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Sample records for field current drive

  1. Bootstrapped tokamak with oscillating field current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Weening, R.H. )

    1993-07-01

    A magnetic helicity conserving mean-field Ohm's law is used to study bootstrapped tokamaks with oscillating field current drive. The Ohm's law leads to the conclusion that the tokamak bootstrap effect can convert the largely alternating current of oscillating field current drive into a direct toroidal plasma current. This plasma current rectification is due to the intrinsically nonlinear nature of the tokamak bootstrap effect, and suggests that it may be possible to maintain the toroidal current of a tokamak reactor by supplementing the bootstrap current with oscillating field current drive. Steady-state tokamak fusion reactors operating with oscillating field current drive could provide an alternative to tokamak reactors operating with external current drive.

  2. Oscillating field current drive for reversed field pinch discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, K.F.; Gribble, R.F.; Baker, D.A.

    1984-06-01

    Oscillating Field Current Drive (OFCD), also known as F-THETA pumping, is a steady-state current-drive technique proposed for the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Unlike other current-drive techniques, which employ high-technology, invasive, and power intensive schemes using radio frequency or neutral particle injection, F-THETA pumping entails driving the toroidal and poloidal magnetic field circuits with low-frequency (audio) oscillating voltage sources. Current drive by this technique is a consequence of the strong nonlinear plasma coupling in the RFP. Because of its low frequency and efficient plasma coupling, F-THETA pumping shows excellent promise as a reactor-relevant current-drive technique. A conceptual and computational study of this concept, including its experimental and reactor relevance, is explored in this paper.

  3. 3-D MHD Simulation of Oscillating Field Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahimi, F.; Prager, S. C.; Wright, J. C.

    2000-10-01

    Oscillating Field Current Drive (OFCD) is a proposed low frequency steady-state current drive technique for the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). In OFCD toroidal and poloidal oscillating electric fields are applied with 90^circ phase difference to inject magnetic helicity. In the present work, the 3-D nonlinear, resistive MHD code DEBS is used to simulate OFCD in relaxed RFP plasmas. The present simulations are at high Lundquist number S=10^5 and low spect ratio R/a=1.5. The physics issues investigated are the response of background magnetic fluctuations to the oscillating fields, the relative contributions of the tearing mode dynamo and the oscillating fields to the current profile, and the sustainment and control of the steady-state current profile. Initial results with low amplitude oscillating fields show the expected increase in magnetic helicity and current. Results with higher amplitude will also be presented.

  4. Reversed field pinch current drive with oscillating helical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, Ricardo; Clemente, Roberto Antonio

    2006-04-15

    The use of oscillating helical magnetic fields to produce and sustain the toroidal and poloidal currents in a reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated. A simple physical model that assumes fixed ions, massless electrons, and uniform density and resistivity is employed. Thermal effects are neglected in Ohm's law and helical coordinates are introduced to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear equations that must be advanced in time. The results show that it is possible to produce RFP-like magnetic field profiles with pinch parameters close to the experimental values. The efficiencies obtained for moderate resistivity, and the observed scaling, indicate that this could be a very attractive method for high temperature plasmas.

  5. Equilibrium evolution in oscillating-field current-drive experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCollam, K. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Blair, A. P.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Stone, D. R.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Ding, W. X.

    2010-08-01

    Oscillating-field current drive (OFCD) is a proposed method of steady-state toroidal plasma sustainment in which ac poloidal and toroidal loop voltages are applied to produce a dc plasma current. OFCD is added to standard, inductively sustained reversed-field pinch plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)]. Equilibrium profiles and fluctuations during a single cycle are measured and analyzed for different relative phases between the two OFCD voltages and for OFCD off. For OFCD phases leading to the most added plasma current, the measured energy confinement is slightly better than that for OFCD off. By contrast, the phase of the maximum OFCD helicity-injection rate also has the maximum decay rate, which is ascribed to transport losses during discrete magnetic-fluctuation events induced by OFCD. Resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiments reproduce the observed phase dependence of the added current.

  6. Equilibrium evolution in oscillating-field current-drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    McCollam, K. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Blair, A. P.; Craig, D.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ebrahimi, F.; O'Connell, R.; Reusch, J. A.; Sarff, J. S.; Stephens, H. D.; Stone, D. R.; Brower, D. L.; Deng, B. H.; Ding, W. X.

    2010-08-15

    Oscillating-field current drive (OFCD) is a proposed method of steady-state toroidal plasma sustainment in which ac poloidal and toroidal loop voltages are applied to produce a dc plasma current. OFCD is added to standard, inductively sustained reversed-field pinch plasmas in the Madison Symmetric Torus [R. N. Dexter et al., Fusion Technol. 19, 131 (1991)]. Equilibrium profiles and fluctuations during a single cycle are measured and analyzed for different relative phases between the two OFCD voltages and for OFCD off. For OFCD phases leading to the most added plasma current, the measured energy confinement is slightly better than that for OFCD off. By contrast, the phase of the maximum OFCD helicity-injection rate also has the maximum decay rate, which is ascribed to transport losses during discrete magnetic-fluctuation events induced by OFCD. Resistive-magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the experiments reproduce the observed phase dependence of the added current.

  7. Radial current density effects on rotating magnetic field current drive in field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Clemente, R. A.; Gilli, M.; Farengo, R.

    2008-10-15

    Steady state solutions, suitable for field-reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs) are obtained by properly including three-dimensional effects, in the limit of large FRC elongation, and the radial component of Ohm's law. The steady electrostatic potential, necessary to satisfy Ohm's law, is considered to be a surface function. The problem is analyzed at the midplane of the configuration and it is reduced to the solution of two coupled nonlinear differential equations for the real and imaginary parts of the phasor associated to the longitudinal component of the vector potential. Additional constraints are obtained by requesting that the steady radial current density and poloidal magnetic flux vanish at the plasma boundary which is set at the time-averaged separatrix. The results are presented in terms of the degree of synchronism of the electrons with the RMF and compared with those obtained when radial current effects are neglected. Three important differences are observed when compared with the case without radial current density. First, at low penetration of the RMF into the plasma there is a significant increase in the driven azimuthal current. Second, the RMF amplitude necessary to access the high synchronism regime, starting from low synchronism, is larger and the difference appears to increase as the separatrix to classical skin depth ratio increases. Third, the minimum RMF amplitude necessary to sustain almost full synchronism is reduced.

  8. Extended magnetohydrodynamic simulations of field reversed configuration formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2010-06-15

    Three-dimensional simulations of field reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive have been performed with the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. The Hall term is a zeroth order effect with strong coupling between Fourier components, and recent enhancements to the NIMROD preconditioner allow much larger time steps than was previously possible. Boundary conditions to capture the effects of a finite length RMF antenna have been added, and simulations of FRC formation from a uniform background plasma have been performed with parameters relevant to the translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade experiment at the University of Washington [H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and R. D. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112502 (2007)]. The effects of both even-parity and odd-parity antennas have been investigated, and there is no evidence of a disruptive instability for either antenna type. It has been found that RMF effects extend considerably beyond the ends of the antenna, and that a large n=0 B{sub t}heta can develop in the open-field line region, producing a back torque opposing the RMF.

  9. Extended magnetohydrodynamic simulations of field reversed configuration formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milroy, R. D.; Kim, C. C.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2010-06-01

    Three-dimensional simulations of field reversed configuration (FRC) formation and sustainment with rotating magnetic field (RMF) current drive have been performed with the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)]. The Hall term is a zeroth order effect with strong coupling between Fourier components, and recent enhancements to the NIMROD preconditioner allow much larger time steps than was previously possible. Boundary conditions to capture the effects of a finite length RMF antenna have been added, and simulations of FRC formation from a uniform background plasma have been performed with parameters relevant to the translation, confinement, and sustainment-upgrade experiment at the University of Washington [H. Y. Guo, A. L. Hoffman, and R. D. Milroy, Phys. Plasmas 14, 112502 (2007)]. The effects of both even-parity and odd-parity antennas have been investigated, and there is no evidence of a disruptive instability for either antenna type. It has been found that RMF effects extend considerably beyond the ends of the antenna, and that a large n =0 Bθ can develop in the open-field line region, producing a back torque opposing the RMF.

  10. Controlled generation of coherent matter currents using a periodic driving field.

    PubMed

    Creffield, C E; Sols, F

    2008-06-27

    We study the effect of a strong, oscillating driving field on the dynamics of ultracold bosons held in an optical lattice. Modeling the system as a Bose-Hubbard model, we show how the driving field can be used to produce and maintain a coherent atomic current by controlling the phase of the intersite tunneling processes. We investigate both the stroboscopic and time-averaged behavior using Floquet theory, and demonstrate that this procedure provides a stable and precise method of controlling coherent quantum systems.

  11. Reconfigurable Drive Current System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alhorn, Dean C. (Inventor); Dutton, Kenneth R. (Inventor); Howard, David E. (Inventor); Smith, Dennis A. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    A reconfigurable drive current system includes drive stages, each of which includes a high-side transistor and a low-side transistor in a totem pole configuration. A current monitor is coupled to an output of each drive stage. Input channels are provided to receive input signals. A processor is coupled to the input channels and to each current monitor for generating at least one drive signal using at least one of the input signals and current measured by at least one of the current monitors. A pulse width modulation generator is coupled to the processor and each drive stage for varying the drive signals as a function of time prior to being supplied to at least one of the drive stages.

  12. A New High Speed Induction Motor Drive based on Field Orientation and Hysteresis Current Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbuka, Cosmas; Nwosu, Cajethan; Agu, Marcel

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new high speed induction motor drive based on the core advantage of field orientation control (FOC) and hysteresis current comparison (HCC). A complete closed loop speed-controlled induction motor drive system is developed consisting of an outer speed and an inner HCC algorithm which are optimised to obtain fast and stable speed response with effective current and torque tracking, both during transient and steady states. The developed model, being speed-controlled, was examined with step and ramp speed references and excellent performances obtained under full load stress. A speed response comparison of the model with the standard AC3 (Field-Oriented Control Induction Motor Drive) of MATLAB Simpower systems shows that the model achieved a rise time of 0.0762 seconds compared to 0.2930 seconds achieved by the AC3. Also, a settle time of 0.0775 seconds was obtained with the developed model while that of the AC3 model is 0.2986 seconds confirming, therefore, the superiority of the developed model over the AC3 model which, hitherto, served as a reference standard.

  13. THE ROTATING MAGNETIC FIELD OSCILLATOR SYSTEM FOR CURRENT DRIVE IN THE TRANSLATION, CONFINEMENT AND SUSTAINMENT EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    S. TOBIN; ET AL

    2000-12-01

    The experimental setup and test results for the {approximately}125 MW rotating magnetic field current drive system of the Translation, Confinement and Sustainment Experiment at the University of Washington are described. The oscillator system, constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, drives two tank circuits (15 kV{sub peak} potential, 8.5 kA{sub peak} maximum circulating current in each tank to date) operated 90{degree} out of phase to produce a 54 G rotating magnetic field with a frequency of 163 kHz ({omega} = 1.02{sup x} 10{sup {minus}6} s{sup {minus}1}). Programmable waveform generators control ''hot deck'' totem pole drivers that are used to control the grid of 12 Machlett 8618 magnetically beamed triode tubes. This setup allows the current to be turned on or off in less than 100 ns ({approximately}6{degree}). Both tank circuits are isolated from the current source by a 1:1 air core, transmission line transformer. Each tank circuit contains two saddle coils (combined inductance of 1.6 {micro}H) and radio frequency capacitors (580 nF). Test results are presented for three conditions: no external load, a resistive external load and a plasma load. A SPICE model of the oscillator system was created. Comparisons between this model and experimental data are given.

  14. Microturbulence studies of pulsed poloidal current drive discharges in the reversed field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Carmody, D. Pueschel, M. J.; Anderson, J. K.; Terry, P. W.

    2015-01-15

    Experimental discharges with pulsed poloidal current drive (PPCD) in the Madison Symmetric Torus reversed field pinch are investigated using a semi-analytic equilibrium model in the gyrokinetic turbulence code GENE. PPCD cases, with plasma currents of 500 kA and 200 kA, exhibit a density-gradient-driven trapped electron mode (TEM) and an ion temperature gradient mode, respectively. Relative to expectations of tokamak core plasmas, the critical gradients for the onset of these instabilities are found to be greater by roughly a factor of the aspect ratio. A significant upshift in the nonlinear TEM transport threshold, previously found for tokamaks, is confirmed in nonlinear reversed field pinch simulations and is roughly three times the threshold for linear instability. The simulated heat fluxes can be brought in agreement with measured diffusivities by introducing a small, resonant magnetic perturbation, thus modeling the residual fluctuations from tearing modes. These fluctuations significantly enhance transport.

  15. Fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Fast wave current drive is demonstrated in the Princeton ACT-I toroidal device. The fast Alfven wave, in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, produced 40 A of current from 1 kW of rf power coupled into the plasma by fast wave loop antenna. This wave excites a steady current by damping on the energetic tail of the electron distribution function in the same way as lower-hybrid current drive, except that fast wave current drive is appropriate for higher plasma densities.

  16. Turbulent current drive mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDevitt, Christopher J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2017-08-01

    Mechanisms through which plasma microturbulence can drive a mean electron plasma current are derived. The efficiency through which these turbulent contributions can drive deviations from neoclassical predictions of the electron current profile is computed by employing a linearized Coulomb collision operator. It is found that a non-diffusive contribution to the electron momentum flux as well as an anomalous electron-ion momentum exchange term provide the most efficient means through which turbulence can modify the mean electron current for the cases considered. Such turbulent contributions appear as an effective EMF within Ohm's law and hence provide an ideal means for driving deviations from neoclassical predictions.

  17. A mechanism for the dynamo terms to sustain closed-flux current, including helicity balance, by driving current which crosses the magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; Sutherland, D. A.

    2015-07-15

    An analysis of imposed dynamo current drive (IDCD) [T.R. Jarboe et al., Nucl. Fusion 52 083017 (2012)] reveals: (a) current drive on closed flux surfaces seems possible without relaxation, reconnection, or other flux-surface-breaking large events; (b) the scale size of the key physics may be smaller than is often computationally resolved; (c) helicity can be sustained across closed flux; and (d) IDCD current drive is parallel to the current which crosses the magnetic field to produce the current driving force. In addition to agreeing with spheromak data, IDCD agrees with selected tokamak data.

  18. Controlling fluctuations and transport in the reversed field pinch with edge current drive and plasma biasing

    SciTech Connect

    Craig, Darren J.G.

    1998-09-01

    Two techniques are employed in the Madison Symmetric Torus (MST) to test and control different aspects of fluctuation induced transport in the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP). Auxiliary edge currents are driven along the magnetic field to modify magnetic fluctuations, and the particle and energy transport associated with them. In addition, strong edge flows are produced by plasma biasing. Their effect on electrostatic fluctuations and the associated particle losses is studied. Both techniques are accomplished using miniature insertable plasma sources that are biased negatively to inject electrons. This type of emissive electrode is shown to reliably produce intense, directional current without significant contamination by impurities. The two most important conclusions derived from these studies are that the collective modes resonant at the reversal surface play a role in global plasma confinement, and that these modes can be controlled by modifying the parallel current profile outside of the reversal surface. This confirms predictions based on magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations that auxiliary current drive in the sense to flatten the parallel current profile can be successful in controlling magnetic fluctuations in the RFP. However, these studies expand the group of magnetic modes believed to cause transport in MST and suggest that current profile control efforts need to address both the core resonant magnetic modes and those resonant at the reversal surface. The core resonant modes are not significantly altered in these experiments; however, the distribution and/or amplitude of the injected current is probably not optimal for affecting these modes. Plasma biasing generates strong edge flows with shear and particle confinement likely improves in these discharges. These experiments resemble biased H modes in other magnetic configurations in many ways. The similarities are likely due to the common role of electrostatic fluctuations in edge transport.

  19. Power requirements for current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boozer, Allen H.

    1988-03-01

    General formulas for the efficiency of current drive in toroidal plasmas are derived using entropy arguments. The highest possible efficiency for current drive in which a high-energy electron tail is formed is shown to be p=Erj, with p and j the power and current densities and Er≊0.09n14 V/m with n14 the electron density in units of 1014/cm.3 The electric field required to maintain the current in a runaway discharge is also shown to equal Er. If the plasma current is carried by near-Maxwellian electrons, waves that have a low phase velocity, compared to the energy of the electrons with which they interact, can drive a current with Ohmic efficiency, p=ηj2. Such waves were first discussed in the context of current drive by Fisch [Rev. Mod. Phys. 59, 175 (1987)].

  20. Turbulent current drive mechanisms

    DOE PAGES

    McDevitt, Christopher J.; Tang, Xian-Zhu; Guo, Zehua

    2017-07-01

    Mechanisms through which plasma microturbulence can drive a mean electron plasma current are derived. The efficiency through which these turbulent contributions can drive deviations from neoclassical predictions of the electron current profile is computed by employing a linearized Coulomb collision operator. It is found that a non-diffusive contribution to the electron momentum flux as well as an anomalous electron-ion momentum exchange term provide the most efficient means through which turbulence can modify the mean electron current for the cases considered. Such turbulent contributions appear as an effective EMF within Ohm’s law, and hence provide an ideal means for driving deviationsmore » from neoclassical predictions.« less

  1. Fast wave current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, J.; Ono, M.; Colestock, P.; Horton, R.; McNeill, D.; Park, H.

    1985-07-01

    Experiments on the fast wave in the range of high ion cyclotron harmonics in the ACT-1 device show that current drive is possible with the fast wave just as it is for the lower hybrid wave, except that it is suitable for higher plasma densities. A 140° loop antenna launched the high ion cyclotron harmonic fast wave [ω/Ω=O(10)] into a He+ plasma with ne≂4×1012 cm-3 and B=4.5 kG. Probe and magnetic loop diagnostics and FIR laser scattering confirmed the presence of the fast wave, and the Rogowski loop indicated that the circulating plasma current increased by up to 40A with 1 kW of coupled power, which is comparable to lower hybrid current drive in the same device with the same unidirectional fast electron beam used as the target for the rf. A phased antenna array would be used for FWCD in a tokamak without the E-beam.

  2. Turbulent current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garbet, X.; Esteve, D.; Sarazin, Y.; Dif-Pradalier, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Grandgirard, V.; Latu, G.; Smolyakov, A.

    2014-11-01

    The Ohm's law is modified when turbulent processes are accounted for. Besides an hyper-resistivity, already well known, pinch terms appear in the electron momentum flux. Moreover it appears that turbulence is responsible for a source term in the Ohm's law, called here turbulent current drive. Two terms contribute to this source. The first term is a residual stress in the momentum flux, while the second contribution is an electro-motive force. A non zero average parallel wave number is needed to get a finite source term. Hence a symmetry breaking mechanism must be invoked, as for ion momentum transport. E × B shear flows and turbulence intensity gradients are shown to provide similar contributions. Moreover this source term has to compete with the collision friction term (resistivity). The effect is found to be significant for a large scale turbulence in spite of an unfavorable scaling with the ratio of the electron to ion mass. Turbulent current drive appears to be a weak effect in the plasma core, but could be substantial in the plasma edge where it may produce up to 10 % of the local current density.

  3. Current drive, anticurrent drive, and balanced injection

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Bell, R.; Bernabei, S.; Bitter, M.; Cavallo, A.; Chu, T.K.; Fishman, H.; Hill, K.

    1987-08-01

    In lower hybrid (LH) discharges, the number of suprathermal electrons is limited by the upper bound on the current density from the q = 1 condition, which is caused by the onset of the m = 1 MHD instability. The stored energy of suprathermal electrons, measured in terms of a poloidal beta, scales with plasma current as I/sub p//sup -1/. Potentially, these bounds represent very restrictive conditions for heating in larger machines. Consequently, it seems necessary to perform experiments where the electrons are driven in both directions, parallel and antiparallel to the magnetic field, i.e., bidirectional scenarios like anticurrent drive or balanced injection. Data from PLT relevant to these ideas are discussed. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  4. The Extent to Which Dayside Reconnection Drives Field-Aligned Currents During Substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forsyth, C.; Shortt, M. W.; Coxon, J.; Rae, J.; Freeman, M. P.; Kalmoni, N. M. E.; Jackman, C. M.; Anderson, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    Field-aligned currents, also known as Birkeland currents, are the agents by which energy and momentum is transferred to the ionosphere from the magnetosphere and solar wind. In order to understand this coupling, it is necessary to analyze the variations in these current systems with respect to the main energy sources of the solar wind and substorms. In this study, we perform a superposed epoch analysis of field-aligned currents determined by the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) project with respect to substorm expansion phase onsets identified using the Substorm Onsets and Phases from Indices of the Electrojet (SOPHIE) technique. We examine the total upward and downward currents separately in the noon, dusk, dawn and midnight sectors. Our results show that the dusk and dawn currents have up to a 66% linear correlated with the dayside reconnection rate estimated from solar wind measurements, whereas the noon and midnight currents are not. The noon currents show little or no variation throughout the substorm cycle. The midnight currents follows the dusk currents up to 20 min before onset, after which the midnight current increases more rapidly and exponentially. At substorm onset, the exponential growth rate increases. While the midnight field-aligned currents grow exponentially after substorm onset, the auroral indices vary with a 1/6th power law. Overall, our results show that the growth and decay rates of the Region 1 and 2 current systems, which are strongest at dawn and dusk, are directly driven by the solar wind, whereas the growth and decay rates of the substorm current system, which are dominant at midnight, act independently of the upstream driver.

  5. Nonlinear response of a neoclassical four-field magnetic reconnection model to localized current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzaro, E.; Comisso, L.; Valdettaro, L.

    2010-05-15

    In tokamaks magnetic islands arise from an unstable process of tearing and reconnecting of helical field lines across rational surfaces. After a linear stage the magnetic instability develops through three characteristic nonlinear stages where increasingly complex topological alterations occur in the form of the magnetic islands. The problem of response of reconnection process to the injection of an external current suitably localized is addressed using a four-field model in a plane slab plasma, with a novel extension to account consistently of the relevant neoclassical effects, such as bootstrap current and pressure anisotropy. The results found have implications on the interpretation of the possible mechanism of present day experimental results on neoclassical tearing modes as well as on the concepts for their control or avoidance.

  6. Noninductive current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    Various current drive mechanisms may be grouped into four classes: (1) injection of energetic particle beams; (2) launching of rf waves; (3) hybrid schemes, which are combinations of various rf schemes (rf plus beams, rf and/or beam plus ohmic heating, etc.); and (4) other schemes, some of which are specific to reactor plasma conditions requiring the presence of alpha particle or intense synchrotron radiation. Particle injection schemes include current drive by neutral beams and relativistic electron beams. The rf schemes include current drive by the lower hybrid (LH) waves, the electron waves, the waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies, etc. Only a few of these approaches, however, have been tested experimentally, with the broadest data base available for LH waves. Included in this report are (1) efficiency criteria for current drive, (2) current drive by neutral beam injection, (3) LH current drive, (4) electron cyclotron current drive, (5) current drive by ion cyclotron waves - minority species heating, and (6) current drive by other schemes (such as hybrids and low frequency waves).

  7. Anomalous - viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, Thomas H.; Ono, Masayuki

    1988-01-01

    An apparatus and method for maintaining a steady-state current in a toroidal magnetically confined plasma. An electric current is generated in an edge region at or near the outermost good magnetic surface of the toroidal plasma. The edge current is generated in a direction parallel to the flow of current in the main plasma and such that its current density is greater than the average density of the main plasma current. The current flow in the edge region is maintained in a direction parallel to the main current for a period of one or two of its characteristic decay times. Current from the edge region will penetrate radially into the plasma and augment the main plasma current through the mechanism of anomalous viscosity. In another aspect of the invention, current flow driven between a cathode and an anode is used to establish a start-up plasma current. The plasma-current channel is magnetically detached from the electrodes, leaving a plasma magnetically insulated from contact with any material obstructions including the cathode and anode.

  8. Three-Axis Magnetic Field Measurements in the TCSU RMF Current Drive Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velas, K. M.; Milroy, R. D.

    2011-10-01

    A 3-axis probe was installed on TCSU shortly before its shutdown. The probe has 90 windings that simultaneously measure Br, Bθ, and Bz at 30 radial positions and is fully translatable. Positioning the probe at multiple axial positions and taking multiple repeatable shots allows for a full r-z map of the magnetic field. Initially, data has been processed with a 10 kHz low pass filter to capture the steady field. Higher frequency content has more shot-to-shot variability; it is difficult to map this axially. Plans include using a band pass filter to isolate the RMF frequency, which is consistent between shots. It is anticipated that the RMF field, in conjunction with the steady field, will yield a map of the full 3D rotating field structure. The 3- axis probe measurements are used to calculate the end-shorting torque, which opposes the RMF torque. Data from even- and odd-parity experiments will be compared. The NIMROD code has been adapted to simulate the TCSU experiment using boundary conditions adjusted to match both even- and odd-parity experimental conditions. A comparison of the n = 0 components of the calculated fields to the 3- axis probe measurements shows agreement in the magnetic field structure of the FRC as well as in the jet region.

  9. Anomalous-viscosity current drive

    DOEpatents

    Stix, T.H.; Ono, M.

    1986-04-25

    The present invention relates to a method and apparatus for maintaining a steady-state current for magnetically confining the plasma in a toroidal magnetic confinement device using anomalous viscosity current drive. A second aspect of this invention relates to an apparatus and method for the start-up of a magnetically confined toroidal plasma.

  10. Low frequency rf current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1992-01-01

    An unshielded antenna for rf heating has been developed and tested during this report period. In addition to design specifications being given, some experimental results are presented utilizing: (1) an unprotected Faraday shield, (2) insulating guard limiters, (3) unshielded antenna experiments, (4) method for detecting small rf driven currents, (5) rf fast wave current drive experiments, (6) alfven wave interactions with electrons, and (7) machine conditioning, impurity generation and density control.

  11. Improving the Dynamic Response during Field Weakening Control of IPMSM Drive System using Adaptive Hysteresis Current Control Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Amiya; Panda, Anup Kumar; Kar, Sanjeeb Kumar

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents the control of IPMSM drive in flux weakening region, for high speed applications. An adaptive hysteresis band current controller has been designed and implemented in this work to overcome the drawbacks which are present in case of conventional hysteresis band current controllers such as: high torque ripple, more current error, large variation in switching frequency etc. The proposed current controller is a hysteresis controller in which the hysteresis band is programmed as a function of variation of motor speed and load current. Any variation in those parameters causes an appropriate change in the band which in turns reduces the torque ripple as well as current error of the machine. The proposed scheme is modeled and tested in the MATLAB-Simulink environment for the effectiveness of the study. Further, the result is validated experimentally by using TMS320F2812 digital signal processor.

  12. Current Drive in Recombining Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2012-05-15

    The Langevin equations describing the average collisional dynamics of suprathermal particles in nonstationary plasma remarkably admit an exact analytical solution in the case of recombining plasma. The current density produced by arbitrary particle fluxes is derived including the effect of charge recombination. Since recombination has the effect of lowering the charge density of the plasma, thus reducing the charged particle collisional frequencies, the evolution of the current density can be modified substantially compared to plasma with fixed charge density. The current drive efficiency is derived and optimized for discrete and continuous pulses of current, leading to the discovery of a nonzero "residual" current density that persists indefinitely under certain conditions, a feature not present in stationary plasmas.

  13. Dynamic modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ignat, D.W.; Valeo, E.J.; Jardin, S.C.

    1993-10-01

    A computational model of lower hybrid current drive in the presence of an electric field is described and some results are given. Details of geometry, plasma profiles and circuit equations are treated carefully. Two-dimensional velocity space effects are approximated in a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck treatment.

  14. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  15. Direct drive field actuator motors

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  16. Influence of impurity and recycling on high-β steady-state plasmas sustained by rotating magnetic fields current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, H. Y.; Grossnickle, J. A.; Hoffman, A. L.; Vlases, G. C.

    2009-06-01

    A new upgrade of the Translation, Confinement, and Sustainment (TCS) device, TCSU, has been built to form and sustain high temperature compact toroids (CT), known as Field Reversed Configurations, using Rotating Magnetic Fields (RMF). In TCS the plasma temperature was limited to several 10s of eV due to high impurity content. These impurities are greatly reduced in TCSU by using advanced plasma chamber and helium glow discharge cleaning. Reducing impurity radiation, when coupled with reduced overall recycling, enabled the plasma to enter into a new, collisionless regime with temperatures well over 200 eV, substantially exceeding the radiation barrier. This is a first for CTs at low input power density. This was achieved using the simple even-parity RMF drive (despite transient opening of field lines by the RMF) because the associated energy loss is sheath-limited, coupled with the low edge density resulting from the RMF pinch effect.

  17. Driving toroidally asymmetric current through the tokamak scrape-off layer, Part II: Magnetic field structure and spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, I

    2009-04-08

    The structure of the magnetic field perturbations due to non-axisymmetric field-aligned currents in the tokamak scrape-off layer (SOL) are analytically calculated near the X-point. Part I [I. Joseph, et al., submitted to Phys. Plasmas (2008)] demonstrated that biasing divertor target plates in a toroidally asymmetric fashion can generate an appreciable toroidally asymmetric parallel current density in the SOL along the separatrix. Here, the magnetic field perturbation caused by a SOL current channel of finite width and step-wise constant amplitude at the target plate is derived. Flux expansion amplifies the magnetic perturbation near the X-point, while phase interference causes the SOL amplitude to be reduced at large toroidal mode number. Far enough from the current channel, the magnetic field can be approximated as arising from a surface current near the separatrix with differing amplitudes in the SOL and the divertor leg. The perturbation spectrum and resonant components of this field are computed analytically asymptotically close to the separatrix in magnetic flux coordinates. The size of the stochastic layer due to the applied perturbation that would result without self-consistent plasma shielding is also estimated. If enough resonant field is generated, control of the edge pressure gradient may allow stabilization of edge localized modes.

  18. Fast Wave Current Drive on TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, J. H.; Majeski, R.; Hosea, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Schilling, G.; Wilson, J. R.; Budny, R.; Zarnstorff, M. C.

    1996-02-01

    For recent Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD) experiments on TFTR two strap ICRF antennas with ±90 degree phasing between the straps have been used. In one set of experiments an RF frequency of 63.6 MHz and toroidal magnetic field of 2.7 T were selected, which placed the H fundamental resonance on the high field side of the plasma the second harmonic H resonance out of the plasma on the low field side. H-minority heating (43 MHz) was used simultaneously to raise Te. The difference in loop voltage observed is consistent with ˜70 kA of driven current with 2 MW of RF power. In a second experiment an RF frequency of 43 MHz and toroidal magnetic field of 4.3 T was selected, which placed the deuterium fundamental resonance on the high field side of the plasma and the hydrogen fundamental resonance out of the plasma on the low field side (TPX scenario). With 1.4 MW of RF power, the signal to noise ratio in the loop voltage measurement was too low to clearly resolve the effect from current drive.

  19. Geometry of system-bath coupling and gauge fields in bosonic ladders: Manipulating currents and driving phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Chu; Poletti, Dario

    2016-09-01

    Quantum systems in contact with an environment display a rich physics emerging from the interplay between dissipative and Hamiltonian terms. Here we focus on the role of the geometry of the coupling between the system and the baths. Specifically we consider a dissipative boundary driven ladder in the presence of a gauge field that can be implemented with ion microtrap arrays. We show that, depending on the geometry, the currents imposed by the baths can be strongly affected by the gauge field, resulting in nonequilibrium phase transitions. In different phases both the magnitude of the current and its spatial distribution are significantly different. These findings allow for strategies to manipulate and control transport properties in quantum systems.

  20. Driving on ice: impaired driving skills in current methamphetamine users.

    PubMed

    Bosanquet, David; Macdougall, Hamish G; Rogers, Stephen J; Starmer, Graham A; McKetin, Rebecca; Blaszczynski, Alexander; McGregor, Iain S

    2013-01-01

    Previous research indicates a complex link between methamphetamine (METH) and driving performance. Acute dosing with amphetamines has improved driving-related performance in some laboratory studies, while epidemiological studies suggest an association between METH use, impaired driving, and accident culpability. Current METH users were compared to a control group of nonusers on driving simulator performance. Groups were matched for age, gender, and driving experience. Subjects were assessed for current drug use, drug dependence, and drug levels in saliva/blood as well as personality variables, sleepiness, and driving performance. METH users, most of whom met the criteria for METH dependence, were significantly more likely to speed and to weave from side to side when driving. They also left less distance between their vehicle and oncoming vehicles when making a right-hand turn. This risky driving was not associated with current blood levels of METH or its principal metabolite, amphetamine, which varied widely within the METH group. Other drugs were detected (principally low levels of THC or MDMA) in some METH users, but at levels that were unlikely to impair driving performance. There were higher levels of impulsivity and antisocial personality disorder in the METH-using cohort. These findings confirm indications from epidemiological studies of an association between METH use and impaired driving ability and provide a platform for future research to further explore the factors contributing to increased accident risk in this population.

  1. Oscillatory nonhmic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method of the invention maintain a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  2. Oscillatory nonohomic current drive for maintaining a plasma current

    DOEpatents

    Fisch, N.J.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus and methods are described for maintaining a plasma current with an oscillatory nonohmic current drive. Each cycle of operation has a generation period in which current driving energy is applied to the plasma, and a relaxation period in which current driving energy is removed. Plasma parameters, such as plasma temperature or plasma average ionic charge state, are modified during the generation period so as to oscillate plasma resistivity in synchronism with the application of current driving energy. The invention improves overall current drive efficiencies.

  3. Fast wave current drive in DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Lerche, E.; Van Eestera, D.; Messiaen, A.; Collaboration: EFDA-PPPT Contributors

    2014-02-12

    The ability to non-inductively drive a large fraction of the toroidal plasma current in magnetically confined plasmas is an essential requirement for steady state fusion reactors such as DEMO. Besides neutral beam injection (NBI), electron-cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and lower hybrid wave heating (LH), ion-cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) is a promising candidate to drive current, in particular at the high temperatures expected in fusion plasmas. In this paper, the current drive (CD) efficiencies calculated with coupled ICRF wave / CD numerical codes for the DEMO-1 design case (R{sub 0}=9m, B{sub 0}=6.8T, a{sub p}=2.25m) [1] are presented. It will be shown that although promising CD efficiencies can be obtained in the usual ICRF frequency domain (20-100MHz) by shifting the dominant ion-cyclotron absorption layers to the high-field side, operation at higher frequencies (100-300MHz) has a stronger CD potential, provided the parasitic RF power absorption of the alpha particles can be minimized.

  4. Neoclassical effects on rf current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A. . Fusion Power Program); Karney, C.F.F. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-04-01

    A functional form is derived for the efficiency of current drive in toroidal geometry with low frequency waves (frequencies below the electron cyclotron frequency). By fitting constants in order to duplicate numerical results for the efficiency we obtain an accurate function which will be useful for computer calculations of current drive. 13 refs., 6 figs.

  5. Power threshold for neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Politzer, P.A. ); Porter, G.D. )

    1989-10-02

    For fully noninductive current drive in tokamaks using neutral beams, there is a power and density threshold condition, setting a minimum value for P{sup 3/2}/n{sup 2}. If this condition is not met, stationary state cannot occur, and a tokamak discharge will collapse. This is a consequence of the coupling between current and electron temperature, or between current drive efficiency and energy confinement time. 4 figs.

  6. Microwave heating and current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Kerbel, G.D.; Logan, B.G.; Matsuda, Y.; McCoy, M.G.; Nevins, W.M.; Rognlien, T.D.; Smith, G.R.; Harvey, R.W.; Kritz, A.H.; Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.

    1988-08-23

    The use of powerful microwave sources provide unique opportunities for novel and efficient heating and current-drive schemes in the electron-cyclotron and lower-hybrid ranges of frequencies. Free- electron lasers and relativistic klystrons are new sources that have a number of technical advantages over conventional, lower-intensity sources; their use can lead to improved current-drive efficiencies and better penetration into a reactor-grade plasma in specific cases. This paper reports on modeling of absorption and current drive, in intense-pulse and quasilinear regimes, and on analysis of parametric instabilities and self-focusing. 16 refs., 2 figs.

  7. Neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Devoto, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    The theory of neutral-beam current drive in tokamaks is reviewed. Experiments are discussed where neutral beams have been used to drive current directly and also indirectly through neoclassical effects. Application of the theory to an experimental test reactor is described. It is shown that neutral beams formed from negative ions accelerated to 500 to 700 keV are needed for this device.

  8. Epilepsy and driving: current status of research.

    PubMed

    L Devlin, Anna; Odell, Morris; L Charlton, Judith; Koppel, Sjaanie

    2012-12-01

    In many parts of the world, licensing guidelines state that drivers with medical conditions such as epilepsy are restricted or prohibited from driving. These guidelines are sometimes subjective and not strongly evidence-based, rendering the task of assessing fitness to drive a complex one. Determining fitness to drive is not only essential for maintaining the safety of individual drivers but has implications for the community at large. It is therefore important to review the current state of knowledge regarding epilepsy and driving in order to aid health professionals required to assess fitness to drive and to guide future research directions. This review outlines the functional impairments related to epilepsy and driving, treatment and management issues, motor vehicle crash risk for drivers with epilepsy, estimates of predicted seizure occurrence and concludes with a discussion of the international licensing guidelines and relevant legal issues. More comprehensive research, including investigation into the effects of antiepileptic medication on driving, could aid in the development of policies and guidelines for assessing fitness to drive.

  9. ITER equilibrium with bootstrap currents, lower hybrid current drive and fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1989-03-01

    A current drive system is proposed for the technology phase of ITER which relies on rf power and bootstrap currents. The rf/bootstrap system permits operation at high safety factor, and we consider the axial value to be q/sub a/ approx. = 1.9, which minimizes the need for seed current near the magnetic axis. Lower hybrid power (/approximately/30 MW) provides current density near the surface, ICRF (/approximately/65 MHz, /approximately/30 MW) fast waves generate current near the axis, and high frequency fast waves (/approximately/250 MHz, /approximately/74 MW) supply the remaining current density. The system is not yet optimized but appears to offer great flexibility (ion heating for ignition, current rampup, etc.) with relatively inexpensive and well developed technology. 29 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab.

  10. High Harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive for NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J. A.; Majeski, R.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Wilson, J. R.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Smithe, D.

    1996-11-01

    Heating and noninductive current drive in NSTX will initially be accomplished with 6 MW of radio-frequency (rf) power applied in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime. HHFW heating and current drive differs from conventional fast wave current drive in that, although the frequency of operation (30-40 MHz) is in the range of conventional tokamak experiments, ω_rf ~ 10-20 Ω_ci due to the low magnetic field (0.35 T). Strong absorption (100% per pass) is ensured by the high plasma beta. Here we present numerical modelling of HHFW heating and current drive in NSTX using the PICES, FISIC, and METS95 codes. Preliminary designs for the NSTX HHFW antenna and matching system are also presented, along with analysis of the launched antenna wavenumber spectrum using the RANT3D code.

  11. Fast wave current drive: Experimental status and reactor prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1988-03-01

    The fast wave is one of the two possible wave polarizations which propagate according to the basic theory of cold plasmas. It is distinguished from the other (slow wave) branch by having an electric field vector which is mainly orthogonal to the confining magnetic field of the plasma. The plasma and fast wave qualitatively assume different behavior depending on the frequency range of the launched wave. The high frequency fast wave (HFFW), with a frequency (..omega..2..pi.. )approximately) GHz) much higher than the ion cyclotron frequency (..cap omega../sub i/), suffers electron Landau damping and drives current by supplying parallel momentum to superthermal electrons in a fashion similar to lower hybrid (slow wave) current drive. In the simple theory the HFFW should be superior to the slow wave and can propagate to very high density and temperature without impediment. Experiments, however, have not conclusively shown that HFFW current drive can be achieved at densities above the slow wave current drive limit, possibly due to conversion of the launched fast waves into slow waves by density fluctuations. Alternatively, the low frequency fast wave (LFFW), with frequencies ()approxreverse arrowlt) 100 MHz) only a few times the ion cyclotron frequency, is damped by electron Landau damping and, in a hot plasma ()approxreverse arrowgt) 10 keV), by electron transit time magnetic pumping; current drive is achieved by pushing superthermal electrons, and efficiency is prediocted to be slightly better than for lower hybrid current drive. Most significantly, the slow wave does not propagate in high density plasma when ..omega.. )approximately) ..cap omega../sub i/, so parasitic coupling to the slow wave can be avoided, and no density and temperture limitations are foreseen. Experiments with fast wve current drive invariably find current drive efficiency as good as obtained in lower hybrid experiments at comparable, low temperatures. 45 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Relativistic theory of radiofrequency current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Balescu, R.; Metens, T. )

    1991-05-01

    A fully relativistic kinetic theory of rf current drive in a tokamak is developed for both the lower hybrid and the electron cyclotron mechanisms. The problem is treated as a generalization of the classical transport equations, in which the thermodynamic forces are modified by the addition of a rf-source term. In the limit of weak rf amplitude and neglecting toroidal effects (such as particle trapping), explicit analytical expressions are obtained for the rf-generated current, the dissipated power, and the current drive efficiency. These expressions are fully relativistic and are valid over the whole admissible range of frequencies and for all electron temperatures. The relation between efficiency and parallel relativistic transport coefficients is exhibited. The most important relativistic effect is a dramatic broadening of the frequency range over which the rf-generated current is significantly different from zero.

  13. Heating and current drive systems for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, D.; Goranson, P.; Halle, A. von; Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N.

    1994-05-24

    The heating and current drive (H and CD) system proposed for the TPX tokamak will consist of ion cyclotron, neutral beam, and lower hybrid systems. It will have 17.5 MW of installed H and CD power initially, and can be upgraded to 45 MW. It will be used to explore advanced confinement and fully current-driven plasma regimes with pulse lengths of up to 1,000 s.

  14. Heating and current drive systems for TPX

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, D.; Goranson, P.; Halle, A. von; Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N.

    1994-11-01

    The heating and current drive (H&CD) system proposed for the TPX tokamak will consist of ion cyclotron, neutral beam, and lower hybrid systems. It will have 17.5 MW of installed H&CD power initially, and can be upgraded to 45 MW. It will be used to explore advanced confinement and fully current-driven plasma regimes with pulse lengths of up to 1000 s.

  15. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1995-07-11

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor is disclosed including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 37 figs.

  16. Direct-drive field actuator motors

    SciTech Connect

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1995-01-01

    A high-torque, low speed, positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  17. Neoclassical Current Drive by Waves with a Symmetric Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helander, Per

    2000-10-01

    It is well known that plasma waves can produce electric currents if the waves have an asymmetric spectrum, so that they either interact preferentially with electrons travelling in one direction along the magnetic field or impart net parallel momentum to the electrons [1]. This directionality creates an asymmetry in the electron distribution function and thereby produces a current parallel to the field. We demonstrate, somewhat surprisingly, that in a plasma confined by a curved magnetic field no such spectral asymmetry is necessary for current drive if the effect of collisions is properly taken into account. For instance, in a toroidal plasma a current can be produced by a spectrally symmetric wave field if this field is instead up-down asymmetric, which is frequently the case for electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in tokamaks. We have calculated the resulting current drive efficiency and found it to be smaller than that of the conventional current drive mechanism in the banana regime, but not insignificant in the plateau regime. The results will be compared with experiments in DIII-D, where the measured efficiency exceeds the classical prediction [2]. Our calculations are focused on this case of ECCD in tokamaks, but the basic physical mechanism is much more general. It is of a universal neoclassical nature and applies to all wave-particle interaction in curved magnetic fields. [1] N.J. Fisch, Rev. Mod. Phys. 59, 175 (1987). [2] Y. R. Lin-Liu et al., 26th EPS Conf. on Contr. Fusion and Plasma Phys.(European Phys. Soc. Paris, 1999) Vol. 23J, p 1245.

  18. Current Sensor Fault Reconstruction for PMSM Drives

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with a current sensor fault reconstruction algorithm for the torque closed-loop drive system of an interior PMSM. First, sensor faults are equated to actuator ones by a new introduced state variable. Then, in αβ coordinates, based on the motor model with active flux linkage, a current observer is constructed with a specific sliding mode equivalent control methodology to eliminate the effects of unknown disturbances, and the phase current sensor faults are reconstructed by means of an adaptive method. Finally, an αβ axis current fault processing module is designed based on the reconstructed value. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are verified by simulation and experimental tests on the RT-LAB platform. PMID:26840317

  19. Current Sensor Fault Reconstruction for PMSM Drives.

    PubMed

    Huang, Gang; Luo, Yi-Ping; Zhang, Chang-Fan; He, Jing; Huang, Yi-Shan

    2016-01-30

    This paper deals with a current sensor fault reconstruction algorithm for the torque closed-loop drive system of an interior PMSM. First, sensor faults are equated to actuator ones by a new introduced state variable. Then, in αβ coordinates, based on the motor model with active flux linkage, a current observer is constructed with a specific sliding mode equivalent control methodology to eliminate the effects of unknown disturbances, and the phase current sensor faults are reconstructed by means of an adaptive method. Finally, an αβ axis current fault processing module is designed based on the reconstructed value. The feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method are verified by simulation and experimental tests on the RT-LAB platform.

  20. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) current drive and heating physics

    SciTech Connect

    Nevins, W.M.; Lindquist, W. ); Fujisawa, N.; Kimura, H. ); Hopman, H.; Rebuffi, L.; Wegrowe, J.G. . NET Design Team); Parail, V.; Vdovin, V. . Inst. Atomnoj Ehn

    1990-01-01

    The ITER Current Drive and Heating (CD H) systems are required for: Ionization and current initiation; Non-inductive current ramp-up assist; Heating of the plasma; Steady-state operation with full non-inductive current drive; Current profile control; and Burn control by modulation of the auxiliary power. Steady-state current drive is the most demanding requirement, so this has driven the choice of the ITER current drive and heating systems.

  1. Current drive experiments in the Helicity Injected Torus - II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamp, W. T.; Redd, A. J.; Jarboe, T. R.; Nelson, B. A.; O'Neill, R. G.; Raman, R.; Sieck, P. E.; Smith, R. J.; Mueller, D.

    2006-10-01

    The HIT-II spherical torus (ST) device has demonstrated four toroidal plasma current drive configurations to form and sustain a tokamak: 1) inductive (ohmic) current drive, 2) coaxial helicity injection (CHI) current drive, 3) CHI initiated plasmas with ohmic sustainment (CHI+OH), and 4) ohmically initiated plasmas with CHI edge current drive (OH+ECD). CHI discharges with a sufficiently high ratio of injector current to toroidal field current form a closed flux core, and amplify the injector poloidal flux through magnetic reconnection. CHI+OH plasmas are more robust than unassisted ohmic discharges, with a wider operating space and more efficient use of the transformer Volt-seconds. Finally, edge CHI can enhance the plasma current of an ohmic discharge without significantly degrading the quality of the discharge. Results will be presented for each HIT-II operating regime, including empirical performance scalings, applicable parametric operating spaces, and requirements to produce these discharges. Thomson scattering measurements and EFIT simulations are used to evaluate confinement in several representative plasmas. Finally, we outline extensions to the HIT-II CHI studies that could be performed with NSTX, SUNIST, or other ST devices.

  2. Theory of current-drive in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.

    1986-12-01

    The continuous operation of a tokamak fusion reactor requires, among other things, a means of providing continuous toroidal current. Such operation is preferred to the conventional pulsed operation, where the plasma current is induced by a time-varying magnetic field. A variety of methods has been proposed to provide continuous current, including methods which utilize particle beams or radio frequency waves in any of several frequency regimes. Currents as large as half a mega-amp have now been produced in the laboratory by such means, and experimentation in these techniques has now involved major tokamak facilities worldwide.

  3. Electric machine and current source inverter drive system

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S

    2014-06-24

    A drive system includes an electric machine and a current source inverter (CSI). This integration of an electric machine and an inverter uses the machine's field excitation coil for not only flux generation in the machine but also for the CSI inductor. This integration of the two technologies, namely the U machine motor and the CSI, opens a new chapter for the component function integration instead of the traditional integration by simply placing separate machine and inverter components in the same housing. Elimination of the CSI inductor adds to the CSI volumetric reduction of the capacitors and the elimination of PMs for the motor further improve the drive system cost, weight, and volume.

  4. ICRF fast wave current drive and mode conversion current drive in EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, L.; Yang, C.; Gong, X. Y.; Lu, X. Q.; Du, D.; Chen, Y.

    2017-10-01

    Fast wave in the ion-cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) range is a promising candidate for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long pulse and high performance operation of tokamaks. A numerical study on the ICRF fast wave current drive (FWCD) and mode-conversion current drive (MCCD) in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) is carried out by means of the coupled full wave and Ehst-Karney parameterization methods. The results show that FWCD efficiency is notable in two frequency regimes, i.e., f ≥ 85 MHz and f = 50-65 MHz, where ion cyclotron absorption is effectively avoided, and the maximum on-axis driven current per unit power can reach 120 kA/MW. The sensitivity of the CD efficiency to the minority ion concentration is confirmed, owing to fast wave mode conversion, and the peak MCCD efficiency is reached for 22% minority-ion concentration. The effects of the wave-launch position and the toroidal wavenumber on the efficiency of current drive are also investigated.

  5. Current Drive in a Ponderomotive Potential with Sign Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    N.J. Fisch; J.M. Rax; I.Y. Dodin

    2003-07-30

    Noninductive current drive can be accomplished through ponderomotive forces with high efficiency when the potential changes sign over the interaction region. The effect can practiced upon both ions and electrons. The current drive efficiencies, in principle, might be higher than those possible with conventional radio-frequency current-drive techniques, since different considerations come into play.

  6. Direct calculation of current drive efficiency in FISIC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. C.; Phillips, C. K.; Bonoli, P. T.

    1996-02-01

    Two-dimensional RF modeling codes use a parameterization (1) of current drive efficiencies to calculate fast wave driven currents. This parameterization assumes a uniform quasi-linear diffusion coefficient and requires a priori knowledge of the wave polarizations. These difficulties may be avoided by a direct calculation of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient from the Kennel-Englemann form with the field polarizations calculated by the full wave code, FISIC (2). Current profiles are calculated using the adjoint formulation (3). Comparisons between the two formulations are presented.

  7. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Diem, S.; Forest, C. B.; Harvey, R. W.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.

    2014-02-01

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ˜ 104) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ˜ 3×106) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  8. MHD simulation of RF current drive in MST

    SciTech Connect

    Hendries, E. R.; Anderson, J. K.; Forest, C. B.; Reusch, J. A.; Seltzman, A. H.; Sovinec, C. R.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.

    2014-02-12

    Auxiliary heating and current drive using RF waves such as the electron Bernstein wave (EBW) promises to advance the performance of the reversed field pinch (RFP). In previous computational work [1], a hypothetical edge-localized current drive is shown to suppress the tearing activity which governs the macroscopic transport properties of the RFP. The ideal conditions for tearing stabilization include a reduced toroidal induction, and precise width and radial position of the Gaussian-shaped external current drive. In support of the EBW experiment on the Madison Symmetric Torus, an integrated modeling scheme now incorporates ray tracing and Fokker-Plank predictions of auxiliary current into single fluid MHD. Simulations at low Lundquist number (S ∼ 10{sup 4}) generally agree with the previous work; significantly more burdensome simulations at MST-like Lundquist number (S ∼ 3×10{sup 6}) show unexpected results. The effect on nonlinearly saturated current profile by a particular RF-driven external force decreases in magnitude and widens considerably as the Lundquist number increases toward experimental values. Simulations reproduce the periodic current profile relaxation events observed in experiment (sawteeth) in the absence of current profile control. Reduction of the tearing mode amplitudes is still observable; however, reduction is limited to periods between the large bursts of magnetic activity at each sawtooth. The sawtoothing pattern persists with up to 10 MW of externally applied RF power. Periods with prolonged low tearing amplitude are predicted with a combination of external current drive and a reduced toroidal loop voltage, consistent with previous conclusions. Finally, the resistivity profile is observed to have a strong effect on the optimal externally driven current profile for mode stabilization.

  9. Enhanced Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments on HT-7 Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei-ci; Kuang, Guang-li; Liu, Yue-xiu; Ding, Bo-jiang; Shi, Yao-jiang; HT-7 Team

    2003-02-01

    Effective Lower Hybrid Current Driving (LHCD) and improved confinement experiments in higher plasma parameters (Ip > 200 kA, ne > 2 × 1013 cm-3, Te >= 1 keV) have been curried out in optimized LH wave spectrum and plasma parameters in HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The dependence of current driving efficiency on LH power spectrum, plasma density ne and toroidal magnetic field BT has been obtained under optimal conditions. A good CD efficiency was obtained at higher plasma current and higher electron density. The improvement of the energy confinement time is accompanied with the increase in line averaged electron density, and in ion and electron temperatures. The highest current driving efficiency reached ηCD = Ipbar neR/PRF approx 1.05 × 1019 Am-2/W. Wave-plasma coupling was sustained in a good state and the reflective coefficient was less than 5%. The experiments have also demonstrated the ability of LH wave in the start-up and ramp-up of the plasma current. The measurement of the temporal distribution of plasma parameter shows that lower hybrid leads to a broader profile in plasma parameter. The LH power deposition profile and the plasma current density profile were modeled with a 2D Fokker-Planck code corresponding to the evolution process of the hard x-ray detector array.

  10. System studies of rf current drive for MST

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J. K.; Burke, D. R.; Forest, C. B.; Goetz, J. A.; Hendries, E. R.; Seltzman, A. H.; Thomas, M. A.; Diem, S.; Harvey, R. W.; Kaufman, M. C.

    2011-12-23

    Two rf schemes are being studied on the MST reversed field pinch for their potential in current profile control experiments. MHD modeling has shown that a substantial externally-driven off axis parallel current can improve stability of the dominant core tearing modes. A radially localized axisymmetric population of fast electrons has been observed by SXR emission during LH injection (100kW at 800MHz), and is consistent with CQL3D modeling which predicts a small driven current. Computational work suggests that doubling the input power will statistically improve the LH-induced SXR signal to background ratio, and that about 2MW of injected power (an order of magnitude increase) will drive enough current for stabilization of tearing modes. Additionally, a 1 MW 5.5 GHz electron Bernstein wave (EBW) experiment is under construction, which utilizes a very simple and compact antenna compatible with the demands of the RFP. EBW allows access to electron cyclotron heating and current drive in the overdense plasma. Coupling of the external electromagnetic wave to the EBW has been demonstrated, and initial tests at {approx}100kW power have produced a small, localized xray flux consistent with rf heating and high diffusivity of fast electrons. Computational work is currently underway to answer the very important questions of how much power is required, and what level of electron diffusivity is tolerable, to generate a consequential amount of EBW current.

  11. Path to Efficient Lower Hybrid Current Drive at High Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Brunner, D.; Faust, I.; Labombard, B. L.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Wukitch, S.

    2015-11-01

    Recovery of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) efficiency at high density was demonstrated on Alcator C-Mod by modifying the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma. RF probe measurements around the C-Mod tokamak indicate that the LH wave amplitude at the high field side wall significantly attenuates with plasma density. This is interpreted as enhanced collisional loss due to the increase in the SOL density and width. By taking advantage of the narrower SOL width by doubling plasma current to 1.1 MA, it is found that the LH wave amplitude maintains its strength, and an effective current drive is extended to above 1x10e20 m-3. An order of magnitude increase in non-thermal Bremsstrahlung emission is consistent with ray-tracing results which take into account the change of SOL profiles with current. In the coming campaign, a further investigation on the role of the SOL plasma is planned by raising plasma current above 1.1 MA. This will be aided with newly developed RF magnetic loop antennas mounted on a radially movable probe head. This system is expected to intercept the LH resonance cone on the first pass, allowing us to measure radial profiles of both the wave amplitude and dominant parallel wavenumber in the SOL for the first time. These data will be compared with the GENRAY ray-tracing code. Work supported by USDoE awards DE-FC02-99ER54512.

  12. Direct Calculations of Current Drive with a Full Wave Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John C.; Phillips, Cynthia K.

    1997-11-01

    We have developed a current drive package that evaluates the current driven by fast magnetosonic waves in arbitrary flux geometry. An expression for the quasilinear flux has been derived which accounts for coupling between modes in the spectrum of waves launched from the antenna. The field amplitudes are calculated in the full wave code, FISIC, and the current response function, \\chi, also known as the Spitzer function, is determined with Charles Karney's Fokker-Planck code, adj.f. Both codes have been modified to incorporate the same numerical equilibria. To model the effects of a trapped particle population, the bounce averaged equations for current and power are used, and the bounce averaged flux is calculated. The computer model is benchmarked against the homogenous equations for a high aspect ratio case in which the expected agreement is confirmed. Results from cases for TFTR, NSTX and CDX-U are contrasted with the predictions of the Ehst-Karney parameterization of current drive for circular equilibria. For theoretical background, please see the authors' archive of papers. (http://w3.pppl.gov/ ~jwright/Publications)

  13. Current European developments in solar paddle drives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bentall, R. H.

    1973-01-01

    The European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) is sponsoring the development of a number of critical spacecraft hardware items. The hardware under development includes two competing solar paddle drives which are being produced to similar specifications. Three mechanisms of each type are being produced and will undergo thermal vacuum testing. All mechanisms have lead lubricated bearings.

  14. On Current Drive and Wave Induced Bootstrap Current in Toroidal Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hellsten, T.; Johnson, T.

    2008-11-01

    A comprehensive treatment of wave-particle interactions in toroidal plasmas including collisional relaxation, applicable to heating or anomalous wave induced transport, has been obtained by using Monte Carlo operators satisfying quasi-neutrality. This approach enables a self-consistent treatment of wave-particle interactions applicable to the banana regime in the neoclassical theory. It allows an extension into a regime with large temperature and density gradients, losses and transport of particles by wave-particle interactions making the method applicable to transport barriers. It is found that at large gradients the relationship between radial electric field, parallel velocity, temperature and density gradient in the neoclassical theory is modified such that coefficient in front of the logarithmic ion temperature gradient, which in the standard neoclassical theory is small and counteracts the electric field caused by the density gradient, now changes sign and contributes to the built up of the radial electric field. The possibility to drive current by absorbing the waves on trapped particles has been studied and how the wave-particle interactions affect the bootstrap current. Two new current drive mechanisms are studied: current drive by wave induced bootstrap current and selective detrapping into passing orbits by directed waves.

  15. Current drive and helicity transport in slowly building SSPX discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hooper, Bick; Bulmer, Dick; Hill, David; Holcomb, Chris; McLean, Harry; Pearlstein, Don; Stallard, Barry; Wood, Reg; Woodruff, Simon

    2002-11-01

    In some SSPX discharges the toroidal current increases slowly throughout the 2-3 ms part of the flattop current pulse. These discharges suggest the possibility of a slow buildup to high toroidal currents and magnetic fields, although to date they are similar to those in fast (<< 1 ms) buildup. Buildup is found in several bias field configurations with multiple, low amplitude magnetic fluctuations but no large-amplitude, coherent n=1 column mode. Reconstruction of the equilibria from wall probes shows that some have hollow current profiles along the geometric axis. An hyper-resistive model for Ohm's law1 is used to evaluate the transport of helicity and the resultant current drive for comparison with fluctuation amplitudes and spectra (n=0, 1, 2 ...) from wall probes. Possible extrapolation to longer, higher field pulses is considered. Work performed under the auspices of the U. S. Department of Energy by University of California LLNL under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. 1. E. B. Hooper and L. D. Pearlstein, Plasma Physics Reports (in press).

  16. Penetration of lower hybrid current drive waves in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, W.; Goniche, M.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Litaudon, X.

    2013-11-15

    Lower hybrid (LH) ray propagation in toroidal plasma is shown to be controlled by combination of the azimuthal spectrum launched by the antenna, the poloidal variation of the magnetic field, and the scattering of the waves by the drift wave fluctuations. The width of the poloidal and radial radio frequency wave spectrum increases rapidly as the rays penetrate into higher density and scatter from the drift waves. The electron temperature gradient (ETG) spectrum is particularly effective in scattering the LH waves due to its comparable wavelengths and phase velocities. ETG turbulence is also driven by the radial gradient of the electron current profile giving rise to an anomalous viscosity spreading the LH driven plasma currents. The LH wave scattering is derived from a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of the ray trajectories with diffusivities derived from the drift wave fluctuations. The condition for chaotic diffusion for the rays is derived. The evolution of the poloidal and radial mode number spectrum of the lower hybrid waves are both on the antenna spectrum and the spectrum of the drift waves. Antennas launching higher poloidal mode number spectra drive off-axis current density profiles producing negative central shear [RS] plasmas with improved thermal confinement from ETG transport. Core plasma current drive requires antennas with low azimuthal mode spectra peaked at m = 0 azimuthal mode numbers.

  17. High frequency fast wave current drive for DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, R.; Lerche, E.; Van Eester, D.; Nightingale, M.

    2011-12-01

    A steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR) requires a high efficiency current drive system, from plug to driven mega-amps. RF systems working in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) have high efficiency from plug to antenna but a limited current drive (CD) efficiency and centrally peaked CD profiles. The latter feature is not adequate for a SSTR where the current should be sufficiently broad to keep the central safety factor (possibly significantly) above 1. In addition, the fact that the fast wave (FW) is evanescent at the edge limits coupling, requiring high voltage operation, which makes the system dependent on plasma edge properties and prone to arcing, reducing its reliability. A possible way to overcome these weaknesses is to operate at higher frequency (10 times or more the cyclotron frequency). The advantages are: (1) The coupling can be much better (waves propagate in vacuum) if the parallel refractive index n∥ is kept below one, (2) The FW group velocity tends to align to the magnetic field, so the power circumnavigates the magnetic axis and can drive off-axis current, (3) Due to the latter property, n∥ can be upshifted along the wave propagation path, allowing low n∥ launch (hence good coupling, large CD efficiency) with ultimately good electron absorption (which requires higher n∥). Note however that the n∥ upshift is a self-organized feature, that electron absorption is in competition with α-particle absorption and that uncoupling of the FW from the lower hybrid resonance at the edge requires n∥ slightly above one. The latter possibly counterproductive features might complicate the picture. The different aspects of this potentially attractive off-axis FWCD scheme are discussed.

  18. Relationships between Geomagnetic Induced Currents and Field Aligned Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waters, C. L.; Barnett, R.; Anderson, B. J.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Korth, H.; Barnes, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic Induced Currents (GICs) appear in the ground due to time varying magnetic fields that occur during periods of enhanced geomagnetic activity. The resultant time varying electric fields at Earth's surface drive very low frequency, currents through electricity supply transformers which reduces transforming capacity. In extreme cases, electricity supply grids can collapse as multiple transformers are affected. GICs have larger magnitudes at auroral latitudes and should be related to the field aligned current (FAC) and auroral ionosphere currents systems. At ground locations under the regions between upward and downward FACs, the GIC related fields show a direct relationship with the time derivative of the FACs. This allows a conversion factor between FAC and GIC magnitudes. Examples of the relationship between FAC and GIC related fields are presented using data derived from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) and SuperMAG.

  19. Optimized calculation of the synergy conditions between electron cyclotron current drive and lower hybrid current drive on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Wei; Bo-Jiang, Ding; Y, Peysson; J, Decker; Miao-Hui, Li; Xin-Jun, Zhang; Xiao-Jie, Wang; Lei, Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The optimized synergy conditions between electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) and lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) with normal parameters of the EAST tokamak are studied by using the C3PO/LUKE code based on the understanding of the synergy mechanisms so as to obtain a higher synergistic current and provide theoretical reference for the synergistic effect in the EAST experiment. The dependences of the synergistic effect on the parameters of two waves (lower hybrid wave (LHW) and electron cyclotron wave (ECW)), including the radial position of the power deposition, the power value of the LH and EC waves, and the parallel refractive indices of the LHW (N∥) are presented and discussed. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011GB102000, 2012GB103000, and 2013GB106001), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11175206 and 11305211), the JSPS-NRF-NSFC A3 Foresight Program in the Field of Plasma Physics (Grant No. 11261140328), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (Grant No. JZ2015HGBZ0472).

  20. Sensorless optimal sinusoidal brushless direct current for hard disk drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soh, C. S.; Bi, C.

    2009-04-01

    Initiated by the availability of digital signal processors and emergence of new applications, market demands for permanent magnet synchronous motors have been surging. As its back-emf is sinusoidal, the drive current should also be sinusoidal for reducing the torque ripple. However, in applications like hard disk drives, brushless direct current (BLDC) drive is adopted instead of sinusoidal drive for simplification. The adoption, however, comes at the expense of increased harmonics, losses, torque pulsations, and acoustics. In this paper, we propose a sensorless optimal sinusoidal BLDC drive. First and foremost, the derivation for an optimal sinusoidal drive is presented, and a power angle control scheme is proposed to achieve an optimal sinusoidal BLDC. The scheme maintains linear relationship between the motor speed and drive voltage. In an attempt to execute the sensorless drive, an innovative power angle measurement scheme is devised, which takes advantage of the freewheeling diodes and measures the power angle through the detection of diode voltage drops. The objectives as laid out will be presented and discussed in this paper, supported by derivations, simulations, and experimental results. The proposed scheme is straightforward, brings about the benefits of sensorless sinusoidal drive, negates the need for current sensors by utilizing the freewheeling diodes, and does not incur additional cost.

  1. Co-counter asymmetry in fast wave heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeger, E.F.; Carter, M.D.; Berry, L.A.; Batchelor, D.B.; Forest, C.B.; Weitzner, H.

    1997-04-01

    Full wave ICRF coupling models show differences in plasma response when antenna arrays are phase to drive currents and counter to the plasma current. The source of this difference lies in the natural up- sown asymmetry of the antenna`s radiated power spectrum. This asymmetry is due to Hall terms in the wave equation, and occurs even without a poloidal magnetic field. When a poloidal field is included, the up-down asymmetry acquires a toroidal component. The result is that plasma absorption (i.e. antenna loading) is shifted or skewed toward the co-current drive direction, independent of the direction of the magnetic field. When wave are launched to drive current counter the plasma current , electron heating an current profiles are more peaked on axis, and this peaking becomes more pronounce a lower toroidal magnetic fields.

  2. High Harmonic Fast Wave heating and current drive for NSTX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, J. A.; Majeski, R.; Hosea, J.; Menard, J.; Ono, M.; Phillips, C. K.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ryan, P.; Swain, D.; Mau, T. K.; Chiu, S. C.; Smithe, D.

    1997-11-01

    Heating and noninductive current drive in NSTX will initially use 6 MW of rf power in the high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) regime. We present numerical modelling of HHFW heating and current drive in NSTX using the PICES, CURRAY, FISIC, and METS95 codes. High electron β during the discharge flattop in NSTX is predicted to result in off-axis power deposition and current drive. However, reductions in the trapped electron fraction (due also to high β effects) are predicted to result in adequate current drive efficiency, with ~ 400 - 500 kA of noninductive current driven. Sufficient per-pass absorption (>10%) to ensure effective electron heating is also expected for the startup plasma. Present plans call for a single twelve strap antenna driven by six FMIT transmitters operating at 30 MHz. The design for the antenna and matching system will also be discussed.

  3. RF helicity injection and current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamatsu, K.; Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Azumi, M.

    1990-07-01

    The relation between (Range of Frequency) RF-driven current and wave helicity is analytically and numerically studied for tokamak plasma. The helicity conversion coefficient from the wave to the plasma is generally obtained and numerically examined for the waves in the range of ion cyclotron frequency. The wave propagation equation is solved as a boundary-value problem with one-dimensional inhomogeneities. It is shown that the wave helicity well satisfies the continuity equation. It was confirmed that the RF-helicity injection is not an identical phenomenon of the reduction of the one turn loop voltage due to the RF-driven current.

  4. Current Perspectives of Bioptic Driving in Low Vision

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Robert; Cucuras, Maria; Jay, Walter M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In this review, the authors discuss the current perspectives of spectacle-mounted telescopes (bioptics) used for driving among patients with vision impairments. The history, design, driving laws surrounding bioptic use, and developing programs in The Netherlands and Canada are discussed. Patients who have certain visual requirements and stable disease status may be eligible candidates to consider using a bioptic aid for driving. Given the high prevalence of depression among visually impaired patients, low vision specialists can work with neuro-ophthalmologists to maximise the independence and visual function of patients who have permanent vision impairments but capable of maintaining driving privileges. PMID:27928386

  5. Magnetospheric electric fields and currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Zanetti, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    The progress made in the years 1983-1986 in understanding the character and operation of magnetospheric electric fields and electric currents is discussed, with emphasis placed on the connection with the interior regions. Special attention is given to determinations of global electric-field configurations, measurements of the response of magnetospheric particle populations to the electric-field configurations, and observations of the magnetospheric currents at high altitude and during northward IMF. Global simulations of current distributions are discussed, and the sources of global electric fields and currents are examined. The topics discussed in the area of impulsive and small-scale phenomena include substorm current systems, impulsive electric fields and associated currents, and field-aligned electrodynamics. A key finding of these studies is that the electric fields and currents are interrelated and cannot be viewed as separate entities.

  6. Analysis of current driving capability of pentacene TFTs for OLEDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Gi Seong; Byun, Hyun Sook; Xu, Yong Xian; Pyo, Kyung Soo; Choe, Ki Beom; Song, Chung Kun

    2005-01-01

    The flexible display and the application of Roll-To-Roll process is difficult because high temperature process of a-Si;H TFT and poly-Si TFT limited the use of plastic substrate. We proposed AMOLED using Pentacene TFT (OTFT) to fabricate flexible display. The first stage for OTFT application to OLED, we analyzed OTFT as driving device of OLED. The process performed on glass and plastic (PET) substrate that is coated ITO and PVP is used for gate insulator. The field effect mobility of the fabricated OTFT is 0.1~0.3cm2/V"sec and Ion/Ioff current ratio is 103~105. OLED is fabricated with two stories structure of TPD and Alq3, and we can observe the light at 5V by the naked eye. The wavelength of observed lights is 530nm ~550nm. We can confirm the driving of OLED due to OTFT using Test panel and observe OLED control by gate voltage of OTFT. Also, we verify designed structure and process, and make a demonstration fabricating 64 by 64 backplane based on Test panel.

  7. Fast electron transport in lower-hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, K.; Bers, A.

    1991-01-01

    We generalize the quasilinear-Fokker-Planck formulation for lower-hybrid current drive to include the wave induced radial transport of fast electrons. Toroidal ray tracing shows that the wave fields in the plasma develop a large poloidal component associated with the upshift in k1l and the filling of the "spectral gap". These fields lead to an enhanced radial E x B drift of resonant electrons. Two types of radial flows are obtained: an outward convective flow driven by the asymmetry in the poloidal wave spectrum, and a diffusive flow proportional to the width of the poloidal spectrum. Simulations of Alcator C and JT60, show that the radial convection velocity has a broad maximum of nearly 1 m/sec and is independent of the amplitude of fields. In both cases, the radial diffusion is found to be highly localized near the magnetic axis. For JT60, the peak of the diffusion profile can be quite large, nearly 1 m2/sec.

  8. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-15

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  9. A thermodynamical analysis of rf current drive with fast electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizarro, João P. S.

    2015-08-01

    The problem of rf current drive (CD) by pushing fast electrons with high-parallel-phase-velocity waves, such as lower-hybrid (LH) or electron-cyclotron (EC) waves, is revisited using the first and second laws, the former to retrieve the well-known one-dimensional (1D) steady-state CD efficiency, and the latter to calculate a lower bound for the rate of entropy production when approaching steady state. The laws of thermodynamics are written in a form that explicitly takes care of frictional dissipation and are thus applied to a population of fast electrons evolving under the influence of a dc electric field, rf waves, and collisions while in contact with a thermal, Maxwellian reservoir with a well-defined temperature. Besides the laws of macroscopic thermodynamics, there is recourse to basic elements of kinetic theory only, being assumed a residual dc electric field and a strong rf drive, capable of sustaining in the resonant region, where waves interact with electrons, a raised fast-electron tail distribution, which becomes an essentially flat plateau in the case of the 1D theory for LHCD. Within the 1D model, particularly suited for LHCD as it solely retains fast-electron dynamics in velocity space parallel to the ambient magnetic field, an H theorem for rf CD is also derived, which is written in different forms, and additional physics is recovered, such as the synergy between the dc and rf power sources, including the rf-induced hot conductivity, as well as the equation for electron-bulk heating. As much as possible 1D results are extended to 2D, to account for ECCD by also considering fast-electron velocity-space dynamics in the direction perpendicular to the magnetic field, which leads to a detailed discussion on how the definition of an rf-induced conductivity may depend on whether one works at constant rf current or power. Moreover, working out the collisional dissipated power and entropy-production rate written in terms of the fast-electron distribution, it

  10. Trapped electron effects on ICRF Current Drive Predictions in TFTR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, John C.; Phillips, Cynthia K.; Bonoli, Paul T.

    1996-11-01

    Most 2D RF modeling codes use a parameterization^1 of current drive efficiencies to calculate fast wave driven currents. Because this parameterization is derived from a ray--tracing model, there are difficulties in applying it to a spectrum of waves. In addition, one cannot account for multiple resonances and coherency effects between the electrons and the waves. These difficulties may be avoided by a direct calculation of the quasilinear diffusion coefficient in an inhomogenous geometry coupled with a full wave code for the field polarizations. Current profiles are then calculated using the adjoint formulation^2, with the magnetic equilibrium specified consistently in both the adjoint routine and the full wave code. This approach has been implemented in the FISIC code^3. Results are benchmarked by comparing a power deposition calculation from conductivity to one from the quasilinear expression. It is shown that the two expressions agree. We quantify differences seen based upon aspect ratio and elongation. The largest discrepancies are seen in the regime of small aspect ratio, and little loss in accuracy for moderate aspect ratios ~>3. This work supported by DoE contract No. DE--AC02--76--CH03073. ^1 D. A. Ehst and C. F. F. Karney, Nucl. Fusion 31, 1933 (1991). ^2 C. F. F. Karney, Computer Physics Reports 4, 183 (1986). ^3 M. Brambilla and T. Krücken, Nucl. Fusion 28, 1813 (1988).

  11. Neutral beam current drive scaling in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G.D.; Bhadra, D.K.; Burrell, K.H.; Callis, R.W.; Colleraine, A.P.; Ferron, J.R.; James, R.A.; Kellman, A.G.; Kim, J.; Matsuoka, M.

    1989-03-01

    Neutral beam current drive scaling experiments have been carried out on the DIII-D tokamak at General Atomics. These experiments were performed using up to 10 MW of 80 keV hydrogen beams. Previous current drive experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated beam driven currents up to 340 kA. In the experiments reported here we achieved beam driven currents of at least 500 kA, and have obtained operation with record values of poloidal beta (epsilon..beta../sub p/ = 1.4). The beam driven current reported here is obtained from the total plasma current by subtracting an estimate of the residual Ohmic current determined from the measured loop voltage. In this report we discuss the scaling of the current drive efficiency with plasma conditions. Using hydrogen neutral beams, we find the current drive efficiency is similar in Deuterium and Helium target plasmas. Experiments have been performed with plasma electron temperatures up to T/sub e/ = 3 keV, and densities in the range 2 /times/ 10/sup 19/m/sup /minus/3/ < n/sub e/ < 4 /times/ 10/sup 19/m/sup /minus/3/. The current drive efficiency (nIR/P) is observed to scale linearly with the energy confinement time on DIII-D to a maximum of 0.05 /times/ 10/sup 20/m/sup /minus/2/ A/W. The measured efficiency is consistent with a 0-D theoretical model. In addition to comparison with this simple model, detailed analysis of several shots using the time dependent transport code ONETWO is discussed. This analysis indicates that bootstrap current contributes approximately 10--20% of the the total current. Our estimates of this effect are somewhat uncertain due to limited measurements of the radial profile of the density and temperatures. 4 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Electron Cyclotron Current Drive by Radial Transport of Particles in the Continuous Current Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sanghyun

    In the Continuous Current Tokamak at the UCLA, electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments have been conducted in the absence of ohmic heating or any other power input. With X-band source of 30 kW lasting 1 mS launched from the high field side in X-mode, 240 A of plasma current has been generated at the neutral pressure corresponding to the critical density for the wave frequency. The Spitzer resistivity calculated from the L/R decay time of the current yielded an electron temperature of 100 eV. For the interest of mapping out radial profiles of wave and particle parameters, S-band sources at 2.45 GHz, 1.5 kW lasting 8 mS with duty cycle of 50% have been used for quasi-steady state current drive experiments. There are four launching structures; (1) Inside perpendicular, (2) Outside perpendicular, (3) Outside 60^circ, and (4) Outside -60^circ with respect to the toroidal magnetic field. It has been found that the four ways of microwaves give comparable results in plasma current driven. The plasma current measurements as a function of the radial location of the electron cyclotron resonance layer show a I_{rm p}~ -sin(pi r/a) where R_{res} = R_{0} + r for -a >=q r >=q O. The vertical field dependence has been shown to be I_{rm p}~ -x exp(-x^2) where x is a normalized vertical field for -inftycurrent is reversed as the applied vertical field is reversed for all four launch schemes. As a toroidal electric field is applied, the co(counter)-injection with cos^{-1}( k_0 cdot B_{t}) = +(-)60^circ give the same result in plasma current driven. The energy distribution of the current carrying electrons as determined by the biased, two-side Langmuir probe show that the current is carried by the bulk of the plasma electrons whose energy is comparable to the plasma electron temperature, and not by the high energy tail of the distribution as predicted by theories based on the Fokker-Planck equation. The vertical and toroidal field

  13. Fast wave current drive in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Callis, R.W.; Chiu, S.C.; deGrassie, J.S.; Forest, C.B.; Freeman, R.L.; Gohil, P.; Harvey, R.W.; Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.-R.

    1995-02-01

    The non-inductive current drive from fast Alfven waves launched by a directional four-element antenna was measured in the DIII-D tokamak. The fast wave frequency (60 MHz) was eight times the deuterium cyclotron frequency at the plasma center. An array of rf pickup loops at several locations around the torus was used to verify the directivity of the four-element antenna. Complete non-inductive current drive was achieved using a combination of fast wave current drive (FWCD) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) in discharges for which the total plasma current was inductively ramped down from 400 to 170 kA. For discharges with steady plasma current, up to 110 kA of FWCD was inferred from an analysis of the loop voltage, with a maximum non-inductive current (FWCD, ECCD, and bootstrap) of 195 out of 310 kA. The FWCD efficiency increased linearly with central electron temperature. For low current discharges, the FWCD efficiency was degraded due to incomplete fast wave damping. The experimental FWCD was found to agree with predictions from the CURRAY ray-tracing code only when a parasitic loss of 4% per pass was included in the modeling along with multiple pass damping.

  14. Heliostat field cost reduction by `slope drive' optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbes, Florian; Weinrebe, Gerhard; Wöhrbach, Markus

    2016-05-01

    An algorithm to optimize power tower heliostat fields employing heliostats with so-called slope drives is presented. It is shown that a field using heliostats with the slope drive axes configuration has the same performance as a field with conventional azimuth-elevation tracking heliostats. Even though heliostats with the slope drive configuration have a limited tracking range, field groups of heliostats with different axes or different drives are not needed for different positions in the heliostat field. The impacts of selected parameters on a benchmark power plant (PS10 near Seville, Spain) are analyzed.

  15. Fast Waves and Electron Current Drive in the Irvine Torus.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platt, Robert Croft

    This work reports the results of experimental studies of the fast wave with frequencies near the mean gyro-frequency (omega ~ ~ (omega _{rm ci}omega_{ rm ce})^{1/2}) in magnetized, toroidal plasmas with comparison to theory. Experiments investigating fast wave dispersion and damping, and the use of unidirectional fast waves to drive steady-state electron currents were performed on the Irvine Torus. The wave was excited in the plasmas by a phased array antenna which allowed launching of uni - or bi-directional fast waves around the torus. Probe measurements of the angle of propagation of wave energy, radial wavelengths, and the direction and magnitude of radial wave phase velocities were found to be in good agreement with predictions from cold plasma theory. Measurements of fast wave damping showed the observed damping lengths to be anomalously short when compared to predictions for electron Landau damping, transit-time magnetic pumping, and collisional damping, but may be explained by effects due to fast wave scattering from drift wave density fluctuations. Steady-state electron currents were driven by uni-directional fast waves. Low power experiments (< 25W) generated up to 1.3 A of electron current with a peak efficiency of eta = INR _{rm o}/P ~eq 6 times 10^{-2}A/W (10 ^{13}cm^{-3 }) m. Up to 14% of the wave energy was converted to poloidal magnetic field energy. The maximum current observed was found to be in rough agreement with a prediction from quasi-linear theory. Electron currents generated by application of radio-frequency power applied to a loop coupler antenna designed to excite the fast wave were observed in the Princeton Large Torus.

  16. Heating and Current Drive by Electron Cyclotron Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prater, R.

    2003-10-01

    The physics model of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) is becoming well validated through systematic comparisons of theory and experiment. Work has shown that ECCD can be highly localized and robustly controlled, leading to applications including stabilization of MHD instabilities like neoclassical tearing modes, control and sustainment of desired profiles of current density and plasma pressure, and studies of localized transport. These physics applications and the study of the basic physics of ECH and ECCD were enabled by the advent of the gyrotron in the 1980s and of the diamond window for megawatt gyrotrons in the 1990s. The experimental work stimulated a broad base of theory based on first principles which is encapsulated in linear ray tracing codes and fully relativistic quasilinear Fokker-Planck codes. Recent experiments use measurements of the local poloidal magnetic field through the motional Stark effect to determine the magnitude and profile of the locally driven current. The subtle balance between wave-induced diffusion and Coulomb relaxation in velocity space provides an understanding of the effects of trapping of current-carrying electrons in the magnetic well, an effect which can be used to advantage. Strong quasilinear effects and radial transport of electrons which may broaden the driven current profile have also been observed under some conditions and appear to be consistent with theory, but in large devices these are usually insignificant. Additional advantages of ECH compared with other rf heating methods are that the antenna can be far removed from the plasma and the power density can be very high. The agreement of theory and experiment, the broad base of established applications, and the technical advantages of ECH support the application of ECH in next-step tokamaks and stellarators.

  17. Fokker-Planck modeling of current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Merkulov, A.; Westerhof, E.; Schueller, F. C.

    2007-05-15

    The current penetration during electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the resistive time scale is studied with a Fokker-Planck simulation, which includes a model for the magnetic diffusion that determines the parallel electric field evolution. The existence of the synergy between the inductive electric field and EC driven current complicates the process of the current penetration and invalidates the standard method of calculation in which Ohm's law is simply approximated by j-j{sub cd}={sigma}E. Here it is proposed to obtain at every time step a self-consistent approximation to the plasma resistivity from the Fokker-Planck code, which is then used in a concurrent calculation of the magnetic diffusion equation in order to obtain the inductive electric field at the next time step. A series of Fokker-Planck calculations including a self-consistent evolution of the inductive electric field has been performed. Both the ECCD power and the electron density have been varied, thus varying the well known nonlinearity parameter for ECCD P{sub rf}[MW/m{sup -3}]/n{sub e}{sup 2}[10{sup 19} m{sup -3}] [R. W. Harvey et al., Phys. Rev. Lett 62, 426 (1989)]. This parameter turns out also to be a good predictor of the synergetic effects. The results are then compared with the standard method of calculations of the current penetration using a transport code. At low values of the Harvey parameter, the standard method is in quantitative agreement with Fokker-Planck calculations. However, at high values of the Harvey parameter, synergy between ECCD and E{sub parallel} is found. In the case of cocurrent drive, this synergy leads to the generation of large amounts of nonthermal electrons and a concomitant increase of the electrical conductivity and current penetration time. In the case of countercurrent drive, the ECCD efficiency is suppressed by the synergy with E{sub parallel} while only a small amount of nonthermal electrons is produced.

  18. Electron cyclotron current drive efficiency in general tokamak geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Chan, V. S.; Prater, R.

    2003-01-01

    Green's-function techniques are used to calculate electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency in general tokamak geometry in the low-collisionality regime. Fully relativistic electron dynamics is employed in the theoretical formulation. The high-velocity collision model is used to model Coulomb collisions and a simplified quasi-linear rf diffusion operator describes wave-particle interactions. The approximate analytic solutions which are benchmarked with a widely used ECCD model, facilitate time-dependent simulations of tokamak operational scenarios using the non-inductive current drive of electron cyclotron waves.

  19. The Effects of Dextromethorphan on Driving Performance and the Standardized Field Sobriety Test.

    PubMed

    Perry, Paul J; Fredriksen, Kristian; Chew, Stephanie; Ip, Eric J; Lopes, Ingrid; Doroudgar, Shadi; Thomas, Kelan

    2015-09-01

    Dextromethorphan (DXM) is abused most commonly among adolescents as a recreational drug to generate a dissociative experience. The objective of the study was to assess driving with and without DXM ingestion. The effects of one-time maximum daily doses of DXM 120 mg versus a guaifenesin 400 mg dose were compared among 40 healthy subjects using a crossover design. Subjects' ability to drive was assessed by their performance in a driving simulator (STISIM® Drive driving simulator software) and by conducting a standardized field sobriety test (SFST) administered 1-h postdrug administration. The one-time dose of DXM 120 mg did not demonstrate driving impairment on the STISIM® Drive driving simulator or increase SFST failures compared to guaifenesin 400 mg. Doses greater than the currently recommended maximum daily dose of 120 mg are necessary to perturb driving behavior. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  20. Simulations of EBW current drive and power deposition in the WEGA Stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Preinhaelter, J.; Urban, J.; Vahala, L.; Vahala, G.

    2009-11-26

    The WEGA stellarator is well suited for fundamental electron Bernstein wave (EBW) studies. Heating and current drive experiments at 2.45 GHz and 28 GHz, carried out in WEGA's low temperature, steady state overdense plasmas, were supported by intensive modelling. We employ our AMR (Antenna-Mode-conversion-Ray-tracing) code to calculate the O-X-EBW conversion efficiency with a full-wave equation solver, while the power deposition and current drive profiles using ray tracing. Several phenomena have been studied and understood. Particularly, EBW current drive was theoretically predicted and experimentally detected at 2.45 GHz. Simulations confirmed the presence of two (cold and hot) electron components and the resonant behaviour of the EBW power deposition and its dependence on the magnetic field configuration. Furthermore, the code is used to predict the 28 GHz heating and current drive performance and to simulate EBW emission spectra.

  1. Assessment of Electron-Cyclotron-Current-Drive-Assisted Operation in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, E.; Fable, E.; Tardini, G.; Zohm, H.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Porte, L.

    2012-09-01

    The achievable efficiency for external current drive through electron-cyclotron (EC) waves in a demonstration tokamak reactor is discussed. Two possible reactor designs, one for steady state and one for pulsed operation, are considered. It is found that for midplane injection the achievable current drive efficiency is limited by secondharmonic absorption at levels consistent with previous studies. Propagation through the second-harmonic region can be reduced by moving the launch position to the high-field side (this can be obtained by injecting the beam from an upper port in the vacuum vessel). In this case, beam tracing calculations deliver values for the EC current drive efficiency approaching those usually reported for neutral beam current drive.

  2. Numerical modeling of lower hybrid heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Valeo, E.J.; Eder, D.C.

    1986-03-01

    The generation of currents in toroidal plasma by application of waves in the lower hybrid frequency range involves the interplay of several physical phenomena which include: wave propagation in toroidal geometry, absorption via wave-particle resonances, the quasilinear generation of strongly nonequilibrium electron and ion distribution functions, and the self-consistent evolution of the current density in such a nonequilibrium plasma. We describe a code, LHMOD, which we have developed to treat these aspects of current drive and heating in tokamaks. We present results obtained by applying the code to a computation of current ramp-up and to an investigation of the possible importance of minority hydrogen absorption in a deuterium plasma as the ''density limit'' to current drive is approached.

  3. Alternating-Current Motor Drive for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauthamer, S.; Rippel, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    New electric drive controls speed of a polyphase as motor by varying frequency of inverter output. Closed-loop current-sensing circuit automatically adjusts frequency of voltage-controlled oscillator that controls inverter frequency, to limit starting and accelerating surges. Efficient inverter and ac motor would give electric vehicles extra miles per battery charge.

  4. 53. Drive shaft, motors, eddie currents, brakes, and differential gears ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. Drive shaft, motors, eddie currents, brakes, and differential gears in south machinery room (interior of both machinery rooms is identical). Facing east. - Henry Ford Bridge, Spanning Cerritos Channel, Los Angeles-Long Beach Harbor, Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Effect of plasma fluctuations on lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Hillairet, J.; Ohsako, T.

    2011-12-23

    The effect of fluctuations of the electron density at the plasma edge on Lower Hybrid current drive is investigated. It is shown that the lack of robustness of the simulations due to ray stochasticity still remain despite the time averaging resulting from fluctuations.

  6. Alternating-Current Motor Drive for Electric Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauthamer, S.; Rippel, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    New electric drive controls speed of a polyphase as motor by varying frequency of inverter output. Closed-loop current-sensing circuit automatically adjusts frequency of voltage-controlled oscillator that controls inverter frequency, to limit starting and accelerating surges. Efficient inverter and ac motor would give electric vehicles extra miles per battery charge.

  7. Modeling of high harmonic fast wave current drive on EAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y. Li, F. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Gao, Q. D.; Zhang, N.

    2015-10-15

    High harmonic fast waves (HHFW) are among the candidates for non-inductive current drive (CD), which is essential for long-pulse or steady-state operation of tokamaks. Current driven with HHFW in EAST tokamak plasmas is numerically studied. The HHFW CD efficiency is found to increase non-monotonically with the wave frequency, and this phenomenon is attributed to the multi-pass absorption of HHFW. The sensitivity of CD efficiency to the value of the parallel refraction index of the launched wave is confirmed. The quasilinear effects, assessed as significant in HHFW current drive with the GENRAY/CQL3D package, cause a significant increase in CD efficiency as RF power is increased, which is very different from helicon current drive. Simulations for a range of toroidal dc electric fields, in combination with a range of fast wave powers, are also presented and indicate that the presence of the DC field can also enhance the CD efficiency.

  8. Low frequency rf current drive. Annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1992-12-31

    An unshielded antenna for rf heating has been developed and tested during this report period. In addition to design specifications being given, some experimental results are presented utilizing: (1) an unprotected Faraday shield, (2) insulating guard limiters, (3) unshielded antenna experiments, (4) method for detecting small rf driven currents, (5) rf fast wave current drive experiments, (6) alfven wave interactions with electrons, and (7) machine conditioning, impurity generation and density control.

  9. Simulations of ICRF-fast wave current drive on DIIID

    SciTech Connect

    Ehst, D.A.

    1990-06-01

    Self-consistent calculations of MHD equilibria, generated by fast wave current drive and including the bootstrap effect, were done to guide and anticipate the results of upcoming experiments on the DIIID tokamak. The simulations predict that 2 MW of ICRF power is more than adequate to create several hundred kiloamperes in steady state; the total current increases with the temperature and density of the target plasma. 12 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Traveling wave current drive theory for an arbitrary m-polar configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, V. N.; Clemente, R. A.; Farengo, R.

    2013-03-15

    An extension of the formalism employed to describe current drive in magnetized plasmas by means of traveling magnetic fields (or double-helix configuration) is presented. In all previous theoretical studies, only driving fields with dipolar topology have been employed and the figure of merit of the current drive mechanism has never been analyzed in terms of the dissipation in the power feeding circuit. In this paper, we show how to express the model equations in terms of the current amplitude in the coils, for an arbitrary number of equally spaced coils wound around the plasma column. We present a brief review of the existing theory and a theoretical formulation, valid for an arbitrary m-polar helical symmetry, which removes the above mentioned complications and limitations. In the limit of straight coils, our magnetic field expression agrees exactly with well-established results of the literature for rotating magnetic field current drive. Finally, we present initial numerical results from a recently developed code which consistently compares the steady driven nonlinear Hall currents and steady fields, corresponding to different configurations in terms of the Ohmic dissipation in the helical coils and discuss future perspectives.

  11. Fast wave current drive on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1995-07-01

    The physics of electron heating and current drive with the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on DIII-D, in reasonable agreement with theoretical modeling. A recently completed upgrade to the fast wave capability should allow full noninductive current drive in steady state advanced confinement discharges and provide some current density profile control for the Advanced Tokamak Program. DIII-D now has three four-strap fast wave antennas and three transmitters, each with nominally 2 MW of generator power. Extensive experiments have been conducted with the first system, at 60 MHz, while the two newer systems have come into operation within the past year. The newer systems are configured for 60 to 120 MHz. The measured FWCD efficiency is found to increase linearly with electron temperature as {gamma} = 0.4 {times} 10{sup 18} T{sub eo} (keV) [A/m{sup 2}W], measured up to central electron temperature over 5 keV. A newly developed technique for determining the internal noninductive current density profile gives efficiencies in agreement with this scaling and profiles consistent with theoretical predictions. Full noninductive current drive at 170 kA was achieved in a discharge prepared by rampdown of the Ohmic current. Modulation of microwave reflectometry signals at the fast wave frequency is being used to investigate fast wave propagation and damping. Additionally, rf pick-up probes on the internal boundary of the vessel provide a comparison with ray tracing codes, with dear evidence for a toroidally directed wave with antenna phasing set for current drive. There is some experimental evidence for fast wave absorption by energetic beam ions at high cyclotron harmonic resonances.

  12. Fast wave current drive on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Forest, C.B.; Ikezi, H.; Prater, R.; Baity, F.W.; Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Chiu, S.C.; Doyle, E.J.; Ferguson, S.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Jaeger, E.F.; Kim, K.W.; Lee, J.H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Murakami, M.; ONeill, R.C.; Porkolab, M.; Rhodes, T.L.; Swain, D.W.

    1996-02-01

    The physics of electron heating and current drive with the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on DIII-D, in reasonable agreement with theoretical modeling. A recently completed upgrade to the fast wave capability should allow full noninductive current drive in steady state advanced confinement discharges and provide some current density profile control for the Advanced Tokamak Program. DIII-D now has three four-strap fast wave antennas and three transmitters, each with nominally 2 MW of generator power. Extensive experiments have been conducted with the first system, at 60 MHz, while the two newer systems have come into operation within the past year. The newer systems are configured for 60 to 120 MHz. The measured FWCD efficiency is found to increase linearly with electron temperature as {gamma}=0.4{times}10{sup 18}{ital T}{sub {ital e}0} (keV) [A/m{sup 2}W], measured up to central electron temperature over 5 keV. A newly developed technique for determining the internal noninductive current density profile gives efficiencies in agreement with this scaling and profiles consistent with theoretical predictions. Full noninductive current drive at 170 kA was achieved in a discharge prepared by rampdown of the Ohmic current. Modulation of microwave reflectometry signals at the fast wave frequency is being used to investigate fast wave propagation and damping. Additionally, rf pick-up probes on the internal boundary of the vessel provide a comparison with ray tracing codes, with clear evidence for a toroidally directed wave with antenna phasing set for current drive. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Current-Drive Efficiency in a Degenerate Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    S. Son and N.J. Fisch

    2005-11-01

    a degenerate plasma, the rates of electron processes are much smaller than the classical model would predict, affecting the efficiencies of current generation by external non-inductive means, such as by electromagnetic radiation or intense ion beams. For electron-based mechanisms, the current-drive efficiency is higher than the classical prediction by more than a factor of 6 in a degenerate hydrogen plasma, mainly because the electron-electron collisions do not quickly slow down fast electrons. Moreover, electrons much faster than thermal speeds are more readily excited without exciting thermal electrons. In ion-based mechanisms of current drive, the efficiency is likewise enhanced due to the degeneracy effects, since the electron stopping power on slow ion beams is significantly reduced.

  14. PHYSICS OF ELCTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY,CC; PRATER,R; LUCE,TC; ELLIS,RA; HARVEY,RW; KINSEY,JE; LAO,LL; LOHR,J; MAKOWSKI,MA

    2002-09-01

    OAK A271 PHYSICS OF ELCTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have focused on determining the effect of trapped particles on the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency. The measured ECCD efficiency increases as the deposition location is moved towards the inboard midplane or towards smaller minor radius for both co and counter injection. The measured ECCD efficiency also increases with increasing electron density and/or temperature. The experimental ECCD is compared to both the linear theory (Toray-GA) as well as a quasilinear Fokker-Planck model (CQL3D). The experimental ECCD is found to be in better agreement with the more complete Fokker-Planck calculation, especially for cases of high rf power density and/or loop voltage. The narrow width of the measured ECCD profile is consistent with only low levels of radial transport for the current carrying electrons.

  15. Current drive at plasma densities required for thermonuclear reactors.

    PubMed

    Cesario, R; Amicucci, L; Cardinali, A; Castaldo, C; Marinucci, M; Panaccione, L; Santini, F; Tudisco, O; Apicella, M L; Calabrò, G; Cianfarani, C; Frigione, D; Galli, A; Mazzitelli, G; Mazzotta, C; Pericoli, V; Schettini, G; Tuccillo, A A

    2010-08-10

    Progress in thermonuclear fusion energy research based on deuterium plasmas magnetically confined in toroidal tokamak devices requires the development of efficient current drive methods. Previous experiments have shown that plasma current can be driven effectively by externally launched radio frequency power coupled to lower hybrid plasma waves. However, at the high plasma densities required for fusion power plants, the coupled radio frequency power does not penetrate into the plasma core, possibly because of strong wave interactions with the plasma edge. Here we show experiments performed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) based on theoretical predictions that nonlinear interactions diminish when the peripheral plasma electron temperature is high, allowing significant wave penetration at high density. The results show that the coupled radio frequency power can penetrate into high-density plasmas due to weaker plasma edge effects, thus extending the effective range of lower hybrid current drive towards the domain relevant for fusion reactors.

  16. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Chiu, S.C.; Jackson, G.L.; Lippmann, S.I.; Prater, R. ); Porkolab, M. . Plasma Fusion Center); Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J. )

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high {beta} target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n{sub {parallel}} value ({approx equal} 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90{degree}) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. In this paper we describe the performance of the DIII-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  17. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Chiu, S.C.; Jackson, G.L.; Lippmann, S.I.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.; Baity, F.W.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high {beta} target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n{sub {parallel}} value ({approx_equal} 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90{degree}) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. In this paper we describe the performance of the DIII-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  18. Fast Wave Current Drive Antenna Performance on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, M. J.; Pinsker, R. I.; Petty, C. C.; Chiu, S. C.; Jackson, G. L.; Lippmann, S. I.; Porkolab, M.; Prater, R.; Baity, F. W.; Goulding, R. H.; Hoffman, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the DIII-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high β target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n∥ value (≂7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90°) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. In this paper we describe the performance of the DIII-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  19. Fast wave current drive antenna performance on D3-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayberry, M. J.; Pinsker, R. I.; Petty, C. C.; Chiu, S. C.; Jackson, G. L.; Lippmann, S. I.; Prater, R.; Porkolab, M.

    1991-10-01

    Fast wave current drive (FWCD) experiments at 60 MHz are being performed on the D3-D tokamak for the first time in high electron temperature, high (beta) target plasmas. A four-element phased-array antenna is used to launch a directional wave spectrum with the peak n(sub parallel) value (approximately = 7) optimized for strong single-pass electron absorption due to electron Landau damping. For this experiment, high power FW injection (2 MW) must be accomplished without voltage breakdown in the transmission lines or antenna, and without significant impurity influx. In addition, there is the technological challenge of impedance matching a four-element antenna while maintaining equal currents and the correct phasing (90 degrees) in each of the straps for a directional spectrum. We describe the performance of the D3-D FWCD antenna during initial FW electron heating and current drive experiments in terms of these requirements.

  20. Useful field of view in simulated driving: Reaction times and eye movements of drivers

    PubMed Central

    Seya, Yasuhiro; Nakayasu, Hidetoshi; Yagi, Tadasu

    2013-01-01

    To examine the spatial distribution of a useful field of view (UFOV) in driving, reaction times (RTs) and eye movements were measured in simulated driving. In the experiment, a normal or mirror-reversed letter “E” was presented on driving images with different eccentricities and directions from the current gaze position. The results showed significantly slower RTs in the upper and upper left directions than in the other directions. The RTs were significantly slower in the left directions than in the right directions. These results suggest that the UFOV in driving may be asymmetrical among the meridians in the visual field. PMID:24349688

  1. Fast wave current drive technology development at ORNL

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.; Batchelor, D.B.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Jaeger, E.F.; Ryan, P.M.; deGrassie, J.S.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Prater, R.

    1993-12-01

    The technology required for fast wave current drive (FWCD) systems is discussed. Experiments are underway on DIII-D, JET, and elsewhere. Antennas for FWCD draw heavily upon the experience gained in the design of ICRF heating systems with the additional requirement of launching a directional wave spectrum. Through collaborations with DIII-D, JET, and Tore Supra rapid progress is being made in the demonstration of the physics and technology of FWCD needed for TPX and ITER.

  2. Lower hybrid current drive favoured by electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Giruzzi, G.; Napoli, F.; Galli, A.; Schettini, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-02-01

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap a fraction of non-inductive plasma current, which would be controlled for obtaining and optimizing steady-state profiles, can be reached by using the Current Drive produced by Lower Hybrid waves (LHCD). FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) experiments demonstrated, indeed, that LHCD is effective at reactor-graded high plasma density, and the LH spectral broadening is reduced, operating with higher electron temperature in the outer region of plasma column (Te_periphery). This method was obtained following the guidelines of theoretical predictions indicating that the broadening of launched spectrum produced by parametric instability (PI) should be reduced, and the LHCD effect at high density consequently enabled, under higher (Te_periphery). In FTU, the temperature increase in the outer plasma region was obtained by operating with reduced particle recycling, lithized walls and deep gas fuelling by means of fast pellet. Heating plasma periphery with electron cyclotron resonant waves (ECRH) will provide a further tool for achieving steady-state operations. New FTU experimental results are presented here, demonstrating that temperature effect at the plasma periphery, affecting LH penetration, occurs in a range of plasma parameters broader than in previous work. New information is also shown on the modelling assessing frequencies and growth rates of the PI coupled modes responsible of spectral broadening. Finally, we present the design of an experiment scheduled on FTU next campaign, where ECRH power is used to slightly increase the electron temperature in the outer plasma region of a high-density discharge aiming at restoring LHCD. Consequent to model results, by operating with a toroidal magnetic field of 6.3 T, useful for locating the electron cyclotron resonant layer at the periphery of the plasma column (r/a˜0.8, f0=144 GHz), an increase of Te in the outer plasma (from 40 eV to 80 eV at r/a˜0.8) is expected by the JETTO code

  3. Lower hybrid current drive favoured by electron cyclotron radiofrequency heating

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Giruzzi, G.; Napoli, F.; Schettini, G.

    2014-02-12

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap a fraction of non-inductive plasma current, which would be controlled for obtaining and optimizing steady-state profiles, can be reached by using the Current Drive produced by Lower Hybrid waves (LHCD). FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) experiments demonstrated, indeed, that LHCD is effective at reactor-graded high plasma density, and the LH spectral broadening is reduced, operating with higher electron temperature in the outer region of plasma column (T{sub e-periphery}). This method was obtained following the guidelines of theoretical predictions indicating that the broadening of launched spectrum produced by parametric instability (PI) should be reduced, and the LHCD effect at high density consequently enabled, under higher (T{sub e-periphery}). In FTU, the temperature increase in the outer plasma region was obtained by operating with reduced particle recycling, lithized walls and deep gas fuelling by means of fast pellet. Heating plasma periphery with electron cyclotron resonant waves (ECRH) will provide a further tool for achieving steady-state operations. New FTU experimental results are presented here, demonstrating that temperature effect at the plasma periphery, affecting LH penetration, occurs in a range of plasma parameters broader than in previous work. New information is also shown on the modelling assessing frequencies and growth rates of the PI coupled modes responsible of spectral broadening. Finally, we present the design of an experiment scheduled on FTU next campaign, where ECRH power is used to slightly increase the electron temperature in the outer plasma region of a high-density discharge aiming at restoring LHCD. Consequent to model results, by operating with a toroidal magnetic field of 6.3 T, useful for locating the electron cyclotron resonant layer at the periphery of the plasma column (r/a∼0.8, f{sub 0}=144 GHz), an increase of T{sub e} in the outer plasma (from 40 eV to 80 eV at r/a∼0.8) is

  4. Control of the Lamb shift by a driving field

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Shuai; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Zheng Hang; Hong Ran; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-05-15

    A unitary transformation approach is used to study the energy level shift of the atom coupled to both a vacuum electromagnetic field and a driving laser. The Lamb shift of the energy levels is shown to depend on the Rabi frequency and the detuning of the driving laser, which couples another pair of levels.

  5. Current drive by spheromak injection into a tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M. R.; Bellan, P. M.

    1990-04-01

    We report the first observation of current drive by injection of a spheromak plasma into a tokamak (Caltech ENCORE small reasearch tokamak) due to the process of helicity injection. After an abrupt 30% increase, the tokamak current decays by a factor of 3 due to plasma cooling caused by the merging of the relatively cold spheromak with the tokamak. The tokamak density profile peaks sharply due to the injected spheromak plasma (n¯3 increases by a factor of 6) then becomes hollow, suggestive of an interchange instability.

  6. Current drive for stability of thermonuclear plasma reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Galli, A.; Panaccione, L.; Paoletti, F.; Schettini, G.; Spigler, R.; Tuccillo, A.

    2016-01-01

    To produce in a thermonuclear fusion reactor based on the tokamak concept a sufficiently high fusion gain together stability necessary for operations represent a major challenge, which depends on the capability of driving non-inductive current in the hydrogen plasma. This request should be satisfied by radio-frequency (RF) power suitable for producing the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, recently demonstrated successfully occurring also at reactor-graded high plasma densities. An LHCD-based tool should be in principle capable of tailoring the plasma current density in the outer radial half of plasma column, where other methods are much less effective, in order to ensure operations in the presence of unpredictably changes of the plasma pressure profiles. In the presence of too high electron temperatures even at the periphery of the plasma column, as envisaged in DEMO reactor, the penetration of the coupled RF power into the plasma core was believed for long time problematic and, only recently, numerical modelling results based on standard plasma wave theory, have shown that this problem should be solved by using suitable parameter of the antenna power spectrum. We show here further information on the new understanding of the RF power deposition profile dependence on antenna parameters, which supports the conclusion that current can be actively driven over a broad layer of the outer radial half of plasma column, thus enabling current profile control necessary for the stability of a reactor.

  7. Lower hybrid current drive efficiency on Tore Supra and JET

    SciTech Connect

    Goniche, M.; Artaud, J.F.; Basiuk, V.; Peysson, Y.; Aniel, T.; Ekedahl, A.; Giruzzi, G.; Imbeaux, F.; Mazon, D.; Zwingman, W.

    2005-09-26

    The lower hybrid current drive efficiency of 66 Tore Supra pulses has been investigated. The ohmic part of the plasma current (0.6-0.9 MA) is very small (Vloop <50mV) for most of the pulses. Different scaling laws were tested with three input parameters: the wave directivity, the plasma current (Ip) or the volume average temperature () and the effective charge (Zeff). When applying these scaling laws to four JET pulses, no discrepancy is found except for the high plasma current (Ip=2.0MA) pulse. Finally the best fit was found by replacing Te (or Ip) by the thermal electron confinement time. This result is supported by the hard X-ray (HXR) diagnostic indicating a fairly good correlation between the plasma edge HXR emission, normalized to the central emission, and the thermal electron confinement time.

  8. FLANDERS FIELDS MEMORIAL IN TRAFFIC ISLAND ON EAST DRIVE. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FLANDERS FIELDS MEMORIAL IN TRAFFIC ISLAND ON EAST DRIVE. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rock Island National Cemetery, Rock Island Arsenal, 0.25 mile north of southern tip of Rock Island, Rock Island, Rock Island County, IL

  9. DETAILED MEASUREMENTS OF THE ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE EFFICIENCY ON DIIID

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY, C.C.; PRATER, R.; LOHR, J.; LUCE, T.C.; FOX,W.R.; HARVEY, R.W.; KINSEY, J.E.; LAO, L.L.; MAKOWSKI, M.A.

    2002-05-01

    Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments on the DIII-D tokamak are solidifying the physics basis for localized, off-axis current drive, the goal being to validate a predictive model for ECCD. The ECCD profiles are determined from the magnetic field pitch angles measured by motional Stark effect (MSE) polarimetry. The measured ECCD switches from the co to the counter direction as the toroidal injection angle is varied with a profile width that is in accordance with ray tracing calculations. Tests of electron trapping in low beta plasmas show that the ECCD efficiency decreases rapidly as the deposition is moved off-axis and towards the outboard side of the plasma, but the detrimental effects of electron trapping on the current drive are greatly reduced in high beta plasmas. Overall, the measured ECCD is in good agreement with theoretical calculations using a quasilinear Fokker-Planck code over a wide range of injection angles and plasma parameters.

  10. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; Fredrickson, E. D.; Gerhardt, S. P.; White, R. B.

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CD efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.

  11. Effects of MHD instabilities on neutral beam current drive

    DOE PAGES

    Podestà, M.; Gorelenkova, M.; Darrow, D. S.; ...

    2015-04-17

    One of the primary tools foreseen for heating, current drive (CD) and q-profile control in future fusion reactors such as ITER and a Fusion Nuclear Science Facility is the neutral beam injection (NBI). However, fast ions from NBI may also provide the drive for energetic particle-driven instabilities (e.g. Alfvénic modes (AEs)), which in turn redistribute fast ions in both space and energy, thus hampering the control capabilities and overall efficiency of NB-driven current. Based on experiments on the NSTX tokamak (M. Ono et al 2000 Nucl. Fusion 40 557), the effects of AEs and other low-frequency magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities on NB-CDmore » efficiency are investigated. When looking at the new fast ion transport model, which accounts for particle transport in phase space as required for resonant AE perturbations, is utilized to obtain consistent simulations of NB-CD through the tokamak transport code TRANSP. It is found that instabilities do indeed reduce the NB-driven current density over most of the plasma radius by up to ~50%. Moreover, the details of the current profile evolution are sensitive to the specific model used to mimic the interaction between NB ions and instabilities. Finally, implications for fast ion transport modeling in integrated tokamak simulations are briefly discussed.« less

  12. RF heating and current drive experiment on JT-60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1987-09-01

    Recent experimental results of Lower Hybrid and Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (LHRF and ICRF) heating and current drive are presented on JT-60 at JAERI. Three LHRF at 2 GHz and one ICRF at 120 MHz system are installed in JT-60. Each unit has launched 2.1-2.4 MW of RF power into the JT-60, so far. Steady current up to 2 MA for 2.5 sec have been maintained only by LHCD at a density of ne=0.32×1019 m-3 with 3.1 MW. The current drive efficiency defined by ɛCD=ne (1019 m-3)R(m)IRF(MA)/PLH(MW) reach 1.5-3.0 by combination of LHCD and NBI heating. High central electron heating up to 6 keV is demonstrated at the density ne=1.7×10-19 m-3. Current profile control and improvement of energy confinement time via LHCD is observed with and without NBI heating. Optimization of the second harmonic ICRF heating is studied with 2×2 phased loop antenna. In combination heating of ICRF and NBI, remarkable beam acceleration is observed in the plasma core.

  13. Fluid equations in the presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2012-12-01

    Two-fluid equations, which include the physics imparted by an externally applied radiofrequency source near electron cyclotron resonance, are derived in their extended magnetohydrodynamic forms using the formalism of Hegna and Callen [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009)]. The equations are compatible with the closed fluid/drift-kinetic model developed by Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); 18, 102506 (2011)] for fusion-relevant regimes with low collisionality and slow dynamics, and they facilitate the development of advanced computational models for electron cyclotron current drive-induced suppression of neoclassical tearing modes.

  14. Fluid equations in the presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.

    2012-12-15

    Two-fluid equations, which include the physics imparted by an externally applied radiofrequency source near electron cyclotron resonance, are derived in their extended magnetohydrodynamic forms using the formalism of Hegna and Callen [Phys. Plasmas 16, 112501 (2009)]. The equations are compatible with the closed fluid/drift-kinetic model developed by Ramos [Phys. Plasmas 17, 082502 (2010); 18, 102506 (2011)] for fusion-relevant regimes with low collisionality and slow dynamics, and they facilitate the development of advanced computational models for electron cyclotron current drive-induced suppression of neoclassical tearing modes.

  15. Derivation of dynamo current drive in a closed-current volume and stable current sustainment in the HIT-SI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossack, A. C.; Sutherland, D. A.; Jarboe, T. R.

    2017-02-01

    A derivation is given showing that the current inside a closed-current volume can be sustained against resistive dissipation by appropriately phased magnetic perturbations. Imposed-dynamo current drive theory is used to predict the toroidal current evolution in the helicity injected torus with steady inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI) experiment as a function of magnetic fluctuations at the edge. Analysis of magnetic fields from a HIT-SI discharge shows that the injector-imposed fluctuations are sufficient to sustain the measured toroidal current without instabilities whereas the small, plasma-generated magnetic fluctuations are not sufficiently large to sustain the current.

  16. Derivation of dynamo current drive in a closed-current volume and stable current sustainment in the HIT-SI experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Hossack, A. C.; Sutherland, D. A.; Jarboe, T. R.

    2017-02-01

    A derivation is given showing that the current inside a closed-current volume can be sustained against resistive dissipation by appropriately phased magnetic perturbations. Imposed-dynamo current drive (IDCD) theory is used to predict the toroidal current evolution in the HIT-SI experiment as a function of magnetic fluctuations at the edge. Analysis of magnetic fields from a HIT-SI discharge shows that the injector-imposed fluctuations are sufficient to sustain the measured toroidal current without instabilities whereas the small, plasma-generated magnetic fluctuations are not sufficiently large to sustain the current.

  17. Coupling of alpha channeling to parallel wavenumber upshift in lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, I. E.; Bertelli, N.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-08-01

    Although lower hybrid (LH) waves have been shown to be effective in driving plasma current in present-day tokamaks, they are predicted to strongly interact with the energetic α particles born from fusion reactions in eventual tokamak reactors. However, in the presence of the expected steep α particle birth gradient, this interaction can produce wave amplification rather than wave damping. Here, we identify the flexibilities and constraints in achieving this amplification effect through a consideration of symmetries in the channeling interaction, in the wave propagation, and in the tokamak field configuration. Interestingly, for standard LH current drive that supports the poloidal magnetic field, we find that wave amplification through α channeling is fundamentally coupled to the poorly understood | k ∥ | upshift. In so doing, we show that wave launch from the tokamak high-field side is favorable both for α-channeling and for achieving the | k ∥ | upshift.

  18. Modeling of Alfven wave heating and current drive in Phaedrus-T

    SciTech Connect

    Moroz, P.; Kishinevsky, M.; Wukitch, S.; Vukovic, M.

    1996-02-01

    Theoretical analysis and numerical modeling of Alfven wave plasma heating and current drive experiments on the Phaedrus-T tokamak is presented. The full-wave hot-plasma code, ALFA, is used in these calculations. The code features toroidal geometry and poloidal magnetic field effects. It is essentially a 2D full-wave code, but can obtain a 3D picture of RF wave fields and absorbed power via Fourier composition of solutions for many toroidal modes. The stand-alone current diffusion code, DIFF, is intergrated with ALFA to model the transient processes of current drive in the Phaedrus-T tokamak. Comparison of numerical calculations to experimental data is given thus permitting a deeper understanding of AWCD processes. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. The Bootstrap Current and Neutral Beam Current Drive in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Politzer, P.A.

    2005-10-15

    Noninductive current drive is an essential part of the implementation of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak program. For an efficient steady-state tokamak reactor, the plasma must provide close to 100% bootstrap fraction (f{sub bs}). For noninductive operation of DIII-D, current drive by injection of energetic neutral beams [neutral beam current drive (NBCD)] is also important. DIII-D experiments have reached {approx}80% bootstrap current in stationary discharges without inductive current drive. The remaining current is {approx}20% NBCD. This is achieved at {beta}{sub N} [approximately equal to] {beta}{sub p} > 3, but at relatively high q{sub 95} ({approx}10). In lower q{sub 95} Advanced Tokamak plasmas, f{sub bs} {approx} 0.6 has been reached in essentially noninductive plasmas. The phenomenology of high {beta}{sub p} and {beta}{sub N} plasmas without current control is being studied. These plasmas display a relaxation oscillation involving repetitive formation and collapse of an internal transport barrier. The frequency and severity of these events increase with increasing {beta}, limiting the achievable average {beta} and causing modulation of the total current as well as the pressure. Modeling of both bootstrap and NBCD currents is based on neoclassical theory. Measurements of the total bootstrap and NBCD current agree with calculations. A recent experiment based on the evolution of the transient voltage profile after an L-H transition shows that the more recent bootstrap current models accurately describe the plasma behavior. The profiles and the parametric dependences of the local neutral beam-driven current density have not yet been compared with theory.

  20. Effect of synergistic alpha current on the fast wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, C.S. |; Van Eester, D.

    1996-02-01

    The traveling fast wave used to drive electron current can interact with the energetic alpha particles through ICRH and generate alpha current. The efficiency of the alpha current can be comparable to that of the electron FWCD, but the radial dependence can be quite different. The synergism can be constructive or destructive. Desirable wave frequency and parallel wave number are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Spectral Effects on Fast Wave Core Heating and Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    C.K. Phillips, R.E. Bell, L.A. Berry, P.T. Bonoli, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, P.M. Ryan, G. Taylor, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, H. Yuh, and the NSTX Team

    2009-05-11

    Recent results obtained with high harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive (CD) on NSTX strongly support the hypothesis that the onset of perpendicular fast wave propagation right at or very near the launcher is a primary cause for a reduction in core heating efficiency at long wavelengths that is also observed in ICRF heating experiments in numerous tokamaks. A dramatic increase in core heating efficiency was first achieved in NSTX L-mode helium majority plasmas when the onset for perpendicular wave propagation was moved away from the antenna and nearby vessel structures. Efficient core heating in deuterium majority L mode and H mode discharges, in which the edge density is typically higher than in comparable helium majority plasmas, was then accomplished by reducing the edge density in front of the launcher with lithium conditioning and avoiding operational points prone to instabilities. These results indicate that careful tailoring of the edge density profiles in ITER should be considered to limit rf power losses to the antenna and plasma facing materials. Finally, in plasmas with reduced rf power losses in the edge regions, the first direct measurements of high harmonic fast wave current drive were obtained with the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic. The location and radial dependence of HHFW CD measured by MSE are in reasonable agreement with predictions from both full wave and ray tracing simulations.

  2. Recent experimental results of KSTAR RF heating and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, S. J. Kim, J.; Jeong, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Kwak, J. G.

    2015-12-10

    The overview of KSTAR activities on ICRH, LHCD and ECH/CD including the last experimental results and future plan aiming for long-pulse high-beta plasma will be presented. Recently we achieved reasonable coupling of ICRF power to H-mode plasma through several efforts to increase system reliability. Power balance will be discussed on this experiment. LHCD is still struggling in the low power regime. Review of antenna spectrum for the higher coupling in H-mode plasma will be tried. ECH/CD provides 41 sec, 0.8 MW of heating power to support high-performance long-pulse discharge. Also, 170 GHz ECH system is integrated with the Plasma Control System (PCS) for the feedback controlling of NTM. Status and plan of ECH/CD will be discussed. Finally, helicon current drive is being prepared for the next stage of KSTAR operation. The hardware preparation and the calculation results of helicon current drive in KSTAR plasma will be discussed.

  3. Light-field-driven currents in graphene.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takuya; Heide, Christian; Ullmann, Konrad; Weber, Heiko B; Hommelhoff, Peter

    2017-09-25

    The ability to steer electrons using the strong electromagnetic field of light has opened up the possibility of controlling electron dynamics on the sub-femtosecond (less than 10(-15) seconds) timescale. In dielectrics and semiconductors, various light-field-driven effects have been explored, including high-harmonic generation, sub-optical-cycle interband population transfer and the non-perturbative change of the transient polarizability. In contrast, much less is known about light-field-driven electron dynamics in narrow-bandgap systems or in conductors, in which screening due to free carriers or light absorption hinders the application of strong optical fields. Graphene is a promising platform with which to achieve light-field-driven control of electrons in a conducting material, because of its broadband and ultrafast optical response, weak screening and high damage threshold. Here we show that a current induced in monolayer graphene by two-cycle laser pulses is sensitive to the electric-field waveform, that is, to the exact shape of the optical carrier field of the pulse, which is controlled by the carrier-envelope phase, with a precision on the attosecond (10(-18) seconds) timescale. Such a current, dependent on the carrier-envelope phase, shows a striking reversal of the direction of the current as a function of the driving field amplitude at about two volts per nanometre. This reversal indicates a transition of light-matter interaction from the weak-field (photon-driven) regime to the strong-field (light-field-driven) regime, where the intraband dynamics influence interband transitions. We show that in this strong-field regime the electron dynamics are governed by sub-optical-cycle Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference, composed of coherent repeated Landau-Zener transitions on the femtosecond timescale. Furthermore, the influence of this sub-optical-cycle interference can be controlled with the laser polarization state. These coherent electron dynamics in

  4. Off-axis Neutral Beam Current Drive for Advanced Scenario Development in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M; Park, J; Petty, C; Luce, T; Heidbrink, W; Osborne, T; Wade, M; Austin, M; Brooks, N; Budny, R; Challis, C; DeBoo, J; deGrassie, J; Ferron, J; Gohil, P; Hobirk, J; Holcomb, C; Hollmann, E; Hong, R; Hyatt, A; Lohr, J; Lanctot, M; Makowski, M; McCune, D; Politzer, P; Prater, R; John, H S; Suzuki, T; West, W; Unterberg, E; Van Zeeland, M; Yu, J

    2008-10-13

    Modification of the two existing DIII-D neutral beam lines is proposed to allow vertical steering to provide off-axis neutral beam current drive (NBCD) as far off-axis as half the plasma radius. New calculations indicate very good current drive with good localization off-axis as long as the toroidal magnetic field, B{sub T}, and the plasma current, I{sub p}, are in the same direction (for a beam steered downward). The effects of helicity can be large: e.g., ITER off-axis NBCD can be increased by more than 20% if the B{sub T} direction is reversed. This prediction has been tested by an off-axis NBCD experiment using reduced size plasmas that are vertically shifted with the existing NBI on DIII-D. The existence of off-axis NBCD is evident in sawtooth and internal inductance behavior. By shifting the plasma upward or downward, or by changing the sign of the toroidal field, measured off-axis NBCD profiles, determined from MSE data, are consistent with predicted differences (40%-45%) arising from the NBI orientation with respect to the magnetic field lines. Modification of the DIII-D NB system will strongly support scenario development for ITER and future tokamaks as well as providing flexible scientific tools for understanding transport, energetic particles and heating and current drive.

  5. Atmospheric driving forces for the Agulhas Current in the subtropics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fetter, A.; Lutjeharms, J. R. E.; Matano, R. P.

    2007-08-01

    The Agulhas Current is the western boundary current of the South Indian Ocean and is thought to play an important role in the global overturning circulation. In this study, we investigate the contribution from the wind stress field over each ocean basin of the southern hemisphere to the variability of Agulhas Current transport. We ran a series of experiments using the Modular Ocean Model 2. The model grid extends from 20°S to 70°S and has a horizontal resolution of $1\\!/\\!_{2° with 25 levels in the vertical. The first experiment was forced with monthly means of the wind stress field from the project ERA 40 from ECMWF. In three other sensitivity experiments, the model was forced with the climatological mean over the whole domain plus the monthly wind stress anomalies (Jan/1979-Dec/2001) over one of the three ocean basins to whit: the South Atlantic, the South Indian and the South Pacific. The results show that inter-annual variations in the Agulhas Current transport are due largely to the wind field over the South Indian Ocean, whereas annual variations are driven by the wind field over both the South Atlantic and South Indian oceans. The annual signal from the South Atlantic is shown to move equatorward along the southeastern coast of Africa through coastally trapped waves.

  6. Integrated Plasma Simulation of Lower Hybrid Current Drive in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Harvey, R. W.; Batchelor, D. B.; Berry, L. A.; Kessel, C. E.; Jardin, S. C.

    2012-03-01

    It has been shown in Alcator C-Mod that the onset time for sawteeth can be delayed significantly (up to 0.5 s) relative to ohmically heated plasmas, through the injection of off-axis LH current drive power [1]. We are simulating these experiments using the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) [2], where the driven LH current density profiles are computed using a ray tracing component (GENRAY) and Fokker Planck code (CQL3D) [3] that are run in a tightly coupled time advance. The background plasma is evolved using the TSC transport code with the Porcelli sawtooth model [4]. Predictions of the driven LH current profiles will be compared with simpler ``reduced'' models for LHCD such as the LSC code which is implemented in TSC and which is also invoked within the IPS. [4pt] [1] C. E. Kessel et al, Bull. of the Am. Phys. Soc. 53, Poster PP6.00074 (2008). [0pt] [2] D. Batchelor et al, Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 125, 012039 (2008). [0pt] [3] R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, Proc. of the IAEA Tech. Comm. Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Therm. Plasmas, Montreal, Canada (1992). [0pt] [4] S. C. Jardin et al, J. Comp. Phys. 66, 481 (1986).

  7. MHD simulations of DC helicity injection for current drive in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sovinec, C.R.; Prager, S.C.

    1994-12-01

    MHD computations of DC helicity injection in tokamak-like configurations show current drive with no ``loop voltage`` in a resistive, pressureless plasma. The self-consistently generated current profiles are unstable to resistive modes that partially relax the profile through the MHD dynamo mechanism. The current driven by the fluctuations leads to closed contours of average poloidal flux. However, the 1% fluctuation level is large enough to produce a region of stochastic magnetic field. A limited Lundquist number (S) scan from 2.5 {times} 10{sup 3} to 4 {times} 10{sup 4} indicates that both the fluctuation level and relaxation increase with S.

  8. Field-Aligned Current Systems at Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyner, Daniel; Exner, Willi

    2017-04-01

    Mercury exhibits a very dynamic magnetosphere, which is partially due to strong dayside reconnection and fast magnetospheric convection. It has been shown that dayside reconnection occurs even on low magnetic shear angles across the magnetopause. This drives quasi-steady region 1 field-aligned currents (FAC) that are observable in in-situ MESSENGER data. Here, the structure of the Hermean FAC-system is discussed and compared to the terrestrial counterpart. Due to the lack of a significant ionosphere at Mercury, it has to be examined how much of the poloidal FAC is reflected back to the magnetosphere, closed via toroidal currents in the planetary interior or via Pedersen currents in the tenuous exosphere. This investigation gives insights into the planetary conductivity structure as well as the exospheric plasma densities. Furthermore, it will be examined how much the only partially developed ring current at Mercury produces possible region 2 FAC signatures. We conclude with requirements to simulations that are needed to forecast the FAC structure on the southern hemisphere that will be closely studied with the upcoming BepiColombo mission.

  9. Conditions for Lower Hybrid Current Drive in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Napoli, F.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Galli, A.; Schettini, G.

    2012-12-01

    To control the plasma current profile represents one of the most important problems of the research of nuclear fusion energy based on the tokamak concept, as in the plasma column the necessary conditions of stability and confinement should be satisfied. This problem can be solved by using the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect, which was demonstrated to occur also at reactor grade high plasma densities provided that a proper method should be utilised, as assessed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade). This method, based on theoretical predictions confirmed by experiment, produces relatively high electron temperature at the plasma periphery and scrape-off layer (SOL), consequently reducing the broadening of the spectrum launched by the antenna produced by parasitic wave physics of the edge, namely parametric instability (PI). The new results presented here show that, for kinetic profiles now foreseen for the SOL of ITER, PI is expected to hugely broaden the antenna spectrum and prevent any penetration in the core of the coupled LH power. However, considering the FTU method and assuming higher electron temperature at the edge (which would be however reasonable for ITER) the PI-produced spectral broadening would be mitigated, and enable the penetration of the coupled LH power in the main plasma. By successful LHCD effect, the control of the plasma current profile at normalised minor radius of about 0.8 would be possible, with much higher efficiency than that obtainable by other tools. A very useful reinforce of bootstrap current effects would be thus possible by LHCD in ITER.

  10. On the efficiency of electrical submersible pumps equipped with variable frequency drives: A field study

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, M.M.

    1996-02-01

    A field study was conducted on 18 electrical-submersible-pump- (ESP-) equipped wells operating in the Williston basin. Fifteen of these wells were run with variable frequency drives (VFD`s). The purpose of the study was to determine the efficiency and operating characteristics of ESP`s operating with VFD`s and compare them to those without. Voltage, current, power, and frequency were measured at the drive input, the drive output, and ESP input. Production data were recorded and power and efficiency were calculated at all measurement locations and compared to published data.

  11. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    J.R. Wilson, S. Bernabei, P. Bonoli, A. Hubbard, R. Parker, A. Schmidt, G. Wallace, J. Wright, and the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2007-10-09

    A Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) system has been installed on the Alcator C-MOD tokamak at MIT. Twelve klystrons at 4.6 GHz feed a 4x22 waveguide array. This system was designed for maximum flexibility in the launched parallel wave-number spectrum. This flexibility allows tailoring of the lower hybrid deposition under a variety of plasma conditions. Power levels up to 900 kW have been injected into the tokomak. The parallel wave number has been varied over a wide range, n|| ~ 1.6–4. Driven currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage and by direct comparison to Fisch-Karney theory, yielding an efficiency of n20IR/P ~ 0.3. Modeling using the CQL3D code supports these efficiencies. Sawtooth oscillations vanish, accompanied with peaking of the electron temperature (Te0 rises from 2.8 to 3.8 keV). Central q is inferred to rise above unity from the collapse of the sawtooth inversion radius, indicating off-axis cd as expected. Measurements of non-thermal x-ray and electron cyclotron emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with phase and plasma density. The x-ray emission is observed to be radialy broader than that predicted by simple ray tracing codes. Possible explanations for this broader emission include fast electron diffusion or broader deposition than simple ray tracing predictions (perhaps due to diffractive effects).

  12. Adiabatic Compression of Compact Tori for Current Drive and Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodruff, Simon; McNab, Angus; Miller, Kenneth; Ziemba, Tim

    2008-11-01

    Several critical issues stand in the development path for compact tori. An important one is the production of strong magnetic fields, (or large flux amplifications) by use of a low current source. The Pulsed Build-up Experiment is a Phase II SBIR project in which we aim to show a new means for generating strong magnetic fields from a low current source, namely, the repetitive injection of helicity-bearing plasma that also undergoes an acceleration and compression. In the Phase I SBIR, advanced computations were benchmarked against analytic theory and run to determine the best means for the acceleration and compression of a compact torus plasma. The study included detailed simulations of magnetic reconnection. In Phase II, an experiment has been designed and is being built to produce strong magnetic fields in a spheromak by the repetitive injection of magnetic helicity from a low current coaxial plasma source. The plasma will be accelerated and compressed in a similar manner to a traveling wave adiabatic compression scheme that was previously applied to a mirror plasma [1]. [1] P. M. Bellan Scalings for a Traveling Mirror Adiabatic Magnetic Compressor Rev. Sci. Instrum. 53(8) 1214 (1982) Work supported by DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-06ER84449.

  13. Status report on Corsica modeling for current drive scenario development

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T. A.; Crotinger, J.; Moller, J.M.; Pearlstein, L.D.

    1996-09-01

    This milestone report covers the progress and status of Corsica modeling for DIII-D experiments over the past year, since our previous report in September, 1995. During this time, we have concentrated on improvements to the code in support of our ability to do self-consistent, predictive modeling of DIII-D discharges. Our interest is in obtaining a tool, benchmarked with experimental data, for developing advanced tokamak operations scenarios including simulation and analysis of high performance negative central shear (NCS) discharges and control of the current profile evolution. Our major focus has been on installing and improving the neutral beam current drive mode in Corsica; this element is critical to modeling the evolution of DIII-D discharges. The NFREYA neutral beam deposition code was installed (starting with a version consistent with GA`s ONETWO code) and the capability for following particle orbits, including the effects of drifts, was added for determining the current driven by neutral beam -injection. In addition, improved methods for more easily integrating experimental profile measurements into the code operation and for calculating Z{sub eff} either from models or from impurity density measurements have been added. We have recently begun to turn on various transport models in our simulation of discharge evolution. We have concentrated on the NCS configuration and have simulated the evolution of two different high neutron reactivity discharges; an NCS discharge with L-mode edge and a single- null, weak NCS discharge from the JET/ITER/DIII-D equivalent shape experiments. Corsica simulation results for these discharges were presented at the EPS meeting in Kiev, Ukraine in June, 1996.

  14. Determination of the Electron Cyclotron Current Drive Profile

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C.; Schuster, D.I.; Makowski, M.A.

    1999-11-01

    Evaluation of the profile of non-inductive current density driven by absorption of electron cyclotron waves (ECCD) using time evolution of the poloidal flux indicated a broader profile than predicted by theory. To determine the nature of this broadening, a 1-1/2 D transport calculation of current density evolution was used to generate the signals which the DIII-D motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic would measure in the event that the current density evolution followed the neoclassical Ohm's law with the theoretical ECCD profile. Comparison with the measured MSE data indicates the experimental data is consistent with the ECCD profile predicted by theory. The simulations yield a lower limit on the magnitude of the ECCD which is at or above the value found in Fokker-Planck calculations of the ECCD including quasilinear and parallel electric field effects.

  15. Effect of Alfvén resonance on low-frequency fast wave current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. Y.; Batchelor, D. B.; Carter, M. D.; Jaeger, E. F.; Stallings, D. C.

    1995-08-01

    The Alfvén resonances may occur on the low- and high-field sides for a low-frequency fast wave current drive scenario proposed for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [Nucl. Fusion 31, 1135 (1991)]. At the resonance on the low-field side, the fast wave may be mode converted into a short-wavelength slow wave, which can be absorbed by electrons at the plasma edge, before the fast wave propagates into the core area of the plasma. Such absorption may cause a significant parasitic power loss.

  16. Advances in Steady Inductive Helicity Injection for Plasma Startup and Toroidal Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victor, Brian S.; Jarboe, Thomas R.; Hossack, Aaron C.; Ennis, David A.; Nelson, Brian A.; Hansen, Chris J.; Wrobel, Jonathan S.

    The Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SI) has achieved a breakthrough in the development of a new method of toroidal plasma startup and current drive. HIT-SI accomplishes helicity injection current drive on a spheromak of major radius 0.3 m with two injectors driven sinusoidally at 14.5 kHz. Results include the first sustainment of toroidal plasma current of over 50 kA at up to 3 times the injected currents added in quadrature. Separatrix toroidal currents—currents not linking the helicity injectors—are sustained at up to 40 kA. Toroidal currents persist for up to 0.65 ms after the injectors are turned off. Results are achieved after helium operations condition the alumina plasma-facing surface. The conditioned alumina walls then act to pump the deuterium, thereby reducing the spheromak density. High performance discharges (Itor/Iinj ≥ 2) are characterized by a decrease in the n = 1 mode activity measured by surface probes near the midplane of the confinement volume. Suppression of internal magnetic fields (measured by an internal probe) below the predicted Taylor equilibrium indicates that the magnetic fields in HIT-SI can no longer be described by a zero pressure, constant λ equilibrium.

  17. On the current drive capability of low dimensional semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-29

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Lastly, our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  18. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  19. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Appenzeller, J

    2015-12-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  20. Current ramp-up with lower hybrid current drive in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Fisch, N. J.; Qin, H.; Li, J. G.; Wilson, J. R.; Kong, E. H.; Zhang, L.; Wei, W.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Gong, X. Z.; Shen, B.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    More economical fusion reactors might be enabled through the cyclic operation of lower hybrid current drive. The first stage of cyclic operation would be to ramp up the plasma current with lower hybrid waves alone in low-density plasma. Such a current ramp-up was carried out successfully on the EAST tokamak. The plasma current was ramped up with a time-averaged rate of 18 kA/s with lower hybrid (LH) power. The average conversion efficiency Pel/PLH was about 3%. Over a transient phase, faster ramp-up was obtained. These experiments feature a separate measurement of the L/R time at the time of current ramp up.

  1. Summary and viewgraphs from the Q-121 US/Japan advanced current drive concepts workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Bonoli, P.; Porkolab, M. ); Chan, V.; Pinsker, R.; Politzer, P. ); Darrow, D. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Ehst, D. ); Fukuyama, Atsushi ); Imai, Tsuyoshi; Watari, Tetsuo ); Itoh, Satoshi; Naka

    1990-03-09

    With the emphasis placed on current drive by ITER, which requires steady state operation in its engineering phase, it is important to bring theory and experiment in agreement for each of the schemes that could be used in that design. Both neutral beam and lower hybrid (LH) schemes are in excellent shape in that regard. Since the projected efficiency of all schemes is marginal it is also important to continue our search for more efficient processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each processes. This workshop featured experimental and theoretical work in each of these areas, that is, validation of theory and the search for better ideas. There were a number of notable results to report, the most striking again (as with last year) the long pulse operation of TRIAM-1M. A low current was sustained for over 1 hour with LH waves, using new hall-effect sensors in the equilibrium field circuit to maintain position control. In JT-60, by sharpening the wave spectrum the current drive efficiency was improved to 0.34 {times} 10{sup 20}m{sup -2}A/W and 1.5 MA of current was driven entirely by the lower hybrid system. Also in that machine, using two different LH frequencies, the H-mode was entered. Finally, by using the LH system for startup they saved 2.5 resistive volt-sec of flux, which if extrapolated to ITER would save 40 volt-sec there. For the first time, and experiment on ECH current drive showed reasonable agreement with theory. Those experiments are reported here by James (LLNL) on the D3-D machine. Substantially lower ECH current drive than expected theoretically was observed on WT-3, but if differed by being in a low absorption regime. Nonetheless, excellent physics results were achieved in the WT-3 experiments, notably in having careful measurements of the parallel velocity distributions.

  2. Current distribution in tissues with conducted electrical weapons operated in drive-stun mode.

    PubMed

    Panescu, Dorin; Kroll, Mark W; Brave, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The TASER® conducted electrical weapon (CEW) is best known for delivering electrical pulses that can temporarily incapacitate subjects by overriding normal motor control. The alternative drive-stun mode is less understood and the goal of this paper is to analyze the distribution of currents in tissues when the CEW is operated in this mode. Finite element modeling (FEM) was used to approximate current density in tissues with boundary electrical sources placed 40 mm apart. This separation was equivalent to the distance between drive-stun mode TASER X26™, X26P, X2 CEW electrodes located on the device itself and between those located on the expended CEW cartridge. The FEMs estimated the amount of current flowing through various body tissues located underneath the electrodes. The FEM simulated the attenuating effects of both a thin and of a normal layer of fat. The resulting current density distributions were used to compute the residual amount of current flowing through deeper layers of tissue. Numerical modeling estimated that the skin, fat and skeletal muscle layers passed at least 86% or 91% of total CEW current, assuming a thin or normal fat layer thickness, respectively. The current density and electric field strength only exceeded thresholds which have increased probability for ventricular fibrillation (VFTJ), or for cardiac capture (CCTE), in the skin and the subdermal fat layers. The fat layer provided significant attenuation of drive-stun CEW currents. Beyond the skeletal muscle layer, only fractional amounts of the total CEW current were estimated to flow. The regions presenting risk for VF induction or for cardiac capture were well away from the typical heart depth.

  3. Advances in modeling of lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Nilsson, E.; Artaud, J.-F.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Hillairet, J.; Ding, B.; Li, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Shiraiwa, S.; Madi, M.

    2016-04-01

    First principle modeling of the lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas is a longstanding activity, which is gradually gaining in accuracy thanks to quantitative comparisons with experimental observations. The ability to reproduce simulatenously the plasma current and the non-thermal bremsstrahlung radial profiles in the hard x-ray (HXR) photon energy range represents in this context a significant achievement. Though subject to limitations, ray tracing calculations are commonly used for describing wave propagation in conjunction with Fokker-Planck codes, as it can capture prominent features of the LH wave dynamics in a tokamak plasma-like toroidal refraction. This tool has been validated on several machines when the full absorption of the LH wave requires the transfer of a small fraction of power from the main lobes of the launched power spectrum to a tail at a higher parallel refractive index. Conversely, standard modeling based on toroidal refraction only becomes more challenging when the spectral gap is large, except if other physical mechanisms may dominate to bridge it, like parametric instabilities, as suggested for JET LH discharges (Cesario et al 2004 Phys. Rev. Lett. 92 175002), or fast fluctuations of the launched power spectrum or ‘tail’ LH model, as shown for Tore Supra (Decker et al 2014 Phys. Plasma 21 092504). The applicability of the heuristic ‘tail’ LH model is investigated for a broader range of plasma parameters as compared to the Tore Supra study and with different LH wave characteristics. Discrepancies and agreements between simulations and experiments depending upon the different models used are discussed. The existence of a ‘tail’ in the launched power spectrum significantly improves the agreement between modeling and experiments in plasma conditions for which the spectral gap is large in EAST and Alcator C-Mod tokamaks. For the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, the experimental evolution of the HXR profiles with density suggests

  4. Plasma Heating and Current Drive for Fusion Reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtkamp, Norbert

    2010-02-01

    ITER (in Latin ``the way'') is designed to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. Fusion is the process by which two light atomic nuclei combine to form a heavier one and thus release energy. In the fusion process two isotopes of hydrogen - deuterium and tritium - fuse together to form a helium atom and a neutron. Thus fusion could provide large scale energy production without greenhouse effects; essentially limitless fuel would be available all over the world. The principal goals of ITER are to generate 500 megawatts of fusion power for periods of 300 to 500 seconds with a fusion power multiplication factor, Q, of at least 10. Q >= 10 (input power 50 MW / output power 500 MW). In a Tokamak the definition of the functionalities and requirements for the Plasma Heating and Current Drive are relevant in the determination of the overall plant efficiency, the operation cost of the plant and the plant availability. This paper summarise these functionalities and requirements in perspective of the systems under construction in ITER. It discusses the further steps necessary to meet those requirements. Approximately one half of the total heating will be provided by two Neutral Beam injection systems at with energy of 1 MeV and a beam power of 16 MW into the plasma. For ITER specific test facility is being build in order to develop and test the Neutral Beam injectors. Remote handling maintenance scheme for the NB systems, critical during the nuclear phase of the project, will be developed. In addition the paper will give an overview over the general status of ITER. )

  5. Photospheric Driving of Non-Potential Coronal Magnetic Field Simulations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-19

    the locations of electric current and free energy. We only show the results for dt h24 . The two chosen times are as follow: (i) during the large...quantities based on the parallel electric current and local twist of the field line, we have settled on an alternative quantity called the “field line...Air Force Data-Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport model • α: current helicity density alpha = j ·B/B2 • B: magnetic field • E: electric field

  6. 60 MHz fast wave current drive experiments for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Mayberry, M.J.; Chiu, S.C.; Porkolab, M.; Chan, V.; Freeman, R.; Harvey, R.; Pinsker, R.

    1989-05-01

    Non-inductive current drive is an essential element of the ITER program because it enhances high fluence nuclear testing during the technology phase of operations. By using fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), current drive efficiencies comparable to lower-hybrid current drive can be obtained with good penetration of wave power to the high temperature plasma core. An additional advantage of the low frequency scheme is its technological simplicity due to the present availability of efficient, multi-megawatt rf sources in the ICRF. The DIII-D facility provides an excellent opportunity to test the feasibility of the low frequency FWCD approach. By combining with high power (2 MW) ECH injection at 60 GHz, it should be possible to generate plasmas with central electron temperatures of T/sub e0/ approx. = 4 keV, and by operating at a reduced toroidal field (B = 1T) to increase the electron ..beta.., strong single-pass absorption (/eta//sub abs/ greater than or equal to 0.3) can be achieved. The availability of a wide port recess (1m toroidal by 0.5m poloidal) will enable a travelling wave spectrum to be launched with N/sub parallel/ approx. = 5--7 at 60 MHz, which should be optimum for strong electron interaction. The resulting current drive efficiency should be sufficiently high to demonstrate FWCD at the /approximately/ 0.25--0.5 MA level at moderate densities (/bar n/ approx. = 1.3 /times/ 10/sup 19/ m/sup /minus/3/) using the existing 2 MW ICRF transmitter. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Low frequency RF current drive. Final report, January 1, 1988--May 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Hershkowitz, N.

    1999-05-01

    This report starts with a summary of research done on the Phaedrus Tandom Mirror concept and how this research led to the design and construction of the Phaedrus-T Tokamak. Next it gives a more detailed description of the results from the last four years of research, which include the following areas: (1) first experimental demonstration of AWCD (Alfven Wave Current Drive); (2) current drive location and loop voltage response; (3) trapping and current drive efficiency; and (4) reflectometry.

  8. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive studies during current ramp-up in Tore-Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimini, F. G.; Basiuk, V.; Bourdelle, C.; Bucalossi, J.; Fenzi-Bonizec, C.; Giruzzi, G.; Hoang, G. T.; Lennholm, M.; Sabot, R.; Ségui, J. L.; Thomas, P. R.

    2005-06-01

    In a recent series of experiments, electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been successfully used, at a level of 0.75 MW, for current profile tailoring during the current ramp-up in Tore-Supra. The electron cyclotron resonance heating power deposition was varied from on-axis to off-axis and the direction of the driven current from co to counter. In these conditions, the current profile is significantly modified with respect to those typically obtained in pure ohmic scenarios. Central reversed magnetic shear conditions have been achieved with on-axis counter-ECCD, accompanied by high electron temperature gradients, exhibiting internal transport barrier features. This improved electron transport is maintained for some time on the current flat-top when combining ECCD with ion cyclotron resonance heating in a (H)D minority scheme. Integrated interpretative analysis with the CRONOS code confirms that deeply reversed magnetic shear is indeed attained by on-axis counter-ECCD in low density conditions and in combination with a relatively fast controlled current ramp. The high electron temperature gradient is found to be located inside the negative magnetic shear region.

  9. Parasitic effects of ion absorption on fast wave current drive in TPX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroz, P. E.; Batchelor, D. B.; Jaeger, E. F.; Mau, T. K.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Porkolab, M.

    1994-10-01

    Parasitic effects of ion absorption on fast wave current drive (FWCD) in TPX have been studied analytically and numerically. Main emphasis has been given to FWCD at frequencies, f=40-110 MHz, in deuterium plasma. The general ion cyclotron harmonic resonances of all plasma species (including neutral injected fast ions) were considered. Fast wave power deposition, power partition between various plasma components, and the resulting current drive efficiency were calculated. The results presented show that the current drive efficiency can be adversely affected by parasitic ion absorption. Favorable current drive scenarios were identified.

  10. Analysis of Wave Fields induced by Offshore Pile Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhnau, M.; Heitmann, K.; Lippert, T.; Lippert, S.; von Estorff, O.

    2015-12-01

    Impact pile driving is the common technique to install foundations for offshore wind turbines. With each hammer strike the steel pile - often exceeding 6 m in diameter and 80 m in length - radiates energy into the surrounding water and soil, until reaching its targeted penetration depth. Several European authorities introduced limitations regarding hydroacoustic emissions during the construction process to protect marine wildlife. Satisfying these regulations made the development and application of sound mitigation systems (e.g. bubble curtains or insulation screens) inevitable, which are commonly installed within the water column surrounding the pile or even the complete construction site. Last years' advances have led to a point, where the seismic energy tunneling the sound mitigation systems through the soil and radiating back towards the water column gains importance, as it confines the maximum achievable sound mitigation. From an engineering point of view, the challenge of deciding on an effective noise mitigation layout arises, which especially requires a good understanding of the soil-dependent wave field. From a geophysical point of view, the pile acts like a very unique line source, generating a characteristic wave field dominated by inclined wave fronts, diving as well as head waves. Monitoring the seismic arrivals while the pile penetration steadily increases enables to perform quasi-vertical seismic profiling. This work is based on datasets that have been collected within the frame of three comprehensive offshore measurement campaigns during pile driving and demonstrates the potential of seismic arrivals induced by pile driving for further soil characterization.

  11. Modeling of the influences of multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive on NTMs in rotating plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Chen; Jinyuan, Liu; Ping, Duan; Guangrui, Liu; Xingyu, Bian

    2017-02-01

    In this work, physical models of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) including bootstrap current and multiple modulated electron cyclotron current drive model are applied. Based on the specific physical problems during the suppression of NTMs by driven current, this work compares the efficiency of continuous and modulated driven currents, and simulates the physical processes of multiple modulated driven currents on suppressing rotating magnetic island. It is found that when island rotates along the poloidal direction, the suppression ability of continuous driven current can be massively reduced due to current deposition outside the island separatrix and reverse deposition direction at the X point, which can be avoided by current drive modulation. Multiple current drive has a better suppressing effect than single current drive. This work gives realistic numerical simulations by optimizing the model and parameters based on the experiments, which could provide references for successful suppression of NTMs in future advanced tokamak such as international thermonuclear experimental reactor.

  12. [Effect of air-electric fields on driving and reaction patterns. Test subjects in the car driving simulator (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Anselm, D; Danner, M; Kirmaier, N; König, H L; Müller-Limmroth, W; Reis, A; Schauerte, W

    1977-06-10

    In the relevant frequency range of about 10 Hertz cars can be considered very largely as Faraday cages and consequently as screens against air-electric fields. This may have a negative influence on driving and reaction patterns as a result. In an extensive investigation 48 subjects in a driving simulator were exposed to definite artificially produced air-electric fields. The self-rating of the performance and concentration of the subjects, reaction times and driving errors were determined. While the reaction times remained practically constant, the driving behavior of the subjects improved.

  13. Influence of driving frequency on discharge modes in a dielectric-barrier discharge with multiple current pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Weiman; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2013-07-15

    A one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model was employed to investigate the effect of the driving frequency on the discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure argon discharge with multiple current pulses. The discharge mode was discussed in detail not only at current peaks but also between two adjacent peaks. The simulation results show that different transitions between the Townsend and glow modes during the discharge take place with the driving frequency increased. A complicated transition from the Townsend mode, through glow, Townsend, and glow, and finally back to the Townsend one is found in the discharge with the driving frequency of 8 kHz. There is a tendency of transition from the Townsend to glow mode for the discharge both at the current peaks and troughs with the increasing frequency. The discharge in the half period can all along operate in the glow mode with the driving frequency high enough. This is resulted from the preservation of more electrons in the gas gap and acquisition of more electron energy from the swiftly varying electric field with the increase in driving frequency. Comparison of the spatial and temporal evolutions of the electron density at different driving frequencies indicates that the increment of the driving frequency allows the plasma chemistry to be enhanced. This electrical characteristic is important for the applications, such as surface treatment and biomedical sterilization.

  14. Lower hybrid current drive at high density in the multi-pass regime

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, G. M.; Faust, I. C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Ma, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Schmidt, A. E.; Harvey, R. W.; Smirnov, A. P.; and others

    2012-06-15

    Assessing the performance of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) at high density is critical for developing non-inductive current drive systems on future steady-state experiments. Excellent LHCD efficiency has been observed during fully non-inductive operation ({eta}=2.0-2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} AW{sup -1}m{sup -2} at n{sub e}=0.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}) on Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] under conditions (n{sub e}, magnetic field and topology, and LHCD frequency) relevant to ITER [S. Shiraiwa et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 103024 (2011)]. To extend these results to advanced tokamak regimes with higher bootstrap current fractions on C-Mod, it is necessary to increase n{sub e} to 1.0-1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3}. However, the number of current-carrying, non-thermal electrons generated by LHCD drops sharply in diverted configurations at densities that are well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks. In these cases, changes in scrape off layer (SOL) ionization and density profiles are observed during LHCD, indicating that significant power is transferred from the LH waves to the SOL. Fokker-Planck simulations of these discharges utilizing ray tracing and full wave propagation codes indicate that LH waves in the high density, multi-pass absorption regime linger in the plasma edge, and SOL region, where absorption near or outside the LCFS results in the loss of current drive efficiency. Modeling predicts that non-thermal emission increases with stronger single-pass absorption. Experimental data show that increasing T{sub e} in high density LH discharges results in higher non-thermal electron emission, as predicted by the models.

  15. Lower hybrid current drive at high density in the multi-pass regimea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Faust, I. C.; Meneghini, O.; Parker, R. R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Baek, S. G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hughes, J. W.; LaBombard, B. L.; Lau, C.; Ma, Y.; Reinke, M. L.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Harvey, R. W.; Schmidt, A. E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Wilson, J. R.

    2012-06-01

    Assessing the performance of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) at high density is critical for developing non-inductive current drive systems on future steady-state experiments. Excellent LHCD efficiency has been observed during fully non-inductive operation (η =2.0-2.5×1019 AW-1m-2 at n¯e=0.5×1020 m-3) on Alcator C-Mod [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] under conditions (ne, magnetic field and topology, and LHCD frequency) relevant to ITER [S. Shiraiwa et al., Nucl. Fusion 51, 103024 (2011)]. To extend these results to advanced tokamak regimes with higher bootstrap current fractions on C-Mod, it is necessary to increase n ¯e to 1.0-1.5×1020 m-3. However, the number of current-carrying, non-thermal electrons generated by LHCD drops sharply in diverted configurations at densities that are well below the density limit previously observed on limited tokamaks. In these cases, changes in scrape off layer (SOL) ionization and density profiles are observed during LHCD, indicating that significant power is transferred from the LH waves to the SOL. Fokker-Planck simulations of these discharges utilizing ray tracing and full wave propagation codes indicate that LH waves in the high density, multi-pass absorption regime linger in the plasma edge, and SOL region, where absorption near or outside the LCFS results in the loss of current drive efficiency. Modeling predicts that non-thermal emission increases with stronger single-pass absorption. Experimental data show that increasing Te in high density LH discharges results in higher non-thermal electron emission, as predicted by the models.

  16. Driving a Superconductor to Insulator Transition with Random Gauge Fields

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, H. Q.; Hollen, S. M.; Shainline, J.; Xu, J. M.; Valles, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    Typically the disorder that alters the interference of particle waves to produce Anderson localization is potential scattering from randomly placed impurities. Here we show that disorder in the form of random gauge fields that act directly on particle phases can also drive localization. We present evidence of a superfluid bose glass to insulator transition at a critical level of this gauge field disorder in a nano-patterned array of amorphous Bi islands. This transition shows signs of metallic transport near the critical point characterized by a resistance , indicative of a quantum phase transition. The critical disorder depends on interisland coupling in agreement with recent Quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We discuss how this disorder tuned SIT differs from the common frustration tuned SIT that also occurs in magnetic fields. Its discovery enables new high fidelity comparisons between theoretical and experimental studies of disorder effects on quantum critical systems. PMID:27901081

  17. Driving a Superconductor to Insulator Transition with Random Gauge Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, H. Q.; Hollen, S. M.; Shainline, J.; Xu, J. M.; Valles, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    Typically the disorder that alters the interference of particle waves to produce Anderson localization is potential scattering from randomly placed impurities. Here we show that disorder in the form of random gauge fields that act directly on particle phases can also drive localization. We present evidence of a superfluid bose glass to insulator transition at a critical level of this gauge field disorder in a nano-patterned array of amorphous Bi islands. This transition shows signs of metallic transport near the critical point characterized by a resistance , indicative of a quantum phase transition. The critical disorder depends on interisland coupling in agreement with recent Quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We discuss how this disorder tuned SIT differs from the common frustration tuned SIT that also occurs in magnetic fields. Its discovery enables new high fidelity comparisons between theoretical and experimental studies of disorder effects on quantum critical systems.

  18. Driving a Superconductor to Insulator Transition with Random Gauge Fields.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, H Q; Hollen, S M; Shainline, J; Xu, J M; Valles, J M

    2016-11-30

    Typically the disorder that alters the interference of particle waves to produce Anderson localization is potential scattering from randomly placed impurities. Here we show that disorder in the form of random gauge fields that act directly on particle phases can also drive localization. We present evidence of a superfluid bose glass to insulator transition at a critical level of this gauge field disorder in a nano-patterned array of amorphous Bi islands. This transition shows signs of metallic transport near the critical point characterized by a resistance , indicative of a quantum phase transition. The critical disorder depends on interisland coupling in agreement with recent Quantum Monte Carlo simulations. We discuss how this disorder tuned SIT differs from the common frustration tuned SIT that also occurs in magnetic fields. Its discovery enables new high fidelity comparisons between theoretical and experimental studies of disorder effects on quantum critical systems.

  19. Operating points and feedback control of plasma characteristics in tokamaks with full current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, D.W.; Attenberger, S.E.; Houlberg, W.A.; Bonoli, P.T.; Nevins, W.M.

    1994-12-31

    Tokamak operation using advanced tokamak modes with steady-state current drive may provide better performance, thereby improving the prospects of power-producing fusion reactors. Scenarios for such operation in TPX and in an ITER-like scale-up of TPX are modeled. Results indicate that the heating and current drive power and feedback control requirements may be achievable.

  20. Control of the current density profile with lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.E.; Bernabei, S.; Chu, T.K.; Gettelfinger, G.; Greenough, N.; Hatcher, R.; Ignat, D.; Jardin, S.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kozub, T.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Okabayashi, M.; Paul, S.; Sauthoff, N.; Sesnic, S.; Sun, Y.; Takahashi, H.; Tighe, W.; Valeo, E.; von Goeler, S.; Blush, L.; Doerner, R.; Schmitz, L.; Tynan, G.; Dunlap, J.; England, A.; Harris, J.; Hirshman, S.; Isler, R.; Lee, D.; Jones, S.; Kesner, J.; Luckhardt, S.; Paoletti, F.; Levinton, F.; Timini, F.

    1993-07-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is being explored as a means to control the current density profile on PBX-M with the goal of raising the central safety factor q(O) to values of 1.5-2 to facilitate access to a full-volume second stable regime. Initial experiments have been conducted with up to 400 kW of 4.6 GHz LH power in circular and indented plasmas with modest parameters. A tangential-viewing two-dimensional hard x-ray imaging diagnostic has been used to observe the bremsstrahlung emission from the suprathermal electrons generated during LHCD. Hollow hard x-ray images have indicated off-axis localization of the driven current. A serious obstacle to the control of the current density profile with LHCD is the concomitant generation of MHD activity, which can seriously degrade the confinement of suprathermal electrons. By combining neutral beam injection with LHCD, an MHD-free condition has been obtained where q(O) is raised above 1.

  1. The role of the plasma current in turbulence decrease during lower hybrid current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antar, G.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Asghar, A.; Žàček, F.

    2017-03-01

    The interaction of radio frequency (RF) waves with edge turbulence has resurfaced after the results obtained on many tokamaks showing that edge turbulence decreases when the ion cyclotron frequency heating (ICRH) is switched on. Using the lower hybrid (LH) waves to drive current into tokamak plasmas, this issue presented contradicting results with some tokamaks (FTU & HT-7) showing a net decrease, similar to the ICRH results, and others (Tore Supra) did not. In this article, these apparent discrepancies among tokamaks and RF wave frequencies are removed. It is found that turbulence large-scale structures in the scrape-off layer decrease at high enough plasma currents (Ip) on the Tore Supra tokamak. We distinguish three regimes: At low Ip's, no modification is detected with statistical properties of turbulence similar to ohmic plasmas even with PLH reaching 4.8 MW. At moderate plasma currents, turbulence properties are modified only at a high LH power. At high plasma currents, turbulent large scales are reduced to values smaller than 1 cm, and this is accompanied by a net decrease in the level of turbulence of about 30% even with a moderate LH power.

  2. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive: Present experiments to ITER. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, R.W.; Nevins, W.M.; Smith, G.R.; Lloyd, B.; O`Brien, M.R.; Warrick, C.D.

    1995-08-01

    Electron cyclotron (EC) power has technological and physics advantages for heating and current drive in a tokamak reactor, and advances in source development make it credible for applications in ITER. Strong single pass absorption makes heating to ignition particularly simple. The optimized EC current drive (ECCD) efficiency ({l_angle}n{r_angle}IR/P) shows a linear temperature scaling at temperatures up to {approximately} 15 keV. For temperatures above 30 keV, the efficiency saturates at approximately 0.3{center_dot}10{sup 20} A/(m{sup 2}W) for a frequency of 220 GHz in an ITER target plasma with toroidal field of 6 T, due primarily to harmonic overlap [G.R. Smith et al., Phys. Fluids 30 3633 (1987)] and to a lesser extent due to limitations arising from relativistic effects [N.J. Fisch, Phys. Rev. A 24 3245 (1981)]. The same efficiency can also be obtained at 170 GHz for the same plasma equilibrium except that the magnetic field is reduced to (170/220) {times} 6 T = 4.6 T. The ECCD efficiencies are obtained with the comprehensive 3D, bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck CQL3D codes [R.W. Harvey and M.G. McCoy, Proc. IAEA TCM/Advances in Simulation and Modeling in Thermonuclear Plasmas 1992, Montreal], and BANDIT3D [M.R. O`Brien, M. Cox, C.D. Warrick, and F. S. Zaitsev, ibid.].

  3. Heating, current drive and energetic particle studies on JET in preparation of ITER operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noterdaeme, J.-M.; Budny, R.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Crisanti, F.; de Grassie, J.; D'Ippolito, D. A.; Durodié, F.; Ekedahl, A.; Figueiredo, A.; Ingesson, C.; Joffrin, E.; Hartmann, D.; Heikkinen, J.; Hellsten, T.; Jones, T.; Kiptily, V.; Lamalle, Ph.; Litaudon, X.; Nguyen, F.; Mailloux, J.; Mantsinen, M.; Mayoral, M.; Mazon, D.; Meo, F.; Monakhov, I.; Myra, J. R.; Paméla, J.; Pericoli, V.; Petrov, Yu.; Sauter, O.; Sarazin, Y.; Sharapov, S. E.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Van Eester, D.; EFDA Contributors, JET

    2003-03-01

    This paper summarizes the recent work on JET in the three areas of heating, current drive and energetic particles. The achievements have extended the possibilities of JET, have a direct connection to ITER operation and provide new and interesting physics. Toroidal rotation profiles of plasmas heated far off axis with little or no refuelling or momentum input are hollow with only small differences on whether the power deposition is located on the low field side or on the high field side. With LH current drive the magnetic shear was varied from slightly positive to negative. The improved coupling (through the use of plasma shaping and CD4) allowed up to 3.4 MW of PLH in internal transport barrier (ITB) plasmas with more than 15 MW of combined NBI and ICRF heating. The q-profile with negative magnetic shear and the ITB could be maintained for the duration of the high heating pulse (8 s). Fast ions have been produced in JET with ICRF to simulate alpha particles: by using third harmonic 4He heating, beam injected 4He at 120 kV were accelerated to energies above 2 MeV, taking advantage of the unique capability of JET to use NBI with 4He and to confine MeV class ions. ICRF heating was used to replicate the dynamics of alpha heating and the control of an equivalent Q = 10 `burn' was simulated.

  4. Clipper for High-Impedance Current-Drive Line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodhouse, Christopher E.

    1987-01-01

    New circuit leakage reduced by shunting current through saturated input at operational-amplifier follower already part of Howland, or equivalent, current source. Typical application is in circuit of germanium resistance thermometer in cryogenic system.

  5. Fast wave current drive in neutral beam heated plasmas on DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Petty, C.C.; Forest, C.B.; Pinsker, R.I.

    1997-04-01

    The physics of non-inductive current drive and current profile control using the fast magnetosonic wave has been demonstrated on the DIII-D tokamak. In non-sawtoothing discharges formed by neutral beam injection (NBI), the radial profile of the fast wave current drive (FWCD) was determined by the response of the loop voltage profile to co, counter, and symmetric antenna phasings, and was found to be in good agreement with theoretical models. The application of counter FWCD increased the magnetic shear reversal of the plasma and delayed the onset of sawteeth, compared to co FWCD. The partial absorption of fast waves by energetic beam ions at high harmonics of the ion cyclotron frequency was also evident from a build up of fast particle pressure near the magnetic axis and a correlated increase in the neutron rate. The anomalous fast particle pressure and neutron rate increased with increasing NBI power and peaked when a harmonic of the deuterium cyclotron frequency passed through the center of the plasma. The experimental FWCD efficiency was highest at 2 T where the interaction between the fast waves and the beam ions was weakest; as the magnetic field strength was lowered, the FWCD efficiency decreased to approximately half of the maximum theoretical value.

  6. Fast-ion transport and NBI current drive in ASDEX Upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Benedikt; Weiland, Markus; Mlynek, Alexander; Dunne, Mike; Dux, Ralph; Fischer, Rainer; Hobirk, Joerg; Hopf, Christian; Reich, Matthias; Rittich, David; Ryter, Francois; Schneider, Philip; Tardini, Giovanni; Garcia-Munoz, Manuel; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-10-01

    Good confinement of fast ions is essential in fusion devices because these suprathermal particles are responsible for plasma heating, current drive and can, if poorly confined, damage surrounding walls. The degradation of the fast-ion confinement caused by large and small scale instabilities must consequently be investigated. In the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak, fast ions are generated by neutral beam injection (NBI) and their slowing down distribution can be studied using FIDA spectroscopy, neutral particle analyzers and neutron detectors. Neo-classical fast-ion transport is observed by these measurements in MHD-quiescent discharges with relatively weak heating power (less than 5 MW). The presence of sawtooth instabilities, in contrast, yields a strong internal fast-ion redistribution that can be modelled very well when assuming full reconnection of the helical magnetic field. The fast-ion current drive efficiency has been studied in discharges with up to 10 MW of heating power in which on-axis and off-axis NBI were exchanged. The radial shape of the fast-ion population, generated by the different NBIs, changes as predicted and a corresponding modification of the current profile is measured.

  7. Field-aligned currents and large scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1980-01-01

    D'Angelo's model of polar cap electric fields (1977) was used to visualize how high-latitude field-aligned currents are driven by the solar wind generator. The region 1 and region 2 currents of Iijima and Potemra (1976) and the cusp field-aligned currents of Wilhjelm et al. (1978) and McDiarmid et al. (1978) are apparently driven by different generators, although in both cases the solar wind is their ultimate source.

  8. Lower hybrid current drive at ITER-relevant high plasma densities

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Panaccione, L.; Pericoli-Ridolfini, V.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Tudisco, O.

    2009-11-26

    Recent experiments indicated that a further non-inductive current, besides bootstrap, should be necessary for developing advanced scenario for ITER. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) should provide such tool, but its effectiveness was still not proved in operations with ITER-relevant density of the plasma column periphery. Progress of the LH deposition modelling is presented, performed considering the wave physics of the edge, and different ITER-relevant edge parameters. Operations with relatively high edge electron temperatures are expected to reduce the LH{sub ||} spectral broadening and, consequently, enabling the LH power to propagate also in high density plasmas ({sub ||} is the wavenumber component aligned to the confinement magnetic field). New results of FTU experiments are presented, performed by following the aforementioned modeling: they indicate that, for the first time, the LHCD conditions are established by operating at ITER-relevant high edge densities.

  9. Broadband sidebands generated by parametric instability in lower hybrid current drive experiments on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amicucci, L.; Ding, B. J.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Giovannozzi, E.; Li, M. H.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2015-12-01

    Modern research on nuclear fusion energy, based on the tokamak concept, has strong need of tools for actively driving non-inductive current especially at the periphery of plasma column, where tools available so far have poor efficiency. This is essential for solving one of the most critical problems for thermonuclear reactor, consisting in how to achieve the figure of fusion gain in the context of sufficient stability. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect has the potential capability of driving current at large radii of reactor plasma with high efficiency [1]. Experiments recently carried out on EAST showed that a strong activity of LH sideband waves (from the RF probe spectra), accompanied by weak core penetration of the coupled LH power, is present when operating at relatively high plasma densities. Previous theoretical results, confirmed by experiments on FTU, showed that the LH sideband phenomenon is produced by parametric instability (PI), which are mitigated by higher plasma edge temperatures. This condition is thus useful for enabling the LH power propagation when operating with profiles having high plasma densities even at the edge. In the present work, we show new PI modeling of EAST plasmas data, obtained in condition of higher plasma edge temperature due to chamber lithisation. The obtained trend of the PI frequencies and growth rates is consistent with data of RF probe spectra, available in different regimes of lithisated and not lithisated vessel. Moreover, these spectra are interpreted as PI effect occurring at the periphery of plasma column, however in the low field side where the LH power is coupled.

  10. Broadband sidebands generated by parametric instability in lower hybrid current drive experiments on EAST

    SciTech Connect

    Amicucci, L. Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Giovannozzi, E.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.

    2015-12-10

    Modern research on nuclear fusion energy, based on the tokamak concept, has strong need of tools for actively driving non-inductive current especially at the periphery of plasma column, where tools available so far have poor efficiency. This is essential for solving one of the most critical problems for thermonuclear reactor, consisting in how to achieve the figure of fusion gain in the context of sufficient stability. The lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect has the potential capability of driving current at large radii of reactor plasma with high efficiency [1]. Experiments recently carried out on EAST showed that a strong activity of LH sideband waves (from the RF probe spectra), accompanied by weak core penetration of the coupled LH power, is present when operating at relatively high plasma densities. Previous theoretical results, confirmed by experiments on FTU, showed that the LH sideband phenomenon is produced by parametric instability (PI), which are mitigated by higher plasma edge temperatures. This condition is thus useful for enabling the LH power propagation when operating with profiles having high plasma densities even at the edge. In the present work, we show new PI modeling of EAST plasmas data, obtained in condition of higher plasma edge temperature due to chamber lithisation. The obtained trend of the PI frequencies and growth rates is consistent with data of RF probe spectra, available in different regimes of lithisated and not lithisated vessel. Moreover, these spectra are interpreted as PI effect occurring at the periphery of plasma column, however in the low field side where the LH power is coupled.

  11. Advanced Techniques for Neoclassical Tearing Mode Control by Electron Cyclotron Current Drive in DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volpe, F.

    2008-11-01

    Novel techniques have been developed in DIII-D for (1) control of rapidly rotating neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and (2) control of NTMs that have locked to a residual error field or the resistive wall. Electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) has been successful at suppression of NTMs in present tokamaks, but will face new challenges in ITER where NTMs are expected to be more prone to locking. In order to avoid locking, rotating islands must be controlled at small widths that are expected to be narrower than the ECCD deposition. Under these conditions, modulated ECCD is predicted to stabilize more efficiently than continuous current drive. (1) A new technique developed at DIII-D detects the island using oblique electron cyclotron emission with a line of sight equivalent to that of the ECCD. This removes much of the uncertainty in mapping the island structure from the detector to the current drive location. This method was used both to measure the radial alignment between ECCD and the island, and to synchronize the modulation in phase with the island O-point, successfully stabilizing an NTM with mode numbers m/n=3/2. (2) If islands do grow large enough to lock, locked mode control will be necessary for recovery or avoiding disruption in ITER. A potential difficulty associated with locking is that the mode can lock in a position not necessarily accessible to ECCD. To obviate this problem, magnetic perturbations were used for the first time to unlock and reposition a locked m/n=2/1 mode in order to bring it in view of the gyrotron beam, leading to a significant reduction in island size. Once unlocked, magnetic perturbations were also used to sustain and control the mode rotation, which has the potential for easier ECCD modulation

  12. Direct-current-like Phase Space Manipulation Using Chirped Alternating Current Fields

    SciTech Connect

    P.F. Schmit and N.J. Fisch

    2010-02-01

    Waves in plasmas can accelerate particles that are resonant with the wave. A dc electric field also accelerates particles, but without a resonance discrimination, which makes the acceleration mechanism profoundly different. Whereas wave-particle acceleration mechanisms have been widely discussed in the literature, this work discusses the direct analogy between wave acceleration and dc field acceleration in a particular parameter regime explored in previous works. Apart from the academic interest of this correspondence, there may be practical advantages in using waves to mimic dc electric fields, for example, in driving plasma current with high efficiency.

  13. Plasma Heating and Current Drive by Stochastic Acceleration of Relativistic Electrons at the WEGA Stellarator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laqua, Heinrich; Chlechowitz, Enrico; Fuchs, Vladimir; Otte, Matthias; Stange, Torsten

    2013-10-01

    Relativistic electrons with parallel energies of up to 2 MeV have been continuously (10 s) generated by a stochastic interaction with the rf-field (6-26kW) of a 2.45 GHz open waveguide antenna without any loop voltage. These ``run-away'' electrons have been detected by their synchrotron, x- and γ-ray emission and have also generated a toroidal plasma current in the kA range. They are perfectly confined in the stellarator magnetic field of 0.5 T. The particle trajectories form their own nested drift surfaces which are shrunken inward and shifted outward with respect to the magnetic flux surfaces. This geometrical effect connects the antenna region, where the electrons are accelerated, with the plasma core, where a low temperature (20eV, 0.2-5 1018m3) bulk plasma is generated. The acceleration process was modelled by a random walk diffusion model and a Fermi Ulan map Monte-Carlo simulation. Both calculations show similar results for the heating and current drive efficiencies. They also reproduce the temporal behaviour of the plasma current and the synchrotron radiation, when the RF-power is modulated and show the need for a random phase interaction between the relativistic electrons and the antenna field.

  14. Lower hybrid current drive in the PLT tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabei, S.; Daughney, C.; Efthimion, P.

    1982-07-01

    Order of magnitude improvements in the level and duration of current driven by lower hybrid waves have been achieved in the PLT tokamak. Steady currents up to 175 kA have been maintained for three seconds and 400 kA for 0.3 sec by the rf power alone. The principal current carrier appears to be a high energy (approx. 100 keV) electron component, concentrated in the central 20 to 40 cm diameter core of the 80 cm PLT discharge.

  15. Driving mechanism for plunger pumps in oil field installations

    SciTech Connect

    Gazarov, R.E.; Zaslavskii, Yu.V.

    1995-07-01

    Mobile oil field pumping installations of up to 1600 kW power at a pressure up to 140 MPa are widely used in hydraulic fracturing of beds, acid treatment of the near-face zone, cementation of wells, and other flushing and pressure operations. Equipment in these installations, which include high-pressure plunger pumps of high unit capacity, are mounted on mobile bases of limited lifting capacity (KrAZ automobile chassis, T-130 tractors, etc.). Very strict demands are made on the reliability, durability, and mass/size characteristics of the pumps and on all the equipment of the mobile installations. In modern pumps, an axial load of up to 100 tons or more, which is transmitted to the crankshaft, acts on each plunger. The engine of the installation rotates the crankshaft through a multiple-speed transmission and the transmission shaft of the pump. The forces acting on the elements of the driving part of a pump with a connecting rod - crank drive and a single-reduction tooth gear are described.

  16. Role of the lower hybrid spectrum in the current drive modeling for DEMO scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.; Santini, F.; Amicucci, L.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Galli, A.; Mirizzi, F.; Napoli, F.; Panaccione, L.; Schettini, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2017-07-01

    The active control of the radial current density profile is one of the major issues of thermonuclear fusion energy research based on magnetic confinement. The lower hybrid current drive could in principle be used as an efficient tool. However, previous understanding considered the electron temperature envisaged in a reactor at the plasma periphery too large to allow penetration of the coupled radio frequency (RF) power due to strong Landau damping. In this work, we present new numerical results based on quasilinear theory, showing that the injection of power spectra with different {n}// widths of the main lobe produce an RF-driven current density profile spanning most of the outer radial half of the plasma ({n}// is the refractive index in a parallel direction to the confinement magnetic field). Plasma kinetic profiles envisaged for the DEMO reactor are used as references. We demonstrate the robustness of the modeling results concerning the key role of the spectral width in determining the lower hybrid-driven current density profile. Scans of plasma parameters are extensively carried out with the aim of excluding the possibility that any artefact of the utilised numerical modeling would produce any novelty. We neglect here the parasitic effect of spectral broadening produced by linear scattering due to plasma density fluctuations, which mainly occurs for low magnetic field devices. This effect will be analyzed in other work that completes the report on the present breakthrough.

  17. Bearing currents and their relationship to PWM drives

    SciTech Connect

    Busse, D.; Erdman, J.; Kerkman, J.; Schlegel, D.; Skibinski, G.

    1997-03-01

    This paper examines ac motor shaft voltages and the resulting bearing currents when operated under pulse width modulation (PWM) voltage source inverters. The paper reviews the mechanical and electrical characteristics of the bearings and motor in relation to shaft voltages and bearing currents. A brief review of previous work is addressed, including the system model and experimental results. The theory of electric discharge machining (EDM) is presented, including component calculations of the system elements. The effect of system elements on shaft voltages and bearing currents are evaluated experimentally and the results compared to theory. A design calculation is proposed that provides the relative potential for EDM. Finally, the paper will present quantitative results on one solution to the shaft voltage and bearing current problem.

  18. Modeling of Trapped Electron Effects on Electron Cyclotron Current Drive for Recent DIII-D Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Sauter, O.; Harvey, R.W.; Chan, V.S.; Luce, T.C.; Prater, R.

    1999-08-01

    Owing to its potential capability of generating localized non-inductive current, especially off-axis, Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) is considered a leading candidate for current profile control in achieving Advanced Tokamak (AT) operation. In recent DIII-D proof-of-principle experiments [1], localized off-axis ECCD has been clearly demonstrated for first time. The measured current drive efficiency near the magnetic axis agrees well with predictions of the bounce-averaged Fokker-Planck theory [2,3]. However, the off-axis current drive efficiency was observed to exceed the theoretical results, which predict significant degradation of the current drive efficiency due to trapped electron effects. The theoretical calculations have been based on an assumption that the effective collision frequency is much smaller than the bounce frequency such that the trapped electrons are allowed to complete the banana orbit at all energies. The assumption might be justified in reactor-grade tokamak plasmas, in which the electron temperature is sufficiently high or the velocity of resonant electrons is much larger than the thermal velocity, so that the influence of collisionality on current drive efficiency can be neglected. For off-axis deposition in the present-day experiments, the effect of high density and low temperature is to reduce the current drive efficiency, but the increasing collisionality reduces the trapping of current-carrying electrons, leading to compensating increases in the current drive efficiency. In this work, we use the adjoint function formulation [4] to examine collisionality effects on the current drive efficiency.

  19. Status and comparison of codes used for fast wave current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, Paul T.

    1994-10-01

    The status of computer models for fast wave current drive in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies is reviewed in this paper. The treatments of wave propagation, wave absorption, and current drive efficiency in the various models are discussed and the important physics issues in each of these areas are emphasized. The predictions for electron heating and current drive among these models is reviewed, especially as related to the recent DIII-D fast wave experiments and to the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Finally, areas requiring further research in these models will be identified.

  20. Review of the experimental papers at the IAEA conference on noninductive current drive, Culham, 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Motley, R.W.

    1983-10-01

    Three types of noninductive current drive experiments have been reported at this conference: (1) neutral beam (2) rf current drive, and (3) relativistic electron beams (REB). If we compare the effort to develop current drive to a horse race, the neutral beam horse was first out of the gates, but it quickly found greener pastures (heating) and has dropped temporarily out of the race. The lower hybrid horse now has a big lead at the first furlong (200 m), but the bulk of the race remains to be run. The fast wave and REB horses have yet to get up speed.

  1. The Driving Magnetic Field and Reconnection in CME/Flare Eruptions and Coronal Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Ronald L.

    2010-01-01

    Signatures of reconnection in major CME (coronal mass ejection)/flare eruptions and in coronal X-ray jets are illustrated and interpreted. The signatures are magnetic field lines and their feet that brighten in flare emission. CME/flare eruptions are magnetic explosions in which: 1. The field that erupts is initially a closed arcade. 2. At eruption onset, most of the free magnetic energy to be released is not stored in field bracketing a current sheet, but in sheared field in the core of the arcade. 3. The sheared core field erupts by a process that from its start or soon after involves fast "tether-cutting" reconnection at an initially small current sheet low in the sheared core field. If the arcade has oppositely-directed field over it, the eruption process from its start or soon after also involves fast "breakout" reconnection at an initially small current sheet between the arcade and the overarching field. These aspects are shown by the small area of the bright field lines and foot-point flare ribbons in the onset of the eruption. 4. At either small current sheet, the fast reconnection progressively unleashes the erupting core field to erupt with progressively greater force. In turn, the erupting core field drives the current sheet to become progressively larger and to undergo progressively greater fast reconnection in the explosive phase of the eruption, and the flare arcade and ribbons grow to become comparable to the pre-eruption arcade in lateral extent. In coronal X-ray jets: 1. The magnetic energy released in the jet is built up by the emergence of a magnetic arcade into surrounding unipolar "open" field. 2. A simple jet is produced when a burst of reconnection occurs at the current sheet between the arcade and the open field. This produces a bright reconnection jet and a bright reconnection arcade that are both much smaller in diameter that the driving arcade. 3. A more complex jet is produced when the arcade has a sheared core field and undergoes an

  2. Electric Field Dependence of Photo-Induced Field Emission Current.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egert, Charles Michael

    We have measured the photo-induced field emission current from a tungsten field emitter as a function of electric field. These experiments were performed with a retardation energy analyzer to measure total current and a 127(DEGREES) cylindrical differential energy analyzer to measure the energy resolved PFE current. The results of these experiments are compared with a simple theory of PFE, developed by Schwartz and Schaich, which is an extension of field emission theory including the surface photoeffect, but assuming constant photoexcitation matrix elements. Our experimental results disagree with this theory in two ways: First, for high fields and photon energy (electrons emitted above the field emission barrier maximum) theory predicts a larger increase in PFE current than is observed experimentally. Second, we have also confirmed the existence of a field dependent oscillatory component of the PFE current emitted from the W(110) surface with photon energies of 2.7 eV and 3.5 eV. The simple theory described here, as well as more sophisticated calculations, have been unable to explain this oscillatory feature. We have also reported, for the first time, the field dependence of the energy resolved PFE current measured with a 127(DEGREES) cylindrical energy analyzer. These preliminary results show evidence of the oscillatory component previously only observed in the total PFE current.

  3. Quantitative inverse spin Hall effect detection via precise control of the driving-field amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavand, M.; Zhang, C.; Sun, D.; Malissa, H.; Vardeny, Z. V.; Boehme, C.

    2017-04-01

    Spin transport in thin-film materials can be studied by ferromagnetic resonantly (FMR) driven spin pumping of a charge-free spin current which induces an electromotive force through the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). For quantitative ISHE experiments, precise control of the FMR driving-field amplitude B1 is crucial. This study exploits in situ monitoring of B1 by utilization of electron paramagnetic resonantly (EPR) induced transient nutation of paramagnetic molecules (a 1:1 complex of α ,γ -bisdiphenylene-β -phenylallyl and benzene, BDPA) placed as a B1 probe in proximity to a NiFe/Pt-based ISHE device. Concurrent to an ISHE experiment, B1 is obtained from the inductively measured BDPA Rabi-nutation frequency. Higher reproducibility is achieved by renormalization of the ISHE voltage to B12 with an accuracy that is determined by the homogeneity of the FMR driving field and thus by the applied microwave resonator and ISHE device setup.

  4. Electric field induced spin-polarized current

    DOEpatents

    Murakami, Shuichi; Nagaosa, Naoto; Zhang, Shoucheng

    2006-05-02

    A device and a method for generating an electric-field-induced spin current are disclosed. A highly spin-polarized electric current is generated using a semiconductor structure and an applied electric field across the semiconductor structure. The semiconductor structure can be a hole-doped semiconductor having finite or zero bandgap or an undoped semiconductor of zero bandgap. In one embodiment, a device for injecting spin-polarized current into a current output terminal includes a semiconductor structure including first and second electrodes, along a first axis, receiving an applied electric field and a third electrode, along a direction perpendicular to the first axis, providing the spin-polarized current. The semiconductor structure includes a semiconductor material whose spin orbit coupling energy is greater than room temperature (300 Kelvin) times the Boltzmann constant. In one embodiment, the semiconductor structure is a hole-doped semiconductor structure, such as a p-type GaAs semiconductor layer.

  5. Coupling of α-channeling to |k∥| upshift in lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, I. E.; Bertelli, N.; Fisch, N. J.

    2014-08-26

    Although lower hybrid waves have been shown to be effective in driving plasma current in present-day tokamaks, they are predicted to strongly interact with the energetic α particles born from fusion reactions in eventual tokamak reactors.

  6. Fast wave current drive modeling using the combined RANT3D and PICES Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Murakami, M.; Stallings, D. C.; Carter, M. D.; Wang, C. Y.; Galambos, J. D.; Batchelor, D. B.; Baity, F. W.; Bell, G. L.; Wilgen, J. B.; Chiu, S. C.; DeGrassie, J. S.; Forest, C. B.; Kupfer, K.; Petty, C. C.; Pinsker, R. T.; Prater, R.; Lohr, J.; Lee, K. M.

    1996-02-01

    Two numerical codes are combined to give a theoretical estimate of the current drive and direct electron heating by fast waves launched from phased antenna arrays on the DIII-D tokamak. Results are compared with experiment.

  7. Isotopic effect in experiments on lower hybrid current drive in the FT-2 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkul, S. I. Altukhov, A. B.; Gurchenko, A. D. Gusakov, E. Z.; D’yachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Irzak, M. A. Kantor, M. Yu.; Kouprienko, D. V.; Saveliev, A. N.; Stepanov, A. Yu.; Shatalin, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    To analyze factors influencing the limiting value of the plasma density at which lower hybrid (LH) current drive terminates, the isotopic factor (the difference in the LH resonance densities in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas) was used for the first time in experiments carried out at the FT-2 tokamak. It is experimentally found that the efficiency of LH current drive in deuterium plasma is appreciably higher than that in hydrogen plasma. The significant role of the parametric decay of the LH pumping wave, which hampers the use of the LH range of RF waves for current drive at high plasma densities, is confirmed. It is demonstrated that the parameters characterizing LH current drive agree well with the earlier results obtained at large tokamaks.

  8. Evaluation of current drive requirements and operating characteristics of a high bootstrap fraction advanced tokamak reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houlberg, W. A.; Attenberger, S. E.

    The reactor potential of some advanced physics operating modes proposed for the TPX physics program are examined. A moderate aspect ratio (A = 4.5 as in TPX), 2 GW reactor is analyzed because of its potential for steady-state, noninductive operation with high bootstrap current fraction. Particle, energy, and toroidal current equations are evolved to steady-state conditions using the 1 1/2-D time-dependent WHIST transport code. The solutions are therefore consistent with particle, energy, and current sources and assumed transport models. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) provides the axial seed current. The bootstrap current typically provides 80-90% of the current, while feedback on the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) power maintains the total current. The sensitivity of the plasma power amplification factor, Q equivalent to P(sub fus)/P(sub aux), to variations in the plasma properties is examined. The auxiliary current drive power, P(sub aux) = P(sub LH) + P(sub FW); bootstrap current fraction; current drive efficiency; and other parameters are evaluated. The plasma is thermodynamically stable for the energy confinement model assumed (a multiple of ITER89P). The FWCD and LHCD sources provide attractive control possibilities, not only for the current profile, but also for the total fusion power since the gain on the incremental auxiliary power is typically 10-30 in these calculations when overall Q approximately equals 30.

  9. Evaluation of current drive requirements and operating characteristics of a high bootstrap fraction advanced tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1994-11-01

    The reactor potential of some advanced physics operating modes proposed for the TPX physics program are examined. A moderate aspect ratio (A = 4.5 as in TPX), 2 GW reactor is analyzed because of its potential for steady-state, non-inductive operation with high bootstrap current fraction. Particle, energy and toroidal current equations are evolved to steady-state conditions using the 1-1/2-D time-dependent WHIST transport code. The solutions are therefore consistent with particle, energy and current sources and assumed transport models. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) provides the axial seed current. The bootstrap current typically provides 80-90% of the current, while feedback on the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) power maintains the total current. The sensitivity of the plasma power amplification factor, Q {triple_bond} P{sub fus}/P{sub aux}, to variations in the plasma properties is examined. The auxiliary current drive power, P{sub aux} = P{sub LH} + P{sub FW}; bootstrap current fraction; current drive efficiency; and other parameters are evaluated. The plasma is thermodynamically stable for the energy confinement model assumed (a multiple of ITER89P). The FWCD and LHCD sources provide attractive control possibilities, not only for the current profile, but also for the total fusion power since the gain on the incremental auxiliary power is typically 10-30 in these calculations when overall Q {approx} 30.

  10. Evaluation of current drive requirements and operating characteristics of a high bootstrap fraction advanced tokamak reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Houlberg, W.A.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1995-02-01

    The reactor potential of some advanced physics operating modes proposed for the TPX physics program are examined. A moderate aspect ratio (A = 4.5 as in TPX), 2 GW reactor is analyzed because of its potential for steady-state, non-inductive operation with high bootstrap current fraction. Particle, energy and toroidal current equations are evolved to steady-state conditions using the 1-1/2-D time-dependent WHIST transport code. The solutions are therefore consistent with particle, energy and current sources and assumed transport models. Fast wave current drive (FWCD) provides the axial seed current. The bootstrap current typically provides 80-90% of the current, while feedback on the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) power maintains the total current. The sensitivity of the plasma power amplification factor, Q {equivalent_to} P{sub fus}/P{sub aux}, to variations in the plasma properties is examined. The auxiliary current drive power, P{sub aux} = P{sub LH} + P{sub FW}; bootstrap current fraction: current drive efficiency; and other parameters are evaluated. The plasma is thermodynamically stable for the energy confinement model assumed (a multiple of ITER89P). The FWCD and LHCD sources provide attractive control possibilities, not only for the current profile, but also for the total fusion power since the gain on the incremental auxiliary power is typically 10-30 in these calculations when overall Q {approx} 30.

  11. Lower Hybrid Current Drive Experiments on Alcator C-Mod: Comparison with Theory and Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, Paul

    2007-11-01

    Recently, lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) experiments have been carried out on Alcator C-Mod using an RF system consisting of 12 klystrons at 4.6 GHz, feeding a 4 x 22 waveguide array. Up to 900 kW of LH power has been coupled in the range1.6 <= n//<= 4), where n// is the parallel refractive index. Driven LH currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage, yielding an efficiency of n20ILHR/PLH 0.3 [1]. We have simulated the LH current drive in these discharges using the combined ray tracing / 3D (r, v, v//) Fokker Planck code GENRAY -- CQL3D [2] and found similar current drive efficiencies. Measurements of nonthermal x-ray emission and electron cyclotron emission (ECE) confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population that varies with waveguide phasing and plasma density. Studies are currently underway to investigate the role of fast electron diffusion and full-wave effects such as diffractional broadening in determining the spatial and velocity space structure of the nonthermal electrons. The 3D (r, v, v//) electron distribution function from CQL3D has been used in synthetic diagnostic codes to simulate the measured hard x-ray and ECE emissions. Fast electron diffusion times have been inferred from x-ray data by employing a radial diffusion operator in CQL3D and determining the fast electron diffusivities that are required to reproduce the experimentally observed profiles of hard x-ray emission. Finally, we have been performing full-wave LH field simulations using the massively parallel TORIC --LH solver [3] in order to assess spatial and spectral broadening of the incident wave front that can result from diffraction and wave focusing effects. [1] R. Parker, Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 20 (2006). [2] R.W. Harvey and M. McCoy, ``The CQL3D Fokker Planck Code,'' Proc. IAEA Tech. Comm. Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada, 1992. [3] J. C. Wright et al., Nucl. Fusion 45

  12. Integrated modelling of steady-state scenarios and heating and current drive mixes for ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Masanori; Park, Jin Myung; Giruzzi, G.; Garcia, J.; Bonoli, P. T.; Budny, R. V.; Doyle, E. J.; Fukuyama, A.; Ferron, J.R.; Hayashi, N.; Honda, M.; Hubbard, A.; Hong, R. M.; Ide, S.; Imbeaux, F.; Jaeger, Erwin Frederick; Jernigan, Thomas C; Luce, T.C.; Na, Y S; Oikawa, T.; Osborne, T.H.; Parail, V.; Polevoi, A.; Prater, R.; Sips, A C C; Shafer, M. W.; Snipes, J. A.; St. John, H. E.; Snyder, P. B.; Voitsekhovitch, I

    2011-01-01

    Recent progress on ITER steady-state (SS) scenario modelling by the ITPA-IOS group is reviewed. Code-to-code benchmarks as the IOS group's common activities for the two SS scenarios (weak shear scenario and internal transport barrier scenario) are discussed in terms of transport, kinetic profiles, and heating and current drive (CD) sources using various transport codes. Weak magnetic shear scenarios integrate the plasma core and edge by combining a theory-based transport model (GLF23) with scaled experimental boundary profiles. The edge profiles (at normalized radius rho = 0.8-1.0) are adopted from an edge-localized mode-averaged analysis of a DIII-D ITER demonstration discharge. A fully noninductive SS scenario is achieved with fusion gain Q = 4.3, noninductive fraction f(NI) = 100%, bootstrap current fraction f(BS) = 63% and normalized beta beta(N) = 2.7 at plasma current I(p) = 8MA and toroidal field B(T) = 5.3 T using ITER day-1 heating and CD capability. Substantial uncertainties come from outside the radius of setting the boundary conditions (rho = 0.8). The present simulation assumed that beta(N)(rho) at the top of the pedestal (rho = 0.91) is about 25% above the peeling-ballooning threshold. ITER will have a challenge to achieve the boundary, considering different operating conditions (T(e)/T(i) approximate to 1 and density peaking). Overall, the experimentally scaled edge is an optimistic side of the prediction. A number of SS scenarios with different heating and CD mixes in a wide range of conditions were explored by exploiting the weak-shear steady-state solution procedure with the GLF23 transport model and the scaled experimental edge. The results are also presented in the operation space for DT neutron power versus stationary burn pulse duration with assumed poloidal flux availability at the beginning of stationary burn, indicating that the long pulse operation goal (3000s) at I(p) = 9 MA is possible. Source calculations in these simulations have been

  13. Heating and current drive in NSTX with electron berstein waves and high harmonic fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Ram, Abhay K.

    2010-03-14

    A suitable theoretical and computational framework for studying heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in the National Spherical Torus Experiment has been developed. This framework can also be used to study heating and current drive by electron Bernstein waves in spherical tori and other magnetic confinement devices. It is also useful in studying the propagation and damping of electron cyclotron waves in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

  14. High energy electron deposition within vertical ports, during lower hybrid current drive on Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saint-Laurent, F.; Martin, G.; Basiuk, V.; Faudot, E.; Grisolia, C.; Heuraux, S.; Lipa, M.

    2005-03-01

    Unexpected hot spots were observed around the edges of vertical ports on Tore-Supra, caused by fast electrons, accelerated by the lower hybrid waves used to drive the current, and trapped in the local ripple wells. Trajectory calculations, with the magnetic fields alone, show that no electrons should reach such locations. However, electrostatic potentials, at a kilovolt level, can induce a toroidal pinch of the trajectories, allowing particle deposition in these normally shadowed areas. Their origin is attributed first to a strong increase of the sheath potential at the port entrance, due to the fast electron flux itself, and second to its reduction within the port, when the sheath width becomes larger than the port width, due to the too low value of the local density. An increase of the capability of the cooling panels within the port, to cope with these additional fluxes, has been implemented.

  15. Electric field-driven currents in the ionosphere of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingim, M. O.; Lillis, R. J.; Ma, Y.

    2011-10-01

    Mars has a complex magnetic topology. Crustal magnetic fields can interact with the solar wind magnetic field to form magnetic cusps. On the nightside, solar wind electron precipitation can produce regions of enhanced ionization at cusps while closed field regions adjacent to cusps can be devoid of significant ionization. Previously, using an electron transport model, we calculated the electron density and spatial structure of the nightside ionosphere of Mars using Mars Global Surveyor electron measurements as input. Localized regions of enhanced ionospheric density were found to occur at magnetic cusps adjacent to low density voids [1]. Additionally, we calculated the horizontal ionospheric currents driven by strong plasma gradients and by thermospheric neutral winds. In the dynamo region of the ionosphere, the collisional ions move in the direction of the applied force (the plasma gradient or neutral wind) while the magnetized electrons move perpendicular to both the applied force and ambient magnetic field. This difference in motion drives horizontal currents. Subsequently, we considered the existence of wind-driven cusp electrojets created by secondary currents arising from polarization electric fields which form in the presence of strong conductivity gradients [2]. At Earth, ionospheric currents at high latitudes are driven predominantly by externally imposed (magnetospheric) electric fields. Here, we compute the horizontal ionospheric currents in the vicinity of magnetic cusps resulting from external electric fields. In the absence of electric field observations, we use the electric field calculated from a global model of the Mars-solar wind interaction as input. We compare the magnitude of these currents with those driven by neutral winds and plasma gradients. Additionally, we estimate the magnitude of the electric field-driven electrojets, analogous to Earth's auroral electrojets. These enhanced currents can lead to localized, enhanced Joule heating

  16. Mass of a skyrmion under a driving current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J. C.; Jalil, M. B. A.

    2017-02-01

    We present arguments for a mass term in the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation based on the notion of mass as an inertial quantity. From trajectories of skyrmions in a confining potential and a 1-D potential we see evidence for a mass-inertia connection. We derive an expression for the effective mass for skyrmions, 1.6 ε ×10-23 kg , where ε accounts for the mismatch between the local magnetic moment induced on the conduction electrons and its corresponding effect on the current-driven skyrmion and varies from 10-2 to 1.

  17. Current Research Activities in Drive System Technology in Support of the NASA Rotorcraft Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Zakrajsek, James J.

    2006-01-01

    Drive system technology is a key area for improving rotorcraft performance, noise/vibration reduction, and reducing operational and manufacturing costs. An overview of current research areas that support the NASA Rotorcraft Program will be provided. Work in drive system technology is mainly focused within three research areas: advanced components, thermal behavior/emergency lubrication system operation, and diagnostics/prognostics (also known as Health and Usage Monitoring Systems (HUMS)). Current research activities in each of these activities will be presented. Also, an overview of the conceptual drive system requirements and possible arrangements for the Heavy Lift Rotorcraft program will be reviewed.

  18. Fringe fields of current dominated multipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Wadlinger, E.A.

    1988-01-01

    We determine analytic functions that describe the fringe field region of Lambertson, or cosine-wound, magnets. In particular, we are interested in determining the aberrations, up to fifth order, of a beam transiting our large-bore current-dominated quadrupoles. We determine the scalar potential from the vector potential calculated first for a single current loop and then for a 2N symmetric current loop multipole magnet. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  19. Laboratory simulation of field-aligned currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wessel, Frank J.; Rostoker, Norman

    1993-01-01

    A summary of progress during the period Apr. 1992 to Mar. 1993 is provided. Objectives of the research are (1) to simulate, via laboratory experiments, the three terms of the field-aligned current equation; (2) to simulate auroral-arc formation processes by configuring the boundary conditions of the experimental chamber and plasma parameters to produce highly localized return currents at the end of a field-aligned current system; and (3) to extrapolate these results, using theoretical and computational techniques, to the problem of magnetospheric-ionospheric coupling and to compare them with published literature signatures of auroral-arc phenomena.

  20. Simultaneous particle and field observations of field-aligned currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berko, F. W.; Hoffman, R. A.; Burton, R. K.; Holzer, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of low energy precipitating electrons and magnetic fluctuations from the low altitude polar orbiting satellite OGO-4 have been compared. Analysis of the two sets of experimental data for isolated events led to the classification of high latitude field-aligned currents as purely temporal or purely spatial variations. Magnetic field disturbances calculated using these simple current models and the measured particle fluxes were in good agreement with measured field values. While fluxes of greater than 1 keV electrons are detected primarily on the nightside, magnetometer disturbances indicative of field-aligned currents were seen at all local times, both in the visual auroral regions and dayside polar cusp. Thus electrons with energies less than approximately 1 keV are the prime charge carriers in high latitude dayside field-aligned currents. The satellite measurements are in good agreement with previously measured field-aligned current values and with values predicted from several models involving magnetospheric field-aligned currents.

  1. High performance and current drive experiments in the JAERI Tokamak-60 Upgrade*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondoh, T.

    1994-05-01

    Recent high-fusion-triple-product and current drive experiments in the JAERI Tokamak-60 Upgrade (JT-60U) [Plasma Devices Oper. 1, 43 (1990)] are reported. The fusion triple product of 1.1×1021 m-3 s keV has been achieved in a more improved confinement mode (high-βp H-mode) in which the confinement is improved in the edge region as well as the core region. The most remarkable feature in the improved confinement mode is the multistage formation of transport barriers. The transport barrier was formed in the plasma interior first. After that, the transport barrier was formed in the edge region. For steady-state operation and current profile control, lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) and neutral beam current drive (NBCD) experiments with bootstrap current contribution are also in progress. Full current drive of 3.6 MA has been achieved at a density of 1.1×1019 m-3 with a current drive efficiency of neṡRpṡICD/PLH=2.5×1019 m-2 A W-1 with a 5.7 MW LH wave injection. Current profile control with various LH wave spectra and with NBCD were also demonstrated.

  2. Field-aligned currents and ionospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the observed distribution of the ionospheric electric field can be deduced from an equation combining Ohm's law with the current continuity equation by using the 'observed' distribution of field-aligned currents as the boundary condition for two models of the ionosphere. The first model has one conductive annular ring representing the quiet-time auroral precipitation belt; the second has two conductive annular rings that simulate the discrete and diffuse auroral regions. An analysis is performed to determine how well the electric-field distribution can be reproduced. The results indicate that the first model reproduces the Sq(p)-type distribution, the second model reproduces reasonably well a substorm-type potential and ionospheric current patterns together with the Harang discontinuity, and that the distribution of field-aligned currents is the same for both models.

  3. The drive to strive: goal generation based on current needs

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Elisabeth A.; Rudebeck, Peter H.

    2013-01-01

    Hungry animals are influenced by a multitude of different factors when foraging for sustenance. Much of the work on animal foraging has focused on factors relating to the amount of time and energy animals expend searching for and harvesting foods. Models that emphasize such factors have been invaluable in determining when it is beneficial for an animal to search for pastures new. When foraging, however, animals also have to determine how to direct their search. For what food should they forage? There is no point searching for more of a particular food when you are sated from eating it. Here we review work in macaques and humans that has sought to reveal the neural circuits critical for determining the subjective value of different foods and associated objects in our environment and tracking this value over time. There is mounting evidence that a network composed of the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), amygdala, and medial thalamus is critical for linking objects in the environment with food value and adjusting those valuations in real time based on current biological needs. Studies using temporary inactivation methods have revealed that the amygdala and OFC play distinct yet complementary roles in this valuation process. Such a network for determining the subjective value of different foods and, by extension, associated objects, must interact with systems that determine where and for how long to forage. Only by efficiently incorporating these two factors into their decisions will animals be able to achieve maximal fitness. PMID:23818876

  4. Observation of Zero Current Density in the Core of JET Discharges with Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, N. C.; Stratton, B. C.; Tala, T.; Challis, C. D.; Conway, G.; Deangelis, R.; Giroud, C.; Hobirk, J.; Joffrin, E.; Lomas, P.; Lotte, P.; Mailloux, J.; Mazon, D.; Rachlew, E.; Reyes-Cortes, S.; Solano, E.; Zastrow, K.-D.

    2001-09-01

    Simultaneous current ramping and application of lower hybrid heating and current drive (LHCD) have produced a region with zero current density within measurement errors in the core ( r/a<=0.2) of JET tokamak optimized shear discharges. The reduction of core current density is consistent with a simple physical explanation and numerical simulations of radial current diffusion including the effects of LHCD. However, the core current density is clamped at zero, indicating the existence of a physical mechanism which prevents it from becoming negative.

  5. Field stability of piezoelectric shear properties in PIN-PMN-PT crystals under large drive field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shujun; Li, Fei; Luo, Jun; Xia, Ru; Hackenberger, Wesley; Shrout, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    The coercive fields (E(C)) of Pb(In₀.₅Nb₀.₅)O₃-Pb(Mg(¹/₃)Nb(²/₃)O₃-PbTiO₃ (PIN-PMN-PT) ternary single crystals were found to be 5 kV/cm, double the value of binary Pb(Mg(¹/₃)Nb(²/₃)O₃-PbTiO₃ (PMNT) crystals, further increased to 6 to 9 kV/cm using Mn modifications. In addition to an increased EC, the acceptor modification resulted in the developed internal bias (E(int)), on the order of ~1 kV/cm. The piezoelectric shear properties of unmodified and Mn-modified PIN-PMN-PT crystals with various domain configurations were investigated. The shear piezoelectric coefficients and electromechanical coupling factors for different domain configurations were found to be >2000 pC/N and >0.85, respectively, with slightly reduced properties observed in Mn-modified tetragonal crystals. Fatigue/cycling tests performed on shearmode samples as a function of ac drive field level demonstrated that the allowable ac field levels (the maximum applied ac field before the occurrence of depolarization) were only ~2 kV/cm for unmodified crystals, less than half of their coercive field. Allowable ac drive levels were on the order of 4 to 6 kV/cm for Mn-modified crystals with rhombohedral/orthorhombic phase, further increased to 5 to 8 kV/cm in tetragonal crystals, because of their higher coercive fields. It is of particular interest that the allowable ac drive field level for Mn-modified crystals was found to be ≥ 60% of their coercive fields, because of the developed E(int), induced by the acceptor-oxygen vacancy defect dipoles.

  6. Field Stability of Piezoelectric Shear Properties in PIN-PMN-PT Crystals Under Large Drive Field

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shujun; Li, Fei; Luo, Jun; Xia, Ru; Hackenberger, Wesley; Shrout, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    The coercive fields (EC) of Pb(In0.5Nb0.5)O3-Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PIN-PMN-PT) ternary single crystals were found to be 5 kV/cm, double the value of binary Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3-PbTiO3 (PMNT) crystals, further increased to 6 to 9 kV/cm using Mn modifications. In addition to an increased EC, the acceptor modification resulted in the developed internal bias (Eint), on the order of ~1 kV/cm. The piezoelectric shear properties of unmodified and Mn-modified PIN-PMN-PT crystals with various domain configurations were investigated. The shear piezoelectric coefficients and electromechanical coupling factors for different domain configurations were found to be >2000 pC/N and >0.85, respectively, with slightly reduced properties observed in Mn-modified tetragonal crystals. Fatigue/cycling tests performed on shear-mode samples as a function of ac drive field level demonstrated that the allowable ac field levels (the maximum applied ac field before the occurrence of depolarization) were only ~2 kV/cm for unmodified crystals, less than half of their coercive field. Allowable ac drive levels were on the order of 4 to 6 kV/cm for Mn-modified crystals with rhombohedral/orthorhombic phase, further increased to 5 to 8 kV/cm in tetragonal crystals, because of their higher coercive fields. It is of particular interest that the allowable ac drive field level for Mn-modified crystals was found to be ≥60% of their coercive fields, because of the developed Eint, induced by the acceptor-oxygen vacancy defect dipoles. PMID:21342812

  7. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milanesio, D.; Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-01

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  8. A DEMO relevant fast wave current drive high harmonic antenna exploiting the high impedance technique

    SciTech Connect

    Milanesio, D. Maggiora, R.

    2015-12-10

    Ion Cyclotron (IC) antennas are routinely adopted in most of the existing nuclear fusion experiments, even though their main goal, i.e. to couple high power to the plasma (MW), is often limited by rather severe drawbacks due to high fields on the antenna itself and on the unmatched part of the feeding lines. In addition to the well exploited auxiliary ion heating during the start-up phase, some non-ohmic current drive (CD) at the IC range of frequencies may be explored in view of the DEMO reactor. In this work, we suggest and describe a compact high frequency DEMO relevant antenna, based on the high impedance surfaces concept. High-impedance surfaces are periodic metallic structures (patches) usually displaced on top of a dielectric substrate and grounded by means of vertical posts embedded inside the dielectric, in a mushroom-like shape. These structures present a high impedance, within a given frequency band, such that the image currents are in-phase with the currents of the antenna itself, thus determining a significant efficiency increase. After a general introduction on the properties of high impedance surfaces, we analyze, by means of numerical codes, a dielectric based and a full metal solution optimized to be tested and benchmarked on the FTU experiment fed with generators at 433MHz.

  9. Experimental Investigation and Validation of Neutral Beam Current Drive for ITER Through ITPA Joint Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, T.; Akers, R. J.; Gates, D.A.; Gunter, S.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Hobirk, J.; Luce, T.C.; Murakami, Masanori; Park, Jin Myung; Turnyanskiy, M.

    2011-01-01

    Joint experiments investigating the off-axis neutral beam current drive (NBCD) capability to be utilized for advanced operation scenario development in ITER were conducted in four tokamaks (ASDEX Upgrade (AUG), DIII-D, JT-60U and MAST) through the international tokamak physics activity (ITPA). The following results were obtained in the joint experiments, where the toroidal field, B(t), covered 0.4-3.7 T, the plasma current, I(p), 0.5-1.2 MA, and the beam energy, E(b), 65-350 keV. A current profile broadened by off-axis NBCD was observed in MAST. In DIII-D and JT-60U, the NB driven current profile has been evaluated using motional Stark effect diagnostics and good agreement between the measured and calculated NB driven current profile was observed. In AUG (at low delta similar to 0.2) and DIII-D, introduction of a fast-ion diffusion coefficient of D(b) similar to 0.3-0.5 m(2) s(-1) in the calculation gave better agreement at high heating power (5 MW and 7.2 MW, respectively), suggesting anomalous transport of fast ions by turbulence. It was found through these ITPA joint experiments that NBCD related physics quantities reasonably agree with calculations (with D(b) = 0-0.5 m(2) s(-1)) in all devices when there is no magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity except ELMs. Proximity of measured off-axis beam driven current to the corresponding calculation with D(b) = 0 has been discussed for ITER in terms of a theoretically predicted scaling of fast-ion diffusion that depends on E(b)/T(e) for electrostatic turbulence or beta(t) for electromagnetic turbulence.

  10. Current Collection in a Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krivorutsky, E. N.

    1997-01-01

    It is found that the upper-bound limit for current collection in the case of strong magnetic field from the current is close to that given by the Parker-Murphy formula. This conclusion is consistent with the results obtained in laboratory experiments. This limit weakly depends on the shape of the wire. The adiabatic limit in this case will be easily surpassed due to strong magnetic field gradients near the separatrix. The calculations can be done using the kinetic equation in the drift approximation. Analytical results are obtained for the region where the Earth's magnetic field is dominant. The current collection can be calculated (neglecting scattering) using a particle simulation code. Dr. Singh has agreed to collaborate, allowing the use of his particle code. The code can be adapted for the case when the current magnetic field is strong. The needed dm for these modifications is 3-4 months. The analytical description and essential part of the program is prepared for the calculation of the current in the region where the adiabatic description can be used. This was completed with the collaboration of Drs. Khazanov and Liemohn. A scheme of measuring the end body position is also proposed. The scheme was discussed in the laboratory (with Dr. Stone) and it was concluded that it can be proposed for engineering analysis.

  11. Non-Inductive Current Drive Modeling Extending Advanced Tokamak Operation to Steady State

    SciTech Connect

    Casper, T.A.; Lodestro, L.L.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Porter, G.D.; Murakami, M.; Lao, L.L.; Lin-Lui, Y.R.; St. John, H.E.

    2000-06-06

    A critical issue for sustaining high performance, negative central shear (NCS) discharges is the ability to maintain current distributions that are maximum off axis. Sustaining such hollow current profiles in steady state requires the use of non-inductively driven current sources. On the DIII-D experiment, a combination of neutral beam current drive (NBCD) and bootstrap current have been used to create transient NCS discharges. The electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and current drive (ECCD) system is currently being upgraded from three gyrotrons to six to provide more than 3MW of absorbed power in long-pulse operation to help sustain the required off-axis current drive. This upgrade SuPporrs the long range goal of DIII-D to sustain high performance discharges with high values of normalized {beta}, {beta}{sub n} = {beta}/(I{sub p}/aB{sub T}), confinement enhancement factor, H, and neutron production rates while utilizing bootstrap current fraction, f{sub bs}, in excess of 50%. At these high performance levels, the likelihood of onset of MHD modes that spoil confinement indicates the need to control plasma profiles if we are to extend this operation to long pulse or steady state. To investigate the effectiveness of the EC system and to explore operating scenarios to sustain these discharges, we use time-dependent simulations of the equilibrium, transport and stability. We explore methods to directly alter the safety factor profile, q, through direct current drive or by localized electron heating to modify the bootstrap current profile. Time dependent simulations using both experimentally determined [1] and theory-based [2] energy transport models have been done. Here, we report on simulations exploring parametric dependencies of the heating, current drive, and profiles that affect our ability to sustain stable discharges.

  12. On the second harmonic electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive experiments on T-10 and DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Forest, C.B.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Luce, T.C.; Harvey, R.W.; Downs, E.A. |; James, R.A. |; Bagdasarov, A.A.; Borshegovskii, A.A.; Chistyakov, V.V.; Dremin, M.M.; Gorshkov, A.V.; Gorelov, Y.A.; Esipchuk, Y.V.; Ivanov, N.V.; Kislov, A.Y.; Kislov, D.A.; Lysenko, S.E.; Medvedev, A.A.; Mirenskii, V.Y.; Notkin, G.E.; Parail, V.V.; Pavlov, Y.D.; Razumova, K.A.; Roi, I.N.; Savrukhin, P.V.; Sannikov, V.V.; Sushkov, A.V.; Trukhin, V.M.; Vasin, N.L.; Volkov, V.V.; Denisov, G.G.; Petelin, M.I.; Flyagin, V.A.

    1993-02-01

    Studies of electron cyclotron current drive at the second harmonic resonance have been performed both on the DIII-D and T-10 tokamaks at injected power levels of approximately 0.5 MW. The DIII-D experiment used high held launch of the extraordinary mode at an angle of 15{degree} to the radial. In this experiment, with pulse lengths {approx_equal} 500 msec, a loop voltage difference, compared to the value expected from the measured profiles, of {approx_equal} 50 mV was ascribed to approximately 50 kA of rf-driven current. When dc electric field and trapped particle effects were considered, this was consistent with theoretical predictions. T-10 experiments planned for the fall of 1992 will use low field launch of the extraordinary mode and an injection angle of 21{degree} off-radial. In preliminary experiments with relatively poor machine conditions and pulse lengths {approx_equal} 400 msec, rf current drive was not observed despite the fact that driven currents as low as 10 kA, corresponding to a loop voltage difference for co- versus counter-injection of 20 mV, could have been detected. In this paper we examine the T-10 experiments using ray tracing and transport calculations in an attempt to understand the results. The dependence of the current drive efficiency on discharge parameters, flux penetration, and non-linear effects will be discussed. The results show that the launching geometry can have a significant effect on the observation of electron cyclotron current drive using the loop voltage as a diagnostic. In addition, predictions for the next series of experiments on T-10, for which greater than 2 MW of high frequency power should be available, will be presented.

  13. Current-drive by lower hybrid waves in the presence of energetic alpha-particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fisch, N.J.; Rax, J.M.

    1991-10-01

    Many experiments have now proved the effectiveness of lower hybrid waves for driving toroidal current in tokamaks. The use of these waves, however, to provide all the current in a reactor is thought to be uncertain because the waves may not penetrate the center of the more energetic reactor plasma, and, if they did, the wave power may be absorbed by alpha particles rather than by electrons. This paper explores the conditions under which lower-hybrid waves might actually drive all the current. 26 refs.

  14. 4 MW fast wave current drive upgrade for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Callis, R.W.; Cary, W.P.; Baity, F.W.

    1994-09-01

    The DIII-D program has just completed a major addition to its ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) systems. This upgrade project added two new fast wave current drive (FWCD) systems, with each system consisting of a 2 MW, 30 to 120 MHz transmitter, ceramic insulated transmission lines and tuner elements, and water-cooled four-strap antenna. With this addition of 4 MW of FWCD power to the original 2 MW, 30 to 60 MHz capability, experiments can be performed that will explore advanced tokamak plasma configurations by using the centrally localized current drive to effect current profile modifications.

  15. Higher-rank fields and currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelfond, O. A.; Vasiliev, M. A.

    2016-10-01

    Sp(2 M) invariant field equations in the space ℳ M with symmetric matrix coordinates are classified. Analogous results are obtained for Minkowski-like subspaces of ℳ M which include usual 4 d Minkowski space as a particular case. The constructed equations are associated with the tensor products of the Fock (singleton) representation of Sp(2 M) of any rank r. The infinite set of higher-spin conserved currents multilinear in rank-one fields in ℳ M is found. The associated conserved charges are supported by rM-r(r-1)/2 -dimensional differential forms in ℳ M , that are closed by virtue of the rank-2 r field equations. The cohomology groups H p ( σ - r ) with all p and r, which determine the form of appropriate gauge fields and their field equations, are found both for ℳ M and for its Minkowski-like subspace.

  16. Current and Historic Trends in Physics and Related Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czujko, Roman

    2002-10-01

    This talk provides a statistical overview of the supply side in physics and related fields. Data on current and historic trends are presented in selected fields at both the bachelor' s and PhD levels. Several of the major factors driving enrollment patterns in higher education are discussed. This paper concludes with an examination of issues related to both supply and demand. The AIP Statistical Research Center has been collecting data on enrollments and degrees in physics for 40 years and they are the source for the physics data presented. The sources for the data on related fields are the National Science Foundation in the case of PhD data and the U.S. Department of Education for bachelor's level data. Finally, this paper includes data on the size of the bachelor's degree classes of 1999 and 2000. These data were not available when the talk was presented.

  17. Calibrated Faraday Current And Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyer, B. T.; Chang, J.; Ruggles, L. E.

    1986-01-01

    We have developed a calibrated optical fiber Faraday rotation current sensor. A strong magnetic field in an optical fiber introduces circular birefringence, causing the plane of polarization of light to rotate by an amount proportional to the magnetic field. Faraday loops used in the past were nonlinear due to the stress-induced linear birefringence caused by bending the loop. This linear birefringence interfered with the Faraday rotation, yielding a complicated relationship between the current and detected light signal. We have found a way to overcome the effects of the unwanted linear birefringence and produce a calibrated current waveform. The calibration is limited only by the accurate knowledge of the Verdet constant of the optical fiber. Results of recent experiments as well as planned measurements will be presented.

  18. A Novel Current Angle Control Scheme in a Current Source Inverter Fed Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor Drive for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Lixin; Su, Gui-Jia

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a novel speed control scheme to operate a current source inverter (CSI) driven surface-mounted permanent magnet synchronous machine (SPMSM) for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) applications. The idea is to use the angle of the current vector to regulate the rotor speed while keeping the two dc-dc converter power switches on all the time to boost system efficiency. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme was verified with a 3 kW CSI-SPMSM drive prototype.

  19. MSE measurements for sawtooth and non-inductive current drive studies in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, J.; Park, H.; Bea, Y. S.; Chung, J.; Jeon, Y. M.

    2016-10-01

    Two major topics where the measurement of the magnetic-field-line rotational transform profiles in toroidal plasma systems include the long-standing issue of complete versus incomplete reconnection model of the sawtooth instability and the issue with future reactor-relevant tokamak devices in which non-inductive steady state current sustainment is essential. The motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic based on the photoelastic-modulator (PEM) approach is one of the most reliable means to measure the internal magnetic pitch, and thus the rotational transform, or its reciprocal (q), profiles. The MSE system has been commissioned for the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) along with the development of various techniques to minimize systematic offset errors such as Faraday rotation and mis-alignment of the bandpass filters. The diagnostic has revealed the central q is well correlated with the sawtooth oscillation, maintaining its value above unity during the MHD quiescent period and that the response of the q profile to external current drive such as electron cyclotron wave injection not only involves the local change of the pitch angle gradient but also a significant shift of the magnetic topology due to the wave energy transport. Work supported by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, Korea.

  20. Status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Joung, M.; Bae, Y. S.; Jeong, J. H.; Park, S.; Kim, H. J.; Yang, H. L.; Park, H.; Cho, M. H.; Namkung, W.; Hosea, J.; Ellis, R.; Sakamoto, K.; Kajiwara, K.; Doane, J.

    2011-12-23

    A 170 GHz Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH/CD) system on KSTAR is designed to launch total 2.4 MW of power for up to 300 sec into the plasma. At present the first 1 MW ECH/CD system is under installation and commissioning for 2011 KSTAR campaign. The 170 GHz, 1 MW, 300 sec gyrotron and the matching optics unit (MOU) will be provided from JAEA under collaboration between NFRI and JAEA. The transmission line consists of MOU and 70 m long 63.5 mm ID corrugated waveguides with the eight miter bends. The 1 MW, 10 sec launcher is developed based on the existing two-mirror front-end launcher in collaboration with Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory and Pohang University of Science and Technology, and is installed on the low field side in the KSTAR equatorial plane. The mirror pivot is located at 30 cm below from the equatorial plane. 3.6 MVA power supply system is manufactured and now is under commissioning to meet the triode gun operation of JAEA gyrotron. The power supply consists of 66 kV/55 A cathode power supply, mode-anode system, and 50 kV/160 mA body power supply. In this paper, the current status of KSTAR 170 GHz, 1 MW ECH/CD system will be presented as well as the experimental plan utilizing 170 GHz new ECH/CD system.

  1. Lower hybrid current drive in FTU high density shear reversed discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuccillo, A. A.; Barbato, E.; Crisanti, F.; Panaccione, L.; Pericoli, V.; Podda, S.; Cirant, S.; Acitelli, L.; Alladio, F.; Amadeo, P.; Angelini, B.; Apicella, M. L.; Apruzzese, G.; Bertocchi, A.; Borra, M.; Bracco, G.; Bruschi, A.; Buceti, G.; Buratti, P.; Cardinali, A.; Centioli, C.; Cesario, R.; Ciattaglia, S.; Ciotti, M.; Cocilovo, V.; De Angelis, R.; De Marco, F.; Esposito, B.; Frigione, D.; Gabellieri, L.; Gatti, G.; Giovannozzi, E.; Gourlan, C.; Granucci, G.; Grolli, M.; Imparato, A.; Kroegler, H.; Leigheb, M.; Lovisetto, L.; Maddaluno, G.; Maffia, G.; Mancuso, A.; Marinucci, M.; Mazzitelli, G.; Micozzi, P.; Mirizzi, F.; Orsitto, P.; Pacella, D.; Panella, M.; Pieroni, L.; Righetti, G. B.; Romanelli, F.; Santini, F.; Simonetto, A.; Sozzi, C.; Sternini, S.; Tudisco, O.; Valente, F.; Vitale, V.; Vlad, G.; Zanza, V.; Zerbini, M.

    1997-04-01

    Results are reported of the 8 GHz Lower Hybrid experiments on FTU after the installation of the new toroidal limiter. A figure of merit of the Current Drive efficiency ηCD≈0.11ṡ1020 A/Wm2 is estimated for plasma density n¯e=1020 m-3 and no appreciable broadening of the launched frequency is detected. In low density experiments sawteeth are stabilised and m=1 activity is present in the plasma. Shear reversed discharges with large reversal radius, rs/a≈0.5, are obtained at higher density, lower temperature, BT=4 T, qa≈5.5, by off-axis LH CD. The reversed configurations exhibit high central temperature coexisting with regular m=2, n=1 relaxations of large amplitude and are maintained up to LH switch off. At higher magnetic field, B=5.2 T, qa≈7, irregular DTM crashes are present during the whole LH pulse. Confinement time of radiofrequency heated discharges (PLH=0.5÷2ṡPOH) exhibits the same behaviour of FTU ohmic discharges following the ITER89-P scaling. Preliminary results of central 140 GHz Electron Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ECRH) during the plasma current ramp-up, aimed at obtaining shear reversed configurations are also reported.

  2. Magnetic perturbation effects on boundary plasmas during high power lower hybrid current drive in Tore Supra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.; Goniche, M.; Grosman, A.; Guilhem, D.; Hess, W.; Vallet, J.-C.

    1992-12-01

    Small time-independent magnetic perturbations (δ br), produced with the Tore Supra ergodic divertor coils, have been used to control thermal loads on plasma facing components, current density profiles, the transport of non-Maxwellian particles, and the confinement properties of thermal plasmas during high power ( PLH≤3.3 MW) lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) discharges. MARFEs with 0.12 ≤ϱ m=π a2 < ne20> Ip-1≤0.22 (i.e., roughly a factor of 3 less than the smallest value of ϱ m previously reported) are obtained during the δ br pulse when PLH>2.0 MW and the edge safety factor is slightly less than 3. These MARFEs generally appear to have the same characteristics as high ϱ m MARFEs and are positionally stable throughout the LHCD+δ br pulse. Steady state conditions in which more than 90% of the total input power is radiated from a 0.15 m wide region near the high-field side wall were obtained.

  3. Controlling the Goos-Hänchen and Imbert-Fedorov shifts via pump and driving fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, Saeed; Xu, Jingping; Al-Amri, M.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2016-01-01

    We consider a three-level atomic medium and discuss how to control the Goos-Hänchen (longitudinal) and Imbert-Fedorov (transverse) shifts for a circular polarized Gaussian beam via a pump field and a coherent driving field applied to the atomic medium. The susceptibility of the atomic medium can be adjusted by changing the driving and pump fields. Consequently, for a fixed driving field, by turning on and off the pump field the amplitude and the direction of the longitudinal and transverse shifts of such beam can be changed. We adopt stationary phase and beam simulation methods to derive our results.

  4. Lower hybrid current drive experiments on Alcator C-Mod: Comparison with theory and simulationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Ko, J.; Parker, R.; Schmidt, A. E.; Wallace, G.; Wright, J. C.; Fiore, C. L.; Hubbard, A. E.; Irby, J.; Marmar, E.; Porkolab, M.; Terry, D.; Wolfe, S. M.; Wukitch, S. J.; Alcator C-Mod Team; Wilson, J. R.; Scott, S.; Valeo, E.; Phillips, C. K.; Harvey, R. W.

    2008-05-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) current drive experiments have been carried out on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [I. H. Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] using a radio-frequency system at 4.6GHz. Up to 900kW of LH power has been coupled and driven LH currents have been inferred from magnetic measurements by extrapolating to zero loop voltage, yielding an efficiency of neILHR0/PLH≈2.5±0.2×1019(A/W/m2). We have simulated the LH current drive in these discharges using the combined ray tracing/three-dimensional (r,v⊥,v∥) Fokker-Planck code GENRAY-CQL3D (R. W. Harvey and M. McCoy, in Proceedings of the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada, 1992) and found similar current drive efficiencies. The simulated profiles of current density from CQL3D, including both ohmic plus LH drive have been found to be in good agreement with the measured current density from a motional Stark effect diagnostic. Measurements of nonthermal x-ray emission confirm the presence of a significant fast electron population and the three-dimensional (r,v⊥,v∥) electron distribution function from CQL3D has been used in a synthetic diagnostic code to simulate the measured hard x-ray data.

  5. Effects of Magnetic Shear on Toroidal Rotation in Tokamak Plasmas with Lower Hybrid Current Drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. E.; Podpaly, Y. A.; Reinke, M. L.; Mumgaard, R.; Scott, S. D.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Chouli, B.; Fenzi-Bonizec, C.; Nave, M. F. F.; Diamond, P. H.; Gao, C.; Granetz, R. S.; Hughes, J. W.; Parker, R. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Giroud, C.; Greenwald, M. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Irby, J. H.; Kirov, K.; Mailloux, J.; Marmar, E. S.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2013-09-01

    Application of lower hybrid (LH) current drive in tokamak plasmas can induce both co- and countercurrent directed changes in toroidal rotation, depending on the core q profile. For discharges with q0<1, rotation increments in the countercurrent direction are observed. If the LH-driven current is sufficient to suppress sawteeth and increase q0 above unity, the core toroidal rotation change is in the cocurrent direction. This change in sign of the rotation increment is consistent with a change in sign of the residual stress (the divergence of which constitutes an intrinsic torque that drives the flow) through its dependence on magnetic shear.

  6. Design of long-pulse fast wave current drive antennas for DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baity, F. W.; Batchelor, D. B.; Bills, K. C.; Fogelman, C. H.; Jaeger, E. F.; Ping, J. L.; Riemer, B. W.; Ryan, P. M.; Stallings, D. C.; Taylor, D. J.; Yugo, J. J.

    1994-10-01

    Two new long-pulse fast wave current drive (FWCD) antennas will be installed on DIII-D in early 1994. These antennas will increase the available FWCD power from 2 MW to 6 MW for pulse lengths of up to 2 s, and to 4 MW for up to 10 s. Power for the new antennas is from two ASDEX-type 30- to 120-MHz transmitters. When operated at 90° phasing into a low-density plasma (˜4×1019m-3) with hot electrons (˜10 keV), these two new antennas are predicted to drive approximately 1 MA of plasma current.

  7. Particle Confinement Properties of Lower Hybrid Current Drive Plasma on the HL-1 Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xuru; Yuan, Chengjie; Qian, Shangjie; Ding, Xuantong; Yuan, Bin; Yang, Guang; Diao, Guangyue

    1994-03-01

    The particle confinement property of LHCD (lower hybrid current drive) plasma on the HL-1 tokamak is mainly affected by the line-averaged density of electrons (ne). With ne < 2.0 × 1013 cm-3, the particle confinement time (τp) is improved with the suppression of Hα(Dα) fluctuation at the edge, and tends to increase with the power PLH. The peak of τp appears near the critical density (1.0×1013 cm-3). These results are not influenced by the current drive directions.

  8. Particle simulation of intense electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, B.I.

    1987-10-12

    High-power free-electron lasers make new methods possible for heating plasmas and driving current in toroidal plasmas with electromagnetic waves. We have undertaken particle simulation studies with one and two dimensional, relativistic particle simulation codes of intense pulsed electron cyclotron heating and beat-wave current drive. The particle simulation methods here are conventional: the algorithms are time-centered, second-order-accurate, explicit, leap-frog difference schemes. The use of conventional methods restricts the range of space and time scales to be relatively compact in the problems addressed. Nevertheless, experimentally relevant simulations have been performed. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  9. Driving with homonymous visual field loss: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Alex R.

    2016-01-01

    Driving is an important rehabilitation goal for patients with homonymous field defects (HFDs); however, whether or not people with HFDs should be permitted to drive is not clear. Over the last 15 years there has been a marked increase in the number of studies evaluating the effects of HFDs on driving performance. This review of the literature provides a much-needed summary for practitioners and researchers, addressing the following topics: regulations pertaining to driving with HFDs, self-reported driving difficulties, pass rates in on-road tests, the effects of HFDs on lane position and steering stability, the effects of HFDs on scanning and detection of potential hazards, screening for potential fitness to drive, evaluating practical fitness to drive, and the efficacy of interventions to improve driving of persons with HFDs. Although there is clear evidence from on-road studies that some people with HFDs may be rated as safe to drive, others are reported to have significant deficits in skills important for safe driving including taking a lane position too close to one side of the travel lane, unstable steering and inadequate viewing (scanning) behaviors. Driving simulator studies have provided strong evidence of a wide range in compensatory scanning abilities and detection performance, despite similar amounts of visual field loss. Conventional measurements of visual field extent (in which eye movements are not permitted) do not measure such compensatory abilities and are not predictive of on-road driving performance; thus, there is a need to develop better tests to screen for visual fitness to drive of people with HFDs. We are not yet at a point where we can predict which HFD patient is likely to be a safe driver. Therefore, it seems only fair to provide an opportunity for individualized assessments of practical fitness to drive either on the road and/or in a driving simulator. PMID:27535208

  10. Driving with homonymous visual field loss: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bowers, Alex R

    2016-09-01

    Driving is an important rehabilitation goal for patients with homonymous field defects (HFDs); however, whether or not people with HFDs should be permitted to drive is not clear. Over the last 15 years, there has been a marked increase in the number of studies evaluating the effects of HFDs on driving performance. This review of the literature provides a much-needed summary for practitioners and researchers, addressing the following topics: regulations pertaining to driving with HFDs, self-reported driving difficulties, pass rates in on-road tests, the effects of HFDs on lane position and steering stability, the effects of HFDs on scanning and detection of potential hazards, screening for potential fitness to drive, evaluating practical fitness to drive and the efficacy of interventions to improve driving of persons with HFDs. Although there is clear evidence from on-road studies that some people with HFDs may be rated as safe to drive, others are reported to have significant deficits in skills important for safe driving, including taking a lane position too close to one side of the travel lane, unstable steering and inadequate viewing (scanning) behaviour. Driving simulator studies have provided strong evidence of a wide range in compensatory scanning abilities and detection performance, despite similar amounts of visual field loss. Conventional measurements of visual field extent (in which eye movements are not permitted) do not measure such compensatory abilities and are not predictive of on-road driving performance. Thus, there is a need to develop better tests to screen people with HFDs for visual fitness to drive. We are not yet at a point where we can predict which HFD patient is likely to be a safe driver. Therefore, it seems only fair to provide an opportunity for individualised assessments of practical fitness to drive either on the road and/or in a driving simulator. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  11. On the merits of heating and current drive for tearing mode stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLazzari, D.; Westerhof, E.

    2009-07-01

    Neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) are magnetohydrodynamic modes that can limit the performance of high β discharges in a tokamak, leading eventually to a plasma disruption. A NTM is sustained by the perturbation of the 'bootstrap' current, which is a consequence of the pressure flattening across a magnetic island. Control and suppression of this mode can be achieved by means of electron cyclotron waves (ECWs) which allow the deposition of highly localized power at the island location. The ECW power replenishes the missing bootstrap current by generating a current perturbation either inductively, through a temperature perturbation (electron cyclotron resonance heating), or non-inductively by direct current drive (electron cyclotron current drive). Although both methods have been applied successfully to experiments showing a predominance of ECRH for medium-sized limiter tokamaks (TEXTOR, T-10) and of ECCD for mid-to-large-sized divertor tokamaks (AUG, DIII-D, JT-60), conditions determining their relative importance are still unclear. We address this problem with a numerical study focused on the contributions of heating and current drive to the temporal evolution of NTMs as described by the modified Rutherford equation. For the effects of both heating as well as current drive, simple analytical expressions have been found in terms of an efficiency fore-factor times a 'geometrical' term depending on the power deposition width wdep, location and modulation. When the magnetic island width w equals the width of the deposition profile, w ≈ wdep, both geometric terms are practically identical. Whereas for current drive the geometric term approaches a constant for small island widths and is inversely proportional to (w/wdep)2 for large island widths, the heating term approaches a constant for large island widths and is proportional to (w/wdep) for small island widths. For medium-sized tokamaks (TEXTOR, AUG) the heating and current drive efficiencies are of the same order

  12. Effect of sleep deprivation and driving duration on the useful visual field in younger and older subjects during simulator driving.

    PubMed

    Rogé, Joceline; Pébayle, Thierry; El Hannachi, Saida; Muzet, Alain

    2003-06-01

    Nine older subjects (40-51 years) and 10 younger subjects (18-30 years) took part in two one-hour driving sessions. They performed a very monotonous task during which they had to follow a vehicle either after a complete night of sleep or after one night of sleep deprivation. While driving their useful visual field was assessed by introducing signals that would appear on the whole road scene. The analysis of the data indicates that the ability to process peripheral signals deteriorates with age, driving duration and sleep deprivation. However, the effects of these three variables on the peripheral visual ability are not similar in a dual task. The driver's useful visual field changes with age and prolongation of the monotonous driving activity according to a tunnel vision phenomenon. On the other hand, a sleep debt deteriorates the useful visual field according to a general interference phenomenon. These results are discussed in terms of decrease in the level of arousal and increase of fatigue.

  13. Application of drive circuit based on L298N in direct current motor speed control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Liuliu; Wang, Fang; Han, Sen; Li, Yuchen; Sun, Hao; Lu, Qingjie; Yang, Cheng; Wang, Quanzhao

    2016-10-01

    In the experiment of researching the nanometer laser interferometer, our design of laser interferometer circuit system is up to the wireless communication technique of the 802.15.4 IEEE standard, and we use the RF TI provided by Basic to receive the data on speed control system software. The system's hardware is connected with control module and the DC motor. However, in the experiment, we found that single chip microcomputer control module is very difficult to drive the DC motor directly. The reason is that the DC motor's starting and braking current is larger than the causing current of the single chip microcomputer control module. In order to solve this problem, we add a driving module that control board can transmit PWM wave signal through I/O port to drive the DC motor, the driving circuit board can come true the function of the DC motor's positive and reversal rotation and speed adjustment. In many various driving module, the L298N module's integrated level is higher compared with other driver module. The L298N model is easy to control, it not only can control the DC motor, but also achieve motor speed control by modulating PWM wave that the control panel output. It also has the over-current protection function, when the motor lock, the L298N model can protect circuit and motor. So we use the driver module based on L298N to drive the DC motor. It is concluded that the L298N driver circuit module plays a very important role in the process of driving the DC motor in the DC motor speed control system.

  14. Electron cyclotron current drive simulations for finite collisionality plasmas in Wendelstein 7-X using the full linearized collision model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.; Heyn, Martin F.; Marushchenko, Nikolai B.; Turkin, Yuriy

    2016-11-01

    The Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD) efficiency is usually modeled in the collisionless limit. While such models are sufficient for plasmas with rather low collisionality, they might underestimate the current drive in plasmas at low temperatures likely to occur at the initial phase of high density device operation. In this paper, the impact of finite collisionality effects on the wave-induced current drive is studied for a high-mirror configuration of Wendelstein 7-X using a combination of the drift kinetic equation solver NEO-2 and the ray-tracing code TRAVIS for a realistic set of plasma parameter profiles. The generalized Spitzer function, which describes the ECCD efficiency in phase space, is modeled with help of NEO-2, which uses the full linearized Coulomb collision operator, including energy and momentum conservation. Within this approach, the linearized drift kinetic equation is solved by means of the field line integration technique without any simplifications on device geometry. The results of the ray-tracing code TRAVIS using the ECCD efficiency from NEO-2 within the adjoint approach show a significant difference for the driven current when compared to commonly used collisionless models for the ordinary as well as the extraordinary second harmonic mode.

  15. Validation of on- and off-axis neutral beam current drive against experiment in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J. M.; Murakami, M.; Petty, C. C.; Osborne, T. H.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Prater, R.; Luce, T. C.; Wade, M. R.; Brooks, N. H.; DeBoo, J. C.; DeGrassie, J. S.; Ferron, J. R.; Gohil, P.; Hong, R. M.; Hyatt, A. W.; Lohr, J.; Politzer, P. A.; St John, H. E.; West, W. P.; Heidbrink, W. W.

    2009-09-15

    Neutral beam current drive (NBCD) experiments in DIII-D using vertically shifted plasmas to move the current drive away from the axis have clearly demonstrated robust off-axis NBCD. Time-dependent measurements of magnetic field pitch angles by the motional Stark effect diagnostic are used to obtain the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux, which indicates a broad off-axis NBCD profile with a peak at about half the plasma minor radius. In most cases, the measured off-axis NBCD profile is consistent with calculations using an orbit-following Monte Carlo code for the beam ion slowing down including finite-orbit effects provided there is no large-scale magnetohydrodynamic activity such as Alfven eigenmodes modes or sawteeth. An alternative analysis method shows good agreement between the measured pitch angles and those from simulations using transport-equilibrium codes. Two-dimensional image of Doppler-shifted fast ion D{sub {alpha}} light emitted by neutralized energetic ions shows clear evidence for a hollow profile of beam ion density, consistent with classical beam ion slowing down. The magnitude of off-axis NBCD is sensitive to the alignment of the beam injection relative to the helical pitch of the magnetic field lines. If the signs of toroidal magnetic field and plasma current yield the proper helicity, both measurement and calculation indicate that the efficiency is as good as on-axis NBCD because the increased fraction of trapped electrons reduces the electron shielding of the injected ion current, in contrast with electron current drive schemes where the trapping of electrons degrades the efficiency. The measured off-axis NBCD increases approximately linearly with the injection power, although a modest amount of fast ion diffusion is needed to explain an observed difference in the NBCD profile between the measurement and the calculation at high injection power.

  16. Validation of on- and off-axis neutral beam current drive against experiment in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jin Myung; Murakami, Masanori; Unterberg, Ezekial A

    2009-01-01

    Neutral beam current drive (NBCD) experiments in DIII-D using vertically shifted plasmas to move the current drive away from the axis have clearly demonstrated robust off-axis NBCD. Time-dependent measurements of magnetic field pitch angles by the motional Stark effect diagnostic are used to obtain the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux, which indicates a broad off-axis NBCD profile with a peak at about half the plasma minor radius. In most cases, the measured off-axis NBCD profile is consistent with calculations using an orbit-following Monte Carlo code for the beam ion slowing down including finite-orbit effects provided there is no large-scale magnetohydrodynamic activity such as Alfven eigenmodes modes or sawteeth. An alternative analysis method shows good agreement between the measured pitch angles and those from simulations using transport-equilibrium codes. Two-dimensional image of Doppler-shifted fast ion D-alpha light emitted by neutralized energetic ions shows clear evidence for a hollow profile of beam ion density, consistent with classical beam ion slowing down. The magnitude of off-axis NBCD is sensitive to the alignment of the beam injection relative to the helical pitch of the magnetic field lines. If the signs of toroidal magnetic field and plasma current yield the proper helicity, both measurement and calculation indicate that the efficiency is as good as on-axis NBCD because the increased fraction of trapped electrons reduces the electron shielding of the injected ion current, in contrast with electron current drive schemes where the trapping of electrons degrades the efficiency. The measured off-axis NBCD increases approximately linearly with the injection power, although a modest amount of fast ion diffusion is needed to explain an observed difference in the NBCD profile between the measurement and the calculation at high injection power.

  17. Impact of off-axis RF current drive on JET advanced scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Giruzzi, G.; Litaudon, X.; Mailloux, J.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Decker, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Peysson, Y.; Schneider, M.; JET EFDA contributors, the

    2011-07-01

    The impact of the radio-frequency heating and current drive systems on JET advanced scenarios at high density is analysed by means of the CRONOS suite of codes for integrated tokamak modelling. In particular, the performance of the proposed electron cyclotron heating and current drive system for JET is evaluated. As a first step, the code is applied in the interpretative mode to analyse two high power advanced scenario discharges of JET, in order to validate both the heating and current drive computational modules and the overall simulation procedure. Then, JET advanced scenarios are studied by predictive simulations on the basis of previous results. The simulations show that lower hybrid and electron cyclotron heating and current drive systems can together provide off-axis current in order to create and sustain steady-state scenarios on JET at high density. These results give deeper insight into the future advanced scenarios in ITER, since they establish a clear way to test some key aspects of them in present day devices such as JET.

  18. Study of lower hybrid current drive efficiency over a wide range of FTU plasma parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pericoli Ridolfini, V.; Calabrò, G.; Panaccione, L.; FTU Team; ECH Team

    2005-11-01

    The key quantities affecting the efficiency of Lower Hybrid (LH) radiofrequency waves in driving non-inductively the toroidal current in a tokamak have been recognized by means of a linear regression analysis over all the data available for the Frascati Tokamak Upgrade. The parameter space is bounded within the following ranges: line averaged plasma density 0.29\\times 10^{20} \\leq \\bar {n}_{\\rme} \\leq 1.29\\times 10^{20}\\,m^{-3} , central electron temperatures 1.1 <= Te0 <= 7.4 keV, corresponding to volume averaged temperatures 0.27 <= langTerang <= 1.2 keV, plasma current 0.3 <= Ip <= 0.7 MA, magnetic field 4 <= BT0 <= 7.2 T, with a safety factor between 4.7 <= qa <= 10.7, LH power 0.4 <= PLH <= 2.1 MW and LH parallel refraction index 1.32 <= Npar0 <= 2.42. The experimental current drive (CD) efficiency, reduced to the effective ion charge state Zeff = 1, varies for this data set within 0.12 \\leq \\eta ^{\\ast }_CD \\leq 0.34\\,A\\,W^{-1} \\times 10^{20}\\,m^{-2} . A linear regression analysis gives a reliable scaling law for \\eta ^{\\ast }_CD with a correlation coefficient close to 0.9 that points out the importance of the various quantities. The CD efficiency is a significantly increasing function of langTerang and BT, and a decreasing one of qa and PLH, while Npar and \\bar{n}_{\\rme} have limited influence. The physical reasons for the observed trend related to the variation of each parameter are recognized and discussed. The main causes are identified in the modification suffered by the Npar spectrum along the ray trajectory before the power can be absorbed by the electrons and in the interaction with the edge plasma density fluctuations. The analysis also allows putting into evidence the synergy between the LH and electron cyclotron waves, when the latter are absorbed directly on the LH generated suprathermal electron tails and produce the highest values of \\eta ^{\\ast }_CD .

  19. Lower Hybrid Heating and Current Drive on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    R. Wilson, R. Parker, M. Bitter, P.T. Bonoli, C. Fiore, R.W. Harvey, K. Hill, A.E. Hubbard, J.W. Hughes, A. Ince-Cushman, C. Kessel, J.S. Ko, O. Meneghini, C.K. Phillips, M. Porkolab, J. Rice, A.E. Schmidt, S. Scott,S. Shiraiwa, E. Valeo, G.Wallace, J.C. Wright and the Alcator C-Mod Team

    2009-11-20

    On the Alcator C-Mod tokamak, lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is being used to modify the current profile with the aim of obtaining advanced tokamak (AT) performance in plasmas with parameters similar to those that would be required on ITER. To date, power levels in excess of 1 MW at a frequency of 4.6 GHz have been coupled into a variety of plasmas. Experiments have established that LHCD on C-Mod behaves globally as predicted by theory. Bulk current drive efficiencies, n20IlhR/Plh ~ 0.25, inferred from magnetics and MSE are in line with theory. Quantitative comparisons between local measurements, MSE, ECE and hard x-ray bremsstrahlung, and theory/simulation using the GENRAY, TORIC-LH CQL3D and TSC-LSC codes have been performed. These comparisons have demonstrated the off-axis localization of the current drive, its magnitude and location dependence on the launched n|| spectrum, and the use of LHCD during the current ramp to save volt-seconds and delay the peaking of the current profile. Broadening of the x-ray emission profile during ICRF heating indicates that the current drive location can be controlled by the electron temperature, as expected. In addition, an alteration in the plasma toroidal rotation profile during LHCD has been observed with a significant rotation in the counter current direction. Notably, the rotation is accompanied by peaking of the density and temperature profiles on a current diffusion time scale inside of the half radius where the LH absorption is taking place.

  20. Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes in Tokamaks by Radio Frequency Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    La Haye, R. J.

    2007-09-28

    Resistive neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) will be the principal limit on stability and performance in the ITER standard scenario as the resulting islands break up the magnetic surfaces that confine the plasma. Drag from rotating island-induced eddy current in the resistive wall can also slow the plasma rotation, produce locking to the wall, and cause loss of high confinement H-mode and disruption. The NTMs are maintained by helical perturbations to the pressure-gradient driven 'bootstrap' current. Thus, this is a high beta instability even at the modest beta for ITER. A major line of research on NTM stabilization is the use of radio frequency (rf) current drive at the island rational surface. While large, broad current drive from lower hybrid waves has been shown to be stabilizing (COMPASS-D), most research is directed to small, narrow current drive from electron cyclotron waves (ECCD); ECCD stabilization and/or preemptive prevention is successful in ASDEX Upgrade, DIII-D and JT-60U, for example, with as little as a few percent of the total plasma current if the ECCD is kept sufficiently narrow so that the peak off-axis ECCD is comparable to the local bootstrap current.

  1. Commissioning of the long-pulse fast wave current drive antennas for DIII{endash}D

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.C.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; DeGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Cary, W.

    1996-02-01

    Two new four-element fast wave current drive antennas have been installed on DIII-D tokamak. The full power operation regime will be possible after the development and conditioning of the transmitters which are on the way. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Numerical study on the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes by electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wu, Bin; Zhu, Sizheng; Hu, Yemin

    2015-02-15

    It is well known that electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) around the o-point of magnetic island along the plasma current direction can stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) in tokamak devices. The effects of the radial misalignment between the island and the driven current, the phase misalignment, and the on-duty ratio for modulated current drive on NTM stabilization are studied numerically in this paper. A small radial misalignment is found to significantly decrease the stabilizing effect. When a sufficiently large phase misalignment occurs for the modulated ECCD, the stabilization effect is also reduced a lot. The optimal on-duty ratio of modulated ECCD to stabilize NTMs is found to be in the range of 60%–70%. A larger on-duty ratio than 50% could also mitigate the effect of phase misalignment if it is not too large. There is no benefit from modulation if the phase misalignment is larger than a threshold.

  3. Anomalous currents in a driven XXZ chain with boundary twisting at weak coupling or weak driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popkov, Vladislav; Salerno, Mario

    2013-02-01

    The spin 1/2 XXZ chain driven out of equilibrium by coupling with boundary reservoirs targeting perpendicular spin orientations in the XY plane is investigated. The existence of an anomaly in the nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) at the isotropic point Δ = 1 is demonstrated in both the weak coupling and weak driving limits. The nature of the anomaly is studied analytically by calculating exact NESSs for small system sizes, and investigating steady currents. The spin current at the points Δ =± 1 has a singularity which leads to a current discontinuity when either driving or coupling vanishes, and the current of energy develops a twin peak anomaly. The character of the singularity is shown to depend qualitatively on whether the system size is even or odd.

  4. Investigations of LHW-plasma coupling and current drive at high density related to H-mode experiments in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, Y. C.; Zhang, L.; Li, M. H.; Wei, W.; Kong, E. H.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Wang, S. L.; Xu, G. S.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Jia, H.; Cheng, M.; Yang, Y.; Liu, L.; Zhao, H. L.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Goniche, M.; Amicucci, L.; Cesario, R.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Baek, S. G.; Parker, R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Paoletti, F.; Yang, C.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; the EAST Team

    2015-09-01

    Two important issues in achieving lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) high confinement plasma in EAST are to improve lower hybrid wave (LHW)-plasma coupling and to drive the plasma current at a high density. Studies in different configurations with different directions of toroidal magnetic field (Bt) show that the density near the antenna is affected by both the radial electric field induced by plasma without a LHW (Er_plasma) in the scrape off layer (SOL), and the radial electric field induced by LHW power (Er_LH) near the grill. Investigations indicate that Er  ×  Bt in the SOL leads to a different effect of configuration on the LHW-plasma coupling and Er_LH  ×  Bt accounts for the asymmetric density behaviour in the SOL observed in the experiments, where Er is the total radial electric field in the SOL. Modelling of parametric instability (PI), collisional absorption (CA) and scattering from density fluctuations (SDF) in the edge region, performed considering the parameters of high density LHCD experiments in EAST, has shown that these mechanisms could be responsible for the low current drive (CD) efficiency at high density. Radiofrequency probe spectra, useful for documenting PI occurrence, show sidebands whose amplitude in the case of the lithiated vacuum chamber is smaller than in the case of poor lithiation, consistently with growth rates from PI modeling of the respective reference discharges. Since strong lithiation is also expected to diminish the parasitic effect on the LHCD of the remaining possible mechanisms, this appears to be a useful method for improving LHCD efficiency at a high density.

  5. Modeling of the influences of electron cyclotron current drive on neoclassical tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Long; Liu, Jinyuan; Sun, Jizhong; Sun, Guanglan; Duan, Ping

    2015-05-15

    Influences of external current drive on neoclassical tearing modes are studied numerically with a set of compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. By considering the effects of driven current parameters and its deposition timing, and by examining the relationship between driven current and the missing bootstrap current, the basic requirements of deposition width and external current density for effectively suppressing neoclassical tearing modes are investigated. When the driven current density is able to compensate the missing bootstrap current and the deposition region is comparable with the saturated island, the suppression results are notable. Meanwhile, the pre-emptive strategy of current deposition reported experimentally is also evaluated, and the results agree with the experimental ones that early current deposition can enhance suppression effectiveness greatly. In addition, the deficiencies of continuous driven current are discussed when the plasma rotation has been taken into account, and the application of modulated current drive, which is synchronized in phase with the rotating island, can restore the stabilizing role under some conditions. The favorable parameters of modulation such as duty cycle are also addressed.

  6. Investigation of runaway electrons in the current ramp-up by a fully non-inductive lower hybrid current drive on the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H. W.; Zha, X. J.; Zhong, F. C.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhou, R. J.; EAST Team

    2013-05-01

    The possibility of using a lower hybrid wave (LHW) to ramp up the plasma current (Ip) from a low level to a high enough level required for fusion burn in the EAST (experimental advanced superconducting tokamak) tokamak is examined experimentally. The focus in this paper is on investigating how the relevant plasma parameters evolve during the current ramp-up (CRU) phase driving by a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) with poloidal field (PF) coil cut-off, especially the behaviors of runaway electrons generated during the CRU phase. It is found that the intensity of runaway electron emission increases first, and then decreases gradually as the discharge goes on under conditions of PF coil cut-off before LHW was launched into plasma, PF coil cut-off at the same time as LHW was launched into plasma, as well as PF coil cut-off after LHW was launched into plasma. The relevant plasma parameters, including Hα line emission (Ha), impurity line emission (UV), soft x-ray emission and electron density n_{\\rm{e}} , increase to a high level. The loop voltage decreases from positive to negative, and then becomes zero because of the cut-off of PF coils. Also, the magnetohydrodynamic activity takes place during the CRU driving by LHCD.

  7. Rapid Current Ramp-Up by Cyclotron-Driving Electrons beyond Runaway Velocity

    SciTech Connect

    Uchida, M.; Yoshinaga, T.; Tanaka, H.; Maekawa, T.

    2010-02-12

    The toroidal current has been rapidly ramped-up after the formation of an initial closed flux surface in an electron cyclotron heated discharge in the low aspect ratio torus experiment device. A current carrying fast electron tail is developed well beyond the runaway velocity against the reverse voltage from self-induction, suggesting a forward driving force on the tail by the cyclotron absorption of high N{sub ||} electron Bernstein waves.

  8. Optimal current control strategies for surface-mounted permanent-magnet synchronous machine drives

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, P.L.; Sudhoff, S.D.; Whitcomb, C.A.

    1999-12-01

    The current waveforms for optimal excitation of surface-mounted permanent-magnet synchronous machines are set forth. Four different modes are considered, involving varying degrees of minimization of rms current and torque ripple. The optimized waveforms are markedly different than the traditional sinusoidal or rectangular excitation schemes. Inclusion of cogging torque and arbitrary degree of torque ripple minimization generalize this work over that of previous authors. An experimental drive and a detailed computer simulation verify the proposed control schemes.

  9. Analysis of non-inductive current drive from ECCD and bootstrap on T-10

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, J.; Harvey, R.W.; Luce, T.C.; Petty, C.C. ); James, R.A. ); Alikaev, V.V.; Bagdasarov, A.A.; Borshchegovsky, A.A.; Esipchuk, Y.V.; Gorelov, Y.A.; Pimenov, A.B.; Razumova, K.A.; Roi, I.N.; Trukhin, V.M.; Vasin, N.L. )

    1991-10-01

    The combination of electron cyclotron current drive and the bootstrap effect has produced completely non-inductively driven current of 75kA for up to 200 msec in the T-10 tokamak. At higher values of plasma current I{sub p} {approximately} 175kA, I{sub p} {ge} 60kA was maintained by ECCD. These experiments have been modeled with the coupled ray training and transport codes TORAY and ONETWO. Within the uncertainties in the experimental data, the calculations show that the sum of bootstrap and ECCD substantially exceeded the net programmed plasma current. 2 figs.

  10. Field oriented control design of inset rotor PMSM drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukti, Ersalina Werda; Wijanarko, Sulistyo; Muqorobin, Anwar; Rozaqi, Latif

    2017-06-01

    The main challenge of PMSM implementation in the adjustable-speed drives especially in automotive industry is to attain the optimal PMSM drive performance. Vector control is proved to be the best method in controlling synchronous machine such as PMSM. This paper objective is to design a speed control system for the manufactured inset rotor PMSM, which integrates the interleaved DC-DC boost converter, inverter, and sinusoidal pulse width modulation and fed by the battery bank DC source. The proposed speed control in this paper employs FOC vector control technique with PI controller which control both converter and inverter independently. This paper investigates the effectiveness of the proposed speed control method for driving the manufactured inset rotor PMSM. To verify the effectiveness of the designed speed control system, computer simulation is conducted. The motor performances are observed in operating condition with disturbance in form of sudden change of load torque. The simulation results show that the control method is stable but the rotor speed still affected by the given disturbance.

  11. Self field triggered superconducting fault current limiter

    DOEpatents

    Tekletsadik, Kasegn D.

    2008-02-19

    A superconducting fault current limiter array with a plurality of superconductor elements arranged in a meanding array having an even number of supconductors parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to an odd number of the plurality of superconductors, where the odd number of supconductors are parallel to each other and arranged in a plane that is parallel to the even number of the plurality of superconductors, when viewed from a top view. The even number of superconductors are coupled at the upper end to the upper end of the odd number of superconductors. A plurality of lower shunt coils each coupled to the lower end of each of the even number of superconductors and a plurality of upper shunt coils each coupled to the upper end of each of the odd number of superconductors so as to generate a generally orthoganal uniform magnetic field during quenching using only the magenetic field generated by the superconductors.

  12. Enhancing the driving field for plasmonic nanoparticles in thin-film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Santbergen, Rudi; Tan, Hairen; Zeman, Miro; Smets, Arno H M

    2014-06-30

    The scattering cross-section of a plasmonic nanoparticle is proportional to the intensity of the electric field that drives the plasmon resonance. In this work we determine the driving field pattern throughout a complete thin-film silicon solar cell. Our simulations reveal that by tuning of the thicknesses of silicon and transparent conductive oxide layers the driving field intensity experienced by an embedded plasmonic nanoparticle can be enhanced up to a factor of 14. This new insight opens the route towards more efficient plasmonic light trapping in thin-film solar cells.

  13. Current drive and current profile control studies in the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Porkolab, M.; Sugiyama, L.; Kessel, C.

    1996-02-01

    Simulation studies of noninductive current profile control have been carried out for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX).1 The predicted MHD equilibria have been analyzed for ideal ballooning stability and stability to the low-n, external kink modes. An advanced rf physics technique for off-axis current profile control has also been investigated for TPX. This scheme utilizes mode conversion and electron absorption in a D-(3He) plasma mixture.

  14. Consequences of plasma rotation for neoclassical tearing mode suppression by electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Ayten, B.; Westerhof, E.

    2012-09-15

    In the generalized Rutherford equation describing the nonlinear evolution of the width of the magnetic island associated with a neoclassical tearing mode, the effect of localized current drive is represented by a term {Delta}{sub CD}{sup Prime }. We investigate oscillations in {Delta}{sub CD}{sup Prime} originating from the rotation of the island through the electron cyclotron power deposition region and their dependence on the collisional time scale on which the driven current is generated, the rotation period, the island size, and the power deposition width. Furthermore, their consequences for the island growth or the stabilization are analyzed. This work shows that the net result of the oscillations in {Delta}{sub CD}{sup Prime} is a slight increase in the stabilizing effect of electron cyclotron current drive and consequently, a reduction in the minimum power requirement to fully suppress an island.

  15. Current profile modification during lower hybrid current drive in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; Bell, R.; Batha, S.H.

    1996-02-01

    Current profile modification with lower hybrid waves has been demonstrated in the Princeton Beta Experiment-Modification tokamak. When the n{parallel} spectrum of the launched waves was varied, local changes in the current profile were observed according to equilibria reconstructed from motional Stark effect polarimetry measurements. Changes in the central safety factor (q) were also determined to be a function of the applied radio frequency (rf) power. These results have been modeled with the Tokamak Simulation Code/Lower Hybrid Simulation Code, which is able to duplicate the general trends seen in the data.

  16. Current drive and current profile control studies in the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.; Sugiyama, L.; Kessel, C.

    1996-02-01

    Simulation studies of noninductive current profile control have been carried out for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX).{sup 1} The predicted MHD equilibria have been analyzed for ideal ballooning stability and stability to the low-{ital n}, external kink modes. An advanced rf physics technique for off-axis current profile control has also been investigated for TPX. This scheme utilizes mode conversion and electron absorption in a D-({sup 3}He) plasma mixture. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. a Circuit Model of Quantum Cascade Lasers Applicable to both Small and Large Current Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, M. K.; Webb, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, a circuit model is devised to analyze nonlinear behaviour of quantum cascade lasers. Such nonlinear behavior influences the light output when the laser is driven by currents comparable to the average (DC) current. The simplified 2-level rate equations are first improved. Next, the circuit model is obtained following the approach for interband lasers. The difference between the circuit models of quantum cascade lasers and interband lasers is pointed out. The circuit model is simpler compared to that obtained from a 3-level model. Unlike a circuit model derived earlier from the 2-level model, the present model can handle both small and large current drives.

  18. Inferring Lower Boundary Driving Conditions Using Vector Magnetic Field Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuck, Peter W.; Linton, Mark; Leake, James; MacNeice, Peter; Allred, Joel

    2012-01-01

    Low-beta coronal MHD simulations of realistic CME events require the detailed specification of the magnetic fields, velocities, densities, temperatures, etc., in the low corona. Presently, the most accurate estimates of solar vector magnetic fields are made in the high-beta photosphere. Several techniques have been developed that provide accurate estimates of the associated photospheric plasma velocities such as the Differential Affine Velocity Estimator for Vector Magnetograms and the Poloidal/Toroidal Decomposition. Nominally, these velocities are consistent with the evolution of the radial magnetic field. To evolve the tangential magnetic field radial gradients must be specified. In addition to estimating the photospheric vector magnetic and velocity fields, a further challenge involves incorporating these fields into an MHD simulation. The simulation boundary must be driven, consistent with the numerical boundary equations, with the goal of accurately reproducing the observed magnetic fields and estimated velocities at some height within the simulation. Even if this goal is achieved, many unanswered questions remain. How can the photospheric magnetic fields and velocities be propagated to the low corona through the transition region? At what cadence must we observe the photosphere to realistically simulate the corona? How do we model the magnetic fields and plasma velocities in the quiet Sun? How sensitive are the solutions to other unknowns that must be specified, such as the global solar magnetic field, and the photospheric temperature and density?

  19. Compact antenna for two-dimensional beam scan in the JT-60U electron cyclotron heating/current drive system

    SciTech Connect

    Moriyama, S.; Kajiwara, K.; Takahashi, K.; Kasugai, A.; Seki, M.; Ikeda, Y.; Fujii, T.

    2005-11-15

    A compact antenna system was designed and fabricated to enable millimeter-wave beam scanning in the toroidal and poloidal directions of the JT-60U tokamak for electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) experiments. The antenna consists of a fast movable flat mirror mounted on the tokamak vacuum vessel and a rotary focusing mirror attached at the end of the waveguide that is supported from outside the vacuum vessel. This separate support concept enables a compact structure inside a shallow port (0.68x0.54x0.2 m) that is shared with a subport for an independent diagnostic system. During a plasma shot, the flat mirror is driven by a servomotor with a 3-m-long drive shaft to reduce the influence of the high magnetic field on the motor. The focusing mirror is rotated by a simple mechanism utilizing a push rod and an air cylinder. The antenna has been operated reliably for 3 years after a small improvement to the rotary drive mechanism. It has made significant contributions to ECH and ECCD experiments, especially the current profile control in JT-60U.

  20. Effects of electron cyclotron current drive on magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Xiao, C. J.; Lin, Z. H.; Wang, K. J.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of the electron cyclotron current drive on magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas are studied using gyrokinetic simulations. By investigating the effects of different characteristics of the driven current, such as current density distribution and deposition location, the factors which can determine the suppression effect on the resistive tearing modes have been explored. It is found that an electron cyclotron wave (ECW) driven current with a larger peak value and more focused deposition region has a better stabilization effect. When the ECW-driven current is closer to the rational surface, it has a better stabilizing effect. These gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) linear simulations in the electron fluid limit of the tearing modes in the cylindrical geometry agree well with the magnetohydrodynamic codes. Furthermore, the optimal timing control of the current deposition on resistive tearing modes is demonstrated.

  1. Development of Gate and Base Drive Using SiC Junction Field Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Development of Gate and Base Drive Using SiC Junction Field Effect Transistors by Timothy E. Griffin ARL-TR-4475 May 2008...Development of Gate and Base Drive Using SiC Junction Field Effect Transistors Timothy E. Griffin Sensors and Electron Devices...Effect Transistors 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Timothy E. Griffin 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER

  2. FED-A, an advanced performance FED based on low safety factor and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Y.K.M.; Rutherford, P.H.

    1983-08-01

    The FED-A study aims to quantify the potential improvement in cost-effectiveness of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) by assuming low safety factor q (less than 2 as opposed to about 3) at the plasma edge and noninductive current drive (as opposed to only inductive current drive). The FED-A performance objectives are set to be : (1) ignition assuming International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR) plamsa confinement scaling, but still achieving a fusion power amplification Q greater than or equal to 5 when the confinement is degraded by a factor of 2; (2) neutron wall loading of about 1 MW/m/sup 2/, with 0.5 MW/m/sup 2/ as a conservative lower bound; and (3) more clearly power-reactor-like operations, such as steady state.

  3. Redundant drive current imbalance problem of the Automatic Radiator Inspection Device (ARID)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latino, Carl D.

    1992-01-01

    The Automatic Radiator Inspection Device (ARID) is a 4 Degree of Freedom (DOF) robot with redundant drive motors at each joint. The device is intended to automate the labor intensive task of space shuttle radiator inspection. For safety and redundancy, each joint is driven by two independent motor systems. Motors driving the same joint, however, draw vastly different currents. The concern was that the robot joints could be subjected to undue stress. It was the objective of this summer's project to determine the cause of this current imbalance. In addition it was to determine, in a quantitative manner, what was the cause, how serious the problem was in terms of damage or undue wear to the robot and find solutions if possible. It was concluded that most problems could be resolved with a better motor control design. This document discusses problems encountered and possible solutions.

  4. A current-source inverter fed induction motor drive system with reduced losses

    SciTech Connect

    Espinoza, J.R.; Joos, G.

    1995-12-31

    Standard low and medium induction power motor drives are based on the PWM voltage source inverter (VSI) fed from a diode rectifier. The dual topology, based on the current source inverter/rectifier structure is used in medium and high power applications. This paper addresses some of the drawbacks of this approach compared to the voltage source approach. The proposed drive features: (a) an on-line operated PWM inverter, using instantaneous output capacitor voltage control based on space vector modulation; (b) a line-synchronized PWM rectifier, with dc bus current control; (c) an additional inverter modulation index control loop, ensuring a constant inverter modulation index. The resulting advantages include: (a) ruggedness and inherent continuous regeneration capability; (b) near unity global input power factor; (c) reduced motor voltage distortion; (d) reduced dc bus inductor and switch conduction losses; (e) fast motor dynamic response; (f) elimination of motor circuit resonances. Simulated and experimental results based on a DSP implementation are given.

  5. Redundant drive current imbalance problem of the Automatic Radiator Inspection Device (ARID)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latino, Carl D.

    1992-09-01

    The Automatic Radiator Inspection Device (ARID) is a 4 Degree of Freedom (DOF) robot with redundant drive motors at each joint. The device is intended to automate the labor intensive task of space shuttle radiator inspection. For safety and redundancy, each joint is driven by two independent motor systems. Motors driving the same joint, however, draw vastly different currents. The concern was that the robot joints could be subjected to undue stress. It was the objective of this summer's project to determine the cause of this current imbalance. In addition it was to determine, in a quantitative manner, what was the cause, how serious the problem was in terms of damage or undue wear to the robot and find solutions if possible. It was concluded that most problems could be resolved with a better motor control design. This document discusses problems encountered and possible solutions.

  6. Spectral shaping and phase control of a fast-wave current drive antenna array

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.; Gardner, W.L.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; Ryan, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    The requirements for antenna design and phase control circuitry for a fast-wave current drive (FWCD) array operating in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies are considered. The design of a phase control system that can operate at arbitrary phasing over a wide range of plasma-loading and strap-coupling values is presented for a four-loop antenna array, prototypical of an array planned for the DIII-D tokamak (General Atomics, San Diego, California). The goal is to maximize the power launched with the proper polarization for current drive while maintaining external control of phase. Since it is desirable to demonstrate the feasibility of FWCD prior to ITER, a four-strap array has been designed for DIII-D to operate with the existing 2-MW transmitter at 60 MHz. 3 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Design of long-pulse fast wave current drive antennas for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.; Batchelor, D.B.; Bills, K.C.; Fogelman, C.H.; Jaeger, E.F.; Ping, J.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Stallings, D.C.; Taylor, D.J.; Yugo, J.J. )

    1994-10-15

    Two new long-pulse fast wave current drive (FWCD) antennas will be installed on DIII-D in early 1994. These antennas will increase the available FWCD power from 2 MW to 6 MW for pulse lengths of up to 2 s, and to 4 MW for up to 10 s. Power for the new antennas is from two ASDEX-type 30- to 120-MHz transmitters. When operated at 90[degree] phasing into a low-density plasma ([similar to]4[times]10[sup 19]m[sup [minus]3]) with hot electrons ([similar to]10 keV), these two new antennas are predicted to drive approximately 1 MA of plasma current.

  8. X-ray analysis of nonMaxwellian distributions (current drive)

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Stevens, J.; Stodiek, W.

    1983-06-01

    The plasma bremsstrahlung emission is utilized to determine the shape of the electron velocity distribution in situations where it deviates strongly from a Maxwellian distribution. The instrumentation used to measure the hard x-ray emission is briefly discussed. Model calculations show that polarization measurements give best results for unrelativistic tails with tail temperatures T/sub b/ < 50 keV, whereas measurements of the angular distribution of the x-ray emission based on the forward scattering of bremsstrahlung for relativistic electrons yields the best information for T/sub b/ > 50 keV. The techniques were originally developed in order to analyze runaway discharges. Recently, they found new interest because of the formation of energetic electron tails during current drive. The first x-ray results from the current drive during LH heating on PLT are discussed.

  9. Radiation Effects on Current Field Programmable Technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R.; LaBel, K.; Wang, J. J.; Cronquist, B.; Koga, R.; Penzin, S.; Swift, G.

    1997-01-01

    Manufacturers of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAS) take different technological and architectural approaches that directly affect radiation performance. Similar y technological and architectural features are used in related technologies such as programmable substrates and quick-turn application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). After analyzing current technologies and architectures and their radiation-effects implications, this paper includes extensive test data quantifying various devices total dose and single event susceptibilities, including performance degradation effects and temporary or permanent re-configuration faults. Test results will concentrate on recent technologies being used in space flight electronic systems and those being developed for use in the near term. This paper will provide the first extensive study of various configuration memories used in programmable devices. Radiation performance limits and their impacts will be discussed for each design. In addition, the interplay between device scaling, process, bias voltage, design, and architecture will be explored. Lastly, areas of ongoing research will be discussed.

  10. Radiation effects on current field programmable technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, R.; LaBel, K.; Wang, J. J.; Cronquist, B.; Koga, R.; Penzin, S.; Swift, G.

    1997-12-01

    Manufacturers of field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs) take different technological and architectural approaches that directly affect radiation performance. Similar technological and architectural features are used in related technologies such as programmable substrates and quick-turn application specific integrated circuits (ASICs). After analyzing current technologies and architectures and their radiation-effects implications, this paper includes extensive test data quantifying various devices' total dose and single event susceptibilities, including performance degradation effects and temporary or permanent re-configuration faults. Test results will concentrate on recent technologies being used in space flight electronic systems and those being developed for use in the near term. This paper will provide the first extensive study of various configuration memories used in programmable devices. Radiation performance limits and their impacts will be discussed for each design. In addition, the interplay between device scaling, process, bias voltage, design, and architecture will be explored. Lastly, areas of ongoing research will be discussed.

  11. Open problems of magnetic island control by electron cyclotron current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, D.; Lazzaro, E.; Borgogno, D.; Comisso, L.

    2016-12-01

    This paper reviews key aspects of the problem of magnetic islands control by electron cyclotron current drive in fusion devices. On the basis of the ordering of the basic spatial and time scales of the magnetic reconnection physics, we present the established results, highlighting some of the open issues posed by the small-scale structures that typically accompany the nonlinear evolution of the magnetic islands and constrain the effect of the control action.

  12. Open problems of magnetic island control by electron cyclotron current drive

    DOE PAGES

    Grasso, Daniela; Lazzaro, E.; Borgogno, D.; ...

    2016-11-17

    This study reviews key aspects of the problem of magnetic islands control by electron cyclotron current drive in fusion devices. On the basis of the ordering of the basic spatial and time scales of the magnetic reconnection physics, we present the established results, highlighting some of the open issues posed by the small-scale structures that typically accompany the nonlinear evolution of the magnetic islands and constrain the effect of the control action.

  13. Open problems of magnetic island control by electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, Daniela; Lazzaro, E.; Borgogno, D.; Comisso, L.

    2016-11-17

    This study reviews key aspects of the problem of magnetic islands control by electron cyclotron current drive in fusion devices. On the basis of the ordering of the basic spatial and time scales of the magnetic reconnection physics, we present the established results, highlighting some of the open issues posed by the small-scale structures that typically accompany the nonlinear evolution of the magnetic islands and constrain the effect of the control action.

  14. REMOTE FIELD EDDY CURRENT INSPECTION OF UNPIGGABLE PIPELINES

    SciTech Connect

    Albert Teitsma

    2004-03-01

    The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique is ideal for inspecting unpiggable pipelines because all its components can be made much smaller than the diameter of the pipe to be inspected. We reviewed the technique, and used demonstrations from prior work by others in presentations on the technique and how we plan to develop it. Coils were wound; a jig for pulling the coils through the pipe was manufactured; defects were machined in one six-inch diameter, ten-foot long pipe; and the equipment was assembled. After completing first crude pullout test to show that RFEC inspection would work, we repeated the experiment with a proper jig and got excellent results. The test showed the expected behavior, with the direct field dominating the signal to about two pipe diameters from the drive coil, and the remote field dominating for greater separations between the drive coil and the sensing coils. Response of RFEC to a typical defect was measured, as was the sensitivity to defect size. Before manufacturing defects in the pipe, we measured the effect of defect separation and concluded that defects separated by 18 inches or 1/3rd of the pipe diameter did not interfere with each other. We manufactured a set of 13 defects, and measured the RFEC signals. We found a background variation that was eventually attributed to permeability variations in the seamless pipe. We scanned all thirteen defects and got satisfactory results. The two smallest defects did not show a signal, but these were much too small to be reported in a pipeline inspection. We acquired a ten-foot seam welded pipe that has much less background variation. We are measuring the sensitivity of RFEC signals to mechanical variations between the exciter and sensing coils.

  15. Rydberg-interaction gates via adiabatic passage and phase control of driving fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaizhi; Huang, Xi-Rong; Hu, Chang-Sheng; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Zheng, Shi-Biao

    2017-08-01

    In this paper we propose two theoretical schemes for implementation of quantum phase gates by engineering the phase-sensitive dark state of two atoms subjected to Rydberg-Rydberg interaction. Combining the conventional adiabatic techniques and currently developed approaches of phase control, a feasible proposal for implementation of a geometric phase gate is presented, where the conditional phase shift (Berry phase) is achieved by adiabatically and cyclically changing the parameters of the driving fields. Here we find that the geometric phase acquired is related to the way how the relative phase is modulated. In the second scheme, the system Hamiltonian is adiabatically changed in a noncyclic manner, so that the acquired conditional phase is not a Berry phase. A detailed analysis of the experimental feasibility and the effect of decoherence is also given. The proposed schemes provide new perspectives for adiabatic manipulation of interacting Rydberg systems with tailored phase modulation.

  16. Heating and current drive requirements towards steady state operation in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, F. M.; Kessel, C. E.; Gorelenkova, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Batchelor, D. B.; Harvey, B.; Petrov, Y.

    2014-02-12

    Steady state scenarios envisaged for ITER aim at optimizing the bootstrap current, while maintaining sufficient confinement and stability to provide the necessary fusion yield. Non-inductive scenarios will need to operate with Internal Transport Barriers (ITBs) in order to reach adequate fusion gain at typical currents of 9 MA. However, the large pressure gradients associated with ITBs in regions of weak or negative magnetic shear can be conducive to ideal MHD instabilities, reducing the no-wall limit. The E × B flow shear from toroidal plasma rotation is expected to be low in ITER, with a major role in the ITB dynamics being played by magnetic geometry. Combinations of H/CD sources that maintain weakly reversed magnetic shear profiles throughout the discharge are the focus of this work. Time-dependent transport simulations indicate that, with a trade-off of the EC equatorial and upper launcher, the formation and sustainment of quasi-steady state ITBs could be demonstrated in ITER with the baseline heating configuration. However, with proper constraints from peeling-ballooning theory on the pedestal width and height, the fusion gain and the maximum non-inductive current are below the ITER target. Upgrades of the heating and current drive system in ITER, like the use of Lower Hybrid current drive, could overcome these limitations, sustaining higher non-inductive current and confinement, more expanded ITBs which are ideal MHD stable.

  17. Leakage current and commutation losses reduction in electric drives for Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miliani, El Hadj

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, leakage current and inverter losses, produced by adjustable-speed AC drive systems become one of the main interested subject for researchers on Electric Vehicle (EV) and Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) technology. The continuous advancements in solid state device engineering have considerably minimized the switching transients for power switches but the high dv/dt and high switching frequency have caused many adverse effects such as shaft voltage, bearing current, leakage current and electromagnetic interference (EMI). The major objective of this paper is to investigate and suppress of the adverse effects of a PWM inverter feeding AC motor in EV and HEV. A technique to simultaneously reduce the leakage current and the switching losses is presented in this paper. Based on a discontinuous space vector pulse width modulation (DSVPWM) and a modular switches gate resistance, inverter losses and leakage current are reduced. Algorithms are presented and implemented on a DSP controller and experimental results are presented.

  18. Potential of ion cyclotron resonance frequency current drive via fast waves in DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakov, Ye O.; Van Eester, D.; Wauters, T.; Lerche, E.; Ongena, J.

    2015-02-01

    For the continuous operation of future tokamak-reactors like DEMO, non-inductively driven toroidal plasma current is needed. Bootstrap current, due to the pressure gradient, and current driven by auxiliary heating systems are currently considered as the two main options. This paper addresses the current drive (CD) potential of the ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating system in DEMO-like plasmas. Fast wave CD scenarios are evaluated for both the standard midplane launch and an alternative case of exciting the waves from the top of the machine. Optimal ICRF frequencies and parallel wave numbers are identified to maximize the CD efficiency. Limitations of the high frequency ICRF CD operation are discussed. A simplified analytical method to estimate the fast wave CD efficiency is presented, complemented with the discussion of its dependencies on plasma parameters. The calculated CD efficiency for the ICRF system is shown to be similar to those for the negative neutral beam injection and electron cyclotron resonance heating.

  19. Phase-field approach to chemotactic driving of neutrophil morphodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najem, Sara; Grant, Martin

    2013-09-01

    To simulate the motion of neutrophils and their morphodynamics in response to chemical cues, we construct a model based on the phase-field method utilizing a description with a free-energy functional and associated dynamics which captures the basic features of the phenomenon. We additionally incorporate spatial sensing by introducing an auxiliary field which depicts the polymerization of the region of the cell facing the highest concentration of the chemical attractant.

  20. Investigation of lower hybrid wave coupling and current drive experiments at different configurations in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Qin, Y. L.; Li, W. K.; Li, M. H.; Kong, E. H.; Zhang, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Hu, H. C.; Xu, G. S.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; Group, EAST

    2011-08-01

    Using a 2 MW 2.45 GHz lower hybrid wave (LHW) system installed in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak, we have systematically carried out LHW-plasma coupling and lower hybrid current drive experiments in both divertor (double null and lower single null) and limiter plasma configuration with plasma current (Ip) ˜ 250 kA and central line averaged density (ne) ˜ 1.0-1.3 × 1019 m-3 recently. Results show that the reflection coefficient (RC) first is flat up to some distance between plasma and LHW grill, and then increases with the distance. Studies indicate that with the same plasma parameters, the best coupling is obtained in the limiter case (with plasma leaning on the inner wall), followed by the lower single null, and the one with the worst coupling is the double null configuration, explained by different magnetic connection length. The RCs in the different poloidal rows show that they have different coupling characteristics, possibly due to local magnetic connection length. Current drive efficiency has been investigated by a least squares fit with N//peak=2.1, where N//peak is the peak value of parallel refractive index of the launched wave. Results show that there is no obvious difference in the current drive efficiency between double null and lower single null cases, whereas the efficiency is somewhat small in the limiter configuration. This is in agreement with the ray tracing/Fokker-Planck code simulation by LUKE/C3PO and can be interpreted by the power spectrum up-shift factor in different plasma configurations. A transformer recharge is realized with ˜0.8 MW LHW power and the energy conversion efficiency from LHW to poloidal field energy is about 2%.

  1. Alfven resonance mode conversion in the Phaedrus-T current drive experiments: Modelling and density fluctuations measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Vukovic, M.; Harper, M.; Breun, R.; Wukitch, S.

    1995-12-31

    Current drive experiments on the Phaedrus-T tokamak performed with a low field side two-strap fast wave antenna at frequencies below {omega}{sub cH} show loop volt drops of up to 30% with strap phasing (0, {pi}/2). RF induced density fluctuations in the plasma core have also been observed with a microwave reflectometer. It is believed that they are caused by kinetic Alfven waves generated by mode conversion of fast waves at the Alfven resonance. Correlation of the observed density fluctuations with the magnitude of the {Delta}V{sub loop} suggest that the {Delta}V{sub loop} is attributable to current drive/heating due to mode converted kinetic Alfven waves. The toroidal cold plasma wave code LION is used to model the Alfven resonance mode conversion surfaces in the experiments while the cylindrical hot plasma kinetic wave code ISMENE is used to model the behavior of kinetic Alfven waves at the Alfven resonance location. Initial results obtained from limited density, magnetic field, antenna phase, and impurity scans show good agreement between the RF induced density fluctuations and the predicted behavior of the kinetic Alfven waves. Detailed comparisons between the density fluctuations and the code predictions are presented.

  2. Simulation of three-phase induction motor drives using indirect field oriented control in PSIM environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aziri, Hasif; Patakor, Fizatul Aini; Sulaiman, Marizan; Salleh, Zulhisyam

    2017-09-01

    This paper presents the simulation of three-phase induction motor drives using Indirect Field Oriented Control (IFOC) in PSIM environment. The asynchronous machine is well known about natural limitations fact of highly nonlinearity and complexity of motor model. In order to resolve these problems, the IFOC is applied to control the instantaneous electrical quantities such as torque and flux component. As FOC is controlling the stator current that represented by a vector, the torque component is aligned with d coordinate while the flux component is aligned with q coordinate. There are five levels of the incremental system are gradually built up to verify and testing the software module in the system. Indeed, all of system build levels are verified and successfully tested in PSIM environment. Moreover, the corresponding system of five build levels are simulated in PSIM environment which is user-friendly for simulation studies in order to explore the performance of speed responses based on IFOC algorithm for three-phase induction motor drives.

  3. Analysis of the efficiency of lower hybrid current drive in the FT-2 tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Lashkul, S. I.; Altukhov, A. B.; Gurchenko, A. D.; D'yachenko, V. V.; Esipov, L. A.; Kantor, M. Yu.; Kuprienko, D. V.; Irzak, M. A.; Savel'ev, A. N.; Sidorov, A. V.; Stepanov, A. Yu.; Shatalin, S. V.

    2010-09-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of the efficiency of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in the FT-2 tokamak. The dependence of the LHCD efficiency on the grill phasing {Delta}{phi} and RF oscillator power was determined experimentally in a wide range of plasma densities. It is shown that, at high plasma currents (i.e., at sufficiently high electron temperatures), current drive is suppressed when the plasma density reaches its resonance value n{sub LH} for the pumping wave frequency, rather than when parametric decay comes into play (as was observed in regimes with lower plasma currents and, accordingly, lower electron temperatures T{sub e}). In order to analyze the experimentally observed effect of LHCD and its dependence on the value and sign of the antenna phasing, the spectra of the excited LH waves, P(N{sub z}), were calculated. Simulations using the FRTC code with allowance for the P(N{sub z}) spectrum and the measured plasma parameters made it possible to calculate the value and direction of the LH-driven current, which are determined by the spectrum of the excited LH waves. It is shown that the synergetic effect caused by the interaction between different spectral components of the excited RF wave plays a decisive role in the bridging of the gap in the wave spectrum.

  4. Non-inductive current drive and transport in high beta(N) plasmas in JET

    SciTech Connect

    Voitsekhovitch, I; Alper, B.; Budny, R. V.; Buratti, P.; Challis, C D; Ferron, J.R.; Giroud, C.; Laborde, L.; Luce, T.C.; McCune, D.; Menard, J.; Murakami, Masanori; Park, Jin Myung

    2009-01-01

    A route to stationary MHD stable operation at high beta(N) has been explored at the Joint European Torus (JET) by optimizing the current ramp-up, heating start time and the waveform of neutral beam injection (NBI) power. In these scenarios the current ramp-up has been accompanied by plasma pre-heat (or the NBI has been started before the current flat-top) and NBI power up to 22 MW has been applied during the current flat-top. In the discharges considered transient total beta(N) approximate to 3.3 and stationary (during high power phase) beta(N) approximate to 3 have been achieved by applying the feedback control of beta(N) with the NBI power in configurations with monotonic or flat core safety factor profile and without an internal transport barrier (ITB). The transport and current drive in this scenario is analysed here by using the TRANSP and ASTRA codes. The interpretative analysis performed with TRANSP shows that 50-70% of current is driven non-inductively; half of this current is due to the bootstrap current which has a broad profile since an ITB was deliberately avoided. The GLF23 transport model predicts the temperature profiles within a +/- 22% discrepancy with the measurements over the explored parameter space. Predictive simulations with this model show that the E x B rotational shear plays an important role for thermal ion transport in this scenario, producing up to a 40% increase of the ion temperature. By applying transport and current drive models validated in self-consistent simulations of given reference scenarios in a wider parameter space, the requirements for fully non-inductive stationary operation at JET are estimated. It is shown that the strong stiffness of the temperature profiles predicted by the GLF23 model restricts the bootstrap current at larger heating power. In this situation full non-inductive operation without an ITB can be rather expensive strongly relying on the external non-inductive current drive sources.

  5. Electron Cyclotron / Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive Experiments using Phased-array Antenna in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Idei, H.; Zushi, H.; Hanada, K.; Nakamura, K.; Fujisawa, A.; Hasegawa, M.; Yoshida, N.; Watanebe, H.; Tokunaga, K.; Nagashima, Y.; Kawasaki, S.; Nakashima, H.; Higashijima, A.; Sakamoto, M.; Ejiri, A.; Takase, Y.; Sakaguchi, M.; Kalinnikova, E.; Ishiguro, M.; Tashima, S.

    2011-12-23

    The phased-array antenna system for Electron Cyclotron/Bernstein Wave Heating and Current Drive experiments has been developed in the QUEST. The antenna was designed to excite a pure O-mode wave in the oblique injection for the O-X-B mode conversion experiments, and its good performances were confirmed at a low power level. The plasma current (<{approx}15 kA) with an aspect ratio of 1.5 was started up and sustained by only RF injection in the low-density operations. The long pulse discharge of 10 kA was also attained for 37 s. The new density window to sustain the plasma current was observed in the high-density plasmas. The single-null divertor configuration with the high plasma current (<{approx}25 kA) was attained in the 17 s plasma sustainment.

  6. COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    PETTY,CC; LAHAYE,LA; LUCE,TC; HUMPHREYS,DA; HYATT,AW; PRATER,R; STRAIT,EJ; WADE,MR

    2003-03-01

    A271 COMPLETE SUPPRESSION OF THE M=2/N-1 NEOCLASSICAL TEARING MODE USING ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. The first suppression of the important and deleterious m=2/n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) is reported using electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to replace the ''missing'' bootstrap current in the island O-point. Experiments on the DIII-D tokamak verify the maximum shrinkage of the m=2/n=1 island occurs when the ECCD location coincides with the q = 2 surface. The DIII-D plasma control system is put into search and suppress mode to make small changes in the toroidal field to find and lock onto the optimum position, based on real time measurements of dB{sub {theta}}/dt, for complete m=2/n=1 NTM suppression by ECCD. The requirements on the ECCD for complete island suppression are well modeled by the modified Rutherford equation for the DIII-D plasma conditions.

  7. Driving toroidally asymmetric current through the tokamak scrape-off layer, Part I: Potential for ELM suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, I; Cohen, R H; Ryutov, D D

    2009-03-31

    A potential technique for suppressing edge localized magnetohydrodynamic instabilities (ELMs) is theoretically analyzed. Recent experiments have shown that externally generated resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) can stabilize ELMs by modifying the density profile [T. E. Evans, et al., Nature Phys. 2, 419 (2006); Y. Liang, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 265004 (2007)]. Driving toroidally asymmetric current internally, through the scrape-off layer (SOL) plasma itself, can also generate RMPs that are close to the required threshold for ELM control. The limiting ion saturation current densities can be achieved by producing potential differences on the order of the electron temperature. Although the threshold is uncertain in future devices, if driven coherently though the SOL, the upper limit for the resulting field would exceed the present experimental threshold. This analysis provides the tools required for estimating the magnitude of the coherent SOL current and RMP generated via toroidally asymmetric biasing of the target. Flux expansion increases the RMP near the X-point, while phase interference due to the shearing of field lines near the X-point reduces the amplitude of the effective SOL perturbation and makes the result sensitive to both toroidal mode number n and the radial coherence width of the biasing region. If the limiting current density decays rapidly enough radially, both the width and the amplitude of the current density drawn from the target will be reduced. The RMP can still exceed the present threshold at low n if the radial location and width of the biasing region are optimally chosen.

  8. Method for producing silicon thin-film transistors with enhanced forward current drive

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1998-01-01

    A method for fabricating amorphous silicon thin film transistors (TFTs) with a polycrystalline silicon surface channel region for enhanced forward current drive. The method is particularly adapted for producing top-gate silicon TFTs which have the advantages of both amorphous and polycrystalline silicon TFTs, but without problem of leakage current of polycrystalline silicon TFTs. This is accomplished by selectively crystallizing a selected region of the amorphous silicon, using a pulsed excimer laser, to create a thin polycrystalline silicon layer at the silicon/gate-insulator surface. The thus created polysilicon layer has an increased mobility compared to the amorphous silicon during forward device operation so that increased drive currents are achieved. In reverse operation the polysilicon layer is relatively thin compared to the amorphous silicon, so that the transistor exhibits the low leakage currents inherent to amorphous silicon. A device made by this method can be used, for example, as a pixel switch in an active-matrix liquid crystal display to improve display refresh rates.

  9. Method for producing silicon thin-film transistors with enhanced forward current drive

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1998-06-30

    A method is disclosed for fabricating amorphous silicon thin film transistors (TFTs) with a polycrystalline silicon surface channel region for enhanced forward current drive. The method is particularly adapted for producing top-gate silicon TFTs which have the advantages of both amorphous and polycrystalline silicon TFTs, but without problem of leakage current of polycrystalline silicon TFTs. This is accomplished by selectively crystallizing a selected region of the amorphous silicon, using a pulsed excimer laser, to create a thin polycrystalline silicon layer at the silicon/gate-insulator surface. The thus created polysilicon layer has an increased mobility compared to the amorphous silicon during forward device operation so that increased drive currents are achieved. In reverse operation the polysilicon layer is relatively thin compared to the amorphous silicon, so that the transistor exhibits the low leakage currents inherent to amorphous silicon. A device made by this method can be used, for example, as a pixel switch in an active-matrix liquid crystal display to improve display refresh rates. 1 fig.

  10. Numerical studies of electron cyclotron wave current drive on HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Song, S. D.; Gao, Q. D.; Zheng, P. W.; Du, D.

    2015-06-15

    The electron cyclotron wave (ECW) current drive (CD) for the HL-2A tokamak is investigated numerically with a new ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck code. The code is benchmarked with other well-tested linear and quasilinear codes and is then used to study the electron cyclotron current drive on the HL-2A tokamak. The wave propagation, power deposition, and driven-current profiles are presented. The effect of electron trapping is also assessed. It is found that quasilinear effects are negligible at the present ECW power levels and that when both waves are injected at an angle of 20° on the plasma equatorial plane, the CD efficiency for the HL-2A saturates at ∼0.029 × 10{sup 20 }A/W/m{sup 2} and ∼0.020 × 10{sup 20 }A/W/m{sup 2} for the 0.5 MW/68 GHz first harmonic ordinary (O1) and 1 MW/140 GHz second harmonic extraordinary (X2) modes, respectively. The effects of the plasma density, temperature, and wave-launching position on the driven current are also investigated analytically and numerically.

  11. Generation of uniform synthetic magnetic fields by split driving of an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creffield, C. E.; Sols, F.

    2014-08-01

    We describe a method to generate a synthetic gauge potential for ultracold atoms held in an optical lattice. Our approach uses a time-periodic driving potential based on quickly alternating two Hamiltonians to engineer the appropriate Aharonov-Bohm phases, and permits the simulation of a uniform tunable magnetic field. We explicitly demonstrate that our split-driving scheme reproduces the behavior of a charged quantum particle in a magnetic field over the complete range of field strengths, and obtain the Hofstadter butterfly band structure for the Floquet quasienergies.

  12. Transient and steady-state velocity of domain walls for a complete range of drive fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bourne, H. C., Jr.; Bartran, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    Approximate analytic solutions for transient and steady-state 180 deg domain wall motion in bulk magnetic material are obtained from the dynamic torque equations with a Gilbert damping term. The results for the Walker region in which the transient solution approaches the familiar Walker steady-state solution are presented in a slightly new form for completeness. An analytic solution corresponding to larger drive fields predicts an oscillatory motion with an average value which decreases with drive field for reasonable values of the damping parameter. These results agree with those obtained by a computer solution of the torque equation and those obtained with the assumption of a very large anisotropy field.

  13. Current drive with combined electron cyclotron wave and high harmonic fast wave in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. C.; Gong, X. Y.; Dong, J. Q.; Wang, J.; Zhang, N.; Zheng, P. W.; Yin, C. Y.

    2016-12-01

    The current driven by combined electron cyclotron wave (ECW) and high harmonic fast wave is investigated using the GENRAY/CQL3D package. It is shown that no significant synergetic current is found in a range of cases with a combined ECW and fast wave (FW). This result is consistent with a previous study [Harvey et al., in Proceedings of IAEA TCM on Fast Wave Current Drive in Reactor Scale Tokamaks (Synergy and Complimentarily with LHCD and ECRH), Arles, France, IAEA, Vienna, 1991]. However, a positive synergy effect does appear with the FW in the lower hybrid range of frequencies. This positive synergy effect can be explained using a picture of the electron distribution function induced by the ECW and a very high harmonic fast wave (helicon). The dependence of the synergy effect on the radial position of the power deposition, the wave power, the wave frequency, and the parallel refractive index is also analyzed, both numerically and physically.

  14. Closure of the single fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Westerhof, E. Pratt, J.

    2014-10-15

    In the presence of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the Ohm's law of single fluid magnetohydrodynamics is modified as E + v × B = η(J – J{sub EC}). This paper presents a new closure relation for the EC driven current density appearing in this modified Ohm's law. The new relation faithfully represents the nonlocal character of the EC driven current and its main origin in the Fisch-Boozer effect. The closure relation is validated on both an analytical solution of an approximated Fokker-Planck equation as well as on full bounce-averaged, quasi-linear Fokker-Planck code simulations of ECCD inside rotating magnetic islands. The new model contains the model put forward by Giruzzi et al. [Nucl. Fusion 39, 107 (1999)] in one of its limits.

  15. Thyristor-based current-fed drive with direct power control for permanent magnet-assisted synchronous reluctance generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, J.; Kwak, S.-S.; Toliyat, H. A.

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a robust and simple direct power control (DPC) of a thyristor-based current-fed drive for generator applications. A current-fed drive and permanent magnet-assisted synchronous reluctance generator (PMa-SynRG) are investigated to deliver 3 kW power using a combustion engine. The current-fed drive utilises a thyristor-based three-phase rectifier to convert generator power to DC-link power and a single-phase current-fed inverter to supply a single-phase inductive load. In addition, a new control algorithm is developed based on DPC for the current-fed drive. The DC-link voltage-based DPC is proposed in order to directly control the output power. The goal of the DPC is to maintain the DC-link voltage at the required output power operating point. The DPC has advantages such as a simple algorithm for constant speed operation. Another feature of the developed current-fed drive is its inherent capability to provide generating action by making the PMa-SynRG operates as a generator, rectifying the phase voltages by means of the three-phase rectifier and feeding the power into the load. These features make the current-fed drive a good candidate for driving any type of synchronous generators including the proposed PMa-SynRG.

  16. Advances in lower hybrid current drive technology on Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, G. M.; Shiraiwa, S.; Hillairet, J.; Preynas, M.; Beck, W.; Casey, J. A.; Doody, J.; Faust, I. C.; Fitzgerald, E.; Johnson, D. K.; Kanojia, A. D.; Koert, P.; Lau, C.; Lin, Y.; Leccacorvi, R.; MacGibbon, P.; Meneghini, O.; Murray, R.; Parker, R. R.; Terry, D. R.; Vieira, R.; Wilson, J. R.; Wukitch, S.; Zhou, L.

    2013-07-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is an attractive option for non-inductive tokamak operation due to its high current drive efficiency and ability to drive current off axis. The parameters of the Alcator C-Mod LHCD system (f0 = 4.6 GHz, Bφ ≃ 5.5 T, \\bar{n}_\\rme \\simeq 10^{20}\\,m^{-3} ) are similar to the proposed LHCD system on ITER. This paper will describe improvements in LHCD technology on C-Mod designed to increase single-pass absorption at high \\bar{n}_\\rme , extend pulse length (to >3 s), and increase power delivered to the plasma (to ∼2 MW). Modelling of lower hybrid (LH) wave propagation indicates that the observed loss of LHCD efficiency at higher \\bar{n}_\\rme can be mitigated by enhancing the single pass power absorption through use of an off mid-plane launcher. The four rows of the launcher are located above the mid-plane (with Ip and Bφ both clockwise viewing from the top down) in order to exploit the poloidal upshift of n‖ as rays propagate from the antenna into the plasma. The transmitter protection system (TPS) was redesigned to model the coolant temperature in real time and shut off the klystron beam voltage if the coolant is close to boiling. The TPS upgrade has been installed and operated on C-Mod for pulses up to 4.5 s into dummy loads and 1.0 s into the plasma. A new movable local LH launcher protection limiter was designed to reduce reflection coefficients across a wide range of launcher positions. Finally, a high power waveguide double-stub tuner is under development to provide feedback controlled load matching to reduce power reflected from the antenna under poor coupling conditions.

  17. The targeted heating and current drive applications for the ITER electron cyclotron system

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, M.; Darbos, C.; Gandini, F.; Gassmann, T.; Loarte, A.; Omori, T.; Purohit, D.; Saibene, G.; Gagliardi, M.; Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Hanson, G.; Poli, E.; Takahashi, K.

    2015-02-15

    A 24 MW Electron Cyclotron (EC) system operating at 170 GHz and 3600 s pulse length is to be installed on ITER. The EC plant shall deliver 20 MW of this power to the plasma for Heating and Current Drive (H and CD) applications. The EC system is designed for plasma initiation, central heating, current drive, current profile tailoring, and Magneto-hydrodynamic control (in particular, sawteeth and Neo-classical Tearing Mode) in the flat-top phase of the plasma. A preliminary design review was performed in 2012, which identified a need for extended application of the EC system to the plasma ramp-up, flattop, and ramp down phases of ITER plasma pulse. The various functionalities are prioritized based on those applications, which can be uniquely addressed with the EC system in contrast to other H and CD systems. An initial attempt has been developed at prioritizing the allocated H and CD applications for the three scenarios envisioned: ELMy H-mode (15 MA), Hybrid (∼12 MA), and Advanced (∼9 MA) scenarios. This leads to the finalization of the design requirements for the EC sub-systems.

  18. Effort of lower hybrid current drive experiments toward to H-mode in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Liu, L.; Zhao, L. M.; Yang, Y.; Wu, Z. G.; Feng, J. Q.; Hu, H. C.; Jia, H.; Cheng, M.; Zang, Q.; Lyu, B.; Duan, Y. M.; Lin, S. Y.; Wu, J. H.; Hillairet, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Peysson, Y.; Goniche, M.; Tuccillo, A. A.; Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Shen, B.; Gong, X. Z.; Xu, G. S.; Zhao, H. L.; Hu, L. Q.; Li, J. G.; Wan, B. N.; EAST Team

    2017-02-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) is an effective tool to achieve high confinement (H-mode) plasma in EAST. To utilize LHCD for accessing H-mode plasma, efforts have been made to improve LHW (lower hybrid wave)-plasma coupling and current drive capability at high density. Improved LHW-plasma coupling by means of local gas puffing and gas puffing from the electron side is routinely used during EAST operation with LHCD. High density experiments suggest that low recycling and high LH frequency are preferred for LHCD experiments at high density, consistent with previous results in other machines. The effect of LHCD on the current profile in EAST demonstrates that it is possible to control the plasma profile by optimizing the LHW spectrum. Repeatable H-mode plasma was obtained by LHCD and the maximum density during H-mode with the combination of 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz LH waves was up to 4.5  ×  1019 m-3.

  19. High efficiency off-axis current drive by high frequency fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, R.; Pinsker, R. I.; Moeller, C. P.; Porkolab, M.; Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-12

    Modeling work shows that current drive can be done off-axis with high efficiency, as required for FNSF and DEMO, by using very high harmonic fast waves (“helicons” or “whistlers”). The modeling indicates that plasmas with high electron beta are needed in order for the current drive to take place off-axis, making DIII-D a highly suitable test vehicle for this process. The calculations show that the driven current is not very sensitive to the launched value of n{sub ∥}, a result that can be understood from examination of the evolution of n{sub ∥} as the waves propagate in the plasma. Because of this insensitivity, relatively large values (∼3) of n{sub ∥} can be launched, thereby avoiding some of the problems with mode conversion in the boundary found in some previous experiments. Use of a traveling wave antenna provides a very narrow n{sub ∥} spectrum, which also helps avoid mode conversion.

  20. [Magnetic helicity and current drive in fusion devices]. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-02

    The research program focused on two main themes: (i) magnetic helicity and (ii) current drive by low-frequency waves. At first these themes seemed unrelated, but as time progressed, they became interwoven, and ultimately closely connected. A sub-theme is that while the MHD model of a plasma stimulates many intriguing counter-intuitive ideas for creating and sustaining magnetic confinement configurations, usually the crux of these schemes involves some sort of breakdown of MHD, i.e., involves physics which transcends MHD.

  1. Stabilization and Destabilization of Sawtooth Oscillations by Lower Hybrid Current Drive in the WT-3 Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Motomi; Maekawa, Takashi; Tanaka, Hitoshi; Ide, Shunsuke; Ogura, Kazuo; Hanada, Kazuaki; Iwamasa, Mikito; Itoh, Takehiko; Terumichi, Yasushi; Tanaka, Shigetoshi

    1988-11-01

    Sawtooth oscillations appearing in Ohmically heated (OH) plasmas are suppressed by the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in the WT-3 tokamak (R{=}65 cm, a{=}20 cm, Ip≃100 kA, \\bar{n}e{=}1-2× 1013 cm-3, qa≃4.5, and PLH≳100 kW). After the suppression, sawteeth reappear following m{=}1 oscillations in the LHCD plasmas. The latter sawteeth have a large amplitude and long period (Ts{=}2--5 msec), compared with the former one (Ts{=}0.5--1.5 msec). Furthermore, they do not accompany a precursor and crash very fast.

  2. Demonstration of effective control of fast-ion-stabilized sawteeth by electron-cyclotron current drive.

    PubMed

    Lennholm, M; Eriksson, L-G; Turco, F; Bouquey, F; Darbos, C; Dumont, R; Giruzzi, G; Jung, M; Lambert, R; Magne, R; Molina, D; Moreau, P; Rimini, F; Segui, J-L; Song, S; Traisnel, E

    2009-03-20

    In a tokamak plasma, sawtooth oscillations in the central temperature, caused by a magnetohydrodynamic instability, can be partially stabilized by fast ions. The resulting less frequent sawtooth crashes can trigger unwanted magnetohydrodynamic activity. This Letter reports on experiments showing that modest electron-cyclotron current drive power, with the deposition positioned by feedback control of the injection angle, can reliably shorten the sawtooth period in the presence of ions with energies >or=0.5 MeV. Certain surprising elements of the results are evaluated qualitatively in terms of existing theory.

  3. Demonstration of Effective Control of Fast-Ion-Stabilized Sawteeth by Electron-Cyclotron Current Drive

    SciTech Connect

    Lennholm, M.; Eriksson, L.-G.; Turco, F; Bouquey, F.; Darbos, C.; Dumont, R.; Giruzzi, G.; Jung, M.; Lambert, R.; Magne, R.; Molina, D.; Moreau, P.; Rimini, F.; Segui, J-L.; Song, S.; Traisnel, E.

    2009-03-20

    In a tokamak plasma, sawtooth oscillations in the central temperature, caused by a magnetohydrodynamic instability, can be partially stabilized by fast ions. The resulting less frequent sawtooth crashes can trigger unwanted magnetohydrodynamic activity. This Letter reports on experiments showing that modest electron-cyclotron current drive power, with the deposition positioned by feedback control of the injection angle, can reliably shorten the sawtooth period in the presence of ions with energies {>=}0.5 MeV. Certain surprising elements of the results are evaluated qualitatively in terms of existing theory.

  4. Development of a prototype T-shaped fast switching device for electron cyclotron current drive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nagashima, Koji; Honzu, Toshihiko; Saigusa, Mikio; Oda, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2016-09-01

    A T-shaped high-power switching device composed of circular corrugated waveguides with three ports and double dielectric disks made of sapphire was proposed as a fast switching device based on a new principle in electron cyclotron current drive systems. This switching device has the advantages of operating at a fixed frequency and being compact. The design of the prototype switch was obtained by numerical simulations using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The size of these components was optimized for the frequency band of 170 GHz. Low-power tests were carried out in a cross-shaped model.

  5. Effects of electron cyclotron current drive on the evolution of double tearing mode

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Guanglan Dong, Chunying; Duan, Longfang

    2015-09-15

    The effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) on the double tearing mode (DTM) in slab geometry are investigated by using two-dimensional compressible magnetohydrodynamics equations. It is found that, mainly, the double tearing mode is suppressed by the emergence of the secondary island, due to the deposition of driven current on the X-point of magnetic island at one rational surface, which forms a new non-complete symmetric magnetic topology structure (defined as a non-complete symmetric structure, NSS). The effects of driven current with different parameters (magnitude, initial time of deposition, duration time, and location of deposition) on the evolution of DTM are analyzed elaborately. The optimal magnitude or optimal deposition duration of driven current is the one which makes the duration of NSS the longest, which depends on the mutual effect between ECCD and the background plasma. Moreover, driven current introduced at the early Sweet-Parker phase has the best suppression effect; and the optimal moment also exists, depending on the duration of the NSS. Finally, the effects varied by the driven current disposition location are studied. It is verified that the favorable location of driven current is the X-point which is completely different from the result of single tearing mode.

  6. Commissioning of the long-pulse fast wave current drive antennas for DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Baity, F.W.; Barber, G.C.; Goulding, R.H.; Hoffman, D.J.; DeGrassie, J.S.; Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C.; Cary, W.

    1995-09-01

    Two new four-element fast wave current drive antennas have been installed on DIII-D. These antennas are designed for 10-s pulses at 2 MW each in the frequency range of 30 to 120 MHz. Each element comprises two poloidal segments fed in parallel in order to optimize plasma coupling at the upper end of the frequency range. The antennas are mounted on opposite sides of the vacuum vessel, in ports designated 0{degrees} and 180{degrees} after their toroidal angle. Each antenna array is fed by a single transmitter. The power is first split two ways by means of a 3-dB hybrid coupler, then each of these lines feeds a resonant loop connecting a pair of array elements. The power transfer during asymmetric phasing is shunted between resonant loops by a decoupler. The resonant loops are fitted with line stretchers so that multiple frequencies of operation are possible without reconfiguring the transmission line. Commissioning of these antennas has been underway since June 1994. Several deficiencies in the transmission line system were uncovered during initial vacuum conditioning, including problems with the transmission line insulators and with the drive rods for the variable elements. The former was solved by replacing the original alumina insulators, and the latter has been avoided during operation to date by positioning the tuners to avoid high voltage appearing on the drive rods. A modified design for the drive rods will be implemented before RF operations resume operation June 1995. New transmitters were procured from ABB for the new antennas and were installed in parallel with the antenna installation. During initial vacuum conditioning of the antenna in the 180{degree} port a fast digital oscilloscope was used to try to pinpoint the location of arcing by a time-of-flight technique and to develop an understanding of the typical arc signature in the system.

  7. Field aligned current observations in the polar cusp ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ledley, B. G.; Farthing, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vector magnetic field measurements made during a sounding rocket flight in the polar cusp ionosphere show field fluctuations in the lower F-region which are interpreted as being caused by the payload's passage through a structured field aligned current system. The field aligned currents have a characteristic horizontal scale size of one kilometer. Analysis of one large field fluctuation gives a current density of 0.0001 amp/m sq.

  8. Non-linear effects in electron cyclotron current drive applied for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayten, B.; Westerhof, E.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2014-07-01

    Due to the smallness of the volumes associated with the flux surfaces around the O-point of a magnetic island, the electron cyclotron power density applied inside the island for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) can exceed the threshold for non-linear effects as derived previously by Harvey et al (1989 Phys. Rev. Lett. 62 426). We study the non-linear electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency through bounce-averaged, quasi-linear Fokker-Planck calculations in the magnetic geometry as created by the islands. The calculations are performed for the parameters of a typical NTM stabilization experiment on ASDEX Upgrade. A particular feature of these experiments is that the rays of the EC wave beam propagate tangential to the flux surfaces in the power deposition region. The calculations show significant non-linear effects on the ECCD efficiency, when the ECCD power is increased from its experimental value of 1 MW to a larger value of 4 MW. The nonlinear effects are largest in the case of locked islands or when the magnetic island rotation period is longer than the collisional time scale. The non-linear effects result in an overall reduction of the current drive efficiency for this case with absorption of the EC power on the low-field side of the electron cyclotron resonance layer. As a consequence of the non-linear effects, also the stabilizing effect of the ECCD on the island is reduced from linear expectations.

  9. The future of biology in driving the field of hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Dewhirst, Mark W; Lee, Chen-Ting; Ashcraft, Kathleen A

    2016-01-01

    In 2011 Hanahan and Weinberg updated their well-established paper 'The hallmarks of cancer'. The rationale for that review and its predecessor was to produce a conceptual framework for future research in cancer. The original Hallmarks included: cell signalling to enhance tumour cell proliferation, acquisition of ability to evade growth suppressors, developing mechanisms to resist cell death, enabling replicative immortality, initiating angiogenesis and activating processes to enable invasion and metastasis. In the more recent paper, Hanahan and Weinberg added important new features to this composite paradigm. The new features were: (1) altered metabolism, (2) evasion of immune destruction, (3) tumour promoting inflammation, and (4) the cellular microenvironment. These four new features are the main focus of this review. Hanahan and Weinberg did not specifically include the physiological microenvironment which is dominated by hypoxia and acidosis. In this review we will consider these features in addition to the cellular and metabolic components of the microenvironment. The purpose of this review is to present a vision of emerging fields of study in hyperthermia biology over the next decade and beyond. As such, we are focusing our attention on pre-clinical studies, primarily using mice. The application of hyperthermia in human patients has been thoroughly reviewed elsewhere.

  10. Comparison of the theory and the practice of rf current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Karney, C.F.F.; Fisch, N.J.; Jobes, F.C.

    1984-10-01

    The theory of rf-driven plasma currents is applied to the lower-hybrid experiments on the PLT tokamak. Particular emphasis is placed on those experiments in which the plasma current was varying. The comparison between theory and experiment is made with respect to the efficiency with which rf energy was converted to poloidal magnetic field energy. Good agreement is found irrespective of whether the current was increasing, constant, or decreasing.

  11. ECWGB: a beam tracing 3D code for EC current drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farina, D.; Nowak, S.; Ramponi, G.

    2003-10-01

    The existing code, which describes the quasi-optical propagation of a Gaussian beam of electron cyclotron (EC) waves(S.Cirant, S.Nowak, A.Orefice, Wave Dispersion and Resonant Deposition Profiles of Electron Cyclotron Gaussian Beams in Toroidal Plasmas), J. Plasma Physics, 53, 345 (1995) and the relevant absorbed power and driven current,(S.Nowak , E. Lazzaro , G. Ramponi, Self-diffraction effects of electron cyclotron Gaussian beams on noninductively driven current in the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor tokamak), Phys. Plasmas 3, 4140 (1996) has been optimized and updated by including a new module for the computation of the EC driven current. Different theoretical approaches for the solution of the linearised neoclassical adjoint problem for the current are compared, and the validity of the different models is discussed. The present version of the ECWGB code is extensively used for calculations of EC driven current in ITER plasmas in the framework of MHD modes control and stabilization by means of localized EC current drive.

  12. The Backward Electrostatic Ion-Cyclotron Wave, Fast Wave Current Drive, and Far-Infrared Laser Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goree, John Arlin

    1985-12-01

    The first observations of several radio frequency wave phenomena in a magnetized plasma are presented. The backward branch of the electrostatic ion-cyclotron wave, which was previously described in reports of theoretical but not experimental work, was observed. This hot magnetized plasma mode propagates for frequencies above each harmonic of the ion-cyclotron frequency. A phased antenna structure, inserted into a neon plasma, excited the wave. An experimental dispersion relation produced from probe measurements of the mode agrees with the dispersion relation predicted using linear theory. Fast wave current drive in a toroidal plasma was observed for the first time. A loop antenna launched the fast Alfven wave in the range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics, (omega)/(OMEGA) = O(10). Signals from magnetic loop probes, Langmuir probes, and FIR laser scattering revealed the identity of the mode. Using a single antenna to launch the wave into a plasma containing a unidirectional electron beam, the circulating current increased according to the rf power applied. This increase in current occurs when the plasma is sufficiently dense to support fast wave propagation. Fast wave current drive may be a desirable method of sustaining the toroidal current in a fusion reactor. A fast wave antenna also excites slow wave resonance cones, i.e., lower-hybrid waves, as shown here for the first time. This process occurs in the same frequency range of high ion-cyclotron harmonics as fast wave current drive, and may represent an undesirable loss mechanism. A far-infrared laser scattering diagnostic was developed for detecting coherent radio frequency waves. In this system, an unusual detection method employing two lock-in amplifiers reduced noise from rf pickup and broadband noise. A criterion is presented for its use. A new type of cathode for producing plasmas, used in the fast wave experiment, consists of a lanthanum-hexaboride emissive element heated by a graphite resistor. Inserted

  13. Experimental and modeling uncertainties in the validation of lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, F. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Chilenski, M.; Mumgaard, R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Andre, R.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Scott, S.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu V.; Reinke, M.; Faust, I.; Granetz, R.; Hughes, J.; Rice, J.

    2016-07-28

    Our work discusses sources of uncertainty in the validation of lower hybrid wave current drive simulations against experiments, by evolving self-consistently the magnetic equilibrium and the heating and current drive profiles, calculated with a combined toroidal ray tracing code and 3D Fokker–Planck solver. The simulations indicate a complex interplay of elements, where uncertainties in the input plasma parameters, in the models and in the transport solver combine and compensate each other, at times. It is concluded that ray-tracing calculations should include a realistic representation of the density and temperature in the region between the confined plasma and the wall, which is especially important in regimes where the LH waves are weakly damped and undergo multiple reflections from the plasma boundary. Uncertainties introduced in the processing of diagnostic data as well as uncertainties introduced by model approximations are assessed. We show that, by comparing the evolution of the plasma parameters in self-consistent simulations with available data, inconsistencies can be identified and limitations in the models or in the experimental data assessed.

  14. Synergy effects during current drive by two lower-hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Youlei; Xiang, Nong; Hu, Ye Min

    2017-03-01

    In recent lower-hybrid current drive experiments on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak, two lower-hybrid waves are launched simultaneously from different locations with different phase velocities to drive the plasma current. To understand the synergy effects of the two LH waves, the analytical expression for the electron velocity distribution is obtained based on Fuchs' model [Fuchs et al., Phys. Fluids 28(12), 3619-3628 (1985)], which is in good agreement with that obtained by solving the quasi-linear equation numerically via the CQL3D code [R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, in Proceedings of IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Simulation and Modeling of Thermonuclear Plasmas, Montreal, Canada (1992)]. The synergy factor is also obtained analytically. It is found that the existence of two resonant regions may bring more resonant electrons interacting with each wave and the perpendicular dynamics can further enhance the synergy effect by increasing the effective electron temperature, which in turn increases the number of electrons in the resonance with each wave.

  15. Lower hybrid current drive experiments with different launched wave frequencies in the EAST tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M. H.; Ding, B. J.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Liu, L.; Hu, H. C.; Zhang, X. J.; Li, Y. C.; Wei, W.; Wu, Z. G.; Ma, W. D.; Yang, Y.; Feng, J. Q.; Jia, H.; Wang, X. J.; Wu, D. J.; Chen, M.; Xu, L.; Wang, J.; Lin, S. Y.; Zhang, J. Z.; Qian, J. P.; Luo, Z. P.; Zang, Q.; Han, X. F.; Zhao, H. L.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Hillairet, J.; Goniche, M.

    2016-10-01

    EAST has been equipped with two high power lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) systems with operating frequencies of 2.45 GHz and 4.6 GHz. Comparative LHCD experiments with the two different frequencies were performed in the same conditions of plasma for the first time. It was found that current drive (CD) efficiency and plasma heating effect are much better for 4.6 GHz LH waves than for the one with 2.45 GHz. High confinement mode (H-mode) discharges with 4.6 GHz LHCD as the sole auxiliary heating source have been obtained in EAST and the confinement is higher with respect to that produced previously by 2.45 GHz. A combination of ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck calculations by using the C3PO/LUKE codes was performed in order to explain the different experimental observations between the two waves. In addition, the frequency spectral broadening of the two LH wave operating frequencies was surveyed by using a radio frequency probe.

  16. Experimental and modeling uncertainties in the validation of lower hybrid current drive

    DOE PAGES

    Poli, F. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Chilenski, M.; ...

    2016-07-28

    Our work discusses sources of uncertainty in the validation of lower hybrid wave current drive simulations against experiments, by evolving self-consistently the magnetic equilibrium and the heating and current drive profiles, calculated with a combined toroidal ray tracing code and 3D Fokker–Planck solver. The simulations indicate a complex interplay of elements, where uncertainties in the input plasma parameters, in the models and in the transport solver combine and compensate each other, at times. It is concluded that ray-tracing calculations should include a realistic representation of the density and temperature in the region between the confined plasma and the wall, whichmore » is especially important in regimes where the LH waves are weakly damped and undergo multiple reflections from the plasma boundary. Uncertainties introduced in the processing of diagnostic data as well as uncertainties introduced by model approximations are assessed. We show that, by comparing the evolution of the plasma parameters in self-consistent simulations with available data, inconsistencies can be identified and limitations in the models or in the experimental data assessed.« less

  17. Experimental and modeling uncertainties in the validation of lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Poli, F. M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Chilenski, M.; Mumgaard, R.; Shiraiwa, S.; Wallace, G. M.; Andre, R.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Scott, S.; Wilson, J. R.; Harvey, R. W.; Petrov, Yu V.; Reinke, M.; Faust, I.; Granetz, R.; Hughes, J.; Rice, J.

    2016-07-28

    Our work discusses sources of uncertainty in the validation of lower hybrid wave current drive simulations against experiments, by evolving self-consistently the magnetic equilibrium and the heating and current drive profiles, calculated with a combined toroidal ray tracing code and 3D Fokker–Planck solver. The simulations indicate a complex interplay of elements, where uncertainties in the input plasma parameters, in the models and in the transport solver combine and compensate each other, at times. It is concluded that ray-tracing calculations should include a realistic representation of the density and temperature in the region between the confined plasma and the wall, which is especially important in regimes where the LH waves are weakly damped and undergo multiple reflections from the plasma boundary. Uncertainties introduced in the processing of diagnostic data as well as uncertainties introduced by model approximations are assessed. We show that, by comparing the evolution of the plasma parameters in self-consistent simulations with available data, inconsistencies can be identified and limitations in the models or in the experimental data assessed.

  18. Review of tokamak experiments on direct electron heating and current drive with fast waves

    SciTech Connect

    Pinsker, R.I.

    1993-12-01

    Results from tokamak experiments on direct electron interaction with the compressional Alfven wave ({open_quote}fast wave{close_quote}) are reviewed. Experiments aimed at electron heating as well as those in which fast wave electron current drive was investigated are discussed. A distinction is drawn between experiments employing the lower hybrid range of frequencies, where both the lower hybrid wave ({open_quote}slow wave{close_quote}) and the fast wave can propagate in much of the plasma, and those experiments using the fast wave in the range of moderate to high ion cyclotron harmonics, where only the fast wave can penetrate to the plasma core. Most of the early tokamak experiments were in the lower hybrid frequency regime, and the observed electron interaction appeared to be very similar to that obtained with the slow wave at the same frequency. In particular, electron interaction with the fast wave was observed only below a density limit nearly the same as the well known slow wave density limit. In the more recent lower frequency fast wave experiments, electron interaction (heating and current drive) is observed at the center of the discharge, where slow waves are not present.

  19. Impact of heating and current drive mix on the ITER hybrid scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Citrin, J.; Artaud, J. F.; Garcia, J.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Imbeaux, F.

    2010-11-01

    Hybrid scenario performance in ITER is studied with the CRONOS integrated modelling suite, using the GLF23 anomalous transport model for heat transport prediction. GLF23 predicted core confinement is optimized through tailoring the q-profile shape by a careful choice of current drive actuators, affecting the transport due to the predicted dependence of the turbulence level on the absolute q-profile values and magnetic shear. A range of various heating and current drive choices are examined, as are different assumptions on the pedestal height. The optimum q-profile shape is predicted to be one that maximizes the ratio of s/q throughout the bulk of the plasma volume. Optimizing the confinement allows a minimization of the plasma density required in order to achieve a defined target fusion power of 350 MW. A lower density then allows a lower total current (Ip) at the same Greenwald fraction (fG), thus aiding in maintaining q > 1 as desired in a hybrid scenario, and in minimizing the flux consumption. The best performance is achieved with a combination of NBI and ECCD (e.g. 33/37 MW NBI/ECCD for a scenario with a pedestal height of 4 keV). The q-profile shape and plasma confinement properties are shown to be highly sensitive to the positioning of the ECCD deposition. Comparisons with the lower performing cases where some or all of the ECCD power is replaced with LHCD or ICRH are shown (e.g. 33/20/17 MW NBI/ECCD/LHCD or NBI/ECCD/ICRH). The inclusion of LHCD reduces confinement due to deleterious shaping of the q-profile, and the inclusion of ICRH, particularly in a stiff model, does not lead to significantly increased fusion power and furthermore does not contribute to the non-inductive current fraction. For the optimum NBI/ECCD current drive mix, the predictions show that a satisfactory ITER hybrid scenario (Pfus ~ 350 MW, Q >= 5, qmin close to 1) may be achieved with Tped >= 4 keV. In addition, predicted performance sensitivity analysis was carried out for several

  20. Ion cyclotron and lower hybrid arrays applicable to current drive in fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bosia, G.; Ragona, R.; Helou, W.; Goniche, M.; Hillaret, J.

    2014-02-12

    This paper presents concepts for Ion Cyclotron and Lower Hybrid Current Drive arrays applicable to fusion reactors and based on periodically loaded line power division. It is shown that, in large arrays, such as the ones proposed for fusion reactor applications, these schemes can offer, in principle, a number of practical advantages, compared with currently adopted ones, such as in-blanket operation at significantly reduced power density, lay out suitable for water cooling, single ended or balanced power feed, simple and load independent impedance matching In addition, a remote and accurate real time measurement of the complex impedance of all array elements as well as detection, location, and measurement of the complex admittance of a single arc occurring anywhere in the structure is possible.

  1. Plasma Sheet Response to the Ionosphere's Demand for Field-Aligned Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coroniti, F. V.; Pritchett, P. L.

    2007-12-01

    Magnetospheric convection electric fields and plasma stresses are transmitted to the ionosphere by Alfvén wave electric fields and field-aligned currents (FACs). The closure of the FACs by ionospheric Hall and Pedersen currents drives the ionospheric convection system. However, the ionospheric system does not necessarily mesh smoothly with the magnetospheric drivers, and the magnetosphere must respond by altering its convection and plasma stress configuration, thereby creating self-consistent closure paths for the complete coupled system of currents and electric potentials. Three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma kinetic simulations are used to determine the plasma sheet response to various current systems imposed as boundary conditions at the near-Earth boundary. These systems consist of separate downward and upward tubes of FAC and a substorm current wedge configuration. The results demonstrate that the creation of closure paths for ionospheric FACs can result in large configuration changes within the near-Earth plasma sheet. The plasma sheet is forced to establish polarization electric fields that locally increase the cross-tail current by producing a duskward Hall electron current; this results in the formation of thin (in z), spatially localized (in y) electron-dominated Hall current sheets. The observed complex magnetic field configuration with opposite polarity Bz fields in close proximity separated by electron scale thin current sheets is reminiscent of the turbulent magnetic fields that are observed within the near-Earth current disruption region at substorm breakup [ Lui et al., 1988, 1992].

  2. Variational full wave calculation of fast wave current drive in DIII-D using the ALCYON code

    SciTech Connect

    Becoulet, A.; Moreau, D.

    1992-04-01

    Initial fast wave current drive simulations performed with the ALCYON code for the 60 MHz DIII-D experiment are presented. Two typical shots of the 1991 summer campaign were selected with magnetic field intensities of 1 and 2 teslas respectively. The results for the wave electromagnetic field in the plasma chamber are displayed. They exhibit a strong enrichment of the poloidal mode number m-spectrum which leads to the upshift of the parallel wavenumber, {kappa}{perpendicular}, and to the wave absorption. The m-spectrum is bounded when the local poloidal wavenumber reaches the Alfven wavenumber and the {kappa}{perpendicular} upshifts do not destroy the wave directionality. Linear estimations of the driven current are made. The current density profiles are found to be peaked and we find that about 88 kA can be driven in the 1 tesla/1.7 keV phase with 1.7 MW coupled to the electrons. In the 2 tesla/3.4 keV case, 47 kA are driven with a total power of 1.5 MW, 44% of which are absorbed on the hydrogen minority, through the second harmonic ion cyclotron resonance. The global efficiency is then 0.18 {times} 10{sup 19} A m{sup {minus}2}W{sup {minus}1} if one considers only the effective power going to the electrons.

  3. Physiological responses related to moderate mental load during car driving in field conditions.

    PubMed

    Wiberg, Henrik; Nilsson, Emma; Lindén, Per; Svanberg, Bo; Poom, Leo

    2015-05-01

    We measured physiological variables on nine car drivers to capture moderate magnitudes of mental load (ML) during driving in prolonged and repeated city and highway field conditions. Ecological validity was optimized by avoiding any artificial interference to manipulate drivers ML, drivers were alone in the car, they were free to choose their paths to the target, and the repeated drives familiarized drivers to the procedure. Our aim was to investigate if driver's physiological variables can be reliably measured and used as predictors of moderate individual levels of ML in naturally occurring unpredictably changing field conditions. Variables investigated were: heart-rate, skin conductance level, breath duration, blink frequency, blink duration, and eye fixation related potentials. After the drives, with support from video uptakes, a self-rating and a score made by external raters were used to distinguish moderately high and low ML segments. Variability was high but aggregated data could distinguish city from highway drives. Multivariate models could successfully classify high and low ML within highway and city drives using physiological variables as input. In summary, physiological variables have a potential to be used as indicators of moderate ML in unpredictably changing field conditions and to advance the evaluation and development of new active safety systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Useful field of view predicts driving in the presence of distracters.

    PubMed

    Wood, Joanne M; Chaparro, Alex; Lacherez, Philippe; Hickson, Louise

    2012-04-01

    The Useful Field of View (UFOV) test has been shown to be highly effective in predicting crash risk among older adults. An important question which we examined in this study is whether this association is due to the ability of the UFOV to predict difficulties in attention-demanding driving situations that involve either visual or auditory distracters. Participants included 92 community-living adults (mean age 73.6 ± 5.4 years; range 65-88 years) who completed all three subtests of the UFOV involving assessment of visual processing speed (subtest 1), divided attention (subtest 2), and selective attention (subtest 3); driving safety risk was also classified using the UFOV scoring system. Driving performance was assessed separately on a closed-road circuit while driving under three conditions: no distracters, visual distracters, and auditory distracters. Driving outcome measures included road sign recognition, hazard detection, gap perception, time to complete the course, and performance on the distracter tasks. Those rated as safe on the UFOV (safety rating categories 1 and 2), as well as those responding faster than the recommended cut-off on the selective attention subtest (350 msec), performed significantly better in terms of overall driving performance and also experienced less interference from distracters. Of the three UFOV subtests, the selective attention subtest best predicted overall driving performance in the presence of distracters. Older adults who were rated as higher risk on the UFOV, particularly on the selective attention subtest, demonstrated poorest driving performance in the presence of distracters. This finding suggests that the selective attention subtest of the UFOV may be differentially more effective in predicting driving difficulties in situations of divided attention which are commonly associated with crashes.

  5. Field Theoretic Investigations in Current Algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackiw, Roman

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Canonical and Space-Time Constraints in Current Algebra * Canonical Theory of Currents * Space-Time Constraints on Commutators * Space-Time Constraints on Green's Functions * Space-Time Constraints on Ward Identities * Schwinger Terms * Discussion * The Bjorken-Johnson-Low Limit * The π 0 → 2γ Problem * Preliminaries * Sutherland-Veltman Theorem * Model Calculation * Anomalous Ward Identity * Anomalous Commutators * Anomalous Divergence of Axial Current * Discussion * Electroproduction Sum Rules * Preliminaries * Derivation of Sum Rules, Naive Method * Derivation of Sum Rules, Dispersive Method * Model Calculation * Anomalous Commutators * Discussion * Discussion of Anomalies in Current Algebra * Miscellaneous Anomalies * Non-Perturbative Arguments for Anomalies * Models without Anomalies * Discussion * Approximate Scale Symmetry * Introduction * Canonical Theory of Scale and Conformal Transformations * Ward Identities and Trace Identities * False Theorems * True Theorems * EXERCISES * SOLUTIONS

  6. Calibrated Faraday current and magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neyer, B. T.; Chang, J.; Lockwood, G. J.; Ruggles, L. E.

    A calibrated optical fiber Faraday rotation current sensor is developed. This sensor has a gigahertz response, is immune to electromagnetic interference, and is constructed entirely of dielectric material. All of these advantages make the sensor ideal for pulsed power measurements.

  7. Role of ambient magnetic field in driving the eruption of an arched laboratory magnetoplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Shreekrishna; Gekelman, Walter

    2014-06-01

    Eruptions of arched magnetoplasma structures cover a wide spatiotemporal scale on the Sun and drive energetic phenomena such as coronal mass ejections. Due to presence of an electrical-current and associated twist in the magnetic-field, the term “arched magnetic flux rope” (AMFR) is used for these structures. Contemporary models of solar eruptions predict that solar AMFRs are confined for relatively long duration (days to weeks) by ambient magnetic fields (known as strapping field) before their sudden eruption. The structure of the ambient-magnetic-field plays an important role in the evolution of the confined and erupting solar AMFRs. In a laboratory plasma experiment, the interaction between an AMFR and its ambient magnetic field has been investigated. The AMFR (plasma β ≈ 10-3, Lundquist number ≈102-105, AMFR radius/ion-gyroradius ≈ 20, B ≈ 1000 G at footpoints) was produced using a LaB6 plasma source in an ambient magnetoplasma (B ≈ 0 - 100 G). The ambient magnetic field was oriented normal to the symmetry plane of the AMFR. The experiment runs continuously and generates reproducible AMFR eruptions with a period of 2 s. Hence, the plasma parameters were recorded with a good resolution (spatial-resolution/AMFR-length ≈ 10-2 - 10-3, temporal-resolution/eruption-time ≈ 10-3) using computer-controlled movable probes. A fast-CCD camera was utilized to capture the evolution of the AMFR. The pre-eruption phase of the AMFR remained quiescent for ≈ 100 Alfven transit times and the camera images evinced its persistent appearance. In contrast, the post-eruption phase of the AMFR was observed to be associated with significant changes in its magnetic topology. Our initial results suggest that linkage of the magnetic-field of the AMFR with the ambient magnetoplasma (which is ignored in the models of solar eruptions) plays the most important role in the ejection of a large flux rope from the leading edge of the AMFR. Implications of these results to

  8. Current Status of the Polyamine Research Field

    PubMed Central

    Pegg, Anthony E.; Casero, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the polyamine field and introduces the 32 other chapters that make up this volume. These chapters provide a wide range of methods, advice, and background relevant to studies of the function of polyamines, the regulation of their content, their role in disease, and the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting polyamine content and function. The methodology provided in this new volume will enable laboratories already working in this area to expand their experimental techniques and facilitate the entry of additional workers into this rapidly expanding field. PMID:21318864

  9. Current status of the polyamine research field.

    PubMed

    Pegg, Anthony E; Casero, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the polyamine field and introduces the 32 other chapters that make up this volume. These chapters provide a wide range of methods, advice, and background relevant to studies of the function of polyamines, the regulation of their content, their role in disease, and the therapeutic potential of drugs targeting polyamine content and function. The methodology provided in this new volume will enable laboratories already working in this area to expand their experimental techniques and facilitate the entry of additional workers into this rapidly expanding field.

  10. Dynamics of Dirac strings and monopolelike excitations in chiral magnets under a current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Shi -Zeng; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-02-10

    Skyrmion lines in metallic chiral magnets carry an emergent magnetic field experienced by the conduction electrons. The inflow and outflow of this field across a closed surface is not necessarily equal, thus it allows for the existence of emergent monopoles. One example is a segment of skyrmion line inside a crystal, where a monopole and antimonopole pair is connected by the emergent magnetic flux line. This is a realization of Dirac stringlike excitations. Here we study the dynamics of monopoles in chiral magnets under an electric current. We show that in the process of creation of skyrmion lines, skyrmion line segments are first created via the proliferation of monopoles and antimonopoles. Then these line segments join and span the whole system through the annihilation of monopoles. The skyrmion lines are destroyed via the proliferation of monopoles and antimonopoles at high currents, resulting in a chiral liquid phase. We also propose to create the monopoles in a controlled way by applying an inhomogeneous current to a crystal. Remarkably, an electric field component in the magnetic field direction proportional to the current squared in the low current region is induced by the motion of distorted skyrmion lines, in addition to the Hall and longitudinal voltage. As a result, the existence of monopoles can be inferred from transport or imaging measurements.

  11. Dynamics of Dirac strings and monopolelike excitations in chiral magnets under a current drive

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Shi -Zeng; Saxena, Avadh

    2016-02-10

    Skyrmion lines in metallic chiral magnets carry an emergent magnetic field experienced by the conduction electrons. The inflow and outflow of this field across a closed surface is not necessarily equal, thus it allows for the existence of emergent monopoles. One example is a segment of skyrmion line inside a crystal, where a monopole and antimonopole pair is connected by the emergent magnetic flux line. This is a realization of Dirac stringlike excitations. Here we study the dynamics of monopoles in chiral magnets under an electric current. We show that in the process of creation of skyrmion lines, skyrmion linemore » segments are first created via the proliferation of monopoles and antimonopoles. Then these line segments join and span the whole system through the annihilation of monopoles. The skyrmion lines are destroyed via the proliferation of monopoles and antimonopoles at high currents, resulting in a chiral liquid phase. We also propose to create the monopoles in a controlled way by applying an inhomogeneous current to a crystal. Remarkably, an electric field component in the magnetic field direction proportional to the current squared in the low current region is induced by the motion of distorted skyrmion lines, in addition to the Hall and longitudinal voltage. As a result, the existence of monopoles can be inferred from transport or imaging measurements.« less

  12. Requirements on localized current drive for the suppression of neoclassical tearing modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertelli, N.; De Lazzari, D.; Westerhof, E.

    2011-10-01

    A heuristic criterion for the full suppression of an NTM was formulated as ηNTM ≡ jCD,max/jBS >= 1.2 (Zohm et al 2005 J. Phys. Conf. Ser. 25 234), where jCD,max is the maximum in the driven current density profile applied to stabilize the mode and jBS is the local bootstrap current density. In this work we subject this criterion to a systematic theoretical analysis on the basis of the generalized Rutherford equation. Taking into account only the effect of jCD inside the island, a new criterion for full suppression by a minimum applied total current is obtained in the form of a maximum allowed value for the width of the driven current, wdep, combined with a required minimum for the total driven current in the form of wdepηNTM, where both limits depend on the marginal and saturated island sizes. These requirements can be relaxed when additional effects are taken into account, such as a change in the stability parameter Δ' from the current driven outside the island, power modulation, the accompanying heating inside the island or when the current drive is applied preemptively. When applied to ITER scenario 2, the requirement for full suppression of either the 3/2 or 2/1 NTM becomes wdep <~ 5 cm and wdepηNTM >~ 5 cm in agreement with (Sauter et al 2010 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 52 025002). Optimization of the ITER ECRH Upper Port Launcher design towards minimum required power for full NTM suppression requires an increase in the toroidal injection angle of the lower steering mirror of several degrees compared with its present design value, while for the upper steering mirror the present design value is close to the optimum.

  13. Mutagenic Effect on Alternating Current Magnetic Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    translation in 17 chromosomal regions . Interestingly, the same 17 regions were also the same chromosomal regions that control and regulate cell growth and...Cobos. (1992) Influence of Continuous Electromagnetic Fields on the Stage, Weight and Stature of Chick Embryo. Acta Anatomica 145:302-306. Prata, S

  14. Mutagenic Effect on Alternating Current Magnetic Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    translation in 17 chromosomal regions . Interestingly, the same 17 regions were also the same chromosomal regions that control and regulate cell growth...Cobos. (1992) Influence of Continuous Electromagnetic Fields on the Stage, Weight and Stature of Chick Embryo. Acta Anatomica 145:302-306. Prata, S

  15. Robust current control-based generalized predictive control with sliding mode disturbance compensation for PMSM drives.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xudong; Zhang, Chenghui; Li, Ke; Zhang, Qi

    2017-09-06

    This paper addresses the current control of permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) for electric drives with model uncertainties and disturbances. A generalized predictive current control method combined with sliding mode disturbance compensation is proposed to satisfy the requirement of fast response and strong robustness. Firstly, according to the generalized predictive control (GPC) theory based on the continuous time model, a predictive current control method is presented without considering the disturbance, which is convenient to be realized in the digital controller. In fact, it's difficult to derive the exact motor model and parameters in the practical system. Thus, a sliding mode disturbance compensation controller is studied to improve the adaptiveness and robustness of the control system. The designed controller attempts to combine the merits of both predictive control and sliding mode control, meanwhile, the controller parameters are easy to be adjusted. Lastly, the proposed controller is tested on an interior PMSM by simulation and experiment, and the results indicate that it has good performance in both current tracking and disturbance rejection. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutagenic Potential of Alternating Current Electric Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    did a study in Drosophila melanogaster where they found a significant increase in the rate of transcription and translation in 17 chromosomal regions ...Interestingly, the same 17 regions were also the same chromosomal regions that control and regulate cell growth and development (Wiesbrot and Uluc...Continuous Electromagnetic Fields on the Stage, Weight and Stature of Chick Embryo. Acta Anatomica 145:302-306. Prata, S. (1993) EMF Handbook., The Waite

  17. Mutagenic Potential of Direct Current Magnetic Fields.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    melanogaster where they found a significant increase in the rate of transcription and translation in 17 chromosomal regions . Interestingly, the same 17... regions were also the same chromosomal regions that control and regulate cell growth and development (Wiesbrot and Uluc, 1993). Piera and Cobos (1992) of...Influence of Continuous Electromagnetic Fields on the Stage, Weight and Stature of Chick Embryo. Acta Anatomica 145:302-306. Prata, S. (1993) EMF

  18. Field primatology of today: current ethical issues.

    PubMed

    MacKinnon, K C; Riley, E P

    2010-09-01

    As members of professional organizations such as American Society of Primatologists (ASP) and the International Primatological Society (IPS), primatologists must adhere to a set of nonhuman primate-focused principles outlined in resolutions and policy statements on, for example, the ethical treatment of nonhuman primates. Those of us that work in the field must also address issues such as the protection of primate health in the wild and the conservation of wild primate populations. Moreover, we increasingly find ourselves in complex situations where we must balance human and nonhuman primate needs and interests. The selection of commentary pieces in this edition of the American Journal of Primatology originated from presentations given in the symposium, Field Primatology of Today: Navigating the Ethical Landscape, held at the 32nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Primatologists (ASP) in September 2009. The goals of that symposium and these resulting commentary pieces are threefold: (1) to revive a discussion of key contemporary ethical issues faced by field primatologists, (2) to highlight the need for centrally placed ethical considerations in various facets of our professional lives, particularly research and teaching, and (3) to consider what a comprehensive ethical code that addresses all of these issues might look like.

  19. Low drive field amplitude for improved image resolution in magnetic particle imaging

    PubMed Central

    Croft, Laura R.; Goodwill, Patrick W.; Konkle, Justin J.; Arami, Hamed; Price, Daniel A.; Li, Ada X.; Saritas, Emine U.; Conolly, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging technology that directly detects superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. The technique has potential medical applications in angiography, cell tracking, and cancer detection. In this paper, the authors explore how nanoparticle relaxation affects image resolution. Historically, researchers have analyzed nanoparticle behavior by studying the time constant of the nanoparticle physical rotation. In contrast, in this paper, the authors focus instead on how the time constant of nanoparticle rotation affects the final image resolution, and this reveals nonobvious conclusions for tailoring MPI imaging parameters for optimal spatial resolution. Methods: The authors first extend x-space systems theory to include nanoparticle relaxation. The authors then measure the spatial resolution and relative signal levels in an MPI relaxometer and a 3D MPI imager at multiple drive field amplitudes and frequencies. Finally, these image measurements are used to estimate relaxation times and nanoparticle phase lags. Results: The authors demonstrate that spatial resolution, as measured by full-width at half-maximum, improves at lower drive field amplitudes. The authors further determine that relaxation in MPI can be approximated as a frequency-independent phase lag. These results enable the authors to accurately predict MPI resolution and sensitivity across a wide range of drive field amplitudes and frequencies. Conclusions: To balance resolution, signal-to-noise ratio, specific absorption rate, and magnetostimulation requirements, the drive field can be a low amplitude and high frequency. Continued research into how the MPI drive field affects relaxation and its adverse effects will be crucial for developing new nanoparticles tailored to the unique physics of MPI. Moreover, this theory informs researchers how to design scanning sequences to minimize relaxation-induced blurring for better spatial resolution or to exploit

  20. Status of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darbos, Caroline; Albajar, Ferran; Bonicelli, Tullio; Carannante, Giuseppe; Cavinato, Mario; Cismondi, Fabio; Denisov, Grigory; Farina, Daniela; Gagliardi, Mario; Gandini, Franco; Gassmann, Thibault; Goodman, Timothy; Hanson, Gregory; Henderson, Mark A.; Kajiwara, Ken; McElhaney, Karen; Nousiainen, Risto; Oda, Yasuhisa; Omori, Toshimichi; Oustinov, Alexander; Parmar, Darshankumar; Popov, Vladimir L.; Purohit, Dharmesh; Rao, Shambhu Laxmikanth; Rasmussen, David; Rathod, Vipal; Ronden, Dennis M. S.; Saibene, Gabriella; Sakamoto, Keishi; Sartori, Filippo; Scherer, Theo; Singh, Narinder Pal; Strauß, Dirk; Takahashi, Koji

    2016-01-01

    The electron cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive (H&CD) system developed for the ITER is made of 12 sets of high-voltage power supplies feeding 24 gyrotrons connected through 24 transmission lines (TL), to five launchers, four located in upper ports and one at the equatorial level. Nearly all procurements are in-kind, following general ITER philosophy, and will come from Europe, India, Japan, Russia and the USA. The full system is designed to couple to the plasma 20 MW among the 24 MW generated power, at the frequency of 170 GHz, for various physics applications such as plasma start-up, central H&CD and magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activity control. The design takes present day technology and extends toward high-power continuous operation, which represents a large step forward as compared to the present state of the art. The ITER EC system will be a stepping stone to future EC systems for DEMO and beyond.

  1. ITER ECH launcher options for start-up assist, bulk heating, and EC current drive experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.

    1994-03-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is proposed for providing plasma start-up, bulk heating, current drive, and other applications on the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) project. The requirements for ECH power launching systems for ITER have been investigated, and several possible configurations that have been devised are described in this report. The proposed launcher designs use oversized circular corrugated waveguides that make small penetrations through the blanket modules and radiate into the plasma. The criteria used for the design calls for minimum blanket penetration area, maximum reliability, and optimum launched beam quality. The effects of the harsh plasma edge environment on the launcher are discussed. Power generation systems, windows, and other components of the ECH systems are also investigated. The designs presented are believed to be capable of operating reliably and are relatively easy to maintain remotely.

  2. Enhancement of localized ICRF heating and current drive in TFTR D-T plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Schilling, G.; Hosea, J.C.; Majeski, R.; Rogers, J.H.; Wilson, J.R.

    1997-04-01

    Theoretical advantages have led to an increased importance of the modification and sustainment of pressure and magnetic shear profiles in plasmas. We have demonstrated electron heating and current drive in TFTR plasmas with the existing 43/63.6 MHz ICRF system, both via the fast wave and via mode conversion of the fast wave to an ion Bernstein wave. In order to achieve both on and off-axis mode conversion in a pure D-T plasma, we have changed the operating frequency of two of our transmitters and antennas to 30 MHz and improved the launched directional wave spectrum. As a second step, two new four-strap fast wave antennas have been installed, and a new four-strap direct-launch IBW antenna has been added as well. This reconfiguration and the resulting operating characteristics of the TFTR ICRF system in a variety of discharges will be presented. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. The efficiency of fast wave current drive for a weakly relativistic plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, S. C.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Karney, C. F. F.

    1994-10-01

    Current drive by fast waves (FWCD) is an important candidate for steady-state operation of tokamaks. Major experiments using this scheme are being carried out on DIII-D. There has been considerable study of the theoretical efficiency of FWCD. In Refs. 4 and 5, the nonrelativistic efficiency of FWCD at arbitrary frequencies was studied. For DIII-D parameters, the results can be considerably different from the Landau and Alfvén limits. At the high temperatures of reactors and DIII-D upgrade, relativistic effects become important. In this paper, the relativistic FWCD efficiency for arbitrary frequencies is studied. Assuming that the plasma is weakly relativistic, i.e., Te/mc2 is small, an analytic expression for FWCD is obtained for high resonant energies (uph/uTe≫1). Comparisons with the results from a numerical code ADJ and the nonrelativistic results shall be made and analytical fits in the whole range of velocities shall be presented.

  4. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Studies of NSTX H-Mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G. Taylor, P.T. Bonoli, D.L. Green, R.W. Harvey, J.C. Hosea, E.F. Jaeger, B.P. LeBlanc, R. Maingi, C.K. Phillips, P.M. Ryan, E.J. Valeo, J.R. Wilson, J.C. Wright, and the NSTX Team

    2011-06-08

    30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive are being developed to assist fully non-inductive plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up in NSTX. The initial approach to achieving this goal has been to heat I{sub p} = 300 kA inductive plasmas with current drive antenna phasing in order to generate an HHFW H-mode with significant bootstrap and RF-driven current. Recent experiments, using only 1.4 MW of RF power (P{sub RF}), achieved a noninductive current fraction, f{sub NI} {approx} 0.65. Improved antenna conditioning resulted in the generation of I{sub p} = 650 kA HHFW H-mode plasmas, with f{sub NI} {approx} 0.35, when P{sub RF} {ge} 2.5 MW. These plasmas have little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity during HHFW heating, a substantial increase in stored energy and a sustained central electron temperature of 5-6 keV. Another focus of NSTX HHFW research is to heat an H-mode generated by 90 keV neutral beam injection (NBI). Improved HHFW coupling to NBI-generated H-modes has resulted in a broad increase in electron temperature profile when HHFW heating is applied. Analysis of a closely matched pair of NBI and HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas revealed that about half of the antenna power is deposited inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Of the power damped inside the LCFS about two-thirds is absorbed directly by electrons and one-third accelerates fast-ions that are mostly promptly lost from the plasma. At longer toroidal launch wavelengths, HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas can have an RF power flow to the divertor outside the LCFS that significantly reduces RF power deposition to the core. ELMs can also reduce RF power deposition to the core and increase power deposition to the edge. Recent full wave modeling of NSTX HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas, with the model extended to the vessel wall, predicts a coaxial standing mode between the LCFS and the wall that can have large amplitudes at longer launch wavelengths. These simulation results qualitatively agree with HHFW

  5. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Studies of NSTX H-Mode Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, G.; Bonoli, P. T.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.; Hosea, J. C.; Jaeger, E. F.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Maingi, R.; Phillips, C. K.; Ryan, P. M.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive are being developed to assist fully non-inductive plasma current (Ip) ramp-up in NSTX. The initial approach to achieving this goal has been to heat Ip = 300 kA inductive plasmas with current drive antenna phasing in order to generate an HHFW H-mode with significant bootstrap and RF-driven current. Recent experiments, using only 1.4 MW of RF power (PRF), achieved a non-inductive current fraction, fNI˜0.65. Improved antenna conditioning resulted in the generation of Ip = 650 kA HHFW H-mode plasmas, with fNI˜0.35, when PRF≥2.5 MW. These plasmas have little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity during HHFW heating, a substantial increase in stored energy and a sustained central electron temperature of 5-6 keV. Another focus of NSTX HHFW research is to heat an H-mode generated by 90 keV neutral beam injection (NBI). Improved HHFW coupling to NBI-generated H-modes has resulted in a broad increase in electron temperature profile when HHFW heating is applied. Analysis of a closely matched pair of NBI and HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas revealed that about half of the antenna power is deposited inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Of the power damped inside the LCFS about two-thirds is absorbed directly by electrons and one-third accelerates fast-ions that are mostly promptly lost from the plasma. At longer toroidal launch wavelengths, HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas can have an RF power flow to the divertor outside the LCFS that significantly reduces RF power deposition to the core. ELMs can also reduce RF power deposition to the core and increase power deposition to the edge. Recent full wave modeling of NSTX HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas, with the model extended to the vessel wall, predicts a coaxial standing mode between the LCFS and the wall that can have large amplitudes at longer launch wavelengths. These simulation results qualitatively agree with HHFW+NBI H-mode data that show decreasing core RF heating

  6. HHFW Heating and Current Drive Studies of NSTX H-Mode Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hosea, J. C.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Bonoli, P. T.; Wright, J. C.; Green, D. L.; Jaeger, E. F.; Maingi, R.; Ryan, P. M.; Harvey, R. W.

    2011-12-23

    30 MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive are being developed to assist fully non-inductive plasma current (I{sub p}) ramp-up in NSTX. The initial approach to achieving this goal has been to heat I{sub p} = 300 kA inductive plasmas with current drive antenna phasing in order to generate an HHFW H-mode with significant bootstrap and RF-driven current. Recent experiments, using only 1.4 MW of RF power (P{sub RF}), achieved a non-inductive current fraction, f{sub NI}{approx}0.65. Improved antenna conditioning resulted in the generation of I{sub p} = 650 kA HHFW H-mode plasmas, with f{sub NI}{approx}0.35, when P{sub RF}{>=}2.5 MW. These plasmas have little or no edge localized mode (ELM) activity during HHFW heating, a substantial increase in stored energy and a sustained central electron temperature of 5-6 keV. Another focus of NSTX HHFW research is to heat an H-mode generated by 90 keV neutral beam injection (NBI). Improved HHFW coupling to NBI-generated H-modes has resulted in a broad increase in electron temperature profile when HHFW heating is applied. Analysis of a closely matched pair of NBI and HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas revealed that about half of the antenna power is deposited inside the last closed flux surface (LCFS). Of the power damped inside the LCFS about two-thirds is absorbed directly by electrons and one-third accelerates fast-ions that are mostly promptly lost from the plasma. At longer toroidal launch wavelengths, HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas can have an RF power flow to the divertor outside the LCFS that significantly reduces RF power deposition to the core. ELMs can also reduce RF power deposition to the core and increase power deposition to the edge. Recent full wave modeling of NSTX HHFW+NBI H-mode plasmas, with the model extended to the vessel wall, predicts a coaxial standing mode between the LCFS and the wall that can have large amplitudes at longer launch wavelengths. These simulation results qualitatively agree with HHFW

  7. Analysis of field-oriented controlled induction motor drives under sensor faults and an overview of sensorless schemes.

    PubMed

    Arun Dominic, D; Chelliah, Thanga Raj

    2014-09-01

    To obtain high dynamic performance on induction motor drives (IMD), variable voltage and variable frequency operation has to be performed by measuring speed of rotation and stator currents through sensors and fed back them to the controllers. When the sensors are undergone a fault, the stability of control system, may be designed for an industrial process, is disturbed. This paper studies the negative effects on a 12.5 hp induction motor drives when the field oriented control system is subjected to sensor faults. To illustrate the importance of this study mine hoist load diagram is considered as shaft load of the tested machine. The methods to recover the system from sensor faults are discussed. In addition, the various speed sensorless schemes are reviewed comprehensively. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Time-dependent simulation of lower hybrid current drive in JET discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbato, E.; Saveliev, A.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Kirov, K.; Goniche, M.

    2014-12-01

    In this paper we report on simulations of lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) in JET closely comparing the simulation results to the available experimental data. The simulations are performed all over the relevant discharge duration by ASTRA. The LHCD module, FRTC, is based on a standard ray-tracing Fokker-Planck model. The purpose of the paper is to understand the present LHCD experiments issues within the limit of the LH linear propagation model. These issues are: (i) analysis of non-resonant collisional absorption (NRCA) of LH wave power in the main JET plasma during the current ramp-up phase and in steady-state (SS) scenarios, (ii) the lack of penetration of LHCD in high-density plasmas, (iii) current diffusion during the LHCD-assisted current ramp-up and (iv) assessment of the current profile alignment in JET SS discharges in the presence of LHCD. In recent experiments from FTU, JET and C_MOD, LHCD effects at high plasma density are either completely absent or less than expected. It has been shown, both in FTU and ALCATOR-C_MOD, that NRCA of LH wave power can be responsible for that. Indeed NRCA is estimated to be small in JET plasmas, at least in the main heating phase and therefore it is not expected to be responsible for the lack of penetration of LHW in high-density JET plasmas, however here we show for the first time that it can be effective during the early phase of the current ramp-up, when the plasma is still collisional. On the contrary it is suggested that the reduction of LHCD effects at high density may be attributed at least partially to the loss of accessibility of the n‖ spectrum effectively launched into the plasma. Furthermore it is shown that the linear propagation model provide very broad and stable LH current density profiles, with no need to include any non-linear spectral broadening. The current diffusion during the LHCD-assisted current ramp-up is investigated and a careful comparison between the simulated q-profiles and the measured

  9. Sensorless Sinusoidal Wave Drive for Control of Power Factor of PM Motor by Detection of Inverter Bus Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushita, Motoshi; Kameyama, Hiroyuki; Ikeboh, Yasuhiro; Morimoto, Shigeo

    Permanent-magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs) with a sinusoidal back EMF are widely used in domestic appliances for reduction of acoustic noises and energy consumption. PMSMs are generally controlled with a sinusoidal waveform current. Typically, PMSMs are controlled by vector-controlled sinusoidal drives, which require powerful computational resources. Hence, simpler sinusoidal wave drives such as V/f drives, which control the phase difference between the voltage and the current (power factor of PM Motor) have been proposed for controlling PMSMs. This paper presents a new method that does not require current sensors but can be used to estimate the phase difference by sampling the voltage of the shunt register, which is used to detect the over current supplied to the inverter. This method enables detection of current and accurate estimation and appropriate control of the phase difference. Using this method, we could control the phase difference and achieve high efficiency, cost reduction, and high reliability.

  10. Spectral broadening of parametric instability in lower hybrid current drive at a high density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesario, R.; Amicucci, L.; Cardinali, A.; Castaldo, C.; Marinucci, M.; Napoli, F.; Paoletti, F.; De Arcangelis, D.; Ferrari, M.; Galli, A.; Gallo, G.; Pullara, E.; Schettini, G.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The important goal of adding to the bootstrap current a more flexible tool, capable of producing and controlling steady-state profiles with a high fraction of non-inductive plasma current, could be reached using the lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) effect. Experiments performed on FTU (Frascati Tokamak Upgrade) demonstrated that LHCD can occur at reactor-graded high plasma density, provided that the parametric instability (PI)-produced broadening of the spectrum launched by the antenna is reduced under proper operating conditions, capable of producing relatively high temperature in the outer region of plasma column. This condition was produced by operations that reduce particle recycling from the vessel walls, and enhance the gas fuelling in the core by means of fast pellet. New results of FTU experiments are presented documenting that the useful effect of temperature at the periphery, which reduces the LH spectral broadening and enhances the LH-induced hard-x ray emission level, occurs in a broader range of plasma parameters than in previous work. Modelling results show that a further tool for helping LHCD at a high density would be provided by electron cyclotron resonant heating of plasma periphery. New information is provided on the modelling, able determining frequencies, growth rates and LH spectral broadening produced by PI, which allowed assessing the new method for enabling LHCD at high densities. Further robustness is provided to theoretical and experimental fundaments of the method for LHCD at a high density.

  11. Design and performance of fast wave current drive systems in the ICRF

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, R.H.; Baity, R.W.; Batchelor, D.B.; Carter, M.D.; Jaeger, E.F.; Hoffman, D.J.; Ryan, P.M.; Tolliver, J.S. ); Mayberry, M.J.; Petty, C.C.; Pinsker, R.I.; Prater, R. )

    1991-01-01

    Experiments have begun on D3-D using the fast wave current drive (FWCD) phased antenna array. The array consists of four elements with slotted septa between them to reduce mutual coupling. The passive phasing/matching circuit developed for the launcher incorporates only five tuning elements and is driven by a single rf power supply. The system has successfully operated in the presence of plasma at power levels up to 1.25 MW, with {pi}/2 relative phasing, and approximately equal currents and voltages on all elements. Tuning algorithms that allow proper setting of all five elements within 1--2 shots have been developed. In addition, substantial modeling has been undertaken in support of the D3-D FWCD program. Loading calculations that take into account currents induced in the septa as well as other effects related to antenna geometry have been performed, and the results agree well with the observed data. A circuit model has been developed that, in combination with the loading calculations, allows the simulation of shot-to-shot matching for various tuning algorithms. 6 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Feasibility experiments for electron ripple injection on current drive experiment-upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Choe, W.; Ono, M.; Hwang, Y.S.; Chang, C.S.

    1998-04-01

    In search of a method to generate a radial electric field in tokamak plasmas, an experimental study has been performed to investigate the possibility of inducing radial electrical current. An external coil array has been used to create a local magnetic ripple well and the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH) has been used to trap some electrons that will then be subject to rapid vertical drifts into the plasma. Using a simplified experimental arrangement with only a toroidal magnetic field, an ECH-driven radial electrical current has been observed. The ECH-driven elecron temperature anisotropy, which is necessary for ripple trapping and electron drifts, has been determined by several different methods. The perpendicular temperature can be shown to be as large as 11 times the parallel temperature, which should yield a significant amount of ripple trapping and radial current. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  13. Current Status of Protein Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Pedro E.M.; Guvench, Olgun

    2015-01-01

    Summary The current status of classical force fields for proteins is reviewed. These include additive force fields as well as the latest developments in the Drude and AMOEBA polarizable force fields. Parametrization strategies developed specifically for the Drude force field are described and compared with the additive CHARMM36 force field. Results from molecular simulations of proteins and small peptides are summarized to illustrate the performance of the Drude and AMOEBA force fields. PMID:25330958

  14. Fault diagnosis of motor drives using stator current signal analysis based on dynamic time warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, D.; Wang, T.; Gu, F.; Ball, A. D.

    2013-01-01

    Electrical motor stator current signals have been widely used to monitor the condition of induction machines and their downstream mechanical equipment. The key technique used for current signal analysis is based on Fourier transform (FT) to extract weak fault sideband components from signals predominated with supply frequency component and its higher order harmonics. However, the FT based method has limitations such as spectral leakage and aliasing, leading to significant errors in estimating the sideband components. Therefore, this paper presents the use of dynamic time warping (DTW) to process the motor current signals for detecting and quantifying common faults in a downstream two-stage reciprocating compressor. DTW is a time domain based method and its algorithm is simple and easy to be embedded into real-time devices. In this study DTW is used to suppress the supply frequency component and highlight the sideband components based on the introduction of a reference signal which has the same frequency component as that of the supply power. Moreover, a sliding window is designed to process the raw signal using DTW frame by frame for effective calculation. Based on the proposed method, the stator current signals measured from the compressor induced with different common faults and under different loads are analysed for fault diagnosis. Results show that DTW based on residual signal analysis through the introduction of a reference signal allows the supply components to be suppressed well so that the fault related sideband components are highlighted for obtaining accurate fault detection and diagnosis results. In particular, the root mean square (RMS) values of the residual signal can indicate the differences between the healthy case and different faults under varying discharge pressures. It provides an effective and easy approach to the analysis of motor current signals for better fault diagnosis of the downstream mechanical equipment of motor drives in the time

  15. Temperature compensated current sensor using reference magnetic field

    DOEpatents

    Yakymyshyn, Christopher Paul; Brubaker, Michael Allen; Yakymyshyn, Pamela Jane

    2007-10-09

    A method is described to provide temperature compensation and self-calibration of a current sensor based on a plurality of magnetic field sensors positioned around a current carrying conductor. A reference magnetic field generated within the current sensor housing is detected by a separate but identical magnetic field sensor and is used to correct variations in the output signal due to temperature variations and aging.

  16. Field-Line Resonances in the Current Basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostaszewski, Katharina; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Nabert, Christian

    2016-04-01

    The MHD theory of the field-line resonance is of great importance for the understanding of ultra low-frequency waves in the magnetosphere. Most theoretical works concerning field-line resonance use the electric field as the basis set. In an ideal MHD plasma the field-aligned component of the electrical field vanishes because of the frozen-in theorem. However, a field-aligned current flows to maintain quasi-neutrality. This field-aligned current can only be carried by the transverse MHD Alfvèn wave and is therefore a characteristic feature of these types of waves. In this study we investigate the field-line resonance phenomenon using a three dimensional current vector space as the basis set. Using the model of the box magnetosphere of Southwood (1974) we derive an equation for the field-aligned current. This equation provides a simpler and more detailed insight into the coupling process between the fast mode and the Alfvèn mode. Furthermore we investigate the effect of the Hall current on the field-aligned current by including the Hall term in Ohm's law. It is shown that in some situations the Hall current can nullify the filed-aligned current and therefore prevent the resonance.

  17. Detecting Field-Aligned Current Signatures Using MAVEN Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanley, K.; Brain, D.; Weber, T. D.

    2016-12-01

    Currents aligned with magnetic field lines have been observed on multiple planets, including Mars, Mercury, Earth, Saturn, and Jupiter. As documented by Mars Global Surveyor, field-aligned currents occur at Mars near regions of moderate or strong crustal magnetic fields. These currents, identified by the magnetic field perturbations they cause, indicate the acceleration of charged particles toward the Martian atmosphere, which may result in atmospheric heating, ionization, and discrete aurora observed at ultraviolet wavelengths. It is likely that charged particles are removed from the atmosphere via these currents in magnetic cusp regions. At present, the locations and conditions for which field-aligned current systems can occur at Mars are not well understood. We use magnetic field measurements collected by MAVEN between December 2014 and September 2015 to investigate the incidence of low-altitude field-aligned currents on the nightside of the planet in regions of strong crustal fields. These currents have been found to cause perturbations in the magnetic field at magnitudes of 5 nT. We have automated the detection process in order to facilitate future study of field-aligned currents using MAVEN data. First, low-frequency signals caused by spacecraft motion are removed from the data, revealing short-term (1-5 seconds) perturbations. The disturbances due to field-aligned currents are recorded by finding areas where the filtered data exceeds a threshold value for multiple seconds. Current events are then mapped to the planet's surface. We report on the geographic distribution of field-aligned current signatures, as well as their distributions with respect to local time.

  18. The evolution of arguments regarding the existence of field-aligned currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    The present understanding of Birkeland (magnetically-field-aligned) currents was not obtained by a direct, logical course. The story is rather more complex. Starting at the end of the 19th century, the Norwegian scientist Kristian Birkeland laid out a compelling case, supported by both theory and experiment, for the existence of field-aligned currents that cause both the aurora and polar geomagnetic disturbances. Sydney Chapman, the British geophysicist, became the acknowledged leader and opinion maker in the field in the decades following Birkeland's death. Chapman proposed, in contradistinction to Birkeland's ideas, equivalent currents that were restricted to flow in the ionosphere with no vertical or field-aligned components. Birkeland's ideas may have faded completely if it had not been for Hannes Alfven, who became involved well after Chapman's ideas gained predominance. Alfven kept insisting that Birkeland's current system made more sense because field-aligned currents were required to drive most of the ionospheric currents. The author became personally involved when Zmuda et al. (1966) submitted to the Journal of Geophysical Research a paper reporting satellite data showing magnetic disturbances above the ionosphere that were consistent with field-aligned Birkeland currents, but which they did not interpret as being due to such currents.

  19. High Non-inductive Fraction H-mode Discharges Generated by High-harmonic Fast Wave Heating and Current Drive in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, G.; Hosea, J.; Kessel, C. E.; LeBlanc, B; Mueller, D.; Phillips, C. K.; Valeo, E. J.; Wilson, J. R.; Ryan, Philip Michael; Bonoli, P.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-01-01

    A deuterium H-mode discharge with a plasma current of 300 kA, an axial toroidal magnetic field of 0.55 T, and a calculated non-inductive plasma current fraction of 0.7 1 has been generated in the National Spherical Torus Experiment by 1.4MW of 30MHz high-harmonic fast wave (HHFW) heating and current drive. Seventy-five percent of the non-inductive current was generated inside an internal transport barrier that formed at a normalized minor radius 0.4. Three quarters of the non-inductive current was bootstrap current, and the remaining non-inductive current was generated directly by HHFW power inside a normalized minor radius 0.2. VC 2012 American Institute of Physics.

  20. Nonlinear MHD simulation of current drive by multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection in spherical torus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanki, Takashi; Nagata, Masayoshi; Kagei, Yasuhiro

    2011-10-01

    The dynamics of structures of magnetic field, current density, and plasma flow generated during multi-pulsed coaxial helicity injection in spherical torus is investigated by 3-D nonlinear MHD simulations. During the driven phase, the flux and current amplifications occur due to the merging and magnetic reconnection between the preexisting plasma in the confinement region and the ejected plasma from the gun region involving the n = 1 helical kink distortion of the central open flux column (COFC). Interestingly, the diamagnetic poloidal flow which tends toward the gun region is then observed due to the steep pressure gradients of the COFC generated by ohmic heating through an injection current winding around the inboard field lines, resulting in the formation of the strong poloidal flow shear at the interface between the COFC and the core region. This result is consistent with the flow shear observed in the HIST. During the decay phase, the configuration approaches the axisymmetric MHD equilibrium state without flow because of the dissipation of magnetic fluctuation energy to increase the closed flux surfaces, suggesting the generation of ordered magnetic field structure. The parallel current density λ concentrated in the COFC then diffuses to the core region so as to reduce the gradient in λ, relaxing in the direction of the Taylor state.

  1. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    DOEpatents

    Danby, G.T.; Jackson, J.W.

    1990-03-19

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations (dB/dt) in the particle beam.

  2. Method of correcting eddy current magnetic fields in particle accelerator vacuum chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Danby, Gordon T.; Jackson, John W.

    1991-01-01

    A method for correcting magnetic field aberrations produced by eddy currents induced in a particle accelerator vacuum chamber housing is provided wherein correction windings are attached to selected positions on the housing and the windings are energized by transformer action from secondary coils, which coils are inductively coupled to the poles of electro-magnets that are powered to confine the charged particle beam within a desired orbit as the charged particles are accelerated through the vacuum chamber by a particle-driving rf field. The power inductively coupled to the secondary coils varies as a function of variations in the power supplied by the particle-accelerating rf field to a beam of particles accelerated through the vacuum chamber, so the current in the energized correction coils is effective to cancel eddy current flux fields that would otherwise be induced in the vacuum chamber by power variations in the particle beam.

  3. Upper-limb kinematics and coordination of short grip and classic drives in field hockey.

    PubMed

    Bretigny, Perrine; Seifert, Ludovic; Leory, David; Chollet, Didier

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the upper-limb kinematics and coordination of the short grip and classic drives in field hockey. Ten elite female players participated in the experiment. The VICON system was used to record the displacement of markers placed on the stick and the players' joints during five short grip and five classic drives. Kinematic and coordination parameters were analyzed. The ball's velocity was recorded by a radar device that also served as the drive target. Kinematic differences were noted between the two drive conditions, with shorter duration and smaller overall amplitude in the short grip drive, explained by the shorter lever arm and the specific context in which it is used. No differences were noted for upper-limb coordination. In both types of stick holding, an interlimb dissociation was noted on the left side, whereas the right interlimb coordination was in phase. Moreover, the time lag increased in the disto-proximal direction, suggesting wrist uncocking before impact and the initiation of descent motion by the left shoulder. Mediolateral analysis confirmed these results: coordination of left-right limbs converged at the wrist but dissociated with more proximal joints (elbows and shoulders).

  4. A High-resolution Model of Field-aligned Currents Through Empirical Orthogonal Functions Analysis (MFACE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Maosheng; Vogt, Joachim; Luehr, Hermann; Sorbalo, Eugen; Blagau, Adrian; Le, Guan; Lu, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Ten years of CHAMP magnetic field measurements are integrated into MFACE, a model of field-aligned currents (FACs) using empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs). EOF1 gives the basic Region-1/Region-2 pattern varying mainly with the interplanetary magnetic field Bz component. EOF2 captures separately the cusp current signature and By-related variability. Compared to existing models, MFACE yields significantly better spatial resolution, reproduces typically observed FAC thickness and intensity, improves on the magnetic local time (MLT) distribution, and gives the seasonal dependence of FAC latitudes and the NBZ current signature. MFACE further reveals systematic dependences on By, including 1) Region-1/Region-2 topology modifications around noon; 2) imbalance between upward and downward maximum current density; 3) MLT location of the Harang discontinuity. Furthermore, our procedure allows quantifying response times of FACs to solar wind driving at the bow shock nose: we obtain 20 minutes and 35-40 minutes lags for the FAC density and latitude, respectively.

  5. The effect of Birkeland currents on magnetic field topology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peroomian, Vahe; Lyons, Larry R.; Schulz, Michael

    1996-01-01

    A technique was developed for the inclusion of large scale magnetospheric current systems in magnetic field models. The region 1 and 2 Birkeland current systems are included in the source surface model of the terrestrial magnetosphere. The region 1 and 2 Birkeland currents are placed in the model using a series of field aligned, infinitely thin wire segments. The normal component of the magnetic field from these currents is calculated on the surface of the magnetopause and shielded using image current carrying wires placed outside of the magnetosphere. It is found that the inclusion of the Birkeland currents in the model results in a northward magnetic field in the near-midnight tail, leading to the closure of previously open flux in the tail, and a southward magnetic field in the flanks. A sunward shift in the separatrix is observed.

  6. A current sheet model for the Earth's magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stump, Daniel R.; Pollack, Gerald L.

    1998-09-01

    As an example in magnetostatics we consider the main magnetic field of the Earth and its current sources. The measured field on the surface is accurately given, in tables of the International Geological Reference Field, in terms of Gaussian coefficients. By applying Maxwell's equations to these data we calculate the extended field, inside the Earth, and give graphical representations of it. We also construct a simple theoretical model of the source of the field, in which the field is the result of currents flowing on the surface of a sphere inside the Earth. The current sources which give the observed field are calculated in terms of vector spherical harmonics. The stream function and currents are displayed on a Mercator projection for a sphere whose radius is half the Earth's radius. Interesting properties of vector operations on the Mercator plane are analytically and graphically described.

  7. On electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive in the W VII-AS stellarator

    SciTech Connect

    Erckmann, V. ); Kasparek, W.; Mueller, G.A.; Schueller, P.G.; Thumm, M. ); W VII-AS Team

    1989-07-01

    The design of the Advanced Stellarator Wendelstein W VII-AS is based on optimization of the vacuum magnetic field configuration. Essential features of the underlying concept are the reduction of the Pfirsch-Schlueter currents and of the neoclassical heat transport losses. This optimization in general leads to a non-axisymmetric complex magnetic field configuration, which was realized by a set of modul twisted coils. Plasma operation started in October 1988. In the first experimental campaign the experiments concentrated on ECRH alone, combination with NBI is foreseen as the next step.

  8. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-15

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  9. Calculating electron cyclotron current drive stabilization of resistive tearing modes in a nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Thomas G.; Kruger, Scott E.; Hegna, C. C.; Schnack, Dalton D.; Sovinec, Carl R.

    2010-01-01

    A model which incorporates the effects of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) into the magnetohydrodynamic equations is implemented in the NIMROD code [C. R. Sovinec et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] and used to investigate the effect of ECCD injection on the stability, growth, and dynamical behavior of magnetic islands associated with resistive tearing modes. In addition to qualitatively and quantitatively agreeing with numerical results obtained from the inclusion of localized ECCD deposition in static equilibrium solvers [A. Pletzer and F. W. Perkins, Phys. Plasmas 6, 1589 (1999)], predictions from the model further elaborate the role which rational surface motion plays in these results. The complete suppression of the (2,1) resistive tearing mode by ECCD is demonstrated and the relevant stabilization mechanism is determined. Consequences of the shifting of the mode rational surface in response to the injected current are explored, and the characteristic short-time responses of resistive tearing modes to spatial ECCD alignments which are stabilizing are also noted. We discuss the relevance of this work to the development of more comprehensive predictive models for ECCD-based mitigation and control of neoclassical tearing modes.

  10. Optimization of the ITER electron cyclotron equatorial launcher for improved heating and current drive functional capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Farina, D.; Figini, L.; Henderson, M.; Saibene, G.

    2014-06-15

    The design of the ITER Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (EC H and CD) system has evolved in the last years both in goals and functionalities by considering an expanded range of applications. A large effort has been devoted to a better integration of the equatorial and the upper launchers, both from the point of view of the performance and of the design impact on the engineering constraints. However, from the analysis of the ECCD performance in two references H-mode scenarios at burn (the inductive H-mode and the advanced non-inductive scenario), it was clear that the EC power deposition was not optimal for steady-state applications in the plasma region around mid radius. An optimization study of the equatorial launcher is presented here aiming at removing this limitation of the EC system capabilities. Changing the steering of the equatorial launcher from toroidal to poloidal ensures EC power deposition out to the normalized toroidal radius ρ ≈ 0.6, and nearly doubles the EC driven current around mid radius, without significant performance degradation in the core plasma region. In addition to the improved performance, the proposed design change is able to relax some engineering design constraints on both launchers.

  11. Integrated Plasma Simulation of Lower Hybrid Current Drive Modification of Sawtooth in Alcator C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonoli, P. T.; Hubbard, A. E.; Schmidt, A. E.; Wright, J. C.; Kessel, C. E.; Batchelor, D. B.; Berry, L. A.; Harvey, R. W.

    2010-11-01

    Experiments were performed in Alcator C-Mod, where the onset time for sawteeth was delayed significantly (up to 0.5 s) relative to ohmically heated plasmas, through injection of off-axis LH current drive power [1]. In this poster we discuss simulations of these experiments using the Integrated Plasma Simulator (IPS) [2], through which driven current density profiles and hard x-ray spectra are computed using a ray tracing code (GENRAY) and Fokker Planck code (CQL3D) [3], that are executed repeatedly in time. The background plasma is evolved in these simulations using the TSC transport code with the Porcelli sawtooth model [4]. [4pt] [1] C. E. Kessel et al, Bull. of the Am. Phys. Soc. 53, Poster PP6.00074 (2008). [0pt] [2] D. Batchelor et al, Journal of Physics: Conf. Series 125, 012039 (2008). [0pt] [3] R. W. Harvey and M. G. McCoy, Proc. of the IAEA Tech. Comm. Mtg. on Sim. and Mod. of Therm. Plasmas, Montreal, Canada (1992). [0pt] [4] S. C. Jardin et al, Journal Comp. Phys. 66, 481 (1986).

  12. Transmission line component testing for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, Richard; Bell, G. L.; Deibele, C. E.; McCarthy, M. P.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Barber, G. C.; Barbier, C. N.; Cambell, I. H.; Moon, R. L.; Pesavento, P. V.; Fredd, E.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.

    2014-10-01

    High power RF testing is underway to evaluate transmission line components for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System. The transmission line has a characteristic impedance Z0 = 50 Ω and a nominal outer diameter of 305 mm. It is specified to carry up to 6 MW at VSWR = 1.5 for 3600 s pulses, with transient voltages up to 40 kV. The transmission line is actively cooled, with turbulent gas flow (N2) used to transfer heat from the inner to outer conductor, which is water cooled. High voltage and high current testing of components has been performed using resonant lines generating steady state voltages of 35 kV and transient voltages up to 60 kV. A resonant ring, which has operated with circulating power of 6 MW for 1 hr pulses, is being used to test high power, low VSWR operation. Components tested to date include gas barriers, straight sections of various lengths, and 90 degree elbows. Designs tested include gas barriers fabricated from quartz and aluminum nitride, and transmission lines with quartz and alumina inner conductor supports. The latest results will be presented. This manuscript has been authored by UT-Battelle, LLC, under Contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  13. High power millimeter wave experiment of ITER relevant electron cyclotron heating and current drive system.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Kajiwara, K; Oda, Y; Kasugai, A; Kobayashi, N; Sakamoto, K; Doane, J; Olstad, R; Henderson, M

    2011-06-01

    High power, long pulse millimeter (mm) wave experiments of the RF test stand (RFTS) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) were performed. The system consists of a 1 MW/170 GHz gyrotron, a long and short distance transmission line (TL), and an equatorial launcher (EL) mock-up. The RFTS has an ITER-relevant configuration, i.e., consisted by a 1 MW-170 GHz gyrotron, a mm wave TL, and an EL mock-up. The TL is composed of a matching optics unit, evacuated circular corrugated waveguides, 6-miter bends, an in-line waveguide switch, and an isolation valve. The EL-mock-up is fabricated according to the current design of the ITER launcher. The Gaussian-like beam radiation with the steering capability of 20°-40° from the EL mock-up was also successfully proved. The high power, long pulse power transmission test was conducted with the metallic load replaced by the EL mock-up, and the transmission of 1 MW/800 s and 0.5 MW/1000 s was successfully demonstrated with no arcing and no damages. The transmission efficiency of the TL was 96%. The results prove the feasibility of the ITER electron cyclotron heating and current drive system. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  14. Chaotic magnetic field lines and spontaneous development of current sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sanjay; Bhattacharyya, R.; Dasgupta, B.; Janaki, M. S.

    2017-08-01

    The performed magnetohydrodynamic simulations aim to assess the influence of chaotic magnetic field lines on spontaneous generation of current sheets in an evolving viscous magnetofluid with infinite electrical conductivity. Suitable non-force-free initial fields having chaotic magnetic field lines are constructed by superposing two Arnold-Beltrami-Childress magnetic fields. The construction is such that the superposed field is devoid of any three or two-dimensional magnetic nulls, which are potential sites of current sheet development. Consequently, the notion of spontaneity can be attributed to any current sheet generated by the evolving magnetofluid. Moreover, to ensure the development to be spontaneous, the simulations are performed in congruence with Parker's magnetostatic theorem which necessitates an attainment of a terminal quasi-steady state and maintenance of flux-freezing to high fidelity. Importantly, the paper establishes spontaneous onset of volume distributed current sheets to be positively proportional to the strength of chaos in magnetic field lines. Evolution of more chaotic field lines is found to develop stronger current sheets which are more volume distributed. These localized current sheets are characterized by intense volume current density and hence a large electric field in the presence of magnetic diffusivity. An interesting scenario then develops, where more chaotic field lines can accelerate charged particles to greater kinetic energies than the field lines which are less chaotic.

  15. Modeling of neutral beam injection heating and current drive during the ramp-up phase in KSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terzolo, L.

    2014-06-01

    For flexible control of the plasma pressure and the current profiles, which are essential for a high performance plasma with long pulse operation, KSTAR is going to implement several heating and current systems, which include Neutral Beam Injection (NBI), Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heting (ICRH)/Fast Wave Current Drive (FWCD), Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD), and Eclectron Cyclotron Heating (ECH)/Electron Cyclotron Current Drive (ECCD). Here, the NBI system is typically used for the central heating and current drive. For the time being, only one NBI device (composed of 3 sources) is available in KSTAR. The first two sources were successfully commissioned in 2010 and 2013. The last source will be installed in 2014. In this work, we present a simulation study of the heating and current drive of the first NBI system (3 sources) during the ramp-up phase. We consider two different NBI configurations (low and high beam energy). The simulation is performed with NUBEAM, a well-recognized Monte-Carlo code. Several different types of KSTAR target equilibria (scan from lower to higher plasma density) are used for the calculation of the current drive, the heating and the different NB losses (shinethrough, charge exchange and bad orbit). The study shows the dependency of those quantities on the plasma density, the position of the NB source and the beam energy. It also shows that because of the shinethrough loss is too high, each NB source cannot be used when the plasma density is under a certain threshold. This study can be used to determine the starting time of the different NB sources during the KSTAR ramp-up phase.

  16. Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg interferometry with driving fields in the quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashhab, S.

    2017-03-01

    We analyze the dynamics of a two-level quantum system (TLS) under the influence of a strong sinusoidal driving signal whose origin is the interaction of the two-level system with a quantum field. In this approach the driving field is replaced by a harmonic oscillator that is either strongly coupled to the TLS or populated with a large number of photons. Starting from the Rabi model, we derive expressions for the TLS’s oscillation frequencies and compare the results with those obtained from the model where the driving signal is treated classically. We show that in the limits of weak coupling and large photon number, the well-known expression for the Rabi frequency in the strong driving regime is recovered. In the opposite limit of strong coupling and small photon number, we find differences between the predictions of the semiclassical and quantum models. The results of the quantum picture can therefore be understood as Landau-Zener-Stueckelberg interferometry in the fully quantum regime.

  17. Bogi and Capiron fields, Oriente Basin, Ecuador: Similar reservoirs but contrasting drive mechanisms and recoveries

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, H.; Morales, M.; Young, R.; Zambrano, H.

    1996-08-01

    Bogi and Capiron fields are being developed under a unit agreement with Petroecuador. These adjoining fields straddle Block 16 in the Oriente Basin and probably share a common oil water contact. Both fields are simple four-way-dip closures which produce heavy oil from Campanian sandstones of similar quality. However, the two fields are remarkably different in terms of oil production and projected recovery as a result of differing structural closures, reservoir distributions and, hence, differing drive mechanisms. The main reservoir at Bogi field is an amalgamation of two fluvial sheet sandstones thought to be low-stand deposits associated with two falls in relative sea level. The reservoir is thick (56-78 ft) and, with an observed oil column of only 38 feet, a bottom-water drive mechanism is ubiquitous. The oil is heavy (18 API) and mobility ratios unfavorable; water production is high and oil recovery from conventional drilling is expected to be 3-5%. In contrast, only the upper fluvial sheet sandstone is present in Capiron field and a reservoir thickness of 32-48 ft combined with an oil column of 99 ft ensures an edge-water drive mechanism over most of the field with concomitant initial low water production and oil recoveries of approximately 30%. The contrast between Bogi and Capiron fields highlights the problems and challenges in the Block 16 area. Small structural closures filled with heavy oil are abundant and an accurate seismic depth map coupled with an understanding of reservoir distribution are vital to economic success.

  18. Electric Dipole Moment Experiment Systematic from Electric Field Discharge Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feinberg, B.; Gould, Harvey

    2014-09-01

    A magnetic field, in the direction of the electric field and synchronous with the electric field reversal, will mimic an EDM signal. One might expect a discharge across the electric field plates to produce magnetic fields with only small or vanishing components parallel to the electric field, minimizing its systematic effect. Our experimental model, using simulated discharge currents, found otherwise: the discharge current may be at an angle to the normal, and thus generate a normal magnetic field. Comparison of data from the experimental model with the results from calculations will be presented, along with estimates of the time-averaged normal magnetic field seen by atoms in an electron EDM experiment using a fountain of laser-cooled francium, as a function of discharge current.

  19. Self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-06-13

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser Facility were investigated employing radiography with ~10- to 60-MeV protons. The experiment used plastic-shell targets with imposed surface defects (glue spots, wires, and mount stalks), which enhance self-generated fields. The fields were measured during the 1-ns laser drive with an on-target intensity ~1015 W/cm2. Proton radiographs show multiple ring-like structures produced by electric fields ~107 V/cm and fine structures from surface defects, indicating self-generated fields up to ~3 MG. These electric and magnetic fields show good agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations when the latter include the ∇Te × ∇ne source, Nernst convection, and anisotropic resistivity. The simulations predict that self-generated fields affect heat fluxes in the conduction zone and, through this, affect the growth of local perturbations.

  20. Self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Igumenshchev, I. V.; Nilson, P. M.; Goncharov, V. N.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-06-15

    Electric and self-generated magnetic fields in direct-drive implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser Facility were investigated employing radiography with ∼10- to 60-MeV protons. The experiment used plastic-shell targets with imposed surface defects (glue spots, wires, and mount stalks), which enhance self-generated fields. The fields were measured during the 1-ns laser drive with an on-target intensity ∼10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. Proton radiographs show multiple ring-like structures produced by electric fields ∼10{sup 7} V/cm and fine structures from surface defects, indicating self-generated fields up to ∼3 MG. These electric and magnetic fields show good agreement with two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations when the latter include the ∇T{sub e} × ∇n{sub e} source, Nernst convection, and anisotropic resistivity. The simulations predict that self-generated fields affect heat fluxes in the conduction zone and, through this, affect the growth of local perturbations.

  1. Eddy-current analysis of isolated permanent-magnet drives using two- and three-dimensional finite-element methods (abstract)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, C. A.

    1990-05-01

    Present drive systems which rely on mechanical devices for torque transmission have some negative features: the driven component cannot be isolated from the drive motor, rotating seals have inherent leakage and friction problems, and mechanical failures often occur due to torque overloads. Magnetic couplings are especially well suited for use in isolated-drive systems. This is often the case in military and aerospace applications where pumps and compressors are vital parts of the thermal and fuel operating systems. The application of permanent-magnet couplings in isolated drives requires accurate calculation of the eddy-current losses induced on the hermetic vessel. This is because the losses along with the required output torque dictate the size and efficiency of the permanent-magnet coupling. The vessel isolates the drive member from the driven member of the turbocompressor. The paper will show the formulation of the computational method based on the Poynting-vector theorem and the concept of motional electric field intensity. The eddy-current losses are calculated using two- and three-dimensional magnetostatic finite-element (FE) analysis. A comparison of the results obtained by two- and three-dimensional FE analysis is made. The results of the analysis will be compared to test data for verification. The test-facility setup and procedure will also be described. This state-of-the-art technique for computation of eddy-current losses has several advantages over conventional analysis methods: the nonlinearities of the magnetic circuit are taken into account, magnetic field fringing and end-leakage effects are not neglected, and the method does not rely on the use of empirical factors. The significant benefits of this approach are that trial-and-error experimental design approaches are eliminated and test data provide validation of analytical results.

  2. The Mechanism Responsible for a Low Electrostatic Discharge Failure Threshold of an Output Buffer Circuit with Low Current Drive Capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shih, Jiaw-Ren; Lee, Jian-Hsing; Wu, Yi-Hsun; Liao, Scott; Liew, Boon-Khim; Shiue, Ruey-Yun; Hwang, Huey-Liang; Yue, John

    2000-02-01

    The electrostatic discharge (ESD) failure threshold of an output buffer is observed to be sensitive to the used-gate finger number. It is found that the lower the current drive capability, the lower the ESD failure threshold, and the damage sites of the output buffer are always located at the used gate n-channel metal-oxide semiconductor (NMOS) transistors. This observation can only be explained on the basis of the energy dissipation (E=VSP× ID× time) in each finger, where ID is composed of channel current and bipolar current. From the real-time current-voltage measurement during ESD zapping, three phenomena are observed. The first is that a transistor with a floating gate (used-gate fingers) has a larger snapback voltage (VSP) than that with a grounded gate transistor. The second is that due to the accumulation of hot holes in the floating gate, a constant gate voltage can be induced during the ESD zapping. The last is that this induced-gate-voltage can assist the switching on of the NMOS transistors and reduction of the ESD duration. Therefore, the ESD duration of a transistor with high current drive capability will be much shorter than that of low current drive capability. As a result, high current drive capability leads to a high ESD failure threshold.

  3. Controllable optical output fields from an optomechanical system with mechanical driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xun-Wei; Li, Yong

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the properties of the optical output fields from a cavity optomechanical system, where the cavity is optically driven by a strong coupling field and a weak probe field and the mechanical resonator is driven by a coherent mechanical pump. When the frequency of the mechanical pump matches the frequency difference between the coupling and probe optical fields, due to the interference between the different optical components at the same frequency, we demonstrate that the large positive or negative group delay of the output field at the frequency of probe field can be achieved and tuned by adjusting the phase and amplitude of the mechanical driving field. Moreover, the strength of the output field at the frequency of an optical four-wave-mixing (FWM) field also can be controlled (enhanced and suppressed) by tuning the phase and amplitude of the mechanical pump. We show that the power of the output field at the frequency of the optical FWM field can be suppressed to zero or enhanced so much that it can be comparable with and even larger than the power of the input probe optical field.

  4. Sources of field-aligned currents in the auroral plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, J.A.; Burch, J.L. ); Kan, J.R. ); Reiff, P.H. ); Slavin, J.A. )

    1991-01-01

    Data from the Dynamics Explorer 1 High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) and magnetometer are used to investigate the sources of field-aligned currents in the nightside auroral zone. It is found that the formula developed by S. Knight predicts the field-aligned current density fairly accurately in regions where a significant potential drop can be inferred from the HAPI data; there are, however, regions in which the proportionality between potential drop and field-aligned current does not hold. In particular, the authors note occurrences of strong upward field-aligned current associated not with inverted-V events but instead with suprathermal bursts. In addition, upward field-aligned currents are often observed to peak near the edges of inverted-V events, rather than in the center as would be predicted by Knight.

  5. Sources of field-aligned currents in the auroral plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. A.; Burch, J. L.; Kan, J. R.; Reiff, P. H.; Slavin, J. A.

    1991-01-01

    Data from the Dynamics Explorer 1 High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) and magnetometer are used to investigate the sources of field-aligned currents in the nightside auroral zone. It is found that the formula developed by S. Knight predicts the field-aligned current density fairly accurately in regions where a significant potential drop can be inferred from the HAPI data; there are, however, regions in which the proportionality between potential drop and field-aligned current does not hold. In particular, occurrences of strong upward field-aligned current associated not with inverted-V events but instead with suprathermal bursts are noted. In addition, upward field-aligned currents are often observed to peak near the edges of inverted-V events, rather than in the center as would be predicted by Knight.

  6. High-speed current dq PI controller for vector controlled PMSM drive.

    PubMed

    Marufuzzaman, Mohammad; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Chang, Tae Gyu

    2014-01-01

    High-speed current controller for vector controlled permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is presented. The controller is developed based on modular design for faster calculation and uses fixed-point proportional-integral (PI) method for improved accuracy. Current dq controller is usually implemented in digital signal processor (DSP) based computer. However, DSP based solutions are reaching their physical limits, which are few microseconds. Besides, digital solutions suffer from high implementation cost. In this research, the overall controller is realizing in field programmable gate array (FPGA). FPGA implementation of the overall controlling algorithm will certainly trim down the execution time significantly to guarantee the steadiness of the motor. Agilent 16821A Logic Analyzer is employed to validate the result of the implemented design in FPGA. Experimental results indicate that the proposed current dq PI controller needs only 50 ns of execution time in 40 MHz clock, which is the lowest computational cycle for the era.

  7. High-Speed Current dq PI Controller for Vector Controlled PMSM Drive

    PubMed Central

    Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne; Rahman, Labonnah Farzana; Chang, Tae Gyu

    2014-01-01

    High-speed current controller for vector controlled permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) is presented. The controller is developed based on modular design for faster calculation and uses fixed-point proportional-integral (PI) method for improved accuracy. Current dq controller is usually implemented in digital signal processor (DSP) based computer. However, DSP based solutions are reaching their physical limits, which are few microseconds. Besides, digital solutions suffer from high implementation cost. In this research, the overall controller is realizing in field programmable gate array (FPGA). FPGA implementation of the overall controlling algorithm will certainly trim down the execution time significantly to guarantee the steadiness of the motor. Agilent 16821A Logic Analyzer is employed to validate the result of the implemented design in FPGA. Experimental results indicate that the proposed current dq PI controller needs only 50 ns of execution time in 40 MHz clock, which is the lowest computational cycle for the era. PMID:24574913

  8. Driving Force Variation in Weld Pool Affected by Current Density and Flow Velocity of Gas Tungsten Arc Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Tadashi; Taki, Hiroyuki; Iwao, Toru; Tashiro, Shinichi; Tanaka, Manabu; Yumoto, Motoshige

    In arc welding, Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) is suitable when good quality and a good surface are required. However, the weld shape is shallow and wide. Furthermore, GTAW welding is slow and inefficient. A deep weld shape is necessary to increase the welding speed. The heat input from the arc and convection flow of the weld pool in formation of weld pool are important. The convection flow varies along with the driving force. Past research has indicated some relation between the driving force and arc characteristics. In this study, the driving force in the weld pool changes with the current density. Flow velocity is simulated, and this relativity is elucidated. The Lorentz force, drag force, and Marangoni effect are focused in driving forces. Consequently, the Lorentz force of the axial direction decreases in direct relation to the -0.60th power of current density near the cathode in the maximum force. This force in the center of the axial direction decreases in relation to the -0.62th power of the current density. In addition, the drag force increases in relation to the 1.70th power of the maximum flow velocity, and the Marangoni effect decreases in direct relation to the -0.20th power of the maximum flow velocity in the maximum force. The driving force is apparently dependent on the arc current density and flow velocity.

  9. Adiabatic quantum state transfer in tight-binding chains using periodic driving fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longhi, S.

    2014-09-01

    A method for high-fidelity coherent adiabatic transport in a zig-zag tight-binding chain, based on application of two external periodic driving fields, is theoretically proposed. The method turns out to be robust against imperfections and disorder of the static lattice Hamiltonian, is tolerant to next-nearest neighborhood interactions, and enables coherent transport in long chains without the need for a local control and timing of the trapping potential.

  10. Relationship between Birkeland current regions, particle precipitation, and electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Beaujardiere, O.; Watermann, J.; Newell, P.; Rich, F.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship of the large-scale dayside Birkeland currents to large-scale particle precipitation patterns, currents, and convection is examined using DMSP and Sondrestrom radar observations. It is found that the local time of the mantle currents is not limited to the longitude of the cusp proper, but covers a larger local time extent. The mantle currents flow entirely on open field lines. About half of region 1 currents flow on open field lines, consistent with the assumption that the region 1 currents are generated by the solar wind dynamo and flow within the surface that separates open and closed field lines. More than 80 percent of the Birkeland current boundaries do not correspond to particle precipitation boundaries. Region 2 currents extend beyond the plasma sheet poleward boundary; region 1 currents flow in part on open field lines; mantle currents and mantle particles are not coincident. On most passes when a triple current sheet is observed, the convection reversal is located on closed field lines.

  11. MAGNETIC FIELD RELAXATION AND CURRENT SHEETS IN AN IDEAL PLASMA

    SciTech Connect

    Candelaresi, S.; Pontin, D. I.; Hornig, G.

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the existence of magnetohydrostatic equilibria for topologically complex magnetic fields. The approach employed is to perform ideal numerical relaxation experiments. We use a newly developed Lagrangian relaxation scheme that exactly preserves the magnetic field topology during the relaxation. Our configurations include both twisted and sheared fields, of which some fall into the category for which Parker predicted no force-free equilibrium. The first class of field considered contains no magnetic null points, and field lines connect between two perfectly conducting plates. In these cases, we observe only resolved current layers of finite thickness. In further numerical experiments, we confirm that magnetic null points are loci of singular currents.

  12. Conserved currents for electromagnetic fields in the Kerr spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Alexander; Flanagan, Eanna

    2017-01-01

    For any classical linear Lagrangian field theory, the symplectic product provides a conserved current that is bilinear on the space of solutions. Given a linear mapping from the space of solutions into itself, a ``symmetry operator'', one can therefore generate quadratic conserved currents for any linear classical field theory. We apply this procedure to the case of electromagnetism on a Kerr background, showing that this procedure can generate the conserved currents given by Andersson, Bäckdahl, and Blue, as well as two new conserved currents. These currents reduce to the sum of (positive powers of) the Carter constants of the photons in the geometric optics limit, and generalize the current for scalar fields discovered by Carter. We furthermore show that the fluxes of these new currents through null infinity and the horizon are finite.

  13. RF current drive antenna. Final report, August 15, 1993--August 14, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Probert, P.H.

    1995-09-01

    This work represents an attempt to solve a fundamental problem with all coupling devices in tokamaks intended to launch waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), that of excessive voltage levels on the launcher and its feed lines. These voltages can lead to impurity problems in the plasma, and they determine the maximum power that can be coupled to the plasma, since it is when arcs caused by this voltage frequently occur that the power must be reduced. The approach taken is to consider an antenna which is composed of many smaller units, each operating at much lower voltages, stacked on end to provide the equivalent functionality of a conventional launcher. The work described herein involved designing, building, and operating such a launcher in the Phaedrus-T tokamak. The results showed that the antenna worked as expected, reducing the voltage dramatically, while still functioning property, and producing fewer impurity problems and no arcing. A design extrapolating the principles of this idea to reactor-sized tokamaks such as ITER was developed. In addition, a novel decoupling scheme was developed in order to adapt this antenna idea to low frequency current drive schemes.

  14. RF Sources for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System

    SciTech Connect

    Hosea, J.; Brunkhorst, C.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R. H.; Goulding, R. H.; Greenough, N.; Kung, C.; Rasmussen, D. A.; Swain, D. W.; Wilson, J. R.

    2005-10-04

    The RF source requirements for the ITER ion cyclotron (IC) heating and current drive system are very challenging ? 20 MW CW power into an antenna load with a VSWR of up to 2 over the frequency range of 35-65 MHz. For the two present antenna designs under consideration, 8 sources providing 2.5 MW each are to be employed. For these sources, the outputs of two final power amplifiers (FPAs), using the high power CPI 4CM2500KG tube, are combined with a 180? hybrid combiner to easily meet the ITER IC source requirements ? 2.5 MW is supplied at a VSWR of 2 at ? 70% of the maximum tube power available in class B operation. The cylindrical cavity configuration for the FPAs is quite compact so that the 8 combined sources fit into the space allocated at the ITER site with room to spare. The source configuration is described in detail and its projected operating power curves are presented. Although the CPI tube has been shown to be stable under high power operating conditions on many facilities, a test of the combined FPA source arrangement is in preparation using existing high power 30 MHz amplifiers to assure that this configuration can be made robustly stable for all phases at a VSWR up to 2. The possibility of using 12 sources to feed a suitably modified antenna design is also discussed in the context of providing flexibility for specifying the final IC antenna design.

  15. FED-A, an advanced performance FED based on low safety factor and current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Yueng Kay Martin; Rutherford, P. H.; Hogan, J.T.; Attenberger, S. E.; Holmes, J.A.; Borowski, S. K.; Brown, T. G.; Carreras, B. A.; Ehst, D. A.; Haines, J.R.; Hively, L. M.; Houlberg, Wayne A; Iida, H.; Lee, V. D.; Lynch, S.J.; Reid, R. L.; Rothe, K. E.; Strickler, Dennis J; Stewart, L. D.

    1983-08-01

    This document is one of four describing studies performed in FY 1982 within the context of the Fusion Engineering Device (FED) Program for the Office of Fusion Energy, U.S. Department of Energy. The documents are: 1. FED Baseline Engineering Studies (ORNL/FEDC-82/2), 2. FED-A, An Advanced Performance FED Based on Low Safety Factor and Current Drive (this document), 3. FED-R, A Fusion Device Utilizing Resistive Magnets (ORNL/FEDC-82/1), and 4. Technology Demonstration Facility TDF. These studies extend the FED Baseline concept of FY 1981 and develop innovative and alternative concepts for the FED. The FED-A study project was carried out as part of the Innovative and Alternative Tokamak FED studies, under the direction of P. H. Rutherford, which were part of the national FED program during FY 1982. The studies were performed jointly by senior scientists in the magnetic fusion community and the staff of the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC). Y-K. M. Peng of the FEDC, on assignment from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, served as the design manager.

  16. Design of Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System of ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, N.; Bigelow, T.; Rasmussen, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Ramponi, G.; Saibene, G.; Cirant, S.; Denisov, G.; Heidinger, R.; Piosczyk, B.; Henderson, M.; Hogge, J.-P.; Thumm, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Rao, S. L.; Sakamoto, K.; Takahashi, K.; Temkin, R. J.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Zohm, H.

    2007-09-28

    Since the end of EDA, the design of the Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH and CD) system has been modified to respond to progress in physics understanding and change of interface conditions. Nominal RF power of 20 MW is shared by four upper launchers or one equatorial launcher RF beams are steered by front steering mirrors providing wide sweeping angle for the RF beam. DC high voltage power supply may be composed of IGBT pulse step modulators because of high frequency modulation and design flexibility to three different types of 170 GHz gyrotrons provided by three parties. The RF power from the 170 GHz gyrotron is transmitted to the launcher by 63.5 mm{phi} corrugated waveguide line and remotely switched by a waveguide switch between the upper launcher and the equatorial launcher. The ECH and CD system has also a start-up sub-system for assist of initial discharge composed of three 127.5 GHz gyrotrons and a dedicated DC high voltage power supply. Three of transmission lines are shared between 170 GHz gyrotron and 127.5 GHz gyrotron so as to inject RF beam for the start-up through the equatorial launcher. R and Ds of components for high power long pulse and mirror steering mechanism have been on-going in the parties to establish a reliable ITER ECH and CD system.

  17. NTM stabilization by alternating O-point EC current drive using a high-power diplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasparek, W.; Doelman, N.; Stober, J.; Maraschek, M.; Zohm, H.; Monaco, F.; Eixenberger, H.; Klop, W.; Wagner, D.; Schubert, M.; Schütz, H.; Grünwald, G.; Plaum, B.; Munk, R.; Schlüter, K. H.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-12-01

    At the tokamak ASDEX Upgrade, experiments to stabilize neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) by electron cyclotron (EC) heating and current drive in the O-points of the magnetic islands were performed. For the first time, injection into the O-points of the revolving islands was performed via a fast directional switch, which toggled the EC power between two launchers synchronously to the island rotation. The switching was performed by a resonant diplexer employing a sharp resonance in the transfer function, and a small frequency modulation of the feeding gyrotron around the slope of the resonance. Thus, toggling of the power between the two outputs of the diplexer connected to two articulating launchers was possible. Phasing and control of the modulation were performed via a set of Mirnov coils and appropriate signal processing. In the paper, technological issues, the design of the diplexer, the tracking of the diplexer resonance to the gyrotron frequency, the generation and processing of control signals for the gyrotron, and the typical performance concerning switching contrast and efficiency are discussed. The plasma scenario is described, and plasma experiments are presented, where the launchers scanned the region of the resonant surface continuously and also where the launchers were at a fixed position near to the q  =  1.5-surface. In the second case, complete stabilization of a 3/2 NTM could be reached. These experiments are also seen as a technical demonstration for the applicability of diplexers in large-scale ECRH systems.

  18. Efficiency of fast wave current drive for a weakly relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.C.; Lin-Liu, Y.R. ); Karney, C.F.F. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1993-04-01

    Current drive by fast waves (FWCD) is an important candidate for steady-state operation of tokamaks. Major experiments using this scheme are being carried out on DIII-D. There has been considerable study of the theoretical efficiency of FWCD. In Refs. 4 and 5, the nonrelativistic efficiency of FWCD at arbitrary frequencies was studied. For DIII-D parameters, the results can be considerably different from the Landau and Alfven limits. At the high temperatures of reactors and DIII-D upgrade, relativistic effects become important. In this paper, the relativistic FWCD efficiency for arbitrary frequencies is studied. Assuming that the plasma is weakly relativistic, i.e., T[sub e]/Mc[sup 2] is small, an analytic expression for FWCD is obtained for high resonant energies (U[sub ph]/u[sub Te][much gt]). Comparisons with the results from a numerical code ADJ and the nonrelativistic results shall be made and analytical fits in the whole range of velocities shall be presented.

  19. Efficiency of fast wave current drive for a weakly relativistic plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, S.C.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Karney, C.F.F.

    1993-04-01

    Current drive by fast waves (FWCD) is an important candidate for steady-state operation of tokamaks. Major experiments using this scheme are being carried out on DIII-D. There has been considerable study of the theoretical efficiency of FWCD. In Refs. 4 and 5, the nonrelativistic efficiency of FWCD at arbitrary frequencies was studied. For DIII-D parameters, the results can be considerably different from the Landau and Alfven limits. At the high temperatures of reactors and DIII-D upgrade, relativistic effects become important. In this paper, the relativistic FWCD efficiency for arbitrary frequencies is studied. Assuming that the plasma is weakly relativistic, i.e., T{sub e}/Mc{sup 2} is small, an analytic expression for FWCD is obtained for high resonant energies (U{sub ph}/u{sub Te}{much_gt}). Comparisons with the results from a numerical code ADJ and the nonrelativistic results shall be made and analytical fits in the whole range of velocities shall be presented.

  20. Enhancement of Localized ICRF Heating and Current Drive in TFTR D-T Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    = G Schilling, First Author

    1997-04-15

    Theoretical advantages have led to an increased importance of the modification and sustainment of pressure and magnetic shear profiles in plasmas. We have demonstrated electron heating and current drive in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) plasmas with the existing 43/63.6 MHz ICRF (ion cyclotron range of frequencies) system, both via the fast wave and via mode conversion of the fast wave to an ion-Bernstein wave. In order to achieve both on- and off-axis mode conversion in a pure D-T (deuterium-tritium) plasma, we have changed the operating frequency of two of our transmitters and antennas to 30 MHz and improved the launched directional wave spectrum. As a second step, two new four-strap fast-wave antennas have been installed, and a new four-strap direct-launch IBW antenna has been added as well. This reconfiguration and the resulting operating characteristics of the TFTR ICRF system in a variety of discharges will be presented.

  1. Standard series of direct-current motors for regulated electric drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cholewicki, I.; Lubina, M.; Kozhevnikov, V. A.; Kochnev, A. V.; Skoda, K.; Voleskiy, E.

    1984-11-01

    A standard series of d.c. motors for electric drives with speed and torque regulation has been developed. Thyristor-type converters for machine tools with digital program control are also being developed. Meeting future goals requires modification of the motor frame from the conventional round to a nearly square one, a larger ratio of armature stack length to diameter, better cooling, and insulation of a higher temperature class. In addition, it is necessary to laminate the housing partially or completely and to include a compensating winding. The basic motor configuration is 1 M 1001, according to Council of Mutual Economic Assistance (CEMA) Standard 246-78, with at least IP 23S protection and 1C 06 or 1C 05 cooling (shaft height from 112 mm up) and 1C 01 cooling (Shaft height or up to 250 mm). The series will be designed for a reference speed of 1500 rpm with not more than 15% armature current fluctuation, with speeds of 300-3000 rpm depending on voltage and motor size and torque regulation 1:200 (externally cooled motors) or 1;5, 1:10, 1:30 (self-cooled motors). Prototype motors with 132 mm and 355 mm shaft heights have already passed all tests.

  2. Design of Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive System of ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Bigelow, T.; Bonicelli, T.; Cirant, S.; Denisov, G.; Heidinger, R.; Henderson, M.; Hogge, J.-P.; Piosczyk, B.; Ramponi, G.; Rao, S. L.; Rasmussen, D.; Saibene, G.; Sakamoto, K.; Takahashi, K.; Temkin, R. J.; Thumm, M.; Tran, M. Q.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.; Zohm, H.

    2007-09-01

    Since the end of EDA, the design of the Electron Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive (ECH&CD) system has been modified to respond to progress in physics understanding and change of interface conditions. Nominal RF power of 20 MW is shared by four upper launchers or one equatorial launcher RF beams are steered by front steering mirrors providing wide sweeping angle for the RF beam. DC high voltage power supply may be composed of IGBT pulse step modulators because of high frequency modulation and design flexibility to three different types of 170 GHz gyrotrons provided by three parties. The RF power from the 170 GHz gyrotron is transmitted to the launcher by 63.5 mmφ corrugated waveguide line and remotely switched by a waveguide switch between the upper launcher and the equatorial launcher. The ECH&CD system has also a start-up sub-system for assist of initial discharge composed of three 127.5 GHz gyrotrons and a dedicated DC high voltage power supply. Three of transmission lines are shared between 170 GHz gyrotron and 127.5 GHz gyrotron so as to inject RF beam for the start-up through the equatorial launcher. R&Ds of components for high power long pulse and mirror steering mechanism have been on-going in the parties to establish a reliable ITER ECH&CD system.

  3. Plasma heating and current drive by an obliquely propagating upper-hybrid cyclotron beat wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, M. R.; Cairns, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    Excitation of an obliquely propagating upper-hybrid cyclotron beat wave is considered for plasma heating and current drive in tokamaks. The beat wave is excited by the interaction of two intense free-electron laser (FEL) pulses at their difference frequency. The three-wave nonlinear interaction equations in a magnetized plasma are solved numerically in a steady-state two-dimensional (2-D) geometry for this purpose. The 2-D toroidal inhomogeneity effect and the effect of finite spatial width of the pump microwave pulses are taken into account for the beat wave excitation. To illustrate the principle, the microwave tokamak experiment (MTX) [Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 30, 57 (1988)] is considered. It has been found that the fraction of total input power of the pump microwaves deposited in the cyclotron beat wave is lower than the case of a Langmuir type beat wave considered by Amin and Cairns [Nucl. Fusion 30, 327 (1990)]. However, increasing the input powers of the pump microwaves, a substantial amount of input power can be deposited in the excited beat wave. The beat wave eventually transfers this power to the electrons by cyclotron damping. It has also been found that for the same input parameters, right-hand polarized pumps are more efficient than left-hand polarized pump microwaves for beat wave excitation.

  4. High Power Antenna Design for Lower Hybrid Current Drive in MST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, M. A.; Goetz, J. A.; Kaufman, M. C.; Oliva, S. P.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Ryan, P. M.

    2003-10-01

    RF current drive has been proposed as a method for reducing the tearing fluctuations that are responsible for anomalous energy transport in the RFP. A system for launching lower hybrid slow waves at 800 MHz and n_||= 7.5 is now in operation at up to 50 kW on MST. The antenna is an enclosed interdigital line using λ/4 resonators with an opening in the cavity through which the wave is coupled to the plasma. It has an untuned VSWR of ˜2, and is instrumented on 5 of its 23 elements to allow measurement of damping length. The antenna design is being optimized for higher power handling. Improvements include larger vacuum feedthroughs, better impedance matching, and RF instrumentation on all resonators. The new antenna will be modeled in Microwave Studio^TM. The goal is a design which can handle ˜250 kW and presents a VSWR of 1.4 or better without external tuning. Full instrumentation will allow more detailed power deposition measurements.

  5. Detection and sizing of defects in control rod drive mechanism penetrations using eddy current and ultrasonics

    SciTech Connect

    Light, G.M.; Fisher, J.L.; Tennis, R.F.; Stolte, J.S.; Hendrix, G.J.

    1996-08-01

    Over the last two years, concern has been generated about the capabilities of performing nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of the closure-head penetrations in nuclear-reactor pressure vessels. These penetrations are primarily for instrumentation and control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) and are usually thick-walled Inconel tubes, which are shrink-fitted into the steel closure head. The penetrations are then welded between the outside surface of the penetration and the inside surface of the closure head. Stress corrosion cracks initiating at the inner surface of the penetration have been reported at several plants. Through-wall cracks in the CRDM penetration or CRDM weld could lead to loss of coolant in the reactor vessel. The CRDM penetration presents a complex inspection geometry for conventional NDE techniques. A thermal sleeve, through which pass the mechanical linkages for operating the control rods, is inserted into the penetration in such a way that only a small annulus (nominally 3 mm) exists between the thermal sleeve and inside surface of the penetration. Ultrasonic (UT) and eddy current testing (ET) techniques that could be used to provide defect detection and sizing capability were investigated. This paper describes the ET and UT techniques, the probes developed, and the results obtained using these probes and techniques on CRDM penetration mock-ups.

  6. Status of the ITER ion cyclotron heating and current drive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamalle, P.; Beaumont, B.; Kazarian, F.; Gassmann, T.; Agarici, G.; Montemayor, T. Alonzo; Bamber, R.; Bernard, J.-M.; Boilson, D.; Cadinot, A.; Calarco, F.; Colas, L.; Courtois, X.; Deibele, C.; Durodié, F.; Fano, J.; Fredd, E.; Goulding, R.; Greenough, N.; Hillairet, J.; Jacquinot, J.; Kaye, A. S.; Kočan, M.; Labidi, H.; Leichtle, D.; Loarte, A.; McCarthy, M.; Messiaen, A.; Meunier, L.; Mukherjee, A.; Oberlin-Harris, C.; Patel, A. M.; Peters, B.; Rajnish, K.; Rasmussen, D.; Sanabria, R.; Sartori, R.; Singh, R.; Swain, D.; Trivedi, R. G.; Turner, A.

    2015-12-01

    The paper reports on latest developments for the ITER Ion Cyclotron Heating and Current Drive system: imminent acceptance tests of a prototype power supply at full power; successful factory acceptance of candidate RF amplifier tubes which will be tested on dedicated facilities; further design integration and experimental validation of transmission line components under 6MW hour-long pulses. The antenna Faraday shield thermal design has been validated above requirements by cyclic high heat flux tests. R&D on ceramic brazing is under way for the RF vacuum windows. The antenna port plug RF design is stable but major evolution of the mechanical design is in preparation to achieve compliance with the load specification, warrant manufacturability and incorporate late interface change requests. The antenna power coupling capability predictions have been strengthened by showing that, if the plasma scrape-off layer turns out to be steep and the edge density low, the reference burning plasma can realistically be displaced to improve the coupling.

  7. Lightfast optical current in dielectric by plasmonically induced local field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seungchul; Kwon, Ojoon; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2014-08-01

    Recently, ultrafast strong field induced optical current in SiO2 dielectric medium has demonstrated. By foaming laser intensity more than 1013 W•cm-2 in the dielectric material, the optical current was generated in a dielectric gap without any DC bias. This phenomenon is affected by the strength electric field of incident laser field and the generated electrons follow the speed of optical frequency enabling lightfast electronics in the future. In this study, we especially adopted nanoplasmonic field to trigger and control current flow in a nanometer spatial resolution. Nanoplasmonic field enables to manipulate light field in nanoscale domain. By using nanoplasmonic field, optically induced current flow can be selectively controlled by characteristic of nanoplasmonic nanostructure. For the first demonstration, saw tooth like 2-D nano Au pattern was numerically and experimentally investigated to boost up the laser intensity of incident 4.5 fs laser pulse with minimum field distortion and broadening. The intensity enhancement factor of plasmonic field at the saw tooth tip was ~40, enabling Wannier-Stark effect with incidence intensity level of only 1011W•cm-2 in the TiO2 substrate. The carrier envelope phase of laser pulse is controlled to measure ultrafast optical current generation in dielectric medium by plasmonically induced strong near-field. This will be the basis for developing practical lightfast optical electronics in the future.

  8. A camera for imaging hard x-rays from suprathermal electrons during lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Kaita, R.; Bernabei, S.; Davis, W.; Fishman, H.; Gettelfinger, G.; Ignat, D.; Roney, P.; Stevens, J.; Stodiek, W. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Jones, S.; Paoletti, F. . Plasma Fusion Center); Petravich, G. . Central Research Inst. for Physics); Rimini,

    1993-05-01

    During lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), suprathermal electrons are generated that emit hard X-ray bremsstrahlung. A pinhole camera has been installed on the PBX-M tokamak that records 128 [times] 128 pixel images of the bremsstrahlung with a 3 ms time resolution. This camera has identified hollow radiation profiles on PBX-M, indicating off-axis current drive. The detector is a 9in. dia. intensifier. A detailed account of the construction of the Hard X-ray Camera, its operation, and its performance is given.

  9. A camera for imaging hard x-rays from suprathermal electrons during lower hybrid current drive on PBX-M

    SciTech Connect

    von Goeler, S.; Kaita, R.; Bernabei, S.; Davis, W.; Fishman, H.; Gettelfinger, G.; Ignat, D.; Roney, P.; Stevens, J.; Stodiek, W.; Jones, S.; Paoletti, F.; Petravich, G.; Rimini, F.

    1993-05-01

    During lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), suprathermal electrons are generated that emit hard X-ray bremsstrahlung. A pinhole camera has been installed on the PBX-M tokamak that records 128 {times} 128 pixel images of the bremsstrahlung with a 3 ms time resolution. This camera has identified hollow radiation profiles on PBX-M, indicating off-axis current drive. The detector is a 9in. dia. intensifier. A detailed account of the construction of the Hard X-ray Camera, its operation, and its performance is given.

  10. Nonsteady dynamic properties of a domain wall for the creep state under an alternating driving field.

    PubMed

    Zhou, N J; Zheng, B

    2014-07-01

    With Monte Carlo simulations, the nonsteady dynamic properties of a domain wall have been systematically investigated for the thermally activated creep state under an alternating driving field. Taking the driven random-field Ising model in two dimensions as an example, two distinct growth stages of the domain interface are identified with both the correlation length and roughness function. One stage belongs to the universality class of the random depositions, and the other to that of the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson equation. In the latter case, due to the dynamic effect of overhangs, the domain interface may exhibit an intrinsic anomalous scaling behavior, different from that of the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson equation.

  11. Nonsteady dynamic properties of a domain wall for the creep state under an alternating driving field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, N. J.; Zheng, B.

    2014-07-01

    With Monte Carlo simulations, the nonsteady dynamic properties of a domain wall have been systematically investigated for the thermally activated creep state under an alternating driving field. Taking the driven random-field Ising model in two dimensions as an example, two distinct growth stages of the domain interface are identified with both the correlation length and roughness function. One stage belongs to the universality class of the random depositions, and the other to that of the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson equation. In the latter case, due to the dynamic effect of overhangs, the domain interface may exhibit an intrinsic anomalous scaling behavior, different from that of the quenched Edwards-Wilkinson equation.

  12. Quasi-linear modeling of lower hybrid current drive in ITER and DEMO

    SciTech Connect

    Cardinali, A. Cesario, R.; Panaccione, L.; Santini, F.; Amicucci, L.; Castaldo, C.; Ceccuzzi, S.; Mirizzi, F.; Tuccillo, A. A.

    2015-12-10

    First pass absorption of the Lower Hybrid waves in thermonuclear devices like ITER and DEMO is modeled by coupling the ray tracing equations with the quasi-linear evolution of the electron distribution function in 2D velocity space. As usually assumed, the Lower Hybrid Current Drive is not effective in a plasma of a tokamak fusion reactor, owing to the accessibility condition which, depending on the density, restricts the parallel wavenumber to values greater than n{sub ∥crit} and, at the same time, to the high electron temperature that would enhance the wave absorption and then restricts the RF power deposition to the very periphery of the plasma column (near the separatrix). In this work, by extensively using the “ray{sup star}” code, a parametric study of the propagation and absorption of the LH wave as function of the coupled wave spectrum (as its width, and peak value), has been performed very accurately. Such a careful investigation aims at controlling the power deposition layer possibly in the external half radius of the plasma, thus providing a valuable aid to the solution of how to control the plasma current profile in a toroidal magnetic configuration, and how to help the suppression of MHD mode that can develop in the outer part of the plasma. This analysis is useful not only for exploring the possibility of profile control of a pulsed operation reactor as well as the tearing mode stabilization, but also in order to reconsider the feasibility of steady state regime for DEMO.

  13. Current understanding of the driving mechanisms for spatiotemporal variations of atmospheric speciated mercury: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Huiting; Cheng, Irene; Zhang, Leiming

    2016-10-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) is a global pollutant and thought to be the main source of mercury in oceanic and remote terrestrial systems, where it becomes methylated and bioavailable; hence, atmospheric mercury pollution has global consequences for both human and ecosystem health. Understanding of spatial and temporal variations of atmospheric speciated mercury can advance our knowledge of mercury cycling in various environments. This review summarized spatiotemporal variations of total gaseous mercury or gaseous elemental mercury (TGM/GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and particulate-bound mercury (PBM) in various environments including oceans, continents, high elevation, the free troposphere, and low to high latitudes. In the marine boundary layer (MBL), the oxidation of GEM was generally thought to drive the diurnal and seasonal variations of TGM/GEM and GOM in most oceanic regions, leading to lower GEM and higher GOM from noon to afternoon and higher GEM during winter and higher GOM during spring-summer. At continental sites, the driving mechanisms of TGM/GEM diurnal patterns included surface and local emissions, boundary layer dynamics, GEM oxidation, and for high-elevation sites mountain-valley winds, while oxidation of GEM and entrainment of free tropospheric air appeared to control the diurnal patterns of GOM. No pronounced diurnal variation was found for Tekran measured PBM at MBL and continental sites. Seasonal variations in TGM/GEM at continental sites were attributed to increased winter combustion and summertime surface emissions, and monsoons in Asia, while those in GOM were controlled by GEM oxidation, free tropospheric transport, anthropogenic emissions, and wet deposition. Increased PBM at continental sites during winter was primarily due to local/regional coal and wood combustion emissions. Long-term TGM measurements from the MBL and continental sites indicated an overall declining trend. Limited measurements suggested TGM/GEM increasing from the

  14. Free-run Startup Techniques for Sensorless Drive Systems of Permanent Magnet Machine with Phase Current or DC-bus Current Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toba, Akio; Sato, Michihiko-; Inatama, Shigeki; Fujita, Kouetsu

    Starting methods for the inverter that drives a permanent magnet machine with only current sensors, while the rotor is rotating, (“free-run startup techniques") are proposed. The proposed methods are based on whether current flows or does not when one switch of the inverter is turned on, which depends on the electrical angle of the emf and the reverse blocking function of the freewheeling diodes. The merit of the proposed methods is that the calculation to determine the rotor position is simple. The variety of the methods is with the types of current detection. Proposed are the methods not only for the phase current detection but also for the DC-bus line current detection that are utilized in low-cost drive systems. Theoretical analysis, design issues, and experimental verifications of the proposed methods are set forth.

  15. Current practices of driving restriction implementation for patients with brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sayana; Mehta, Minesh P; Kuo, John S; Ian Robins, H; Khuntia, Deepak

    2011-07-01

    Brain tumors may impair functioning in several neuro-cognitive domains and interfere with sophisticated tasks, such as driving motor vehicles. No formalized national guidelines or recommendations for driving restrictions in patients with brain tumors exist in the US. We created and administered a 24 question survey to 1,157 US medical practitioners, mostly neurosurgeons, radiation oncologists, and medical oncologists, to identify their knowledge of local driving restriction laws and their practice patterns regarding driving restriction instructions to brain tumor patients. Response were collected from 251 (21.7%) and analyzed from 221 (19%) recipients. Seventy-one percent of the respondents indicated they discuss driving recommendations/restrictions with brain tumor patients, with 82% primarily basing this on seizure activity. Approximately 28% of respondents were unsure if they are required by their State's motor vehicle licensing authority to report medically impaired drivers. Respondents felt that longer periods of restriction prior to re-evaluation are warranted in patients with malignant versus benign brain tumors and high versus low grade gliomas. Only 25% of respondents use formal, standardized testing to determine driving eligibility and approximately 31% address driving restrictions in every patient with a brain tumor. This survey highlights the lack of consensus regarding the responsibilities of physicians treating brain tumor patients in designing and enforcing driving restrictions. We propose that a panel of experts generate driving restriction guidelines to be used in conjunction with objective testing of motor and sensory impairment. These would aid practitioners in developing individualized driving restrictions for every brain tumor patient.

  16. Current profile redistribution driven by neutral beam injection in a reversed-field pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parke, E.; Anderson, J. K.; Brower, D. L.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Ding, W. X.; Johnson, C. A.; Lin, L.

    2016-05-01

    Neutral beam injection in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas on the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] drives current redistribution with increased on-axis current density but negligible net current drive. Internal fluctuations correlated with tearing modes are observed on multiple diagnostics; the behavior of tearing mode correlated structures is consistent with flattening of the safety factor profile. The first application of a parametrized model for island flattening to temperature fluctuations in an RFP allows inferrence of rational surface locations for multiple tearing modes. The m = 1, n = 6 mode is observed to shift inward by 1.1 ± 0.6 cm with neutral beam injection. Tearing mode rational surface measurements provide a strong constraint for equilibrium reconstruction, with an estimated reduction of q0 by 5% and an increase in on-axis current density of 8% ± 5%. The inferred on-axis current drive is consistent with estimates of fast ion density using TRANSP [Goldston et al., J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)].

  17. Current profile redistribution driven by neutral beam injection in a reversed-field pinch

    SciTech Connect

    Parke, E.; Anderson, J. K.; Den Hartog, D. J.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.; Lin, L.; Johnson, C. A.

    2016-05-15

    Neutral beam injection in reversed-field pinch (RFP) plasmas on the Madison Symmetric Torus [Dexter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 19, 131 (1991)] drives current redistribution with increased on-axis current density but negligible net current drive. Internal fluctuations correlated with tearing modes are observed on multiple diagnostics; the behavior of tearing mode correlated structures is consistent with flattening of the safety factor profile. The first application of a parametrized model for island flattening to temperature fluctuations in an RFP allows inferrence of rational surface locations for multiple tearing modes. The m = 1, n = 6 mode is observed to shift inward by 1.1 ± 0.6 cm with neutral beam injection. Tearing mode rational surface measurements provide a strong constraint for equilibrium reconstruction, with an estimated reduction of q{sub 0} by 5% and an increase in on-axis current density of 8% ± 5%. The inferred on-axis current drive is consistent with estimates of fast ion density using TRANSP [Goldston et al., J. Comput. Phys. 43, 61 (1981)].

  18. Driving self-assembly and emergent dynamics in colloidal suspensions by time-dependent magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Martin, James E.; Snezhko, Alexey

    2013-11-05

    In this review we discuss recent research on driving self assembly of magnetic particle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields. The variety of structures and effects that can be induced in such systems is remarkably broad due to the large number of variables involved. The alternating field can be uniaxial, biaxial or triaxial, the particles can be spherical or anisometric, and the suspension can be dispersed throughout a volume or confined to a soft interface. In the simplest case the field drives the static or quasi-static assembly of unusual particle structures, such as sheets, networks and open-cell foams. More complex,more » emergent collective behaviors evolve in systems that can follow the time-dependent field vector. In these cases energy is continuously injected into the system and striking °ow patterns and structures can arise. In fluid volumes these include the formation of advection and vortex lattices. At air-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces striking dynamic particle assemblies emerge due to the particle-mediated coupling of the applied field to surface excitations. These out-of-equilibrium interface assemblies exhibit a number of remarkable phenomena, including self-propulsion and surface mixing. In addition to discussing various methods of driven self assembly in magnetic suspensions, some of the remarkable properties of these novel materials are described.« less

  19. Driving self-assembly and emergent dynamics in colloidal suspensions by time-dependent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, James E.; Snezhko, Alexey

    2013-12-01

    In this review we discuss recent research on driving self-assembly of magnetic particle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields. The variety of structures and effects that can be induced in such systems is remarkably broad due to the large number of variables involved. The alternating field can be uniaxial, biaxial or triaxial, the particles can be spherical or anisometric, and the suspension can be dispersed throughout a volume or confined to a soft interface. In the simplest case the field drives the static or quasistatic assembly of unusual particle structures, such as sheets, networks and open-cell foams. More complex, emergent collective behaviors evolve in systems that can follow the time-dependent field vector. In these cases energy is continuously injected into the system and striking flow patterns and structures can arise. In fluid volumes these include the formation of advection and vortex lattices. At air-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces striking dynamic particle assemblies emerge due to the particle-mediated coupling of the applied field to surface excitations. These out-of-equilibrium interface assemblies exhibit a number of remarkable phenomena, including self-propulsion and surface mixing. In addition to discussing various methods of driven self-assembly in magnetic suspensions, some of the remarkable properties of these novel materials are described.

  20. Driving self-assembly and emergent dynamics in colloidal suspensions by time-dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E.; Snezhko, Alexey

    2013-11-05

    In this review we discuss recent research on driving self assembly of magnetic particle suspensions subjected to alternating magnetic fields. The variety of structures and effects that can be induced in such systems is remarkably broad due to the large number of variables involved. The alternating field can be uniaxial, biaxial or triaxial, the particles can be spherical or anisometric, and the suspension can be dispersed throughout a volume or confined to a soft interface. In the simplest case the field drives the static or quasi-static assembly of unusual particle structures, such as sheets, networks and open-cell foams. More complex, emergent collective behaviors evolve in systems that can follow the time-dependent field vector. In these cases energy is continuously injected into the system and striking °ow patterns and structures can arise. In fluid volumes these include the formation of advection and vortex lattices. At air-liquid and liquid-liquid interfaces striking dynamic particle assemblies emerge due to the particle-mediated coupling of the applied field to surface excitations. These out-of-equilibrium interface assemblies exhibit a number of remarkable phenomena, including self-propulsion and surface mixing. In addition to discussing various methods of driven self assembly in magnetic suspensions, some of the remarkable properties of these novel materials are described.

  1. Tunneling between chiral magnets: Spin current generation without external fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2017-06-01

    Magnons can generate a spin current, and the standard generating mechanism requires at least one external field. Since this mechanism is often applied to a multilayer system including a magnet and a paramagnetic metal, the system can possess not only the charge current induced by the spin current but also the charge current induced by the external field. The latter is an unnecessary accompaniment. Here we show that the tunneling of a magnon pair between chiral magnets can generate a spin current even without external fields. This phenomenon originates from a phase difference between magnon pairs of separate, weakly coupled chiral magnets, and is essentially different from the mechanism using the angle degree of freedom of the magnon Bose-Einstein condensates. The pair's tunneling is possible in chiral magnets due to lack of the Goldstone type gapless excitations. This phenomenon opens the door to spintronics not requiring any external field and using the magnon pair tunneling.

  2. Controlling the Spectral Characteristics of a Spin-Current Auto-Oscillator with an Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. H.; Chen, Lina; Urazhdin, S.; Du, Y. W.

    2017-08-01

    We study the effects of electrostatic gating on the magnetization auto-oscillations induced by the local injection of electric current into a ferromagnet-heavy-metal bilayer. We find that the characteristic currents required for the excitation, the intensity, and the spectral characteristics of the generated dynamical states can be tuned by the voltage applied to the metallic gate separated from the bilayer by a thin insulating layer. We show that the effect of electrostatic gating becomes enhanced in the strongly nonlinear oscillation regime at sufficiently large driving currents. Analysis shows that the observed effects are caused by a combination of electric-field-dependent surface anisotropy and electric-field-dependent contribution to the current-induced spin-orbit torques. The demonstrated ability to control the microwave emission and spectral characteristics provides an efficient approach to the development of electrically tunable microwave nano-oscillators.

  3. Relationship of the interplanetary electric field to the high-latitude ionospheric electric field and currents Observations and model simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clauer, C. R.; Banks, P. M.

    1986-01-01

    The electrical coupling between the solar wind, magnetosphere, and ionosphere is studied. The coupling is analyzed using observations of high-latitude ion convection measured by the Sondre Stromfjord radar in Greenland and a computer simulation. The computer simulation calculates the ionospheric electric potential distribution for a given configuration of field-aligned currents and conductivity distribution. The technique for measuring F-region in velocities at high time resolution over a large range of latitudes is described. Variations in the currents on ionospheric plasma convection are examined using a model of field-aligned currents linking the solar wind with the dayside, high-latitude ionosphere. The data reveal that high-latitude ionospheric convection patterns, electric fields, and field-aligned currents are dependent on IMF orientation; it is observed that the electric field, which drives the F-region plasma curve, responds within about 14 minutes to IMF variations in the magnetopause. Comparisons of the simulated plasma convection with the ion velocity measurements reveal good correlation between the data.

  4. Charge and current reservoirs for electric and magnetic field enhancement.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dongxing; Yang, Tian; Crozier, Kenneth B

    2010-05-10

    Two optical antenna designs incorporating structures termed charge and current reservoirs are proposed to realize localized high electric and magnetic field enhancement, respectively. Simulation results show that the fan-rod electric antenna design combines the advantages of the rod antenna and the bowtie antenna, and has higher field enhancement than either. The performance of a loop shaped magnetic antenna consisting of a pair of metallic strips with offsets is also verified numerically, with high magnetic field enhancement being observed in the simulation. In both of the designs, the concepts of charge and current reservoirs contribute to high electric and magnetic field enhancement.

  5. The useful field of view assessment predicts simulated commercial motor vehicle driving safety.

    PubMed

    McManus, Benjamin; Heaton, Karen; Vance, David E; Stavrinos, Despina

    2016-10-02

    The Useful Field of View (UFOV) assessment, a measure of visual speed of processing, has been shown to be a predictive measure of motor vehicle collision (MVC) involvement in an older adult population, but it remains unknown whether UFOV predicts commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driving safety during secondary task engagement. The purpose of this study is to determine whether the UFOV assessment predicts simulated MVCs in long-haul CMV drivers. Fifty licensed CMV drivers (Mage = 39.80, SD = 8.38, 98% male, 56% Caucasian) were administered the 3-subtest version of the UFOV assessment, where lower scores measured in milliseconds indicated better performance. CMV drivers completed 4 simulated drives, each spanning approximately a 22.50-mile distance. Four secondary tasks were presented to participants in a counterbalanced order during the drives: (a) no secondary task, (b) cell phone conversation, (c) text messaging interaction, and (d) e-mailing interaction with an on-board dispatch device. The selective attention subtest significantly predicted simulated MVCs regardless of secondary task. Each 20 ms slower on subtest 3 was associated with a 25% increase in the risk of an MVC in the simulated drive. The e-mail interaction secondary task significantly predicted simulated MVCs with a 4.14 times greater risk of an MVC compared to the no secondary task condition. Subtest 3, a measure of visual speed of processing, significantly predicted MVCs in the email interaction task. Each 20 ms slower on subtest 3 was associated with a 25% increase in the risk of an MVC during the email interaction task. The UFOV subtest 3 may be a promising measure to identify CMV drivers who may be at risk for MVCs or in need of cognitive training aimed at improving speed of processing. Subtest 3 may also identify CMV drivers who are particularly at risk when engaged in secondary tasks while driving.

  6. Anode current density distribution in a cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huan; Liu, Hui; Meng, Yingchao; Zhang, Junyou; Yang, Siyu; Hu, Peng; Chen, Pengbo; Yu, Daren

    2015-12-01

    The cusped field thruster is a new electric propulsion device that is expected to have a non-uniform radial current density at the anode. To further study the anode current density distribution, a multi-annulus anode is designed to directly measure the anode current density for the first time. The anode current density decreases sharply at larger radii; the magnitude of collected current density at the center is far higher compared with the outer annuli. The anode current density non-uniformity does not demonstrate a significant change with varying working conditions.

  7. Anode current density distribution in a cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Huan Liu, Hui Meng, Yingchao; Zhang, Junyou; Yang, Siyu; Hu, Peng; Chen, Pengbo; Yu, Daren

    2015-12-15

    The cusped field thruster is a new electric propulsion device that is expected to have a non-uniform radial current density at the anode. To further study the anode current density distribution, a multi-annulus anode is designed to directly measure the anode current density for the first time. The anode current density decreases sharply at larger radii; the magnitude of collected current density at the center is far higher compared with the outer annuli. The anode current density non-uniformity does not demonstrate a significant change with varying working conditions.

  8. Dissipative random quantum spin chain with boundary-driving and bulk-dephasing: magnetization and current statistics in the non-equilibrium-steady-state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2017-04-01

    The Lindblad dynamics with dephasing in the bulk and magnetization-driving at the two boundaries is studied for the quantum spin chain with random fields h j and couplings J j (that can be either uniform or random). In the regime of strong disorder in the random fields, or in the regime of strong bulk-dephasing, the effective dynamics can be mapped onto a classical simple symmetric exclusion process with quenched disorder in the diffusion coefficient associated to each bond. The properties of the corresponding non-equilibrium-steady-state in each disordered sample between the two reservoirs are studied in detail by extending the methods that have been previously developed for the symmetric exclusion process without disorder. Explicit results are given for the magnetization profile, for the two-point correlations, for the mean current and for the current fluctuations, in terms of the random fields and couplings defining the disordered sample.

  9. Magnetic Field Observation around Current Path by Magnetic Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saida, Daisuke; Takahashi, Takuji

    2004-07-01

    The magnetic field around a GaAs/AlGaAs mesa stripe induced by an AC current in the range of 0.3-15.6 μA was observed by magnetic force microscopy (MFM). To confirm the possibility of the vector decomposition of the current-induced magnetic field gradient, we compared the magnetic force signals in the cases of parallel and perpendicular configurations between the MFM cantilever and the current path. In addition, we proposed a novel way of eliminating some effects of electrostatic force, by which a good linearity in the magnetic force signals against the currents was achieved. The spatial resolution of this method was also discussed.

  10. Fourier analysis of polar cap electric field and current distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barbosa, D. D.

    1984-01-01

    A theoretical study of high-latitude electric fields and currents, using analytic Fourier analysis methods, is conducted. A two-dimensional planar model of the ionosphere with an enhanced conductivity auroral belt and field-aligned currents at the edges is employed. Two separate topics are treated. A field-aligned current element near the cusp region of the polar cap is included to investigate the modifications to the convection pattern by the east-west component of the interplanetary magnetic field. It is shown that a sizable one-cell structure is induced near the cusp which diverts equipotential contours to the dawnside or duskside, depending on the sign of the cusp current. This produces characteristic dawn-dusk asymmetries to the electric field that have been previously observed over the polar cap. The second topic is concerned with the electric field configuration obtained in the limit of perfect shielding, where the field is totally excluded equatorward of the auroral oval. When realistic field-aligned current distributions are used, the result is to produce severely distorted, crescent-shaped equipotential contours over the cap. Exact, analytic formulae applicable to this case are also provided.

  11. The Influence of Neutral Beam Injection on the Heating and Current Drive with Electron Cyclotron Wave on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Pengxiang; Wu, Bin; Wang, Jinfang; Li, Yingying; Wang, Xiaoguang; Xu, Handong; Wang, Xiaojie; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Hailin; Hao, Baolong; Yang, Zhen; Zheng, Ting; Hu, Chundong

    2016-11-01

    Both neutral beam injection (NBI) and electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) have been applied on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) in the 2015 campaign. In order to achieve more effective heating and current drive, the effects of NBI on the heating and current drive with electron cyclotron wave (ECW) are analyzed utilizing the code TORAY and experimental data in the shot #54411 and #54417. According to the experimental and simulated results, for the heating with ECW, NBI can improve the heating efficiency and move the power deposition place towards the inside of the plasma. On the other hand, for the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), NBI can also improve the efficiency of ECCD and move the place of ECCD inward. These results will be valuable for the center heating, the achievement of fully non-inductive current drive operation and the suppression of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities with ECW on EAST or ITER with many auxiliary heating methods. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB101001 and 2014DFG61950) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11405212 and 11175211)

  12. Current Status and Future Perspective of Magnetic Behavior Analysis for Hard Disc Drive Magnetic Recording Heads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagiuchi, Katsuaki; Hirata, Kei; Ishida, Yoichi

    With the increase in the recording density of hard disk drives, the narrower magnetic pole and read-sensor widths in writing and reading heads are required, and techniques used for the magnetic behavior analysis in a nanoscale area is essential. The observation of the in-plane domain structure of the writer pole for a perpendicular recording (PMR) head was performed by electron holography in order to elucidate the mechanism of the pole erasure originating from the instability of the magnetic domain state. The results revealed that the stability of the domain structure is strongly related to the domain wall trapping, and the pole erasure can be suppressed by realizing the stable domain structures. With respect to a current perpendicular to plane (CPP)-giant magneto-resistive (GMR) head, which has been promising candidates of a next-generation reading head element, the insertion of non-magnetic materials, such as Cu, between the ferromagnetic pinned and free layers is known to increase the MR ratio. For realizing the practical use of the CPP-GMR head, effects of the insertion of materials on the increase in the MR ratio were investigated by X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). The results revealed that XMCD is a powerful technique to obtain information on electronic states and magnetic moments with the help of the theoretical electronic band calculation. The potential application of secondary cantilever resonance magnetic force microscopy and spin-polarized scanning electron microscope to the in-situ magnetic imaging of PMR heads will be also discussed.

  13. Net field-aligned currents observed by Triad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sugiura, M.; Potemra, T. A.

    1975-01-01

    From the Triad magnetometer observation of a step-like level shift in the east-west component of the magnetic field at 800 km altitude, the existence of a net current flowing into or away from the ionosphere in a current layer was inferred. The current direction is toward the ionosphere on the morning side and away from it on the afternoon side. The field aligned currents observed by Triad are considered as being an important element in the electro-dynamical coupling between the distant magnetosphere and the ionosphere. The current density integrated over the thickness of the layer increases with increasing magnetic activity, but the relation between the current density and Kp in individual cases is not a simple linear relation. An extrapolation of the statistical relation to Kp = 0 indicates existence of a sheet current of order 0.1 amp/m even at extremely quiet times. During periods of higher magnetic activity an integrated current of approximately 1 amp/m and average current density of order 0.000001 amp/sq m are observed. The location and the latitudinal width of the field aligned current layer carrying the net current very roughly agree with those of the region of high electron intensities in the trapping boundary.

  14. Simulation of injector dynamics during steady inductive helicity injection current drive in the HIT-SI experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, C.; Marklin, G.; Victor, B.; Akcay, C.; Jarboe, T.

    2015-04-15

    We present simulations of inductive helicity injection in the Helicity Injected Torus with Steady Inductive helicity injection (HIT-SI) device that treats the entire plasma volume in a single dynamic MHD model. A new fully 3D numerical tool, the PSI-center TETrahedral mesh code, was developed that provides the geometric flexibility required for this investigation. Implementation of a zero-β Hall MHD model using PSI-TET will be presented including formulation of a new self-consistent magnetic boundary condition for the wall of the HIT-SI device. Results from simulations of HIT-SI are presented focusing on injector dynamics that are investigated numerically for the first time. Asymmetries in the plasma loading between the two helicity injectors and progression of field reversal in each injector are observed. Analysis indicates cross-coupling between injectors through confinement volume structures. Injector impedance is found to scale with toroidal current at fixed density, consistent with experimental observation. Comparison to experimental data with an injector drive frequency of 14.5 kHz shows good agreement with magnetic diagnostics. Global mode structures from Bi-Orthogonal decomposition agree well with experimental data for the first four modes.

  15. The cometary magnetic field and its associated electric currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ip, W.-H.; Mendis, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    Two different observations of Comet Kohoutek (1973f) seem to suggest the existence of substantial magnetic fields (not less than 100 gammas) in its coma and tail. The effects of the currents and hydromagnetic waves associated with these magnetic fields are considered. It is shown that while the currents closing through the inner coma may represent an important source of ionization in that region, the dissipation of hydromagnetic waves may also be a significant, if not dominant, source of heating there.

  16. Electric currents and voltage drops along auroral field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    An assessment is presented of the current state of knowledge concerning Birkeland currents and the parallel electric field, with discussions focusing on the Birkeland primary region 1 sheets, the region 2 sheets which parallel them and appear to close in the partial ring current, the cusp currents (which may be correlated with the interplanetary B(y) component), and the Harang filament. The energy required by the parallel electric field and the associated particle acceleration processes appears to be derived from the Birkeland currents, for which evidence is adduced from particles, inverted V spectra, rising ion beams and expanded loss cones. Conics may on the other hand signify acceleration by electrostatic ion cyclotron waves associated with beams accelerated by the parallel electric field.

  17. Streaming current magnetic fields in a charged nanopore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Abraham; Taheri, Peyman; Kostiuk, Larry W.

    2016-11-01

    Magnetic fields induced by currents created in pressure driven flows inside a solid-state charged nanopore were modeled by numerically solving a system of steady state continuum partial differential equations, i.e., Poisson, Nernst-Planck, Ampere and Navier-Stokes equations (PNPANS). This analysis was based on non-dimensional transport governing equations that were scaled using Debye length as the characteristic length scale, and applied to a finite length cylindrical nano-channel. The comparison of numerical and analytical studies shows an excellent agreement and verified the magnetic fields density both inside and outside the nanopore. The radially non-uniform currents resulted in highly non-uniform magnetic fields within the nanopore that decay as 1/r outside the nanopore. It is worth noting that for either streaming currents or streaming potential cases, the maximum magnetic field occurred inside the pore in the vicinity of nanopore wall, as opposed to a cylindrical conductor that carries a steady electric current where the maximum magnetic fields occur at the perimeter of conductor. Based on these results, it is suggested and envisaged that non-invasive external magnetic fields readouts generated by streaming/ionic currents may be viewed as secondary electronic signatures of biomolecules to complement and enhance current DNA nanopore sequencing techniques.

  18. Streaming current magnetic fields in a charged nanopore

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri, Abraham; Taheri, Peyman; Kostiuk, Larry W.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic fields induced by currents created in pressure driven flows inside a solid-state charged nanopore were modeled by numerically solving a system of steady state continuum partial differential equations, i.e., Poisson, Nernst-Planck, Ampere and Navier-Stokes equations (PNPANS). This analysis was based on non-dimensional transport governing equations that were scaled using Debye length as the characteristic length scale, and applied to a finite length cylindrical nano-channel. The comparison of numerical and analytical studies shows an excellent agreement and verified the magnetic fields density both inside and outside the nanopore. The radially non-uniform currents resulted in highly non-uniform magnetic fields within the nanopore that decay as 1/r outside the nanopore. It is worth noting that for either streaming currents or streaming potential cases, the maximum magnetic field occurred inside the pore in the vicinity of nanopore wall, as opposed to a cylindrical conductor that carries a steady electric current where the maximum magnetic fields occur at the perimeter of conductor. Based on these results, it is suggested and envisaged that non-invasive external magnetic fields readouts generated by streaming/ionic currents may be viewed as secondary electronic signatures of biomolecules to complement and enhance current DNA nanopore sequencing techniques. PMID:27833119

  19. Streaming current magnetic fields in a charged nanopore.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Abraham; Taheri, Peyman; Kostiuk, Larry W

    2016-11-11

    Magnetic fields induced by currents created in pressure driven flows inside a solid-state charged nanopore were modeled by numerically solving a system of steady state continuum partial differential equations, i.e., Poisson, Nernst-Planck, Ampere and Navier-Stokes equations (PNPANS). This analysis was based on non-dimensional transport governing equations that were scaled using Debye length as the characteristic length scale, and applied to a finite length cylindrical nano-channel. The comparison of numerical and analytical studies shows an excellent agreement and verified the magnetic fields density both inside and outside the nanopore. The radially non-uniform currents resulted in highly non-uniform magnetic fields within the nanopore that decay as 1/r outside the nanopore. It is worth noting that for either streaming currents or streaming potential cases, the maximum magnetic field occurred inside the pore in the vicinity of nanopore wall, as opposed to a cylindrical conductor that carries a steady electric current where the maximum magnetic fields occur at the perimeter of conductor. Based on these results, it is suggested and envisaged that non-invasive external magnetic fields readouts generated by streaming/ionic currents may be viewed as secondary electronic signatures of biomolecules to complement and enhance current DNA nanopore sequencing techniques.

  20. Application of very high harmonic fast waves for off-axis current drive in the DIII-D and FNSF-AT tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    Prater, Ronald; Moeller, Charles P.; Pinsker, Robert I.; ...

    2014-06-26

    Fast waves at frequencies far above the ion cyclotron frequency and approaching the lower hybrid frequency (also called “helicons” or “whistlers”) have application to off-axis current drive in tokamaks with high electron beta. The high frequency causes the whistler-like behavior of the wave power nearly following field lines, but with a small radial component, so the waves spiral slowly toward the plasma center. The high frequency also contributes to strong damping. Modeling predicts robust off-axis current drive with good efficiency compared to alternatives in high performance discharges in DIII-D and Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) when the electron beta ismore » above about 1.8%. Detailed analysis of ray behavior shows that ray trajectories and damping are deterministic (that is, not strongly affected by plasma profiles or initial ray conditions), unlike the chaotic ray behavior in lower frequency fast wave experiments. Current drive was found to not be sensitive to the launched value of the parallel index of refraction n||, so wave accessibility issues can be reduced. Finally, use of a traveling wave antenna provides a very narrow n|| spectrum, which also helps avoid accessibility problems.« less

  1. Application of very high harmonic fast waves for off-axis current drive in the DIII-D and FNSF-AT tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Prater, Ronald; Moeller, Charles P.; Pinsker, Robert I.; Porkolab, Miklos; Meneghini, Orso; Vdovin, V. L.

    2014-06-26

    Fast waves at frequencies far above the ion cyclotron frequency and approaching the lower hybrid frequency (also called “helicons” or “whistlers”) have application to off-axis current drive in tokamaks with high electron beta. The high frequency causes the whistler-like behavior of the wave power nearly following field lines, but with a small radial component, so the waves spiral slowly toward the plasma center. The high frequency also contributes to strong damping. Modeling predicts robust off-axis current drive with good efficiency compared to alternatives in high performance discharges in DIII-D and Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) when the electron beta is above about 1.8%. Detailed analysis of ray behavior shows that ray trajectories and damping are deterministic (that is, not strongly affected by plasma profiles or initial ray conditions), unlike the chaotic ray behavior in lower frequency fast wave experiments. Current drive was found to not be sensitive to the launched value of the parallel index of refraction n||, so wave accessibility issues can be reduced. Finally, use of a traveling wave antenna provides a very narrow n|| spectrum, which also helps avoid accessibility problems.

  2. Tunnel Dielectric Field-Effect Transistors with High Peak-to-Valley Current Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi; Zhuang, Yiqi; Li, Cong; Wang, Ping

    2017-02-01

    We present silicon-compatible tunnel dielectric field-effect transistors with strong negative differential resistance. On-state tunneling currents have been improved and fully suppressed ambipolarity with lowest subthreshold slope (SS) 10 mV/dec. In addition to the TFET mode, our device works as the negative transconductance characteristic that produces a high current peak-to-valley current ratio (PVR) (up to 107). Numerical simulations demonstrate the impact of tunnel dielectric layer thickness, gate oxide thickness and temperature on the PVR. With the significant improvement in SS, on-state current and high PVR, this tunnel dielectric transistor provides an effective technique for enhancing the drive current, and realizes its applications in logic and memory circuits.

  3. Instabilities of current-sheet with a nonuniform guide field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Feng; Xu, Jinrong; Yan, Fei; Zhang, Min; Yu, M. Y.

    2017-09-01

    Instability of a force-free current sheet with a localized nonuniform guide field in a Vlasov-Maxwell plasma is investigated. Two oppositely propagating linearly unstable modes with quite different mode structures are found. The growth rate of one mode varies nonmonotonically with the magnitudes of the guide field and the main-field aligned component of its wave vector. The unstable mode is weakened as the guide-field nonuniformity is reduced, and it vanishes when the guide field becomes uniform. The growth rate of the other mode is almost unaffected by the guide field nonuniformity. However, it decreases monotonously with the magnitudes of the guide field and the wavevector component in the direction of the main field.

  4. Effect of Interhemispheric Field-Aligned Currents on Region-1 Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, Sonya; Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.

    2015-01-01

    An asymmetry in ionospheric conductivity between two hemispheres results in the formation of additional, interhemispheric field-aligned currents flowing between conjugate ionospheres within two auroral zones. These interhemispheric currents are especially significant during summer-winter conditions when there is a significant asymmetry in ionospheric conductivity in two hemispheres. In such conditions, these currents may be comparable in magnitude with the Region 1 field-aligned currents. In this case, the R1 current is the sum of two FACs: one is going from to the solar wind, and another is flowing between conjugate ionospheres. These interhemispheric currents can also cause the formation of auroras extended along the nightside polar cap boundary, which may be related to the so-called double auroral oval. In this study, we present the results of analytical and numerical solutions for the interhemispheric currents and their effect on the Region 1 currents.

  5. Remote field eddy current inspection of support plate fretting wear

    SciTech Connect

    Shatat, A.; Atherton, D.L.

    1997-03-01

    This article demonstrates how the remote field eddy current technique might be extended to measure support plate fretting wear in heat exchanger tubes. A finite element analysis was used to examine the plate`s effect on the eddy current signal. Experimental data lend support to a suggested multifrequency method for sizing fretting grooves.

  6. The pattern of the electromagnetic field emitted by mobile phones in motor vehicle driving simulators.

    PubMed

    Politański, Piotr; Bortkiewicz, Alicja; Zmyślony, Marek

    2013-06-01

    The paper reports the results of the determinations of UMTS EMF distributions in the driver’s cab of motor vehicle simulators. The results will serve as the basis for future research on the influence of EMF emitted by mobile phones on driver physiology. Two motor vehicle driving simulators were monitored, while an EMF source was placed at the driver's head or on the dashboard of the motor vehicle driving simulator. For every applied configuration, the maximal electric field strength was measured, as were the values at 16 points corresponding to chosen locations on a driver's or passenger's body. When the power was set for the maximum (49 mW), a value of 27 V/m was measured in the vicinity of the driver's head when the phone was close to the head. With the same power, when the phone was placed on the dashboard, the measured maximum was 15.2 V/m in the vicinity of the driver's foot. Similar results were obtained for the passenger. Significant perturbations in EMF distribution and an increase in electric field strength values in the mo-tor vehicle driving simulator were also observed in comparison to free space measurements, and the electric field strength was up to 3 times higher inside the simulator. This study can act as the basis of future studies concerning the influence of the EMF emitted by mobile phones on the physiology of the driver. Additionally, the authors postulate that it is advisable to keep mobile phones at a distance from the head, i.e. use, whenever possible, hands-free kits to reduce EMF exposure, both for drivers and passengers.

  7. Three-dimensional structure of ionospheric currents produced by field-aligned currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, M.

    1982-08-01

    Ionospheric currents caused by field-aligned currents are calculated three-dimensionally under quiet conditions at the equinox, using a magnetic field line coordinate system and with the assumption of infinite parallel conductivity. Input field-aligned currents are assumed to be distributed only in the daytime and the whole system is assumed to be symmetric about the equator. Calculated currents are comparable with those of the ionospheric dynamo in higher latitudes, but much weaker in lower latitudes including the equatorial electrojet region. Hence, if the model is valid these currents may have a considerable effect on the day-to-day variation of Sq currents in higher latitudes, but little effect on those in lower latitudes such as the counter-electrojet.

  8. Study of lower hybrid current drive efficiency and its correlation with photon temperatures in the HT-7 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Younis, J.; Wan, B. N.; Lin, S. Y.; Shi, Y. J.; Ding, B. J.; Gong, X.; HT-7 Team

    2009-07-01

    Lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) efficiency is a very important parameter. The experimental current drive efficiency is defined as η = IrfneR/PLH, where Irf is the current driven by the lower hybrid waves (LHWs), ne is the central line-average density, R is the major radius of the plasma and PLH is the injected LH wave power absorbed by the plasma through Landau damping. A study of current drive efficiency of LHWs in the HT-7 tokamak has been carried out in the parameter ranges: ne = (1.2-2.5) × 1019 m-3, Ip = (80-200) kA, Bt = 1.8 T, PLH = (188-532) kW in the limiter configuration. Current drive efficiency is investigated through a simple correlation with photon temperature and normalized intensity of fast electron bremstrahlung emission, which is, in the first approximation, proportional to the averaged velocity and population of the fast electrons. The plasma current scanning experiment shows that CD efficiency increase is due to the increase in both the photon temperature and the population of the fast electrons generated by LHWs. The density scanning experiment shows that as the plasma density is increased, an increment in CD efficiency along with the increase in the population of fast electrons is observed. The slowing down through the collisions with bulk electrons is mainly responsible for the decreased photon temperature during the plasma density scan. These experiments strongly suggest the dominant role of the population of fast electrons generated by LHCD and the generation of the current carried by fast electrons.

  9. Transient Magnetic Fields and Current Distributions in an Electric Vehicle Caused by a Lightning Stroke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kazuo; Kanata, Jun; Ametani, Akihiro

    An electric vehicle includes more electronic parts than a gasoline-powered vehicle. Not only control but also driving circuits of electric vehicles are electrical at variance with those of gasoline-powered vehicles. It means that there is higher possibility of malfunctions on an electric vehicle due to electromagnetic disturbances caused by a lightning stroke. Therefore, it is important to establish lightning protection methodologies for electric vehicles. To solve the mechanisms that the lightning current following through the vehicle body and some other parts causes the malfunctions, it is important to clarify transient magnetic fields and current distributions in electric vehicles. In this paper, the transient magnetic fields and the current distributions in an electric vehicle are simulated using the FDTD method, and the probability of lightning damages is discussed.

  10. Generating vorticity and magnetic fields in plasmas in general relativity: Spacetime curvature drive

    SciTech Connect

    Asenjo, Felipe A.; Mahajan, Swadesh M.; Qadir, Asghar

    2013-02-15

    Using the generally covariant magnetofluid formalism for a hot plasma, a spacetime curvature driven mechanism for generating seed vorticity/magnetic field is presented. The 'battery' owes its origin to the interaction between the gravity modified Lorentz factor of the fluid element and the inhomogeneous plasma thermodynamics. The general relativistic drive is evaluated for two simple cases: seed formation in a simplified model of a hot plasma accreting in stable orbits around a Schwarzschild black hole and for particles in free fall near the horizon. Some astrophysical applications are suggested.

  11. Fast wave dispersion, damping, and electron current drive in the Irvine torus

    SciTech Connect

    Platt, R.C.; McWilliams, R.

    1987-09-01

    Fast waves with frequencies near the mean gyrofrequency were excited in a toroidal magnetized plasma. Experimental measurements of wave dispersion were found to be in good agreement with predictions from cold plasma theory. Experimental measurements of wave damping lengths have been made. Measured damping lengths were found to be anomalously short when compared to predictions for electron Landau-damping, transit-time magnetic pumping and collisional damping. Unidirectional fast waves drove steady-state electron currents. Peak efficiencies up to eta = InR/P = 6 x 10/sup -2/ A/W(10/sup 13/ cm/sup -3/)m were observed with up to 14% of the wave energy converted to poloidal magnetic field energy.

  12. Inductive plasma current start-up by the outer vertical field coil in a spherical tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitarai, Osamu

    1999-12-01

    Plasma current-start up induced by an outer vertical field coil is studied during the ignition access phase in a spherical tokamak reactor. We have illustrated the concept that the plasma current of ~50 MA could be induced by the outer vertical field coil in the proposed spherical tokamak with the help of the small central solenoid flux of +/-5 V s and the strong heating power less than 100 MW for the internal inductance of icons/Journals/Common/ell" ALT="ell" ALIGN="TOP"/>i~0.4-0.8 without the help of bootstrap current and non-inductive current drive power. The required condition to achieve this operation scenario is that the flux produced by the equilibrium vertical field is larger than the inductive flux. Current start-up operation is achieved by adding the small ohmic heating solenoid flux for the flux waveform adjustment because the flux from the outer vertical field coil cannot solely induce the desired plasma current waveform in the case of the preprogramming of the heating power.

  13. Generation of field-aligned current in the auroral zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okuda, Hideo

    1991-01-01

    Generation of a magnetic field-aligned current in the auroral zone connecting the magnetospheric and ionospheric plasmas has been studied by means of a three dimensional particle simulation model. The model is of a magnetostatic variety appropriate for a low beta plasma in which the high frequency transverse displacement current has been eliminated. The simulation model is highly elongated along the magnetic field lines in order to model a highly elongated flux tube in the auroral zone. An enhanced field-aligned current was generated by injection of a magnetospheric plasma across the auroral zone magnetic field at the center of the model. Such a plasma injection may correspond to a plasmoid injection at the geomagnetic tail associated with magnetic reconnection during a substorm or a transverse plasma flow along the low latitude magnetopause boundary layer. The results of the simulations show that the field-aligned current can be enhanced over the thermal current by a factor of 5 - 10 via such injection. Associated with the enhanced current are the electrostatic ion cyclotron waves and shear Alfven waves excited in the auroral zone.

  14. CURRENT SHEETS FORMATION IN TANGLED CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Rappazzo, A. F.; Parker, E. N. E-mail: parker@oddjob.uchicago.edu

    2013-08-10

    We investigate the dynamical evolution of magnetic fields in closed regions of solar and stellar coronae. To understand under which conditions current sheets form, we examine dissipative and ideal reduced magnetohydrodynamic models in Cartesian geometry, where two magnetic field components are present: the strong guide field B{sub 0}, extended along the axial direction, and the dynamical orthogonal field b. Magnetic field lines thread the system along the axial direction that spans the length L and are line-tied at the top and bottom plates. The magnetic field b initially has only large scales, with its gradient (current) length scale of the order of l{sub b}. We identify the magnetic intensity threshold b/B{sub 0} {approx} l{sub b}/L. For values of b below this threshold, field-line tension inhibits the formation of current sheets, while above the threshold they form quickly on fast ideal timescales. In the ideal case, above the magnetic threshold, we show that current sheets thickness decreases in time until it becomes smaller than the grid resolution, with the analyticity strip width {delta} decreasing at least exponentially, after which the simulations become underresolved.

  15. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  16. Magnetic field and electric current structure in the chromosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dravins, D.

    1974-01-01

    The three-dimensional vector magnetic field structure in the chromosphere above an active region is deduced by using high-resolution H-alpha filtergrams together with a simultaneous digital magnetogram. An analog model of the field is made with 400 metal wires representing field lines that outline the H-alpha structure. The height extent of the field is determined from vertical field-gradient observations around sunspots, from observed fibril heights, and from an assumption that the sources of the field are largely local. The computed electric currents (typically 10 mA/sq m) are found to flow in patterns not similar to observed features and not parallel to magnetic fields. Force structures correspond to observed solar features; the dynamics to be expected include: downward motion in bipolar areas in the lower chromosphere, an outflow of the outer chromosphere into the corona with radially outward flow above bipolar plage regions, and motion of arch filament systems.

  17. Momentum and Current Transport in the MST Reversed Field Pinch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. X.; Lin, Liang; Brower, D. L.; Almagri, A. F.; Chapman, B. E.; Hartog, D. J. Den; Duff, J.; Sarff, J. S.

    2013-10-01

    Self-generated flows and current (dynamo effects) are routinely observed in the MST RFP where both parallel flow and electric field reverse sign compared to the edge. In the absence of external torque and applied poloidal electric field, both the flow and electric field may arise from kinetic effects. Kinetic effects, defined as the correlated product of parallel pressure and radial magnetic field fluctuations, have been measured by using a high-speed polarimetry-interferometry diagnostic (for combined radial magnetic field and density fluctuation measurement). Between sawtooth crashes it is found that the measured kinetic effects associated with density fluctuations (a component of parallel pressure fluctuation) has a finite amplitude that may account for the observed flow in the core. In addition, the same fluctuations also influence electron dynamics via the kinetic dynamo. These results suggest kinetic effects may play an important role in coupling between momentum transport and current transport. Work supported by US DOE and NSF.

  18. 3-D Magnetospheric Field and Plasma Containing Thin Current Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharia, S.; Cheng, C. Z.; Maezawa, K.; Wing, S.

    2002-05-01

    In this study we present fully-3D self-consistent solutions of the magnetosphere by using observation-based plasma pressure distributions and computational boundary conditions based on the T96 magnetospheric field model. The pressure profiles we use are either taken directly from observations (GEOTAIL pressure data in the plasma sheet and DMSP ionospheric pressure) or empirical (Spence-Kivelson formula for pressure on the midnight equatorial line). The 3-D solutions involve solving 2 coupled elliptic equations in a flux coordinate systems, with the magnetic field expressed by two Euler potentials and using appropriate boundary conditions for both the closed- and open-field regions derived from the empirical field model. We look into how the self-consistent magnetic field and current structures change under different external conditions, and we discuss the appearance of thin cross-tail current sheets during disturbed magnetospheric times.

  19. Effective variable switching point predictive current control for ac low-voltage drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolze, Peter; Karamanakos, Petros; Kennel, Ralph; Manias, Stefanos; Endisch, Christian

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents an effective model predictive current control scheme for induction machines driven by a three-level neutral point clamped inverter, called variable switching point predictive current control. Despite the fact that direct, enumeration-based model predictive control (MPC) strategies are very popular in the field of power electronics due to their numerous advantages such as design simplicity and straightforward implementation procedure, they carry two major drawbacks. These are the increased computational effort and the high ripples on the controlled variables, resulting in a limited applicability of such methods. The high ripples occur because in direct MPC algorithms the actuating variable can only be changed at the beginning of a sampling interval. A possible remedy for this would be to change the applied control input within the sampling interval, and thus to apply it for a shorter time than one sample. However, since such a solution would lead to an additional overhead which is crucial especially for multilevel inverters, a heuristic preselection of the optimal control action is adopted to keep the computational complexity at bay. Experimental results are provided to verify the potential advantages of the proposed strategy.

  20. DC magnetic field sensor based on electric driving and magnetic tuning in piezoelectric/magnetostrictive bilayer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Long; Wing Or, Siu; Ming Leung, Chung; Ho, S. L.

    2014-05-01

    A dc magnetic field sensor possessing an interestingly high electric voltage-driven, magnetic field-tuned dc magnetoelectric (ME) effect is developed based on a bilayer of Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 piezoelectric transformer and Tb0.3Dy0.7Fe1.92 magnetostrictive substrate. The dc ME effect in the sensor, as evaluated experimentally and theoretically, is induced by driving the bilayer at its zero-field longitudinal resonance frequency (fr0) using an ac electric voltage (Vac) referenced at the input of the piezoelectric transformer, as well as, by tuning the field-dependent compliance and resonance characteristics of the bilayer with the dc magnetic field to be measured (Hdc) upon the negative-ΔE effect intrinsic in the magnetostrictive substrate. The sensor shows a good linear negative response of ac ME voltage (VME) at the output of the piezoelectric transformer to a broad range of Hdc of 0-350 Oe under a small Vac of 2.5 V peak at the designated fr0 of 125.3 kHz. This gives a high negative dc magnetic field sensitivity (S) of -1.58 mV/Oe.

  1. Critical current density and current distribution in field cooled superconducting disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, Pierre; Noudem, Jacques; Dupont, Louis

    2016-07-01

    Applications of bulk superconductors concern superconducting motors and generators, the levitation of vehicles, the generation of high magnetic fields with small size cryo-magnets, the shielding of magnetic fields and other applications. For all of them, it is essential to determine the critical current density, and to understand the effect of the shape and size of the bulks on the properties of interest. In this contribution, we show how the combination of levitation force and trapped field measurements allow one to determine the characteristics and the potential performances of superconducting disks using analytical modeling. As examples of applications we detail the effects of the magnetizing field and of the bulk sheet critical current density on the levitation force. An important result of the reported measurements is that in field-cooled samples, the shielding currents possibly do not flow along the whole thickness of the disks.

  2. Are Teens Driving Safer? Cross Currents Issue 4, October 2005. Publication # 2005-16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Pilar S.; Brown, Brett V.

    2005-01-01

    For many teens, learning to drive and obtaining a driver's license are exciting achievements,often allowing them more freedom to socialize, work at a job, or participate in other activities without being totally reliant on a parent or others for transportation. This brief provides an overview of relevant data including teen crash rates and trends,…

  3. Are Teens Driving Safer? Cross Currents Issue 4, October 2005. Publication # 2005-16

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marin, Pilar S.; Brown, Brett V.

    2005-01-01

    For many teens, learning to drive and obtaining a driver's license are exciting achievements,often allowing them more freedom to socialize, work at a job, or participate in other activities without being totally reliant on a parent or others for transportation. This brief provides an overview of relevant data including teen crash rates and trends,…

  4. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Boothe, Richard W.

    1996-01-01

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements.

  5. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Boothe, R.W.

    1994-02-15

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements. 6 figures.

  6. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, Charles E.; Boothe, Richard W.

    1994-01-01

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements.

  7. Method and apparatus for improved efficiency in a pulse-width-modulated alternating current motor drive

    DOEpatents

    Konrad, C.E.; Boothe, R.W.

    1996-01-23

    A scheme for optimizing the efficiency of an AC motor drive operated in a pulse-width-modulated mode provides that the modulation frequency of the power furnished to the motor is a function of commanded motor torque and is higher at lower torque requirements than at higher torque requirements. 6 figs.

  8. Pulsed Direct Current Electric Fields Enhance Osteogenesis in Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hammerick, Kyle E.; James, Aaron W.; Huang, Zubin; Prinz, Fritz B.

    2010-01-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) constitute a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine applications. Previous studies of osteogenic potential in ASCs have focused on chemicals, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli. Citing the demonstrated role electric fields play in enhancing healing in bone fractures and defects, we investigated the ability of pulsed direct current electric fields to drive osteogenic differentiation in mouse ASCs. Employing 50 Hz direct current electric fields in concert with and without osteogenic factors, we demonstrated increased early osteoblast-specific markers. We were also able to establish that commonly reported artifacts of electric field stimulation are not the primary mediators of the observed effects. The electric fields caused marked changes in the cytoskeleton. We used atomic force microscopy–based force spectroscopy to record an increase in the cytoskeletal tension after treatment with electric fields. We abolished the increased cytoskeletal stresses with the rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y27632, and did not see any decrease in osteogenic gene expression, suggesting that the pro-osteogenic effects of the electric fields are not transduced via cytoskeletal tension. Electric fields may show promise as candidate enhancers of osteogenesis of ASCs and may be incorporated into cell-based strategies for skeletal regeneration. PMID:19824802

  9. Pulsed direct current electric fields enhance osteogenesis in adipose-derived stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Hammerick, Kyle E; James, Aaron W; Huang, Zubin; Prinz, Fritz B; Longaker, Michael T

    2010-03-01

    Adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs) constitute a promising source of cells for regenerative medicine applications. Previous studies of osteogenic potential in ASCs have focused on chemicals, growth factors, and mechanical stimuli. Citing the demonstrated role electric fields play in enhancing healing in bone fractures and defects, we investigated the ability of pulsed direct current electric fields to drive osteogenic differentiation in mouse ASCs. Employing 50 Hz direct current electric fields in concert with and without osteogenic factors, we demonstrated increased early osteoblast-specific markers. We were also able to establish that commonly reported artifacts of electric field stimulation are not the primary mediators of the observed effects. The electric fields caused marked changes in the cytoskeleton. We used atomic force microscopy-based force spectroscopy to record an increase in the cytoskeletal tension after treatment with electric fields. We abolished the increased cytoskeletal stresses with the rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor, Y27632, and did not see any decrease in osteogenic gene expression, suggesting that the pro-osteogenic effects of the electric fields are not transduced via cytoskeletal tension. Electric fields may show promise as candidate enhancers of osteogenesis of ASCs and may be incorporated into cell-based strategies for skeletal regeneration.

  10. Field-aligned current response to solar indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Thom R.; Weimer, D. R.; Tobiska, W. K.; Olsen, Nils

    2017-05-01

    Magnetometer data from three satellite missions have been used to analyze and identify the effects of varying solar radiation on the magnitudes and locations of field-aligned currents in the Earth's upper atmosphere. Data from the CHAMP, Ørsted, and Swarm satellite missions have been brought together to provide a database spanning a 15 year period. The extensive time frame has been augmented by data from the ACE satellite, as well as a number of indices of solar radiation. This data set has been sorted by a number of solar wind, interplanetary magnetic field, and solar radiation indices to provide measurements for the field-aligned current structures in both hemispheres for arbitrary seasonal tilts. In addition, routines have been developed to extract the total current for different regions of the current structures, including regions 0, 1, and 2. Results from this study have been used to evaluate the effects of variations in four different solar indices on the total current in different regions of the polar cap. While the solar indices do not have major influence on the total current of the polar cap when compared to solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field parameters, it does appear that there is a nonlinear response to increasing F10.7, M10.7, and S10.7 solar indices. Surprisingly, there appears to be a very linear response as Y10.7 solar index increases.

  11. Experimental investigations of LHW-plasma coupling and current drive related to achieving H-mode plasmas in EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, B. J.; Kong, E. H.; Li, M. H.; Zhang, Lei; Wei, W.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Li, Y. C.; Ling, B. L.; Zang, Q.; Xu, G. S.; Han, X. F.; Zhao, H. L.; Zhang, Ling; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Yang, Y.; Liu, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Cesario, R.; Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Basiuk, V.; Huynh, P.; Artaud, J.; Imbeaux, F.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, L. Q.; Gao, X.; Guo, H. Y.; Wan, B. N.; Li, J. G.; the EAST Team

    2013-11-01

    Aimed at high-confinement (H-mode) plasmas in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), the effect of local gas puffing from electron and ion sides of a lower hybrid wave (LHW) antenna on LHW-plasma coupling and high-density experiments with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) are investigated in EAST. Experimental results show that gas puffing from the electron side is more favourable to improve coupling compared with gas puffing from the ion side. Investigations indicate that LHW-plasma coupling without gas puffing is affected by the density near the LHW grill (grill density), hence leading to multi-transition of low-high-low (L-H-L) confinement, with a correspondingly periodic characteristic behaviour in the plasma radiation. High-density experiments with LHCD suggest that strong lithiation gives a significant improvement on current drive efficiency in the higher density region than 2 × 1019 m-3. Studies indicate that the sharp decrease in current drive efficiency is mainly correlated with parametric decay instability. Using lithium coating and gas puffing from the electron side of the LHW antenna, an H-mode plasma is obtained by LHCD in a wide range of parameters, whether LHW is deposited inside the half-minor radius or not, implying that a central and large driven current is not a necessary condition for the H-mode plasma. H-mode is investigated with CRONOS.

  12. Current Sheets Formation and Relaxation of Coronal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rappazzo, A. F.

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the relaxation of magnetic fields in closed regions of solar and stellar coronae, extending to further topologies our previous work (Rappazzo, A.F. & Parker, E.N., ApJL, 773, L2 (2013)). The dynamical evolution is integrated with the equations of reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) apt to model a plasma embedded in a strong guide field B0 extended along the axial direction, where the dynamical field is the orthogonal component b. Dissipative and ideal simulations are carried out in Cartesian geometry: magnetic field lines thread the system along the axial direction that spans the length L and are line-tied at the top and bottom plates in a motionless photosphere. The magnetic field b initially has only large scales, and is not in equilibrium. We show that the magnetic relaxation leads to the formation of current sheets when the intensity of the magnetic field b is beyond a critical value b_c. For values of b below this threshold (b < b_c), line-tying and field-line tension inhibit the formation of current sheets, while above the threshold (b > b_c) they form quickly on fast ideal timescales. In the ideal case, above the magnetic threshold, we show that current sheets thickness decreases in time until it becomes smaller than the grid resolution, with the analyticity strip width δ decreasing at least exponentially, after which the simulations become under-resolved.

  13. Net ionospheric currents closing field-aligned currents in the auroral region: CHAMP results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yun-Liang; Lühr, Hermann

    2017-04-01

    By utilizing the high-resolution and precise vector magnetic field measurements from CHAMP during 2001-2005, the characteristics of the net auroral currents calculated by Ampère's integral law are comprehensively investigated. It is found that the net currents deduced from noon-midnight (dawn-dusk) orbits are directed duskward (antisunward). The intensities of the net currents increase linearly when the merging electric field (Em) is growing, exhibiting maximum values of about 2 (1) MA for the net duskward (antisunward) currents when Em exceeds 4 mV/m. For the first time the seasonal variations of the different net currents are shown. The net currents deduced from full orbits show only little seasonal dependence due to a compensation of the effects between the hemispheres. Conversely, the net currents deduced separately for the two hemispheres exhibit prominent seasonal dependences. For the net duskward currents the amplitudes and slopes of Em dependence are both larger by a factor of about 2 in summer than in winter. The related cross-polar cap Pedersen currents are higher in the sunlit hemisphere due to enhanced conductivity. The summer-time duskward currents are larger in the Northern Hemisphere than in the Southern Hemisphere by a factor of 1.5. Conversely, the net antisunward currents show an opposite seasonal dependence. The ratio of summer to winter intensity amounts to about 0.7. In this case the currents are stronger in the Southern Hemisphere.

  14. The interplanetary electric field, cleft currents and plasma convection in the polar caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Clauer, C. R.; Araki, T.; St. Maurice, J. P.; Foster, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between the pattern of plasma convection in the polar cleft and the dynamics of the interplanetary electric field (IEF) is examined theoretically. It is shown that owing to the geometrical properties of the magnetosphere, the East-West component of the IEF will drive field-aligned currents which connect to the ionosphere at points lying on either side of noon, while currents associated with the North-South component of the IEF will connect the two polar caps as sheet currents, also centered at 12 MLT. In order to describe the consequences of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) effects upon high-latitude electric fields and convection patterns, a series of numerical simulations was carried out. The simulations were based on a solution to the steady-state equation of current continuity in a height-integrated ionospheric current. The simulations demonstrate that a simple hydrodynamical model can account for the narrow 'throats' of strong dayside antisunward convection observed during periods of southward interplanetary IMF drift, as well as the sunward convection observed during periods of strongly northward IMF drift.

  15. The interplanetary electric field, cleft currents and plasma convection in the polar caps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, P. M.; Clauer, C. R.; Araki, T.; St. Maurice, J. P.; Foster, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    The relationship between the pattern of plasma convection in the polar cleft and the dynamics of the interplanetary electric field (IEF) is examined theoretically. It is shown that owing to the geometrical properties of the magnetosphere, the East-West component of the IEF will drive field-aligned currents which connect to the ionosphere at points lying on either side of noon, while currents associated with the North-South component of the IEF will connect the two polar caps as sheet currents, also centered at 12 MLT. In order to describe the consequences of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) effects upon high-latitude electric fields and convection patterns, a series of numerical simulations was carried out. The simulations were based on a solution to the steady-state equation of current continuity in a height-integrated ionospheric current. The simulations demonstrate that a simple hydrodynamical model can account for the narrow 'throats' of strong dayside antisunward convection observed during periods of southward interplanetary IMF drift, as well as the sunward convection observed during periods of strongly northward IMF drift.

  16. Lower hybrid current drive in experiments for transport barriers at high {beta}{sub N} of JET (Joint European Torus)

    SciTech Connect

    Cesario, R. C.; Castaldo, C.; De Angelis, R.; Smeulders, P.; Calabro, G.; Pericoli, V.; Ravera, G.

    2007-09-28

    LHCD has been used in JET experiments aimed at producing internal transport barriers (ITBs) in highly triangular plasmas ({delta}{approx_equal}0.4) at high {beta}{sub N} (up to 3) for steady-state application. The LHCD is a potentially valuable tool for (i) modifying the target q-profile, which can help avoid deleterious MHD modes and favour the formation of ITBs, and (ii) contributing to the non-inductive current drive required to prolong such plasma regimes. The q-profile evolution has been simulated during the current ramp-up phase for such a discharge (B{sub 0} = 2.3 T, I{sub P} = 1.5 MA) where 2 MW of LHCD has been coupled. The JETTO code was used taking measured plasma profiles, and the LHCD profile modeled by the LHstar code. The results are in agreement with MSE measurements and indicate the importance of the elevated electron temperature due to LHCD, as well as the driven current. During main heating with 18 MW of NBI and 3 MW of ICRH the bootstrap current density at the edge also becomes large, consistently with the observed reduction of the local turbulence and of the MHD activity. JETTO modelling suggests that the bootstrap current can reduce the magnetic shear (sh) at large radius, potentially affecting the MHD stability and turbulence behaviour in this region. Keywords: lower hybrid current drive (LHCD), bootstrap current, q (safety factor) and shear (sh) profile evolutions.

  17. Swarm Observations of Field Aligned Currents during Geomagnetic Storms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, G.; Luhr, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Strangeway, R. J.; Russell, C. T.; Slavin, J. A.; Bromund, K. R.; Plaschke, F.; Magnes, W.; Fischer, D.; Nakamura, R.; Leinweber, H. K.; Torbert, R. B.; Le Contel, O.; Oliveira, D. M.; Raeder, J.; Kepko, L.

    2015-12-01

    Field-aligned currents connect the Earth's magnetosphere to the high latitude ionosphere, and provide a main channel for energy transfer from the magnetosphere to the ionosphere. They are driven by solar wind-magnetosphere interactions and respond dynamically to changes in the solar wind and interplanetary magnetic field. Enhanced interaction during geomagnetic storms significantly intensifies their strength and variability. In this paper, we review our recent observations of field-aligned currents (FACs) during geomagnetic storms using observations from polar orbiting Swarm constellation as well as the Active Magnetosphere and Polar Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE). Both temporal resolutions and spatial coverage of these observations provide new insights in understanding the FACs and the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. We will discuss their spatial and temporal evolutions, ionospheric closure currents, and hemispheric asymmetry during storms.

  18. Ring Current Modeling in a Realistic Magnetic Field Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Moore, T. E.

    1997-01-01

    A 3-dimensional kinetic model has been developed to study the dynamics of the storm time ring current in a dipole magnetic field. In this paper, the ring current model is extended to include a realistic, time-varying magnetic field model. The magnetic field is expressed as the cross product of the gradients of two Euler potentials and the bounce-averaged particle drifts are calculated in the Euler potential coordinates. A dipolarization event is modeled by collapsing a tail-like magnetosphere to a dipole-like configuration. Our model is able to simulate the sudden enhancements in the ring current ion fluxes and the corresponding ionospheric precipitation during the substorm expansion.

  19. Chaotic behavior of magnetic field lines near simplest current systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veselovsky, I. S.; Lukashenko, A. T.

    2016-12-01

    In the context of studying the problem of simulation of magnetic fields on the Sun, the structure of the field in the vicinity of two circular current loops with different mutual arrangement in space is considered. When the symmetry in the arrangement is sufficient, a system of magnetic surfaces created by the closed field lines arises. With a reduction in symmetry, isolated closed lines may exist. For the case of two identical current loops coupled perpendicularly, it is shown that the subsystems of these lines may be ordered in space in a complex manner. At large distances, a system of loops is equivalent to a dipole with a high degree of accuracy, while an approximate winding of the lines on the deformed toroids, encircling each of the loops, occurs at small distances. At intermediate distances, there are regions of both ordered and chaotic behavior of field lines. Results were obtained with the use of the numerical simulation method.

  20. Fundamental properties of field emission-driven direct current microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumbach, Paul; Go, David B.

    2012-11-01

    For half a century, it has been known that the onset of field emission in direct current microdischarges with gap sizes less than 10 μm can lead to breakdown at applied voltages far less than predicted by Paschen's law. It is still unclear how field emission affects other fundamental plasma properties at this scale. In this work, a one-dimensional fluid model is used to predict basic scaling laws for fundamental properties including ion density, electric field due to space charge, and current-voltage relations in the pre-breakdown regime. Computational results are compared with approximate analytic solutions. It is shown that field emission provides an abundance of cathode electrons, which in turn create large ion concentrations through ionizing collisions well before Paschen's criterion for breakdown is met. Breakdown due to ion-enhanced field emission occurs when the electric field due to space charge becomes comparable to the applied electric field. Simple scaling analysis of the 1D Poisson equation demonstrates that an ion density of n+ ≈ 0.1VAɛ0/qd2 is necessary to significantly distort the electric field. Defining breakdown in terms of this critical ion density leads analytically to a simple, effective secondary emission coefficient γ' of the same mathematical form initially suggested by Boyle and Kisliuk [Phys. Rev. 97, 255 (1955)].