to be harvested and appropriately placed on a substrate for study or application. Structures grown with absolute position control, directly onto a substrate that is amenable to study have inherent advantages. Not only are complex handling issues circumvented, but new hybrid properties of the substrate and line can be attained. By growing molecular assemblies on silicon, a wealth of opportunities become available (1). It becomes possible to directly study molecule-molecule and molecule-substrate coupling. Modes and materials for creating molecular wires can be studied in a rational fashion. Methods for transport determination can be employed. Our original work in this area employed styrene molecules on H-terminated Si(100) to create a self-directed growth procedure for making molecular assemblies of predefined absolute position, order, extent and composition - all without the need for arduous atom-by-atom crafting with a scanned probe (2). In this talk many material and mechanistic advances in this area will be summarized. These include new chemical linking strategies, post attachment rearrangements in tethered molecules, kinetic measurements and a non-aromatic intermediate stabilization stategy. 1) Controlled Molecular Adsorption on Si: Laying a Foundation for Molecular Devices, R.A. Wolkow, Ann. Rev. Phys.Chem., 50, 413-41, 1999. 2)Self-Directed Growth of Molecular Nano Structures on Silicon, G.P Lopinski, D.D.M. Wayner and R.A. Wolkow, Nature 406, 48 (2000).

  8. Analysis of Self-Directed Learning upon Student of Mathematics Education Study Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kleden, Maria Agustina

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have rendered self-directed learning disposition to be significant in the learning of mathematics, however several previous studies have pointed the level of self-directed learning disposition to be at a low point. This research is aimed to enhance self-directed learning through implementing a metacognitive strategy in learning…

  9. The Influence of Complexity and Uncertainty on Self-Directed Team Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David

    2012-01-01

    To help increase the effectiveness of self-directed teams, this paper studies the attitudes and behaviour of self-directed team members during the course of a computer simulated marketing strategy game. Self-directed teams are used widely throughout organisations yet receive little scrutiny when they undertake a task which is subject to conditions…

  10. Self-Directed Learning and the Hard-to-Reach Adult.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Ralph

    1983-01-01

    Explores the potential of self-directed learning as a strategy for better understanding and serving the hard-to-reach adult. Cites evidence of self-directed learning among special adult populations and considers fundamental questions about the concept of self-directed learning. (JOW)

  11. Resistance to Self-Direction in Adult Learning: Myths and Misunderstandings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Ralph G.

    1994-01-01

    Resistance to self-direction in learning often results from misconception: self-direction is all or nothing, implies learning in isolation, is a fad, is not worth the time, is an easy way out for teachers, and is the one best way for adults. The relationship of self-directed learning to humanist concepts also gives rise to resistance. (SK)

  12. Magnetic Optimization in a Multicellular Magnetotactic Organism

    PubMed Central

    Winklhofer, Michael; Abraçado, Leida G.; Davila, Alfonso F.; Keim, Carolina N.; Lins de Barros, Henrique G. P.

    2007-01-01

    Unicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes, which typically carry a natural remanent magnetic moment equal to the saturation magnetic moment, are the prime example of magnetically optimized organisms. We here report magnetic measurements on a multicellular magnetotactic prokaryote (MMP) consisting of 17 undifferentiated cells (mean from 148 MMPs) with chains of ferrimagnetic particles in each cell. To test if the chain polarities of each cell contribute coherently to the total magnetic moment of the MMP, we used a highly sensitive magnetization measurement technique (1 fAm2) that enabled us to determine the degree of magnetic optimization (DMO) of individual MMPs in vivo. We obtained DMO values consistently above 80%. Numerical modeling shows that the probability of reaching a DMO > 80% would be as low as 0.017 for 17 randomly oriented magnetic dipoles. We simulated different scenarios to test whether high DMOs are attainable by aggregation or self-organization of individual magnetic cells. None of the scenarios investigated is likely to yield consistently high DMOs in each generation of MMPs. The observed high DMO values require strong Darwinian selection and a sophisticated reproduction mechanism. We suggest a multicellular life cycle as the most plausible scenario for transmitting the high DMO from one generation to the next. PMID:17071652

  13. Integration of single and multicellular wound responses

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Andrew G.; Miller, Ann L.; Vaughan, Emily; Yu, Hoi-Ying E.; Penkert, Rhiannon; Bement, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Single cells and multicellular tissues rapidly heal wounds. These processes are considered distinct, but one mode of healing—Rho GTPase-dependent formation and closure of a purse string of actin filaments (F-actin) and myosin-2 around wounds—occurs in single cells (1,2) and in epithelia (3-10). Here we show that wounding of one cell in Xenopus embryos elicits Rho GTPase activation around the wound and at the nearest cell-cell junctions in the neighbor cells. F-actin and myosin-2 accumulate at the junctions as well as around the wound itself, and as the resultant actomyosin array closes over the wound site, junctional F-actin and myosin-2 become mechanically integrated with the actin and myosin-2 around the wound, forming a hybrid purse string. When cells are ablated rather than wounded, Rho GTPase activation and F-actin accumulation occur at cell-cell junctions surrounding the ablated cell, and the purse string closes the hole in the epithelium. Elevation of intracellular free calcium, an essential upstream signal for the single cell wound response (2,11), also occurs at the cell-cell contacts and in neighbor cells. Thus, the single and multicellular purse string wound responses represent points on a signaling and mechanical continuum that are integrated by cell-cell junctions. PMID:19631537

  14. Finding self-directed learning readiness and fostering self-directed learning through weekly assessment of self-directed learning topics during undergraduate clinical training in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Soumendra

    2016-01-01

    Background: To know the individual’s current level of readiness and to manage self-directed learning (SDL) not only help learners but also the instructors. The objectives of this study were to find SDL readiness among 4th year medical student and to analyze the effect of weekly assessment of SDL topics. Methodology: This was a cross-sectional study to analyze the effect of weekly assessment of SDL topics in fostering SDL. The 51 4th year students during a clinical posting in ophthalmology participated for this study. Each recruited student was tested for SDL readiness through the SDL readiness scale (SDLRS) developed by Lucy Guglielmino (1978), which was validated in our local setting and responses were collected from students on the 1st day of the clinical posting. The students chose SDL topics which were assessed on a weekly basis in the form of scenario-based multiple choice questionnaires. Written feedback was collected from each student regarding such activity during their clinical posting, especially to know the actual utilization of SDL hours provided in teaching schedule, satisfaction on the type of questions and motivation for SDL. Results: The mean SDLRS score in male students were 214.15 ± 19.73 and in female 207.95 ± 17.983, which falls under average score as defined in Guglielmino scale. The majority of study population expressed better utilization of SDL study hours because of weekly assessment than when they had no assessment for SDL. Conclusions: Majority of the study population were found to be ready for SDL. The weekly assessment of SDL topics was found to stimulate proper utilization of SDL slots in teaching schedule thereby fostering SDL habits. PMID:27563580

  15. Rational self-directed hypnotherapy: a treatment for panic attacks.

    PubMed

    Der, D F; Lewington, P

    1990-01-01

    A single-subject research design was employed to assess the efficacy of rational self-directed hypnotherapy in the treatment of panic attacks. Presenting symptoms were acute fear, dizziness, constricted throat, upset stomach, loss of appetite, loss of weight, insomnia, fear of doctors, and fear of returning to work. Treatment lasted 13 weeks plus a 2-week baseline and posttherapy period and a 6-month follow-up. Objective measurements (MMPI, TSCS, POMS) and self-report assessments (physiological symptoms and a subjective stress inventory) were implemented. Using hypnosis and guided imagery, the subject reviewed critical incidents identifying self-defeating components within a cognitive paradigm, revising and rehearsing these incidents. Results showed an increased sense of control, improved self-concept, elimination of pathological symptoms, and cessation of panic attacks.

  16. Deciphering unusual uncultured magnetotactic multicellular prokaryotes through genomics

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Fernanda; Morillo, Viviana; Nascimento, Fabrícia F; Werneck, Clarissa; Cantão, Mauricio Egidio; Ciapina, Luciane Prioli; de Almeida, Luiz Gonzaga Paula; Lefèvre, Christopher T; Bazylinski, Dennis A; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Lins, Ulysses

    2014-01-01

    Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis (Ca. M. multicellularis) is a member of a group of uncultured magnetotactic prokaryotes that possesses a unique multicellular morphology. To better understand this organism's physiology, we used a genomic approach through pyrosequencing. Genomic data analysis corroborates previous structural studies and reveals the proteins that are likely involved in multicellular morphogenesis of this microorganism. Interestingly, some detected protein sequences that might be involved in cell adhesion are homologues to phylogenetically unrelated filamentous multicellular bacteria proteins, suggesting their contribution in the early development of multicellular organization in Bacteria. Genes related to the behavior of Ca. M. multicellularis (chemo-, photo- and magnetotaxis) and its metabolic capabilities were analyzed. On the basis of the genomic–physiologic information, enrichment media were tested. One medium supported chemoorganoheterotrophic growth of Ca. M. multicellularis and allowed the microorganisms to maintain their multicellular morphology and cell cycle, confirming for the first time that the entire life cycle of the MMP occurs in a multicellular form. Because Ca. M. multicellularis has a unique multicellular life style, its cultivation is an important achievement for further studies regarding the multicellular evolution in prokaryotes. PMID:24196322

  17. Multicellular density fluctuations in epithelial monolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehnder, Steven M.; Wiatt, Marina K.; Uruena, Juan M.; Dunn, Alison C.; Sawyer, W. Gregory; Angelini, Thomas E.

    2015-09-01

    Changes in cell size often accompany multicellular motion in tissue, and cell number density is known to strongly influence collective migration in monolayers. Density fluctuations in other forms of active matter have been explored extensively, but not the potential role of density fluctuations in collective cell migration. Here we investigate collective motion in cell monolayers, focusing on the divergent component of the migration velocity field to probe density fluctuations. We find spatial patterns of diverging and converging cell groups throughout the monolayers, which oscillate in time with a period of approximately 3-4 h. Simultaneous fluorescence measurements of a cytosol dye within the cells show that fluid passes between groups of cells, facilitating these oscillations in cell density. Our findings reveal that cell-cell interactions in monolayers may be mediated by intercellular fluid flow.

  18. The multicellular complexity of peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Cattin, Anne-Laure; Lloyd, Alison C

    2016-08-01

    Peripheral nerves show a remarkable ability to regenerate following a transection injury. Downstream of the cut, the axons degenerate and so to regenerate the nerve, the severed axons need to regrow back to their targets and regain function. This requires the axons to navigate through two different environments. (1) The bridge of new tissue that forms between the two nerve stumps and (2) the distal stump of the nerve that remains associated with the target tissues. This involves distinct, complex multicellular responses that guide and sustain axonal regrowth. These processes have important implications for our understanding of the regeneration of an adult tissue and have parallels to aspects of tumour formation and spread. PMID:27128880

  19. Role of Multicellular Aggregates in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Kragh, Kasper N.; Hutchison, Jaime B.; Melaugh, Gavin; Rodesney, Chris; Roberts, Aled E. L.; Irie, Yasuhiko; Jensen, Peter Ø.; Diggle, Stephen P.; Allen, Rosalind J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In traditional models of in vitro biofilm development, individual bacterial cells seed a surface, multiply, and mature into multicellular, three-dimensional structures. Much research has been devoted to elucidating the mechanisms governing the initial attachment of single cells to surfaces. However, in natural environments and during infection, bacterial cells tend to clump as multicellular aggregates, and biofilms can also slough off aggregates as a part of the dispersal process. This makes it likely that biofilms are often seeded by aggregates and single cells, yet how these aggregates impact biofilm initiation and development is not known. Here we use a combination of experimental and computational approaches to determine the relative fitness of single cells and preformed aggregates during early development of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms. We find that the relative fitness of aggregates depends markedly on the density of surrounding single cells, i.e., the level of competition for growth resources. When competition between aggregates and single cells is low, an aggregate has a growth disadvantage because the aggregate interior has poor access to growth resources. However, if competition is high, aggregates exhibit higher fitness, because extending vertically above the surface gives cells at the top of aggregates better access to growth resources. Other advantages of seeding by aggregates, such as earlier switching to a biofilm-like phenotype and enhanced resilience toward antibiotics and immune response, may add to this ecological benefit. Our findings suggest that current models of biofilm formation should be reconsidered to incorporate the role of aggregates in biofilm initiation. PMID:27006463

  20. Multicellular computing using conjugation for wiring.

    PubMed

    Goñi-Moreno, Angel; Amos, Martyn; de la Cruz, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Recent efforts in synthetic biology have focussed on the implementation of logical functions within living cells. One aim is to facilitate both internal "re-programming" and external control of cells, with potential applications in a wide range of domains. However, fundamental limitations on the degree to which single cells may be re-engineered have led to a growth of interest in multicellular systems, in which a "computation" is distributed over a number of different cell types, in a manner analogous to modern computer networks. Within this model, individual cell type perform specific sub-tasks, the results of which are then communicated to other cell types for further processing. The manner in which outputs are communicated is therefore of great significance to the overall success of such a scheme. Previous experiments in distributed cellular computation have used global communication schemes, such as quorum sensing (QS), to implement the "wiring" between cell types. While useful, this method lacks specificity, and limits the amount of information that may be transferred at any one time. We propose an alternative scheme, based on specific cell-cell conjugation. This mechanism allows for the direct transfer of genetic information between bacteria, via circular DNA strands known as plasmids. We design a multi-cellular population that is able to compute, in a distributed fashion, a Boolean XOR function. Through this, we describe a general scheme for distributed logic that works by mixing different strains in a single population; this constitutes an important advantage of our novel approach. Importantly, the amount of genetic information exchanged through conjugation is significantly higher than the amount possible through QS-based communication. We provide full computational modelling and simulation results, using deterministic, stochastic and spatially-explicit methods. These simulations explore the behaviour of one possible conjugation-wired cellular computing

  1. Geometry shapes evolution of early multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Libby, Eric; Ratcliff, William; Travisano, Michael; Kerr, Ben

    2014-09-01

    Organisms have increased in complexity through a series of major evolutionary transitions, in which formerly autonomous entities become parts of a novel higher-level entity. One intriguing feature of the higher-level entity after some major transitions is a division of reproductive labor among its lower-level units in which reproduction is the sole responsibility of a subset of units. Although it can have clear benefits once established, it is unknown how such reproductive division of labor originates. We consider a recent evolution experiment on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a unique platform to address the issue of reproductive differentiation during an evolutionary transition in individuality. In the experiment, independent yeast lineages evolved a multicellular "snowflake-like" cluster formed in response to gravity selection. Shortly after the evolution of clusters, the yeast evolved higher rates of cell death. While cell death enables clusters to split apart and form new groups, it also reduces their performance in the face of gravity selection. To understand the selective value of increased cell death, we create a mathematical model of the cellular arrangement within snowflake yeast clusters. The model reveals that the mechanism of cell death and the geometry of the snowflake interact in complex, evolutionarily important ways. We find that the organization of snowflake yeast imposes powerful limitations on the available space for new cell growth. By dying more frequently, cells in clusters avoid encountering space limitations, and, paradoxically, reach higher numbers. In addition, selection for particular group sizes can explain the increased rate of apoptosis both in terms of total cell number and total numbers of collectives. Thus, by considering the geometry of a primitive multicellular organism we can gain insight into the initial emergence of reproductive division of labor during an evolutionary transition in individuality.

  2. Promotion of Self-directed Learning Using Virtual Patient Cases

    PubMed Central

    Schonder, Kristine; McGee, James

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assess the effectiveness of virtual patient cases to promote self-directed learning (SDL) in a required advanced therapeutics course. Design. Virtual patient software based on a branched-narrative decision-making model was used to create complex patient case simulations to replace lecture-based instruction. Within each simulation, students used SDL principles to learn course objectives, apply their knowledge through clinical recommendations, and assess their progress through patient outcomes and faculty feedback linked to their individual decisions. Group discussions followed each virtual patient case to provide further interpretation, clarification, and clinical perspective. Assessments. Students found the simulated patient cases to be organized (90%), enjoyable (82%), intellectually challenging (97%), and valuable to their understanding of course content (91%). Students further indicated that completion of the virtual patient cases prior to class permitted better use of class time (78%) and promoted SDL (84%). When assessment questions regarding material on postoperative nausea and vomiting were compared, no difference in scores were found between the students who attended the lecture on the material in 2011 (control group) and those who completed the virtual patient case on the material in 2012 (intervention group). Conclusion. Completion of virtual patient cases, designed to replace lectures and promote SDL, was overwhelmingly supported by students and proved to be as effective as traditional teaching methods. PMID:24052654

  3. Enhancing nurse carer partnerships: A self-directed learning approach.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Freeman, Adele

    2006-07-01

    For many mental health consumers living in the community, friends or relatives provide day-to-day care and support. Consequently, mental health nurses are increasingly required to work collaboratively with carers and integrate their perspective into patient care. Despite this, research suggests that communication between healthcare workers and carers is poor and training in imparting information to carers effectively and encouraging their involvement has been negligible. In recognition of this, it was deemed important to develop a self-directed learning programme for mental health nurses who wish to enhance their skills in carer partnership. Many nurses are interested in developing their clinical leadership abilities and this programme provides an opportunity to demonstrate expertise through portfolio development in a key area of healthcare delivery. This innovative programme provides educative opportunities to nurses who are frequently busy, work rotating rosters, and have competing demands upon their time. It is open to all nurses irrespective of position or setting and utilises a purpose-designed workbook based on contemporary learning principles. This approach is not without its limitations however. In this paper we share our experiences and hope that it may inform others planning innovations to develop practice through education. PMID:19040881

  4. Agent Based Modelling Helps in Understanding the Rules by Which Fibroblasts Support Keratinocyte Colony Formation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Tao; McMinn, Phil; Holcombe, Mike; Smallwood, Rod; MacNeil, Sheila

    2008-01-01

    Background Autologous keratincoytes are routinely expanded using irradiated mouse fibroblasts and bovine serum for clinical use. With growing concerns about the safety of these xenobiotic materials, it is desirable to culture keratinocytes in media without animal derived products. An improved understanding of epithelial/mesenchymal interactions could assist in this. Methodology/Principal Findings A keratincyte/fibroblast o-culture model was developed by extending an agent-based keratinocyte colony formation model to include the response of keratinocytes to both fibroblasts and serum. The model was validated by comparison of the in virtuo and in vitro multicellular behaviour of keratinocytes and fibroblasts in single and co-culture in Greens medium. To test the robustness of the model, several properties of the fibroblasts were changed to investigate their influence on the multicellular morphogenesis of keratinocyes and fibroblasts. The model was then used to generate hypotheses to explore the interactions of both proliferative and growth arrested fibroblasts with keratinocytes. The key predictions arising from the model which were confirmed by in vitro experiments were that 1) the ratio of fibroblasts to keratinocytes would critically influence keratinocyte colony expansion, 2) this ratio needed to be optimum at the beginning of the co-culture, 3) proliferative fibroblasts would be more effective than irradiated cells in expanding keratinocytes and 4) in the presence of an adequate number of fibroblasts, keratinocyte expansion would be independent of serum. Conclusions A closely associated computational and biological approach is a powerful tool for understanding complex biological systems such as the interactions between keratinocytes and fibroblasts. The key outcome of this study is the finding that the early addition of a critical ratio of proliferative fibroblasts can give rapid keratinocyte expansion without the use of irradiated mouse fibroblasts and bovine

  5. Infection and cancer in multicellular organisms

    PubMed Central

    Ewald, Paul W.; Swain Ewald, Holly A.

    2015-01-01

    Evolutionary considerations suggest that oncogenic infections should be pervasive among animal species. Infection-associated cancers are well documented in humans and domestic animals, less commonly reported in undomesticated captive animals, and rarely documented in nature. In this paper, we review the literature associating infectious agents with cancer to evaluate the reasons for this pattern. Non-malignant infectious neoplasms occur pervasively in multicellular life, but oncogenic progression to malignancy is often uncertain. Evidence from humans and domestic animals shows that non-malignant infectious neoplasms can develop into cancer, although generally with low frequency. Malignant neoplasms could be difficult to find in nature because of a low frequency of oncogenic transformation, short survival after malignancy and reduced survival prior to malignancy. Moreover, the evaluation of malignancy can be ambiguous in nature, because criteria for malignancy may be difficult to apply consistently across species. The information available in the literature therefore does not allow for a definitive assessment of the pervasiveness of infectious cancers in nature, but the presence of infectious neoplasias and knowledge about the progression of benign neoplasias to cancer is consistent with a widespread but largely undetected occurrence. PMID:26056368

  6. Apprehending multicellularity: regulatory networks, genomics and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, L.; Anantharaman, Vivek; Venancio, Thiago M.

    2009-01-01

    The genomic revolution has provided the first glimpses of the architecture of regulatory networks. Combined with evolutionary information, the “network view” of life processes leads to remarkable insights into how biological systems have been shaped by various forces. This understanding is critical because biological systems, including regulatory networks, are not products of engineering but of historical contingencies. In this light, we attempt a synthetic overview of the natural history of regulatory networks operating in the development and differentiation of multicellular organisms. We first introduce regulatory networks and their organizational principles as can be deduced using ideas from the graph theory. We then discuss findings from comparative genomics to illustrate the effects of lineage-specific expansions, gene-loss, and non-protein-coding DNA on the architecture of networks. We consider the interaction between expansions of transcription factors, and cis regulatory and more general chromatin state stabilizing elements in the emergence of morphological complexity. Finally, we consider a case study of the Notch sub-network, which is present throughout Metazoa, to examine how such a regulatory system has been pieced together in evolution from new innovations and pre-existing components that were originally functionally distinct. PMID:19530132

  7. Multicellular oxidant defense in unicellular organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Ma, M; Eaton, J W

    1992-01-01

    Although catalase is thought to be a major defense against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), the catalase activity within individual Escherichia coli fails to protect against exogenous H2O2. Contrary to earlier reports, we find that dilute suspensions of wild-type and catalase-deficient E. coli are identical in their sensitivity to H2O2, perhaps because even wild-type, catalase-positive E. coli cannot maintain an internal/external concentration gradient of this highly diffusible oxidant. However, concentrated suspensions or colonies of catalase-positive E. coli do preferentially survive H2O2 challenge and can even cross-protect adjacent catalase-deficient organisms. Furthermore, high-density catalase-positive--but not catalase-negative--E. coli can survive and multiply in the presence of competitive, peroxide-generating streptococci. These observations support the concept that bacterial catalase may defend colonial, but not individual, E. coli against environmental H2O2. Group protection by the activity of enzymes that mitigate oxidative stress may have been a driving force in the evolution of multicellular organisms. Images PMID:1518815

  8. Infection and cancer in multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Ewald, Paul W; Swain Ewald, Holly A

    2015-07-19

    Evolutionary considerations suggest that oncogenic infections should be pervasive among animal species. Infection-associated cancers are well documented in humans and domestic animals, less commonly reported in undomesticated captive animals, and rarely documented in nature. In this paper, we review the literature associating infectious agents with cancer to evaluate the reasons for this pattern. Non-malignant infectious neoplasms occur pervasively in multicellular life, but oncogenic progression to malignancy is often uncertain. Evidence from humans and domestic animals shows that non-malignant infectious neoplasms can develop into cancer, although generally with low frequency. Malignant neoplasms could be difficult to find in nature because of a low frequency of oncogenic transformation, short survival after malignancy and reduced survival prior to malignancy. Moreover, the evaluation of malignancy can be ambiguous in nature, because criteria for malignancy may be difficult to apply consistently across species. The information available in the literature therefore does not allow for a definitive assessment of the pervasiveness of infectious cancers in nature, but the presence of infectious neoplasias and knowledge about the progression of benign neoplasias to cancer is consistent with a widespread but largely undetected occurrence. PMID:26056368

  9. Semiautomatic growth analysis of multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Rodday, Bjoern; Hirschhaeuser, Franziska; Walenta, Stefan; Mueller-Klieser, Wolfgang

    2011-10-01

    Multicellular tumor spheroids (MCTS) are routinely employed as three-dimensional in vitro models to study tumor biology. Cultivation of MCTS in spinner flasks provides better growing conditions, especially with regard to the availability of nutrients and oxygen, when compared with microtiter plates. The main endpoint of drug response experiments is spheroid size. It is common practice to analyze spheroid size manually with a microscope and an ocular micrometer. This requires removal of some spheroids from the flask, which entails major limitations such as loss of MCTS and the risk of contamination. With this new approach, the authors present an efficient and highly reproducible method to analyze the size of complete MCTS populations in culture containers with transparent, flat bottoms. MCTS sediments are digitally scanned and spheroid volumes are calculated by computerized image analysis. The equipment includes regular office hardware (personal computer, flatbed scanner) and software (Adobe Photoshop, Microsoft Excel, ImageJ). The accuracy and precision of the method were tested using industrial precision steel beads with known diameter. In summary, in comparison with other methods, this approach provides benefits in terms of semiautomation, noninvasiveness, and low costs.

  10. Emotional Intelligence and Self-Directed Learning Readiness among College Students Participating in a Leadership Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radnitzer, Karl David

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible relationships between self-directed learning readiness and emotional intelligence in a leadership development program and if self-directed learning leads to greater self-directed learning capabilities. Prior research has examined self-directed learning and emotional intelligence but never have…

  11. Mechanical Trade-offs in Experimentally Evolved Multicellular Yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobeen, Shane; Pentz, Jennifer; Ratcliff, William; Yunker, Peter

    The evolution of multicellularity as much about physics as it is about biology, as selection acts on the physical properties of multicellular bodies. Nascent multicellular organisms are confronted by internal and external forces that act on large length scales and are capable of fracturing intercellular bonds. We study the evolution of the mechanical properties of multicellular `snowflake' yeast that were selected for increased size over ~1,500 generations. While these snowflakes evolve to be larger by mitigating internal forces, they also become more susceptible to fracturing when faced with external compressive forces. Using confocal microscopy and direct mechanical measurements, we investigate the physical underpinnings and consequences of this strength-toughness trade-off.

  12. Aggregative multicellularity evolved independently in the eukaryotic supergroup Rhizaria.

    PubMed

    Brown, Matthew W; Kolisko, Martin; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Roger, Andrew J

    2012-06-19

    Multicellular forms of life have evolved many times, independently giving rise to a diversity of organisms such as animals, plants, and fungi that together comprise the visible biosphere. Yet multicellular life is far more widespread among eukaryotes than just these three lineages. A particularly common form of multicellularity is a social aggregative fruiting lifestyle whereby individual cells associate to form a "fungus-like" sorocarp. This complex developmental process that requires the interaction of thousands of cells working in concert was made famous by the "cellular slime mold"Dictyostelium discoideum, which became an important model organism. Although sorocarpic protistan lineages have been identified in five of the major eukaryote groups, the ubiquitous and globally distributed species Guttulinopsis vulgaris has eluded proper classification. Here we demonstrate, by phylogenomic analyses of a 159-protein data set, that G. vulgaris is a member of Rhizaria and is thus the first member of this eukaryote supergroup known to be capable of aggregative multicellularity. PMID:22608512

  13. Influence of Adult Goal-Setting Instruction on Students' Responsibility toward Self-Directed Competencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apa Browne, Lynn Geri

    2014-01-01

    Elementary grade students in a mid-Atlantic state school district have not been meeting academic standards on state assessments. Research indicates that academic achievement is connected to self-directed readiness to learn; however, often the instruction in strategies for student self-directed readiness to learn remains teacher-centered. The…

  14. Self-Directed Teams in the Introductory Information Systems Course: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffington, James R.

    Research clearly supports the efficacy of self-directed teams in the learning of information systems (IS) skills. This paper proposes that the use of self-directed teams demands a considerable amount of direction on the part of the instructor. Students in two sections of an introductory IS class were surveyed with explicit questions about their…

  15. Self Directed Support and People with Learning Disabilities: A Review of the Published Research Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkes, Mary Anne; Brown, Michael; Horsburgh, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    A systematic literature review was undertaken to determine the evidence base underpinning the strategy of Self Directed Support and whether evidence demonstrates that this policy is accessible to everyone with a learning disability. It also sought to identify whether there were any barriers to Self Directed Support for people with severe or…

  16. Using Study Plans to Develop Self-Directed Learning Skills: Implications from a Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Du, Fengning

    2012-01-01

    Self-directed learning has been lauded as a powerful learner-centered approach to involve students in every aspect of their learning. This article depicts a pilot project utilizing study plan as a vehicle to promote self-directed learning in an intensive and teacher-dominant college language program. This article seeks to identify both the…

  17. The Effects of Self-Directed Teams in an Automotive Manufacturing Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shall, David W.

    2010-01-01

    This study compares self-directed work structures to more traditional supervised work structures in order to determine if the expenditures and efforts required to implement self-directed work teams are warranted. Multiple internal performance metrics are examined in comparing plant work structures in various degrees of implementation between…

  18. Measuring Self-Directed Learning: A Diagnostic Tool for Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khiat, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Self-directed learning is an important form of adult learning (Caffarella, 1993; Knowles, 1975; Knowles, Holton & Swanson, 2005; Merriam, 2001; Merriam & Caffarella, 1999). The strategies of self-directed learning allow adult learners to cope better with their studies while fulfilling family, work and other commitments. This study…

  19. Comparison of Self-Directed Learning Readiness of Fire Executives to the Norm and Public Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Burton A.

    A study was conducted to compare the self-directed learning readiness of National Fire Academy (NFA) fire executive development students to the theoretical norm and to other public managers. Procedures included testing 30 NFA fire executive development students with the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale (SDLRS). The distribution of fire…

  20. Preferences of a Traditional Extension Audience for Self-Directed Delivery Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Allen E.; Richardson, John G.

    1995-01-01

    North Carolina farmers growing barley (n=20) tested 3 self-directed information delivery methods: fact sheets, fact sheets plus audiocassettes, and an extension bulletin/pamphlet. The fact sheet/cassette was preferred by 17 of 20; they achieved significant knowledge gains with self-directed methods. The fact sheet/cassette was considered…

  1. Self-Directed Learning in Gross Human Anatomy: Assessment Outcomes and Student Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smythe, Gayle; Hughes, Diane

    2008-01-01

    Speech pathology students enrolled in a lecture-based gross human anatomy program completed two out of nine topics in self-directed mode. Student performance in quizzes was compared for the two modes, and the students completed questionnaires on their perceptions of the self-directed mode of delivery. Students performed as well in the first…

  2. The Relationship between Transformational Leadership and Knowledge Workers' Self-Directed Learning Readiness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aparicio, Ricardo Antonio

    2013-01-01

    The rapid pace of change for knowledge workers competing globally necessitates ongoing continuous learning. Increasingly, knowledge workers will need to be ready--willing and able--to engage in self-directed learning. This makes it important to understand what factors in the work environment might be related to the self-directed learning…

  3. Self-Directed Learning and Schooling: Identifying Pertinent Theories and Illustrative Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skager, Rodney

    1979-01-01

    Six theoretical positions on human learning are identified as relevant to the development of self-direction: modeling; reinforcement; curiosity motivation; competency motivation; attribution theory and personal causation; and humanism. Four approaches to educational practice associated with self-direction are identified: experimental learning;…

  4. The Effects of a Self-Directed Drug Abuse Education Program on Attitudes of College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwell, James Toy, Jr.

    The major purpose of this study was to determine if significant differences in attitude change toward eight drug abuse concepts would be generated among college students when taught a drug abuse education program with the use of self-directed multi-media learning activities. The subjects' opinions and evaluation of the self-directed education…

  5. Two Decades of Literature on Self-Directed Learning: A Content Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Ralph G.; Stockdale, Susan L.; Fogerson, Dewey L.; Cox, Barry F.; Canipe, James B.; Chuprina, Larissa A.; Donaghy, Robert C.; Chadwell, Nancy E.

    Using a quantitative content analysis approach, a study examined the literature on self direction, or self-directed learning (SDL), that appeared in 14 mainstream adult education journals between 1980-98. The procedure involved classifying, entering, and tallying information on each article through use of an Internet-based program. Results…

  6. Self-Directed Learning among Adults: The Challenge for Continuing Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Percy, Keith; And Others

    During the past 25 years, self-directed, informal, and independent learning by adults has been the subject of a significant amount of research in North America but comparatively little research in Great Britain. In the United States and Canada, "self-directed learning" has become an umbrella term that has been used by different researchers in a…

  7. Life Satisfaction and Learner Self-Direction: Enhancing Quality of Life during the Later Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Ralph G.

    1987-01-01

    Examined the relationship between several aspects of perceived life satisfaction and the extent to which one possesses attitudes and skills associated with self-direction in learning in older adults (N=64). Results suggest that self-directed learning and life satisfaction may be linked in a way that offers implications for improving quality of…

  8. Founders' Continuing Roles in Schools Supporting Self-Directed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, Carol

    2014-01-01

    What should be the continuing role of founders in schools supporting self-directed learning? To answer this, the founders' views of two North American schools for self-directed learners will be compared. One school is exam-focused and private; the other is, test-free and public. The founders of both schools have comparable beliefs regarding…

  9. Conditions Enhancing Self-Directed Learning in the Workplace. A Report to the Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1992

    The appreciative inquiry process was used to identify conditions enhancing self-directed learning. Participants in the project did the following: (1) used the five-step process to identify factors/conditions/forces that seemed to cause self-directed learning to occur; (2) created a matrix by combining the factors/conditions/forces with six…

  10. I Feel, Therefore, I Learn: The Role of Emotion in Self-Directed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2009-01-01

    It is rare to find the emotional component of self-directed learning discussed explicitly in the literature. This lack is particularly glaring given the interest sparked by recent brain research concerning the importance of emotion in all types of learning as well as by the dramatic increase in self-directed learning in the emotionally charged…

  11. The Readiness of Adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder for Self-Directed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Melissa Sue

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the readiness for self-directed learning of adults with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), as well as their overall educational experiences. Using Guglielmino's Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale for Adults (SDLRS-A), the researcher investigated whether the following factors were significantly related to…

  12. A Framework for Developing Self-Directed Technology Use for Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Chun

    2013-01-01

    Critical to maximizing the potential of technology for learning is enhancing language learners' self-directed use of technology for learning purposes. This study aimed to enhance our understanding of the determinants of self-directed technology use through the construction of a structural equation modelling (SEM) framework of factors and…

  13. SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING, TEAMWORK, HOLISTIC VIEW AND ORAL HEALTH.

    PubMed

    Leisnert, Leif

    2014-01-01

    The dental program at the Malmö Dental School, the so called Malmö-model, is guided by four linked principles: self-directed learning, teamwork, a holistic view of patient care, and oral health (Fig.1). Self-assessment ability is a critical competence for healthcare professionals, necessary for the successful adaptation to the modern life-long learning environment. Educational research seems to point out two critical factors for the development of such skills, continuous practice of self-assessment and constructive feedback. The first study presented in this thesis assessed students' self-assessment ability by means of the Interactive Examination in a cohort of senior dental students, who had gone through an identical assessment procedure during their second year of studies. The results indicated that self-assessment ability was not directly relevant to subject knowledge. Upon graduation, there were a number of students (10%) with significant self-assessment difficulties. Early detection of students with weak self-assessment abilities appears possible to achieve. The aim of the second study, concerning teamwork and holistic view, was to investigate if highlighting teamwork between dental and dental hygienist students could improve the students' holistic view on patients, as well as their knowledge of, and insight into, each other's future professions. This project showed that by initiating teamwork between dental and dental hygienist students, it was possible to increase students' knowledge on dental hygienists competence, develop students' perceived holistic view on patients, and prepare students for teamwork. The third study explored findings clinicians used when diagnosing chronic periodontitis. A questionnaire was distributed to students, dental teachers and clinical supervisors in the Public Dental Services. Within all categories of clinicians, the majority of the clinicians used deepened pocket, bone loss on x-rays, and bleeding as findings. There were

  14. SELF-DIRECTED LEARNING, TEAMWORK, HOLISTIC VIEW AND ORAL HEALTH.

    PubMed

    Leisnert, Leif

    2014-01-01

    The dental program at the Malmö Dental School, the so called Malmö-model, is guided by four linked principles: self-directed learning, teamwork, a holistic view of patient care, and oral health (Fig.1). Self-assessment ability is a critical competence for healthcare professionals, necessary for the successful adaptation to the modern life-long learning environment. Educational research seems to point out two critical factors for the development of such skills, continuous practice of self-assessment and constructive feedback. The first study presented in this thesis assessed students' self-assessment ability by means of the Interactive Examination in a cohort of senior dental students, who had gone through an identical assessment procedure during their second year of studies. The results indicated that self-assessment ability was not directly relevant to subject knowledge. Upon graduation, there were a number of students (10%) with significant self-assessment difficulties. Early detection of students with weak self-assessment abilities appears possible to achieve. The aim of the second study, concerning teamwork and holistic view, was to investigate if highlighting teamwork between dental and dental hygienist students could improve the students' holistic view on patients, as well as their knowledge of, and insight into, each other's future professions. This project showed that by initiating teamwork between dental and dental hygienist students, it was possible to increase students' knowledge on dental hygienists competence, develop students' perceived holistic view on patients, and prepare students for teamwork. The third study explored findings clinicians used when diagnosing chronic periodontitis. A questionnaire was distributed to students, dental teachers and clinical supervisors in the Public Dental Services. Within all categories of clinicians, the majority of the clinicians used deepened pocket, bone loss on x-rays, and bleeding as findings. There were

  15. Duplicate gene enrichment and expression pattern diversification in multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Padawer, Timothy; Leighty, Ralph E.; Wang, Degeng

    2012-01-01

    The enrichment of duplicate genes, and therefore paralogs (proteins coded by duplicate genes), in multicellular versus unicellular organisms enhances genomic functional innovation. This study quantitatively examined relationships among paralog enrichment, expression pattern diversification and multicellularity, aiming to better understand genomic basis of multicellularity. Paralog abundance in specific cells was compared with those in unicellular proteomes and the whole proteomes of multicellular organisms. The budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans, for which the gene sets expressed in specific cells are available, were used as uni and multicellular models, respectively. Paralog count (K) distributions [P(k)] follow a power-law relationship [P(k) ∝ k−α] in the whole proteomes of both species and in specific C. elegans cells. The value of the constant α can be used as a gauge of paralog abundance; the higher the value, the lower the paralog abundance. The α-value is indeed lower in the whole proteome of C. elegans (1.74) than in S. cerevisiae (2.34), quantifying the enrichment of paralogs in multicellular species. We also found that the power-law relationship applies to the proteomes of specific C. elegans cells. Strikingly, values of α in specific cells are higher and comparable to that in S. cerevisiae. Thus, paralog abundance in specific cells is lower and comparable to that in unicellular species. Furthermore, how much the expression level of a gene fluctuates across different C. elegans cells correlates positively with its paralog count, which is further confirmed by human gene-expression patterns across different tissues. Taken together, these results quantitatively and mechanistically establish enrichment of paralogs with diversifying expression patterns as genomic and evolutionary basis of multicellularity. PMID:22645319

  16. Self-directed and student-centred learning in nurse education: 2.

    PubMed

    Nolan, J; Nolan, M

    Based on a study of student nurses' expectations at the start of their Project 2000 training, this article, the second of two, argues for the need to develop a new approach to self-directed learning. Termed the cooperative model, it places emphasis on tutors providing initial direction and leadership so that students can gradually develop the skills needed to become self-directed. This requires the use of pedagogical approaches which recognize the value of didactic as well as experiential teaching strategies. The characteristics of the cooperative model, which is located within the continuum of self-directed learning suggested by D'A Slevin and Lavery (1991), are outlined. PMID:9116435

  17. Multicellularity in green algae: upsizing in a walled complex.

    PubMed

    Domozych, David S; Domozych, Catherine E

    2014-01-01

    Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous, and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM), most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In "ulvophytes," uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell's signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the ECM. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity. PMID:25477895

  18. Multicellularity in green algae: upsizing in a walled complex

    PubMed Central

    Domozych, David S.; Domozych, Catherine E.

    2014-01-01

    Modern green algae constitute a large and diverse taxonomic assemblage that encompasses many multicellular phenotypes including colonial, filamentous, and parenchymatous forms. In all multicellular green algae, each cell is surrounded by an extracellular matrix (ECM), most often in the form of a cell wall. Volvocalean taxa like Volvox have an elaborate, gel-like, hydroxyproline rich glycoprotein covering that contains the cells of the colony. In “ulvophytes,” uronic acid-rich and sulfated polysaccharides are the likely adhesion agents that maintain the multicellular habit. Charophytes also produce polysaccharide-rich cell walls and in late divergent taxa, pectin plays a critical role in cell adhesion in the multicellular complex. Cell walls are products of coordinated interaction of membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal dynamics and the cell’s signal transduction machinery responding both to precise internal clocks and external environmental cues. Most often, these activities must be synchronized with the secretion, deposition and remodeling of the polymers of the ECM. Rapid advances in molecular genetics, cell biology and cell wall biochemistry of green algae will soon provide new insights into the evolution and subcellular processes leading to multicellularity. PMID:25477895

  19. Triassic origin and early radiation of multicellular volvocine algae

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Matthew D.; Hackett, Jeremiah D.; Aylward, Frank O.; Michod, Richard E.

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary transitions in individuality (ETIs) underlie the watershed events in the history of life on Earth, including the origins of cells, eukaryotes, plants, animals, and fungi. Each of these events constitutes an increase in the level of complexity, as groups of individuals become individuals in their own right. Among the best-studied ETIs is the origin of multicellularity in the green alga Volvox, a model system for the evolution of multicellularity and cellular differentiation. Since its divergence from unicellular ancestors, Volvox has evolved into a highly integrated multicellular organism with cellular specialization, a complex developmental program, and a high degree of coordination among cells. Remarkably, all of these changes were previously thought to have occurred in the last 50–75 million years. Here we estimate divergence times using a multigene data set with multiple fossil calibrations and use these estimates to infer the times of developmental changes relevant to the evolution of multicellularity. Our results show that Volvox diverged from unicellular ancestors at least 200 million years ago. Two key innovations resulting from an early cycle of cooperation, conflict and conflict mediation led to a rapid integration and radiation of multicellular forms in this group. This is the only ETI for which a detailed timeline has been established, but multilevel selection theory predicts that similar changes must have occurred during other ETIs. PMID:19223580

  20. Bacterial swarming: an example of prokaryotic differentiation and multicellular behaviour.

    PubMed

    Allison, C; Hughes, C

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial swarming involves the differentiation of vegetative cells into hyperflagellated swarm cells which undergo cycles of rapid and coordinated population migration across solid surfaces. Species capable of this simple form of developmental behaviour lie on the boundary between unicellular and multicellular organisms and provide processes for study which are not only of intrinsic interest but which are analogous to components of more complex eukaryotic systems. This review attempts to place current knowledge of bacterial swarming within the framework provided by more extensively studied forms of prokaryotic multicellular behaviour. It discusses the potential of swarming as a readily accessible model of differentiation and multicellular behaviour and describes evidence indicating that swarming differentiation plays an important role in bacterial virulence.

  1. A conceptual framework for the evolutionary origins of multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libby, Eric; Rainey, Paul B.

    2013-06-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular counterparts involved a transition in Darwinian individuality from single cells to groups. A particular challenge is to understand the nature of the earliest groups, the causes of their evolution, and the opportunities for emergence of Darwinian properties. Here we outline a conceptual framework based on a logical set of possible pathways for evolution of the simplest self-replicating groups. Central to these pathways is the recognition of a finite number of routes by which genetic information can be transmitted between individual cells and groups. We describe the form and organization of each primordial group state and consider factors affecting persistence and evolution of the nascent multicellular forms. Implications arising from our conceptual framework become apparent when attempting to partition fitness effects at individual and group levels. These are discussed with reference to the evolutionary emergence of individuality and its manifestation in extant multicellular life—including those of marginal Darwinian status.

  2. Tyrosine kinase signaling and the emergence of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Miller, W Todd

    2012-06-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an essential element of signal transduction in multicellular animals. Although tyrosine kinases were originally regarded as specific to the metazoan lineage, it is now clear that they evolved prior to the split between unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes (≈600million years ago). Genome analyses of choanoflagellates and other protists show an abundance of tyrosine kinases that rivals the most complex animals. Some of these kinases are orthologs of metazoan enzymes (e.g., Src), but others display unique domain compositions not seen in any metazoan. Biochemical experiments have highlighted similarities and differences between the unicellular and multicellular tyrosine kinases. In particular, it appears that the complex systems of kinase autoregulation may have evolved later in the metazoan lineage. PMID:22480439

  3. Tyrosine kinase signaling and the emergence of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Miller, W Todd

    2012-06-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an essential element of signal transduction in multicellular animals. Although tyrosine kinases were originally regarded as specific to the metazoan lineage, it is now clear that they evolved prior to the split between unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes (≈600million years ago). Genome analyses of choanoflagellates and other protists show an abundance of tyrosine kinases that rivals the most complex animals. Some of these kinases are orthologs of metazoan enzymes (e.g., Src), but others display unique domain compositions not seen in any metazoan. Biochemical experiments have highlighted similarities and differences between the unicellular and multicellular tyrosine kinases. In particular, it appears that the complex systems of kinase autoregulation may have evolved later in the metazoan lineage.

  4. Emotional consequences of collective action participation: differentiating self-directed and outgroup-directed emotions.

    PubMed

    Becker, Julia C; Tausch, Nicole; Wagner, Ulrich

    2011-12-01

    The present research examines the emotional and behavioral consequences of collective action participation. It demonstrates that "positive" and "negative" emotions can be experienced simultaneously as a result of collective action participation, yet it is important to distinguish outgroup-directed from self-directed emotions. Results of two experiments (N = 71 and N = 101) that manipulated participation in collective action illustrate that whereas collective action participants experience more outgroup-directed anger and contempt, they feel more self-directed positive affect. Furthermore, collective action participation predicted willingness to engage in moderate and radical collective actions in the future. These relations were mediated by outgroup-directed, but not by self-directed, emotions, suggesting that outgroup-directed rather than self-directed emotions play a crucial role in the maintenance of protest behavior. Theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:21737603

  5. Can a Self-Directed Learner Be Independent, Autonomous and Interdependent?: Implications for Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nah, Yoonkyeong

    1999-01-01

    Although adult education values independence and autonomy in self-directed learners, non-Western cultures value interdependence. Interviews with five Korean women leaders suggest that there is value in developing both independence and interdependence in adult learners. (SK)

  6. Methodological and Substantive Issues in the Measurement of Self-Directed Learning Readiness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Ralph G.

    1985-01-01

    It is felt that while the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale may be appropriate for certain segments of the adult population, it may be inappropriate for other groups such as those of low formal educational attainment. (Author/CT)

  7. The relationship between assessment methods and self-directed learning readiness in medical education

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives   This research explored the assessment of self-directed learning readiness within the comprehensive evaluation of medical students’ knowledge and skills and the extent to which several variables predicted participants’ self-directed learning readiness prior to their graduation. Methods   Five metrics for evaluating medical students were considered in a multiple regression analysis.  Fourth-year medical students at a competitive US medical school received an informed consent and an online survey.  Participants voluntarily completed a self-directed learning readiness scale that assessed four subsets of self-directed learning readiness and consented to the release of their academic records. Results   The assortment of metrics considered in this study only vaguely captured students’ self-directedness.  The strongest predictors were faculty evaluations of students’ performance on clerkship rotations.  Specific clerkship grades were mildly predictive of three subscales.  The Pediatrics clerkship modestly predicted critical self-evaluation (r=-.30, p=.01) and the Psychiatry clerkship mildly predicted learning self-efficacy (r =-.30, p=.01), while the Junior Surgery clerkship nominally correlated with participants’ effective organization for learning (r=.21, p=.05).  Other metrics examined did not contribute to predicting participants’ readiness for self-directed learning. Conclusions   Given individual differences among participants for the variables considered, no combination of students’ grades and/or test scores overwhelmingly predicted their aptitude for self-directed learning.  Considering the importance of fostering medical students’ self-directed learning skills, schools need a reliable and pragmatic approach to measure them.  This data analysis, however, offered no clear-cut way of documenting students’ self-directed learning readiness based on the evaluation metrics included. PMID:26970653

  8. Deconstructing the effect of self-directed study on episodic memory.

    PubMed

    Markant, Douglas; DuBrow, Sarah; Davachi, Lila; Gureckis, Todd M

    2014-11-01

    Self-directed learning is often associated with better long-term memory retention; however, the mechanisms that underlie this advantage remain poorly understood. This series of experiments was designed to "deconstruct" the notion of self-directed learning, in order to better identify the factors most responsible for these improvements to memory. In particular, we isolated the memory advantage that comes from controlling the content of study episodes from the advantage that comes from controlling the timing of those episodes. Across four experiments, self-directed learning significantly enhanced recognition memory, relative to passive observation. However, the advantage for self-directed learning was found to be present even under extremely minimal conditions of volitional control (simply pressing a button when a participant was ready to advance to the next item). Our results suggest that improvements to memory following self-directed encoding may be related to the ability to coordinate stimulus presentation with the learner's current preparatory or attentional state, and they highlight the need to consider the range of cognitive control processes involved in and influenced by self-directed study.

  9. Cell behavior observation and gene expression analysis of melanoma associated with stromal fibroblasts in a three-dimensional magnetic cell culture array.

    PubMed

    Okochi, Mina; Matsumura, Taku; Yamamoto, And Shuhei; Nakayama, Eiichi; Jimbow, Kowichi; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) multicellular tumor spheroid culture array has been fabricated using a magnetic force-based cell patterning method, analyzing the effect of stromal fibroblast on the invasive capacity of melanoma. Formation of spheroids was observed when array-like multicellular patterns of melanoma were developed using a pin-holder device made of magnetic soft iron and an external magnet, which enables the assembly of the magnetically labeled cells on the collagen gel-coated surface as array-like cell patterns. The interaction of fibroblast on the invasion of melanoma was investigated using three types of cell interaction models: (i) fibroblasts were magnetically labeled and patterned together in array with melanoma spheroids (direct-interaction model), (ii) fibroblasts coexisting in the upper collagen gel (indirect-interaction model) of melanoma spheroids, and (iii) fibroblast-sheets coexisting under melanoma spheroids (fibroblast-sheet model). The fibroblast-sheet model has largely increased the invasive capacity of melanoma, and the promotion of adhesion, migration, and invasion were also observed. In the fibroblast-sheet model, the expression of IL-8 and MMP-2 increased by 24-fold and 2-fold, respectively, in real time RT-PCR compared to the absence of fibroblasts. The results presented in this study demonstrate the importance of fibroblast interaction to invasive capacity of melanoma in the 3D in vitro bioengineered tumor microenvironment.

  10. Regulated aggregative multicellularity in a close unicellular relative of metazoa.

    PubMed

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Irimia, Manuel; Del Campo, Javier; Parra-Acero, Helena; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-12-24

    The evolution of metazoans from their unicellular ancestors was one of the most important events in the history of life. However, the cellular and genetic changes that ultimately led to the evolution of multicellularity are not known. In this study, we describe an aggregative multicellular stage in the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of metazoans. Remarkably, transition to the aggregative stage is associated with significant upregulation of orthologs of genes known to establish multicellularity and tissue architecture in metazoans. We further observe transitions in regulated alternative splicing during the C. owczarzaki life cycle, including the deployment of an exon network associated with signaling, a feature of splicing regulation so far only observed in metazoans. Our results reveal the existence of a highly regulated aggregative stage in C. owczarzaki and further suggest that features of aggregative behavior in an ancestral protist may had been co-opted to develop some multicellular properties currently seen in metazoans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01287.001.

  11. Regulated aggregative multicellularity in a close unicellular relative of metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Irimia, Manuel; del Campo, Javier; Parra-Acero, Helena; Russ, Carsten; Nusbaum, Chad; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of metazoans from their unicellular ancestors was one of the most important events in the history of life. However, the cellular and genetic changes that ultimately led to the evolution of multicellularity are not known. In this study, we describe an aggregative multicellular stage in the protist Capsaspora owczarzaki, a close unicellular relative of metazoans. Remarkably, transition to the aggregative stage is associated with significant upregulation of orthologs of genes known to establish multicellularity and tissue architecture in metazoans. We further observe transitions in regulated alternative splicing during the C. owczarzaki life cycle, including the deployment of an exon network associated with signaling, a feature of splicing regulation so far only observed in metazoans. Our results reveal the existence of a highly regulated aggregative stage in C. owczarzaki and further suggest that features of aggregative behavior in an ancestral protist may had been co-opted to develop some multicellular properties currently seen in metazoans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01287.001 PMID:24368732

  12. Self-directed learning of hospital pharmacy residents in western Canada.

    PubMed

    Levchuk, J W

    1983-01-01

    The extent of self-directed learning among hospital pharmacy residents in western Canada was studied. A preresidency questionnaire and a postresidency group interview with a set of questionnaires were used. The residents were asked to list learning projects conducted in their residency programs; these learning projects were categorized as self-directed, mutual-agreement, and preceptor-directed. A postinterview questionnaire was used to obtain postresidency measurements of self-directedness and resident autonomy. Twenty-four residents provided data on 164 learning projects. Projects with the most meaningfulness, high achievement contribution, positive motivation, and relevance corresponded with the self-directed approach. Residents who had more meaningful learning entered their residencies with no more self-directedness than other residents, but they did have more autonomy in their residencies. No particular type of project, with respect to learner autonomy, was found to be more problematic than the others. Facilitation of learner autonomy in a hospital pharmacy residency may increase the value of self-directed learning projects in general and improve the resident's self-directedness. Self-directed learning should continue to be part of residency programs.

  13. Self-directed and student-centred learning in nurse education: 1.

    PubMed

    Nolan, J; Nolan, M

    This article, the first of two, considers the factors precipitating the widespread adoption of self-directed and student-centered learning in nurse education. It argues that these concepts have been accepted in a relatively uncritical fashion and that the theoretical rationale for their use has yet to be fully tested empirically. The results of a study of the expectations of Project 2000 students suggest that adult learners may not necessarily want the freedom afforded by self-directed approaches, but may prefer a more structural and ordered model. PMID:9016000

  14. Garrison's model of self-directed learning: preliminary validation and relationship to academic achievement.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Fattah, Sabry M

    2010-11-01

    In this project, 119 undergraduates responded to a questionnaire tapping three psychological constructs implicated in Garrison's model of self-directed learning: self-management, self-monitoring, and motivation. Mediation analyses showed that these psychological constructs are interrelated and that motivation mediates the relationship between self-management and self-monitoring. Path modeling analyses revealed that self-management and self-monitoring significantly predicted academic achievement over two semesters with self-management being the strongest predictor. Motivation significantly predicted academic achievement over the second semester only. Implications of these findings for self-directed learning and academic achievement in a traditional classroom setting are discussed. PMID:20977009

  15. An evolutionary scenario for the transition to undifferentiated multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Thomas; Bonhoeffer, Sebastian

    2003-01-01

    The evolutionary transition from single cells toward multicellular forms of life represents one of the major transitions in the evolution of complex organisms. In this transition, single autonomously reproducing cells became parts of larger reproducing entities that eventually constituted a new unit of selection. The first step in the evolutionary transition to multicellularity likely was the evolution of simple, undifferentiated cell clusters. However, what the selective advantage of such cell clusters may have been remains unclear. Here, we argue that in populations of unicellular organisms with cooperative behavior, clustering may be beneficial by reducing interactions with noncooperative individuals. In support of this hypothesis, we present a set of computer simulations showing that clustering can evolve as a biological, heritable trait for cells that cooperate in the use of external energy resources. Following the evolution of simple cell clusters, further benefits could have arisen from the exchange of resources between cells of a cluster. PMID:12547910

  16. Life cycles, fitness decoupling and the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Hammerschmidt, Katrin; Rose, Caroline J; Kerr, Benjamin; Rainey, Paul B

    2014-11-01

    Cooperation is central to the emergence of multicellular life; however, the means by which the earliest collectives (groups of cells) maintained integrity in the face of destructive cheating types is unclear. One idea posits cheats as a primitive germ line in a life cycle that facilitates collective reproduction. Here we describe an experiment in which simple cooperating lineages of bacteria were propagated under a selective regime that rewarded collective-level persistence. Collectives reproduced via life cycles that either embraced, or purged, cheating types. When embraced, the life cycle alternated between phenotypic states. Selection fostered inception of a developmental switch that underpinned the emergence of collectives whose fitness, during the course of evolution, became decoupled from the fitness of constituent cells. Such development and decoupling did not occur when groups reproduced via a cheat-purging regime. Our findings capture key events in the evolution of Darwinian individuality during the transition from single cells to multicellularity.

  17. Detecting tree-like multicellular life on extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Christopher E; Wolf, Adam

    2010-11-01

    Over the next two decades, NASA and ESA are planning a series of space-based observatories to find Earth-like planets and determine whether life exists on these planets. Previous studies have assessed the likelihood of detecting life through signs of biogenic gases in the atmosphere or a red edge. Biogenic gases and the red edge could be signs of either single-celled or multicellular life. In this study, we propose a technique with which to determine whether tree-like multicellular life exists on extrasolar planets. For multicellular photosynthetic organisms on Earth, competition for light and the need to transport water and nutrients has led to a tree-like body plan characterized by hierarchical branching networks. This design results in a distinct bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) that causes differing reflectance at different sun/view geometries. BRDF arises from the changing visibility of the shadows cast by objects, and the presence of tree-like structures is clearly distinguishable from flat ground with the same reflectance spectrum. We examined whether the BRDF could detect the existence of tree-like structures on an extrasolar planet by using changes in planetary albedo as a planet orbits its star. We used a semi-empirical BRDF model to simulate vegetation reflectance at different planetary phase angles and both simulated and real cloud cover to calculate disk and rotation-averaged planetary albedo for a vegetated and non-vegetated planet with abundant liquid water. We found that even if the entire planetary albedo were rendered to a single pixel, the rate of increase of albedo as a planet approaches full illumination would be comparatively greater on a vegetated planet than on a non-vegetated planet. Depending on how accurately planetary cloud cover can be resolved and the capabilities of the coronagraph to resolve exoplanets, this technique could theoretically detect tree-like multicellular life on exoplanets in 50 stellar systems

  18. Multi-cellular, three-dimensional living mammalian tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a multicellular, three-dimensional, living mammalian tissue. The tissue is produced by a co-culture process wherein two distinct types of mammalian cells are co-cultured in a rotating bioreactor which is completely filled with culture media and cell attachment substrates. As the size of the tissue assemblies formed on the attachment substrates changes, the rotation of the bioreactor is adjusted accordingly.

  19. Detecting tree-like multicellular life on extrasolar planets.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Christopher E; Wolf, Adam

    2010-11-01

    Over the next two decades, NASA and ESA are planning a series of space-based observatories to find Earth-like planets and determine whether life exists on these planets. Previous studies have assessed the likelihood of detecting life through signs of biogenic gases in the atmosphere or a red edge. Biogenic gases and the red edge could be signs of either single-celled or multicellular life. In this study, we propose a technique with which to determine whether tree-like multicellular life exists on extrasolar planets. For multicellular photosynthetic organisms on Earth, competition for light and the need to transport water and nutrients has led to a tree-like body plan characterized by hierarchical branching networks. This design results in a distinct bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) that causes differing reflectance at different sun/view geometries. BRDF arises from the changing visibility of the shadows cast by objects, and the presence of tree-like structures is clearly distinguishable from flat ground with the same reflectance spectrum. We examined whether the BRDF could detect the existence of tree-like structures on an extrasolar planet by using changes in planetary albedo as a planet orbits its star. We used a semi-empirical BRDF model to simulate vegetation reflectance at different planetary phase angles and both simulated and real cloud cover to calculate disk and rotation-averaged planetary albedo for a vegetated and non-vegetated planet with abundant liquid water. We found that even if the entire planetary albedo were rendered to a single pixel, the rate of increase of albedo as a planet approaches full illumination would be comparatively greater on a vegetated planet than on a non-vegetated planet. Depending on how accurately planetary cloud cover can be resolved and the capabilities of the coronagraph to resolve exoplanets, this technique could theoretically detect tree-like multicellular life on exoplanets in 50 stellar systems.

  20. Division of labour and the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Ackermann, Martin; Doebeli, Michael

    2012-05-01

    Understanding the emergence and evolution of multicellularity and cellular differentiation is a core problem in biology. We develop a quantitative model that shows that a multicellular form emerges from genetically identical unicellular ancestors when the compartmentalization of poorly compatible physiological processes into component cells of an aggregate produces a fitness advantage. This division of labour between the cells in the aggregate occurs spontaneously at the regulatory level owing to mechanisms present in unicellular ancestors and does not require any genetic predisposition for a particular role in the aggregate or any orchestrated cooperative behaviour of aggregate cells. Mathematically, aggregation implies an increase in the dimensionality of phenotype space that generates a fitness landscape with new fitness maxima, in which the unicellular states of optimized metabolism become fitness saddle points. Evolution of multicellularity is modelled as evolution of a hereditary parameter: the propensity of cells to stick together, which determines the fraction of time a cell spends in the aggregate form. Stickiness can increase evolutionarily owing to the fitness advantage generated by the division of labour between cells in an aggregate. PMID:22158952

  1. Heritable Remodeling of Yeast Multicellularity by an Environmentally Responsive Prion

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, Daniel L.; Lancaster, Alex K.; Lindquist, Susan; Halfmann, Randal

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Prion proteins undergo self-sustaining conforma-tional conversions that heritably alter their activities. Many of these proteins operate at pivotal positions in determining how genotype is translated into pheno-type. But the breadth of prion influences on biology and their evolutionary significance are just beginning to be explored. We report that a prion formed by the Mot3 transcription factor, [MOT3+], governs the acquisition of facultative multicellularity in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The traits governed by [MOT3+] involved both gains and losses of Mot3 regulatory activity. [MOT3+]-dependent expression of FLO11, a major determinant of cell-cell adhesion, produced diverse lineage-specific multicellular phenotypes in response to nutrient deprivation. The prions themselves were induced by ethanol and eliminated by hypoxia—conditions that occur sequentially in the natural respiro-fermen-tative cycles of yeast populations. These data demonstrate that prions can act as environmentally responsive molecular determinants of multicellularity and contribute to the natural morphological diversity of budding yeast. PMID:23540696

  2. Applying Self-Directed Learning Principles in the Technical Training of a High-Risk Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackwood, Constance C.

    1994-01-01

    Experience with nuclear power plant workers for whom continuing education is mandated yielded techniques for incorporating self-direction to overcome resistance: educate management, involve workers, know the audience, incorporate feedback in training plans, be consistent, use learning contracts, motivate learners, use alternative methods, build…

  3. Verification of Accurate Technical Insight: A Prerequisite for Self-Directed Surgical Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Yinin; Kim, Helen; Mahmutovic, Adela; Choi, Joanna; Le, Ivy; Rasmussen, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Simulation-based surgical skills training during preclinical education is a persistent challenge due to time constraints of trainees and instructors alike. Self-directed practice is resource-efficient and flexible; however, insight into technical proficiency among trainees is often lacking. The purpose of this study is to prospectively assess the…

  4. Stages of Learning during a Self-Directed Stress Management Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Karl L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to document the stages of learning reflected through student journaling during a self-directed experience in stress management, and the relationship of those stages to a historical model. Methods: College students participating in a full-semester course in stress management theory were required to select a…

  5. Self-Directed Learning: Adult Learners' Perceptions and Their Study Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greyling, E. S. G.; Geyser, H. C.; Fourie, C. M.

    2002-01-01

    Triggered by the poor performance of historically-disadvantaged students in a South African distance education course, examined students' perceptions of their self-directed learning (SDL). Also examined the SDL support contained in their study materials. Found that the students generally lacked readiness for SDL, suggesting several changes needed…

  6. Development of a Supported Self-Directed Learning Approach for Anatomy Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findlater, Gordon S.; Kristmundsdottir, Fanney; Parson, Simon H.; Gillingwater, Thomas H.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to deliver sufficient core anatomical knowledge and understanding to medical students with limited time and resources remains a major challenge for anatomy educators. Here, we report the results of switching from a primarily didactic method of teaching to supported self-directed learning for students studying anatomy as part of…

  7. Effects of Self-Regulatory Instructional Aids on Self-Directed Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bednall, Timothy C.; Kehoe, E. James

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of providing instructional support for the self-regulation of a self-directed homework assignment. Across four parallel experiments, university students completed an online module on critical thinking. In Experiment 1, participants who were prompted on a broad spectrum of study strategies showed superior…

  8. Design and Evaluation of a Development Portfolio: How to Improve Students' Self-Directed Learning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kicken, Wendy; Brand-Gruwel, Saskia; van Merrienboer, Jeroen; Slot, Wim

    2009-01-01

    In on-demand education, students often experience problems with directing their own learning processes. A Structured Task Evaluation and Planning Portfolio (STEPP) was designed to help students develop 3 basic self-directed learning skills: Assessing the quality of own performance, formulating learning needs, and selecting future learning tasks. A…

  9. Using Self-Directed Video Prompting to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cannella-Malone, Helen I.; Brooks, David G.; Tullis, Christopher A.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of self-directed video prompting presented via an iPod Touch on teaching four adolescents with moderate-to-severe intellectual and developmental disabilities two daily living tasks. Students were taught to wash a table using instructor-delivered video prompts. After reaching 80% correct for at least three…

  10. Computer versus Counselor Interpretation of Interest Inventories: The Case of the Self-Directed Search.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gati, Itamar; Blumberg, Dani

    1991-01-01

    Examined interpretations of 100 career counselee's responses to Self-Directed Search (SDS). Found that agreement between scales identified as relevant was as high as agreement among counselors, insignificant correlations between counselors' judgments of counselee's degree of interest crystallization and Holland's (1985) measure of consistency, and…

  11. The Design of a Web-Based Course for Self-Directed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Mingzhuo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore how to design a web-based course in the context of China for self-directed learning from four perspectives--i.e. pedagogical, psychological, social and technological--and also to summarize the design principles for the web-based course. Design/methodology/approach: The paper reviews literature…

  12. Self-Directed Learning: College Students' Technology Preparedness Change in the Last 10 Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caravello, Michael J.; Jiménez, Joel R.; Kahl, Lois J.; Brachio, Brian; Morote, Elsa-Sofia

    2015-01-01

    This study compares a sample of approximately 44 first year college students in 2005 and 2015 on Long Island, New York, in their technology preparedness and self-directed instruction. The researchers used a survey instrument including demographic information focused upon students' preparation for classroom technology in high school and college.…

  13. Evaluating the Effects of Competency-Based Web Learning on Self-Directed Learning Aptitudes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chi-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    The main aim of the study is to evaluate the impact of the competency-based web learning material (CBWLM) on the self-directed learning aptitude (SDLA) of college students. Specifically, it seeks to investigate, statistically, the changes in SDLAs at different stages of competency-based web learning (CBWL) over an eight-week period. The sample of…

  14. Self-Directed Workplace Literacy Distance Learning for Developmental Disabilities Workers: External Formative Evaluation Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Markowsky, Mary E.

    The formative evaluation of the Self-Directed Literacy Distance Learning for Developmental Disabilities Workers project is intended to assess the effectiveness of the course materials, operations process, and implementation. Designed to provide 96 hours of workplace literacy training to 426 developmental disabilities workers in about 80…

  15. Individualized Instruction in Science, Earth-Space Project, Self-Directed Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    As a supplement to Learning Activity Packages (LAP) of the earth-space project, this manual presents self-directed activities especially designed for individualized instruction. Besides an introduction to LAP characteristics, sets of instructions are given in connection with the metric system, the earth's dimensions, indirect evidence for atomic…

  16. Self-Directed Learning and Academic Achievement in Secondary Online Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carson, Elaine Hendricks

    2012-01-01

    This study examined attributes of self-directed learning (SDL) in students, grades 8 through 12, taking online courses through a state-wide online program in the Southeastern United States. The study investigated whether distinct latent classes of SDL exist; whether there was a significant difference in SDL according to gender, ethnicity, and…

  17. The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, Gregory C.; Lim, Doo Hun; Yoon, Seung Won; Fontan, Johnny

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between self-directed work teams and traditional work groups using four work ethic subscales: dependable, considerate, ambitious, and cooperative (Dawson, [1999]; Petty, [1991]). Differences in measured work ethic scores were also compared across six demographic variables: age,…

  18. The Effect of Self-Directed Work Teams on Work Ethic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Doo Hun; Petty, Gregory; Fontan, Johnny; Yoon, Seung Won

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare work ethic of manufacturing machine operators between a self-directed work team and a traditional work team based on four work ethic subscales and identify differences in work ethic based on six demographic factors. The major findings from the study indicated there were significant differences in the work…

  19. Understanding Responsibility: A Self-Directed Learning Application of the Triangle Model of Responsibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kohns, Jonathan W.; Ponton, Michael K.

    2006-01-01

    Personal responsibility has long been considered an important component in self-directed learning. And yet, a theoretical understanding of personal responsibility that could lead to meaningful instrumentation has eluded the field. The present study considers the merits of the Triangle Model of Responsibility (TMR) (Schlenker, Britt, Pennington,…

  20. The Relationship between Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Student Retention in Nursing Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larmon, Brandy H.

    2015-01-01

    Retention in higher education, especially nursing education, is a concern for nurse educators. Due to the needs of nurse graduates and practicing nurses, the characteristic of self-directed learning in students is often an educational goal of a rigorous nursing curriculum. Program retention is often impacted by such demands. This study, based upon…

  1. Self-Directed Learning Needs, Patterns, and Outcomes among General Surgeons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagliardi, Anna R.; Wright, Frances C.; Victor, J. Charles; Brouwers, Melissa C.; Silver, Ivan L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: To explore the relationship between self-directed learning (SDL) needs, patterns, barriers, and outcomes among nonacademic general surgeons. Methods: Participants dictated details of SDL episodes associated with cancer patient management from October 2007 to March 2008. Transcripts were coded thematically. Frequencies were calculated…

  2. Self-Directed Learning and Prostate Cancer: A Thematic Analysis of the Experiences of Twelve Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2006-01-01

    Although self-directed learning is a common response for many of the 232,090 US men who are diagnosed with prostate cancer each year, very little is known about the nature of the experience for them. Four themes emerged from interviews with 12 prostate cancer patients describing their self-education efforts in regard to their disease. A…

  3. Serious but Fun, Self-Directed yet Social: Blogging as a Form of Lifelong Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harju, Vilhelmiina; Pehkonen, Leila; Niemi, Hannele

    2016-01-01

    The article explores the role of digital media in supporting lifelong learning. In particular, it focuses on bloggers who write their blogs voluntarily in their own free time. The aim is to examine how lifelong learning--viewed as self-directed, nonformal learning and active participation that evolves from a desire for self-actualization--occurs…

  4. e-Portfolios Enhancing Students' Self-Directed Learning: A Systematic Review of Influencing Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckers, Jorrick; Dolmans, Diana; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    e-Portfolios have become increasingly popular among educators as learning tools. Some research even shows that e-portfolios can be utilised to facilitate the development of skills for self-directed learning. Such skills include self-assessment of performance, formulation of learning goals, and selection of future tasks. However, it is not yet…

  5. Mid-Career Adults in Self-Directed and Teacher-Directed Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitler, Michael A.

    The question of what determines the appropriate use of self-directed learning (SDL) as opposed to teacher-directed learning (TDL) for midcareer professionals was examined through a review of the literature on SDL, SDL in professional development, and through interviews with 12 midcareer adults in a wide variety of professions. In general, the…

  6. The Power of Self-Directed Journals: Being a Temporary "Other" for Learning to Teach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Yumi

    2016-01-01

    This case study investigates how an ESL teacher's activity of self-directed journal writing can facilitate learning and function as a mediational tool for teacher professional development. The participant for this study is a native English speaker who taught an ESL freshman writing course in an American university. Since he had little time to…

  7. A Journey with Chronic Pain: Self-Directed Learning as Survival

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Kathleen P.

    2014-01-01

    Over the past 20 years in the USA, increased insurance control of healthcare decisions, litigation and regulations, have contributed to a dramatic shift in the doctor-patient relationship and respective responsibilities. This paper presents an autoethnographic study of the self-directed learning (SDL) strategies and patterns used by an individual…

  8. Individualized Instruction in Science, Time-Space-Matter, Self-Directed Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuczma, R. M.

    As a supplement to Learning Activity Packages (LAP) on the time-space-matter subject, details are presented for self-directed activities. Major descriptions are given on the background of LAP characteristics, metric system, profile graph construction, spectroscope operation, radiant energy measurement, sunspot effects, density determination,…

  9. An Examination of Self-Directed Learning Readiness in Executive-Level Fire Officers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the self-directed learning readiness in executive fire officers in relation to the independent variables of personality type, educational attainment, and professional designation. This research utilized a quantitative design. This study utilized the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and the Self-Directed…

  10. How Older Rural Adults Utilize Self-Directed Learning in Late Life Adjustments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberson, Donald N., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    The increasing numbers and influence of older adults is causing many segments of western society to re-evaluate the concept of old age. Medical advances and personal lifestyles have resulted in older adults living longer and healthier lives. As one ages, adjustments in work, family, and health must be made. Self-directed learning (SDL) is one way…

  11. Predictors of Differential Response to Cognitive, Experiential, and Self-Directed Psychotherapeutic Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Compared group cognitive therapy (CT); focused expressive psychotherapy; and supportive, self-directed therapy (S/SD) among 63 patients with major depressive disorder. Results suggest that patient characteristics can be used differentially to assign psychotherapy types. Externalizing patients and low defensive patients improved more in CT;…

  12. Determining a Difference in Self-Directed Learning Readiness Using the Survey of Adult Learning Traits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezell, Diana

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the self-directed learning of educators and explore the differences between and among the variables of age, level of education, position, school district ratings, levels of poverty and affluence, and gender. The Survey of Adult Learning Traits (SALT) authored by Hogg was used as the instrument to measure…

  13. Twin Similarities in Holland Types as Shown by Scores on the Self-Directed Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chauvin, Ida; McDaniel, Janelle R.; Miller, Mark J.; King, James M.; Eddlemon, Ondie L. M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the degree of similarity between scores on the Self-Directed Search from one set of identical twins. Predictably, a high congruence score was found. Results from a biographical sheet are discussed as well as implications of the results for career counselors.

  14. The Influence of Job Characteristics and Self-Directed Learning Orientation on Workplace Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raemdonck, Isabel; Gijbels, David; van Groen, Willemijn

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing importance of learning at work, we set out to examine the factors which influence workplace learning behaviour. The study investigated the influence of the job characteristics from Karasek's Job Demand Control Support model and the personal characteristic self-directed learning orientation on workplace learning. A total…

  15. The Relative Influence of Different Domains of Social Connectedness on Self-Directed Violence in Adolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminski, Jennifer W.; Puddy, Richard W.; Hall, Diane M.; Cashman, Sandra Y.; Crosby, Alexander E.; Ortega, LaVonne A. G.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has linked greater social connectedness with a lowered risk of self-directed violence among adolescents. However, few studies have analyzed the comparative strength of different domains of connectedness (e.g., family, peers and school) to determine where limited resources might best be focused. Data to address that gap were taken…

  16. Development and Initial Validation of the Self-Directed Learning Inventory with Korean College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suh, Han Na; Wang, Kenneth T.; Arterberry, Brooke J.

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the development and psychometric evaluation of the Self-Directed Learning Inventory (SDLI) tailored to Korean college students, based on study evidences of differences in learning behavior across culture and educational level. With a sample of 605 female college students in Korea, exploratory factor analysis (EFA) results…

  17. The Self-Directed Learning Experience of Mothers Whose Child Has Had a Paediatric Stroke

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Kenda S.

    2014-01-01

    This study employed qualitative research methodology to explore the experiences of mothers who self-directed their learning following their child's stroke diagnosis. Paediatric stroke, although rare, is among the top 10 causes of death in children in the USA, but information about the cause, treatment and long-term impact are difficult to…

  18. Fostering Postgraduate Student Engagement: Online Resources Supporting Self-Directed Learning in a Diverse Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mello, Luciane V.

    2016-01-01

    The research question for this study was: "Can the provision of online resources help to engage and motivate students to become self-directed learners?" This study presents the results of an action research project to answer this question for a postgraduate module at a research-intensive university in the United Kingdom. The analysis of…

  19. Examining the role of self-discrepancy and self-directed style in bulimia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Mason, Tyler B; Pearson, Carolyn M; Lavender, Jason M; Wonderlich, Stephen A; Crosby, Ross D; Erickson, Ann L; Mitchell, James E; Crow, Scott J; Smith, Tracey L; Klein, Marjorie H; Peterson, Carol B

    2016-10-30

    Two of the primary components within Integrative Cognitive Affective Therapy (ICAT) are self-discrepancy and self-directed style. Self-discrepancy includes both actual:ideal (discrepancy between oneself and who one wishes they were) and actual:ought (discrepancy between oneself and who one believes they ought to be). Self-directed style in ICAT refers to a variety of behaviors emitted by a person toward the self including self-blaming and self-affirming. This study explored main effects and interactions between self-discrepancy and self-directed style in relation to global eating disorder (ED) psychopathology, depressive symptoms, and anxiety. Eighty treatment-seeking adults from the Midwest with BN or subthreshold BN completed interviews and self-report measures. Self-affirm and self-blame were associated with ED psychopathology, depressive symptoms, and anxiety. Actual:ideal discrepancy was related to anxiety and actual:ought discrepancy was related to anxiety and depressive symptoms. Interactions were found between self-affirm and actual:ought discrepancy as well as self-blame and actual:ought discrepancy for depressive symptoms. High actual:ought was related to increased depressive symptoms regardless of levels of self-affirm or self-blame. Effect sizes for models were medium-to-large with anxiety models demonstrating the largest effects. This study provides further evidence supporting the ICAT model and treatment, which targets self-discrepancies, self-directed styles, and related emotional states. PMID:27512918

  20. The Influence of Item Response Indecision on the Self-Directed Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sampson, James P., Jr.; Shy, Jonathan D.; Hartley, Sarah Lucas; Reardon, Robert C.; Peterson, Gary W.

    2009-01-01

    Students (N = 247) responded to Self-Directed Search (SDS) per the standard response format and were also instructed to record a question mark (?) for items about which they were uncertain (item response indecision [IRI]). The initial responses of the 114 participants with a (?) were then reversed and a second SDS summary code was obtained and…

  1. Students' Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning and Collaborative Learning with and without Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, K.; Tsai, P.-S.; Chai, C. S.; Koh, J. H. L.

    2014-01-01

    This study explored students' perceptions of self-directed learning (SDL) and collaborative learning (CL) with/without technology in an information and communications technology-supported classroom environment. The factors include SDL, CL, SDL supported by technology, and CL supported by technology. Based on the literature review, this study…

  2. An Investigation of the Construct Validity of the Personality Trait of Self-Directed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lounsbury, John W.; Levy, Levy J.; Park, Soo-Hee; Gibson, Lucy W.; Smith, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Based on samples of 398 middle school students, 568 high school students, and 1159 college students, self-directed learning was found to be related to cumulative grade-point-average at all levels as well as to Big Five personality traits (Openness, Conscientiousness, Emotional Stability, and Extraversion), narrow personality traits (Optimism,…

  3. Predictors of Self-Directed Learning for Low-Qualified Employees: A Multi-Level Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raemdonck, Isabel; van der Leeden, Rien; Valcke, Martin; Segers, Mien; Thijssen, Jo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine which variables at the level of the individual employee and at the company level are predictors of self-directed learning in low-qualified employees. Methodology: Results were obtained from a sample of 408 low-qualified employees from 35 different companies. The companies were selected from the energy sector,…

  4. Adult Learning, Self-Directed Learning and Problem-Based Learning: Deconstructing the Connections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miflin, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a critique of the literature of problem-based learning (PBL) in medical education. The objective of the review was to examine the various meanings that medical teachers attribute to concepts of adult learning and self-directed learning within the context of PBL. The critique found that there are assumptions about the meanings of…

  5. Using Two Different Self-Directed Search (SDS) Interpretive Materials: Implications for Career Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dozier, V. Casey; Sampson, James P.; Reardon, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    John Holland's Self-Directed Search (SDS) is a career assessment that consists of several booklets designed to be self-scored and self-administered. It simulates what a practitioner and an individual might do together in a career counseling session (e.g., review preferred activities and occupations; review competencies, abilities and possible…

  6. Ecology: Learning To Love Our Planet. A Self-Directed Learning Experience. Grades K-8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enz, Judith; Diffenderfer, Susan

    This self-directed study unit for grades K-3 and 4-8 was developed expressly to transport the student from the position of passive recipient to active participant in his/her own pursuit of knowledge. Within the guide are two complete units: one created for the lower elementary student and one for the upper elementary/middle school student. Units…

  7. Promoting Self-Directed Learning in a Learning Organization: Tools and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rana, Sowath; Ardichvili, Alexandre; Polesello, Daiane

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine a set of practices that can help promote self-directed learning (SDL) in congruence with the goals of developing and maintaining a learning organization. Design/methodology/approach Findings from this study were derived from an extensive review of the SDL and the learning organization literature, as…

  8. Assessing readiness for self-directed learning within a non-traditional nursing cohort.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Brian N; Turnbull, Beverley J; He, Flora X

    2015-03-01

    Increasing deregulation of the Australian tertiary system has led to changes in entry behaviours anticipated in non-traditional student cohorts. Many nursing students are returning to formal studies later in their lives seeking a career change. Accessibility and flexible study paths make external study increasingly attractive. However external studies require a level of commitment and willingness to develop self-direction and a capacity for resilience. This study sought to elicit the level of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) among undergraduate nursing students currently enrolled at a bachelor level, and to elicit what differences existed in the levels of SDLR in relation to age, gender, academic year, and previous qualifications. An online survey questionnaire was utilised based on the Self-directed Learning Readiness Scale for Nursing Education. In contrast to earlier work, the participant profile in this study was predominantly non-traditional and captured participants from all three years of the nursing programme. Results found no significant age or gender differences. First year students demonstrated lower levels of self-directed learning readiness. However, unexpected results were demonstrated in the survey subscales in relation to previous qualifications. Participants who already held post-graduate qualifications showed lower scores for Self-Management than those who held diploma qualifications, while students who already held a bachelor's degree had the highest scores in Desire for Learning. The study findings suggest that universities should not assume that SDL capability is dependent on mature age or length of exposure to tertiary study.

  9. Personalisation of Adult Social Care: Self-Directed Support and the Choice and Control Agenda

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Sophie; Cameron, Ailsa

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, "self-directed support" was introduced in adult social care in England to establish choice and control--in the assessment process itself and over service provision--for "all" service users. The personalisation agenda is underpinned by a range of ideologies, particularly a civil rights empowerment approach and…

  10. Reflective Teaching as Self-Directed Professional Development: Building Practical or Work-Related Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minott, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    The broad purpose of this self-study is two-fold: first, to aid in redressing the lack of attention given to the professional development of teacher educators; and second, to forward the idea that teaching reflectively is not only an excellent framework through which self-directed professional development can be enacted, but it is also an…

  11. Dynamic Training Elements in a Circuit Theory Course to Implement a Self-Directed Learning Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krouk, B. I.; Zhuravleva, O. B.

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports on the implementation of a self-directed learning process in a circuit theory course, incorporating dynamic training elements which were designed on the basis of a cybernetic model of cognitive process management. These elements are centrally linked in a dynamic learning frame, created on the monitor screen, which displays the…

  12. Self-Directed Learning and Guidance in Non-Formal Open Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponti, Marisa

    2014-01-01

    Digital media and open educational resources (OER) are said to redraw the boundaries between learners and teachers, by weakening the centralization of expertise and the distribution of subject-matter authority. This paper presents the findings of an ethnographic study of how the use of OER mediates the relations between self-directed learners and…

  13. An Examination of the Self-Directed Learning Practices of ESL Adult Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grover, Kendra S.; Miller, Michael T.; Swearingen, Brent; Wood, Nancy

    2014-01-01

    Self-directed learning is one of the preeminent theories in the field of adult education. This study explored how English as a Second Language learners directed their own learning outside of the formal classroom through the use of practices that potentially advance their English language proficiency. Results from a survey of over 400 ESL students…

  14. Practical Experience with Self-Directed Learning in Business and Industry Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guglielmino, Lucy M.; Guglielmino, Paul J.

    1994-01-01

    Four strategies for overcoming resistance to self-directed learning (SDL) in business and industry are visible company support; internal promotion; easy access, especially through electronic linkages; and formalized use of SDL strategies, such as using learning contracts in performance appraisals. (SK)

  15. The Relationship between Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Life Satisfaction among Older Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Ralph G.

    1985-01-01

    Readiness for self-directed learning and perceived life satisfaction were explored among a sample of 64 adults over 60 years of age. A significant positive relationship was found between learning readiness and life satisfaction. Though not related to chronological age, learning readiness is connected to previous formal schooling. Self-directedness…

  16. The Effect of Formative Testing and Self-Directed Learning on Mathematics Learning Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumantri, Mohamad Syarif; Satriani, Retni

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to determine the effect of formative testing and self-directed learning on mathematics learning outcomes. The research was conducted at an elementary school in central Jakarta during the 2014/2015 school year. Seventy-two fourth-grade students who were selected using random sampling participated in this study. Data…

  17. Encouraging Self-Directed Group Learning through an E-Portfolio System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fukuda, Eri; Suzuki, Mitsuko; Hashimoto, Shinichi; Okazak, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the researchers examined how 64 university students engaged in self-directed group learning and used a self-developed e-portfolio system. A sixweek event was held where the students made entries to the e-portfolio individually each week, received feedback from advisors, studied in groups on a voluntary basis, and reflected on their…

  18. A Conceptual Model for Understanding Self-Directed Learning in Online Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Song, Liyan; Hill, Janette R.

    2007-01-01

    Research indicates that online learning often situates control of implementation with the learner. Recently, scholars have turned attention to the importance of self-directed learning (SDL) skills for online learning environments. Existing frameworks for understanding SDL focus primarily on process and personal attributes in face-to-face settings.…

  19. A Thematic Analysis of the Self-Directed Learning Experiences of 13 Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Although self-directed learning is a common response for many of the 183000 American women who are diagnosed with breast cancer each year, very little is known about the nature of the experience for them. Four themes emerged from interviews with 13 breast cancer patients describing their self-education efforts in regard to their disease. A…

  20. A Phenomenological Exploration of Self-Directed Learning among Successful Minority Entrepreneurs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alexander, Nancy Hope

    2013-01-01

    This transcendental, phenomenological study explored the Self-directed learning (SDL) of 10 successful minority entrepreneurs. Two SDL theories serve as lenses for the study, Spear and Mocker's (1984) Organizing Circumstance and Brockett and Heimstra's (1991) Personal Responsibility Orientation model. Five themes emerged from the data:…

  1. An Exploratory Study of Self-Directed Science Concept Learning by Students with Moderate Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jimenez, Bree A.; Browder, Diane M.; Courtade, Ginevra R.

    2009-01-01

    This investigation focused on the effects of a treatment package including multiple exemplar training, time delay, and a self-directed learning prompt (KWHL chart) on students' ability to complete an inquiry lesson independently and generalize to untrained materials. Three middle school students with moderate intellectual disabilities learned to…

  2. What Drives Students' Self-Directed Learning in a Hybrid PBL Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Young-Mee; Mann, Karen V.; Frank, Blye W.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence supporting Problem-based learning (PBL) fostering students' self-directed learning (SDL) in hybrid PBL curricula is inconsistent. To explore the influence of PBL in a hybrid curriculum on students' SDL, the authors investigated the following: (1) students' self-assessed SDL ability, (2) students' perceptions of the influence of curricular…

  3. Promoting Students' Self-Directed Learning Ability through Teaching Mathematics for Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Voss, Richard; Rickards, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Mathematics is a subject which is often taught using abstract methods and processes. These methods by their very nature may for students alienate the relationship between Mathematics and real life situations. Further, these abstract methods and processes may disenfranchise students from becoming self-directed learners of Mathematics. A solution to…

  4. Self-directed interventions to promote weight loss: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jason C H; Abraham, Charles; Greaves, Colin J; Nikolaou, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Many self-directed weight-loss interventions have been developed using a variety of delivery formats (e.g., internet and smartphone) and change techniques. Yet, little research has examined whether self-directed interventions can exclusively promote weight loss. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library were systematically reviewed for randomised controlled trials evaluating self-directed interventions in relation to weight-loss outcomes in adults. Standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random effects model. Twenty-seven trials incorporating 36 comparisons met our inclusion criteria. Participants using self-directed interventions lost significantly more weight (MD = -1.56 kg, CI -2.25, -0.86 ranging from 0.6 to 5.3 kg) compared to those in the minimal intervention or no-treatment groups (3.1-month follow-up median). The majority of interventions were internet based (18 evaluations) and these were effective at 3 months (MD = -1.74 kg, CI -2.65, -0.82 ranging from 0.6 to 4.8 kg) (SMD = -0.48, 95% CI -0.72, -0.24, I(2) = 82%; p < .0001; 16 evaluations) and 6 months follow-up (MD = -2.71 kg, CI -4.03, -1.39 ranging from 2.2 to 5.3 kg) (SMD = -0.59, 95% CI -0.99, -0.19, I(2) = 76%; p = .004; 4 evaluations). Self-directed weight-loss interventions can generate modest weight loss for up to 6 months but may need to be supplemented by other interventions to achieve sustained and clinically meaningful weight loss.

  5. Less-structured time in children's daily lives predicts self-directed executive functioning

    PubMed Central

    Barker, Jane E.; Semenov, Andrei D.; Michaelson, Laura; Provan, Lindsay S.; Snyder, Hannah R.; Munakata, Yuko

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions (EFs) in childhood predict important life outcomes. Thus, there is great interest in attempts to improve EFs early in life. Many interventions are led by trained adults, including structured training activities in the lab, and less-structured activities implemented in schools. Such programs have yielded gains in children's externally-driven executive functioning, where they are instructed on what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. However, it is less clear how children's experiences relate to their development of self-directed executive functioning, where they must determine on their own what goal-directed actions to carry out and when. We hypothesized that time spent in less-structured activities would give children opportunities to practice self-directed executive functioning, and lead to benefits. To investigate this possibility, we collected information from parents about their 6–7 year-old children's daily, annual, and typical schedules. We categorized children's activities as “structured” or “less-structured” based on categorization schemes from prior studies on child leisure time use. We assessed children's self-directed executive functioning using a well-established verbal fluency task, in which children generate members of a category and can decide on their own when to switch from one subcategory to another. The more time that children spent in less-structured activities, the better their self-directed executive functioning. The opposite was true of structured activities, which predicted poorer self-directed executive functioning. These relationships were robust (holding across increasingly strict classifications of structured and less-structured time) and specific (time use did not predict externally-driven executive functioning). We discuss implications, caveats, and ways in which potential interpretations can be distinguished in future work, to advance an understanding of this fundamental aspect of growing up

  6. Self-directed interventions to promote weight loss: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jason C H; Abraham, Charles; Greaves, Colin J; Nikolaou, Vasilis

    2016-09-01

    Many self-directed weight-loss interventions have been developed using a variety of delivery formats (e.g., internet and smartphone) and change techniques. Yet, little research has examined whether self-directed interventions can exclusively promote weight loss. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and the Cochrane Library were systematically reviewed for randomised controlled trials evaluating self-directed interventions in relation to weight-loss outcomes in adults. Standardised mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random effects model. Twenty-seven trials incorporating 36 comparisons met our inclusion criteria. Participants using self-directed interventions lost significantly more weight (MD = -1.56 kg, CI -2.25, -0.86 ranging from 0.6 to 5.3 kg) compared to those in the minimal intervention or no-treatment groups (3.1-month follow-up median). The majority of interventions were internet based (18 evaluations) and these were effective at 3 months (MD = -1.74 kg, CI -2.65, -0.82 ranging from 0.6 to 4.8 kg) (SMD = -0.48, 95% CI -0.72, -0.24, I(2) = 82%; p < .0001; 16 evaluations) and 6 months follow-up (MD = -2.71 kg, CI -4.03, -1.39 ranging from 2.2 to 5.3 kg) (SMD = -0.59, 95% CI -0.99, -0.19, I(2) = 76%; p = .004; 4 evaluations). Self-directed weight-loss interventions can generate modest weight loss for up to 6 months but may need to be supplemented by other interventions to achieve sustained and clinically meaningful weight loss. PMID:27091296

  7. Responses of fibroblasts to anchorage of dorsal extracellular matrix receptors.

    PubMed

    Beningo, Karen A; Dembo, Micah; Wang, Yu-li

    2004-12-28

    Fibroblasts in 2D cultures differ dramatically in behavior from those in the 3D environment of a multicellular organism. However, the basis of this disparity is unknown. A key difference is the spatial arrangement of anchored extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors to the ventral surface in 2D cultures and throughout the entire surface in 3D cultures. Therefore, we asked whether changing the topography of ECM receptor anchorage alone could invoke a morphological response. By using polyacrylamide-based substrates to present anchored fibronectin or collagen on dorsal cell surfaces, we found that well spread fibroblasts in 2D cultures quickly changed into a bipolar or stellate morphology similar to fibroblasts in vivo. Cells in this environment lacked lamellipodia and large actin bundles and formed small focal adhesions only near focused sites of protrusion. These responses depend on substrate rigidity, calcium ion, and, likely, the calcium-dependent protease calpain. We suggest that fibroblasts respond to both spatial distribution and mechanical input of anchored ECM receptors. Changes in cell shape may in turn affect diverse cellular activities, including gene expression, growth, and differentiation, as shown in numerous previous studies.

  8. Responses of fibroblasts to anchorage of dorsal extracellular matrix receptors.

    PubMed

    Beningo, Karen A; Dembo, Micah; Wang, Yu-li

    2004-12-28

    Fibroblasts in 2D cultures differ dramatically in behavior from those in the 3D environment of a multicellular organism. However, the basis of this disparity is unknown. A key difference is the spatial arrangement of anchored extracellular matrix (ECM) receptors to the ventral surface in 2D cultures and throughout the entire surface in 3D cultures. Therefore, we asked whether changing the topography of ECM receptor anchorage alone could invoke a morphological response. By using polyacrylamide-based substrates to present anchored fibronectin or collagen on dorsal cell surfaces, we found that well spread fibroblasts in 2D cultures quickly changed into a bipolar or stellate morphology similar to fibroblasts in vivo. Cells in this environment lacked lamellipodia and large actin bundles and formed small focal adhesions only near focused sites of protrusion. These responses depend on substrate rigidity, calcium ion, and, likely, the calcium-dependent protease calpain. We suggest that fibroblasts respond to both spatial distribution and mechanical input of anchored ECM receptors. Changes in cell shape may in turn affect diverse cellular activities, including gene expression, growth, and differentiation, as shown in numerous previous studies. PMID:15601776

  9. Transition from one- to two-dimensional development facilitates maintenance of multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Manjarrez-Casas, Alejandra M.; Bagheri, Homayoun C.

    2016-01-01

    Filamentous organisms represent an example where incomplete separation after cell division underlies the development of multicellular formations. With a view to understanding the evolution of more complex multicellular structures, we explore the transition of multicellular growth from one to two dimensions. We develop a computational model to simulate multicellular development in populations where cells exhibit density-dependent division and death rates. In both the one- and two-dimensional contexts, multicellular formations go through a developmental cycle of growth and subsequent decay. However, the model shows that a transition to a higher dimension increases the size of multicellular formations and facilitates the maintenance of large cell clusters for significantly longer periods of time. We further show that the turnover rate for cell division and death scales with the number of iterations required to reach the stationary multicellular size at equilibrium. Although size and life cycles of multicellular organisms are affected by other environmental and genetic factors, the model presented here evaluates the extent to which the transition of multicellular growth from one to two dimensions contributes to the maintenance of multicellular structures during development. PMID:27703714

  10. Fibroblast biology in pterygia.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Woo; Park, Soo Hyun; Kim, Jae Chan

    2016-01-01

    Activation of fibroblasts is a vital process during wound healing. However, if prolonged and exaggerated, profibrotic pathways lead to tissue fibrosis or scarring and further organ malfunction. Although the pathogenesis of pterygium is known to be multi-factorial, additional studies are needed to better understand the pathways initiated by fibroblast activation for the purpose of therapeutic translation. Regarding pterygium as a possible systemic disorder, we discuss the different cell types that pterygium fibroblasts originate from. These may include bone marrow-derived progenitor cells, cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and local resident stromal cells. We also describe how pterygium fibroblasts can be activated and perpetuate profibrotic signaling elicited by various proliferative drivers, immune-inflammation, and novel factors such as stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) as well as a known key fibrotic factor, transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β). Finally, epigenetic modification is discussed to explain inherited susceptibility to pterygium. PMID:26675401

  11. Corelation between Complexity and Stability in Multicellular Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werman, Steven D.; Qaddour, Jihad; Deyoung, Gary; Misra, Prasanta K.

    1997-03-01

    We present a model to study the corelation between the complexity and stability of unicellular and multicellular organisms. We state the postulates made by us and define the thermodynamic functions and other parameters used to formulate the problem. We have also used several theorems based on reasonable assumptions to analyze the functional interactions which are non-symmetric, non-local and non-instantaneous. The mathematical model developed by using these hypotheses is explained in detail and a set of non-linear equations for each type of organism is presented. We present the results obtained by us by solving these equations.

  12. Waltzing Volvox/: Orbiting Bound States of Flagellated Multicellular Algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drescher, K.; Leptos, K.; Pedley, T. J.; Goldstein, R. E.; Ishikawa, T.

    2008-11-01

    The spherical colonial alga Volvox swims by means of flagella on thousands of surface somatic cells. This geometry and its large size makes it a model organism for the fluid dynamics of multicellularity. Remarkably, when two nearby colonies swim close to a solid surface, they are attracted together and can form a stable bound state in which they continuously waltz around each other. A surface-mediated hydrodynamic attraction between colonies combined with the rotational motion of bottom-heavy Volvox are shown to explain the stability and dynamics of the bound state. This phenomenon is suggested to underlie observed clustering of colonies at surfaces.

  13. Assessment of Animated Self-Directed Learning Activities Modules for Children's Number Sense Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Der-Ching; Li, Mao-Neng

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relative effectiveness of two different learning modes; namely, a computer animation self-directed learning approach and a paper version of the self-directed learning approach, to 5th-graders' number sense development. Two 5th-grade classes, 30 students each, were selected from a public elementary…

  14. Understanding Faculty and Non-Traditional Student Perceptions of Self-Directed Learning in a Practical Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    This study was designed to identify and investigate nursing faculty and student perspectives of self-directed learning in a practical nursing program. It also explored the degree to which student's perceptions of self-directed learning exhibited factors consistent with that of critical thinking. This study is important because self-directed…

  15. Exploring Self-Directed Learning in the Online Learning Environment: Comparing Traditional versus Nontraditional Learner Populations a Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plews, Rachel Christine

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore self-directed learning in the online learning context. A sample of traditional and nontraditional learners, who were considered above average in their level of self-direction, participated in qualitative interviews to discuss their learning while engaged in an online course. The findings suggested no major…

  16. The Nature of Self-Directed Learning and Transformational Learning in Self-Managing Bipolar Disorder to Stay Well

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francik, Wendy A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the research was to explore the self-directed learning and transformational learning experiences among persons with bipolar disorder. A review of previous research pointed out how personal experiences with self-directed learning and transformational learning facilitated individuals' learning to manage HIV, Methicillan-resitant…

  17. A Preliminary Investigation of Self-Directed Learning Activities in a Non-Formal Blended Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwier, Richard A.; Morrison, Dirk; Daniel, Ben K.

    2009-01-01

    This research considers how professional participants in a non-formal self-directed learning environment (NFSDL) made use of self-directed learning activities in a blended face-to-face and on line learning professional development course. The learning environment for the study was a professional development seminar on teaching in higher education…

  18. Designing Learning Environments for the Enhancement of Self-Directed Learning: A Personal Approach to Integrating Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skruber, Richard

    Self-directed learning is more appropriate than teacher-directed learning for adult students in colleges and universities. In a self-directed learning environment, students collaborate with the teacher in determining the skills to be learned in the course and form teams needed to carry out work to learn the skills. One learner-oriented model is…

  19. The Relationship between Engineering Students' Self-Directed Learning Abilities and Online Learning Performances: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Pao-Nan

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to explore engineering students' self-directed learning abilities in an online learning environment. The research centered on the correlation relationship between students' self-directed learning abilities and learning outcomes. The instructional activity in one experimental study was to simulate an online learning task in the…

  20. Experimental evolution of an alternating uni- and multicellular life cycle in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Ratcliff, William C.; Herron, Matthew D.; Howell, Kathryn; Pentz, Jennifer T.; Rosenzweig, Frank; Travisano, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The transition to multicellularity enabled the evolution of large, complex organisms, but early steps in this transition remain poorly understood. Here we show that multicellular complexity, including development from a single cell, can evolve rapidly in a unicellular organism that has never had a multicellular ancestor. We subject the alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii to conditions that favour multicellularity, resulting in the evolution of a multicellular life cycle in which clusters reproduce via motile unicellular propagules. While a single-cell genetic bottleneck during ontogeny is widely regarded as an adaptation to limit among-cell conflict, its appearance very early in this transition suggests that it did not evolve for this purpose. Instead, we find that unicellular propagules are adaptive even in the absence of intercellular conflict, maximizing cluster-level fecundity. These results demonstrate that the unicellular bottleneck, a trait essential for evolving multicellular complexity, can arise rapidly via co-option of the ancestral unicellular form. PMID:24193369

  1. Community Reinforcement and Family Training: a pilot comparison of group and self-directed delivery.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Jennifer K; Austin, Julia L; Miller, William R; McCrady, Barbara S; Tonigan, J Scott; Meyers, Robert J; Smith, Jane Ellen; Bogenschutz, Michael P

    2012-07-01

    In a randomized clinical pilot study, 40 concerned significant others (CSOs) of treatment-refusing alcohol- and drug-using individuals were randomized to either Community Reinforcement and Family Training (CRAFT) conducted in a group format (Group CRAFT) or a Self-Directed CRAFT condition. Although results indicated no significant between-group difference in engaging treatment-refusing substance-using individuals (referred to as identified patients or IPs) into treatment, the engagement rate in Group CRAFT was similar to rates previously reported with individual CRAFT. For the intent-to-treat analysis, 60% of Group CRAFT CSOs engaged their loved one into treatment, as compared with 40% in Self-Directed CRAFT. Of CSOs in the Group condition who received at least one session of group therapy, 71% engaged their IP into treatment. CSOs in both conditions reported improvements in family cohesion and conflict at the 3- and 6-month follow-up, replicating prior CRAFT findings.

  2. Aging and health: Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Albertina L; Silva, José T; Lima, Margarida P

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To validate the Escala de Autoeficácia para a Autodireção na Saúde (EAAS – Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale). METHODS Non-experimental quantitative study of EAAS validation, by confirmatory factorial analyses, evaluating a sample of 508 older adults from the north and the center of Portugal with mean age of 71.67 (from 51 to 96 years), to whom the Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale, the Rosenberg Self-esteem Scale, the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, and the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale were applied. The EAAS was developed from the theoretical constructs of self-efficacy and from self-directed learning within the PALADIN European project framework, aiming to develop an instrument able to assess the extent to which older adults take good care of their health. RESULTS The internal consistency was 0.87 (Cronbach’s alpha) and confirmatory factorial analyses enabled to find a model near the one theoretically proposed, indicating a structure consisting of four dimensions: physical exercise, healthy diet, engaging in health-related learning, and visits to health professionals. From the psychometric point of view, the model in four factors showed quite satisfactory fit indicators. CONCLUSIONS The Self-efficacy for Self-direction in Health Scale, with 16 items, is adequate to evaluate to what extent older adults have confidence in their ability to take care of their own health, with high degree of autonomy. PMID:27384970

  3. Self-directed treatment for lower limb wounds in persons with diabetes: a short report

    PubMed Central

    Harnarayan, Patrick; Cawich, Shamir O; Islam, Shariful; Ramsewak, Shivaa; Naraynsingh, Vijay

    2014-01-01

    Aim There has been little focus on self-directed treatment for lower limb wounds, although it a common practice among persons with diabetes across the Caribbean. We sought to document this practice in a Caribbean nation. Methods We prospectively interviewed all consecutive patients with diabetes who were admitted with lower limb wounds at the San Fernando General Hospital in Trinidad and Tobago over a period of 18 months. A questionnaire was used to collect data on patient demographics, use of self-directed treatment, and details of these treatments. Results Of 839 persons with diabetes who were admitted with infected lower limb wounds, 344 (41%) admitted to self-directed treatment before seeking medical attention. These patients were predominantly male (59.9%) at a mean age of 56.4±12.4 years. The practice was most common in persons of Afro-Caribbean descent (45.9%) and those with type 2 diabetes (93.9%). In this group, 255 (74.4%) patients were previously admitted to hospital for lower limb infections. And of those, 32 (12.6%) had a prior amputation and 108 (42.4%) had at least one operative debridement specifically for foot infections. Conclusion Caribbean cultural practices may be an important contributor to negative outcomes when treating lower limb wounds in persons with diabetes. Despite being acutely aware of the potentially devastating consequences of inadequate treatment, 41% of our patients with diabetes still opted to use self-directed treatment for lower limb wounds. This deserves further study in order to give a more tailored approach in care delivery. PMID:25214770

  4. Self-directed exploration provides a Ncs1-dependent learning bonus

    PubMed Central

    Mun, Ho-Suk; Saab, Bechara J.; Ng, Enoch; McGirr, Alexander; Lipina, Tatiana V.; Gondo, Yoichi; Georgiou, John; Roder, John C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of memory formation is fundamental to establishing optimal educational practices and restoring cognitive function in brain disease. Here, we show for the first time in a non-primate species, that spatial learning receives a special bonus from self-directed exploration. In contrast, when exploration is escape-oriented, or when the full repertoire of exploratory behaviors is reduced, no learning bonus occurs. These findings permitted the first molecular and cellular examinations into the coupling of exploration to learning. We found elevated expression of neuronal calcium sensor 1 (Ncs1) and dopamine type-2 receptors upon self-directed exploration, in concert with increased neuronal activity in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and area CA3, as well as the nucleus accumbens. We probed further into the learning bonus by developing a point mutant mouse (Ncs1P144S/P144S) harboring a destabilized NCS-1 protein, and found this line lacked the equivalent self-directed exploration learning bonus. Acute knock-down of Ncs1 in the hippocampus also decoupled exploration from efficient learning. These results are potentially relevant for augmenting learning and memory in health and disease, and provide the basis for further molecular and circuit analyses in this direction. PMID:26639399

  5. Self-directed exploration provides a Ncs1-dependent learning bonus.

    PubMed

    Mun, Ho-Suk; Saab, Bechara J; Ng, Enoch; McGirr, Alexander; Lipina, Tatiana V; Gondo, Yoichi; Georgiou, John; Roder, John C

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of memory formation is fundamental to establishing optimal educational practices and restoring cognitive function in brain disease. Here, we show for the first time in a non-primate species, that spatial learning receives a special bonus from self-directed exploration. In contrast, when exploration is escape-oriented, or when the full repertoire of exploratory behaviors is reduced, no learning bonus occurs. These findings permitted the first molecular and cellular examinations into the coupling of exploration to learning. We found elevated expression of neuronal calcium sensor 1 (Ncs1) and dopamine type-2 receptors upon self-directed exploration, in concert with increased neuronal activity in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and area CA3, as well as the nucleus accumbens. We probed further into the learning bonus by developing a point mutant mouse (Ncs1(P144S/P144S)) harboring a destabilized NCS-1 protein, and found this line lacked the equivalent self-directed exploration learning bonus. Acute knock-down of Ncs1 in the hippocampus also decoupled exploration from efficient learning. These results are potentially relevant for augmenting learning and memory in health and disease, and provide the basis for further molecular and circuit analyses in this direction. PMID:26639399

  6. Are self-directed work teams successful and effective tools for today`s organization?

    SciTech Connect

    Arnwine, A.D.

    1995-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to (1) show the effectiveness and success of self-directed work teams within the organization, (2) emphasize the importance of team building in the success of the team, and (3) assist organizations in building self-directed work teams. The researcher used a direct survey and studied the following team building techniques: (1) Is the team`s mission clearly defined to each team member? (2) Are the goals clearly defined and achievable by all team members? (3) Will empowerment (decision-making power) be given equally to all team members? (4) Will open and honest communication be allowed among team members? (5) Will each team member be respected and valued for his/her position on the team? (6) Are self-directed work teams effectively rewarded for accomplishments? (7) Have team members received adequate training to effectively complete their job tasks? Upon completion of the literature review and statistical data, and after analyzing the seven areas of team building techniques, it was determined three of the four teams were successful and effective. The only area of concern to the organization is that the participants felt they did not have true ownership of their teams; that is, team members were not given full empowerment. According to this study and the review of literature, full empowerment must be given to achieve successful and effective teams. If true empowerment is not given, the team will suffer in other areas of team building, and the organization will lose a valuable tool.

  7. Inspiring Climate Education Excellence (ICEE): Developing self-directed professional development modules for secondary science teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buhr, S. M.; Lynds, S. E.; McCaffrey, M. S.; Morton, E.

    2010-12-01

    Inspiring Climate Education Excellence (ICEE) is a NASA-funded project to develop online course modules and self-directed learning resources aligned with the Essential Principles of Climate Science. Following a national needs assessment survey and a face to face workshop to pilot test topics, a suite of online modules is being developed suitable for self-directed learning by secondary science teachers. Modules are designed around concepts and topics in which teachers express the most interest and need for instruction. Module design also includes attention to effective teaching strategies, such as awareness of student misconceptions, strategies for forestalling controversy and advice from master teachers on implementation and curriculum development. The resources are being developed in partnership with GLOBE, and the National Science Digital Library (NSDL) and is informed by the work of the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) project. ICEE will help to meet the professional development needs of teachers, including those participating in the GLOBE Student Climate Research Campaign. Modules and self-directed learning resources will be developed and disseminated in partnership with the National Science Digital Library (NSDL). This presentation introduces the needs assessment and pilot workshop data upon which the modules are based, and describes the modules that are available and in development.

  8. Self-directed exploration provides a Ncs1-dependent learning bonus.

    PubMed

    Mun, Ho-Suk; Saab, Bechara J; Ng, Enoch; McGirr, Alexander; Lipina, Tatiana V; Gondo, Yoichi; Georgiou, John; Roder, John C

    2015-12-07

    Understanding the mechanisms of memory formation is fundamental to establishing optimal educational practices and restoring cognitive function in brain disease. Here, we show for the first time in a non-primate species, that spatial learning receives a special bonus from self-directed exploration. In contrast, when exploration is escape-oriented, or when the full repertoire of exploratory behaviors is reduced, no learning bonus occurs. These findings permitted the first molecular and cellular examinations into the coupling of exploration to learning. We found elevated expression of neuronal calcium sensor 1 (Ncs1) and dopamine type-2 receptors upon self-directed exploration, in concert with increased neuronal activity in the hippocampal dentate gyrus and area CA3, as well as the nucleus accumbens. We probed further into the learning bonus by developing a point mutant mouse (Ncs1(P144S/P144S)) harboring a destabilized NCS-1 protein, and found this line lacked the equivalent self-directed exploration learning bonus. Acute knock-down of Ncs1 in the hippocampus also decoupled exploration from efficient learning. These results are potentially relevant for augmenting learning and memory in health and disease, and provide the basis for further molecular and circuit analyses in this direction.

  9. The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale for nursing education revisited: a confirmatory factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Murray J; King, Jennie

    2010-01-01

    The Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale for Nursing Education (SDLRSNE) was initially developed as an alternative to Guglielmino's [Guglielmino, L.M. 1977. Development of the Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale. Unpublished Doctoral Dissertation, University of Georgia. Dissertation Abstracts International, vol. 38 (11a), p. 6467] Self-Directed Learning Readiness Scale. The aim of this study was to re-examine the factor structure of the subscales of the SDLRSNE and provide evidence of its validity. Data was collected using a cross-sectional survey of 227 first year undergraduate nursing students. To examine the factor structure of the SDLRSNE three one-factor congeneric models, each representing a different subscale, were tested with maximum likelihood confirmatory factor analysis. The model fit indices of the three one-factor congeneric models indicate that the resultant models fit the data well, providing support for the factorial validity of the SDLRSNE. Of the 40 items, 11 items had to be removed from the analyses as they failed to provide good fit with their subscales. Further research investigating the factor validity of the SDLRSNE is encouraged, specifically to examine the stability of the items across factors using multi-factor models. PMID:19541394

  10. Cancer across the tree of life: cooperation and cheating in multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Aktipis, C. Athena; Boddy, Amy M.; Jansen, Gunther; Hibner, Urszula; Hochberg, Michael E.; Maley, Carlo C.; Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity is characterized by cooperation among cells for the development, maintenance and reproduction of the multicellular organism. Cancer can be viewed as cheating within this cooperative multicellular system. Complex multicellularity, and the cooperation underlying it, has evolved independently multiple times. We review the existing literature on cancer and cancer-like phenomena across life, not only focusing on complex multicellularity but also reviewing cancer-like phenomena across the tree of life more broadly. We find that cancer is characterized by a breakdown of the central features of cooperation that characterize multicellularity, including cheating in proliferation inhibition, cell death, division of labour, resource allocation and extracellular environment maintenance (which we term the five foundations of multicellularity). Cheating on division of labour, exhibited by a lack of differentiation and disorganized cell masses, has been observed in all forms of multicellularity. This suggests that deregulation of differentiation is a fundamental and universal aspect of carcinogenesis that may be underappreciated in cancer biology. Understanding cancer as a breakdown of multicellular cooperation provides novel insights into cancer hallmarks and suggests a set of assays and biomarkers that can be applied across species and characterize the fundamental requirements for generating a cancer. PMID:26056363

  11. Cancer across the tree of life: cooperation and cheating in multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Aktipis, C Athena; Boddy, Amy M; Jansen, Gunther; Hibner, Urszula; Hochberg, Michael E; Maley, Carlo C; Wilkinson, Gerald S

    2015-07-19

    Multicellularity is characterized by cooperation among cells for the development, maintenance and reproduction of the multicellular organism. Cancer can be viewed as cheating within this cooperative multicellular system. Complex multicellularity, and the cooperation underlying it, has evolved independently multiple times. We review the existing literature on cancer and cancer-like phenomena across life, not only focusing on complex multicellularity but also reviewing cancer-like phenomena across the tree of life more broadly. We find that cancer is characterized by a breakdown of the central features of cooperation that characterize multicellularity, including cheating in proliferation inhibition, cell death, division of labour, resource allocation and extracellular environment maintenance (which we term the five foundations of multicellularity). Cheating on division of labour, exhibited by a lack of differentiation and disorganized cell masses, has been observed in all forms of multicellularity. This suggests that deregulation of differentiation is a fundamental and universal aspect of carcinogenesis that may be underappreciated in cancer biology. Understanding cancer as a breakdown of multicellular cooperation provides novel insights into cancer hallmarks and suggests a set of assays and biomarkers that can be applied across species and characterize the fundamental requirements for generating a cancer.

  12. Transport by Collective Flagellar Beating Facilitates Evolutionary Transitions to Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Short, Martin; Powers, Thomas

    2005-11-01

    A central problem underlying the evolution from single cells to multicellular organisms is the relationship between metabolic requirements and environmental metabolite exchange with increasing size. For organisms that form spherical colonies such as the volvocalean green algae, there is a bottleneck if diffusion alone governs nutrient uptake as they increase in size, for the diffusive flux is linear in the radius while the requirements of surface somatic cells grow quadratically. Using Volvox as a model organism, we examine experimentally and theoretically the role that advection of fluid by surface flagella plays in enhancing nutrient uptake. We show that the fluid flow driven by the coordinated beating of those flagella produces a boundary layer in the concentration of a diffusing solute which renders the metabolite exchange rate quadratic in the colony radius. This bypasses the diffusive bottleneck, facilitating evolutionary transitions to multicellularity which may be driven by other environmental factors. These results suggest that flagella may have evolved not only for motility, but also to enhance metabolite exchange.

  13. Emergent patterns of growth controlled by multicellular form and mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Jean, Ronald P.; Tan, John L.; Liu, Wendy F.; Sniadecki, Nathan J.; Spector, Alexander A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2005-01-01

    Spatial patterns of cellular growth generate mechanical stresses that help to push, fold, expand, and deform tissues into their specific forms. Genetic factors are thought to specify patterns of growth and other behaviors to drive morphogenesis. Here, we show that tissue form itself can feed back to regulate patterns of proliferation. Using microfabrication to control the organization of sheets of cells, we demonstrated the emergence of stable patterns of proliferative foci. Regions of concentrated growth corresponded to regions of high tractional stress generated within the sheet, as predicted by a finite-element model of multicellular mechanics and measured directly by using a micromechanical force sensor array. Inhibiting actomyosin-based tension or cadherin-mediated connections between cells disrupted the spatial pattern of proliferation. These findings demonstrate the existence of patterns of mechanical forces that originate from the contraction of cells, emerge from their multicellular organization, and result in patterns of growth. Thus, tissue form is not only a consequence but also an active regulator of tissue growth. PMID:16049098

  14. A Novel Cell Traction Force Microscopy to Study Multi-Cellular System

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Sandeep V.; Saif, Taher A.

    2014-01-01

    Traction forces exerted by adherent cells on their microenvironment can mediate many critical cellular functions. Accurate quantification of these forces is essential for mechanistic understanding of mechanotransduction. However, most existing methods of quantifying cellular forces are limited to single cells in isolation, whereas most physiological processes are inherently multi-cellular in nature where cell-cell and cell-microenvironment interactions determine the emergent properties of cell clusters. In the present study, a robust finite-element-method-based cell traction force microscopy technique is developed to estimate the traction forces produced by multiple isolated cells as well as cell clusters on soft substrates. The method accounts for the finite thickness of the substrate. Hence, cell cluster size can be larger than substrate thickness. The method allows computing the traction field from the substrate displacements within the cells' and clusters' boundaries. The displacement data outside these boundaries are not necessary. The utility of the method is demonstrated by computing the traction generated by multiple monkey kidney fibroblasts (MKF) and human colon cancerous (HCT-8) cells in close proximity, as well as by large clusters. It is found that cells act as individual contractile groups within clusters for generating traction. There may be multiple of such groups in the cluster, or the entire cluster may behave a single group. Individual cells do not form dipoles, but serve as a conduit of force (transmission lines) over long distances in the cluster. The cell-cell force can be either tensile or compressive depending on the cell-microenvironment interactions. PMID:24901766

  15. An Integrated In Vitro Imaging Platform for Characterizing Filarial Parasite Behavior within a Multicellular Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Kassis, Timothy; Skelton, Henry M.; Lu, Iris M.; Moorhead, Andrew R.; Dixon, J. Brandon

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic Filariasis, a Neglected Tropical Disease, is caused by thread-like parasitic worms, including B. malayi, which migrate to the human lymphatic system following transmission. The parasites reside in collecting lymphatic vessels and lymph nodes for years, often resulting in lymphedema, elephantiasis or hydrocele. The mechanisms driving worm migration and retention within the lymphatics are currently unknown. We have developed an integrated in vitro imaging platform capable of quantifying B. malayi migration and behavior in a multicellular microenvironment relevant to the initial site of worm injection by incorporating the worm in a Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel in the presence of human dermal lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) and human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). The platform utilizes a motorized controllable microscope with CO2 and temperature regulation to allow for worm tracking experiments with high resolution over large length and time scales. Using post-acquisition algorithms, we quantified four parameters: 1) speed, 2) thrashing intensity, 3) percentage of time spent in a given cell region and 4) persistence ratio. We demonstrated the utility of our system by quantifying these parameters for L3 B. malayi in the presence of LECs and HDFs. Speed and thrashing increased in the presence of both cell types and were altered within minutes upon exposure to the anthelmintic drug, tetramisole. The worms displayed no targeted migration towards either cell type for the time course of this study (3 hours). When cells were not present in the chamber, worm thrashing correlated directly with worm speed. However, this correlation was lost in the presence of cells. The described platform provides the ability to further study B. malayi migration and behavior. PMID:25412444

  16. Sorodiplophrys stercorea: Another Novel Lineage of Sorocarpic Multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alexander K; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Walthall, Austin C; Le, Khoa N D; Spiegel, Frederick W; Brown, Matthew W

    2016-09-01

    Sorodiplophrys stercorea is a sorocarpic organism that utilizes filose pseudopodia for locomotion and absorptive nutrition. It has traditionally been considered to be a member of the Labyrinthulae based on its morphology. Its closest relatives were thought to be species in the taxon Diplophrys. Since the genus Diplophrys has been shown to be paraphyletic and S. stercorea has pseudopodia similar to some members of Rhizaria, we examined its relationship with other eukaryotes. We obtained four isolates from the dung of cow and horse, brought each into monoeukaryotic culture, and sequenced their SSU rRNA gene for phylogenetic analysis. All our isolates were shown to form a monophyletic group in the Labyrinthulae, nested in the Amphifiloidea clade. Our results demonstrate that Sorodiplophrys is more closely related to species of the genus Amphifila than to Diplophrys and represents an additional independent origin of sorocarpic multicellularity among eukaryotes. This study represents the first confirmed sorocarpic lifestyle in the Stramenopiles.

  17. Sorodiplophrys stercorea: Another Novel Lineage of Sorocarpic Multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Tice, Alexander K; Silberman, Jeffrey D; Walthall, Austin C; Le, Khoa N D; Spiegel, Frederick W; Brown, Matthew W

    2016-09-01

    Sorodiplophrys stercorea is a sorocarpic organism that utilizes filose pseudopodia for locomotion and absorptive nutrition. It has traditionally been considered to be a member of the Labyrinthulae based on its morphology. Its closest relatives were thought to be species in the taxon Diplophrys. Since the genus Diplophrys has been shown to be paraphyletic and S. stercorea has pseudopodia similar to some members of Rhizaria, we examined its relationship with other eukaryotes. We obtained four isolates from the dung of cow and horse, brought each into monoeukaryotic culture, and sequenced their SSU rRNA gene for phylogenetic analysis. All our isolates were shown to form a monophyletic group in the Labyrinthulae, nested in the Amphifiloidea clade. Our results demonstrate that Sorodiplophrys is more closely related to species of the genus Amphifila than to Diplophrys and represents an additional independent origin of sorocarpic multicellularity among eukaryotes. This study represents the first confirmed sorocarpic lifestyle in the Stramenopiles. PMID:26940948

  18. Increased nanoparticle penetration in collagenase-treated multicellular spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Thomas T; Olive, Peggy L; Pun, Suzie H

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular matrix of solid tumors presents a transport barrier that restricts nanoparticle penetration, thereby limiting the efficacy of nanosized delivery vehicles for cancer imaging and therapy. In this study, the effect of nanoparticle size and collagenase treatment on penetration of carboxylated polystyrene nanoparticles was systematically assessed in a multicellular spheroid model. Penetration of the nanoparticles into the spheroid core was limited to particles smaller than 100 nm. Collagenase treatment of spheroids resulted in significantly increased penetration of nanoparticles up to 100 nm with only a minor increase in particle penetration observed for particles larger than 100 nm. Collagenase was immobilized onto the surface of nanoparticles for site-specific degradation of ECM proteins. Collagenase-coated, 100 nm nanoparticles demonstrated a 4-fold increase in the number of particles delivered to the spheroid core compared with control nanoparticles. Thus, nanoparticle delivery to solid tumors may be substantially improved by the incorporation of ECM-modulating enzymes in the delivery formulation. PMID:17722554

  19. Modeling collective & intelligent decision making of multi-cellular populations.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong-Jun; Mahrou, Bahareh

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of unpredictable disturbances and uncertainties, cells intelligently achieve their goals by sharing information via cell-cell communication and making collective decisions, which are more reliable compared to individual decisions. Inspired by adaptive sensor network algorithms studied in communication engineering, we propose that a multi-cellular adaptive network can convert unreliable decisions by individual cells into a more reliable cell-population decision. It is demonstrated using the effector T helper (a type of immune cell) population, which plays a critical role in initiating immune reactions in response to invading foreign agents (e.g., viruses, bacteria, etc.). While each individual cell follows a simple adaptation rule, it is the combined coordination among multiple cells that leads to the manifestation of "self-organizing" decision making via cell-cell communication.

  20. Modeling a synthetic multicellular clock: Repressilators coupled by quorum sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Ojalvo, Jordi; Elowitz, Michael B.; Strogatz, Steven H.

    2004-07-01

    Diverse biochemical rhythms are generated by thousands of cellular oscillators that somehow manage to operate synchronously. In fields ranging from circadian biology to endocrinology, it remains an exciting challenge to understand how collective rhythms emerge in multicellular structures. Using mathematical and computational modeling, we study the effect of coupling through intercell signaling in a population of Escherichia coli cells expressing a synthetic biological clock. Our results predict that a diverse and noisy community of such genetic oscillators interacting through a quorum-sensing mechanism should self-synchronize in a robust way, leading to a substantially improved global rhythmicity in the system. As such, the particular system of coupled genetic oscillators considered here might be a good candidate to provide the first quantitative example of a synchronization transition in a population of biological oscillators.

  1. Regulation of Multicellular Spheroids by MAPK and FYN Kinase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Casey; Ramos, Daniel M

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the biology of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has not progressed significantly in the past 60 years, with 5-year survival remaining at approximately 50%. The epidemic of Human Papilloma Virus and its associated SCC warrants a renewed emphasis on fully understanding this disease. We previously used the 3-dimensional multicellular spheroid (MCS) model system to evaluate SCC behavior more accurately. In this study, we determined that SCC growth in MCS approximates epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Organization of an MCS requires the full-length β6 integrin subunit and its maintenance requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Limiting FYN kinase activation results in the down-regulation of E-cadherin, β-catenin and an increase in expression of N-cadherin and SNAIL. These results indicate that the microenvironment and growth patterns in an MCS are complex and require MAPK and FYN kinase. PMID:27466485

  2. Nascent multicellular life and the emergence of individuality.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Silvia; Rainey, Paul B

    2014-04-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular ancestors involves a shift in the level at which selection operates. It is usual to think about this shift in terms of the emergence of traits that cause heritable differences in reproductive output at the level of nascent collectives. Defining these traits and the causes of their origin lies at the heart of understanding the evolution of multicellular life. In working toward a mechanistic, take-nothing-for-granted account, we begin by recognizing that the standard Lewontin formulation of properties necessary and sufficient for evolution by natural selection does not necessarily encompass Darwinian evolution in primitive collectives where parent-offspring relationships may have been poorly defined. This, we suggest, limits the ability to conceptualize and capture the earliest manifestations of Darwinian properties. By way of solution we propose a relaxed interpretation of Lewontin's conditions and present these in the form of a set of necessary requirements for evolution by natural selection based upon the establishment of genealogical connections between recurrences of collectives. With emphasis on genealogy - as opposed to reproduction - it is possible to conceive selection acting on collectives prior to any manifestation of heritable variance in fitness. Such possibility draws attention to the evolutionary emergence of traits that strengthen causal relationships between recurrences - traits likely to underpin the emergence of forms of multiplication that establish parent-offspring relationships. Application of this framework to collectives of marginal status, particularly those whose recurrence is not defined by genealogy, makes clear that change at the level of collectives need not arise from selection acting at the higher level. We conclude by outlining applicability of our framework to loosely defined collectives of cells, such as those comprising the slugs of social amoeba and microbes that constitute

  3. Nascent multicellular life and the emergence of individuality.

    PubMed

    De Monte, Silvia; Rainey, Paul B

    2014-04-01

    The evolution of multicellular organisms from unicellular ancestors involves a shift in the level at which selection operates. It is usual to think about this shift in terms of the emergence of traits that cause heritable differences in reproductive output at the level of nascent collectives. Defining these traits and the causes of their origin lies at the heart of understanding the evolution of multicellular life. In working toward a mechanistic, take-nothing-for-granted account, we begin by recognizing that the standard Lewontin formulation of properties necessary and sufficient for evolution by natural selection does not necessarily encompass Darwinian evolution in primitive collectives where parent-offspring relationships may have been poorly defined. This, we suggest, limits the ability to conceptualize and capture the earliest manifestations of Darwinian properties. By way of solution we propose a relaxed interpretation of Lewontin's conditions and present these in the form of a set of necessary requirements for evolution by natural selection based upon the establishment of genealogical connections between recurrences of collectives. With emphasis on genealogy - as opposed to reproduction - it is possible to conceive selection acting on collectives prior to any manifestation of heritable variance in fitness. Such possibility draws attention to the evolutionary emergence of traits that strengthen causal relationships between recurrences - traits likely to underpin the emergence of forms of multiplication that establish parent-offspring relationships. Application of this framework to collectives of marginal status, particularly those whose recurrence is not defined by genealogy, makes clear that change at the level of collectives need not arise from selection acting at the higher level. We conclude by outlining applicability of our framework to loosely defined collectives of cells, such as those comprising the slugs of social amoeba and microbes that constitute

  4. Calcium inhibits bap-dependent multicellular behavior in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Arrizubieta, María Jesús; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Amorena, Beatriz; Penadés, José R; Lasa, Iñigo

    2004-11-01

    Bap (biofilm-associated protein) is a 254-kDa staphylococcal surface protein implicated in formation of biofilms by staphylococci isolated from chronic mastitis infections. The presence of potential EF-hand motifs in the amino acid sequence of Bap prompted us to investigate the effect of calcium on the multicellular behavior of Bap-expressing staphylococci. We found that addition of millimolar amounts of calcium to the growth media inhibited intercellular adhesion of and biofilm formation by Bap-positive strain V329. Addition of manganese, but not addition of magnesium, also inhibited biofilm formation, whereas bacterial aggregation in liquid media was greatly enhanced by metal-chelating agents. In contrast, calcium or chelating agents had virtually no effect on the aggregation of Bap-deficient strain M556. The biofilm elicited by insertion of bap into the chromosome of a biofilm-negative strain exhibited a similar dependence on the calcium concentration, indicating that the observed calcium inhibition was an inherent property of the Bap-mediated biofilms. Site-directed mutagenesis of two of the putative EF-hand domains resulted in a mutant strain that was capable of forming a biofilm but whose biofilm was not inhibited by calcium. Our results indicate that Bap binds Ca2+ with low affinity and that Ca2+ binding renders the protein noncompetent for biofilm formation and for intercellular adhesion. The fact that calcium inhibition of Bap-mediated multicellular behavior takes place in vitro at concentrations similar to those found in milk serum supports the possibility that this inhibition is relevant to the pathogenesis and/or epidemiology of the bacteria in the mastitis process.

  5. Calcium Inhibits Bap-Dependent Multicellular Behavior in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Arrizubieta, María Jesús; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Amorena, Beatriz; Penadés, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo

    2004-01-01

    Bap (biofilm-associated protein) is a 254-kDa staphylococcal surface protein implicated in formation of biofilms by staphylococci isolated from chronic mastitis infections. The presence of potential EF-hand motifs in the amino acid sequence of Bap prompted us to investigate the effect of calcium on the multicellular behavior of Bap-expressing staphylococci. We found that addition of millimolar amounts of calcium to the growth media inhibited intercellular adhesion of and biofilm formation by Bap-positive strain V329. Addition of manganese, but not addition of magnesium, also inhibited biofilm formation, whereas bacterial aggregation in liquid media was greatly enhanced by metal-chelating agents. In contrast, calcium or chelating agents had virtually no effect on the aggregation of Bap-deficient strain M556. The biofilm elicited by insertion of bap into the chromosome of a biofilm-negative strain exhibited a similar dependence on the calcium concentration, indicating that the observed calcium inhibition was an inherent property of the Bap-mediated biofilms. Site-directed mutagenesis of two of the putative EF-hand domains resulted in a mutant strain that was capable of forming a biofilm but whose biofilm was not inhibited by calcium. Our results indicate that Bap binds Ca2+ with low affinity and that Ca2+ binding renders the protein noncompetent for biofilm formation and for intercellular adhesion. The fact that calcium inhibition of Bap-mediated multicellular behavior takes place in vitro at concentrations similar to those found in milk serum supports the possibility that this inhibition is relevant to the pathogenesis and/or epidemiology of the bacteria in the mastitis process. PMID:15516560

  6. A conserved signalling pathway for amoebozoan encystation that was co-opted for multicellular development.

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Yoshinori; Schilde, Christina; Du, Qingyou; Schaap, Pauline

    2015-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity required novel mechanisms for intercellular communication, but their origin is unclear. Dictyostelium cells exchange signals to position specialized cell types in multicellular spore-bearing structures. These signals activate complex pathways that converge on activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Genes controlling PKA were detected in the Dictyostelid unicellular ancestors, which like most protists form dormant cysts when experiencing environmental stress. We deleted PKA and the adenylate cyclases AcrA and AcgA, which synthesize cAMP for PKA activation, in the intermediate species Polysphondylium, which can develop into either cysts or into multicellular structures. Loss of PKA prevented multicellular development, but also completely blocked encystation. Loss of AcrA and AcgA, both essential for sporulation in Dictyostelium, did not affect Polysphondylium sporulation, but prevented encystation. We conclude that multicellular cAMP signalling was co-opted from PKA regulation of protist encystation with progressive refunctionalization of pathway components.

  7. Green Algae and the Origins of Multicellularity in the Plant Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Umen, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The green lineage of chlorophyte algae and streptophytes form a large and diverse clade with multiple independent transitions to produce multicellular and/or macroscopically complex organization. In this review, I focus on two of the best-studied multicellular groups of green algae: charophytes and volvocines. Charophyte algae are the closest relatives of land plants and encompass the transition from unicellularity to simple multicellularity. Many of the innovations present in land plants have their roots in the cell and developmental biology of charophyte algae. Volvocine algae evolved an independent route to multicellularity that is captured by a graded series of increasing cell-type specialization and developmental complexity. The study of volvocine algae has provided unprecedented insights into the innovations required to achieve multicellularity. PMID:25324214

  8. Plant architecture without multicellularity: quandaries over patterning and the soma-germline divide in siphonous algae

    PubMed Central

    Coneva, Viktoriya; Chitwood, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity has independently evolved numerous times throughout the major lineages of life. Often, multicellularity can enable complex, macroscopic organismal architectures but it is not required for the elaboration of morphology. Several alternative cellular strategies have arisen as solutions permitting exquisite forms. The green algae class Ulvophyceae, for example, contains truly multicellular organisms, as well as macroscopic siphonous cells harboring one or multiple nuclei, and siphonocladous species, which are multinucleate and multicellular. These diverse cellular organizations raise a number of questions about the evolutionary and molecular mechanisms underlying complex organismal morphology in the green plants. Importantly, how does morphological patterning arise in giant coenocytes, and do nuclei, analogous to cells in multicellular organisms, take on distinct somatic and germline identities? Here, we comparatively explore examples of patterning and differentiation in diverse coenocytic and single-cell organisms and discuss possible mechanisms of development and nuclear differentiation in the siphonous algae. PMID:25964794

  9. Green algae and the origins of multicellularity in the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Umen, James G

    2014-10-16

    The green lineage of chlorophyte algae and streptophytes form a large and diverse clade with multiple independent transitions to produce multicellular and/or macroscopically complex organization. In this review, I focus on two of the best-studied multicellular groups of green algae: charophytes and volvocines. Charophyte algae are the closest relatives of land plants and encompass the transition from unicellularity to simple multicellularity. Many of the innovations present in land plants have their roots in the cell and developmental biology of charophyte algae. Volvocine algae evolved an independent route to multicellularity that is captured by a graded series of increasing cell-type specialization and developmental complexity. The study of volvocine algae has provided unprecedented insights into the innovations required to achieve multicellularity.

  10. 'It's your problem, not mine': does competence have anything to do with desire and aspiration to self-direct?

    PubMed

    Crozier, Michelle; Muenchberger, Heidi

    2013-11-01

    The current disability policy paradigm operating across all states in Australia is self-direction. This central movement is closely linked to preparations for a National Disability Insurance Scheme called DisabilityCare. We provide one perspective in relation to self-direction in Australia including assumptions about aspirations to self-direct and the limited research evidence base that is available even though anecdotally self-direction practices have been occurring for many years. We conclude that by developing a funding platform, such as DisabilityCare, that empowers people with a disability to make decisions about their own fundamental needs and the fulfilment of them, it will lead to a society that supports people to access and achieve a 'typical' and desired life. PMID:24120223

  11. CHUM: collaborative healthcare utilization model--an example of a self-directed team in a hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Inkson, T; Latham, G; Mather, C; Prokopczak, D; Smits, E

    1994-01-01

    Self-directed work teams are innovative tools used in industry to improve productivity and quality. Work teams are complementary to the process of Total Quality Management (TQM) and build on the same foundations of customer satisfaction, goal setting, and staff education and training (Arikian, 1991; Sheehy & Musselwhite, 1990). The Collaborative Healthcare Utilization Model (CHUM) encompasses a self-directed team which enables nurse managers and physicians to lead a busy, tertiary care surgical service. The opportunity to develop CHUM arose when a middle management (director) position was removed from the nursing division. Development of the self-directed team included "selling" the idea and piloting the venture in an environment where work teams are not part of the organizational structure. The authors describe their experience in introducing a self-directed team into a hospital setting. PMID:7918513

  12. Constructive, collaborative, contextual, and self-directed learning in surface anatomy education.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Esther M; Sieben, Judith M; Smailbegovic, Ida; de Bruin, Anique B H; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2013-01-01

    Anatomy education often consists of a combination of lectures and laboratory sessions, the latter frequently including surface anatomy. Studying surface anatomy enables students to elaborate on their knowledge of the cadaver's static anatomy by enabling the visualization of structures, especially those of the musculoskeletal system, move and function in a living human being. A recent development in teaching methods for surface anatomy is body painting, which several studies suggest increases both student motivation and knowledge acquisition. This article focuses on a teaching approach and is a translational contribution to existing literature. In line with best evidence medical education, the aim of this article is twofold: to briefly inform teachers about constructivist learning theory and elaborate on the principles of constructive, collaborative, contextual, and self-directed learning; and to provide teachers with an example of how to implement these learning principles to change the approach to teaching surface anatomy. Student evaluations of this new approach demonstrate that the application of these learning principles leads to higher student satisfaction. However, research suggests that even better results could be achieved by further adjustments in the application of contextual and self-directed learning principles. Successful implementation and guidance of peer physical examination is crucial for the described approach, but research shows that other options, like using life models, seem to work equally well. Future research on surface anatomy should focus on increasing the students' ability to apply anatomical knowledge and defining the setting in which certain teaching methods and approaches have a positive effect.

  13. Readiness for Self-Directed learning among first year Saudi Medical students: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Mona; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives of the present study was to explore the readiness for Self Directed Learning (SDL) among first year Saudi Medical students enrolled at King Saud University (KSU) and Princess NourahBintAbdulrahman University (PNU) in Saudi Arabia. Methods: First year medical students were invited to participate in a descriptive cross sectional study design. Data were collected using a Self-Directed Learner Readiness Scale (SDLRS) which is a self- assessment tool aimed to assess three main components: self-management, desire for learning and self-control. The students responded to each item of the SDLRS on a 5-point Likert scale. Data were analyzed using SPSS, mean, median and total scores were calculated and were compared among student’s groups. Results: The mean score for the desire of learning was the highest (4.08± 0.5) of all the three components of the SDLRS followed by self-control (3.9± 0.9), while the least mean score was for self-management (3.7±0.5). Overall, differences between student’s groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: The present study revealed that the overall SDL readiness of participants was good, students were highly motivated for self-learning and had the ability for self-control. However, they need assistance to improve their self-management skills. PMID:26430406

  14. Crowding increases salivary cortisol but not self-directed behavior in captive baboons.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Brandon L; Reeder, DeeAnn M; Judge, Peter G

    2015-04-01

    Reduced space can lead to crowding in social animals. Crowding increases the risk of agonistic interactions that, in turn, may require additional physiological defensive coping mechanisms affecting health. To determine the stress induced from increased social density in a group of nineteen baboons living in an indoor/outdoor enclosure, saliva cortisol levels and rates of anxiety-related behavior were analyzed across two unique crowding episodes. Initially, mean salivary cortisol levels when animals were restricted to their indoor quarters were compared to those when they also had access to their larger outdoor enclosure. Then, mean cortisol levels were compared before, during, and after two distinct crowding periods of long and short duration. Crowding resulted in significantly elevated cortisol during crowding periods compared to non-crowded periods. Cortisol levels returned to baseline following two crowding episodes contrasting in their length and ambient climate conditions. These cortisol elevations indicate greater metabolic costs of maintaining homeostasis under social stress resulting from reduced space. Self-directed behavior, conversely, was not reliably elevated during crowding. Results suggest that the potential for negative social interactions, and/or the uncertainty associated with social threat can cause physiological stress responses detected by salivary cortisol. Self-directed behavioral measures of stress may constitute inadequate indicators of social stress in colony-housed monkeys or represent subjective emotional arousal unrelated to hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis activation.

  15. Synchronization of Eukaryotic Flagella and the Evolution of Multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Raymond

    2009-03-01

    Flagella, among the most highly conserved structures in eukaryotes, are responsible for such tasks as fluid transport, motility and phototaxis, establishment of embryonic left-right asymmetry, and intercellular communication, and are thought to have played a key role in the development of multicellularity. These tasks are usually performed by the coordinated action of groups of flagella (from pairs to thousands), which display various types of spatio-temporal organization. The origin and quantitative characterization of flagellar synchronization has remained an important open problem, involving interplay between intracellular biochemistry and interflagellar mechanical/hydrodynamic coupling. The Volvocine green algae serve as useful model organisms for the study of these phenomena, as they form a lineage spanning from unicellular Chlamydomonas to germ-soma differentiated Volvox, having as many as 50,000 biflagellated surface somatic cells. In this talk I will describe extensive studies [1], using micromanipulation and high-speed imaging, of the flagellar synchronization of two key species - Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Volvox carteri - over tens of thousands of cycles. With Chlamydomonas we find that the flagellar dynamics moves back and forth between a stochastic synchronized state consistent with a simple model of hydrodynamically coupled noisy oscillators, and a deterministic one driven by a large interflagellar frequency difference. These results reconcile previously contradictory studies, based on short observations, showing only one or the other of these two states, and, more importantly, show that the flagellar beat frequencies themselves are regulated by the cell. Moreover, high-resolution three-dimensional tracking of swimming cells provides strong evidence that these dynamical states are related to reorientation events in the trajectories, yielding a eukaryotic equivalent of the ``run and tumble'' motion of peritrichously flagellated bacteria. The degree

  16. Development of cell differentiation in the transition to multicellularity: a dynamical modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Mora Van Cauwelaert, Emilio; Arias Del Angel, Juan A.; Benítez, Mariana; Azpeitia, Eugenio M.

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity has emerged and continues to emerge in a variety of lineages and under diverse environmental conditions. In order to attain individuality and integration, multicellular organisms must exhibit spatial cell differentiation, which in turn allows cell aggregates to robustly generate traits and behaviors at the multicellular level. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that may lead to the development of cellular differentiation and patterning in emerging multicellular organisms remain unclear. We briefly review two conceptual frameworks that have addressed this issue: the cooperation-defection framework and the dynamical patterning modules (DPMs) framework. Then, situating ourselves in the DPM formalism first put forward by S. A. Newman and collaborators, we state a hypothesis for cell differentiation and arrangement in cellular masses of emerging multicellular organisms. Our hypothesis is based on the role of the generic cell-to-cell communication and adhesion patterning mechanisms, which are two fundamental mechanisms for the evolution of multicellularity, and whose molecules seem to be well-conserved in extant multicellular organisms and their unicellular relatives. We review some fundamental ideas underlying this hypothesis and contrast them with empirical and theoretical evidence currently available. Next, we use a mathematical model to illustrate how the mechanisms and assumptions considered in the hypothesis we postulate may render stereotypical arrangements of differentiated cells in an emerging cellular aggregate and may contribute to the variation and recreation of multicellular phenotypes. Finally, we discuss the potential implications of our approach and compare them to those entailed by the cooperation-defection framework in the study of cell differentiation in the transition to multicellularity. PMID:26157427

  17. Development of cell differentiation in the transition to multicellularity: a dynamical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Mora Van Cauwelaert, Emilio; Arias Del Angel, Juan A; Benítez, Mariana; Azpeitia, Eugenio M

    2015-01-01

    Multicellularity has emerged and continues to emerge in a variety of lineages and under diverse environmental conditions. In order to attain individuality and integration, multicellular organisms must exhibit spatial cell differentiation, which in turn allows cell aggregates to robustly generate traits and behaviors at the multicellular level. Nevertheless, the mechanisms that may lead to the development of cellular differentiation and patterning in emerging multicellular organisms remain unclear. We briefly review two conceptual frameworks that have addressed this issue: the cooperation-defection framework and the dynamical patterning modules (DPMs) framework. Then, situating ourselves in the DPM formalism first put forward by S. A. Newman and collaborators, we state a hypothesis for cell differentiation and arrangement in cellular masses of emerging multicellular organisms. Our hypothesis is based on the role of the generic cell-to-cell communication and adhesion patterning mechanisms, which are two fundamental mechanisms for the evolution of multicellularity, and whose molecules seem to be well-conserved in extant multicellular organisms and their unicellular relatives. We review some fundamental ideas underlying this hypothesis and contrast them with empirical and theoretical evidence currently available. Next, we use a mathematical model to illustrate how the mechanisms and assumptions considered in the hypothesis we postulate may render stereotypical arrangements of differentiated cells in an emerging cellular aggregate and may contribute to the variation and recreation of multicellular phenotypes. Finally, we discuss the potential implications of our approach and compare them to those entailed by the cooperation-defection framework in the study of cell differentiation in the transition to multicellularity. PMID:26157427

  18. Cooperatively Generated Stresslet Flows Supply Fresh Fluid to Multicellular Choanoflagellate Colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Marcus; Dayel, Mark J.; Pepper, Rachel E.; Koehl, M. A. R.

    2013-05-01

    The flagellated protozoan Salpingoeca rosetta is one of the closest relatives of multicellular animals. Unicellular S. rosetta can be induced to form multicellular colonies, but colonies swim more slowly than individual cells so the advantages conferred by colony formation are uncertain. Here we use theoretical models to show that hydrodynamic cooperation between cells can increase the fluid supply to the colony, an important predictor of feeding rate. Our results suggest that hydrodynamic benefits may have been an important selective factor in the evolution of early multicellular animals.

  19. Proliferation and motility of HaCaT keratinocyte derivatives is enhanced by fibroblast nemosis

    SciTech Connect

    Raesaenen, Kati; Vaheri, Antti

    2010-06-10

    The role of paracrine tumor-stroma regulation in the progression of cancer is under intense investigation. Activated fibroblasts are key components of the tumor microenvironment providing the soluble factors mediating the regulation. Nemosis is an experimental model to study these parameters: formation of a multicellular spheroid activates fibroblasts and leads to increased production of soluble factors involved in the promotion of growth and motility. Role of nemosis was investigated in the tumorigenesis of HaCaT derivatives representing skin carcinoma progression. Conditioned medium from fibroblast spheroids increased proliferation rate of HaCaT derivatives. Expression of proliferation marker Ki-67 increased significantly in benign A5 and low-grade malignant II-4 cells, but did not further increase in the metastatic RT3 cells. Expression of p63, keratinocyte stem cell marker linked to cancer progression, was augmented by medium from nemotic fibroblasts; this increase was also seen in RT3 cells. Scratch-wound healing of the keratinocytes was enhanced in response to fibroblast nemosis. Neutralizing antibodies against growth factors inhibited wound healing to some extent; the response varied between benign and malignant keratinocytes. Migration and invasion were enhanced by conditioned medium from nemotic fibroblasts in benign and low-grade malignant cells. RT3 keratinocyte migration was further augmented, but invasion was not, indicating their intrinsic capacity to invade. Our data demonstrate that fibroblast nemosis increases proliferation and motility of HaCaT keratinocyte derivatives, and thus nemosis can be used as a model to study the role of soluble factors secreted by fibroblasts in tumor progression.

  20. Self-directed learning and portfolio development for nurses: developing workbooks as a facilitative tool.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Michelle; Freeman, Adele

    2005-09-01

    Workbooks are often used for discipline-specific learning in academic institutions but there is growing recognition of their potential usefulness in the clinical setting to promote learning and professional development. The purpose of this paper is to share some tips/guidelines for those clinical staff interested in developing self-directed learning programs using a workbook approach. Combined with skilled facilitation, custom designed workbooks based on adult learning theories can enhance skills and encourage portfolio development in the clinical setting. This cost and time effective approach utilises existing resources to cater to diverse needs and topics, building sustainable collaborations. This paper will argue that the proposed program has the potential to contribute to healthcare improvement by promoting skill development amongst staff and contributing to evidence-based practice.

  1. A Quasi-Linear Behavioral Model and an Application to Self-Directed Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Carr, Paul B.

    1999-01-01

    A model is presented that describes the relationship between one's knowledge of the world and the concomitant personal behaviors that serve as a mechanism to obtain desired outcomes. Integrated within this model are the differing roles that outcomes serve as motivators and as modifiers to one's worldview. The model is dichotomized between general and contextual applications. Because learner self-directedness (a personal characteristic) involves cognition and affection while self-directed learning (a pedagogic process) encompasses conation, behavior and introspection, the model can be dichotomized again in another direction. Presented also are the roles that cognitive motivation theories play in moving an individual through this behavioral model and the roles of wishes, self-efficacy, opportunity and self-influence.

  2. Novel species and expanded distribution of ellipsoidal multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-ran; Zhang, Wen-yan; Zhou, Ke; Pan, Hong-miao; Du, Hai-jian; Xu, Cong; Xu, Jian-hong; Pradel, Nathalie; Santini, Claire-Lise; Li, Jin-hua; Huang, Hui; Pan, Yong-xin; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-fei

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes (MMPs) are a peculiar group of magnetotactic bacteria, each comprising approximately 10-100 cells of the same phylotype. Two morphotypes of MMP have been identified, including several species of globally distributed spherical mulberry-like MMPs (s-MMPs), and two species of ellipsoidal pineapple-like MMPs (e-MMPs) from China (Qingdao and Rongcheng cities). We recently collected e-MMPs from Mediterranean Sea sediments (Six-Fours-les-Plages) and Drummond Island, in the South China Sea. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MMPs from Six-Fours-les-Plages and the previously reported e-MMP Candidatus Magnetananas rongchenensis have 98.5% sequence identity and are the same species, while the MMPs from Drummond Island appear to be a novel species, having > 7.1% sequence divergence from the most closely related e-MMP, Candidatus Magnetananas tsingtaoensis. Identification of the novel species expands the distribution of e-MMPs to Tropical Zone. Comparison of nine physical and chemical parameters revealed that sand grain size and the content of inorganic nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium and nitrite) in the sediments from Rongcheng City and Six-Fours-les-Plages were similar, and lower than found for sediments from the other two sampling sites. The results of the study reveal broad diversity and wide distribution of e-MMPs. PMID:26711721

  3. Robust finite time observer design for multicellular converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defoort, Michael; Djemai, Mohamed; Floquet, Thierry; Perruquetti, Wilfrid

    2011-11-01

    In this article, a nonlinear finite time observer is designed for multicellular converters. The aim is to estimate the capacitor voltages by taking into account the hybrid behaviour of the converter. This article extends the validity of the strong Lyapunov function, proposed in Moreno and Osorio (Moreno, J., and Osorio, M. (2008), 'A Lyapunov Approach to Second Order Sliding Mode Controllers and Observers', in Proceedings of the IEEE Conference on Decision and Control, New Orleans, USA, pp. 2856-2861), in order to deeply study the reaching time estimation and robustness of the homogeneous finite time observer given in Perruquetti et al. (Perruquetti, W., Floquet, T., and Moulay, E. (2008), 'Finite Time Observers: Application to Secure Communication', IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control, 53, 356-360). The proposed approach enables the stabilisation of the observation errors in spite of the presence of perturbations and uncertainties. Some simulations and comparisons with the super-twisting sliding mode observer highlight the efficiency of the proposed strategy.

  4. Origins of multicellular complexity: Volvox and the volvocine algae.

    PubMed

    Herron, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    The collection of evolutionary transformations known as the 'major transitions' or 'transitions in individuality' resulted in changes in the units of evolution and in the hierarchical structure of cellular life. Volvox and related algae have become an important model system for the major transition from unicellular to multicellular life, which touches on several fundamental questions in evolutionary biology. The Third International Volvox Conference was held at the University of Cambridge in August 2015 to discuss recent advances in the biology and evolution of this group of algae. Here, I highlight the benefits of integrating phylogenetic comparative methods and experimental evolution with detailed studies of developmental genetics in a model system with substantial genetic and genomic resources. I summarize recent research on Volvox and its relatives and comment on its implications for the genomic changes underlying major evolutionary transitions, evolution and development of complex traits, evolution of sex and sexes, evolution of cellular differentiation and the biophysics of motility. Finally, I outline challenges and suggest future directions for research into the biology and evolution of the volvocine algae. PMID:26822195

  5. Multicellularity and the Functional Interdependence of Motility and Molecular Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solari, C.; Ganguly, S.; Kessler, J. O.; Michod, R.; Goldstein, R. E.

    2006-03-01

    Benefits, costs and requirements accompany the transition from motile totipotent unicellular organisms to multicellular organisms having cells specialized into reproductive (germ) and vegetative (sterile soma) functions such as motility. In flagellated colonial organisms such as the volvocalean green algae, organized beating by the somatic cells' flagella yields propulsion important in phototaxis and chemotaxis. It has not been generally appreciated that for the larger colonies, flagellar stirring of boundary layers and remote transport are fundamental for maintaining a sufficient rate of metabolite turnover, one not attainable by diffusive transport alone. We describe experiments that quantify the role of advective dynamics in enhancing productivity in germ-soma differentiated colonies. First, experiments with suspended deflagellated colonies of Volvox carteri show that forced advection improves productivity. Second, Particle Imaging Velocimetry of fluid motion around colonies reveals flow fields with very large characteristic velocities U extending to length scales comparable to the colony radius R. For a typical metabolite diffusion constant D, the Peclet number Pe=2UR/D 1, indicative of the dominance of advection over diffusion, with striking augmentation at the cell division stage.

  6. MicroRNAs in a multicellular green alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingrui; Wu, Yang; Qi, Yijun

    2014-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as key components in the eukaryotic gene regulatory network. We and others have previously identified many miRNAs in a unicellular green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. To investigate whether miRNA-mediated gene regulation is a general mechanism in green algae and how miRNAs have been evolved in the green algal lineage, we examined small RNAs in Volvox carteri, a multicellular species in the same family with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. We identified 174 miRNAs in Volvox, with many of them being highly enriched in gonidia or somatic cells. The targets of the miRNAs were predicted and many of them were subjected to miRNA-mediated cleavage in vivo, suggesting that miRNAs play regulatory roles in the biology of green algae. Our catalog of miRNAs and their targets provides a resource for further studies on the evolution, biological functions, and genomic properties of miRNAs in green algae. PMID:24369344

  7. Biocellion: accelerating computer simulation of multicellular biological system models

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seunghwa; Kahan, Simon; McDermott, Jason; Flann, Nicholas; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Biological system behaviors are often the outcome of complex interactions among a large number of cells and their biotic and abiotic environment. Computational biologists attempt to understand, predict and manipulate biological system behavior through mathematical modeling and computer simulation. Discrete agent-based modeling (in combination with high-resolution grids to model the extracellular environment) is a popular approach for building biological system models. However, the computational complexity of this approach forces computational biologists to resort to coarser resolution approaches to simulate large biological systems. High-performance parallel computers have the potential to address the computing challenge, but writing efficient software for parallel computers is difficult and time-consuming. Results: We have developed Biocellion, a high-performance software framework, to solve this computing challenge using parallel computers. To support a wide range of multicellular biological system models, Biocellion asks users to provide their model specifics by filling the function body of pre-defined model routines. Using Biocellion, modelers without parallel computing expertise can efficiently exploit parallel computers with less effort than writing sequential programs from scratch. We simulate cell sorting, microbial patterning and a bacterial system in soil aggregate as case studies. Availability and implementation: Biocellion runs on x86 compatible systems with the 64 bit Linux operating system and is freely available for academic use. Visit http://biocellion.com for additional information. Contact: seunghwa.kang@pnnl.gov PMID:25064572

  8. Multicellular contractility contributes to the emergence of mesothelioma nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czirok, Andras

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) nodules arise from the mesothelial lining of the pleural cavity by a poorly understood mechanism. We demonstrate that macroscopic multicellular aggregates, reminiscent of the MPM nodules found in patients, develop when MPM cell lines are cultured at high cell densities for several weeks. Surprisingly, the nodule-like aggregates do not arise by excessive local cell proliferation, but by myosin II-driven cell contractility. Contractile nodules contain prominent actin cables that can span several cells. Several features of the in vitro MPM nodule development can be explained by a computational model that assumes uniform and steady intercellular contractile forces within a monolayer of cells, and a mechanical load-dependent lifetime of cell-cell contacts. The model behaves as a self-tensioned Maxwell fluid and exhibits an instability that leads to pattern formation. Altogether, our findings suggest that inhibition of the actomyosin system may provide a hitherto not utilized therapeutic approach to affect MPM growth. NIH R01-GM102801.

  9. Origins of multicellular complexity: Volvox and the volvocine algae.

    PubMed

    Herron, Matthew D

    2016-03-01

    The collection of evolutionary transformations known as the 'major transitions' or 'transitions in individuality' resulted in changes in the units of evolution and in the hierarchical structure of cellular life. Volvox and related algae have become an important model system for the major transition from unicellular to multicellular life, which touches on several fundamental questions in evolutionary biology. The Third International Volvox Conference was held at the University of Cambridge in August 2015 to discuss recent advances in the biology and evolution of this group of algae. Here, I highlight the benefits of integrating phylogenetic comparative methods and experimental evolution with detailed studies of developmental genetics in a model system with substantial genetic and genomic resources. I summarize recent research on Volvox and its relatives and comment on its implications for the genomic changes underlying major evolutionary transitions, evolution and development of complex traits, evolution of sex and sexes, evolution of cellular differentiation and the biophysics of motility. Finally, I outline challenges and suggest future directions for research into the biology and evolution of the volvocine algae.

  10. Novel species and expanded distribution of ellipsoidal multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-ran; Zhang, Wen-yan; Zhou, Ke; Pan, Hong-miao; Du, Hai-jian; Xu, Cong; Xu, Jian-hong; Pradel, Nathalie; Santini, Claire-Lise; Li, Jin-hua; Huang, Hui; Pan, Yong-xin; Xiao, Tian; Wu, Long-fei

    2016-04-01

    Multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes (MMPs) are a peculiar group of magnetotactic bacteria, each comprising approximately 10-100 cells of the same phylotype. Two morphotypes of MMP have been identified, including several species of globally distributed spherical mulberry-like MMPs (s-MMPs), and two species of ellipsoidal pineapple-like MMPs (e-MMPs) from China (Qingdao and Rongcheng cities). We recently collected e-MMPs from Mediterranean Sea sediments (Six-Fours-les-Plages) and Drummond Island, in the South China Sea. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the MMPs from Six-Fours-les-Plages and the previously reported e-MMP Candidatus Magnetananas rongchenensis have 98.5% sequence identity and are the same species, while the MMPs from Drummond Island appear to be a novel species, having > 7.1% sequence divergence from the most closely related e-MMP, Candidatus Magnetananas tsingtaoensis. Identification of the novel species expands the distribution of e-MMPs to Tropical Zone. Comparison of nine physical and chemical parameters revealed that sand grain size and the content of inorganic nitrogen (nitrate, ammonium and nitrite) in the sediments from Rongcheng City and Six-Fours-les-Plages were similar, and lower than found for sediments from the other two sampling sites. The results of the study reveal broad diversity and wide distribution of e-MMPs.

  11. Self-directed Mindfulness Training and Improvement in Blood Pressure, Migraine Frequency, and Quality of Life

    PubMed Central

    Rempe, Margaret; Bradley, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Background: Interest in case studies has undergone a resurgence concurrent with increasing prioritization of illustrations of patient-centered care. However, substantial inclusion of the patient in these reports remains limited. Here, a doctor and patient collaborate to present her case report of self-directed mindfulness training and the subsequent changes in blood pressure, migraine frequency, and quality of life. Methods: After receiving encouragement from her naturopathic doctor, the patient initiated an 8-week program in mindfulness training following the Kabat-Zinn protocol and logged her daily blood pressure and symptoms before and after meditation sessions over an 11-week period. Results: Patient-reported outcomes included decreased perceived stress, increased focus, and a newfound sense of centeredness and calm. Changes in objective outcomes were clinically and statistically significant, including reductions in mean systolic and diastolic blood pressure between week 1 and week 11 (P = .0001 and P = .0004 for systolic and diastolic, respectively, by paired, 2-sided t-tests). Self-reported frequency of chronic migraine was also reduced. Critical to the patient's success was that mindfulness training was first approached in a simple, accessible manner prior to embarking on a deeper, extended experience. Discussion and Conclusion: Self-directed mindfulness training can have a meaningful impact on both subjective and objective health outcomes. It may take years of encouragement from a healthcare provider before a patient is ready to adopt a mind-body practice; it is important to recognize and counsel patients with messages appropriate to their stage of change and self-efficacy. Additionally, case studies that combine the voice of the clinician and the patient can provide useful illustrations of truly patient-centered care. PMID:24278842

  12. Medical student preferences for self-directed study resources in gross anatomy.

    PubMed

    Choi-Lundberg, Derek L; Low, Tze Feng; Patman, Phillip; Turner, Paul; Sinha, Sankar N

    2016-01-01

    Gross anatomy instruction in medical curricula involve a range of resources and activities including dissection, prosected specimens, anatomical models, radiological images, surface anatomy, textbooks, atlases, and computer-assisted learning (CAL). These resources and activities are underpinned by the expectation that students will actively engage in self-directed study (SDS) to enhance their knowledge and understanding of anatomy. To gain insight into preclinical versus clinical medical students' preferences for SDS resources for learning gross anatomy, and whether these vary on demographic characteristics and attitudes toward anatomy, students were surveyed at two Australian medical schools, one undergraduate-entry and the other graduate-entry. Lecture/tutorial/practical notes were ranked first by 33% of 156 respondents (mean rank ± SD, 2.48 ± 1.38), textbooks by 26% (2.62 ± 1.35), atlases 20% (2.80 ± 1.44), videos 10% (4.34 ± 1.68), software 5% (4.78 ± 1.50), and websites 4% (4.24 ± 1.34). Among CAL resources, Wikipedia was ranked highest. The most important factor in selecting CAL resources was cost (ranked first by 46%), followed by self-assessment, ease of use, alignment with curriculum, and excellent graphics (each 6-9%). Compared with preclinical students, clinical students ranked software and Acland's Video Atlas of Human Anatomy higher and felt radiological images were more important in selecting CAL resources. Along with other studies reporting on the quality, features, and impact on learning of CAL resources, the diversity of students' preferences and opinions on usefulness and ease of use reported here can help guide faculty in selecting and recommending a range of CAL and other resources to their students to support their self-directed study. PMID:26033851

  13. Medical student preferences for self-directed study resources in gross anatomy.

    PubMed

    Choi-Lundberg, Derek L; Low, Tze Feng; Patman, Phillip; Turner, Paul; Sinha, Sankar N

    2016-01-01

    Gross anatomy instruction in medical curricula involve a range of resources and activities including dissection, prosected specimens, anatomical models, radiological images, surface anatomy, textbooks, atlases, and computer-assisted learning (CAL). These resources and activities are underpinned by the expectation that students will actively engage in self-directed study (SDS) to enhance their knowledge and understanding of anatomy. To gain insight into preclinical versus clinical medical students' preferences for SDS resources for learning gross anatomy, and whether these vary on demographic characteristics and attitudes toward anatomy, students were surveyed at two Australian medical schools, one undergraduate-entry and the other graduate-entry. Lecture/tutorial/practical notes were ranked first by 33% of 156 respondents (mean rank ± SD, 2.48 ± 1.38), textbooks by 26% (2.62 ± 1.35), atlases 20% (2.80 ± 1.44), videos 10% (4.34 ± 1.68), software 5% (4.78 ± 1.50), and websites 4% (4.24 ± 1.34). Among CAL resources, Wikipedia was ranked highest. The most important factor in selecting CAL resources was cost (ranked first by 46%), followed by self-assessment, ease of use, alignment with curriculum, and excellent graphics (each 6-9%). Compared with preclinical students, clinical students ranked software and Acland's Video Atlas of Human Anatomy higher and felt radiological images were more important in selecting CAL resources. Along with other studies reporting on the quality, features, and impact on learning of CAL resources, the diversity of students' preferences and opinions on usefulness and ease of use reported here can help guide faculty in selecting and recommending a range of CAL and other resources to their students to support their self-directed study.

  14. Gender and factor-level interactions in psychopathy: implications for self-directed violence risk and borderline personality disorder symptoms.

    PubMed

    Verona, Edelyn; Sprague, Jenessa; Javdani, Shabnam

    2012-07-01

    Women with antisocial and psychopathic traits have a more extensive history of self-directed violence, as well as borderline personality disorder (BPD) symptoms, than their male counterparts (Chapman, Specht, & Cellucci, 2005; Warren et al., 2003). To inform this area of research, we examined gender differences in the relationship between psychopathy factors and risk for self-directed violence, as measured by a history of suicidal ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempts, across 2 studies. In both studies, we found that the interaction of the interpersonal-affective (Factor 1) and impulsive-antisocial traits (Factor 2) of psychopathy, a combination considered to exemplify high psychopathy, was associated with ideation, self-harm, and suicide attempt histories specifically in women. In men, Factor 2 traits were associated with these risk indices for self-directed violence, regardless of Factor 1. In Study 2, we extended our analysis to examine whether BPD accounted for the relationship between psychopathy and self-directed violence differentially in women and men. Results suggested that BPD symptoms partially accounted for the effects of Factor 2 on self-directed violence (both self-harm and attempts) in both genders but fully accounted for Factor 1 protective effects only in men. These findings underscore the notion that the same psychopathic trait liabilities, at least as they are currently assessed, may confer risk for different forms of behavioral maladjustment in women versus men.

  15. An epithelial tissue in Dictyostelium challenges the traditional origin of metazoan multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Daniel J; Nelson, W James; Weis, William I

    2012-10-01

    We hypothesize that aspects of animal multicellularity originated before the divergence of metazoans from fungi and social amoebae. Polarized epithelial tissues are a defining feature of metazoans and contribute to the diversity of animal body plans. The recent finding of a polarized epithelium in the non-metazoan social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum demonstrates that epithelial tissue is not a unique feature of metazoans, and challenges the traditional paradigm that multicellularity evolved independently in social amoebae and metazoans. An alternative view, presented here, is that the common ancestor of social amoebae, fungi, and animals spent a portion of its life cycle in a multicellular state and possessed molecular machinery necessary for forming an epithelial tissue. Some descendants of this ancestor retained multicellularity, while others reverted to unicellularity. This hypothesis makes testable predictions regarding tissue organization in close relatives of metazoans and provides a novel conceptual framework for studies of early animal evolution. PMID:22930590

  16. High relatedness is necessary and sufficient to maintain multicellularity in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Kuzdzal-Fick, Jennie J; Fox, Sara A; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2011-12-16

    Most complex multicellular organisms develop clonally from a single cell. This should limit conflicts between cell lineages that could threaten the extensive cooperation of cells within multicellular bodies. Cellular composition can be manipulated in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, which allows us to test and confirm the two key predictions of this theory. Experimental evolution at low relatedness favored cheating mutants that could destroy multicellular development. However, under high relatedness, the forces of mutation and within-individual selection are too small for these destructive cheaters to spread, as shown by a mutation accumulation experiment. Thus, we conclude that the single-cell bottleneck is a powerful stabilizer of cellular cooperation in multicellular organisms. PMID:22174251

  17. Phylogeny of Opisthokonta and the evolution of multicellularity and complexity in Fungi and Metazoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Mónica; Collins, Allen G.; Taylor, John W.; Valentine, James W.; Lipps, Jere H.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda; Sogin, Mitchell L.

    2003-07-01

    While early eukaryotic life must have been unicellular, multicellular lifeforms evolved multiple times from protistan ancestors in diverse eukaryotic lineages. The origins of multicellularity are of special interest because they require evolutionary transitions towards increased levels of complexity. We have generated new sequence data from the nuclear large subunit ribosomal DNA gene (LSU rDNA) and the SSU rDNA gene of several unicellular opisthokont protists - a nucleariid amoeba (Nuclearia simplex) and four choanoflagellates (Codosiga gracilis, Choanoeca perplexa, Proterospongia choanojuncta and Stephanoeca diplocostata) to provide the basis for re-examining relationships among several unicellular lineages and their multicellular relatives (animals and fungi). Our data indicate that: (1) choanoflagellates are a monophyletic rather than a paraphyletic assemblage that independently gave rise to animals and fungi as suggested by some authors and (2) the nucleariid filose amoebae are the likely sister group to Fungi. We also review published information regarding the origin of multicellularity in the opisthokonts.

  18. Multicellular group formation in response to predators in the alga Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R M; Bell, T; West, S A

    2016-03-01

    A key step in the evolution of multicellular organisms is the formation of cooperative multicellular groups. It has been suggested that predation pressure may promote multicellular group formation in some algae and bacteria, with cells forming groups to lower their chance of being eaten. We use the green alga Chlorella vulgaris and the protist Tetrahymena thermophila to test whether predation pressure can initiate the formation of colonies. We found that: (1) either predators or just predator exoproducts promote colony formation; (2) higher predator densities cause more colonies to form; and (3) colony formation in this system is facultative, with populations returning to being unicellular when the predation pressure is removed. These results provide empirical support for the hypothesis that predation pressure promotes multicellular group formation. The speed of the reversion of populations to unicellularity suggests that this response is due to phenotypic plasticity and not evolutionary change. PMID:26663204

  19. Potential impact of gene regulatory mechanisms on the evolution of multicellularity in the volvocine algae.

    PubMed

    Kianianmomeni, Arash

    2015-01-01

    A fundamental question in biology is how multicellular organisms can arise from their single-celled precursors. The evolution of multicellularity requires the adoption of new traits in unicellular ancestors that allows the generation of form by, for example, increasing the size and developing new cell types. But what are the genetic, cellular and biochemical bases underlying the evolution of multicellularity? Recent advances in evolutionary developmental biology suggest that the regulation of gene expression by cis-regulatory factors, gene duplication and alternative splicing contribute to phenotypic evolution. These mechanisms enable different degrees of phenotypic divergence and complexity with variation in traits from genomes with similar gene contents. In addition, signaling pathways specific to cell types are developed to guarantee the modulation of cellular and developmental processes matched to the cell types as well as the maintenance of multicellularity. PMID:26479715

  20. Point of care information services: a platform for self-directed continuing medical education for front line decision makers

    PubMed Central

    Moja, Lorenzo; Kwag, Koren Hyogene

    2015-01-01

    The structure and aim of continuing medical education (CME) is shifting from the passive transmission of knowledge to a competency-based model focused on professional development. Self-directed learning is emerging as the foremost educational method for advancing competency-based CME. In a field marked by the constant expansion of knowledge, self-directed learning allows physicians to tailor their learning strategy to meet the information needs of practice. Point of care information services are innovative tools that provide health professionals with digested evidence at the front line to guide decision making. By mobilising self-directing learning to meet the information needs of clinicians at the bedside, point of care information services represent a promising platform for competency-based CME. Several points, however, must be considered to enhance the accessibility and development of these tools to improve competency-based CME and the quality of care. PMID:25655251

  1. Point of care information services: a platform for self-directed continuing medical education for front line decision makers.

    PubMed

    Moja, Lorenzo; Kwag, Koren Hyogene

    2015-02-01

    The structure and aim of continuing medical education (CME) is shifting from the passive transmission of knowledge to a competency-based model focused on professional development. Self-directed learning is emerging as the foremost educational method for advancing competency-based CME. In a field marked by the constant expansion of knowledge, self-directed learning allows physicians to tailor their learning strategy to meet the information needs of practice. Point of care information services are innovative tools that provide health professionals with digested evidence at the front line to guide decision making. By mobilising self-directing learning to meet the information needs of clinicians at the bedside, point of care information services represent a promising platform for competency-based CME. Several points, however, must be considered to enhance the accessibility and development of these tools to improve competency-based CME and the quality of care.

  2. Versatile Functions of p53 Protein in Multicellular Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Chumakov, P. M.

    2009-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a pivotal role by controlling virtually all processes in the cell. The functions of p53 determine modes of behavior of cells in multicellular organisms and ensure priorities of interests of the organism as a whole above the interests of an individual cell. Multiple signaling pathways of the cell report signals modifying the activities of p53 through numerous connections, ensuring highly selective and gradual regulation of functions that depend on the ongoing events in the cell. The task of p53 is to control the integrity and correctness of all processes in each individual cell and in the organism as a whole. The changes in the activity of p53 depend on the degree of errors or faults, and the effect is directed either toward correction of an imbalance or damage, or, in case of severe damages, leads to the prevention of multiplication of abnormal cells or their death. The strategy of p53 ensures genetic identity of cells and prevents the selection of cells having growth or other advantages. By accomplishing these strategic tasks, p53 may use a wide spectrum of activities. The majority of the activities are due to the ability of p53 to function as a transcription factor, by inducing or repressing different genes. However, p53 can also function as an enzyme, acting as an exonuclease during DNA reparation, or as an adaptor or a regulatory protein, intervening into functions of numerous signaling pathways. It can also act as direct inducer of apoptosis by translocation into mitochondria. Loss of function of the p53 gene occurs in virtually every case of cancer, and deficiency in p53 is an unavoidable prerequisite to the development of malignancies. The functions of p53 play substantial roles in many other pathologies as well as in the aging process. This review is focused on strategies of the p53 gene, demonstrating individual mechanisms underlying its functions. The p53 tumor suppressor plays a pivotal role in multicellular organism by

  3. Development of ichthyosporeans sheds light on the origin of metazoan multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Suga, Hiroshi; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-05-01

    To understand the mechanisms involved in the transition from protists to multicellular animals (metazoans), studying unicellular relatives of metazoans is as important as studying metazoans themselves. However, investigations remain poor on the closest unicellular (or colonial) relatives of Metazoa, i.e., choanoflagellates, filastereans and ichthyosporeans. Molecular-level analyses on these protists have been severely limited by the lack of transgenesis tools. Their genomes, however, contain several key genes encoding proteins important for metazoan development and multicellularity, including those involved in cell-cell communication, cell proliferation, cell differentiation, and tissue growth control. Tools to analyze their functions in a molecular level are awaited. Here we report techniques of cell transformation and gene silencing developed for the first time in a close relative of metazoans, the ichthyosporean Creolimax fragrantissima. We propose C. fragrantissima as a model organism to investigate the origin of metazoan multicellularity. By transgenesis, we demonstrate that its colony develops from a fully-grown multinucleate syncytium, in which nuclear divisions are strictly synchronized. It has been hypothesized that metazoan multicellular development initially occurred in the course of evolution through successive rounds of cell division, which were not necessarily be synchronized, or alternatively through cell aggregation. Our findings point to another possible mechanism for the evolution of animal multicellularity, namely, cellularization of a syncytium in which nuclear divisions are synchronized. We believe that further studies on the development of ichthyosporeans by the use of our methodologies will provide novel insights into the origin of metazoan multicellularity.

  4. Evolution of multicellularity coincided with increased diversification of cyanobacteria and the Great Oxidation Event.

    PubMed

    Schirrmeister, Bettina E; de Vos, Jurriaan M; Antonelli, Alexandre; Bagheri, Homayoun C

    2013-01-29

    Cyanobacteria are among the most diverse prokaryotic phyla, with morphotypes ranging from unicellular to multicellular filamentous forms, including those able to terminally (i.e., irreversibly) differentiate in form and function. It has been suggested that cyanobacteria raised oxygen levels in the atmosphere around 2.45-2.32 billion y ago during the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), hence dramatically changing life on the planet. However, little is known about the temporal evolution of cyanobacterial lineages, and possible interplay between the origin of multicellularity, diversification of cyanobacteria, and the rise of atmospheric oxygen. We estimated divergence times of extant cyanobacterial lineages under Bayesian relaxed clocks for a dataset of 16S rRNA sequences representing the entire known diversity of this phylum. We tested whether the evolution of multicellularity overlaps with the GOE, and whether multicellularity is associated with significant shifts in diversification rates in cyanobacteria. Our results indicate an origin of cyanobacteria before the rise of atmospheric oxygen. The evolution of multicellular forms coincides with the onset of the GOE and an increase in diversification rates. These results suggest that multicellularity could have played a key role in triggering cyanobacterial evolution around the GOE.

  5. Evolution of multicellularity coincided with increased diversification of cyanobacteria and the Great Oxidation Event

    PubMed Central

    Schirrmeister, Bettina E.; de Vos, Jurriaan M.; Antonelli, Alexandre; Bagheri, Homayoun C.

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are among the most diverse prokaryotic phyla, with morphotypes ranging from unicellular to multicellular filamentous forms, including those able to terminally (i.e., irreversibly) differentiate in form and function. It has been suggested that cyanobacteria raised oxygen levels in the atmosphere around 2.45–2.32 billion y ago during the Great Oxidation Event (GOE), hence dramatically changing life on the planet. However, little is known about the temporal evolution of cyanobacterial lineages, and possible interplay between the origin of multicellularity, diversification of cyanobacteria, and the rise of atmospheric oxygen. We estimated divergence times of extant cyanobacterial lineages under Bayesian relaxed clocks for a dataset of 16S rRNA sequences representing the entire known diversity of this phylum. We tested whether the evolution of multicellularity overlaps with the GOE, and whether multicellularity is associated with significant shifts in diversification rates in cyanobacteria. Our results indicate an origin of cyanobacteria before the rise of atmospheric oxygen. The evolution of multicellular forms coincides with the onset of the GOE and an increase in diversification rates. These results suggest that multicellularity could have played a key role in triggering cyanobacterial evolution around the GOE. PMID:23319632

  6. Symbiotic Cell Differentiation and Cooperative Growth in Multicellular Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Jumpei F; Saito, Nen; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2016-01-01

    As cells grow and divide under a given environment, they become crowded and resources are limited, as seen in bacterial biofilms and multicellular aggregates. These cells often show strong interactions through exchanging chemicals, as evident in quorum sensing, to achieve mutualism and division of labor. Here, to achieve stable division of labor, three characteristics are required. First, isogenous cells differentiate into several types. Second, this aggregate of distinct cell types shows better growth than that of isolated cells without interaction and differentiation, by achieving division of labor. Third, this cell aggregate is robust with respect to the number distribution of differentiated cell types. Indeed, theoretical studies have thus far considered how such cooperation is achieved when the ability of cell differentiation is presumed. Here, we address how cells acquire the ability of cell differentiation and division of labor simultaneously, which is also connected with the robustness of a cell society. For this purpose, we developed a dynamical-systems model of cells consisting of chemical components with intracellular catalytic reaction dynamics. The reactions convert external nutrients into internal components for cellular growth, and the divided cells interact through chemical diffusion. We found that cells sharing an identical catalytic network spontaneously differentiate via induction from cell-cell interactions, and then achieve division of labor, enabling a higher growth rate than that in the unicellular case. This symbiotic differentiation emerged for a class of reaction networks under the condition of nutrient limitation and strong cell-cell interactions. Then, robustness in the cell type distribution was achieved, while instability of collective growth could emerge even among the cooperative cells when the internal reserves of products were dominant. The present mechanism is simple and general as a natural consequence of interacting cells with

  7. Moving toward a lifelong learning society: The relationship of readiness to self-directed learning and resource support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, Min-Huei

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between readiness for self-directed learning and resource support. The hypotheses that guided this investigation related to the relationship between readiness for self-directed learning and resource support in regular university students (traditional students) and university extension students (non-traditional students). The population was students at Shih Chien University and its educational extension institute in Taiwan. The participants were fifty students from university and fifty students from the extension program. The self-directed learning readiness scale instrument has fifty-eight items. Participants responded on a five-point Likert-type scale ranging from "Almost never true of me" to "Almost always true of me." The return rate was 86 percent for university students and 80 percent for extension students. Analyses of variance followed by Pearson Product-Moment Correlation tests revealed significant relationship between self-directed learning readiness and resource support in two groups. And t tests revealed significant differences between university students and educational extension program students. The major areas examined were (1) relationship between SDLRS and resources support in university students, (2) relationship between SDLRS and resource support in extension program students, and (3) difference in SDLRS and resource support between the two groups. The.05 level of significance was used. The results of the study showed no significant relationship between SDLRS and resource support in the two groups. No significant difference between the two groups in most SDLRS and resource support. There was only one significant difference found between the two groups in "personal relations support." Recommendations suggested that activities to help learner become ready for self-directed learning. The recommendation was also made to repeat the study with a valid and a reliable resource support

  8. Self-Reported Usual Care for Self-Directed Violence during the Six Months Prior to Emergency Department Admission

    PubMed Central

    Comtois, Katherine Anne; Kerbrat, Amanda H.; Atkins, David C.; Roy-Byrne, Peter; Katon, Wayne J.

    2014-01-01

    Background The literature describing the health services individuals receive prior to and following self-directed violence is limited. Objectives This study examines services received for the six months preceding admission to an urban county medical center emergency department for self-directed violence. We predicted that individuals with at least one prior act of self-directed violence in the past six months would have received more services than those for whom the index admission was their only recent act. Method Participants were recruited from emergency department admissions during shifts selected to maximize representativeness. Participants (n=202) were interviewed using the Suicide Attempt Self-Injury Interview, Suicide Attempt Self-Injury Count, Treatment History Interview, MINI, Brief Symptom Index, and SF-12. Results The majority of index acts of self-directed violence (79%) were suicide attempts. The participants were characterized by low socio-economic status, substantial symptomatology, low physical and mental health functioning, and multiple psychiatric diagnoses. In the preceding six months, 34% were admitted to a hospital and 56% received crisis services (including 44% in the ED). While three quarters (76%) had seen an outpatient medical provider and most (70%) received psychotropic medications, less than half of the sample received psychiatric services (40%) or outpatient psychosocial treatment (48%). As predicted, utilization for most types of usual care was higher for those engaging in self-directed violence in the six months preceding the index admission. Conclusions Individuals admitted to this emergency department for self-directed violence received inadequate outpatient psychosocial and psychiatric services despite severe illness and disability. PMID:25494233

  9. Increasing knowledge level of evidence-based nursing through self-directed learning: lessons learned for staff development.

    PubMed

    Zadvinskis, Inga M

    2008-01-01

    Recent literature and Magnet standards emphasize the promotion of evidence-based practice in nursing. Nurses prepared over 5 years ago may not necessarily have received education regarding the principles of evidence-based practice. Therefore, an independent study was developed to educate staff nurses regarding the basics of evidence-based practice. The development of a self-directed independent study is described, including the rationale, benefits, course content, and lessons learned when teaching evidence-based practice through self-directed learning. PMID:18685469

  10. Self directed home based electrical muscle stimulation training improves exercise tolerance and strength in healthy elderly.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Brian; Prendergast, Ann; Rainsford, Gary; Minogue, Conor

    2013-01-01

    Advancing age is associated with a gradual decline in muscle strength, exercise tolerance and subsequent capacity for activities of daily living. It is important that we develop effective strategies to halt this process of gradual decline in order to enhance functional ability and capacity for independent living. To achieve this, we must overcome the challenge of sustaining ongoing engagement in physical exercise programmes in the sedentary elderly population, particularly those who experience barriers to exercise participation. Recent developments in electrical muscle stimulation technology could provide a potential solution. In this pilot case-control study we investigated the effects of a self-directed home based programme of electrical muscle stimulation training on muscle strength and exercise tolerance in a group of 16 healthy elderly volunteers (10f, 6m). Study participants completed 30 separate 1-hour electrical muscle stimulation sessions at home over a 6-week period. We observed significant improvements in quadriceps muscle strength and 6-minute walk distance, suggesting that this form of electrical muscle stimulation training has promise as an exercise modality in the elderly population.

  11. Effects of Cognitive Challenge on Self-Directed Behaviors by Chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes)

    PubMed Central

    Leavens, David A.; Aureli, Filippo; Hopkins, William D.; Hyatt, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    In primates, including humans, scratching and other self-directed behaviors (SDBs) have recently been reported to be differentially displayed as a function of social interactions, anxiety-related drugs, and response outcomes during learning tasks. Yet few studies have focused on the factors influencing SDBs in our closest living relatives, the chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes). Furthermore, no previous experimental study has examined handedness of SDBs as a function of changes in task difficulty. Using matching-to-sample tasks of varying difficulty, the present study examines the effect of manipulations of task difficulty on rates, handedness, and type of SDBs in an experimental study of eight chimpanzees. SDBs were categorized as rubs, gentle scratches, and rough scratches. SDBs increased during difficult discriminations, but only for subjects who started the experiment on an easy discrimination; subjects who started on a difficult discrimination exhibited no differential rates of SDBs as a function of task difficulty. There was a tendency to exhibit relatively more SDBs with the right hand in the more difficult task. Rates of SDBs decreased after auditory feedback signals, suggesting a link between SDBs and uncertainty. Rubs were directed more to the face (trigeminal), and gentle and rough scratches more to the body (spinothalamic), suggesting that face-directed SDBs may index a different motivational basis than scratches. Taken together, these results extend previous research on SDBs to the domain of cognitive stress in nonsocial contexts, demonstrating that SDBs are sensitive to manipulations of task difficulty in chimpanzees. PMID:11536312

  12. Spreading and spontaneous motility of multicellular aggregates on soft substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochard-Wyart, Françoise

    2013-03-01

    We first describe the biomechanics of multicellular aggregates, a model system for tissues and tumors. We first characterize the tissue mechanical properties (surface tension, elasticity, viscosity) by a new pipette aspiration technique. The aggregate exhibits a viscoelastic response but, unlike an inert fluid, we observe aggregate reinforcement with pressure, which for a narrow range of pressures results in pulsed contractions or shivering. We interpret this reinforcement as a mechanosensitive active response of the acto-myosin cortex. Such an active behavior has previously been found to cause tissue pulsation during dorsal closure of Drosophila embryo. We then describe the spreading of aggregates on rigid glass substrates, varying both intercellular and substrate adhesion. We find both partial and complete wetting regimes. For the dynamics, we find a universal spreading law at short time, analogous to that of a viscoelastic drop. At long time, we observe, for strong substrate adhesion, a precursor film spreading around the aggregate. Depending on aggregate cohesion, this precursor film can be a dense cellular monolayer (liquid state) or consist of individual cells escaping from the aggregate body (gas state). The transition from liquid to gas state appears also to be present in the progression of a tumor from noninvasive to metastatic, known as the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Finally, we describe the effect of the substrate rigidity on the phase diagram of wetting. On soft gels decorated with fibronectin and strongly cohesive aggregates, we have observed a wetting transition induced by the substrate rigidity: on ultra soft gels, below an elastic modulus Ec the aggregates do not spread, whereas above Ec we observe a precursor film expending with a diffusive law. The diffusion coefficient D(E) present a maximum for E =Em. A maximum of mobility versus the substrate rigidity had also been observed for single cells. Near Em, we observe a new phenomenon: a cell

  13. Diffusion of an e-Portfolio to Assist in the Self-Directed Learning of Physicians: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goliath, Cheryl Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Professional societies in the field of medicine have recommended that the traditional model for lifelong medical learning, which had previously focused on attendance at weeklong didactic continuing medical education (CME) courses, should be replaced by individualized study. Self-directed and practice-linked learning are well accepted in principle,…

  14. Handbook Preparation as a Tool for Self-Directed Learning Process: A Case Study on Endocrine Topic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerrah Ozsevgec, Lale; Ayas, Alipasa; Ozsevgec, Tuncay

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of handbook preparation as a method in the self-directed learning process of student teachers in teaching endocrine glands, and increasing their levels of knowledge. Thirty student teachers were selected from a biology department. A pencil and paper test and a clinical interview procedure were used to collect…

  15. Design Lessons about Participatory Self-Directed Online Learning in a Graduate-Level Instructional Technology Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamagata-Lynch, Lisa C.; Do, Jaewoo; Skutnik, Anne L.; Thompson, Duren J.; Stephens, Adam F.; Tays, Cheryl A.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports on a case of participatory self-directed online learning within the context of a graduate-level instructional technology course. The course was about online learning environments and relied on both asynchronous and synchronous technologies. In this case, the instructor and students engaged in collaborative course design…

  16. Development of Competency-Based Web Learning Material and Effect Evaluation of Self-Directed Learning Aptitudes on Learning Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chi-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to develop and evaluate competency-based web learning material (CBWLM) for the college practicum Microprocessor Laboratory. After using the CBWLM for 8 weeks, this study investigates CBWL's learning effects and self-directed learning aptitudes (SDLAs) as well as exploring the influence of SDLA on learning effects based on the…

  17. Development and Achievement Effects of a Teacher-Directed Structure for Self-Directed Process of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alf, Herbert A.

    Through review of literature of biology, psychology, and education, critical needs were identified for human development and a theory of education was synthesized to meet these needs. The consequent Structure for Self-Directed Education (STRUSD Education) was operationalized as Treatment A and tested in an educational psychology course. STRUSD…

  18. Self-Directed Support: Impact of Hiring Practices on Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heller, Tamar; Arnold, Catherine K.; van Heumen, Lieke; McBride, Elizabeth L.; Factor, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the differential experiences and outcomes for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families receiving self-directed services based on the type of personal support worker hired (parents, siblings, other relatives, friends, and agency staff). The sample consisted of 372 participants in a self-directed…

  19. The Self-Directed Violence Classification System and the Columbia Classification Algorithm for Suicide Assessment: A Crosswalk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matarazzo, Bridget B.; Clemans, Tracy A.; Silverman, Morton M.; Brenner, Lisa A.

    2013-01-01

    The lack of a standardized nomenclature for suicide-related thoughts and behaviors prompted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, with the Veterans Integrated Service Network 19 Mental Illness Research Education and Clinical Center, to create the Self-Directed Violence Classification System (SDVCS). SDVCS has been adopted by the…

  20. From Autonomy to Reciprocity, or Vice Versa? French Personalism's Contribution to a New Perspective on Self-Directed Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eneau, Jerome

    2008-01-01

    After many years of research focused on the individual and psychological aspects of self-directed learning, the field has taken into consideration the context and situation surrounding the education of an adult, placing the development of individual autonomy into a constructivist perspective. But it is only recently, in France at least, that…

  1. Problem-Based Learning Revisited, Introduction of Active and Self-Directed Learning to Reduce Fatigue among Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czabanowska, Katarzyna; Moust, Jos H. C.; Meijer, Andre W. M.; Schroder-Back, Peter; Roebertsen, Herma

    2012-01-01

    Despite several years of successfully applying problem-based learning at Maastricht University, the Faculty of Medicine observed a slow erosion of problem-based practices and "PBL fatigue" among themselves and students. In response to this fatigue and new research into the development of the young adult brain, Active Self-Directed Learning was…

  2. Understanding the Self-Directed Online Learning Preferences, Goals, Achievements, and Challenges of MIT OpenCourseWare Subscribers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonk, Curtis J.; Lee, Mimi Miyoung; Kou, Xiaojing; Xu, Shuya; Sheu, Feng-Ru

    2015-01-01

    This research targeted the learning preferences, goals and motivations, achievements, challenges, and possibilities for life change of self-directed online learners who subscribed to the monthly OpenCourseWare (OCW) e-newsletter from MIT. Data collection included a 25-item survey of 1,429 newsletter subscribers; 613 of whom also completed an…

  3. Self-Directed Learning with Web-Based Sites: How Well Do Students' Perceptions and Thinking Match with Their Teachers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Wan

    2008-01-01

    With research consistently showing that students can be motivated to learn with ICT, this case study sought to investigate Year 7 students' learning about simple machines in an ICT-enhanced environment where they could self-direct their own learning with minimal intervention from the teacher. The study is focused on how well do students and…

  4. Paraprofessionals' Perceptions on Delivering Infant Feeding Lessons to Disadvantaged Mothers via a Self-Directed Computer-Supported Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singleterry, Lisa R.; Horodynski, Mildred A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain paraprofessionals' perceptions regarding a self-directed computer-supported nutrition educational intervention to disadvantaged mothers of infants. Design: Qualitative focus group study. Setting: Three county extension programs in a Midwestern state, which serve disadvantaged families. Method: Sixteen paraprofessional…

  5. A Correlational Study of Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Learning Activity Preference for Continuing Medical Education among Family Physicians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrett, Theresa J.

    2014-01-01

    This quantitative, nonexperimental, correlational study sought to determine whether a relationship exists between family physicians' levels of self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) and their preferences for continuing medical education (CME) activities. The study also sought to determine whether years in clinical practice or size of clinical…

  6. The Effects of Metacognitive Training on Performance and Use of Metacognitive Skills in Self-Directed Learning Situations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kincannon, Joyce; Gleber, Conrad; Kim, Jaehyun

    This research examined the effects of teaching metacognitive strategies on performance in a self-directed learning situation. All participants, 60 university students enrolled in a beginning photography course for non-art majors, were subject to the same conditions. The treatment was embedded instruction and practice in reflection, planning, and…

  7. #TwitterforTeachers: The Implications of Twitter as a Self-Directed Professional Development Tool for K-12 Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Visser, Ryan D.; Evering, Lea Calvert; Barrett, David E.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explores how K-12 teachers use Twitter. An online survey was disseminated via Twitter to gauge their usage of, access to, and perceptions of Twitter. The results indicated that teachers highly value Twitter as a means of self-directed professional development. Respondents who reported using Twitter multiple times a day…

  8. Transformation for Adults in an Internet-Based Learning Environment--Is It Necessary to Be Self-Directed?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Regina Juchun; Chu, Anita Zichun; Weng, Cathy; Tsai, Chin-Chung; Lin, Chia-chun

    2012-01-01

    This research explores the relationships between self-directed learning readiness and transformative learning theory (TLT) reflected by the Constructivist Internet-based Learning Environment Scale (CILES). A questionnaire survey about adult learner's perceptions of Internet-based learning was administered to adults enrolled in classes in community…

  9. Increasing Student Participation in IEP Meetings: Establishing the Self-Directed IEP as an Evidenced-Based Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, James E.; van Dycke, Jamie L.; Christensen, W. Robert; Greene, Barbara A.; Gardner, J. Emmett; Lovett, David L.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of the Self-Directed IEP to teach individualized education program (IEP) meeting skills. One hundred and thirty secondary students were randomly assigned to the treatment or control group. Observations of 130 meetings and 764 IEP team members were performed using 10-s momentary time sampling to determine the…

  10. Paid Educational Leave and Self-Directed Learning: Implications for Legislation on the Learning Leave Scheme in South Korea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oh, Jeong Rok; Park, Cho Hyun; Jo, Sung Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purposes of this study are to explore paid educational leave (PEL), self-directed learning (SDL) and the relationship between them; and to identify the implications for legislation on the learning leave scheme in South Korea. Design/Methodology/Approach: The research method of the study is a literature review. Articles were identified…

  11. Self-Perceived and Observable Self-Direction in an Online Asynchronous Programming Course Using Peer Learning Forums

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaspar, Alessio; Langevin, Sarah; Boyer, Naomi; Armitage, William

    2009-01-01

    This study broadens the objectives of previous work (Boyer, N., Langevin, S., Gaspar, A. (2008). "Self direction and constructivism in programming education." "Proceedings of the ACM Special Interest Group in IT Education Conference," 16-18 October 2008, Cincinnati, OH) in which we used a survey-based instrument, the Personal Responsibility…

  12. Enabling Self-Directed Computer Use for Individuals with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review of Assistive Devices and Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, T. Claire; Mudge, Suzie; Ameratunga, Shanthi; Stott, N. Susan

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to systematically review published evidence on the development, use, and effectiveness of devices and technologies that enable or enhance self-directed computer access by individuals with cerebral palsy (CP). Methods: Nine electronic databases were searched using keywords "computer", "software", "spastic",…

  13. Interest Profile Elevation, Big Five Personality Traits, and Secondary Constructs on the Self-Directed Search: A Replication and Extension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullock, Emily E.; Reardon, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    The study used the Self-Directed Search (SDS) and the NEO-FFI to explore profile elevation, four secondary constructs, and the Big Five personality factors in a sample of college students in a career course. Regression model results showed that openness, conscientiousness, differentiation high-low, differentiation Iachan, and consistency accounted…

  14. The Self-Directed Learning Handbook: Challenging Adolescent Students to Excel. The Jossey-Bass Education Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbons, Maurice

    This publication offers teachers and principals a program for customizing schooling to individual students' learning needs and motivating them to take increased responsibility for deciding what and how to learn. It presents a comprehensive framework for introducing self-directed learning (SDL) approaches in the classroom. Nine chapters include:…

  15. Self-Directed Work Teams in a Post-Apartheid Gold Mine: Perspectives from the Rock Face.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phatkathi, Timothy Sizwe

    2002-01-01

    A participant-observation study in a South African mining company that used self directed work team training identified organizational constraints that hindered training effectiveness: lack of materials, machinery breakdown, decentralized budget, and imposed standards. Miners more often used improvisation and initiative to solve daily problems,…

  16. The Pause Model: A Qualitative Method of Self-Directed Continuing Education for Professionals with Social Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebowitz, Steven E.

    This paper introduces the Pause Model, an innovative means of integrating self-directed learning and continuing professional education. Since the method was developed for professionals such as counselors, educators, and managers who practice in social settings, the paper begins with an explanation of a few of the unique attributes of professional…

  17. Learning on Their Own: Vocationally Oriented Self-Directed Learning Projects. [and] Invited Reaction: Learning on Their Own.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clardy, Alan; Willis, Verna J.

    2000-01-01

    In Clardy's study, 56 employees described 109 vocationally oriented self-directed learning projects undertaken. Projects were categorized as induced (spurred by imbalance between job expectations and capability), voluntary (fueled by personal motivation), or synergistic (combined motivation with the spark of workplace circumstances). Willis'…

  18. Understanding Self-Directed Learning in the Context of Mobile Web 2.0--Case Study with Workplace Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gu, Jia

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the findings from a multiple-case study which has investigated the impact of mobile Web 2.0 technologies on self-directed learning (SDL) of workplace learners by exploring participants' learning experiences with a mobile App. Drawing on existing literatures, we examined learners' SDL personal attributes and process in the…

  19. Effects of Project-Based Learning Strategy on Self-Directed Learning Skills of Educational Technology Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagheri, Mohsen; Ali, Wan Zah Wan; Abdullah, Maria Chong Binti; Daud, Shaffe Mohd

    2013-01-01

    Given the importance of globalization as well as the need to train skilled and knowledgeable employees for the 21st century workforce, higher education needs to take a more critical look at the educational practices and instructional methods which lead to improvements in students' essential skills such as self-directed learning. This study sought…

  20. Using the Self-Directed Search in Research: Selecting a Representative Pool of Items to Measure Vocational Interests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poitras, Sarah-Caroline; Guay, Frederic; Ratelle, Catherine F.

    2012-01-01

    Using Item Response Theory (IRT) and Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), the goal of this study was to select a reduced pool of items from the French Canadian version of the Self-Directed Search--Activities Section (Holland, Fritzsche, & Powell, 1994). Two studies were conducted. Results of Study 1, involving 727 French Canadian students, showed…

  1. Comparison of Self-Scoring Error Rate for SDS (Self Directed Search) (1970) and the Revised SDS (1977).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Gary E.; And Others

    A comparison of Self-Scoring Error Rate for Self Directed Search (SDS) and the revised SDS is presented. The subjects were college freshmen and sophomores who participated in career planning as a part of their orientation program, and a career workshop. Subjects, N=190 on first study and N=84 on second study, were then randomly assigned to the SDS…

  2. Patterns of Co-Occurring Non-Verbal Behaviour and Self-Directed Speech; a Comparison of Three Methodological Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuvalja, Martina; Verma, Mohini; Whitebread, David

    2014-01-01

    "Self-directed speech"--the audible or partially whispered self-talk that children engage in during their daily activities, was proposed by Vygotsky to have a mediating role in the emerging self-regulatory behaviour of young children. Studies with correlational findings tend to lend support to this hypothesis but fail to delineate the…

  3. Designing On-Demand Education for Simultaneous Development of Domain-Specific and Self-Directed Learning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taminiau, E. M. C.; Kester, L.; Corbalan, G.; Spector, J. M.; Kirschner, P. A.; Van Merriënboer, J. J. G.

    2015-01-01

    On-demand education enables individual learners to choose their learning pathways according to their own learning needs. They must use self-directed learning (SDL) skills involving self-assessment and task selection to determine appropriate pathways for learning. Learners who lack these skills must develop them because SDL skills are prerequisite…

  4. The Influence of Career Indecision on the Strong Interest Inventory and the Self-Directed Search: A Pilot Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rowell, R. Kevin

    A pilot study was conducted with 48 adults to determine if career indecision/dissatisfaction as indicated by flat Strong Interest Inventory (SII) (L. Harmon, J. Hansen, F. Borgen, and A. Hammer, 1994) profiles corresponded with flat profiles on the Self-Directed Search (SDS) and to determine if indecision affected scores on SII Personal Style…

  5. Self-Directed Learning Characteristics of First-Generation, First-Year College Students Participating in a Summer Bridge Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to advance understanding of self-directed learning characteristics of first-year, first-generation college students participating in a summer bridge program. Understanding the experience of these students in higher education can lead to the development of programmatic and pedagogical strategies to better meet the…

  6. Effectiveness of a Standard Computer Interface Paradigm on Computer Anxiety, Self-Direction, Efficiency, and Self-Confidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward, Hugh C., Jr.

    A study was undertaken to explore whether students using an advance organizer-metacognitive learning strategy would be less anxious, more self-directing, more efficient, and more self-confident when learning unknown computer applications software than students using traditional computer software learning strategies. The first experiment was…

  7. It Takes Two to Tango: In Dynamic Inquiry, the Self-Directed Student Acts in Association with the Facilitating Teacher

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zion, M.; Slezak, M.

    2005-01-01

    The current research presents a qualitative view of a teacher-student association within the context of dynamic inquiry, as encouraged by a new biology curriculum, ''Biomind''. This curriculum enables open inquiry learning through teacher guidance. We characterized the various aspects of the student's functioning as a self-directed student during…

  8. Gender as a Context for Interpreting the Self-Directed Learning Experiences of Prostate and Breast Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rager, Kathleen B.

    2007-01-01

    This article reports the findings from a secondary analysis of the data from two qualitative studies conducted by the researcher regarding the self-directed learning experiences of prostate and breast cancer patients. Of interest were possible differences in the descriptions of the participants' experiences that appear to relate to gender.…

  9. Students' Perceptions of Success in the Online Graduate-Level Classes: A Self-Directed Learning Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Pao-Nan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the phenomenon of successful online learning, defined as a higher academic performance (A or 90) and to find if there is the evidence to confirm the role of self-directed learning in the online graduate-level courses. A qualitative method was used to analyze learners' perceptions of online learning…

  10. A general allometric and life-history model for cellular differentiation in the transition to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Solari, Cristian A; Kessler, John O; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2013-03-01

    The transition from unicellular, to colonial, to larger multicellular organisms has benefits, costs, and requirements. Here we present a model inspired by the volvocine green algae that explains the dynamics involved in the unicellular-multicellular transition using life-history theory and allometry. We model the two fitness components (fecundity and viability) and compare the fitness of hypothetical colonies of different sizes with varying degrees of cellular differentiation to understand the general principles that underlie the evolution of multicellularity. We argue that germ-soma separation may have evolved to counteract the increasing costs and requirements of larger multicellular colonies. The model shows that the cost of investing in soma decreases with size. For lineages such as the Volvocales, as reproduction costs increase with size for undifferentiated colonies, soma specialization benefits the colony indirectly by decreasing such costs and directly by helping reproductive cells acquire resources for their metabolic needs. Germ specialization is favored once soma evolves and takes care of vegetative functions. To illustrate the model, we use some allometric relationships measured in Volvocales. Our analysis shows that the cost of reproducing an increasingly larger group has likely played an important role in the transition to multicellularity and cellular differentiation.

  11. Chitosan Treatment Delays the Induction of Senescence in Human Foreskin Fibroblast Strains.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Wen; Kao, Yu-Ting; Chiang, I-Ni; Wang, Jyh-Horng; Young, Tai-Horng

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblasts have been extensively used as a model to study cellular senescence. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the human foreskin fibroblast aging process could be regulated by using the biomaterial chitosan. Fibroblasts cultured on commercial tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) entered senescence after 55-60 population doublings (PDs), and were accompanied by larger cell shape, higher senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-gal) activity, lower proliferation capacity, and upregulation of senescence-associated molecular markers p21, p53, retinoblastoma (pRB), and p16. Before senescence was reached, PD48 cells were collected from TCPS and seeded on chitosan for three days (PD48-Cd3) to form multicellular spheroids. The protein expression of senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs) and senescence-associated molecular markers of these cells in PD48-Cd3 spheroids were downregulated significantly. Following chitosan treatment, fibroblasts reseeded on TCPS showed lower SA β-gal activity, increased cellular motility, and a higher proliferation ability of 70-75 PDs. These phenotypic changes were not accompanied by colonies forming in soft agar and a continuous decrease in the senescence-associated proteins p53 and pRB which act as a barrier to tumorigenesis. These results demonstrate that chitosan treatment could delay the induction of senescence which may be useful and safe for future tissue engineering applications.

  12. 'Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis', a multicellular, magnetotactic prokaryote from a hypersaline environment.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Fernanda; Martins, Juliana Lopes; Silveira, Thaís Souza; Keim, Carolina Neumann; de Barros, Henrique G P Lins; Filho, Frederico J Gueiros; Lins, Ulysses

    2007-06-01

    Phylogenetic analysis and phenotypic characterization were used to assign a multicellular magnetotactic prokaryote the name 'Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis'. 'Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis' lives in a large hypersaline coastal lagoon from Brazil and has properties that are unique among prokaryotes. It consists of a compact assembly or aggregate of flagellated bacterial cells, highly organized in a sphere, that swim in either helical or straight trajectories. The life cycle of 'Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis' is completely multicellular, in which one aggregate grows by enlarging the size of its cells and approximately doubling the volume of the whole organism. Cells then divide synchronously, maintaining the spherical arrangement; finally the cells separate into two identical aggregates. Phylogenetic 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis showed that 'Candidatus Magnetoglobus multicellularis' is related to the dissimilatory sulfate-reducing bacteria within the Deltaproteobacteria and to other previously described, but not yet well characterized, multicellular magnetotactic prokaryotes.

  13. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Ayuso, Jose M; Basheer, Haneen A; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar; Fernández, Luis J; Ochoa, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC-19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC-19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  14. Study of the Chemotactic Response of Multicellular Spheroids in a Microfluidic Device

    PubMed Central

    Ayuso, Jose M.; Basheer, Haneen A.; Monge, Rosa; Sánchez-Álvarez, Pablo; Doblaré, Manuel; Shnyder, Steven D.; Vinader, Victoria; Afarinkia, Kamyar

    2015-01-01

    We report the first application of a microfluidic device to observe chemotactic migration in multicellular spheroids. A microfluidic device was designed comprising a central microchamber and two lateral channels through which reagents can be introduced. Multicellular spheroids were embedded in collagen and introduced to the microchamber. A gradient of fetal bovine serum (FBS) was established across the central chamber by addition of growth media containing serum into one of the lateral channels. We observe that spheroids of oral squamous carcinoma cells OSC–19 invade collectively in the direction of the gradient of FBS. This invasion is more directional and aggressive than that observed for individual cells in the same experimental setup. In contrast to spheroids of OSC–19, U87-MG multicellular spheroids migrate as individual cells. A study of the exposure of spheroids to the chemoattractant shows that the rate of diffusion into the spheroid is slow and thus, the chemoattractant wave engulfs the spheroid before diffusing through it. PMID:26444904

  15. Case study: Comparison of motivation for achieving higher performance between self-directed and manager-directed aerospace engineering teams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlick, Katherine

    "The stereotype of engineers is that they are not people oriented; the stereotype implies that engineers would not work well in teams---that their task emphasis is a solo venture and does not encourage social aspects of collaboration" (Miner & Beyerlein, 1999, p. 16). The problem is determining the best method of providing a motivating environment where design engineers may contribute within a team in order to achieve higher performance in the organization. Theoretically, self-directed work teams perform at higher levels. But, allowing a design engineer to contribute to the team while still maintaining his or her anonymity is the key to success. Therefore, a motivating environment must be established to encourage greater self-actualization in design engineers. The purpose of this study is to determine the favorable motivational environment for design engineers and describe the comparison between two aerospace design-engineering teams: one self-directed and the other manager directed. Following the comparison, this study identified whether self-direction or manager-direction provides the favorable motivational environment for operating as a team in pursuit of achieving higher performance. The methodology used in this research was the case study focusing on the team's levels of job satisfaction and potential for higher performance. The collection of data came from three sources, (a) surveys, (b) researcher observer journal and (c) collection of artifacts. The surveys provided information regarding personal behavior characteristics, potentiality for higher performance and motivational attributes. The researcher journal provided information regarding team dynamics, individual interaction, conflict and conflict resolution. The milestone for performance was based on the collection of artifacts from the two teams. The findings from this study illustrated that whether the team was manager-directed or self-directed does not appear to influence the needs and wants of the

  16. GPI/AMF inhibition blocks the development of the metastatic phenotype of mature multi-cellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Gallardo-Pérez, Juan Carlos; Rivero-Segura, Nadia Alejandra; Marín-Hernández, Alvaro; Moreno-Sánchez, Rafael; Rodríguez-Enríquez, Sara

    2014-06-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cellular invasiveness are two pivotal processes for the development of metastatic tumor phenotypes. The metastatic profile of non-metastatic MCF-7 cells growing as multi-cellular tumor microspheroids (MCTSs) was analyzed by determining the contents of the EMT, invasive and migratory proteins, as well as their migration and invasiveness potential and capacity to secrete active cytokines such as the glucose phosphate isomerase/AMF (GPI/AMF). As for the control, the same analysis was also performed in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 (highly metastatic, MDA) monolayer cells, and in stage IIIB and IV human metastatic breast biopsies. The proliferative cell layers (PRL) of mature MCF-7 MCTSs, MDA monolayer cells and metastatic biopsies exhibited increased cellular contents (2-15 times) of EMT (β-catenin, SNAIL), migratory (vimentin, cytokeratin, and fibronectin) and invasive (MMP-1, VEGF) proteins versus MCF-7 monolayer cells, quiescent cell layers of mature MCF-7 MCTS and non-metastatic breast biopsies. The increase in metastatic proteins correlated with substantially elevated cellular abilities for migration (18-times) and invasiveness (13-times) and with the higher level (6-times) of the cytokine GPI/AMF in the extracellular medium of PRL, as compared to MCF-7 monolayer cells. Interestingly, the addition of the GPI/AMF inhibitors erythrose-4-phosphate or 6-phosphogluconate at micromolar doses significantly decreased its extracellular activity (>80%), with a concomitant diminution in the metastatic protein content and migratory tumor cell capacity, and with no inhibitory effect on tumor lactate production or toxicity on 3T3 mouse fibroblasts. The present findings provide new insights into the discovery of metabolic inhibitors to be used as complementary therapy against metastatic and aggressive tumors.

  17. Development of a Multicellular Three-dimensional Organotypic Model of the Human Intestinal Mucosa Grown Under Microgravity.

    PubMed

    Salerno-Goncalves, Rosangela; Fasano, Alessio; Sztein, Marcelo B

    2016-01-01

    Because cells growing in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment have the potential to bridge many gaps of cell cultivation in 2-D environments (e.g., flasks or dishes). In fact, it is widely recognized that cells grown in flasks or dishes tend to de-differentiate and lose specialized features of the tissues from which they were derived. Currently, there are mainly two types of 3-D culture systems where the cells are seeded into scaffolds mimicking the native extracellular matrix (ECM): (a) static models and (b) models using bioreactors. The first breakthrough was the static 3-D models. 3-D models using bioreactors such as the rotating-wall-vessel (RWV) bioreactors are a more recent development. The original concept of the RWV bioreactors was developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center in the early 1990s and is believed to overcome the limitations of static models such as the development of hypoxic, necrotic cores. The RWV bioreactors might circumvent this problem by providing fluid dynamics that allow the efficient diffusion of nutrients and oxygen. These bioreactors consist of a rotator base that serves to support and rotate two different formats of culture vessels that differ by their aeration source type: (1) Slow Turning Lateral Vessels (STLVs) with a co-axial oxygenator in the center, or (2) High Aspect Ratio Vessels (HARVs) with oxygenation via a flat, silicone rubber gas transfer membrane. These vessels allow efficient gas transfer while avoiding bubble formation and consequent turbulence. These conditions result in laminar flow and minimal shear force that models reduced gravity (microgravity) inside the culture vessel. Here we describe the development of a multicellular 3-D organotypic model of the human intestinal mucosa composed of an intestinal epithelial cell line and primary human lymphocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts cultured under microgravity provided by the RWV bioreactor. PMID:27500889

  18. A Comparison of Students' Outcomes in Two Classes: Business Administration Students vs Communication Arts Students Based on Self-Directed Learning Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orawiwatnakul, Wiwat; Wichadee, Saovapa

    2011-01-01

    With research showing the benefits of self-directed learning, more activities are needed to provide learners opportunities for self-directed practice (Khomson, 1997; Lee, 1998; Phongnapharuk, 2007). A 12-week experimental study was performed with 80 EFL learners; one group contained 40 Communication Arts students and the other one consisted of 40…

  19. The Quality of Questions and Use of Resources in Self-Directed Learning: Personal Learning Projects in the Maintenance of Certification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsley, T.; O'Neill, J.; Campbell, C.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: To engage effectively and efficiently in self-directed learning and knowledge-seeking practices, it is important that physicians construct well-formulated questions; yet, little is known about the quality of good questions and their relationship to self-directed learning or to change in practice behavior. Methods: Personal learning…

  20. Comparison of a Self-Directed and Therapist-Assisted Telehealth Parent-Mediated Intervention for Children with ASD: A Pilot RCT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingersoll, Brooke; Wainer, Allison L.; Berger, Natalie I.; Pickard, Katherine E.; Bonter, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    This pilot RCT compared the effect of a self-directed and therapist-assisted telehealth-based parent-mediated intervention for young children with ASD. Families were randomly assigned to a self-directed or therapist-assisted program. Parents in both groups improved their intervention fidelity, self-efficacy, stress, and positive perceptions of…

  1. The Effect of TASC Wheel on Developing Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Academic Self Efficacy on a Sample of 7th Graders in Jordan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awwad, Ferial Mohammad Abu; Asha, Intisar Khalil; Jado, Saleh Mohammad Abu

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the impact of Thinking Actively in Social Contexts (TASC Wheel) on developing self-directed learning readiness and academic self efficacy on a sample of seventh graders in Jordan. To achieve this objective, the researchers administered, after investigating their psychometric properties, a self-directed learning…

  2. A Help To Start Research/Practice That Facilitates Self-Directed Learning in a Japanese Language Class: 50 Questions That Promote Research [and] Related Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ariizumi, Yoshihiko

    This paper presents 50 questions that promote research/practices to facilitate self-directed learning in Japanese language classes. The questions are divided into the five following categories: (1) general questions and general research methodology issues (e.g., Why is it important to nurture self-directed learning?); (2) learners' readiness for…

  3. Development of the PRO-SDLS: A Measure of Self-Direction in Learning Based on the Personal Responsibility Orientation Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stockdale, Susan L.; Brockett, Ralph G.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a reliable and valid instrument to measure self-directedness in learning among college students based on an operationalization of the personal responsibility orientation (PRO) model of self-direction in learning. The resultant 25-item Personal Responsibility Orientation to Self-Direction in Learning Scale…

  4. Teachers' Self-Directed Professional Development: Science and Mathematics Teachers' Adoption of ICT as a Professional Development Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mushayikwa, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    This paper is part of a larger study that was carried out to investigate the use of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) in the self-directed professional development on the self-directed professional development (SDPD) of mathematics and science teachers in Zimbabwe. The educational context provides an example of how teachers…

  5. Benefits and limitations of an employer-led, structured logbook to promote self-directed learning in the clinical workplace.

    PubMed

    Dale, Vicki H M; Pierce, Stephanie E; May, Stephen A

    2013-01-01

    A structured logbook, consisting of a competency log and a learning contract, was designed and implemented as part of a two-week structured work placement for final-year veterinary students to help them become more self-directed in the workplace. The competency log encompassed 48 core skills and, along with the learning contract, was reviewed at the start and end of the placement. To assess their perceptions of the logbook in promoting self-directed learning, students and supervisors were asked to complete a questionnaire pre- and post-placement and to participate in focus groups (students) and interviews (supervisors) after the placement. The study found significant increases pre- to post-placement in students' perceived levels of competence in all 48 skills and their confidence in being self-directed. However, student attitudes toward the logbook significantly decreased in terms of it encouraging supervisors to take a clearly designed role in structuring learning and facilitating alignment of employer and student expectations. Although supervisors were generally positive about the logbook, some had not been able to review it with their students, which affected students' perceptions of the logbook's usefulness. Some supervisors felt they had not received enough training, and most, erroneously, believed the logbook to be an external research initiative rather than having been designed by the head of their own organization. This study demonstrated that a structured logbook may be useful in helping students become more self-directed; however, supervisor support for the logbook is critical. To facilitate this, supervisors require training and support from senior management.

  6. So many options, so little control: abstract representations can reduce selection demands to increase children's self-directed flexibility.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Hannah R; Munakata, Yuko

    2013-11-01

    Children often struggle to behave flexibly when they must use self-directed goals (e.g., doing homework without prompting) rather than externally driven goals (e.g., cleaning up when told). Such struggles may reflect the demands of selecting among many potential options, as required for self-directed control. The current study tested whether (a) 6-year-old children show difficulty in selecting among competing semantic representations, (b) providing category labels designed to reduce selection demands improves performance, and (c) such benefits transfer to self-directed flexibility. Selection was measured using the blocked cyclic naming task for the first time with children. Pictures were named repeatedly in either homogeneous blocks from the same category (e.g., all animals), which create high selection demands due to spreading semantic activation and engage effortful cognitive control, or mixed blocks with each picture from a different category. Children showed robust difficulty in selecting among options, as indexed by response time (RT) differences between homogeneous and mixed blocks. Providing subcategory labels designed to reduce selection demands by distinguishing among same-category items (e.g., "A cow is a farm animal. A cat is a pet.") improved selection. Providing superordinate categories (e.g., "A cow is an animal. A cat is an animal.") also improved selection, but these benefits were less robust, and subcategory labels led to greater benefits than superordinate category labels on a subsequent verbal fluency task. These results support a role for subcategory representations in reducing selection demands to aid self-directed flexibility while suggesting that some children may use superordinate category labels to activate subcategory representations on their own. PMID:23998951

  7. A novel 3D high-content assay identifies compounds that prevent fibroblast invasion into tissue surrogates.

    PubMed

    Wenzel, Carsten; Otto, Saskia; Prechtl, Stefan; Parczyk, Karsten; Steigemann, Patrick

    2015-11-15

    Invasion processes underlie or accompany several pathological processes but only a limited number of high-throughput capable phenotypic models exist to test anti-invasive compounds in vitro. We here evaluated 3D co-cultures as a high-content phenotypic screening system for fibrotic invasive processes. 3D multicellular spheroids were used as living tissue surrogates in co-culture with fluorescently labeled lung fibroblasts to monitor invasion processes by automated microscopy. This setup was used to screen a compound library containing 480 known bioactive substances. Identified hits prevented fibroblast invasion and could be subdivided into two hit classes. First, Prostaglandins were shown to prevent fibroblast invasion, most likely mediated by the prostaglandin EP2 receptor and generation of cAMP. Additionally, Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitors prevented fibroblast invasion, possibly by inactivation of myosin II. Importantly, both Prostaglandins and ROCK inhibitors are potential treatment options shown to be effective in in vitro and in vivo models of fibrotic diseases. This validates the presented novel phenotypic screening approach for the evaluation of potential inhibitors and the identification of novel compounds with activity in diseases that are associated with fibroblast invasion.

  8. The Gonium pectorale genome demonstrates co-option of cell cycle regulation during the evolution of multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Hanschen, Erik R; Marriage, Tara N; Ferris, Patrick J; Hamaji, Takashi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Neme, Rafik; Noguchi, Hideki; Minakuchi, Yohei; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Smith, David R; Sparks, Halle; Anderson, Jaden; Bakarić, Robert; Luria, Victor; Karger, Amir; Kirschner, Marc W; Durand, Pierre M; Michod, Richard E; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Olson, Bradley J S C

    2016-01-01

    The transition to multicellularity has occurred numerous times in all domains of life, yet its initial steps are poorly understood. The volvocine green algae are a tractable system for understanding the genetic basis of multicellularity including the initial formation of cooperative cell groups. Here we report the genome sequence of the undifferentiated colonial alga, Gonium pectorale, where group formation evolved by co-option of the retinoblastoma cell cycle regulatory pathway. Significantly, expression of the Gonium retinoblastoma cell cycle regulator in unicellular Chlamydomonas causes it to become colonial. The presence of these changes in undifferentiated Gonium indicates extensive group-level adaptation during the initial step in the evolution of multicellularity. These results emphasize an early and formative step in the evolution of multicellularity, the evolution of cell cycle regulation, one that may shed light on the evolutionary history of other multicellular innovations and evolutionary transitions. PMID:27102219

  9. Multicellularity arose several times in the evolution of eukaryotes (response to DOI 10.1002/bies.201100187).

    PubMed

    Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Lahr, Daniel J G

    2013-04-01

    The cellular slime mold Dictyostelium has cell-cell connections similar in structure, function, and underlying molecular mechanisms to animal epithelial cells. These similarities form the basis for the proposal that multicellularity is ancestral to the clade containing animals, fungi, and Amoebozoa (including Dictyostelium): Amorphea (formerly "unikonts"). This hypothesis is intriguing and if true could precipitate a paradigm shift. However, phylogenetic analyses of two key genes reveal patterns inconsistent with a single origin of multicellularity. A single origin in Amorphea would also require loss of multicellularity in each of the many unicellular lineages within this clade. Further, there are numerous other origins of multicellularity within eukaryotes, including three within Amorphea, that are not characterized by these structural and mechanistic similarities. Instead, convergent evolution resulting from similar selective pressures for forming multicellular structures with motile and differentiated cells is the most likely explanation for the observed similarities between animal and dictyostelid cell-cell connections. PMID:23315654

  10. The Gonium pectorale genome demonstrates co-option of cell cycle regulation during the evolution of multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Hanschen, Erik R.; Marriage, Tara N.; Ferris, Patrick J.; Hamaji, Takashi; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Neme, Rafik; Noguchi, Hideki; Minakuchi, Yohei; Suzuki, Masahiro; Kawai-Toyooka, Hiroko; Smith, David R.; Sparks, Halle; Anderson, Jaden; Bakarić, Robert; Luria, Victor; Karger, Amir; Kirschner, Marc W.; Durand, Pierre M.; Michod, Richard E.; Nozaki, Hisayoshi; Olson, Bradley J. S. C.

    2016-01-01

    The transition to multicellularity has occurred numerous times in all domains of life, yet its initial steps are poorly understood. The volvocine green algae are a tractable system for understanding the genetic basis of multicellularity including the initial formation of cooperative cell groups. Here we report the genome sequence of the undifferentiated colonial alga, Gonium pectorale, where group formation evolved by co-option of the retinoblastoma cell cycle regulatory pathway. Significantly, expression of the Gonium retinoblastoma cell cycle regulator in unicellular Chlamydomonas causes it to become colonial. The presence of these changes in undifferentiated Gonium indicates extensive group-level adaptation during the initial step in the evolution of multicellularity. These results emphasize an early and formative step in the evolution of multicellularity, the evolution of cell cycle regulation, one that may shed light on the evolutionary history of other multicellular innovations and evolutionary transitions. PMID:27102219

  11. Experimental evolution reveals that high relatedness protects multicellular cooperation from cheaters.

    PubMed

    Bastiaans, Eric; Debets, Alfons J M; Aanen, Duur K

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, there is a potential risk that cheating mutants gain access to the germline. Development from a single-celled zygote resets relatedness among cells to its maximum value each generation, which should accomplish segregation of cheating mutants from non-cheaters and thereby protect multicellular cooperation. Here we provide the crucial direct comparison between high- and low-relatedness conditions to test this hypothesis. We allow two variants of the fungus Neurospora crassa to evolve, one with and one without the ability to form chimeras with other individuals, thus generating two relatedness levels. While multicellular cooperation remains high in the high-relatedness lines, it significantly decreases in all replicate low-relatedness lines, resulting in an average threefold decrease in spore yield. This reduction is caused by cheating mutants with reduced investment in somatic functions, but increased competitive success when fusing with non-cheaters. Our experiments demonstrate that high genetic relatedness is crucial to sustain multicellular cooperation. PMID:27139112

  12. Experimental evolution reveals that high relatedness protects multicellular cooperation from cheaters

    PubMed Central

    Bastiaans, Eric; Debets, Alfons J. M.; Aanen, Duur K.

    2016-01-01

    In multicellular organisms, there is a potential risk that cheating mutants gain access to the germline. Development from a single-celled zygote resets relatedness among cells to its maximum value each generation, which should accomplish segregation of cheating mutants from non-cheaters and thereby protect multicellular cooperation. Here we provide the crucial direct comparison between high- and low-relatedness conditions to test this hypothesis. We allow two variants of the fungus Neurospora crassa to evolve, one with and one without the ability to form chimeras with other individuals, thus generating two relatedness levels. While multicellular cooperation remains high in the high-relatedness lines, it significantly decreases in all replicate low-relatedness lines, resulting in an average threefold decrease in spore yield. This reduction is caused by cheating mutants with reduced investment in somatic functions, but increased competitive success when fusing with non-cheaters. Our experiments demonstrate that high genetic relatedness is crucial to sustain multicellular cooperation. PMID:27139112

  13. Magnetic manipulation and spatial patterning of multi-cellular stem cell aggregates†

    PubMed Central

    Bratt-Leal, Andrés M.; Kepple, Kirsten L.; Carpenedo, Richard L.; Cooke, Marissa T.; McDevitt, Todd C.

    2015-01-01

    The controlled assembly and organization of multi-cellular systems to mimic complex tissue structures is critical to the engineering of tissues for therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Recent advances in micro-scale technologies to control multi-cellular aggregate formation typically require chemical modification of the interface between cells and materials and lack multi-scale flexibility. Here we demonstrate that simple physical entrapment of magnetic microparticles within the extracellular space of stem cells spheroids during initial formation enables scaffold-free immobilization, translocation and directed assembly of multi-cellular aggregates across multiple length and time scales, even under dynamic suspension culture conditions. The response of aggregates to externally applied magnetic fields was a direct function of microparticle incorporation, allowing for rapid and transient control of the extracellular environment as well as separation of heterogeneous populations. In addition, spatial patterning of heterogeneous spheroid populations as well as individual multi-cellular aggregates was readily achieved by imposing temporary magnetic fields. Overall, this approach provides novel routes to examine stem cell differentiation and tissue morphogenesis with applications that encompass the creation of new model systems for developmental biology, scaffold-free tissue engineering strategies and scalable bioprocessing technologies. PMID:22076329

  14. A Novel Laboratory Activity for Teaching about the Evolution of Multicellularity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliff, William C.; Raney, Allison; Westreich, Sam; Cotner, Sehoya

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of complexity remains one of the most challenging topics in biology to teach effectively. We present a novel laboratory activity, modeled on a recent experimental breakthrough, in which students experimentally evolve simple multicellularity using single-celled yeast ("Saccharomyces cerevisiae"). By simply selecting for…

  15. Transcription factor evolution in eukaryotes and the assembly of the regulatory toolkit in multicellular lineages.

    PubMed

    de Mendoza, Alex; Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Šestak, Martin Sebastijan; Matejcic, Marija; Torruella, Guifré; Domazet-Loso, Tomislav; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2013-12-10

    Transcription factors (TFs) are the main players in transcriptional regulation in eukaryotes. However, it remains unclear what role TFs played in the origin of all of the different eukaryotic multicellular lineages. In this paper, we explore how the origin of TF repertoires shaped eukaryotic evolution and, in particular, their role into the emergence of multicellular lineages. We traced the origin and expansion of all known TFs through the eukaryotic tree of life, using the broadest possible taxon sampling and an updated phylogenetic background. Our results show that the most complex multicellular lineages (i.e., those with embryonic development, Metazoa and Embryophyta) have the most complex TF repertoires, and that these repertoires were assembled in a stepwise manner. We also show that a significant part of the metazoan and embryophyte TF toolkits evolved earlier, in their respective unicellular ancestors. To gain insights into the role of TFs in the development of both embryophytes and metazoans, we analyzed TF expression patterns throughout their ontogeny. The expression patterns observed in both groups recapitulate those of the whole transcriptome, but reveal some important differences. Our comparative genomics and expression data reshape our view on how TFs contributed to eukaryotic evolution and reveal the importance of TFs to the origins of multicellularity and embryonic development. PMID:24277850

  16. The evo-devo of multinucleate cells, tissues, and organisms, and an alternative route to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Cobb, Edward D; Crawford, David R

    2013-01-01

    Multinucleate cells, tissues, or organisms occur in 60 families of land plants and in five otherwise diverse algal lineages (Rhodophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Charophyceae). Inspection of a morphospace constructed out of eight developmental processes reveals a large number of possible variants of multinucleate cells and organisms that, with two exceptions, are represented by one or more plant species in one or more clades. Thus, most of these permutations of developmental processes exist in nature. Inspection of the morphospace also shows how the siphonous body plan (a multinucleate cell with the capacity for indeterminate growth in size) can theoretically serve as the direct progenitor of a multicellular organism by a process similar to segregative cell division observed in siphonocladean algae. Using molecular phylogenies of algal clades, different evolutionary scenarios are compared to see how the multicellular condition may have evolved from a multinucleate unicellular progenitor. We also show that the siphonous progenitor of a multicellular organism has previously passed through the alignment-of-fitness phase (in which genetic similarity among cells/nuclei minimizes internal genomic conflict) and the export-of-fitness phase (in which genetically similar cells/nuclei collaborate to achieve a reproductively integrated multicellular organism). All that is theoretically required is the evolutionary acquisition of the capacity to compartmentalize its cytoplasm. PMID:24261447

  17. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm-3 respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm-1, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  18. Surface chemistry-mediated penetration and gold nanorod thermotherapy in multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Jin, Shubin; Ma, Xiaowei; Ma, Huili; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liu, Juan; Hou, Shuai; Meng, Jie; Wang, Paul C; Wu, Xiaochun; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the penetration and thermotherapy efficiency of different surface coated gold nanorods (Au NRs) in multicellular tumor spheroids. The current data show that negatively charged Au NRs, other than positively charged Au NRs, can penetrate deep into the tumor spheroids and achieve a significant thermal therapeutic benefit.

  19. Bioelectrical Signals and Ion Channels in the Modeling of Multicellular Patterns and Cancer Biophysics.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Javier; Alcaraz, Antonio; Mafe, Salvador

    2016-02-04

    Bioelectrical signals and ion channels are central to spatial patterns in cell ensembles, a problem of fundamental interest in positional information and cancer processes. We propose a model for electrically connected cells based on simple biological concepts: i) the membrane potential of a single cell characterizes its electrical state; ii) the long-range electrical coupling of the multicellular ensemble is realized by a network of gap junction channels between neighboring cells; and iii) the spatial distribution of an external biochemical agent can modify the conductances of the ion channels in a cell membrane and the multicellular electrical state. We focus on electrical effects in small multicellular ensembles, ignoring slow diffusional processes. The spatio-temporal patterns obtained for the local map of cell electric potentials illustrate the normalization of regions with abnormal cell electrical states. The effects of intercellular coupling and blocking of specific channels on the electrical patterns are described. These patterns can regulate the electrically-induced redistribution of charged nanoparticles over small regions of a model tissue. The inclusion of bioelectrical signals provides new insights for the modeling of cancer biophysics because collective multicellular states show electrical coupling mechanisms that are not readily deduced from biochemical descriptions at the individual cell level.

  20. Bioelectrical Signals and Ion Channels in the Modeling of Multicellular Patterns and Cancer Biophysics

    PubMed Central

    Cervera, Javier; Alcaraz, Antonio; Mafe, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrical signals and ion channels are central to spatial patterns in cell ensembles, a problem of fundamental interest in positional information and cancer processes. We propose a model for electrically connected cells based on simple biological concepts: i) the membrane potential of a single cell characterizes its electrical state; ii) the long-range electrical coupling of the multicellular ensemble is realized by a network of gap junction channels between neighboring cells; and iii) the spatial distribution of an external biochemical agent can modify the conductances of the ion channels in a cell membrane and the multicellular electrical state. We focus on electrical effects in small multicellular ensembles, ignoring slow diffusional processes. The spatio-temporal patterns obtained for the local map of cell electric potentials illustrate the normalization of regions with abnormal cell electrical states. The effects of intercellular coupling and blocking of specific channels on the electrical patterns are described. These patterns can regulate the electrically-induced redistribution of charged nanoparticles over small regions of a model tissue. The inclusion of bioelectrical signals provides new insights for the modeling of cancer biophysics because collective multicellular states show electrical coupling mechanisms that are not readily deduced from biochemical descriptions at the individual cell level. PMID:26841954

  1. Sponge cell reaggregation: Cellular structure and morphogenetic potencies of multicellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Andrey I; Kosevich, Igor A

    2016-02-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are one of the most ancient extant multicellular animals and can provide valuable insights into origin and early evolution of Metazoa. High plasticity of cell differentiations and anatomical structure is characteristic feature of sponges. Present study deals with sponge cell reaggregation after dissociation as the most outstanding case of sponge plasticity. Dynamic of cell reaggregation and structure of multicellular aggregates of three demosponge species (Halichondria panicea (Pallas, 1766), Haliclona aquaeductus (Sсhmidt, 1862), and Halisarca dujardinii Johnston, 1842) were studied. Sponge tissue dissociation was performed mechanically. Resulting cell suspensions were cultured at 8-10°C for at least 5 days. Structure of multicellular aggregates was studied by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Studied species share common stages of cell reaggregation-primary multicellular aggregates, early-stage primmorphs and primmorphs, but the rate of reaggregation varies considerably among species. Only cells of H. dujardinii are able to reconstruct functional and viable sponge after primmorphs formation. Sponge reconstruction in this species occurs due to active cell locomotion. Development of H. aquaeductus and H. panicea cells ceases at the stages of early primmorphs and primmorphs, respectively. Development of aggregates of these species is most likely arrested due to immobility of the majority of cells inside them. However, the inability of certain sponge species to reconstruct functional and viable individuals during cell reaggregation may be not a permanent species-specific characteristic, but depends on various factors, including the stage of the life cycle and experimental conditions. PMID:26863993

  2. The evo-devo of multinucleate cells, tissues, and organisms, and an alternative route to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Niklas, Karl J; Cobb, Edward D; Crawford, David R

    2013-01-01

    Multinucleate cells, tissues, or organisms occur in 60 families of land plants and in five otherwise diverse algal lineages (Rhodophyceae, Xanthophyceae, Chlorophyceae, Ulvophyceae, and Charophyceae). Inspection of a morphospace constructed out of eight developmental processes reveals a large number of possible variants of multinucleate cells and organisms that, with two exceptions, are represented by one or more plant species in one or more clades. Thus, most of these permutations of developmental processes exist in nature. Inspection of the morphospace also shows how the siphonous body plan (a multinucleate cell with the capacity for indeterminate growth in size) can theoretically serve as the direct progenitor of a multicellular organism by a process similar to segregative cell division observed in siphonocladean algae. Using molecular phylogenies of algal clades, different evolutionary scenarios are compared to see how the multicellular condition may have evolved from a multinucleate unicellular progenitor. We also show that the siphonous progenitor of a multicellular organism has previously passed through the alignment-of-fitness phase (in which genetic similarity among cells/nuclei minimizes internal genomic conflict) and the export-of-fitness phase (in which genetically similar cells/nuclei collaborate to achieve a reproductively integrated multicellular organism). All that is theoretically required is the evolutionary acquisition of the capacity to compartmentalize its cytoplasm.

  3. Bioelectrical Signals and Ion Channels in the Modeling of Multicellular Patterns and Cancer Biophysics.

    PubMed

    Cervera, Javier; Alcaraz, Antonio; Mafe, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrical signals and ion channels are central to spatial patterns in cell ensembles, a problem of fundamental interest in positional information and cancer processes. We propose a model for electrically connected cells based on simple biological concepts: i) the membrane potential of a single cell characterizes its electrical state; ii) the long-range electrical coupling of the multicellular ensemble is realized by a network of gap junction channels between neighboring cells; and iii) the spatial distribution of an external biochemical agent can modify the conductances of the ion channels in a cell membrane and the multicellular electrical state. We focus on electrical effects in small multicellular ensembles, ignoring slow diffusional processes. The spatio-temporal patterns obtained for the local map of cell electric potentials illustrate the normalization of regions with abnormal cell electrical states. The effects of intercellular coupling and blocking of specific channels on the electrical patterns are described. These patterns can regulate the electrically-induced redistribution of charged nanoparticles over small regions of a model tissue. The inclusion of bioelectrical signals provides new insights for the modeling of cancer biophysics because collective multicellular states show electrical coupling mechanisms that are not readily deduced from biochemical descriptions at the individual cell level. PMID:26841954

  4. Sponge cell reaggregation: Cellular structure and morphogenetic potencies of multicellular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Lavrov, Andrey I; Kosevich, Igor A

    2016-02-01

    Sponges (phylum Porifera) are one of the most ancient extant multicellular animals and can provide valuable insights into origin and early evolution of Metazoa. High plasticity of cell differentiations and anatomical structure is characteristic feature of sponges. Present study deals with sponge cell reaggregation after dissociation as the most outstanding case of sponge plasticity. Dynamic of cell reaggregation and structure of multicellular aggregates of three demosponge species (Halichondria panicea (Pallas, 1766), Haliclona aquaeductus (Sсhmidt, 1862), and Halisarca dujardinii Johnston, 1842) were studied. Sponge tissue dissociation was performed mechanically. Resulting cell suspensions were cultured at 8-10°C for at least 5 days. Structure of multicellular aggregates was studied by light, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Studied species share common stages of cell reaggregation-primary multicellular aggregates, early-stage primmorphs and primmorphs, but the rate of reaggregation varies considerably among species. Only cells of H. dujardinii are able to reconstruct functional and viable sponge after primmorphs formation. Sponge reconstruction in this species occurs due to active cell locomotion. Development of H. aquaeductus and H. panicea cells ceases at the stages of early primmorphs and primmorphs, respectively. Development of aggregates of these species is most likely arrested due to immobility of the majority of cells inside them. However, the inability of certain sponge species to reconstruct functional and viable individuals during cell reaggregation may be not a permanent species-specific characteristic, but depends on various factors, including the stage of the life cycle and experimental conditions.

  5. MUC16 mucin (CA125) regulates the formation of multicellular aggregates by altering β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Giannakouros, Panagiota; Comamala, Marina; Matte, Isabelle; Rancourt, Claudine; Piché, Alain

    2015-01-01

    After shedding from the primary tumor site, ovarian cancer cells form three-dimensional multicellular aggregates that serve as vehicle for cancer cell dissemination in the peritoneal cavity. MUC16 mucin (CA125) is aberrantly expressed by most advanced serous ovarian cancers and can promote proliferation, migration and metastasis. MUC16 associates with E-cadherin and β-catenin, two proteins involved in regulation of cell adhesion and the formation of multicellular aggregates. However, the role of MUC16 in the formation of multicellular aggregates remains to be defined. Here, we show that MUC16 alters E-cadherin cellular localization and expression. Consistent with this, MUC16 knockdown inhibited the formation of multicellular aggregates and, conversely, forced expression of MUC16 C-terminal domain (CTD) enhanced the formation of multicellular aggregates. MUC16 knockdown induces β-catenin relocation from the cell membrane to the cytoplasm, decreases its expression by increasing degradation and decreases β-catenin target gene expression. MUC16 CTD inhibits GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation and degradation of β-catenin, leading to increased β-catenin levels. Importantly, knockdown of β-catenin inhibited multicellular aggregation. These findings indicate that MUC16 promotes the formation of multicellular aggregates by inhibiting β-catenin degradation. PMID:25628932

  6. Fibroblast growth factors as tissue repair and regeneration therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Quentin M; Li, Yong; Sun, Changye; Kinnunen, Tarja K; Fernig, David G

    2016-01-01

    Cell communication is central to the integration of cell function required for the development and homeostasis of multicellular animals. Proteins are an important currency of cell communication, acting locally (auto-, juxta-, or paracrine) or systemically (endocrine). The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family contributes to the regulation of virtually all aspects of development and organogenesis, and after birth to tissue maintenance, as well as particular aspects of organism physiology. In the West, oncology has been the focus of translation of FGF research, whereas in China and to an extent Japan a major focus has been to use FGFs in repair and regeneration settings. These differences have their roots in research history and aims. The Chinese drive into biotechnology and the delivery of engineered clinical grade FGFs by a major Chinese research group were important enablers in this respect. The Chinese language clinical literature is not widely accessible. To put this into context, we provide the essential molecular and functional background to the FGF communication system covering FGF ligands, the heparan sulfate and Klotho co-receptors and FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinases. We then summarise a selection of clinical reports that demonstrate the efficacy of engineered recombinant FGF ligands in treating a wide range of conditions that require tissue repair/regeneration. Alongside, the functional reasons why application of exogenous FGF ligands does not lead to cancers are described. Together, this highlights that the FGF ligands represent a major opportunity for clinical translation that has been largely overlooked in the West. PMID:26793421

  7. Fibroblast growth factors as tissue repair and regeneration therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Kinnunen, Tarja K.

    2016-01-01

    Cell communication is central to the integration of cell function required for the development and homeostasis of multicellular animals. Proteins are an important currency of cell communication, acting locally (auto-, juxta-, or paracrine) or systemically (endocrine). The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family contributes to the regulation of virtually all aspects of development and organogenesis, and after birth to tissue maintenance, as well as particular aspects of organism physiology. In the West, oncology has been the focus of translation of FGF research, whereas in China and to an extent Japan a major focus has been to use FGFs in repair and regeneration settings. These differences have their roots in research history and aims. The Chinese drive into biotechnology and the delivery of engineered clinical grade FGFs by a major Chinese research group were important enablers in this respect. The Chinese language clinical literature is not widely accessible. To put this into context, we provide the essential molecular and functional background to the FGF communication system covering FGF ligands, the heparan sulfate and Klotho co-receptors and FGF receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinases. We then summarise a selection of clinical reports that demonstrate the efficacy of engineered recombinant FGF ligands in treating a wide range of conditions that require tissue repair/regeneration. Alongside, the functional reasons why application of exogenous FGF ligands does not lead to cancers are described. Together, this highlights that the FGF ligands represent a major opportunity for clinical translation that has been largely overlooked in the West. PMID:26793421

  8. Co-Culture of Tumor Spheroids and Fibroblasts in a Collagen Matrix-Incorporated Microfluidic Chip Mimics Reciprocal Activation in Solid Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Su-Yeong; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Yoojin; Chung, Seok; Kuh, Hyo-Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular 3D culture and interaction with stromal components are considered essential elements in establishing a ‘more clinically relevant’ tumor model. Matrix-embedded 3D cultures using a microfluidic chip platform can recapitulate the microscale interaction within tumor microenvironments. As a major component of tumor microenvironment, cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) play a role in cancer progression and drug resistance. Here, we present a microfluidic chip-based tumor tissue culture model that integrates 3D tumor spheroids (TSs) with CAF in proximity within a hydrogel scaffold. HT-29 human colorectal carcinoma cells grew into 3D TSs and the growth was stimulated when co-cultured with fibroblasts as shown by 1.5-folds increase of % changes in diameter over 5 days. TS cultured for 6 days showed a reduced expression of Ki-67 along with increased expression of fibronectin when co-cultured with fibroblasts compared to mono-cultured TSs. Fibroblasts were activated under co-culture conditions, as demonstrated by increases in α-SMA expression and migratory activity. When exposed to paclitaxel, a survival advantage was observed in TSs co-cultured with activated fibroblasts. Overall, we demonstrated the reciprocal interaction between TSs and fibroblasts in our 7-channel microfluidic chip. The co-culture of 3D TS-CAF in a collagen matrix-incorporated microfluidic chip may be useful to study the tumor microenvironment and for evaluation of drug screening and evaluation. PMID:27391808

  9. [Direct cell-cell communications and social behavior of cells in mammals, protists, and bacteria. Possible causes of multicellularity].

    PubMed

    Brodskiĭ, V Ia

    2009-01-01

    Comparison of current data on direct cell-cell communications in mammals, protists, and bacteria suggests that the emergence of the signaling systems of self-organization underlay the emergence of multicellular organisms. Biogenic amines, regulators of coordinated behavior and aggregation in bacteria, have been found in protists and multicellular organisms. In metazoans, biogenic amines have become specific neurotransmitters. At the same time, the studies on synchronization of protein synthesis rhythm in mammalian cell cultures demonstrated that noradrenaline and serotonin have conserved their ancient function of cell-cell cooperation in mammals, which is manifested as coordinated social behavior of cells in population in the case of bacteria and multicellular organisms.

  10. Perceptions of self-determination by special education and rehabilitation practitioners based on viewing a self-directed IEP versus an external-directed IEP meeting.

    PubMed

    Branding, Dave; Bates, Paul; Miner, Craig

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated perception of self-determination by special education and rehabilitation practitioners following their exposure to a videotaped simulation of a self-directed IEP meeting and an external-directed IEP meeting involving an adolescent with mild mental retardation. Groups of special education practitioners and rehabilitation practitioners did not differ from each other in their perceptions of self-determination before or after viewing either the self-directed or external-directed IEP meeting simulation. However, both groups of respondents had higher perceptions of the self-determination capability of the confederate student when they viewed her in a self-directed meeting. In addition, respondents consistently rated the self-directed meeting simulation as being of higher overall quality than the external-directed meeting. Results are discussed in relation to practitioner recommendations and future research in regard to the development and enabling of self-determination skills involving persons with disabilities.

  11. An introduction to My Environmental Education Evaluation Resource Assistant (MEERA), a web-based resource for self-directed learning about environmental education program evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zint, Michaela

    2010-05-01

    My Environmental Education Evaluation Resource Assistant or "MEERA" is a web-site designed to support environmental educators' program evaluation activities. MEERA has several characteristics that set it apart from other self-directed learning evaluation resources. Readers are encouraged to explore the site and to reflect on the role that self-directed learning resources can play in program evaluation and how those resources could be better designed.

  12. Imaging multicellular specimens with real-time optimized tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qinyi; Martin, Benjamin L; Matus, David Q; Gao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the progress made in selective plane illumination microscopy, high-resolution 3D live imaging of multicellular specimens remains challenging. Tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy (TLS-SPIM) with real-time light-sheet optimization was developed to respond to the challenge. It improves the 3D imaging ability of SPIM in resolving complex structures and optimizes SPIM live imaging performance by using a real-time adjustable tiling light sheet and creating a flexible compromise between spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the 3D live imaging ability of TLS-SPIM by imaging cellular and subcellular behaviours in live C. elegans and zebrafish embryos, and show how TLS-SPIM can facilitate cell biology research in multicellular specimens by studying left-right symmetry breaking behaviour of C. elegans embryos. PMID:27004937

  13. Bacterial Stigmergy: An Organising Principle of Multicellular Collective Behaviours of Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Gloag, Erin S.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.

    2015-01-01

    The self-organisation of collective behaviours often manifests as dramatic patterns of emergent large-scale order. This is true for relatively “simple” entities such as microbial communities and robot “swarms,” through to more complex self-organised systems such as those displayed by social insects, migrating herds, and many human activities. The principle of stigmergy describes those self-organised phenomena that emerge as a consequence of indirect communication between individuals of the group through the generation of persistent cues in the environment. Interestingly, despite numerous examples of multicellular behaviours of bacteria, the principle of stigmergy has yet to become an accepted theoretical framework that describes how bacterial collectives self-organise. Here we review some examples of multicellular bacterial behaviours in the context of stigmergy with the aim of bringing this powerful and elegant self-organisation principle to the attention of the microbial research community. PMID:25653882

  14. Predictive modeling of multicellular structure formation by using Cellular Particle Dynamics simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCune, Matthew; Shafiee, Ashkan; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2014-03-01

    Cellular Particle Dynamics (CPD) is an effective computational method for describing and predicting the time evolution of biomechanical relaxation processes of multicellular systems. A typical example is the fusion of spheroidal bioink particles during post bioprinting structure formation. In CPD cells are modeled as an ensemble of cellular particles (CPs) that interact via short-range contact interactions, characterized by an attractive (adhesive interaction) and a repulsive (excluded volume interaction) component. The time evolution of the spatial conformation of the multicellular system is determined by following the trajectories of all CPs through integration of their equations of motion. CPD was successfully applied to describe and predict the fusion of 3D tissue construct involving identical spherical aggregates. Here, we demonstrate that CPD can also predict tissue formation involving uneven spherical aggregates whose volumes decrease during the fusion process. Work supported by NSF [PHY-0957914]. Computer time provided by the University of Missouri Bioinformatics Consortium.

  15. Evolution of oxygen utilization in multicellular organisms and implications for cell signalling in tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Stamati, Katerina; Mudera, Vivek

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen is one of the critically defining elements resulting in the existence of eukaryotic life on this planet. The rise and fall of this element can be tracked through time and corresponds with the evolution of diverse life forms, development of efficient energy production (oxidative phosphorylation) in single cell organisms, the evolution of multicellular organisms and the regulation of complex cell phenotypes. By understanding these events, we can plot the effect of oxygen on evolution and its direct influence on different forms of life today, from the whole organism to specific cells within multicellular organisms. In the emerging field of tissue engineering, understanding the role of different levels of oxygen for normal cell function as well as control of complex signalling cascades is paramount to effectively build 3D tissues in vitro and their subsequent survival when implanted. PMID:22292107

  16. Noise-plasticity correlations of gene expression in the multicellular organism Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Koudai; Nagano, Atsushi J; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-12-21

    Gene expression levels exhibit stochastic variations among genetically identical organisms under the same environmental conditions (called gene expression "noise" or phenotype "fluctuation"). In yeast and Escherichia coli, positive correlations have been found between such gene expression noise and "plasticity" with environmental variations. To determine the universality of such correlations in both unicellular and multicellular organisms, we focused on the relationships between gene expression "noise" and "plasticity" in Arabidopsis thaliana, a multicellular model organism. In recent studies on yeast and E. coli, only some gene groups with specific properties of promoter architecture, average expression levels, and functions exhibited strong noise-plasticity correlations. However, we found strong noise-plasticity correlations for most gene groups in Arabidopsis; additionally, promoter architecture, functional essentiality of genes, and circadian rhythm appeared to have only a weak influence on the correlation strength. The differences in the characteristics of noise-plasticity correlations may result from three-dimensional chromosomal structures and/or circadian rhythm.

  17. Imaging multicellular specimens with real-time optimized tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Qinyi; Martin, Benjamin L.; Matus, David Q.; Gao, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Despite the progress made in selective plane illumination microscopy, high-resolution 3D live imaging of multicellular specimens remains challenging. Tiling light-sheet selective plane illumination microscopy (TLS-SPIM) with real-time light-sheet optimization was developed to respond to the challenge. It improves the 3D imaging ability of SPIM in resolving complex structures and optimizes SPIM live imaging performance by using a real-time adjustable tiling light sheet and creating a flexible compromise between spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate the 3D live imaging ability of TLS-SPIM by imaging cellular and subcellular behaviours in live C. elegans and zebrafish embryos, and show how TLS-SPIM can facilitate cell biology research in multicellular specimens by studying left-right symmetry breaking behaviour of C. elegans embryos. PMID:27004937

  18. Noise-plasticity correlations of gene expression in the multicellular organism Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hirao, Koudai; Nagano, Atsushi J; Awazu, Akinori

    2015-12-21

    Gene expression levels exhibit stochastic variations among genetically identical organisms under the same environmental conditions (called gene expression "noise" or phenotype "fluctuation"). In yeast and Escherichia coli, positive correlations have been found between such gene expression noise and "plasticity" with environmental variations. To determine the universality of such correlations in both unicellular and multicellular organisms, we focused on the relationships between gene expression "noise" and "plasticity" in Arabidopsis thaliana, a multicellular model organism. In recent studies on yeast and E. coli, only some gene groups with specific properties of promoter architecture, average expression levels, and functions exhibited strong noise-plasticity correlations. However, we found strong noise-plasticity correlations for most gene groups in Arabidopsis; additionally, promoter architecture, functional essentiality of genes, and circadian rhythm appeared to have only a weak influence on the correlation strength. The differences in the characteristics of noise-plasticity correlations may result from three-dimensional chromosomal structures and/or circadian rhythm. PMID:26431771

  19. The Dynamic Regulatory Genome of Capsaspora and the Origin of Animal Multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Ballaré, Cecilia; Parra-Acero, Helena; Chiva, Cristina; Tena, Juan J; Sabidó, Eduard; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Di Croce, Luciano; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2016-05-19

    The unicellular ancestor of animals had a complex repertoire of genes linked to multicellular processes. This suggests that changes in the regulatory genome, rather than in gene innovation, were key to the origin of animals. Here, we carry out multiple functional genomic assays in Capsaspora owczarzaki, the unicellular relative of animals with the largest known gene repertoire for transcriptional regulation. We show that changing chromatin states, differential lincRNA expression, and dynamic cis-regulatory sites are associated with life cycle transitions in Capsaspora. Moreover, we demonstrate conservation of animal developmental transcription-factor networks and extensive network interconnection in this premetazoan organism. In contrast, however, Capsaspora lacks animal promoter types, and its regulatory sites are small, proximal, and lack signatures of animal enhancers. Overall, our results indicate that the emergence of animal multicellularity was linked to a major shift in genome cis-regulatory complexity, most notably the appearance of distal enhancer regulation. PMID:27114036

  20. Genomic analysis of organismal complexity in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri.

    PubMed

    Prochnik, Simon E; Umen, James; Nedelcu, Aurora M; Hallmann, Armin; Miller, Stephen M; Nishii, Ichiro; Ferris, Patrick; Kuo, Alan; Mitros, Therese; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K; Hellsten, Uffe; Chapman, Jarrod; Simakov, Oleg; Rensing, Stefan A; Terry, Astrid; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Jurka, Jerzy; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grigoriev, Igor V; Schmitt, Rüdiger; Kirk, David; Rokhsar, Daniel S

    2010-07-01

    The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and its morphologically diverse close relatives (the volvocine algae) are well suited for the investigation of the evolution of multicellularity and development. We sequenced the 138-mega-base pair genome of V. carteri and compared its approximately 14,500 predicted proteins to those of its unicellular relative Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Despite fundamental differences in organismal complexity and life history, the two species have similar protein-coding potentials and few species-specific protein-coding gene predictions. Volvox is enriched in volvocine-algal-specific proteins, including those associated with an expanded and highly compartmentalized extracellular matrix. Our analysis shows that increases in organismal complexity can be associated with modifications of lineage-specific proteins rather than large-scale invention of protein-coding capacity. PMID:20616280

  1. The Dynamic Regulatory Genome of Capsaspora and the Origin of Animal Multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Sebé-Pedrós, Arnau; Ballaré, Cecilia; Parra-Acero, Helena; Chiva, Cristina; Tena, Juan J; Sabidó, Eduard; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Di Croce, Luciano; Ruiz-Trillo, Iñaki

    2016-05-19

    The unicellular ancestor of animals had a complex repertoire of genes linked to multicellular processes. This suggests that changes in the regulatory genome, rather than in gene innovation, were key to the origin of animals. Here, we carry out multiple functional genomic assays in Capsaspora owczarzaki, the unicellular relative of animals with the largest known gene repertoire for transcriptional regulation. We show that changing chromatin states, differential lincRNA expression, and dynamic cis-regulatory sites are associated with life cycle transitions in Capsaspora. Moreover, we demonstrate conservation of animal developmental transcription-factor networks and extensive network interconnection in this premetazoan organism. In contrast, however, Capsaspora lacks animal promoter types, and its regulatory sites are small, proximal, and lack signatures of animal enhancers. Overall, our results indicate that the emergence of animal multicellularity was linked to a major shift in genome cis-regulatory complexity, most notably the appearance of distal enhancer regulation.

  2. Surface chemistry-mediated penetration and gold nanorod thermotherapy in multicellular tumor spheroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Shubin; Ma, Xiaowei; Ma, Huili; Zheng, Kaiyuan; Liu, Juan; Hou, Shuai; Meng, Jie; Wang, Paul C.; Wu, Xiaochun; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the penetration and thermotherapy efficiency of different surface coated gold nanorods (Au NRs) in multicellular tumor spheroids. The current data show that negatively charged Au NRs, other than positively charged Au NRs, can penetrate deep into the tumor spheroids and achieve a significant thermal therapeutic benefit.We investigated the penetration and thermotherapy efficiency of different surface coated gold nanorods (Au NRs) in multicellular tumor spheroids. The current data show that negatively charged Au NRs, other than positively charged Au NRs, can penetrate deep into the tumor spheroids and achieve a significant thermal therapeutic benefit. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Materials and methods section. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31877f

  3. Continuing education for general practice. 1. Experience, competence and the media of self-directed learning for established general practitioners.

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, I; al-Shehri, A; Thomas, P

    1993-01-01

    The arrangements under which continuing education for general practice is provided and attendance by general practitioners is rewarded have now been in operation for three years. More recently, reaccreditation has emerged as a significant issue for the profession. For these reasons it appears timely to review the whole basis of ongoing learning by established general practitioners. In this the first of two papers, learning by established professionals is considered in relation to the educational development of the learner, the role of experience and the goals of competence and performance. It is concluded that self-directed learning based on experience should form the centre-piece of continuing education for general practice and that educational provision should adopt a complementary role in sustaining motivation to learn and by enabling learning from experience to be shared and enriched. A model of self-directed learning, connecting experience and competence through systematic application of three learning media, reading, reflection and audit, is proposed and related to appropriate educational participation by established general practitioners. PMID:8347389

  4. Social Work Field Training for the Community: A Student Self-Directed Approach in the Environmental Domain in Jordan

    PubMed Central

    Al-Makhamreh, Sahar; Alnabulsi, Hana; Asfour, Hana

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines innovative field training methods that foster the abilities of undergraduate social work students so that they are able to empower the local community and raise awareness of environmental issues. In this study, students were engaged in a local community assessment that sought to understand their views on environmental and community impacts of the Synchrotron-Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East (SESAME) Project on the lives of the host village's residents. A students' self-directed approach was applied for the fieldwork out of which interventions were developed ( Garrison, 1997). Quantitative data were gathered by eighteen students through a survey of 361 questionnaires targeting Allan society. In addition to students' field notes, pre and post focus groups were used to collect qualitative information. Study findings highlighted the effectiveness of students' self-directed projects in cultivating culturally competent practices; ensuring sustainable development; and providing evidence-based knowledge on social work practice involving environmental issues. PMID:27559202

  5. Processing and characterization of multi-cellular monolithic bioceramics for bone regenerative scaffolds

    SciTech Connect

    Ari-Wahjoedi, Bambang; Ginta, Turnad Lenggo; Parman, Setyamartana; Abustaman, Mohd Zikri Ahmad

    2014-10-24

    Multicellular monolithic ceramic body is a ceramic material which has many gas or liquid passages partitioned by thin walls throughout the bulk material. There are many currently known advanced industrial applications of multicellular ceramics structures i.e. as supports for various catalysts, electrode support structure for solid oxide fuel cells, refractories, electric/electronic materials, aerospace vehicle re-entry heat shields and biomaterials for dental as well as orthopaedic implants by naming only a few. Multicellular ceramic bodies are usually made of ceramic phases such as mullite, cordierite, aluminum titanate or pure oxides such as silica, zirconia and alumina. What make alumina ceramics is excellent for the above functions are the intrinsic properties of alumina which are hard, wear resistant, excellent dielectric properties, resists strong acid and alkali attacks at elevated temperatures, good thermal conductivities, high strength and stiffness as well as biocompatible. In this work the processing technology leading to truly multicellular monolithic alumina ceramic bodies and their characterization are reported. Ceramic slip with 66 wt.% solid loading was found to be optimum as impregnant to the polyurethane foam template. Mullitic ceramic composite of alumina-sodium alumino disilicate-Leucite-like phases with bulk and true densities of 0.852 and 1.241 g cm{sup −3} respectively, pore linear density of ±35 cm{sup −1}, linear and bulk volume shrinkages of 7-16% and 32 vol.% were obtained. The compressive strength and elastic modulus of the bioceramics are ≈0.5-1.0 and ≈20 MPa respectively.

  6. Reactive Oxygen Species in the Signaling and Adaptation of Multicellular Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Čáp, Michal; Váchová, Libuše; Palková, Zdena

    2012-01-01

    One of the universal traits of microorganisms is their ability to form multicellular structures, the cells of which differentiate and communicate via various signaling molecules. Reactive oxygen species (ROS), and hydrogen peroxide in particular, have recently become well-established signaling molecules in higher eukaryotes, but still little is known about the regulatory functions of ROS in microbial structures. Here we summarize current knowledge on the possible roles of ROS during the development of colonies and biofilms, representatives of microbial multicellularity. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae colonies, ROS are predicted to participate in regulatory events involved in the induction of ammonia signaling and later on in programmed cell death in the colony center. While the latter process seems to be induced by the total ROS, the former event is likely to be regulated by ROS-homeostasis, possibly H2O2-homeostasis between the cytosol and mitochondria. In Candida albicans biofilms, the predicted signaling role of ROS is linked with quorum sensing molecule farnesol that significantly affects biofilm formation. In bacterial biofilms, ROS induce genetic variability, promote cell death in specific biofilm regions, and possibly regulate biofilm development. Thus, the number of examples suggesting ROS as signaling molecules and effectors in the development of microbial multicellularity is rapidly increasing. PMID:22829965

  7. The Evolution of Aggregative Multicellularity and Cell-Cell Communication in the Dictyostelia.

    PubMed

    Du, Qingyou; Kawabe, Yoshinori; Schilde, Christina; Chen, Zhi-Hui; Schaap, Pauline

    2015-11-20

    Aggregative multicellularity, resulting in formation of a spore-bearing fruiting body, evolved at least six times independently amongst both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Amongst eukaryotes, this form of multicellularity is mainly studied in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. In this review, we summarise trends in the evolution of cell-type specialisation and behavioural complexity in the four major groups of Dictyostelia. We describe the cell-cell communication systems that control the developmental programme of D. discoideum, highlighting the central role of cAMP in the regulation of cell movement and cell differentiation. Comparative genomic studies showed that the proteins involved in cAMP signalling are deeply conserved across Dictyostelia and their unicellular amoebozoan ancestors. Comparative functional analysis revealed that cAMP signalling in D. discoideum originated from a second messenger role in amoebozoan encystation. We highlight some molecular changes in cAMP signalling genes that were responsible for the novel roles of cAMP in multicellular development. PMID:26284972

  8. Transcriptome profiling of trichome-less reveals genes associated with multicellular trichome development in Cucumis sativus.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Long; Wang, Yun-Li; Yao, Dan-Qing; Zhu, Wen-Ying; Chen, Long; He, Huan-Le; Pan, Jun-Song; Cai, Run

    2015-10-01

    Trichomes on plants, similar to fine hairs on animal and human bodies, play important roles in plant survival and development. They also represent a useful model for the study of cell differentiation. Although the regulatory gene network of unicellular trichome development in Arabidopsis thaliana has been well studied, the genes that regulate multicellular trichome development remain unclear. We confirmed that Cucumis sativus (cucumber) trichomes are multicellular and unbranched, but identified a spontaneous mutant, trichome-less (tril), which presented a completely glabrous phenotype. We compared the transcriptome profilings of the tril mutant and wild type using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing technology. A total of 991 genes exhibited differential expression: 518 were up-regulated and 473 were down-regulated. We further identified 62 differentially expressed genes that encoded crucial transcription factors and were subdivided into seven categories: homeodomain, MADS, MYB, and WRKY domains, ethylene-responsive, zinc finger, and other transcription factor genes. We further analyzed the tissue-expression profiles of two candidate genes, GLABRA2-like and ATHB51-like, using qRT-PCR and found that these two genes were specifically expressed in the epidermis and trichomes, respectively. These results and the tril mutant provide useful tools to study the molecular networks associated with multicellular trichome development.

  9. Transcriptome analysis in Cucumis sativus identifies genes involved in multicellular trichome development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jun-Long; Pan, Jun-Song; Guan, Yuan; Nie, Jing-Tao; Yang, Jun-Jun; Qu, Mei-Ling; He, Huan-Le; Cai, Run

    2015-05-01

    The regulatory gene network of unicellular trichome development in Arabidopsis thaliana has been studied intensively, but that of multicellular remains unclear. In the present study, we characterized cucumber trichomes as representative multicellular and unbranched structures, but in a spontaneous mutant, mict (micro-trichome), all trichomes showed a micro-size and stunted morphologies. We revealed the transcriptome profile using Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencing technology, and determined that a total of 1391 genes exhibited differential expression. We further validated the accuracy of the transcriptome data by RT-qPCR and found that 43 genes encoding critical transcription factors were likely involved in multicellular trichome development. These 43 candidate genes were subdivided into seven groups: homeodomain, MYB-domain, WRKY-domain, bHLH-domain, ethylene-responsive, zinc finger and other transcription factor genes. Our findings also serve as a powerful tool to further study the relevant molecular networks, and provide a new perspective for investigating this complex and species-specific developmental process.

  10. Droplet-based microfluidic system to form and separate multicellular spheroids using magnetic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Sungjun; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Hwan; Kim, Minsoo; Park, Tai Hyun

    2013-04-21

    The importance of creating a three-dimensional (3-D) multicellular spheroid has recently been gaining attention due to the limitations of monolayer cell culture to precisely mimic in vivo structure and cellular interactions. Due to this emerging interest, researchers have utilized new tools, such as microfluidic devices, that allow high-throughput and precise size control to produce multicellular spheroids. We have developed a droplet-based microfluidic system that can encapsulate both cells and magnetic nanoparticles within alginate beads to mimic the function of a multicellular tumor spheroid. Cells were entrapped within the alginate beads along with magnetic nanoparticles, and the beads of a relatively uniform size (diameters of 85% of the beads were 170-190 μm) were formed in the oil phase. These beads were passed through parallel streamlines of oil and culture medium, where the beads were magnetically transferred into the medium phase from the oil phase using an external magnetic force. This microfluidic chip eliminates additional steps for collecting the spheroids from the oil phase and transferring them to culture medium. Ultimately, the overall spheroid formation process can be achieved on a single microchip. PMID:23426090

  11. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Harney, Allison S; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  12. Extended Time-lapse Intravital Imaging of Real-time Multicellular Dynamics in the Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Harney, Allison S.; Wang, Yarong; Condeelis, John S.; Entenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    In the tumor microenvironment, host stromal cells interact with tumor cells to promote tumor progression, angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination and metastasis. Multicellular interactions in the tumor microenvironment can lead to transient events including directional tumor cell motility and vascular permeability. Quantification of tumor vascular permeability has frequently used end-point experiments to measure extravasation of vascular dyes. However, due to the transient nature of multicellular interactions and vascular permeability, the kinetics of these dynamic events cannot be discerned. By labeling cells and vasculature with injectable dyes or fluorescent proteins, high-resolution time-lapse intravital microscopy has allowed the direct, real-time visualization of transient events in the tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a method for using multiphoton microscopy to perform extended intravital imaging in live mice to directly visualize multicellular dynamics in the tumor microenvironment. This method details cellular labeling strategies, the surgical preparation of a mammary skin flap, the administration of injectable dyes or proteins by tail vein catheter and the acquisition of time-lapse images. The time-lapse sequences obtained from this method facilitate the visualization and quantitation of the kinetics of cellular events of motility and vascular permeability in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:27341448

  13. Genomic analysis of organismal complexity in the multicellular green alga Volvox carteri

    SciTech Connect

    Prochnik, Simon E.; Umen, James; Nedelcu, Aurora; Hallmann, Armin; Miller, Stephen M.; Nishii, Ichiro; Ferris, Patrick; Kuo, Alan; Mitros, Therese; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Hellsten, Uffe; Chapman, Jarrod; Simakov, Oleg; Rensing, Stefan A.; Terry, Astrid; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Kapitonov, Vladimir; Jurka, Jerzy; Salamov, Asaf; Shapiro, Harris; Schmutz, Jeremy; Grimwood, Jane; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Schmitt, Rudiger; Kirk, David; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2010-07-01

    Analysis of the Volvox carteri genome reveals that this green alga's increased organismal complexity and multicellularity are associated with modifications in protein families shared with its unicellular ancestor, and not with large-scale innovations in protein coding capacity. The multicellular green alga Volvox carteri and its morphologically diverse close relatives (the volvocine algae) are uniquely suited for investigating the evolution of multicellularity and development. We sequenced the 138 Mb genome of V. carteri and compared its {approx}14,500 predicted proteins to those of its unicellular relative, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Despite fundamental differences in organismal complexity and life history, the two species have similar protein-coding potentials, and few species-specific protein-coding gene predictions. Interestingly, volvocine algal-specific proteins are enriched in Volvox, including those associated with an expanded and highly compartmentalized extracellular matrix. Our analysis shows that increases in organismal complexity can be associated with modifications of lineage-specific proteins rather than large-scale invention of protein-coding capacity.

  14. Directed Self-Assembly of Large Scaffold-free Multicellular Honeycomb Structures

    PubMed Central

    Tejavibulya, Nalin; Youssef, Jacquelyn; Bao, Brian; Ferruccio, Toni-Marie; Morgan, Jeffrey R.

    2011-01-01

    A significant challenge to the field of biofabrication is the rapid construction of large three dimensional (3D) living tissues and organs. Multi-cellular spheroids have been used as building blocks. In this paper, we create large multi-cellular honeycomb building blocks using directed self-assembly, whereby cell-to-cell adhesion, in the context of the shape and obstacles of a micromold, drives the formation of a 3D structure. Computer aided design, rapid prototyping and replica molding were used to fabricate honeycomb-shaped micro-molds. Nonadhesive hydrogels cast from these micro-molds were equilibrated in cell culture medium and seeded with two types of mammalian cells. The cells settled into the honeycomb recess, were unable to attach to the nonadhesive hydrogel and so cell-to-cell adhesion drove the self-assembly of a large multicellular honeycomb within 24 hours. Distinct morphological changes occurred to the honeycomb and its cells indicating the presence of significant cell-mediated tension. Unlike the spheroid, whose size is constrained by a critical diffusion distance needed to maintain cell viability, the overall size of the honeycomb is not limited. The rapid production of the honeycomb building unit, with its multiple rings of high density cells and open lumen spaces, offers interesting new possibilities for biofabrication strategies. PMID:21828905

  15. On eukaryotic intelligence: signaling system's guidance in the evolution of multicellular organization.

    PubMed

    Marijuán, Pedro C; del Moral, Raquel; Navarro, Jorge

    2013-10-01

    Communication with the environment is an essential characteristic of the living cell, even more when considering the origins and evolution of multicellularity. A number of changes and tinkering inventions were necessary in the evolutionary transition between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, which finally made possible the appearance of genuine multicellular organisms. In the study of this process, however, the transformations experimented by signaling systems themselves have been rarely object of analysis, obscured by other more conspicuous biological traits: incorporation of mitochondria, segregated nucleus, introns/exons, flagellum, membrane systems, etc. Herein a discussion of the main avenues of change from prokaryotic to eukaryotic signaling systems and a review of the signaling resources and strategies underlying multicellularity will be attempted. In the expansion of prokaryotic signaling systems, four main systemic resources were incorporated: molecular tools for detection of solutes, molecular tools for detection of solvent (Donnan effect), the apparatuses of cell-cycle control, and the combined system endocytosis/cytoskeleton. The multiple kinds of enlarged, mixed pathways that emerged made possible the eukaryotic revolution in morphological and physiological complexity. The massive incorporation of processing resources of electro-molecular nature, derived from the osmotic tools counteracting the Donnan effect, made also possible the organization of a computational tissue with huge information processing capabilities: the nervous system. In the central nervous systems of vertebrates, and particularly in humans, neurons have achieved both the highest level of molecular-signaling complexity and the highest degree of information-processing adaptability. Theoretically, it can be argued that there has been an accelerated pace of evolutionary change in eukaryotic signaling systems, beyond the other general novelties introduced by eukaryotic cells in their

  16. Sequential combination of imipramine and self-directed exposure in the treatment of panic disorder with agoraphobia.

    PubMed

    Mavissakalian, M

    1990-05-01

    Thirty-eight patients who had panic disorder with agoraphobia completed 8 weeks of treatment with imipramine followed by 8 weeks of treatment with imipramine combined with behavior therapy consisting of self-directed exposure. Sixty-three percent (24) of the patients responded markedly to this cost-effective combined pharmacologic and behavioral approach. Results also revealed that most of the improvement in panic occurred during the first 8 weeks of treatment when imipramine treatment alone was used, whereas improvement in severity, anxiety, depression, and phobias, in particular, continued to be significant between midtreatment and end of study. Further analysis revealed that improvement in phobic anxiety and avoidance in the first 8 weeks of treatment, rather than improvement in panic, predicted final outcome. Implications of these findings on the complex issue of differential antipanic and antiphobic effects of imipramine are briefly discussed. PMID:2335493

  17. External and internal factors influencing self-directed online learning of physiotherapy undergraduate students in Sweden: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Nilsson, Maria H.; Gummesson, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Online courses have become common in health sciences education. This learning environment can be designed using different approaches to support student learning. To further develop online environment, it is important to understand how students perceive working and learning online. The aim of this study is to identify aspects influencing students’ learning processes and their adaptation to self-directed learning online. Methods: Thirty-four physiotherapy students with a mean age of 25 years (range, 21 to 34 years) participated. Qualitative content analysis and triangulation was used when investigating the students’ self-reflections, written during a five week self-directed, problem-oriented online course. Results: Two categories emerged: ‘the influence of the structured framework’ and ‘communication and interaction with teachers and peers.’ The learning processes were influenced by external factors, e.g., a clear structure including a transparent alignment of assignments and assessment. Important challenges to over-come were primarily internal factors, e.g., low self-efficacy, difficulties to plan the work effectively and adapting to a new environment. Conclusion: The analyses reflected important perspectives targeting areas which enable further course development. The influences of external and internal factors on learning strategies and self-efficacy are important aspects to consider when designing online courses. Factors such as pedagogical design, clarity of purpose, goals, and guidelines were important as well as continuous opportunities for communication and collaboration. Further studies are needed to understand and scaffold the motivational factors among students with low self-efficacy. PMID:26101401

  18. Non-suicidal self-injury and other self-directed violent behaviors in India: A review of definitions and research.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Amarendra; Luyckx, Koen; Maitra, Shubhada; Claes, Laurence

    2016-08-01

    The interpersonal theory of suicide suggests that most forms of self-directed violent behaviors lie on a continuum, with each behavior successively increasing the capability of committing suicide. There is increasing evidence to suggest that the continuum may begin with Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI). This theory can be important in developing interventions for suicide prevention. However, in India, consistent usage of definitions of various forms of self-directed violent behaviors is lacking. In the present study, we reviewed definitions of various forms of self-directed violent behaviors that have been investigated in India. Further, we compared the usage of these definitions with the usage by WHO. Additionally, we reviewed NSSI research in India. Thirty-eight publications were identified by a comprehensive electronic search undertaken in Indian psychiatry, psychology, and mental health-related databases. Inconsistent definitions of eight self-directed violent behaviors were observed in Indian literature. Agreement on consistent definitions of various forms of self-directed behaviors is essential. Based on the findings of the current review, it can be suggested that culturally relevant large-scale research on NSSI in India is required to confirm the limited evidence that suggests high prevalence of NSSI in India.

  19. Anaerobic respiration using a complete oxidative TCA cycle drives multicellular swarming in Proteus mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Alteri, Christopher J; Himpsl, Stephanie D; Engstrom, Michael D; Mobley, Harry L T

    2012-10-30

    Proteus mirabilis rapidly migrates across surfaces using a periodic developmental process of differentiation alternating between short swimmer cells and elongated hyperflagellated swarmer cells. To undergo this vigorous flagellum-mediated motility, bacteria must generate a substantial proton gradient across their cytoplasmic membranes by using available energy pathways. We sought to identify the link between energy pathways and swarming differentiation by examining the behavior of defined central metabolism mutants. Mutations in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (fumC and sdhB mutants) caused altered patterns of swarming periodicity, suggesting an aerobic pathway. Surprisingly, the wild-type strain swarmed on agar containing sodium azide, which poisons aerobic respiration; the fumC TCA cycle mutant, however, was unable to swarm on azide. To identify other contributing energy pathways, we screened transposon mutants for loss of swarming on sodium azide and found insertions in the following genes that involved fumarate metabolism or respiration: hybB, encoding hydrogenase; fumC, encoding fumarase; argH, encoding argininosuccinate lyase (generates fumarate); and a quinone hydroxylase gene. These findings validated the screen and suggested involvement of anaerobic electron transport chain components. Abnormal swarming periodicity of fumC and sdhB mutants was associated with the excretion of reduced acidic fermentation end products. Bacteria lacking SdhB were rescued to wild-type pH and periodicity by providing fumarate, independent of carbon source but dependent on oxygen, while fumC mutants were rescued by glycerol, independent of fumarate only under anaerobic conditions. These findings link multicellular swarming patterns with fumarate metabolism and membrane electron transport using a previously unappreciated configuration of both aerobic and anaerobic respiratory chain components. Bacterial locomotion and the existence of microbes were the first scientific

  20. Examining tissue differentiation stability through large scale, multi-cellular pathway modeling.

    SciTech Connect

    May, Elebeoba Eni; Schiek, Richard Louis

    2005-03-01

    Using a multi-cellular, pathway model approach, we investigate the Drosophila sp. segmental differentiation network's stability as a function of initial conditions. While this network's functionality has been investigated in the absence of noise, this is the first work to specifically investigate how natural systems respond to random errors or noise. Our findings agree with earlier results that the overall network is robust in the absence of noise. However, when one includes random initial perturbations in intracellular protein WG levels, the robustness of the system decreases dramatically. The effect of noise on the system is not linear, and appears to level out at high noise levels.

  1. The Paramyxea Levine 1979: An original example of evolution towards multicellularity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desportes, Isabelle

    1984-03-01

    The Paramyxea are parasitic in marine invertebrates. Their development is a sporulation involving the differentiation within a stem cell of several sporonts which produce spores made of cells enclosed inside each other. Three genera are recognized according to the number of spores and sporal cells, and the taxonomic position of the host (Polychaeta, Mollusca, Crustacea). The Paramyxea exhibit both protistan and metazoan characters. Their nine singlets centrioles are observed in different Protoctists whereas the fact that their sporal cells acquire distinctive cytological features may be interpreted as an evolution towards multicellularity.

  2. Experimental versus design correlations in multi-cellular fiber reinforced plastic panels

    SciTech Connect

    GangaRao, H.V.S.; Lopez-Anido, R.; Sotiropoulos, S.; Sonti, S.S.; Winegardner, T.

    1996-11-01

    Reinforced plastic (RP) multi-cellular panels have been used recently in designing low-rise buildings. These RP panels were 24 in. wide and 5{1/2} in. thick and were manufactured by pultrusion process using an existing die with a modified (bidirectional) fiber architecture. Constituent materials were rovings, mats, and bi-directional fabrics made of E-glass, and polyester resin. Bending tests were conducted to characterize the stiffness performance of the RP panels and the stiffness results were compared with a simple analytical model. The joining of panels to create a modular deck or wall system is briefly discussed.

  3. Multicellular natural convection of a low Prandlt number fluid between horizontal concentric cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Joosik Yoo; Jun Young Choi; Moonuhn Kim . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-01-01

    Two-dimensional natural convection of a fluid of low Prandtl number (Pr = 0.02) in an annulus between two concentric horizontal cylinders is numerically investigated in a wide range of gap widths. For low Grashof numbers, a steady unicellular convection is obtained. Above a transition Grashof number that depends on the gap width, a steady bicellular flow occurs. With further increase of the Grashof number, steady or time-periodic multicellular convection occurs, and finally, complex unsteady convective flow appears. A plot is presented that predicts the type of flow patterns for various combination of gap widths and Grashof numbers.

  4. Cell survival and multiplication. The overriding need for signals: from unicellular to multicellular systems.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, L; Christensen, S T; Schousboe, P; Wheatley, D N

    1996-04-01

    There are clear similarities in the control mechanisms for cell survival and multiplication in the two eukaryotes, the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila and the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cell multiplication in both organisms is activated by the same compounds (phorbol esters, diacylglycerol, tetrapyrroles, etc.). These compounds also affect cell multiplication and other activities in mammalian cell systems. This homology in control mechanisms in two distinct groups of unicellular eukaryotes on the one hand, and in cells from multicellular animals on the other, leads us to propose that these cytoplasmic control mechanisms for cell survival and multiplication originated in the unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:8998973

  5. Differential penetration of targeting agents into multicellular spheroids derived from human neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Mairs, R.J.; Angerson, W.J.; Babich, J.W.; Murray, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The authors have used a multicellular tumour spheroid model for determination of the penetration of various targeting agents of potential use in the treatment of neuroblastoma. Both the radiopharmaceutical meta-iodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) and the {beta} subunit of nerve growth factor ({beta}-NGF) distributed uniformly throughout spheroids, though the latter was poorly concentrated relative to mIBG. In contrast, the anti-neuroectodermal monoclonal antibody. UJ13A bound only to peripheral cell layers with little accumulation in the spheroid interior. Differential penetration of targeting agents may influence the choice of conjugated radionuclide which is likely to achieve maximum therapeutic benefit.

  6. Ultrastructure of Fanconi anemia fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Willingale-Theune, J; Schweiger, M; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M; Meek, A E; Paulin-Levasseur, M; Traub, P

    1989-08-01

    Employing indirect immunofluorescence and conventional electron microscopy, gross nuclear aberrations were observed in cultured interphase fibroblasts derived from a patient suffering from Fanconi's anemia (FA). Such aberrations were predominantly expressed in cells at high passages between 28 and 34. The structure of the nuclei appeared compound in nature, often consisting of two to three nuclear fragments connected to each other by thin nuclear bridges containing chromatin and nuclear lamin material. In other cases, the nuclei appeared lobed or budded but the cells did not contain distinct nuclear fragments. Chromatin was conspicuously absent from some nuclear lobes, revealing empty, cage-like structures comprising nuclear lamin material. Micronuclei were often abundant in the perinuclear cytoplasm but in some instances they appeared to be composed of chromatin lacking a delineating nuclear lamin matrix. Residual cytoskeletons examined by whole-mount electron microscopy revealed a network of intermediate filaments (IFs) within FA fibroblasts forming a bridge between the plasma membrane and the nucleus or its major fragments. In addition, there were thinner, 3-4 nm filaments connecting individual IFs with the surface of the nucleus. Micronuclei that were not connected to the main nuclear body, but which were delineated by a distinct lamina and possessed nuclear pores, did not appear to be anchored to the IF network. Multinuclearity, nuclear fragmentation, irregular chromatin distribution and inter-nuclear chromatin/lamin bridges might result from a failure in the redistribution of chromatin to sister nuclei, incomplete cytokinesis and proliferation of nuclear envelope material. These phenomena point to precocious aging of FA fibroblasts and may occur as a consequence of spontaneous damage to the sister chromatids or through the action of DNA-toxic agents.

  7. Papillary fibroblasts differentiate into reticular fibroblasts after prolonged in vitro culture.

    PubMed

    Janson, David; Saintigny, Gaëlle; Mahé, Christian; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb

    2013-01-01

    The dermis can be divided into two morphologically different layers: the papillary and reticular dermis. Fibroblasts isolated from these layers behave differently when cultured in vitro. During skin ageing, the papillary dermis decreases in volume. Based on the functional differences in vitro, it is hypothesized that the loss of papillary fibroblasts contributes to skin ageing. In this study, we aimed to mimic certain aspects of skin ageing by using high-passage cultures of reticular and papillary fibroblasts and investigated the effect of these cells on skin morphogenesis in reconstructed human skin equivalents. Skin equivalents generated with reticular fibroblasts showed a reduced terminal differentiation and fewer proliferating basal keratinocytes. Aged in vitro papillary fibroblasts had increased expression of biomarkers specific to reticular fibroblasts. The phenotype and morphology of skin equivalents generated with high-passage papillary fibroblasts resembled that of reticular fibroblasts. This demonstrates that papillary fibroblasts can differentiate into reticular fibroblasts in vitro. Therefore, we hypothesize that papillary fibroblasts represent an undifferentiated phenotype, while reticular fibroblasts represent a more differentiated population. The differentiation process could be a new target for anti-skin-ageing strategies.

  8. A parallel implementation of an off-lattice individual-based model of multicellular populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Daniel G.; Fletcher, Alexander G.; Osborne, James M.; Pitt-Francis, Joe

    2015-07-01

    As computational models of multicellular populations include ever more detailed descriptions of biophysical and biochemical processes, the computational cost of simulating such models limits their ability to generate novel scientific hypotheses and testable predictions. While developments in microchip technology continue to increase the power of individual processors, parallel computing offers an immediate increase in available processing power. To make full use of parallel computing technology, it is necessary to develop specialised algorithms. To this end, we present a parallel algorithm for a class of off-lattice individual-based models of multicellular populations. The algorithm divides the spatial domain between computing processes and comprises communication routines that ensure the model is correctly simulated on multiple processors. The parallel algorithm is shown to accurately reproduce the results of a deterministic simulation performed using a pre-existing serial implementation. We test the scaling of computation time, memory use and load balancing as more processes are used to simulate a cell population of fixed size. We find approximate linear scaling of both speed-up and memory consumption on up to 32 processor cores. Dynamic load balancing is shown to provide speed-up for non-regular spatial distributions of cells in the case of a growing population.

  9. Symplasmata are a clonal, conditional, and reversible type of bacterial multicellularity

    PubMed Central

    Tecon, Robin; Leveau, Johan H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms are capable of remarkable social behaviours, such as forming transient multicellular assemblages with properties and adaptive abilities exceeding those of individual cells. Here, we report on the formation and structure of genets known as symplasmata produced by Pantoea eucalypti bacteria. Each symplasmatum develops clonally and stochastically from a single bacterium into a membrane-delimited, capsule-embedded cluster of progeny cells and with a frequency that depends on temperature, pH, and nutrient availability. Transposon mutagenesis identified several gene products required for symplasmata formation, including master regulator LrhA, replication inhibitor CspD, polysaccharide transporter RfbX3, and autoinducer synthase PhzI. We also show that bacteria inside symplasmata are shaped irregularly with punctuated cell-to-cell contacts, metabolically responsive to environmental stimuli, dispersal-ready, and transcriptionally reprogrammed to anticipate multiple alternative futures in terms of carbon source availability. The structured and conditionable nature of symplasmata offers exciting prospects towards a mechanistic understanding of multicellular behaviours and their ecological significance. PMID:27534795

  10. Symplasmata are a clonal, conditional, and reversible type of bacterial multicellularity

    DOE PAGES

    Tecon, Robin; Leveau, Johan H. J.

    2016-08-18

    Microorganisms are capable of remarkable social behaviours, such as forming transient multicellular assemblages with properties and adaptive abilities exceeding those of individual cells. Here, we report on the formation and structure of genets known as symplasmata produced by Pantoea eucalypti bacteria. Each symplasmatum develops clonally and stochastically from a single bacterium into a membrane-delimited, capsule-embedded cluster of progeny cells and with a frequency that depends on temperature, pH, and nutrient availability. Transposon mutagenesis identified several gene products required for symplasmata formation, including master regulator LrhA, replication inhibitor CspD, polysaccharide transporter RfbX3, and autoinducer synthase PhzI. We also show that bacteriamore » inside symplasmata are shaped irregularly with punctuated cell-to-cell contacts, metabolically responsive to environmental stimuli, dispersal-ready, and transcriptionally reprogrammed to anticipate multiple alternative futures in terms of carbon source availability. In conclusion, the structured and conditionable nature of symplasmata offers exciting prospects towards a mechanistic understanding of multicellular behaviours and their ecological significance.« less

  11. Kinetic Monte Carlo and cellular particle dynamics simulations of multicellular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flenner, Elijah; Janosi, Lorant; Barz, Bogdan; Neagu, Adrian; Forgacs, Gabor; Kosztin, Ioan

    2012-03-01

    Computer modeling of multicellular systems has been a valuable tool for interpreting and guiding in vitro experiments relevant to embryonic morphogenesis, tumor growth, angiogenesis and, lately, structure formation following the printing of cell aggregates as bioink particles. Here we formulate two computer simulation methods: (1) a kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and (2) a cellular particle dynamics (CPD) method, which are capable of describing and predicting the shape evolution in time of three-dimensional multicellular systems during their biomechanical relaxation. Our work is motivated by the need of developing quantitative methods for optimizing postprinting structure formation in bioprinting-assisted tissue engineering. The KMC and CPD model parameters are determined and calibrated by using an original computational-theoretical-experimental framework applied to the fusion of two spherical cell aggregates. The two methods are used to predict the (1) formation of a toroidal structure through fusion of spherical aggregates and (2) cell sorting within an aggregate formed by two types of cells with different adhesivities.

  12. Dissolved Gases and Ice Fracturing During the Freezing of a Multicellular Organism: Lessons from Tardigrades.

    PubMed

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Hruba, Jolana

    2015-01-01

    Three issues are critical for successful cryopreservation of multicellular material: gases dissolved in liquid, thermal conductivity of the tissue, and localization of microstructures. Here we show that heat distribution is controlled by the gas amount dissolved in liquids and that when changing the liquid into solid, the dissolved gases either form bubbles due to the absence of space in the lattice of solids and/or are migrated toward the concentrated salt and sugar solution at the cost of amount of heat required to be removed to complete a solid-state transition. These factors affect the heat distribution in the organs to be cryopreserved. We show that the gas concentration issue controls fracturing of ice when freezing. There are volumetric changes not only when changing the liquid into solid (volume increases) but also reduction of the volume when reaching lower temperatures (volume decreases). We discuss these issues parallel with observations of the cryosurvivability of multicellular organisms, tardigrades, and discuss their analogy for cryopreservation of large organs. PMID:26309797

  13. Inter-Specific Coral Chimerism: Genetically Distinct Multicellular Structures Associated with Tissue Loss in Montipora capitata

    PubMed Central

    Work, Thierry M.; Forsman, Zac H.; Szabó, Zoltán; Lewis, Teresa D.; Aeby, Greta S.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Montipora white syndrome (MWS) results in tissue-loss that is often lethal to Montipora capitata, a major reef building coral that is abundant and dominant in the Hawai'ian Archipelago. Within some MWS-affected colonies in Kane'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai'i, we saw unusual motile multicellular structures within gastrovascular canals (hereafter referred to as invasive gastrovascular multicellular structure-IGMS) that were associated with thinning and fragmentation of the basal body wall. IGMS were in significantly greater densities in coral fragments manifesting tissue-loss compared to paired normal fragments. Mesenterial filaments from these colonies yielded typical M. capitata mitochondrial haplotypes (CO1, CR), while IGMS from the same colony consistently yielded distinct haplotypes previously only found in a different Montipora species (Montipora flabellata). Protein profiles showed consistent differences between paired mesenterial filaments and IGMS from the same colonies as did seven microsatellite loci that also exhibited an excess of alleles per locus inconsistent with a single diploid organism. We hypothesize that IGMS are a parasitic cellular lineage resulting from the chimeric fusion between M. capitata and M. flabellata larvae followed by morphological reabsorption of M. flabellata and subsequent formation of cell-lineage parasites. We term this disease Montiporaiasis. Although intra-specific chimerism is common in colonial animals, this is the first suspected inter-specific example and the first associated with tissue loss. PMID:21829541

  14. Inter-specific coral chimerism: genetically distinct multicellular structures associated with tissue loss in Montipora capitata.

    PubMed

    Work, Thierry M; Forsman, Zac H; Szabó, Zoltán; Lewis, Teresa D; Aeby, Greta S; Toonen, Robert J

    2011-01-01

    Montipora white syndrome (MWS) results in tissue-loss that is often lethal to Montipora capitata, a major reef building coral that is abundant and dominant in the Hawai'ian Archipelago. Within some MWS-affected colonies in Kane'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai'i, we saw unusual motile multicellular structures within gastrovascular canals (hereafter referred to as invasive gastrovascular multicellular structure-IGMS) that were associated with thinning and fragmentation of the basal body wall. IGMS were in significantly greater densities in coral fragments manifesting tissue-loss compared to paired normal fragments. Mesenterial filaments from these colonies yielded typical M. capitata mitochondrial haplotypes (CO1, CR), while IGMS from the same colony consistently yielded distinct haplotypes previously only found in a different Montipora species (Montipora flabellata). Protein profiles showed consistent differences between paired mesenterial filaments and IGMS from the same colonies as did seven microsatellite loci that also exhibited an excess of alleles per locus inconsistent with a single diploid organism. We hypothesize that IGMS are a parasitic cellular lineage resulting from the chimeric fusion between M. capitata and M. flabellata larvae followed by morphological reabsorption of M. flabellata and subsequent formation of cell-lineage parasites. We term this disease Montiporaiasis. Although intra-specific chimerism is common in colonial animals, this is the first suspected inter-specific example and the first associated with tissue loss. PMID:21829541

  15. Diminishing-returns epistasis among random beneficial mutations in a multicellular fungus.

    PubMed

    Schoustra, Sijmen; Hwang, Sungmin; Krug, Joachim; de Visser, J Arjan G M

    2016-08-31

    Adaptive evolution ultimately is fuelled by mutations generating novel genetic variation. Non-additivity of fitness effects of mutations (called epistasis) may affect the dynamics and repeatability of adaptation. However, understanding the importance and implications of epistasis is hampered by the observation of substantial variation in patterns of epistasis across empirical studies. Interestingly, some recent studies report increasingly smaller benefits of beneficial mutations once genotypes become better adapted (called diminishing-returns epistasis) in unicellular microbes and single genes. Here, we use Fisher's geometric model (FGM) to generate analytical predictions about the relationship between the effect size of mutations and the extent of epistasis. We then test these predictions using the multicellular fungus Aspergillus nidulans by generating a collection of 108 strains in either a poor or a rich nutrient environment that each carry a beneficial mutation and constructing pairwise combinations using sexual crosses. Our results support the predictions from FGM and indicate negative epistasis among beneficial mutations in both environments, which scale with mutational effect size. Hence, our findings show the importance of diminishing-returns epistasis among beneficial mutations also for a multicellular organism, and suggest that this pattern reflects a generic constraint operating at diverse levels of biological organization. PMID:27559062

  16. An early and anaerobic scenario for the transition to undifferentiated multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Aledo, Juan Carlos

    2008-08-01

    Glycolysis, an ancient energy-processing pathway, can operate either under an efficient but slow regime or, alternatively, under a dissipative but fast-working regime. Trading an increase in efficiency for a decrease in rate represents a cooperative behavior, while a dissipative metabolism can be regarded as a cheating strategy. Herein, using irreversible thermodynamic principles and methods derived from game theory, we investigate whether, and under what conditions, the interplay between these two metabolic strategies may have promoted the clustering of undifferentiated cells. In the current model, multicellularity implies the loss of motility, which represents a hindrance rather than a improvement when competing with mobile single-celled organisms. Despite that, when considering glycolysis as the only energy-processing pathway, we conclude that cells endowed with a low basal anabolic metabolism may have benefited from clustering when faced to compete with cells exhibiting a high anabolic activity. The current results suggest that the transition to multicellularity may have taken place much earlier than hitherto thought, providing support for an extended period of Precambrian metazoan diversification.

  17. Dissolved Gases and Ice Fracturing During the Freezing of a Multicellular Organism: Lessons from Tardigrades.

    PubMed

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Hruba, Jolana

    2015-01-01

    Three issues are critical for successful cryopreservation of multicellular material: gases dissolved in liquid, thermal conductivity of the tissue, and localization of microstructures. Here we show that heat distribution is controlled by the gas amount dissolved in liquids and that when changing the liquid into solid, the dissolved gases either form bubbles due to the absence of space in the lattice of solids and/or are migrated toward the concentrated salt and sugar solution at the cost of amount of heat required to be removed to complete a solid-state transition. These factors affect the heat distribution in the organs to be cryopreserved. We show that the gas concentration issue controls fracturing of ice when freezing. There are volumetric changes not only when changing the liquid into solid (volume increases) but also reduction of the volume when reaching lower temperatures (volume decreases). We discuss these issues parallel with observations of the cryosurvivability of multicellular organisms, tardigrades, and discuss their analogy for cryopreservation of large organs.

  18. Inter-cell interference mitigation in multi-cellular visible light communications.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sun-Young; Kwon, Do-Hoon; Yang, Se-Hoon; Han, Sang-Kook

    2016-04-18

    Inter-cell interference hinders multi-cellular optical wireless communication to support various applications. We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a multicarrier-based cell partitioning scheme, combined with frequency reuse, which could be effective in optical communications although it is inefficient in RF wireless communications. For multicarrier-based cell partitioning, Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-based multiple access (OFDMA) was employed to accommodate multi-cellular optical wireless communications without a large guard band between adjacent cells and without additional RF components. Moreover, we employed filter bank-based multicarrier (FBMC) to mitigate inter-cell interference generated in OFDMA-based cell partitioning due to asynchronous signals originated from RF path difference. By using FBMC-based cell partitioning, inter-cell interference could be effectively mitigated as well as capacity and spectral efficiency were improved about 1.5 times compared to those of OFDMA. Because no cyclic prefix (CP) is required in FBMC, the improvement factor could be increased if there is a large RF path difference between lighting cells. Moreover, it could be a stronger solution when many neighboring cells exist causing large interference. The proposed multicarrier-based cell partitioning combined with FBMC will effectively support visible light communication (VLC)-based localization-based services (LBS) and indoor positioning system by transparently providing trilateration-based positioning method. PMID:27137289

  19. Inter-cell interference mitigation in multi-cellular visible light communications.

    PubMed

    Jung, Sun-Young; Kwon, Do-Hoon; Yang, Se-Hoon; Han, Sang-Kook

    2016-04-18

    Inter-cell interference hinders multi-cellular optical wireless communication to support various applications. We proposed and experimentally demonstrated a multicarrier-based cell partitioning scheme, combined with frequency reuse, which could be effective in optical communications although it is inefficient in RF wireless communications. For multicarrier-based cell partitioning, Orthogonal frequency division multiplexing-based multiple access (OFDMA) was employed to accommodate multi-cellular optical wireless communications without a large guard band between adjacent cells and without additional RF components. Moreover, we employed filter bank-based multicarrier (FBMC) to mitigate inter-cell interference generated in OFDMA-based cell partitioning due to asynchronous signals originated from RF path difference. By using FBMC-based cell partitioning, inter-cell interference could be effectively mitigated as well as capacity and spectral efficiency were improved about 1.5 times compared to those of OFDMA. Because no cyclic prefix (CP) is required in FBMC, the improvement factor could be increased if there is a large RF path difference between lighting cells. Moreover, it could be a stronger solution when many neighboring cells exist causing large interference. The proposed multicarrier-based cell partitioning combined with FBMC will effectively support visible light communication (VLC)-based localization-based services (LBS) and indoor positioning system by transparently providing trilateration-based positioning method.

  20. Inter-specific coral chimerism: Genetically distinct multicellular structures associated with tissue loss in Montipora capitata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, Thierry M.; Forsman, Zac H.; Szabo, Zoltan; Lewis, Teresa D.; Aeby, Greta S.; Toonen, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Montipora white syndrome (MWS) results in tissue-loss that is often lethal to Montipora capitata, a major reef building coral that is abundant and dominant in the Hawai'ian Archipelago. Within some MWS-affected colonies in Kane'ohe Bay, Oahu, Hawai'i, we saw unusual motile multicellular structures within gastrovascular canals (hereafter referred to as invasive gastrovascular multicellular structure-IGMS) that were associated with thinning and fragmentation of the basal body wall. IGMS were in significantly greater densities in coral fragments manifesting tissue-loss compared to paired normal fragments. Mesenterial filaments from these colonies yielded typical M. capitata mitochondrial haplotypes (CO1, CR), while IGMS from the same colony consistently yielded distinct haplotypes previously only found in a different Montipora species (Montipora flabellata). Protein profiles showed consistent differences between paired mesenterial filaments and IGMS from the same colonies as did seven microsatellite loci that also exhibited an excess of alleles per locus inconsistent with a single diploid organism. We hypothesize that IGMS are a parasitic cellular lineage resulting from the chimeric fusion between M. capitata and M. flabellata larvae followed by morphological reabsorption of M. flabellata and subsequent formation of cell-lineage parasites. We term this disease Montiporaiasis. Although intra-specific chimerism is common in colonial animals, this is the first suspected inter-specific example and the first associated with tissue loss.

  1. Dissolved Gases and Ice Fracturing During the Freezing of a Multicellular Organism: Lessons from Tardigrades

    PubMed Central

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Hruba, Jolana

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Three issues are critical for successful cryopreservation of multicellular material: gases dissolved in liquid, thermal conductivity of the tissue, and localization of microstructures. Here we show that heat distribution is controlled by the gas amount dissolved in liquids and that when changing the liquid into solid, the dissolved gases either form bubbles due to the absence of space in the lattice of solids and/or are migrated toward the concentrated salt and sugar solution at the cost of amount of heat required to be removed to complete a solid-state transition. These factors affect the heat distribution in the organs to be cryopreserved. We show that the gas concentration issue controls fracturing of ice when freezing. There are volumetric changes not only when changing the liquid into solid (volume increases) but also reduction of the volume when reaching lower temperatures (volume decreases). We discuss these issues parallel with observations of the cryosurvivability of multicellular organisms, tardigrades, and discuss their analogy for cryopreservation of large organs. PMID:26309797

  2. Symplasmata are a clonal, conditional, and reversible type of bacterial multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Tecon, Robin; Leveau, Johan H J

    2016-01-01

    Microorganisms are capable of remarkable social behaviours, such as forming transient multicellular assemblages with properties and adaptive abilities exceeding those of individual cells. Here, we report on the formation and structure of genets known as symplasmata produced by Pantoea eucalypti bacteria. Each symplasmatum develops clonally and stochastically from a single bacterium into a membrane-delimited, capsule-embedded cluster of progeny cells and with a frequency that depends on temperature, pH, and nutrient availability. Transposon mutagenesis identified several gene products required for symplasmata formation, including master regulator LrhA, replication inhibitor CspD, polysaccharide transporter RfbX3, and autoinducer synthase PhzI. We also show that bacteria inside symplasmata are shaped irregularly with punctuated cell-to-cell contacts, metabolically responsive to environmental stimuli, dispersal-ready, and transcriptionally reprogrammed to anticipate multiple alternative futures in terms of carbon source availability. The structured and conditionable nature of symplasmata offers exciting prospects towards a mechanistic understanding of multicellular behaviours and their ecological significance. PMID:27534795

  3. An early and anaerobic scenario for the transition to undifferentiated multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Aledo, Juan Carlos

    2008-08-01

    Glycolysis, an ancient energy-processing pathway, can operate either under an efficient but slow regime or, alternatively, under a dissipative but fast-working regime. Trading an increase in efficiency for a decrease in rate represents a cooperative behavior, while a dissipative metabolism can be regarded as a cheating strategy. Herein, using irreversible thermodynamic principles and methods derived from game theory, we investigate whether, and under what conditions, the interplay between these two metabolic strategies may have promoted the clustering of undifferentiated cells. In the current model, multicellularity implies the loss of motility, which represents a hindrance rather than a improvement when competing with mobile single-celled organisms. Despite that, when considering glycolysis as the only energy-processing pathway, we conclude that cells endowed with a low basal anabolic metabolism may have benefited from clustering when faced to compete with cells exhibiting a high anabolic activity. The current results suggest that the transition to multicellularity may have taken place much earlier than hitherto thought, providing support for an extended period of Precambrian metazoan diversification. PMID:18626681

  4. Advances in the formation, use and understanding of multi-cellular spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Achilli, Toni-Marie; Meyer, Julia; Morgan, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Developing in vitro models for studying cell biology and cell physiology is of great importance to the fields of biotechnology, cancer research, drug discovery, toxicity testing, as well as the emerging fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Traditional two dimensional (2D) methods of mammalian cell culture have several limitations and it is increasingly recognized that cells grown in a three dimensional (3D) environment more closely represent normal cellular function due to the increased cell-to-cell interactions, and by mimicking the in vivo architecture of natural organs and tissues. Areas Covered In this review, we discuss the methods to form 3D multi-cellular spheroids, the advantages and limitations of these methods, and assays used to characterize the function of spheroids. The use of spheroids has led to many advances in basic cell sciences, including understanding cancer cell interactions, creating models for drug discovery and cancer metastasis, and they are being investigated as basic units for engineering tissue constructs. As so, this review will focus on contributions made to each of these fields using spheroid models. Expert Opinion Multi-cellular spheroids are rich in biological content and mimic better the in vivo environment than 2D cell culture. New technologies to form and analyze spheroids are rapidly increasing their adoption and expanding their applications. PMID:22784238

  5. Stigmergy co-ordinates multicellular collective behaviours during Myxococcus xanthus surface migration.

    PubMed

    Gloag, Erin S; Turnbull, Lynne; Javed, Muhammad A; Wang, Huabin; Gee, Michelle L; Wade, Scott A; Whitchurch, Cynthia B

    2016-01-01

    Surface translocation by the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus is a complex multicellular phenomenon that entails two motility systems. However, the mechanisms by which the activities of individual cells are coordinated to manifest this collective behaviour are currently unclear. Here we have developed a novel assay that enables detailed microscopic examination of M. xanthus motility at the interstitial interface between solidified nutrient medium and a glass coverslip. Under these conditions, M. xanthus motility is characterised by extensive micro-morphological patterning that is considerably more elaborate than occurs at an air-surface interface. We have found that during motility on solidified nutrient medium, M. xanthus forges an interconnected furrow network that is lined with an extracellular matrix comprised of exopolysaccharides, extracellular lipids, membrane vesicles and an unidentified slime. Our observations have revealed that M. xanthus motility on solidified nutrient medium is a stigmergic phenomenon in which multi-cellular collective behaviours are co-ordinated through trail-following that is guided by physical furrows and extracellular matrix materials. PMID:27225967

  6. Stigmergy co-ordinates multicellular collective behaviours during Myxococcus xanthus surface migration

    PubMed Central

    Gloag, Erin S.; Turnbull, Lynne; Javed, Muhammad A.; Wang, Huabin; Gee, Michelle L.; Wade, Scott A.; Whitchurch, Cynthia B.

    2016-01-01

    Surface translocation by the soil bacterium Myxococcus xanthus is a complex multicellular phenomenon that entails two motility systems. However, the mechanisms by which the activities of individual cells are coordinated to manifest this collective behaviour are currently unclear. Here we have developed a novel assay that enables detailed microscopic examination of M. xanthus motility at the interstitial interface between solidified nutrient medium and a glass coverslip. Under these conditions, M. xanthus motility is characterised by extensive micro-morphological patterning that is considerably more elaborate than occurs at an air-surface interface. We have found that during motility on solidified nutrient medium, M. xanthus forges an interconnected furrow network that is lined with an extracellular matrix comprised of exopolysaccharides, extracellular lipids, membrane vesicles and an unidentified slime. Our observations have revealed that M. xanthus motility on solidified nutrient medium is a stigmergic phenomenon in which multi-cellular collective behaviours are co-ordinated through trail-following that is guided by physical furrows and extracellular matrix materials. PMID:27225967

  7. Diminishing-returns epistasis among random beneficial mutations in a multicellular fungus

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Sungmin; Krug, Joachim; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Adaptive evolution ultimately is fuelled by mutations generating novel genetic variation. Non-additivity of fitness effects of mutations (called epistasis) may affect the dynamics and repeatability of adaptation. However, understanding the importance and implications of epistasis is hampered by the observation of substantial variation in patterns of epistasis across empirical studies. Interestingly, some recent studies report increasingly smaller benefits of beneficial mutations once genotypes become better adapted (called diminishing-returns epistasis) in unicellular microbes and single genes. Here, we use Fisher's geometric model (FGM) to generate analytical predictions about the relationship between the effect size of mutations and the extent of epistasis. We then test these predictions using the multicellular fungus Aspergillus nidulans by generating a collection of 108 strains in either a poor or a rich nutrient environment that each carry a beneficial mutation and constructing pairwise combinations using sexual crosses. Our results support the predictions from FGM and indicate negative epistasis among beneficial mutations in both environments, which scale with mutational effect size. Hence, our findings show the importance of diminishing-returns epistasis among beneficial mutations also for a multicellular organism, and suggest that this pattern reflects a generic constraint operating at diverse levels of biological organization. PMID:27559062

  8. A model for the origin of group reproduction during the evolutionary transition to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Maliet, Odile; Shelton, Deborah E; Michod, Richard E

    2015-06-01

    During the evolution of multicellular organisms, the unit of selection and adaptation, the individual, changes from the single cell to the multicellular group. To become individuals, groups must evolve a group life cycle in which groups reproduce other groups. Investigations into the origin of group reproduction have faced a chicken-and-egg problem: traits related to reproduction at the group level often appear both to be a result of and a prerequisite for natural selection at the group level. With a focus on volvocine algae, we model the basic elements of the cell cycle and show how group reproduction can emerge through the coevolution of a life-history trait with a trait underpinning cell cycle change. Our model explains how events in the cell cycle become reordered to create a group life cycle through continuous change in the cell cycle trait, but only if the cell cycle trait can coevolve with the life-history trait. Explaining the origin of group reproduction helps us understand one of life's most familiar, yet fundamental, aspects-its hierarchical structure.

  9. Enhancement of couples' communication and dyadic coping by a self-directed approach: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bodenmann, Guy; Hilpert, Peter; Nussbeck, Fridtjof W; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2014-08-01

    Although prevention of relationship distress and dissolution has potential to strengthen the well-being of partners and any children they are raising, dissemination of prevention programs can be limited because couples face many barriers to in-person participation. An alternative strategy, providing couples with an instructional DVD, is tested in the present study, in which 330 Caucasian couples (N = 660 participants; mean age: men 41.4 years, women 40.0 years) were randomly assigned to a DVD group without any further support, a DVD group with technical telephone coaching, or a wait-list control group. Couples completed questionnaires at pretest, posttest, and 3 and 6 months after completion of the intervention. Self-report measures of dyadic coping, communication quality, ineffective arguing, and relationship satisfaction were used to test whether the intervention groups improved in comparison with the control group. Women in both intervention groups increased in dyadic coping, reduced conflict behavior, and were more satisfied with their relationship 6 months after the intervention. Effects for men were mixed. Participants with poorer skills reported stronger improvement. Intimate relationships can, within limits, be positively influenced by a self-directed approach. Effective dissemination of principles underlying successful relationships can be facilitated through the use of emerging low-cost tools and technologies. PMID:24660673

  10. Enhancement of couples' communication and dyadic coping by a self-directed approach: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bodenmann, Guy; Hilpert, Peter; Nussbeck, Fridtjof W; Bradbury, Thomas N

    2014-08-01

    Although prevention of relationship distress and dissolution has potential to strengthen the well-being of partners and any children they are raising, dissemination of prevention programs can be limited because couples face many barriers to in-person participation. An alternative strategy, providing couples with an instructional DVD, is tested in the present study, in which 330 Caucasian couples (N = 660 participants; mean age: men 41.4 years, women 40.0 years) were randomly assigned to a DVD group without any further support, a DVD group with technical telephone coaching, or a wait-list control group. Couples completed questionnaires at pretest, posttest, and 3 and 6 months after completion of the intervention. Self-report measures of dyadic coping, communication quality, ineffective arguing, and relationship satisfaction were used to test whether the intervention groups improved in comparison with the control group. Women in both intervention groups increased in dyadic coping, reduced conflict behavior, and were more satisfied with their relationship 6 months after the intervention. Effects for men were mixed. Participants with poorer skills reported stronger improvement. Intimate relationships can, within limits, be positively influenced by a self-directed approach. Effective dissemination of principles underlying successful relationships can be facilitated through the use of emerging low-cost tools and technologies.

  11. Emergence of multicellularity in a model of cell growth, death and aggregation under size-dependent selection

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Nebreda, Salva; Solé, Ricard

    2015-01-01

    How multicellular life forms evolved from unicellular ones constitutes a major problem in our understanding of the evolution of our biosphere. A recent set of experiments involving yeast cell populations have shown that selection for faster sedimenting cells leads to the appearance of stable aggregates of cells that are able to split into smaller clusters. It was suggested that the observed evolutionary patterns could be the result of evolved programmes affecting cell death. Here, we show, using a simple model of cell–cell interactions and evolving adhesion rates, that the observed patterns in cluster size and localized mortality can be easily interpreted in terms of waste accumulation and toxicity-driven apoptosis. This simple mechanism would have played a key role in the early evolution of multicellular life forms based on both aggregative and clonal development. The potential extensions of this work and its implications for natural and synthetic multicellularity are discussed. PMID:25551152

  12. The actin of muscle and fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, P J

    1976-01-01

    The isolation and quantification of an 18-residue peptide from the N-terminal region of chicken actin was used to quantify the amount of actin in acetone-dried powders of chicken breast muscle and chicken-embryo fibroblasts. Either isotope dilution or double labelling can be used for peptide quantification. About 17% of the protein of chicken breast muscle was estimated to be actin. However, only 0.25% of the protein of chicken-embryo fibroblasts was determined to be actin by quantification of this peptide. The actin content of fibroblasts may be low or the amino acid sequences of muscle and fibroblast actin may differ in the N-terminal region. The methodology used can be extended to examine whether other regions of muscle actin sequence are present in fibroblasts or other cell types. PMID:938480

  13. Investigating the Link between Self Directed Learning Readiness and Project-Based Learning Outcomes: The Case of International Masters Students in an Engineering Management Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Rodney A.

    2007-01-01

    Modern learning approaches increasingly have fewer structured learning activities and more self-directed learning tasks guided through consultation with academics. Such tasks are predominately project-/problem-based where the student is required to follow a freely guided road map to self discovery while simultaneously achieving desired learning…

  14. Case-Based Learning in Endocrine Physiology: An Approach toward Self-Directed Learning and the Development of Soft Skills in Medical Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gade, Shubhada; Chari, Suresh

    2013-01-01

    The Medical Council of India, in the recent "Vision 2015" document, recommended curricular reforms for undergraduates. Case-based learning (CBL) is one method where students are motivated toward self-directed learning and to develop analytic and problem-solving skills. An overview of thyroid physiology was given in a didactic lecture. A…

  15. Improving Career Services and Research with the Computer Version of the Self-Directed Search (Form R): Technical Report Number 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reardon, Robert C.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of the Self-Directed Search: Computer Version (SDS:CV) in a university career center's service delivery and research activities. Data were collected from a sample of 180 clients over a 16-month period, using the information provided in the professional summary report of the SDS:CV. Social and…

  16. The Effect of Self-directed Exercise Using a Task Board on Pain and Function in the Upper Extremities of Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han Suk; Kim, Jin Ung

    2013-01-01

    [Purpose] We evaluated the effect of self-directed exercise using a task board on function and pain in the upper extremities of stroke patients [Subjects and Methods] We used the one group pre-post test design. Seven stroke patients who were selected based on the inclusion criteria participated in the program once a week for 10 weeks. The self-directed exercise comprised 5 stages that were divided according to the level of difficulty. The exercise was performed for 60 minutes using a special task board that we designed. The FMA (Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment), VAS (Visual Analogue Scale), and speed of stacking were assessed to evaluate the amount of use of the affected arm at before and after intervention. [Results] The scores of the VAS and FMA, but not that of the speed of stacking cups, were improved. There was no significant correlation between the changes in VAS, FMA, and the speed of stacking cups. [Conclusion] The findings suggest that self-directed exercise with the task board could improve the levels of function and pain in the upper extremities. We suggest that self-directed exercise can be utilized as a clinical rehabilitation program and improve therapeutic effects. PMID:24259894

  17. Self-Directed Learning among Children of Ages Nine to Eleven in Tehran: Generating a Persian Version of SDLR-ABE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saeednia, Yadolla

    2011-01-01

    SDL (self-directed learning) now is offered as an alternative form for learning and teaching approach. SDL initially has developed in the field of adult learning. The question that may rise is whether SDL is applicable for younger ages. This study intended to generate a reliable and valid translation of a recently released instrument to measure…

  18. Information Sharing, Self-Directed Learning and Its Implications for Workplace Learning: A Comparison of Business Student Attitudes in Germany and the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beitler, Michael A.; Mitlacher, Lars W.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between self-directed learning readiness (SDLR) of business students in Germany and the USA and their attitudes towards information sharing and to ascertain implications for workplace learning. Design/methodology/approach: This empirical study used a survey research design.…

  19. Training Language Teachers to Sustain Self-Directed Language Learning: An Exploration of Advisers' Experiences on a Web-Based Open Virtual Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailly, Sophie; Ciekanski, Maud; Guély-Costa, Eglantine

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the rationale for pedagogical, technological and organizational choices in the design of a web-based and open virtual learning environment (VLE) promoting and sustaining self-directed language learning. Based on the last forty years of research on learner autonomy at the CRAPEL according to Holec's definition (1988), we…

  20. The Effect of Blended Learning and Social Media-Supported Learning on the Students' Attitude and Self-Directed Learning Skills in Science Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akgunduz, Devrim; Akinoglu, Orhan

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of blended learning and social media supported learning on the students' attitude and self-directed learning skills in Science Education. This research took place with the 7th grade 74 students attending to a primary school in Kadikoy, Istanbul and carried out "Our Body Systems"…

  1. The Investigation of the Level of Self-Directed Learning Readiness According to the Locus of Control and Personality Traits of Preschool Teacher Candidates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balaban Dagal, Asude; Bayindir, Dilan

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the level of self-directed learning readiness, locus of control and the personality traits of preschool teacher candidates. The survey method was used for this study. The study group consisted of 151 teacher candidates who volunteered to participate in the study from Preschool…

  2. Medical Students' and Tutors' Experiences of Directed and Self-Directed Learning Programs in Evidence-Based Medicine: A Qualitative Evaluation Accompanying a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Peter; Oterholt, Christina; Nordheim, Lena; Bjorndal, Arild

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study aims to interpret the results of a randomized controlled trial comparing two educational programs (directed learning and self-directed learning) in evidence-based medicine (EBM) for medical students at the University of Oslo from 2002 to 2003. There is currently very little comparative educational research in this field. In…

  3. The Influence of Adult Learners' Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Network Literacy on Online Learning Effectiveness: A Study of Civil Servants in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Horng-Ji

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the effect of civil servants' Self-Directed Learning Readiness (SDLR) and network literacy on their online learning effectiveness in a web-based training program. Participants were 283 civil servants enrolled in an asynchronous online learning program through an e-learning portal provided by the Regional Civil Service…

  4. Self-Direction in Adult Learning: Perspectives on Theory, Research, and Practice. Routledge Series on Theory and Practice of Adult Education in North America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brockett, Ralph G.; Hiemstra, Roger

    This book provides a comprehensive synthesis of major developments, trends, issues, and practices relative to self-direction and adult education and offers strategies that have direct application to practice. Its intended audiences are practitioners and professors, students, and researchers in adult education. Part I is an introduction. Chapter 1…

  5. Influencing Work-Related Learning: The Role of Job Characteristics and Self-Directed Learning Orientation in Part-Time Vocational Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gijbels, David; Raemdonck, Isabel; Vervecken, Dries

    2010-01-01

    Based on the Demand-Control-Support (DCS) model, the present paper aims to investigate the influence of job characteristics such as job demands, job control, social support at work and self-directed learning orientation on the work-related learning behaviour of workers. The present study was conducted in a centre for part-time vocational education…

  6. The Impact of Curriculum Developed in Line with Authentic Learning on the Teacher Candidates' Success, Attitude and Self-Directed Learning Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hursen, Cigdem

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the impact of the curriculum developed in line with authentic learning on the teacher candidates' success, attitudes towards courses and self-directed learning skills. The study, that is quantitative in nature, is carried out with 64 teacher candidates studying at Near East University and taking the course…

  7. The Effect of Self-Directed Learning Readiness and Online Course Quality Ratings on Student Satisfaction and Academic Performance in Undergraduate eLearning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mead, Molly Sherk

    2011-01-01

    Attrition in online programs has historically been much higher than in traditional face to face programs, creating concern regarding the appropriateness of online learning for all populations. This study aimed to address the question of whether students' levels of self-directed learning readiness and the quality ratings of online courses would be…

  8. An Introduction to "My Environmental Education Evaluation Resource Assistant" (MEERA), a Web-Based Resource for Self-Directed Learning about Environmental Education Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zint, Michaela

    2010-01-01

    My Environmental Education Evaluation Resource Assistant or "MEERA" is a web-site designed to support environmental educators' program evaluation activities. MEERA has several characteristics that set it apart from other self-directed learning evaluation resources. Readers are encouraged to explore the site and to reflect on the role that…

  9. High-order sliding mode control of a DC motor drive via a switched controlled multi-cellular converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djemaï, M.; Busawon, K.; Benmansour, K.; Marouf, A.

    2011-11-01

    In this article, we present a high-order sliding mode controller of a DC motor drive connected to a multi-cellular converter. More specifically, we design a second-order (super-twisting) control algorithm for the speed regulation of a DC motor. For this, a switching control for the multi-cellular converter is derived in order to supply the correct reference value for the speed regulation. A practical implementation of the controller is realised using a laboratory set-up. The performance and the validity of the controller are shown experimentally.

  10. Tensional homeostasis in single fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Webster, Kevin D; Ng, Win Pin; Fletcher, Daniel A

    2014-07-01

    Adherent cells generate forces through acto-myosin contraction to move, change shape, and sense the mechanical properties of their environment. They are thought to maintain defined levels of tension with their surroundings despite mechanical perturbations that could change tension, a concept known as tensional homeostasis. Misregulation of tensional homeostasis has been proposed to drive disorganization of tissues and promote progression of diseases such as cancer. However, whether tensional homeostasis operates at the single cell level is unclear. Here, we directly test the ability of single fibroblast cells to regulate tension when subjected to mechanical displacements in the absence of changes to spread area or substrate elasticity. We use a feedback-controlled atomic force microscope to measure and modulate forces and displacements of individual contracting cells as they spread on a fibronectin-patterned atomic-force microscope cantilever and coverslip. We find that the cells reach a steady-state contraction force and height that is insensitive to stiffness changes as they fill the micropatterned areas. Rather than maintaining a constant tension, the fibroblasts altered their contraction force in response to mechanical displacement in a strain-rate-dependent manner, leading to a new and stable steady-state force and height. This response is influenced by overexpression of the actin crosslinker α-actinin, and rheology measurements reveal that changes in cell elasticity are also strain- rate-dependent. Our finding of tensional buffering, rather than homeostasis, allows cells to transition between different tensional states depending on how they are displaced, permitting distinct responses to slow deformations during tissue growth and rapid deformations associated with injury.

  11. Are self-directed parenting interventions sufficient for externalising behaviour problems in childhood? A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tarver, Joanne; Daley, David; Lockwood, Joanna; Sayal, Kapil

    2014-12-01

    Externalising behaviour in childhood is a prevalent problem in the field of child and adolescent mental health. Parenting interventions are widely accepted as efficacious treatment options for reducing externalising behaviour, yet practical and psychological barriers limit their accessibility. This review aims to establish the evidence base of self-directed (SD) parenting interventions for externalising behaviour problems. Electronic searches of PubMed, Web of Knowledge, Psychinfo, Embase and CENTRAL databases and manual searches of reference lists of relevant reviews identified randomised controlled trials and cluster randomised controlled trials examining the efficacy of SD interventions compared to no-treatment or active control groups. A random-effect meta-analysis estimated pooled standard mean difference (SMD) for SD interventions on measures of externalising child behaviour. Secondary analyses examined their effect on measures of parenting behaviour, parental stress and mood and parenting efficacy. Eleven eligible trials were included in the analyses. SD interventions had a large effect on parent report of externalising child behaviour (SMD = 1.01, 95 % CI: 0.77-1.24); although this effect was not upheld by analyses of observed child behaviour. Secondary analyses revealed effects of small to moderate magnitude on measures of parenting behaviour, parental mood and stress and parenting efficacy. An analysis comparing SD interventions with therapist-led parenting interventions revealed no significant difference on parent-reported measures of externalising child behaviour. SD interventions are associated with improvements in parental perception of externalising child behaviour and parental behaviour and well-being. Future research should further investigate the relative efficacy and cost-effectiveness of SD interventions compared to therapist-led interventions.

  12. Asymmetries in the production of self-directed behavior by chimpanzees and gorillas during a computerized cognitive test.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Katherine E; Hopper, Lydia M; Ross, Stephen R

    2016-03-01

    Self-directed behaviors (SDBs) are a commonly used behavioral indicator of arousal in nonhuman primates. Experimental manipulations, designed to increase arousal and uncertainty, have been used to elicit SDB production in primates. Beyond measuring rates of SDB production, researchers have also recorded their lateralized production by primates, thought to reflect laterality of hemispheric brain control and response to emotion. Although a handful of such studies exist, all have been conducted with chimpanzees. Expanding on this line of inquiry, we tested both chimpanzees (N = 3) and gorillas (N = 3) in a serial learning task presented on a touchscreen interface that incorporated both EASY (two-item list) and HARD (four-item list) versions of the task. Although SDB production by the apes did not differ across the two levels of task complexity, both species produced higher rates of SDB when they made an error, regardless of task difficulty. Furthermore, the apes made more SDB with the left hand-directed to the right side of their body (contralateral SDB) and left side of their body (ipsilateral SDB)-when they made an incorrect response. There was no difference in the rate of SDB produced with the right hand across correct compared to incorrect trials. The apes' responses reflect previous reports that show humans are quicker at selecting negative emotional stimuli when using their left, compared to their right, hand (the reverse is true for positive stimuli). However, previous work has shown that chimpanzees are more likely to produce (contralateral) SDB with their right hand when aroused and so we discuss our results in relation to these findings and consider how they relate to the 'right hemisphere' and 'valence' models of emotional processing in apes. PMID:26577088

  13. Phenotypes on demand via switchable target protein degradation in multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Faden, Frederik; Ramezani, Thomas; Mielke, Stefan; Almudi, Isabel; Nairz, Knud; Froehlich, Marceli S; Höckendorff, Jörg; Brandt, Wolfgang; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Dohmen, R Jürgen; Schnittger, Arp; Dissmeyer, Nico

    2016-07-22

    Phenotypes on-demand generated by controlling activation and accumulation of proteins of interest are invaluable tools to analyse and engineer biological processes. While temperature-sensitive alleles are frequently used as conditional mutants in microorganisms, they are usually difficult to identify in multicellular species. Here we present a versatile and transferable, genetically stable system based on a low-temperature-controlled N-terminal degradation signal (lt-degron) that allows reversible and switch-like tuning of protein levels under physiological conditions in vivo. Thereby, developmental effects can be triggered and phenotypes on demand generated. The lt-degron was established to produce conditional and cell-type-specific phenotypes and is generally applicable in a wide range of organisms, from eukaryotic microorganisms to plants and poikilothermic animals. We have successfully applied this system to control the abundance and function of transcription factors and different enzymes by tunable protein accumulation.

  14. Overproduction and easy recovery of biofuels from engineered cyanobacteria, autolyzing multicellular cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Satomi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Ikeda, Ayae; Fukuda, Hirofumi; Kitazaki, Chifumi; Asayama, Munehiko

    2015-06-01

    The semi-filamentous multicellular cyanobacterium Limnothrix/Pseudanabaena sp. strain ABRG5-3 undergoes autolysis, which involves the accumulation of polyphosphate compounds and disintegration of thylakoid membranes in cells, as a unique feature that occurs due to growth conditions. In this study, the overexpression and easy recovery of alkane (a saturated hydrocarbon, C17H36) as a biofuel were examined in recombinants of the cyanobacteria ABRG5-3 and Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803. The results obtained indicated that the accumulated mass of alkane accounted for ∼50 or 60% of the dry weight of ABRG5-3 or PCC6803 recombinant cells, respectively. Furthermore, cultivating cells in liquid medium BG11 in which the nitrogen resource had been depleted promoted the production of alkane and cell lysis, resulting in the easy recovery of target products from the supernatant. PMID:25661591

  15. Overproduction and easy recovery of biofuels from engineered cyanobacteria, autolyzing multicellular cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Satomi; Takahashi, Masatoshi; Ikeda, Ayae; Fukuda, Hirofumi; Kitazaki, Chifumi; Asayama, Munehiko

    2015-06-01

    The semi-filamentous multicellular cyanobacterium Limnothrix/Pseudanabaena sp. strain ABRG5-3 undergoes autolysis, which involves the accumulation of polyphosphate compounds and disintegration of thylakoid membranes in cells, as a unique feature that occurs due to growth conditions. In this study, the overexpression and easy recovery of alkane (a saturated hydrocarbon, C17H36) as a biofuel were examined in recombinants of the cyanobacteria ABRG5-3 and Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803. The results obtained indicated that the accumulated mass of alkane accounted for ∼50 or 60% of the dry weight of ABRG5-3 or PCC6803 recombinant cells, respectively. Furthermore, cultivating cells in liquid medium BG11 in which the nitrogen resource had been depleted promoted the production of alkane and cell lysis, resulting in the easy recovery of target products from the supernatant.

  16. Colloquium: Modeling the dynamics of multicellular systems: Application to tissue engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosztin, Ioan; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Forgacs, Gabor

    2012-10-01

    Tissue engineering is a rapidly evolving discipline that aims at building functional tissues to improve or replace damaged ones. To be successful in such an endeavor, ideally, the engineering of tissues should be based on the principles of developmental biology. Recent progress in developmental biology suggests that the formation of tissues from the composing cells is often guided by physical laws. Here a comprehensive computational-theoretical formalism is presented that is based on experimental input and incorporates biomechanical principles of developmental biology. The formalism is described and it is shown that it correctly reproduces and predicts the quantitative characteristics of the fundamental early developmental process of tissue fusion. Based on this finding, the formalism is then used toward the optimization of the fabrication of tubular multicellular constructs, such as a vascular graft, by bioprinting, a novel tissue engineering technology.

  17. The cellular Ising model: a framework for phase transitions in multicellular environments.

    PubMed

    Weber, Marc; Buceta, Javier

    2016-06-01

    Inspired by the Ising model, we introduce a gene regulatory network that induces a phase transition that coordinates robustly the behaviour of cell ensembles. The building blocks of the design are the so-called toggle switch interfaced with two quorum sensing modules, Las and Lux. We show that as a function of the transport rate of signalling molecules across the cell membrane the population undergoes a spontaneous symmetry breaking from cells individually switching their phenotypes to a global collective phenotypic organization. By characterizing the critical behaviour, we reveal some properties, such as phenotypic memory and hypersensitivity, with relevance in the field of synthetic biology. We argue that our results can be extrapolated to other multicellular systems and be a generic framework for collective decision-making processes. PMID:27307510

  18. Virus-host arms race at the joint origin of multicellularity and programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Iranzo, Jaime; Lobkovsky, Alexander E; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V

    2014-01-01

    Unicellular eukaryotes and most prokaryotes possess distinct mechanisms of programmed cell death (PCD). How an "altruistic" trait, such as PCD, could evolve in unicellular organisms? To address this question, we developed a mathematical model of the virus-host co-evolution that involves interaction between immunity, PCD and cellular aggregation. Analysis of the parameter space of this model shows that under high virus load and imperfect immunity, joint evolution of cell aggregation and PCD is the optimal evolutionary strategy. Given the abundance of viruses in diverse habitats and the wide spread of PCD in most organisms, these findings imply that multiple instances of the emergence of multicellularity and its essential attribute, PCD, could have been driven, at least in part, by the virus-host arms race.

  19. A New Subcarrier Allocation Strategy for MIMO-OFDMA Multicellular Networks Based on Cooperative Interference Mitigation

    PubMed Central

    Gkonis, Panagiotis K.; Seimeni, Maria A.; Asimakis, Nikolaos P.; Kaklamani, Dimitra I.; Venieris, Iakovos S.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the study presented in this paper is to investigate the performance of a new subcarrier allocation strategy for Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiple Access (OFDMA) multicellular networks which employ Multiple Input Multiple Output (MIMO) architecture. For this reason, a hybrid system-link level simulator has been developed executing independent Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in parallel. Up to two tiers of cells around the central cell are taken into consideration and increased loading per cell. The derived results indicate that this strategy can provide up to 12% capacity gain for 16-QAM modulation and two tiers of cells around the central cell in a symmetric 2 × 2 MIMO configuration. This gain is derived when comparing the proposed strategy to the traditional approach of allocating subcarriers that maximize only the desired user's signal. PMID:24683351

  20. Phenotypes on demand via switchable target protein degradation in multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Faden, Frederik; Ramezani, Thomas; Mielke, Stefan; Almudi, Isabel; Nairz, Knud; Froehlich, Marceli S; Höckendorff, Jörg; Brandt, Wolfgang; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Dohmen, R Jürgen; Schnittger, Arp; Dissmeyer, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes on-demand generated by controlling activation and accumulation of proteins of interest are invaluable tools to analyse and engineer biological processes. While temperature-sensitive alleles are frequently used as conditional mutants in microorganisms, they are usually difficult to identify in multicellular species. Here we present a versatile and transferable, genetically stable system based on a low-temperature-controlled N-terminal degradation signal (lt-degron) that allows reversible and switch-like tuning of protein levels under physiological conditions in vivo. Thereby, developmental effects can be triggered and phenotypes on demand generated. The lt-degron was established to produce conditional and cell-type-specific phenotypes and is generally applicable in a wide range of organisms, from eukaryotic microorganisms to plants and poikilothermic animals. We have successfully applied this system to control the abundance and function of transcription factors and different enzymes by tunable protein accumulation. PMID:27447739

  1. Concentration-flux relations for a multicellular biological membrane with Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Auton, T.R. )

    1993-05-01

    A mathematical model is described for the simultaneous diffusion and metabolism of a chemical penetrating a multicellular biological membrane such as skin. Metabolism is assumed to follow saturable Michaelis-Menten kinetics, which leads to nonlinear relationships between the applied concentration and the metabolic and diffusive fluxes through the membrane. Approximate concentration flux relations are derived under limiting conditions, and a computational method is described for the general case. The major barrier to dermal penetration of very lipophilic molecules is thought to be the viable tissues (viable epidermis and some of the dermis) underlying the stratum corneum, and some molecules are known to be metabolized by enzymes within these tissues. It is proposed to use the model to describe penetration and metabolism os such lipophilic molecules within the viable tissues of the skin. 16 refs., 4 figs.

  2. Implementation of Complex Biological Logic Circuits Using Spatially Distributed Multicellular Consortia

    PubMed Central

    Urrios, Arturo; de Nadal, Eulàlia; Solé, Ricard; Posas, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Engineered synthetic biological devices have been designed to perform a variety of functions from sensing molecules and bioremediation to energy production and biomedicine. Notwithstanding, a major limitation of in vivo circuit implementation is the constraint associated to the use of standard methodologies for circuit design. Thus, future success of these devices depends on obtaining circuits with scalable complexity and reusable parts. Here we show how to build complex computational devices using multicellular consortia and space as key computational elements. This spatial modular design grants scalability since its general architecture is independent of the circuit’s complexity, minimizes wiring requirements and allows component reusability with minimal genetic engineering. The potential use of this approach is demonstrated by implementation of complex logical functions with up to six inputs, thus demonstrating the scalability and flexibility of this method. The potential implications of our results are outlined. PMID:26829588

  3. Phenotypes on demand via switchable target protein degradation in multicellular organisms

    PubMed Central

    Faden, Frederik; Ramezani, Thomas; Mielke, Stefan; Almudi, Isabel; Nairz, Knud; Froehlich, Marceli S.; Höckendorff, Jörg; Brandt, Wolfgang; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Dohmen, R. Jürgen; Schnittger, Arp; Dissmeyer, Nico

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes on-demand generated by controlling activation and accumulation of proteins of interest are invaluable tools to analyse and engineer biological processes. While temperature-sensitive alleles are frequently used as conditional mutants in microorganisms, they are usually difficult to identify in multicellular species. Here we present a versatile and transferable, genetically stable system based on a low-temperature-controlled N-terminal degradation signal (lt-degron) that allows reversible and switch-like tuning of protein levels under physiological conditions in vivo. Thereby, developmental effects can be triggered and phenotypes on demand generated. The lt-degron was established to produce conditional and cell-type-specific phenotypes and is generally applicable in a wide range of organisms, from eukaryotic microorganisms to plants and poikilothermic animals. We have successfully applied this system to control the abundance and function of transcription factors and different enzymes by tunable protein accumulation. PMID:27447739

  4. A combined light sheet fluorescence and differential interference contrast microscope for live imaging of multicellular specimens.

    PubMed

    Baker, R P; Taormina, M J; Jemielita, M; Parthasarathy, R

    2015-05-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: light sheet fluorescence microscopy provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labelled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, whereas differential interference contrast microscopy reveals the unlabelled neighbourhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for differential interference contrast microscopy and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behaviour of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. PMID:25611324

  5. A Combined Light Sheet Fluorescence and Differential Interference Contrast Microscope for Live Imaging of Multicellular Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ryan P.; Taormina, Michael J.; Jemielita, Matthew; Parthasarathy, Raghuveer

    2014-01-01

    We describe a microscope capable of both light sheet fluorescence microscopy (LSFM) and differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM). The two imaging modes, which to the best of our knowledge have not previously been combined, are complementary: LSFM provides three-dimensional imaging of fluorescently labeled components of multicellular systems with high speed, large fields of view, and low phototoxicity, while DICM reveals the unlabeled neighborhood of tissues, organs, and other structures with high contrast and inherent optical sectioning. Use of a single Nomarski prism for DICM and a shared detection path for both imaging modes enables simple integration of the two techniques in one custom microscope. We provide several examples of the utility of the resulting instrument, focusing especially on the digestive tract of the larval zebrafish, revealing in this complex and heterogeneous environment anatomical features, the behavior of commensal microbes, immune cell motions, and more. PMID:25611324

  6. Rapid Engineering of Three-Dimensional, Multicellular Tissues With Polymeric Scaffolds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Jordan, Jacqueline; Fraga, Denise N.

    2007-01-01

    A process has been developed for the rapid tissue engineering of multicellular-tissue-equivalent assemblies by the controlled enzymatic degradation of polymeric beads in a low-fluid-shear bioreactor. In this process, the porous polymeric beads serve as temporary scaffolds to support the assemblies of cells in a tissuelike 3D configuration during the critical initial growth phases of attachment of anchorage-dependent cells, aggregation of the cells, and formation of a 3D extracellular matrix. Once the cells are assembled into a 3D array and enmeshed in a structural supportive 3D extracellular matrix (ECM), the polymeric scaffolds can be degraded in the low-fluid-shear environment of the NASA-designed bioreactor. The natural 3D tissuelike assembly, devoid of any artificial support structure, is maintained in the low-shear bioreactor environment by the newly formed natural cellular/ECM. The elimination of the artificial scaffold allows normal tissue structure and function.

  7. Generating Cellular Diversity and Spatial Form: Wnt Signaling and the Evolution of Multicellular Animals.

    PubMed

    Loh, Kyle M; van Amerongen, Renée; Nusse, Roel

    2016-09-26

    There were multiple prerequisites to the evolution of multicellular animal life, including the generation of multiple cell fates ("cellular diversity") and their patterned spatial arrangement ("spatial form"). Wnt proteins operate as primordial symmetry-breaking signals. By virtue of their short-range nature and their capacity to activate both lineage-specifying and cell-polarizing intracellular signaling cascades, Wnts can polarize cells at their site of contact, orienting the axis of cell division while simultaneously programming daughter cells to adopt diverging fates in a spatially stereotyped way. By coupling cell fate to position, symmetry-breaking Wnt signals were pivotal in constructing the metazoan body by generating cellular diversity and spatial form. PMID:27676437

  8. Communication-induced multistability and multirhythmicity in a synthetic multicellular system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Qizhi; Zhou, Tianshou

    2011-05-01

    Traditionally, the main role of cell-to-cell communication was thought of as synchronizing a population of cells, thereby coordinating cellular behavior. Here we show that cell density, which quantifies cellular communication, can induce multistability and multirhythmicity in a synthetic multicellular system, where individual oscillators are a combination of repressillator and hysteresis-based oscillators and are coupled through a quorum-sensing mechanism. Specifically, for moderately small cell densities, the coupled system can exhibit multistability including stable homogenous and inhomogeneous steady states. For moderately large cell densities, it has the potential to generate multirhythmicity including multimode oscillations such as an in-phase periodic solution, antiphase periodic solution, asymmetric periodic solution, mixed-mode oscillations, coexistence of periodic orbits of several different modes, and bursting oscillations such as periodic bursting, torus quasiperiodic bursting, and chaotic bursting. Such versatility of cell-to-cell communication would be beneficial for cells or organisms to live in diversely changeable environments.

  9. Electrical consequences of cardiac myocyte: fibroblast coupling.

    PubMed

    McArthur, Lisa; Chilton, Lisa; Smith, Godfrey L; Nicklin, Stuart A

    2015-06-01

    Gap junctions are channels which allow electrical signals to propagate through the heart from the sinoatrial node and through the atria, conduction system and onwards to the ventricles, and hence are essential for co-ordinated cardiac contraction. Twelve connexin (Cx) proteins make up one gap junction channel, of which there are three main subtypes in the heart; Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45. In the cardiac myocyte, gap junctions are present mainly at the intercalated discs between neighbouring myocytes, and assist in rapid electrical conduction throughout the ventricular myocardium. Fibroblasts provide the structural skeleton of the myocardium and fibroblast numbers significantly increase in heart disease. Fibroblasts also express connexins and this may facilitate heterocellular electrical coupling between myocytes and fibroblasts in the setting of cardiac disease. Interestingly, cardiac fibroblasts have been demonstrated to increase Cx43 expression in experimental models of myocardial infarction and functional gap junctions between myocytes and fibroblasts have been reported. Therefore, in the setting of heart disease enhanced cardiac myocyte: fibroblast coupling may influence the electrical activity of the myocyte and contribute to arrhythmias.

  10. Transcriptional control of cardiac fibroblast plasticity.

    PubMed

    Lighthouse, Janet K; Small, Eric M

    2016-02-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts help maintain the normal architecture of the healthy heart and are responsible for scar formation and the healing response to pathological insults. Various genetic, biomechanical, or humoral factors stimulate fibroblasts to become contractile smooth muscle-like cells called myofibroblasts that secrete large amounts of extracellular matrix. Unfortunately, unchecked myofibroblast activation in heart disease leads to pathological fibrosis, which is a major risk factor for the development of cardiac arrhythmias and heart failure. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control fibroblast plasticity and myofibroblast activation is essential to develop novel strategies to specifically target pathological cardiac fibrosis without disrupting the adaptive healing response. This review highlights the major transcriptional mediators of fibroblast origin and function in development and disease. The contribution of the fetal epicardial gene program will be discussed in the context of fibroblast origin in development and following injury, primarily focusing on Tcf21 and C/EBP. We will also highlight the major transcriptional regulatory axes that control fibroblast plasticity in the adult heart, including transforming growth factor β (TGFβ)/Smad signaling, the Rho/myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF)/serum response factor (SRF) axis, and Calcineurin/transient receptor potential channel (TRP)/nuclear factor of activated T-Cell (NFAT) signaling. Finally, we will discuss recent strategies to divert the fibroblast transcriptional program in an effort to promote cardiomyocyte regeneration. This article is a part of a Special Issue entitled "Fibrosis and Myocardial Remodeling". PMID:26721596

  11. Rapid formation of size-controllable multicellular spheroids via 3D acoustic tweezers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kejie; Wu, Mengxi; Guo, Feng; Li, Peng; Chan, Chung Yu; Mao, Zhangming; Li, Sixing; Ren, Liqiang; Zhang, Rui; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-07-01

    The multicellular spheroid is an important 3D cell culture model for drug screening, tissue engineering, and fundamental biological research. Although several spheroid formation methods have been reported, the field still lacks high-throughput and simple fabrication methods to accelerate its adoption in drug development industry. Surface acoustic wave (SAW) based cell manipulation methods, which are known to be non-invasive, flexible, and high-throughput, have not been successfully developed for fabricating 3D cell assemblies or spheroids, due to the limited understanding on SAW-based vertical levitation. In this work, we demonstrated the capability of fabricating multicellular spheroids in the 3D acoustic tweezers platform. Our method used drag force from microstreaming to levitate cells in the vertical direction, and used radiation force from Gor'kov potential to aggregate cells in the horizontal plane. After optimizing the device geometry and input power, we demonstrated the rapid and high-throughput nature of our method by continuously fabricating more than 150 size-controllable spheroids and transferring them to Petri dishes every 30 minutes. The spheroids fabricated by our 3D acoustic tweezers can be cultured for a week with good cell viability. We further demonstrated that spheroids fabricated by this method could be used for drug testing. Unlike the 2D monolayer model, HepG2 spheroids fabricated by the 3D acoustic tweezers manifested distinct drug resistance, which matched existing reports. The 3D acoustic tweezers based method can serve as a novel bio-manufacturing tool to fabricate complex 3D cell assembles for biological research, tissue engineering, and drug development. PMID:27327102

  12. Molecular recognition between glyconectins as an adhesion self-assembly pathway to multicellularity.

    PubMed

    Misevic, Gradimir N; Guerardel, Yann; Sumanovski, Lazar T; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Demarty, Maurice; Ripoll, Camille; Karamanos, Yannis; Maes, Emmanuel; Popescu, Octavian; Strecker, Gerard

    2004-04-01

    The appearance of multicellular forms of life has been tightly coupled to the ability of an organism to retain its own anatomical integrity and to distinguish self from non-self. Large glycoconjugates, which make up the outermost cell surface layer of all Metazoans, are the primary candidates for the primordial adhesion and recognition functions in biological self-assembly systems. Atomic force microscopy experiments demonstrated that the binding strength between a single pair of Porifera cell surface glyconectin 1 glycoconjugates from Microciona prolifera can hold the weight of 1600 cells, proving their adhesion functions. Here, measurement of molecular self-recognition of glyconectins (GNs) purified from three Porifera species was used as an experimental model for primordial xenogeneic self/non-self discrimination. Physicochemical and biochemical characterization of the three glyconectins, their glycans, and peptides using gel electrophoresis, ultracentrifugation, NMR, mass spectrometry, glycosaminoglycan-degrading enzyme treatment, amino acid and carbohydrate analyses, and peptide mapping showed that GNs define a new family of proteoglycan-like molecules exhibiting species-specific structures with complex and repetitive acidic carbohydrate motives different from the classical proteoglycans and mucins. In functional self-assembly color-coded bead, cell, and blotting assays, glyconectins displayed species-specific recognition and adhesion. Affinity-purified monospecific polyclonal antibodies prepared against GN1, -2, and -3 glycans selectively inhibited cell adhesion of the respective sponge species. These results together with species-specific coaggregation of GN carbohydrate-coated beads with cells showed that GN glycans are functional in cell recognition and adhesion. The specificity of carbohydrate-mediated homophilic GN interactions in Porifera approaches the binding selectivity of the evolutionarily advanced immunoglobulin superfamily. Xenoselectivity of

  13. Cellular differentiation and individuality in the “minor” multicellular taxa

    PubMed Central

    Herron, Matthew D.; Rashidi, Armin; Shelton, Deborah E.; Driscoll, William W.

    2014-01-01

    Biology needs a concept of individuality in order to distinguish organisms from parts of organisms and from groups of organisms, to count individuals and compare traits across taxa, and to distinguish growth from reproduction. Most of the proposed criteria for individuality were designed for ‘unitary’ or ‘paradigm’ organisms: contiguous, functionally and physiologically integrated, obligately sexually reproducing multicellular organisms with a germ line sequestered early in development. However, the vast majority of the diversity of life on Earth does not conform to all of these criteria. We consider the issue of individuality in the ‘minor’ multicellular taxa, which collectively span a large portion of the eukaryotic tree of life, reviewing their general features and focusing on a model species for each group. When the criteria designed for unitary organisms are applied to other groups, they often give conflicting answers or no answer at all to the question of whether or not a given unit is an individual. Complex life cycles, intimate bacterial symbioses, aggregative development, and strange genetic features complicate the picture. The great age of some of the groups considered shows that ‘intermediate’ forms, those with some but not all of the traits traditionally associated with individuality, cannot reasonably be considered ephemeral or assumed transitional. We discuss a handful of recent attempts to reconcile the many proposed criteria for individuality and to provide criteria that can be applied across all the domains of life. Finally, we argue that individuality should be defined without reference to any particular taxon and that understanding the emergence of new kinds of individuals requires recognizing individuality as a matter of degree. PMID:23448295

  14. The Erwinia chrysanthemi Type III Secretion System Is Required for Multicellular Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Mee-Ngan; Yang, Ching-Hong; Barak, Jeri D.; Jahn, Courtney E.; Charkowski, Amy O.

    2005-01-01

    Enterobacterial animal pathogens exhibit aggregative multicellular behavior, which is manifested as pellicles on the culture surface and biofilms at the surface-liquid-air interface. Pellicle formation behavior requires production of extracellular polysaccharide, cellulose, and protein filaments, known as curli. Protein filaments analogous to curli are formed by many protein secretion systems, including the type III secretion system (TTSS). Here, we demonstrate that Erwinia chrysanthemi, which does not carry curli genes, requires the TTSS for pellicle formation. These data support a model where cellulose and generic protein filaments, which consist of either curli or TTSS-secreted proteins, are required for enterobacterial aggregative multicellular behavior. Using this assay, we found that hrpY, which encodes a two-component system response regulator homolog, is required for activity of hrpS, which encodes a σ54-dependent enhancer-binding protein homolog. In turn, hrpS is required for activity of the sigma factor homolog hrpL, which activates genes encoding TTSS structural and secreted proteins. Pellicle formation was temperature dependent and pellicles did not form at 36°C, even though TTSS genes were expressed at this temperature. We found that cellulose is a component of the E. chrysanthemi pellicle but that pellicle formation still occurs in a strain with an insertion in a cellulose synthase subunit homolog. Since the TTSS, but not the cellulose synthase subunit, is required for E. chrysanthemi pellicle formation, this inexpensive assay can be used as a high throughput screen for TTSS mutants or inhibitors. PMID:15629935

  15. Three dimensional multi-cellular muscle-like tissue engineering in perfusion-based bioreactors.

    PubMed

    Cerino, Giulia; Gaudiello, Emanuele; Grussenmeyer, Thomas; Melly, Ludovic; Massai, Diana; Banfi, Andrea; Martin, Ivan; Eckstein, Friedrich; Grapow, Martin; Marsano, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Conventional tissue engineering strategies often rely on the use of a single progenitor cell source to engineer in vitro biological models; however, multi-cellular environments can better resemble the complexity of native tissues. Previous described co-culture models used skeletal myoblasts, as parenchymal cell source, and mesenchymal or endothelial cells, as stromal component. Here, we propose instead the use of adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction cells, which include both mesenchymal and endothelial cells, to better resemble the native stroma. Percentage of serum supplementation is one of the crucial parameters to steer skeletal myoblasts toward either proliferation (20%) or differentiation (5%) in two-dimensional culture conditions. On the contrary, three-dimensional (3D) skeletal myoblast culture often simply adopts the serum content used in monolayer, without taking into account the new cell environment. When considering 3D cultures of mm-thick engineered tissues, homogeneous and sufficient oxygen supply is paramount to avoid formation of necrotic cores. Perfusion-based bioreactor culture can significantly improve the oxygen access to the cells, enhancing the viability and the contractility of the engineered tissues. In this study, we first investigated the influence of different serum supplementations on the skeletal myoblast ability to proliferate and differentiate during 3D perfusion-based culture. We tested percentages of serum promoting monolayer skeletal myoblast-proliferation (20%) and differentiation (5%) and suitable for stromal cell culture (10%) with a view to identify the most suitable condition for the subsequent co-culture. The 10% serum medium composition resulted in the highest number of mature myotubes and construct functionality. Co-culture with stromal vascular fraction cells at 10% serum also supported the skeletal myoblast differentiation and maturation, hence providing a functional engineered 3D muscle model that resembles

  16. Dynamical patterning modules: a "pattern language" for development and evolution of multicellular form.

    PubMed

    Newman, Stuart A; Bhat, Ramray

    2009-01-01

    This article considers the role played by a core set of "dynamical patterning modules" (DPMs) in the origination, development and evolution of complex organisms. These consist of the products of a subset of the genes of what has come to be known as the "developmental-genetic toolkit" in association with physical processes they mobilize. The physical processes are those characteristic of chemically and mechanically excitable mesoscopic systems like cell aggregates: cohesion, viscoelasticity, diffusion, spatiotemporal heterogeneity based on activator-inhibitor interaction, and multistable and oscillatory dynamics. We focus on the emergence of the Metazoa, and show how toolkit gene products and pathways that pre-existed the metazoans acquired novel morphogenetic functions simply by virtue of the change in scale and context inherent to multicellularity. We propose that DPMs, acting singly and in combination with each other, constitute a "pattern language" capable of generating all metazoan body plans and organ forms. This concept implies that the multicellular organisms of the late Precambrian-early Cambrian were phenotypically plastic, fluently exploring morphospace in a fashion decoupled from both function-based selection and genotypic change. The relatively stable developmental trajectories and morphological phenotypes of modern organisms, then, are considered to be products of stabilizing selection. This perspective solves the apparent "molecular homology-analogy paradox," whereby widely divergent modern animal types utilize the same molecular toolkit during development, but it does so by inverting the neo-Darwinian principle that phenotypic disparity was generated over long periods of time in concert with, and in proportion to genotypic change. PMID:19378259

  17. Other- and Self-Directed Forms of Violence and Their Relationships to DSM-IV Substance Use and Other Psychiatric Disorders in a National Survey of Adults

    PubMed Central

    Harford, Thomas C.; Yi, Hsiao-ye; Grant, Bridget F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To examine associations between DSM-IV psychiatric disorders and other- and self- directed violence in the general population. Methods Data were obtained from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC) Waves 1 & 2 (n=34,653). Four violence categories were derived from a latent class analysis (LCA) of 5 other-directed and 4 self-directed violent behavior indicators. Multinomial logistic regression examined class associations for gender, race-ethnicity, age and DSM-IV substance use, mood, anxiety, and personality disorders. Results Approximately 16% of adults reported some form of violent behavior distributed as follows: other-directed only, 4.6%; self-directed only, 9.3%; combined self- and other-directed, 2.0%; and no violence, 84.1%. The majority of the DSM-IV disorders included in this study were significantly and independently related to each form of violence. Generally, other-directed violence was more strongly associated with any substance use disorders (81%) and any personality disorders (42%), while self-directed violence was more strongly associated with mood (41%) and anxiety disorders (57%). Compared with these two forms of violence, the smaller group with combined self- and other-directed violence was more strongly associated with any substance use disorders (88%), mood disorders (63%), and personality disorders (76%). Conclusion Findings from this study are consistent with recent conceptualizations of disorders as reflecting externalizing disorders and internalizing disorders. The identification of the small category with combined forms of violence further extends numerous clinical studies which established associations between self- and other-directed violent behaviors. The extent to which the combined violence category represents a meaningful and reliable category of violence requires further detailed studies. PMID:23587529

  18. A molecular timescale of eukaryote evolution and the rise of complex multicellular life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedges, S. Blair; Blair, Jaime E.; Venturi, Maria L.; Shoe, Jason L.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pattern and timing of the rise in complex multicellular life during Earth's history has not been established. Great disparity persists between the pattern suggested by the fossil record and that estimated by molecular clocks, especially for plants, animals, fungi, and the deepest branches of the eukaryote tree. Here, we used all available protein sequence data and molecular clock methods to place constraints on the increase in complexity through time. RESULTS: Our phylogenetic analyses revealed that (i) animals are more closely related to fungi than to plants, (ii) red algae are closer to plants than to animals or fungi, (iii) choanoflagellates are closer to animals than to fungi or plants, (iv) diplomonads, euglenozoans, and alveolates each are basal to plants+animals+fungi, and (v) diplomonads are basal to other eukaryotes (including alveolates and euglenozoans). Divergence times were estimated from global and local clock methods using 20-188 proteins per node, with data treated separately (multigene) and concatenated (supergene). Different time estimation methods yielded similar results (within 5%): vertebrate-arthropod (964 million years ago, Ma), Cnidaria-Bilateria (1,298 Ma), Porifera-Eumetozoa (1,351 Ma), Pyrenomycetes-Plectomycetes (551 Ma), Candida-Saccharomyces (723 Ma), Hemiascomycetes-filamentous Ascomycota (982 Ma), Basidiomycota-Ascomycota (968 Ma), Mucorales-Basidiomycota (947 Ma), Fungi-Animalia (1,513 Ma), mosses-vascular plants (707 Ma), Chlorophyta-Tracheophyta (968 Ma), Rhodophyta-Chlorophyta+Embryophyta (1,428 Ma), Plantae-Animalia (1,609 Ma), Alveolata-plants+animals+fungi (1,973 Ma), Euglenozoa-plants+animals+fungi (1,961 Ma), and Giardia-plants+animals+fungi (2,309 Ma). By extrapolation, mitochondria arose approximately 2300-1800 Ma and plastids arose 1600-1500 Ma. Estimates of the maximum number of cell types of common ancestors, combined with divergence times, showed an increase from two cell types at 2500 Ma to

  19. Fibroblasts maintained in 3 dimensions show a better differentiation state and higher sensitivity to estrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Montani, Claudia; Steimberg, Nathalie; Boniotti, Jennifer; Biasiotto, Giorgio; Zanella, Isabella; Diafera, Giuseppe; Biunno, Ida; Caimi, Luigi; Mazzoleni, Giovanna; Di Lorenzo, Diego

    2014-11-01

    Cell differentiation and response to hormonal signals were studied in a 3D environment on an in-house generated mouse fibroblast cell line expressing a reporter gene under the control of estrogen responsive sequences (EREs). 3D cell culture conditions were obtained in a Rotary Cell Culture System; (RCCS™), a microgravity based bioreactor that promotes the aggregation of cells into multicellular spheroids (MCS). In this bioreactor the cells maintained a better differentiated phenotype and more closely resembled in vivo tissue. The RCCS™ cultured fibroblasts showed higher expression of genes regulating cell assembly, differentiation and hormonal functions. Microarray analysis showed that genes related to cell cycle, proliferation, cytoskeleton, migration, adhesion and motility were all down-regulated in 3D as compared to 2D conditions, as well as oncogene expression and inflammatory cytokines. Controlled remodeling of ECM, which is an essential aspect of cell organization, homeostasis and tissue was affected by the culture method as assessed by immunolocalization of β-tubulin. Markers of cell organization, homeostasis and tissue repair, metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and its physiological inhibitor (TIMP4) changed expression in association with the relative formation of cell aggregates. The fibroblasts cultured in the RCCS™ maintain a better responsiveness to estrogens, measured as expression of ERα and regulation of an ERE-dependent reporter and of the endogenous target genes CBP, Rarb, MMP1 and Dbp. Our data highlight the interest of this 3D culture model for its potential application in the field of cell response to hormonal signals and the pharmaco-toxicological analyses of chemicals and natural molecules endowed of estrogenic potential. - Highlights: • We here characterized the first cell line derived from an estrogen reporter mouse. • In the RCCS cells express an immortalized behavior but not a transformed phenotype. • The RCCS provides a system for

  20. An ecological theory for the sudden origin of multicellular life in the late precambrian.

    PubMed

    Stanley, S M

    1973-05-01

    According to modern ecological theory, high diversity at any trophic level of a community is possible only under the influence of cropping. Until herbivores evolved, single-celled algae of the Precambrain were resource-limited, and a small number of species saturated aquatic environments. In the near-absence of vacant niches, life diversified slowly. Because the changes required to produce the first algae-eating heterotrophs were therefore delayed, the entire system was self-limiting. When the "heterotroph barrier" was finally crossed in the late Precambrian, herbivorous and carnivorous protists arose almost simultaneously, for no major biological differences separate the two groups. These events automatically triggered the formation of a series of self-propagating feedback systems of diversification between adjacent trophic levels. Comparable systems arose among multi-cellular groups, which radiated rapidly from the newly diversifying protist taxa. The sudden proliferation of complex food webs formed by taxa invading previously vacant adaptive zones produced an explosive diversification of life over a period of a few tens of millions of years. The rapid appearance of skeletons in various groups, though of special geological importance, was no more dramatic than other aspects of the radiation. The overall rate of diversification was comparable to rates for less-extensive adaptive radiations of the Phanerozoic.