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Sample records for field emitters based

  1. Ultra-Sensitivity Glucose Sensor Based on Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    A new glucose sensor based on field emitter of ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNA) was fabricated. This new type of ZNA field emitter-based sensor shows high sensitivity with experimental limit of detection of 1 nM glucose solution and a detection range from 1 nM to 50 μM in air at room temperature, which is lower than that of glucose sensors based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, fluorescence signal transmission, and electrochemical signal transduction. The new glucose sensor provides a key technique for promising consuming application in biological system for detecting low levels of glucose on single cells or bacterial cultures. PMID:20596378

  2. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  3. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  4. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  5. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  6. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  7. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  8. Systems and Methods for Implementing Robust Carbon Nanotube-Based Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Kristof, Valerie (Inventor); Toda, Risaku (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement carbon nanotube-based field emitters. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating a carbon nanotube field emitter includes: patterning a substrate with a catalyst, where the substrate has thereon disposed a diffusion barrier layer; growing a plurality of carbon nanotubes on at least a portion of the patterned catalyst; and heating the substrate to an extent where it begins to soften such that at least a portion of at least one carbon nanotube becomes enveloped by the softened substrate.

  9. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  10. Evolution of the characteristics of a field-electron emitter based on nitrocellulose-carbon nanotube composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolos'ko, A. G.; Ershov, M. V.; Filippov, S. V.; Popov, E. O.

    2013-05-01

    Characteristics of a field-electron emitter based on a nitrocelulose-multiwalled carbon nanotube composite have been studied. A new method of the recording and online processing of current-voltage ( I-U) characteristics of multipoint field-electron emitters has been developed for monitoring the evolution of their properties. Using this method, we have (i) determined the dependences of the field enhancement factor and number of emission centers on the interelectrode distance, (ii) discovered hysteresis of the I-V curve related to variation of the amplitude of applied voltage pulses, and (iii) revealed the influence of the initial emission current level on the temporal evolution of emitter properties.

  11. Planar field emitters and high efficiency photocathodes based on ultrananocrystalline diamond

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Antipov, Sergey P.

    2016-08-16

    A method of forming a field emitter comprises disposing a first layer on a substrate. The first layer is seeded with nanodiamond particles. The substrate with the first layer disposed thereon is maintained at a first temperature and a first pressure in a mixture of gases which includes nitrogen. The first layer is exposed to a microwave plasma to form a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on the first layer, which has a percentage of nitrogen in the range of about 0.05 atom % to about 0.5 atom %. The field emitter has about 10.sup.12 to about 10.sup.14 emitting sites per cm.sup.2. A photocathode can also be formed similarly by forming a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on a substrate similar to the field emitter, and then hydrogen terminating the film. The photocathode is responsive to near ultraviolet light as well as to visible light.

  12. Planar Field Emitters and High Efficiency Photocathodes Based on Ultrananocrystalline Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumant, Anirudha V. (Inventor); Baryshev, Sergey V. (Inventor); Antipov, Sergey P. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method of forming a field emitter comprises disposing a first layer on a substrate. The first layer is seeded with nanodiamond particles. The substrate with the first layer disposed thereon is maintained at a first temperature and a first pressure in a mixture of gases which includes nitrogen. The first layer is exposed to a microwave plasma to form a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on the first layer, which has a percentage of nitrogen in the range of about 0.05 atom % to about 0.5 atom %. The field emitter has about 10.sup.12 to about 10.sup.14 emitting sites per cm.sup.2. A photocathode can also be formed similarly by forming a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on a substrate similar to the field emitter, and then hydrogen terminating the film. The photocathode is responsive to near ultraviolet light as well as to visible light.

  13. Electric field distribution of electron emitter surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagawa, M.; Takenobu, S.; Ohmae, N.; Umeno, M.

    1987-03-01

    The electric field distribution of a tungsten field emitter surface and a LaB6 thermionic emitter surface has been studied. The computer simulation of electric field distribution on the emitter surface was carried out with a charge simulation method. The electric field distribution of the LaB6 thermionic emitter was experimentally evaluated by the Schottky plot. Two independent equations are necessary for obtaining local electric field and work function; the Fowler-Nordheim equation and the equation of total energy distribution of emitted electron being used to evaluate the electric field distribution of the tungsten field emitter. The experimental results agreed with the computer simulation.

  14. Handheld deep ultraviolet emission device based on aluminum nitride quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field emitters.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Iwayama, Sho; Saito, Takao; Kawakami, Yasuyuki; Kubo, Fumio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2012-10-22

    We report the successful fabrication of a compact deep ultraviolet emission device via a marriage of AlGaN quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field electron emitters. The device demonstrated a 20-mW deep ultraviolet output power and an approximately 4% power efficiency. The performance of this device may lead toward the realization of an environmentally friendly, convenient and practical deep ultraviolet light source.

  15. Carbon nanotube emitters and field emission triode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhiqin; Zhang, Binglin; Yao, Ning; Zhang, Lan; Ma, Huizhong; Deng, Jicai

    2006-05-01

    Based on our study on field emission from multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), we experimentally manufactured field emission display (FED) triode with a MWNTs cold cathode, and demonstrated an excellent performance of MWNTs as field emitters. The measured luminance of the phosphor screens was 1.8*10^(3) cd/m2 for green light. The emission is stable with a fluctuation of only 1.5% at an average current of 260 'mu'A.

  16. Current limiting of field emitter array cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.J.

    1986-01-01

    The Field Emitter Array (FEA) cathode possesses high emission potential (approx.30A/cm/sup 2/) at low applied voltages (100-200 volts) but performance has been hampered by non-uniform emission across the array. Poor emission uniformity is mainly related to small variations in emitter tip geometry (of the order of 10-100A), which cannot be rectified by present fabrication techniques. To improve emission uniformity from the arrays, this dissertation investigated the use of current-limiting resistors, individually dedicated to and in series with each emitter, to compensate for the differences in emission. A thin film of silicon was deposited on the backside of a ZrO/sub 2/-W composite chip (the substrate on which emitter structure was based) to form series resistors. Characterization of the silicon film was carried out in a SEM with a micromanipulator capable of making contact with a single tungsten pin so that direct I-V measurement of individual series resistors was possible. To supplement the experimental effort, a mathematical mode of the Current-Limited Field Emitter Array (CLFEA) cathode was devised. A study of the model indicated the Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) plot of resistor current-limited emission from an array would have an upturning curvature.

  17. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  18. Nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond based field emitter array for a flat-panel x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Posada, Chrystian M.; Grant, Edwin J.; Lee, Hyoung K.; Castaño, Carlos H.; Divan, Ralu; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Rosenmann, Daniel; Stan, Liliana

    2014-04-07

    A field emission based flat-panel transmission x-ray source is being developed as an alternative for medical and industrial imaging. A field emitter array (FEA) prototype based on nitrogen incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond film has been fabricated to be used as the electron source of this flat panel x-ray source. The FEA prototype was developed using conventional microfabrication techniques. The field emission characteristics of the FEA prototype were evaluated. Results indicated that emission current densities of the order of 6 mA/cm{sup 2} could be obtained at electric fields as low as 10 V/μm to 20 V/μm. During the prototype microfabrication process, issues such as delamination of the extraction gate and poor etching of the SiO{sub 2} insulating layer located between the emitters and the extraction layer were encountered. Consequently, alternative FEA designs were investigated. Experimental and simulation data from the first FEA prototype were compared and the results were used to evaluate the performance of alternative single and double gate designs that would yield better field emission characteristics compared to the first FEA prototype. The best simulation results are obtained for the double gate FEA design, when the diameter of the collimator gate is around 2.6 times the diameter of the extraction gate.

  19. Fast Photoresponse and Long Lifetime UV Photodetectors and Field Emitters Based on ZnO/Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Films.

    PubMed

    Saravanan, Adhimoorthy; Huang, Bohr-Ran; Lin, Jun-Cheng; Keiser, Gerd; Lin, I-Nan

    2015-11-01

    We have designed photodetectors and UV field emitters based on a combination of ZnO nanowires/nanorods (ZNRs) and bilayer diamond films in a metal-semiconductor-metal (MSM) structure. The ZNRs were fabricated on different diamond films and systematic investigations showed an ultra-high photoconductive response from ZNRs prepared on ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) operating at a lower voltage of 2 V. We found that the ZNRs/UNCD photodetector (PD) has improved field emission properties and a reduced turn-on field of 2.9 V μm(-1) with the highest electron field emission (EFE) by simply illuminating the sample with ultraviolet (UV) light. The photoresponse (Iphoto /Idark ) behavior of the ZNRs/UNCD PD exhibits a much higher photoresponse (912) than bare ZNRs (229), ZNRs/nanocrystalline diamond (NCD; 518), and ZNRs/microcrystalline diamond (MCD; 325) under illumination at λ=365 nm. A photodetector with UNCD films offers superior stability and a longer lifetime compared with carbon materials and bare ZNRs. The lifetime stability of the ZNRs/UNCD-based device is about 410 min, which is markedly superior to devices that use bare ZNRs (92 min). The ZNRs/UNCD PD possesses excellent photoresponse properties with improved lifetime and stability; in addition, ZNRs/UNCD-based UV emitters have great potential for applications such as cathodes in flat-panel displays and microplasma display devices. PMID:26382200

  20. Ballasted and electrically steerable carbon nanotube field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, M. T.; Li, C.; Qu, K.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, B.; Pribat, D.; Milne, W. I.

    2012-09-01

    Here we present our on-going efforts toward the development of stable ballasted carbon nanotube-based field emitters employing hydrothermally synthesized zinc oxide nanowires and thin film silicon-on-insulator substrates. The semiconducting channel in each controllably limits the emission current thereby preventing detrimental burn-out of individual emitters that occurs due to unavoidable statistical variability in emitter characteristics, particularly in their length. Fabrication details and emitter characterization are discussed in addition to their field emission performance. The development of a beam steerable triode electron emitter formed from hexagonal carbon nanotube arrays with central focusing nanotube electrodes, is also described. Numerical ab-initio simulations are presented to account for the empirical emission characteristics. Our engineered ballasted emitters have shown some of the lowest reported lifetime variations (< 0.7%) with on-times of < 1 ms, making them ideally-suited for next-generation displays, environmental lighting and portable x-rays sources.

  1. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-06-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% - 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%.

  2. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-01-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% – 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%. PMID:26042359

  3. Studying fringe field effect of a field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayfullin, M. F.; Nikiforov, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    Field emitter arrays on heavy As-doped Si wafer are studied in vacuum nanoelectronics diode configuration. Different shapes of emitters are considered: cone-shaped point-emitters and cylinder-shaped sharp-edge-emitters are compared. Micro scale field enhancement factor on the edge of cylindrical emitter was calculated via home-developed Matlab application and the results are presented. Two types of anode geometry are proposed: plane anode and spherical anode. Experimental and modelling results of surface electric field distribution are presented. The spherical shape of anode allows higher voltage (and higher field emission current) without destructive arcs risk.

  4. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  5. Silicon based light emitters utilizing radiation from dislocations; electric field induced shift of the dislocation-related luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arguirov, T.; Mchedlidze, T.; Kittler, M.; Reiche, M.; Wilhelm, T.; Hoang, T.; Holleman, J.; Schmitz, J.

    2009-05-01

    Dislocation rich regions can be controllably formed at a certain location inside a silicon wafer. We studied the light emission properties of such regions located in an electric field of a p-n junction under different excitation conditions. It was found that the luminescence spectra of the dislocations are significantly influenced by the presence of the junction. The dislocation-related luminescence peak position appears red-shifted due to the built-in electric field. A suppression of that field by photo-generation of carriers or by applying a forward bias voltage at the junction leads to a gradual decrease in the energy position of the peaks. The dependence of the peak position on the electric field was found to be a quadratic function, similar to that observed for semiconductor nanostructures. We show that the shift of the peak position is due to the Stark effect on dislocation-related excitonic states. The characteristic constant of the shift, obtained by fitting the data with the quadratic Stark effect equation, was 0.0186 meV/(kV/cm) 2. The observed effect opens new possibilities for integration of a silicon based light emitter, combining the radiation from dislocations with a Stark effect based modulator.

  6. Field emitter technologies for nanovision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, H.; Neo, Y.; Aoki, T.; Nagao, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kanemaru, S.

    2009-10-01

    We have been investigating an ultra fine field emission display (FED) and an ultra fine CdTe X-ray image sensor for creating nanovision science. For an ultra fine FED with a sub-micron pixel, we have developed a volcano-structured double-gated field emitter arrays with a capability of focusing electron beam without serous reduction in emission current. For an ultra fine X-ray image sensor, we have proposed and demonstrated a novel CdTe X-ray sensor consisting of a CdTe diode and field emitter array.

  7. Physical electrostatics of small field emitter arrays/clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to improve qualitative understanding of electrostatic influences on apex field enhancement factors (AFEFs) for small field emitter arrays/clusters. Using the "floating sphere at emitter-plate potential" (FSEPP) model, it re-examines the electrostatics and mathematics of three simple systems of identical post-like emitters. For the isolated emitter, various approaches are noted. An adequate approximation is to consider only the effects of sphere charges and (for significantly separated emitters) image charges. For the 2-emitter system, formulas are found for charge-transfer ("charge-blunting") effects and neighbor-field effects, for widely spaced and for "sufficiently closely spaced" emitters. Mutual charge-blunting is always the dominant effect, with a related (negative) fractional AFEF-change δtwo. For sufficiently small emitter spacing c, |δtwo| varies approximately as 1/c; for large spacing, |δtwo| decreases as 1/c3. In a 3-emitter equispaced linear array, differential charge-blunting and differential neighbor-field effects occur, but differential charge-blunting effects are dominant, and cause the "exposed" outer emitters to have higher AFEF (γ0) than the central emitter (γ1). Formulas are found for the exposure ratio Ξ = γ0/γ1, for large and for sufficiently small separations. The FSEPP model for an isolated emitter has accuracy around 30%. Line-charge models (LCMs) are an alternative, but an apparent difficulty with recent LCM implementations is identified. Better descriptions of array electrostatics may involve developing good fitting equations for AFEFs derived from accurate numerical solution of Laplace's equation, perhaps with equation form(s) guided qualitatively by FSEPP-model results. In existing fitting formulas, the AFEF-reduction decreases exponentially as c increases, which is different from the FSEPP-model formulas. This discrepancy needs to be investigated, using systematic Laplace-based simulations and appropriate results

  8. Field-emitter arrays for vacuum microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.; Rosengreen, A.; Brodie, Ivor

    1991-01-01

    An ongoing program on microfabricated field-emitter arrays has produced a gated field-emitter tip structure with submicrometer dimensions and techniques for fabricating emitter arrays with tip packaging densities of up to 1.5 x 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Arrays have been fabricated over areas varying from a few micrometers up to 13 cm in diameter. Very small overall emitter size, materials selection, and rigorous emitter-tip processing procedures have contributed to reducing the potential required for field emission to tens of volts. Emission current densities of up to 100 A/sq cm have been achieved with small arrays of tips, and 100-mA total emission is commonly produced with arrays 1 mm in diameter containing 10,000 tips. Transconductances of 5.0 micro-S per tip have been demonstrated, indicating that 50 S/sq cm should be achievable with tip densities of 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Details of the cathode arrays and a variety of performance characteristics are discussed.

  9. A vacuum-sealed miniature X-ray tube based on carbon nanotube field emitters

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    A vacuum-sealed miniature X-ray tube based on a carbon nanotube field-emission electron source has been demonstrated. The diameter of the X-ray tube is 10 mm; the total length of the tube is 50 mm, and no external vacuum pump is required for the operation. The maximum tube voltage reaches up to 70 kV, and the X-ray tube generates intense X-rays with the air kerma strength of 108 Gy·cm2 min−1. In addition, X-rays produced from the miniature X-ray tube have a comparatively uniform spatial dose distribution. PMID:22594627

  10. Technology for producing carbon field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Khatapova, R.M.; Demskaya, L.L.; Romanova, V.K.

    1985-12-01

    This paper describes methods for producing field emitters from carbon filaments. Coating of Ni and two-layer coatings of Ni-Mo with a thickness of 10-40 um are applied to the carbon filaments by electrochemical deposition so that they can be spot welded to a metal holder. A technology for attaching carbon filaments with a refractory adhesive composition is also described. Field emitters with point radius of curvature of 0.2-0.4 um are made from three types of carbon filament.

  11. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    SciTech Connect

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R.; Pease, R.L.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Kosier, S.L.

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  12. Modeling field emitter arrays using nonlinear line charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Raghwendra

    2016-09-01

    Modeling high aspect ratio field emitter arrays is a computational challenge due to the enormity of the resources involved. The line charge model (LCM) provides an alternate semi-analytical tool that has been used to model both infinite as well as finite sized arrays. It is shown that the linearly varying charge density used in the LCM generically mimics ellipsoidal emitters rather than a Cylindrical-Post-with-an-Ellipsoidal-Tip (CPET) that is typical of nanowires. Furthermore, generalizing the charge density beyond the linear regime allows for modeling shapes that are closer to a CPET. Emitters with a fixed base radius and a fixed apex radius are studied with a view to understanding the effect of nonlinearity on the tip enhancement factor and the emitter current in each case. Furthermore, an infinite square array of the CPET emitters is studied using the nonlinear line charge model, each having a height h =1500 μm and a base radius b =1.5 μm . It is found that for moderate external field strengths ( 0.3 -0.4 V /μm ), the array current density falls sharply for lattice spacings smaller than 4/3 h . Beyond this value, the maximal array current density can be observed over a range of lattice spacings and falls gradually thereafter.

  13. Improved Photoresist Coating for Making CNT Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Manohara, Harish

    2009-01-01

    An improved photoresist-coating technique has been developed for use in the fabrication of carbon-nanotube- (CNT) based field emitters is described. The improved photoresist coating technique overcomes what, heretofore, has been a major difficulty in the fabrication process.

  14. Nanoelectrospray Emitter Arrays Providing Interemitter Electric Field Uniformity

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Page, Jason S.; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-07-15

    Arrays of electrospray ionization (ESI) emitters have been reported previously as a means of achieving the enhanced ionization efficiencies. A key challenge when working with multiple, closely spaced ESI emitters is overcoming the deleterious effects caused by electrical interference among neighboring emitters. Individual emitters experience different electric fields depending on their relative position in the array, such that it becomes difficult to operate all of the emitters optimally for a given applied potential. In this work, we have developed multi-nanoESI emitters arranged with a circular pattern, which enable the constituent emitters to experience a uniform electric field. The performance of the circular emitter array was compared to a single emitter and to a previously developed linear emitter array, which verified that improved electric field uniformity was achieved with the circular arrangement. The circular arrays were also interfaced with a mass spectrometer via a matching multi-capillary inlet, and the results were compared with those obtained using a single emitter. By minimizing inter-emitter electric field inhomogeneities, much larger arrays having closer emitter spacing should be feasible.

  15. Magnetic field emission gun with zirconiated emitter.

    PubMed

    Troyon, M

    1989-03-01

    A magnetic-field-superimposed field emission gun with low aberrations and equipped with a zirconiated tungsten emitter has been developed for applications where very stable high probe currents are required. It has been tested on a conventional electron microscope at 10 kV and on an electron beam testing system at 1 kV. Probe current i = 250 nA in a probe size d = 0.4 micron is obtained at 10 kV; at 1 kV the resolution is 0.1 micron with i = 5 nA, and 0.4 micron with i = 30 nA. For these probe currents, the spatial broadening effect due to electron-electron interactions in the beam is the preponderant factor limiting the probe size.

  16. Gas ionization sensors with carbon nanotube/nickel field emitters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Bohr-Ran; Lin, Tzu-Ching; Yang, Ying-Kan; Tzeng, Shien-Der

    2011-12-01

    Gas ionization sensors based on the field emission properties of the carbon nanotube/nickel (CNT/Ni) field emitters were first developed in this work. It is found that the breakdown electric field (E(b)) slightly decreases from 2.2 V/microm to 1.9 V/microm as the pressure of H2 gas increases from 0.5 Torr to 100 Torr. On the contrary, E(b) obviously increases from 2.9 V/microm to 6.5 V/microm as O2 gas pressure increases from 0.5 Torr to 100 Torr. This may be explained by the depression of the electron emission that caused by the adsorption of the O2 gas on the CNT emitters. The Raman spectra of the CNT/Ni emitters also show that more defects were generated on the CNTs after O2 gas sensing. The Joule heating effect under high current density as performing H2 sensing was also observed. These effects may contribute the pressure dependence on the breakdown electric field of the CNT/Ni gas ionization sensors. PMID:22409010

  17. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  18. The dust nature of micro field emitters in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    Field emission currents emitted by micro-emitters are a limiting factor for the operational gradients of accelerating radio frequency (rf) cavities. Within the rf field emission theory the existence of needle like micro field emitters with very high length relative to the radius and corresponding high enhancement factor (β) is assumed. In this article the hypothesis that micro field emitters consists of long chains of conductive micro-particles is considered. Five different forces acting onto the particles in a high rf field are considered and the respective equations are derived. Some experimental observations and their explanation within this hypothesis are discussed.

  19. Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bronkowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have shown that with suitable choices of critical dimensions, planar arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes (see figure) can serve as high-current-density field emitter (cold-cathode) electron sources. Whereas some hot-cathode electron sources must be operated at supply potentials of thousands of volts, these cold-cathode sources generate comparable current densities when operated at tens of volts. Consequently, arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes might prove useful as cold-cathode sources in miniature, lightweight electron-beam devices (e.g., nanoklystrons) soon to be developed. Prior to the experiments, all reported efforts to develop carbon-nanotube-based field-emission sources had yielded low current densities from a few hundred microamperes to a few hundred milliamperes per square centimeter. An electrostatic screening effect, in which taller nanotubes screen the shorter ones from participating in field emission, was conjectured to be what restricts the emission of electrons to such low levels. It was further conjectured that the screening effect could be reduced and thus emission levels increased by increasing the spacing between nanotubes to at least by a factor of one to two times the height of the nanotubes. While this change might increase the emission from individual nanotubes, it would decrease the number of nanotubes per unit area and thereby reduce the total possible emission current. Therefore, to maximize the area-averaged current density, it would be necessary to find an optimum combination of nanotube spacing and nanotube height. The present concept of using an array of bundles of nanotubes arises partly from the concept of optimizing the spacing and height of field emitters. It also arises partly from the idea that single nanotubes may have short lifetimes as field emitters, whereas bundles of nanotubes could afford redundancy so that the loss of a single nanotube would not significantly reduce the overall field emission.

  20. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki

    2012-11-06

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  1. A glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube emitter for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Seung Jun; Jeong, Jaeik; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Park, Hunkuk; Kwak, Junghwan; Noh, Eunkyong; Paik, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Ryu, Jehwang

    2016-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a carbon nanotube based a glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube without vacuum pump. The x-ray tube consists of four electrodes with anode, focuser, gate, and cathode electrode. The shape of cathode is rectangular for isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The obtained x-ray images show clearly micrometer scale.

  2. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1999-03-30

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and about 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10{sup {minus}8} Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters. 2 figs.

  3. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kwan, Simon W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10.sup.-4 Torr and about 10.sup.-7 Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10.sup.-8 Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters.

  4. Field emitter arrays for plasma and microwave source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K. L.

    1999-05-01

    Field emitter arrays (FEAs) stand to strongly impact device performance when physical size, weight, power consumption, beam current, and/or high pulse repetition frequencies are an issue. FEAs are capable of instant ON/OFF performance, high brightness, high current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, and low voltage operation characteristics. Advanced microwave power tubes, and in particular, inductive output amplifiers, are by far the most technically challenging use to date. Other important uses include, e.g., electron sources for micropropulsion systems-Hall thrusters-and tethers for satellites, and (the most widely pursued application) field emission displays. The characteristics of field emitters that make them attractive to such applications shall be surveyed. A thorough analytical model of a field emitter array, beginning with a review of the nature of field emission and continuing with an analytical model of a single emitter and the operation of an array of emitters, shall be presented. In particular, attention shall be directed towards those features of FEAs that render them attractive as cold cathode candidates for electron beam generation. Tip characteristics, such as emission distribution, and array operation, such as space charge effects, will be analyzed in the context of the model. Finally, restricting attention to microwave applications, the performance of a tapered-helix inductive output amplifier to highlight the advantages of high frequency emission gating of the electron beam in a power tube shall be investigated.

  5. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices. PMID:27607498

  6. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  7. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  8. High efficiency thermophotovoltaic emitter by metamaterial-based nano-pyramid array.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei; Tang, Guihua; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-11-30

    A 2D pyramidal metamaterial-based nano-structure is proposed as a wavelength-selective Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) emitter. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis complemented with normal field method is used to predict the emittance as well as the electromagnetic field and Poynting vector distributions. The proposed emitter is shown to be wavelength-selective, polarization-insensitive, and direction-insensitive in emittance. The mechanisms supporting the emittance close to 1.0 in the wavelength range of 0.3-2.0 μm are elucidated by the distribution of electromagnetic field and Poynting vectors in the proposed structure. Finally, thermal stability and radiant heat-to-electricity TPV efficiency for a realistic InGaAsSb TPV system are discussed.

  9. Imaging of alpha emitters in a field environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Nicholl, Adrian; Hrnecek, Erich; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2015-05-01

    Cameras sensitive to ultraviolet light can be applied to detection of surface contamination induced by alpha particle emitters. When absorbed in air, alpha particles excite nitrogen molecules and the radiative relaxation creates a faint light emission. This radioluminescence can be used for detection purposes, provided that background lighting levels are low. In this work, three low-light sensitive camera technologies (CCD, EMCCD and ICCD) were utilized in a nuclear facility, and their performance in detecting alpha emitters was investigated. The results show that low readout noise is essential for the detection of radioluminescence, as it allows short exposure times to be used. The ICCD camera was found to perform slightly better than the EMCCD camera in the field, while both enable the detection of MBq level alpha activities in 100 s in the test configuration (camera-target distance 0.5 m). Overall, the cameras and techniques used in this study are shown to be effective in detecting alpha emitters in a standard glovebox. This technology can be applied to nuclear security, safety and safeguards, when stand-off detection of alpha emitters is required.

  10. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  11. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube field emitters after high temperature thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Hwang, Yeon Mo; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2014-07-15

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters have been fabricated by attaching a CNT film on a graphite rod using graphite adhesive material. The CNT field emitters showed much improved field emission properties due to increasing crystallinity and decreasing defects in CNTs after the high temperature thermal annealing at 900 °C in vacuum ambient. The CNT field emitters showed the low turn-on electric field of 1.15 V/μm, the low threshold electric field of 1.62 V/μm, and the high emission current of 5.9 mA which corresponds to a current density of 8.5 A/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the CNT field emitters indicated the enhanced field emission properties due to the multi-stage effect when the length of the graphite rod increases. The CNT field emitter showed good field emission stability after the high temperature thermal annealing. The CNT field emitter revealed a focused electron beam spot without any focusing electrodes and also showed good field emission repeatability.

  12. Spacecraft charging control by thermal, field emission with lanthanum-hexaboride emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal, field emitters of lanthanum (or perhaps cerium) hexaboride (LaB6) with temperature variability up to about 1500K are suggested for spacecraft charging control. Such emitters operate at much lower voltages with considerably more control and add plasma-diagnostic versatility. These gains should outweigh the additional complexity of providing heat for the LaB6 thermal, field emitter.

  13. A novel inexpensive device for the electrochemical generation of metallic emitters for field desorption.

    PubMed

    Rechsteiner, C E; Mathis, D E; Bursey, M M; Buck, R P

    1977-02-01

    Details for the construction of a novel, inexpensive device for the electrochemical generation of metallic emitters for field desorption mass spectrometry are described. Use of the device for the generation of cobalt and nickel emitters is demonstrated. PMID:836944

  14. Membrane-Based Emitter for Coupling Microfluidics with Ultrasensitive Nanoelectrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuefei; Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-06-09

    An integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane-based microfluidic emitter for high performance nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) has been fabricated and evaluated. The ~100-μm-thick emitter was created by cutting a PDMS membrane that protrudes beyond the bulk substrate. The reduced surface area at the emitter enhances the electric field and reduces wetting of the surface by the electrospray solvent. As such, the emitter provides highly stable electrospray at flow rates as low as 10 nL/min, and is compatible with electrospray solvents containing a large organic component (e.g., 90% methanol). This approach enables facile emitter construction, and provides excellent stability, reproducibility and sensitivity, as well as compatibility with multilayer soft lithography.

  15. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports a novel implanting micromachining technology. By using this method, for the first time, we could implant nano-scale materials into milli-scale metal substrates at room temperature. Ni-based flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated by the novel micromachining method. By embedding CNT roots into Ni foil using polymer matrix as transfer media, effective direct contact between Ni and CNTs was achieved. As a result, our novel emitter shows relatively good field emission properties such as low turn-on field and good stability. Moreover, the emitter was highly flexible with preservation of the field emission properties. The excellent field emission characteristics attributed to the direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate. To check the practical application of the novel emitter, a simple X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a traditional tube. The gray shadow that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the successful generation of X-ray. PMID:27401089

  16. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports a novel implanting micromachining technology. By using this method, for the first time, we could implant nano-scale materials into milli-scale metal substrates at room temperature. Ni-based flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated by the novel micromachining method. By embedding CNT roots into Ni foil using polymer matrix as transfer media, effective direct contact between Ni and CNTs was achieved. As a result, our novel emitter shows relatively good field emission properties such as low turn-on field and good stability. Moreover, the emitter was highly flexible with preservation of the field emission properties. The excellent field emission characteristics attributed to the direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate. To check the practical application of the novel emitter, a simple X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a traditional tube. The gray shadow that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the successful generation of X-ray.

  17. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Kevin L.; Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin; Rittersdorf, Ian M.; Lebowitz, Joel L.; Harris, John R.; Lau, Y. Y.; Petillo, John J.; Luginsland, John W.

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  18. Field emission from optimized structure of carbon nanotube field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, V.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S.

    2016-04-01

    The authors report a detail study on the emission properties of field emitter array (FEA) of micro-circular emitters of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The FEAs were fabricated on patterned substrates prepared with an array of circular titanium (Ti) islands on titanium nitride coated tantalum substrates. CNTs were rooted into these Ti islands to prepare an array of circular emitters. The circular emitters were prepared in different diameters and pitches in order to optimize their structure for acquiring a high emission current. The pitch was varied from 0 to 600 μm, while a diameter of circular emitters was kept constant to be 50 μm in order to optimize a pitch. For diameter optimization, a diameter was changed from 50 to 200 μm while keeping a constant edge-to-edge distance of 150 μm between the circular emitters. The FEA with a diameter of 50 μm and a pitch of 120 μm was found to be the best to achieve an emission current of 47 mA corresponding to an effective current density of 30.5 A/cm2 at 7 V/μm. The excellent emission current was attributed to good quality of CNT rooting into the substrate and optimized FEA structure, which provided a high electric field on a whole circular emitter of 50 μm and the best combination of the strong edge effect and CNT coverage. The experimental results were confirmed with computer simulation.

  19. Extension of the general thermal field equation for nanosized emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyritsakis, A.; Xanthakis, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    During the previous decade, Jensen et al. developed a general analytical model that successfully describes electron emission from metals both in the field and thermionic regimes, as well as in the transition region. In that development, the standard image corrected triangular potential barrier was used. This barrier model is valid only for planar surfaces and therefore cannot be used in general for modern nanometric emitters. In a recent publication, the authors showed that the standard Fowler-Nordheim theory can be generalized for highly curved emitters if a quadratic term is included to the potential model. In this paper, we extend this generalization for high temperatures and include both the thermal and intermediate regimes. This is achieved by applying the general method developed by Jensen to the quadratic barrier model of our previous publication. We obtain results that are in good agreement with fully numerical calculations for radii R > 4 nm, while our calculated current density differs by a factor up to 27 from the one predicted by the Jensen's standard General-Thermal-Field (GTF) equation. Our extended GTF equation has application to modern sharp electron sources, beam simulation models, and vacuum breakdown theory.

  20. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system's quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  1. High-density Au nanorod optical field-emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, R. G.; Yang, Y.; Keathley, P. D.; Swanwick, M. E.; Velásquez-García, L. F.; Kärtner, F. X.; Graves, W. S.; Berggren, K. K.

    2014-11-01

    We demonstrate the design, fabrication, characterization, and operation of high-density arrays of Au nanorod electron emitters, fabricated by high-resolution electron beam lithography, and excited by ultrafast femtosecond near-infrared radiation. Electron emission characteristic of multiphoton absorption has been observed at low laser fluence, as indicated by the power-law scaling of emission current with applied optical power. The onset of space-charge-limited current and strong optical field emission has been investigated so as to determine the mechanism of electron emission at high incident laser fluence. Laser-induced structural damage has been observed at applied optical fields above 5 GV m-1, and energy spectra of emitted electrons have been measured using an electron time-of-flight spectrometer.

  2. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    SciTech Connect

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-04

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system’s quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  3. X-ray tube with a graphite field emitter inflamed at high temperature

    PubMed Central

    Iwai, Yusuke; Koike, Takayoshi; Hayama, Youhei; Jouzuka, Atsuo; Nakamura, Tomonori; Onizuka, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Motosuke; Mimura, Hidenori

    2013-01-01

    The authors developed a class of novel graphite-based field emitters, known as graphite field emitters inflamed at high temperature (GFEIHTs), which includes numerous edges and juts. The GFEIHT field emission characteristics are investigated in a vacuum tube (10−7 Pa), and an anode current exceeding 2 mA is obtained. The authors also fabricated tipped-off x-ray tubes using GFEIHTs. No degradation in the anode current is observed under the operating conditions of 16.6 kV anode voltage and 160 μA anode current. The current dispersion, defined as the standard deviation (σ)/mean over 24 h, is 2.8%. The authors successfully demonstrated radiography and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry using an x-ray tube with GFEIHT. PMID:23847750

  4. Effective hybrid graphene/carbon nanotubes field emitters by electrophoretic deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Angel T. T.; Chen, Ting; Pan, Likun; Sun, Zhuo; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2013-05-01

    Hybrid graphene and carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated with electrophoretic deposition (EPD). The combination of both materials was used to improve the turn-on field for pure carbon nanotubes emitters and the reliability of pure graphene emitters deposited by the same method. The CNT was envisioned to hold down the graphene flakes, like a safety belt or Velcro, at high voltages to prevent an early short circuit at relatively low voltages. These hybrid emitters were studied for their field emission performance in relation to the EPD deposition duration. It was observed that the emitters performed better when the EPD duration was increased due to the increase in the amount and density of graphene flakes. Possible reasons for the improvement of field emission performance were suggested. The roles of graphene and CNT in these hybrid emitters were also discussed.

  5. Field Emitter Arrays and Displays Produced by Ion Tracking Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Felter, T E; Musket, R G; Bernhardt, A F

    2004-12-28

    When ions of sufficient electronic energy loss traverse a dielectric film or foil, they alter the chemical bonding along their nominally straight path within the material. A suitable etchant can quickly dissolve these so-called latent tracks leaving holes of small diameter ({approx}10nm) but long length - several microns. Continuing the etching process gradually increases the diameter reproducibly and uniformly. The trackable medium can be applied as a uniform film onto large substrates. The small, monodisperse holes produced by this track etching can be used in conjunction with additional thin film processing to create functional structures attached to the substrate. For example, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Candescent Technologies Corporation (CTC) co-developed a process to make arrays of gated field emitters ({approx}100nm diameter electron guns) for CTC's ThinCRT{trademark} displays, which have been fabricated to diagonal dimensions > 13. Additional technological applications of ion tracking lithography will be briefly covered.

  6. The SUBARU Deep Field Project: Lymanα Emitters at a Redshift of 6.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Ajiki, Masaru; Nagao, Tohru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Murayama, Takashi; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Kodaira, Keiichi; Kaifu, Norio; Ando, Hiroyasu; Karoji, Hiroshi; Akiyama, Masayuki; Aoki, Kentaro; Doi, Mamoru; Fujita, Shinobu S.; Furusawa, Hisanori; Hayashino, Tomoki; Iwamuro, Fumihide; Iye, Masanori; Kobayashi, Naoto; Kodama, Tadayuki; Komiyama, Yutaka; Matsuda, Yuichi; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Mizumoto, Yoshihiko; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro; Nariai, Kyoji; Ohta, Koji; Ohyama, Youichi; Okamura, Sadanori; Ouchi, Masami; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Sato, Yasunori; Sekiguchi, Kazuhiro; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Hajime; Umemura, Masayuki; Yamada, Toru; Yasuda, Naoki; Yoshida, Michitoshi

    2005-02-01

    We present new results of a deep optical imaging survey using a narrow band filter (NB921) centered at λ = 9196 Å together with B, V, R, i', and z' broadband filters in the sky area of the Subaru Deep Field, which has been promoted as one of legacy programs of the 8.2m Subaru Telescope. We obtained a photometric sample of 58 Ly α emitter candidates at z ≈ 6.5-6.6 among ˜ 180 strong NB921-excess (z' - NB921 > 1.0) objects together with a color criterion of i' - z' > 1.3. We then obtained optical spectra of 20 objects in our NB921-excess sample, and identified at least nine Ly α emitters at z ˜ 6.5-6.6, including the two emitters reported by Kodaira et al. (2003, PASJ, 55, L17). Since our Ly α-emitter candidates are free from strong amplification of gravitational lensing, we are able to discuss their observational properties from a statistical point of view. Based on these new results, we obtained a lower limit of the star-formation rate density of ρSFR ≃ 5.7 × 10-4 h0.7 M ⊙ yr-1 Mpc-3 at z ≈ 6.6, being consistent with our previous estimate. We discuss the nature of star-formation activity in galaxies beyond z = 6.

  7. Electric Field Screening by the Proximity of Two Knife-Edge Field Emitters of Finite Width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, P.; Tang, W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, B.

    2015-11-01

    Field emitter arrays have the potential to provide high current density, low voltage operation, and high pulse repetition for radar and communication. It is well known that packing density of the field emitter arrays significantly affect the emission current. Previously we calculated analytically the electric field profile of two-dimensional knife-edge cathodes with arbitrary separation by using a Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. Here we extend this previous work to include the finite width of two identical emitters. From the electric field profile, the field enhancement factor, thereby the severity of the electric field screening, are determined. It is found that for two identical emitters with finite width, the magnitude of the electric field on the knife-edge cathodes depends strongly on the ratio h / a and h / r , where h is the height of the knife-edge cathode, 2a is the distance between the cathodes, and 2 r represents their width. Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to compare with the analytical results on the emission current distribution. P. Y. Wong was supported by a Directed Energy Summer Scholar internship at Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, and by AFRL Award No. FA9451-14-1-0374.

  8. Emission Characteristics of Graphite Nanofiber Field Emitter for Field Emission Display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushirozawa, Mizumoto; Hagiwara, Kei; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Yokoo, Kuniyoshi

    Graphite nanofiber (GNF) is a field emission material consisting of intricately tangled nano-sized carbon fibers and has similar field emission characteristics to CNT. An important issue in achieving practical use of FED (field emission display) using carbon nano-materials is how to attain emission uniformity. With the objective of uniformity, field emission characteristics of GNF emitter were examined using a scanning Faraday cup emission profiler. The current density of emitted electrons changed considerably over the emitting area at a low field, as high as two orders in intensity in a measuring emitter area of 1 mm2. However, uniformity was significantly improved due to current saturation at a high field. This paper discusses the current saturation in field emission of GNF from the space-charge effect of emitted electrons.

  9. Nanostructured ultrafast silicon-tip optical field-emitter arrays.

    PubMed

    Swanwick, Michael E; Keathley, Phillip D; Fallahi, Arya; Krogen, Peter R; Laurent, Guillaume; Moses, Jeffrey; Kärtner, Franz X; Velásquez-García, Luis F

    2014-09-10

    Femtosecond ultrabright electron sources with spatially structured emission are an enabling technology for free-electron lasers, compact coherent X-ray sources, electron diffractive imaging, and attosecond science. In this work, we report the design, modeling, fabrication, and experimental characterization of a novel ultrafast optical field emission cathode comprised of a large (>100,000 tips), dense (4.6 million tips·cm(-2)), and highly uniform (<1 nm tip radius deviation) array of nanosharp high-aspect-ratio silicon columns. Such field emitters offer an attractive alternative to UV photocathodes while providing a direct means of structuring the emitted electron beam. Detailed measurements and simulations show pC electron bunches can be generated in the multiphoton and tunneling regime within a single optical cycle, enabling significant advances in electron diffractive imaging and coherent X-ray sources on a subfemtosecond time scale, not possible before. At high charge emission yields, a slow rollover in charge is explained as a combination of the onset of tunneling emission and the formation of a virtual cathode. PMID:25075552

  10. Pulsed laser-deposited nanocrystalline GdB6 thin films on W and Re as field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; Singh, Anil K.; Phase, Deodatta M.; Late, Dattatray J.; Sinha, Sucharita; More, Mahendra A.

    2016-10-01

    Gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) nanocrystalline thin films were grown on tungsten (W), rhenium (Re) tips and foil substrates using optimized pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. The X-ray diffraction analysis reveals formation of pure, crystalline cubic phase of GdB6 on W and Re substrates, under the prevailing PLD conditions. The field emission (FE) studies of GdB6/W and GdB6/Re emitters were performed in a planar diode configuration at the base pressure ~10-8 mbar. The GdB6/W and GdB6/Re tip emitters deliver high emission current densities of ~1.4 and 0.811 mA/cm2 at an applied field of ~6.0 and 7.0 V/µm, respectively. The Fowler-Nordheim ( F- N) plots were found to be nearly linear showing metallic nature of the emitters. The noticeably high values of field enhancement factor ( β) estimated using the slopes of the F- N plots indicate that the PLD GdB6 coating on W and Re substrates comprises of high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. Interestingly, the GdB6/W and GdB6/Re planar emitters exhibit excellent current stability at the preset values over a long-term operation, as compared to the tip emitters. Furthermore, the values of workfunction of the GdB6/W and GdB6/Re emitters, experimentally measured using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, are found to be same, ~1.6 ± 0.1 eV. Despite possessing same workfunction value, the FE characteristics of the GdB6/W emitter are markedly different from that of GdB6/Re emitter, which can be attributed to the growth of GdB6 films on W and Re substrates.

  11. Energy distribution for undergate-type triode carbon nanotube field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, SeGi; Yi, Whikun; Lee, Jeonghee; Jeong, Taewon; Jin, Sunghwan; Heo, Jungna; Kang, J. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Lee, Chang Soo; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Kim, J. M.

    2002-05-01

    Field emission energy distribution (FEED) has been measured for undergate-type triode carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters where the gate electrodes are located underneath the cathode electrodes. The diode-type emission for these CNT emitters was found to follow the Fowler-Nordheim relation, whereas the triode-type emission exhibited the deviation from this relation. The FEED peaks for the undergate CNT emitters under the triode-type emission shifted to lower energy as the gate voltage increased, indicating nonmetallic behavior for the CNT emitters. There exist two different characteristic FEED peaks, where their peak energy shifts as a function of the gate voltage belong to two different slopes. From the difference in the position and intensity of the peaks, it was found that one was field emission directly from CNTs and the other might be emitted from CNTs through glass powders which were added during the CNT field emitter fabrication process.

  12. Elementary framework for cold field emission from quantum-confined, non-planar emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, A. A. Akinwande, A. I.

    2015-05-07

    For suitably small field emitters, the effects of quantum confinement at the emitter tip may have a significant impact on the emitter performance and total emitted current density (ECD). Since the geometry of a quantum system uniquely determines the magnitude and distribution of its energy levels, a framework for deriving ECD equations from cold field electron emitters of arbitrary geometry and dimensionality is developed. In the interest of obtaining semi-analytical ECD equations, the framework is recast in terms of plane wave solutions to the Schrödinger equation via the use of the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. To demonstrate the framework's consistency with our previous work and its capabilities in treating emitters with non-planar geometries, ECD equations were derived for the normally unconfined cylindrical nanowire (CNW) and normally confined (NC) CNW emitter geometries. As a function of the emitter radius, the NC CNW emitter ECD profile displayed a strong dependence on the Fermi energy and had an average ECD that exceeded the Fowler-Nordheim equation for typical values of the Fermi energy due to closely spaced, singly degenerate energy levels (excluding electron spin), comparatively large electron supply values, and the lack of a transverse, zero-point energy. Such characteristics suggest that emitters with non-planar geometries may be ideal for emission from both an electron supply and electrostatics perspective.

  13. Theory of electron emission in high fields from atomically sharp emitters: Validity of the Fowler-Nordheim equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, P. H.; He, Jun; Miller, J.; Miskovsky, N. M.; Weiss, B.; Sullivan, T. E.

    1993-04-01

    Field emission from metallic emitters is generally described by the Fowler-Nordheim [F-N] theory, which is based on a planar model of the tip with a classical image correction. Within the free electron model and the WKB approximation, the planar tip model leads to the well-known Fowler-Nordheim equation, which predicts that a plot of log J/F 2 versus 1/F, where J is the current density and F, the field, should be a straight line within the narrow range of field strengths of typical field emission experiments, 3 - 5V/nm. This has been experimentally confirmed for conventional emitters, (i.e., electrolytically etched tips with radii ⪆50 nm). Field emitters fabricated with today's new techniques are much sharper with radii of curvature of the order of nm's or even the size of a single atom. Hence, the local geometry of the tip may become an important factor in the electron emission process. To investigate the effects of the shape and/or size on emission, the authors, in a recent series of papers, studied the dependence of the current-voltage characteristics on the local geometry of pointed emitters. It was found that the calculated results, plotted as log J/V 2 vs. 1/V, do not exhibit the straight line behavior predicted by the Fowler-Nordheim theory. In addition, there is a dramatic increase in the tunneling current for a fixed external bias, V, relative to the Fowler-Nordheim result for a planar model of the tip with the same bias voltage. Using the exact current integral additional results have been obtained exhibiting the effects of emitter curvature on field electron energy distributions and on electron emission in high fields and temperatures. These results continue to differ with the predictions of the Fowler-Nordheim equation for the same emitter models. Therefore, the adequacy of a β-factor in the conventional planar model Fowler-Nordheim equation to account for emitter curvature is examined. It is demonstrated that even a β-modified Fowler

  14. Electron Field Emission Characteristics of Planar Field Emission Array with Diamondlike Carbon Electron Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chin-Maw; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Yokoyama, Meiso; Chuang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Chun-Hui; Wang, Wen-Chun; Lin, I-Nan

    1999-02-01

    The electron emission characteristics of planar field emission arrays (FEAs), containing undoped and boron-doped diamondlike carbon (DLC) films as emitters, were investigated. The planar DLC FEAs require only 13.3 V/µm to turn on the electron field emission, whereas the boron-doped planar DLC FEAs requires an even lower electric field (9.8 V/µm) to trigger the electron emission. The boron-doped DLC films also possess an electron emission property highly superior to that of the undoped DLC films and exhibit a stable electron emission current of 938 µA under a 20 V/µm bias voltage, which corresponds to a high emission current density of (Je)B-DLC=128 mA/cm2. These superior properties suggest that the boron-doped DLC FEAs are potentially useful as electron emitters in flat panel displays.

  15. Fabrication of Gate-Electrode Integrated Carbon-Nanotube Bundle Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Bronikowski, Michael; Luong, Edward; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    A continuing effort to develop carbon-nanotube-based field emitters (cold cathodes) as high-current-density electron sources has yielded an optimized device design and a fabrication scheme to implement the design. One major element of the device design is to use a planar array of bundles of carbon nanotubes as the field-emission tips and to optimize the critical dimensions of the array (principally, heights of bundles and distances between them) to obtain high area-averaged current density and high reliability over a long operational lifetime a concept that was discussed in more detail in Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters (NPO-40817), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2007), page 58. Another major element of the design is to configure the gate electrodes (anodes used to extract, accelerate, and/or focus electrons) as a ring that overhangs a recess wherein the bundles of nanotubes are located, such that by virtue of the proximity between the ring and the bundles, a relatively low applied potential suffices to generate the large electric field needed for emission of electrons.

  16. On the Importance of Symmetrizing RF Coupler Fields for Low Emittance Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Zhou, Feng; Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    The input power of accelerator structure is normally fed through a coupling slot(s) on the outer wall of the accelerator structure via magnetic coupling. While providing perfect matching, the coupling slots may produce non-axial-symmetric fields in the coupler cell that can induce emittance growth as the beam is accelerated in such a field. This effect is especially important for low emittance beams at low energies such as in the injector accelerators for light sources. In this paper, we present studies of multipole fields of different rf coupler designs and their effect on beam emittance for an X-band photocathode gun being jointly designed with LLNL, and X-band accelerator structures. We will present symmetrized rf coupler designs for these components to preserve the beam emittance.

  17. Coulomb interactions in sharp tip pulsed photo field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Ben; Kruit, Pieter

    2016-10-01

    Photofield emitters show great potential for many single electron pulsed applications. However, for the brightest pulses > 10 11 A / ( m 2 sr V ) , our simulations show that Poisson statistics and stochastic Coulomb interactions limit the brightness and increase the energy spread even with an average of a single electron per pulse. For the systems, we study we find that the energy spread is probably the limiting factor for most applications.

  18. Possible emittance growth induced by nonlinear space charge fields for arbitrary particle distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    A procedure to obtain a ratio of beam radii at final and initial states in arbitrary particle distributions is proposed, and is applied to the estimation of possible emittance growth for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions. The ratios are estimated for Gaussian and thermal equilibrium distributions as a function of tune depression. The possible emittance growth as a function of tune depression and nonlinear field energy factor is also estimated with and without a constant radius ratio approximation. It is confirmed that the possible emittance growths are almost the same in comparison to the cases with and without the constant radius ratio approximation at each distribution.

  19. Microelectrode for energy and current control of nanotip field electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Lüneburg, S.; Müller, M. Paarmann, A. Ernstorfer, R.

    2013-11-18

    Emerging experiments and applications in electron microscopy, holography, and diffraction benefit from miniaturized electron guns for compact experimental setups. We present a highly compact microelectrode integrated field emitter that consists of a tungsten nanotip coated with a few micrometers thick polyimide film followed by a several nanometers thick gold film, both positioned behind the exposed emitter apex by approximately 10–30 μm. The control of the electric field strength at the nanometer scale tip apex allows suppression, extraction, and energy tuning of field-emitted electrons. The performance of the microelectrode is demonstrated experimentally and supported by numerical simulations.

  20. Electron gun using carbon-nanofiber field emitter.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Y; Haga, A; Sugita, S; Kita, S; Tanaka, S-I; Okuyama, F; Kobayashi, N

    2007-01-01

    An electron gun constructed using carbon-nanofiber (CNF) emitters and an electrostatic Einzel lens system has been characterized for the development of a high-resolution x-ray source. The CNFs used were grown on tungsten and palladium tips by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Electron beams with the energies of 10

  1. Observation of valence band electron emission from n-type silicon field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Meng; Kim, Han; Akinwande, Akintunde I.

    1999-08-01

    Electron emission from the valence band of n-type Si field emitter arrays is reported. High electrostatic field at the surface of Si was achieved by reducing the radius of the emitter tip. Using oxidation sharpening, 1 μm aperture polycrystalline Si gate, n-type Si field emitter arrays with small tip radius (˜10 nm) were fabricated. Three distinct emission regions were observed: conduction band emission at low gate voltages, saturated current emission from the conduction band at intermediate voltages, and valence band plus conduction band emission at high gate voltages. Emission currents at low and high voltages obey the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The ratio of the slopes of the corresponding Fowler-Nordheim fits for these two regions is 1.495 which is in close agreement with the theoretical value of 1.445.

  2. A fine-focusing x-ray source using carbon-nanofiber field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, W.; Sugita, S.; Sakai, Y.; Goto, H.; Watanabe, Y.; Ohga, Y.; Kita, S.; Ohara, T.

    2010-08-01

    A fine-focusing x-ray source has been constructed employing a field electron emitter prepared by growing carbon-nanofibers (CNFs) on a metal tip. The x-ray source is composed of a CNF field electron emitter, an electrostatic lens, two magnetic lenses, and a W-target for generating x-rays by electron impact. The CNFs provided field electrons with a current density of J ˜5×109 A/m2, which was evaluated with the aid of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The electron beam extracted from the CNF emitter was accelerated to the energies of E =10-25 keV, and then focused by the lenses. By recording the x-ray images of test charts, the optimum resolution of the x-ray source was estimated to be approximately Dx=0.5 μm.

  3. Optimal dipole-field profiles for emittance reduction in storage rings.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-X.; Wang, Y.; Peng, Y. )

    2011-03-21

    In recent years nonuniform dipoles with bending-radius variation have been studied for reducing storage ring emittance. According to a new minimum-emittance theory, the effects of an arbitrary dipole can be characterized with two parameters determined by the dipole. To have a better idea of the potentials of nonuniform dipoles, here we numerically explore the possible values of these two parameters and associated bending profiles for optimal emittance reduction. Such optimization results provide a useful reference for lattice designs involving nonuniform bending. Simple bending-radius profiles (a short segment of constant radius with linear ramps on the sides) were found to be close to the optimal. Basic beam and lattice properties such as emittance, energy spread, and phase advances are presented based on the optimal dipole solutions.

  4. Multiplexing and scaling-down of nanostructured photon-triggered silicon field emitter arrays for maximum total electron yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chen D.; Swanwick, Michael E.; Keathley, Phillip D.; Kärtner, Franz X.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond ultrabright cathodes with spatially structured emission are a critical technology for applications such as free-electron lasers, tabletop coherent x-ray sources, and ultrafast imaging. In this work, the optimization of the total electron yield of ultrafast photon-triggered field emission cathodes composed of arrays of nanosharp, high-aspect-ratio, single-crystal silicon pillars is explored through the variation of the emitter pitch and height. Arrays of 6 nm tip radius silicon emitters with emitter densities between 1.2 and 73.9 million tips cm-2 (hexagonally packed arrays with emitter pitch between 1.25 and 10 μm) and emitter height between 2.0 and 8.5 μm were characterized using 35 fs 800 nm laser pulses. Three-photon electron emission for low-energy (<0.3 μJ) light pulses and strong-field emission for high-energy (>1 μJ) light pulses was observed, in agreement with the literature. Of the devices tested, the arrays with emitter pitch equal to 2.5 μm produced the highest total electron yield; arrays with larger emitter pitch suffer area sub-utilization, and in devices with smaller emitter pitch the larger emitter density does not compensate the smaller per-emitter current due to the electric field shadowing that results from the proximity of the adjacent tips. Experimental data and simulations suggest that 2 μm tall emitters achieve practical optimal performance as shorter emitters have visibly smaller field factors due to the proximity of the emitter tip to the substrate, and taller emitters show marginal improvement in the electron yield at the expense of greater fabrication difficulty.

  5. Multiplexing and scaling-down of nanostructured photon-triggered silicon field emitter arrays for maximum total electron yield.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chen D; Swanwick, Michael E; Keathley, Phillip D; Kärtner, Franz X; Velásquez-García, Luis F

    2015-07-01

    Femtosecond ultrabright cathodes with spatially structured emission are a critical technology for applications such as free-electron lasers, tabletop coherent x-ray sources, and ultrafast imaging. In this work, the optimization of the total electron yield of ultrafast photon-triggered field emission cathodes composed of arrays of nanosharp, high-aspect-ratio, single-crystal silicon pillars is explored through the variation of the emitter pitch and height. Arrays of 6 nm tip radius silicon emitters with emitter densities between 1.2 and 73.9 million tips cm(-2) (hexagonally packed arrays with emitter pitch between 1.25 and 10 μm) and emitter height between 2.0 and 8.5 μm were characterized using 35 fs 800 nm laser pulses. Three-photon electron emission for low-energy (<0.3 μJ) light pulses and strong-field emission for high-energy (>1 μJ) light pulses was observed, in agreement with the literature. Of the devices tested, the arrays with emitter pitch equal to 2.5 μm produced the highest total electron yield; arrays with larger emitter pitch suffer area sub-utilization, and in devices with smaller emitter pitch the larger emitter density does not compensate the smaller per-emitter current due to the electric field shadowing that results from the proximity of the adjacent tips. Experimental data and simulations suggest that 2 μm tall emitters achieve practical optimal performance as shorter emitters have visibly smaller field factors due to the proximity of the emitter tip to the substrate, and taller emitters show marginal improvement in the electron yield at the expense of greater fabrication difficulty. PMID:26057050

  6. Triode field emitter with a gated planar carbon-nanoparticle cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyung Ho; Seo, Woo Jong; Lee, Soonil; Koh, Ken Ha

    2002-07-01

    We fabricated a triode field emitter with a normal gate structure and a planar cathode of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs), which consisted of good quality graphitic sheets encapsulating metal (carbide) cores. For the quantitative analysis of the emission from the CNP triode emitter, we carried out a two-dimensional numerical calculation of electrostatic potential using the finite element method. As it turned out, a radial variation of electric field was very important to account for the emission from a planar emitting layer. By assuming the work function of 5 eV for CNPs, a set of consistent Fowler-Nordheim parameters, together with the radial position of emitting sites, were determined.

  7. Tunneling-enabled spectrally selective thermal emitter based on flat metallic films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhu; Luk, Ting S.; Tan, Yixuan; Ji, Dengxin; Zhou, Ming; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Yu, Zongfu

    2015-03-11

    Infrared thermal emission from metals has important energy applications in thermophotovoltaics, radiative cooling, and lighting. The emissivity of flat metal films is close to zero because the screening effect prevents metals' fluctuating currents from emitting to the far field. As a result, metal films are often used as reflecting mirrors instead of thermal emitters. Recently, nanostructured metals, such as metamaterials, have emerged as an interesting way to enhance and to spectrally control thermal emission based on plasmonic resonant effects. However, they require sophisticated lithography. Here, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a completely different mechanism to achieve spectrally selective metallic emitters based on atunneling effect. Furthermore, this effect allows a simple flat metal film to achieve a near-unity emissivity with controlled spectral selectivity for efficient heat-to-light energy conversion.

  8. Tunneling-enabled spectrally selective thermal emitter based on flat metallic films

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Zhu; Tan, Yixuan; Zhou, Ming; Yu, Zongfu; Luk, Ting Shan; Ji, Dengxin; Gan, Qiaoqiang

    2015-03-09

    Infrared thermal emission from metals has important energy applications in thermophotovoltaics, radiative cooling, and lighting. Unfortunately, the emissivity of flat metal films is close to zero because the screening effect prevents metals' fluctuating currents from emitting to the far field. As a result, metal films are often used as reflecting mirrors instead of thermal emitters. Recently, nanostructured metals, such as metamaterials, have emerged as an interesting way to enhance and to spectrally control thermal emission based on plasmonic resonant effects. However, they require sophisticated lithography. Here, we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a completely different mechanism to achieve spectrally selective metallic emitters based on a tunneling effect. This effect allows a simple flat metal film to achieve a near-unity emissivity with controlled spectral selectivity for efficient heat-to-light energy conversion.

  9. Analysis of electric field screening by the proximity of two knife-edge field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wilkin; Shiffler, Don; Cartwright, Keith L.

    2011-08-01

    The electric field of two semi-infinitely wide knife-edge cathodes with arbitrary separation is calculated by using a Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. This geometry could also represent a trench (or scratch) on a flat surface. It is found that the magnitude of the electric field on the knife-edge cathodes depends strongly on the ratio h/a, where h is the height of the knife-edge cathodes and 2a is the distance between the cathodes. When h/a increases, the magnitude of the electric field on the cathode's surface decreases. This shows the screening of one cathode by another cathode; for example, keeping the height fixed and decreasing the distance between the cathodes, the field enhancement on the corner decreases. Analytic approximations for the divergent electric field in the immediate vicinity of the sharp edge are derived for the cases where h /a>>1, and h /a≪1. These results lead to insight on the relationship of the density of field emitter in field emitting arrays and field emission from rough surfaces.

  10. Highly reliable field electron emitters produced from reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2014-02-14

    Highly reliable field electron emitters were developed using a formulation for reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube (CNT) composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers and a ball-milling method. We carefully controlled the ball-milling sequence and time to avoid any damage to the CNTs, which incorporated fillers that were fully dispersed as paste constituents. The field electron emitters fabricated by printing the CNT pastes were found to exhibit almost perfect adhesion of the CNT emitters to the cathode, along with good uniformity and reproducibility. A high field enhancement factor of around 10,000 was achieved from the CNT field emitters developed. By selecting nano-sized metal alloys and oxides and using the same formulation sequence, we also developed reliable field emitters that could survive high-temperature post processing. These field emitters had high durability to post vacuum annealing at 950 °C, guaranteeing survival of the brazing process used in the sealing of field emission x-ray tubes. We evaluated the field emitters in a triode configuration in the harsh environment of a tiny vacuum-sealed vessel and observed very reliable operation for 30 h at a high current density of 350 mA cm(-2). The CNT pastes and related field emitters that were developed could be usefully applied in reliable field emission devices. PMID:24434798

  11. Highly reliable field electron emitters produced from reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Highly reliable field electron emitters were developed using a formulation for reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube (CNT) composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers and a ball-milling method. We carefully controlled the ball-milling sequence and time to avoid any damage to the CNTs, which incorporated fillers that were fully dispersed as paste constituents. The field electron emitters fabricated by printing the CNT pastes were found to exhibit almost perfect adhesion of the CNT emitters to the cathode, along with good uniformity and reproducibility. A high field enhancement factor of around 10 000 was achieved from the CNT field emitters developed. By selecting nano-sized metal alloys and oxides and using the same formulation sequence, we also developed reliable field emitters that could survive high-temperature post processing. These field emitters had high durability to post vacuum annealing at 950 °C, guaranteeing survival of the brazing process used in the sealing of field emission x-ray tubes. We evaluated the field emitters in a triode configuration in the harsh environment of a tiny vacuum-sealed vessel and observed very reliable operation for 30 h at a high current density of 350 mA cm-2. The CNT pastes and related field emitters that were developed could be usefully applied in reliable field emission devices.

  12. Carbon and metal nanotube hybrid structures on graphene as efficient electron field emitters.

    PubMed

    Heo, Kwang; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Hyungwoo; Cho, Dong-Guk; Arif, Muhammad; Kim, Kyu Young; Choi, Young Jin; Hong, Seunghun

    2016-07-01

    We report a facile and efficient method for the fabrication of highly-flexible field emission devices by forming tubular hybrid structures based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nickel nanotubes (Ni NTs) on graphene-based flexible substrates. By employing an infiltration process in anodic alumina oxide (AAO) templates followed by Ni electrodeposition, we could fabricate CNT-wrapped Ni NT/graphene hybrid structures. During the electrodeposition process, the CNTs served as Ni nucleation sites, resulting in a large-area array of high aspect-ratio field emitters composed of CNT-wrapped Ni NT hybrid structures. As a proof of concepts, we demonstrate that high-quality flexible field emission devices can be simply fabricated using our method. Remarkably, our proto-type field emission devices exhibited a current density higher by two orders of magnitude compared to other devices fabricated by previous methods, while maintaining its structural integrity in various bending deformations. This novel fabrication strategy can be utilized in various applications such as optoelectronic devices, sensors and energy storage devices. PMID:27233004

  13. Carbon and metal nanotube hybrid structures on graphene as efficient electron field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Kwang; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Hyungwoo; Cho, Dong-guk; Arif, Muhammad; Kim, Kyu Young; Choi, Young Jin; Hong, Seunghun

    2016-07-01

    We report a facile and efficient method for the fabrication of highly-flexible field emission devices by forming tubular hybrid structures based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nickel nanotubes (Ni NTs) on graphene-based flexible substrates. By employing an infiltration process in anodic alumina oxide (AAO) templates followed by Ni electrodeposition, we could fabricate CNT-wrapped Ni NT/graphene hybrid structures. During the electrodeposition process, the CNTs served as Ni nucleation sites, resulting in a large-area array of high aspect-ratio field emitters composed of CNT-wrapped Ni NT hybrid structures. As a proof of concepts, we demonstrate that high-quality flexible field emission devices can be simply fabricated using our method. Remarkably, our proto-type field emission devices exhibited a current density higher by two orders of magnitude compared to other devices fabricated by previous methods, while maintaining its structural integrity in various bending deformations. This novel fabrication strategy can be utilized in various applications such as optoelectronic devices, sensors and energy storage devices.

  14. Flexible electron field emitters fabricated using conducting ultrananocrystalline diamond pyramidal microtips on polynorbornene films

    SciTech Connect

    Sankaran, K. J.; Tai, N. H.; Lin, I. N.

    2014-01-20

    High performance flexible field emitters made of aligned pyramidal shaped conducting ultrananocrystalline diamond (C-UNCD) microtips on polynorbornene substrates is demonstrated. Flexible C-UNCD pyramidal microtips show a low turn-on field of 1.80 V/μm with a field enhancement factor of 4580 and a high emission current density of 5.8 mA/cm{sup 2} (at an applied field of 4.20 V/μm) with life-time stability of 210 min. Such an enhancement in the field emission is due to the presence of sp{sup 2}-graphitic sheath with a nanowire-like diamond core. This high performance flexible C-UNCD field emitter is potentially useful for the fabrication of diverse, flexible electronic devices.

  15. Transfer of arbitrary quantum emitter states to near-field photon superpositions in nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Arthur C T; Cryan, Martin J; Rarity, John G; Oulton, Ruth

    2012-09-24

    We present a method to analyze the suitability of particular photonic cavity designs for information exchange between arbitrary superposition states of a quantum emitter and the near-field photonic cavity mode. As an illustrative example, we consider whether quantum dot emitters embedded in "L3" and "H1" photonic crystal cavities are able to transfer a spin superposition state to a confined photonic superposition state for use in quantum information transfer. Using an established dyadic Green's function (DGF) analysis, we describe methods to calculate coupling to arbitrary quantum emitter positions and orientations using the modified local density of states (LDOS) calculated using numerical finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. We find that while superposition states are not supported in L3 cavities, the double degeneracy of the H1 cavities supports superposition states of the two orthogonal modes that may be described as states on a Poincaré-like sphere. Methods are developed to comprehensively analyze the confined superposition state generated from an arbitrary emitter position and emitter dipole orientation.

  16. Position Effect Based on Anthracene Core for OLED Emitters.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyeonmi; Shin, Hwangyu; Kim, Beomjin; Park, Jongwook

    2016-03-01

    Green-orange emitters based on anthracene core have been successfully synthesized by substitution with triphenylamine side group in the 9, 10 or 2, 6 positions. There are larger blue shifts in the UV-visible absorption and PL spectra of the synthesized 2,6-substituted derivative compared to the 9,10-substituted derivative. When the synthesized compounds were used as emitting layers in non-doped OLED devices, a related trend was observed in their optical properties. In particular, the OLED device containing the 2,6-substituted derivative was found to exhibit excellent characteristics, with maximum EL emission at 518 nm, pure green emission with CIE coordinates of (0.334, 0.604), and external quantum efficiency of 2.83%.

  17. The development of corannulene-based blue emitters.

    PubMed

    Mack, James; Vogel, Philip; Jones, Derek; Kaval, Necati; Sutton, Art

    2007-08-01

    Novel blue emitters were synthesized based on the fullerene fragment corannulene. 1,2- bis(corannulenylethynyl)benzene and 1,4-bis(corannulenylethynyl)benzene were designed, synthesized, and shown to exhibit significant red shifts in their absorption spectra as compared to that of the parent corannulene. Photoluminescence studies show both 1,2- bis(corannulenylethynyl)benzene and 1,4- bis(corannulenylethynyl)benzene gives enhanced blue luminescence compared to the parent corannulene structure. 1,4-bis(corannulenylethynyl)benzene was observed to give intense blue luminescence when excited at 400 nm. DFT and TD-DFT calculations were performed and shown to be consistent with the observed experimental results.

  18. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    DOEpatents

    Korsah, Kofi [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  19. Stable electron field emission from carbon nanotubes emitter transferred on graphene films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ning; Chen, Jing; Qu, Ke; Khan, Qasim; Lei, Wei; Zhang, Xiaobing

    2015-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arrays grown by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MPCVD) method was transferred onto the substrate covered with graphene layer obtained by thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology. The graphene buffer layer provides good electrical and thermal contact to the CNTs. The field emission characteristics of this hybrid structure were investigated in this study. Compared with the CNTs arrays directly grown on the silicon substrate, the hybrid emitter shows better field emission performance, such as high emission current and long-term emission stability. The presence of this graphene layer was shown to improve the field emission behavior of CNTs. This work provides an effective way to realize stable field emission from CNTs emitter and similar hybrid structures.

  20. Field electron emission enhancement of graphenated MWCNTs emitters following their decoration with Au nanoparticles by a pulsed laser ablation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, L.-A.; Le Borgne, V.; Delegan, N.; Pandiyan, R.; El Khakani, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was adapted to alter the growth of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) so that graphene sheets grow out of their tips. Gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) decoration of graphenated MWCNTs (g-MWCNTs) was obtained by subsequent decoration by a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process. By varying the number of laser ablation pulses (NLp) in the PLD process, we were able to control the size of the gold nanoparticles and the surface coverage of the decorated g-MWCNTs. The presence of Au-NPs, preferentially located at the tip of the g-MWCNTs emitters, is shown to significantly improve the field electron emission (FEE) properties of the global g-MWCNT/Au-NP nanohybrid films. Indeed, the electric field needed to extract a current density of 0.1 μA cm-2 from the g-MWCNT/Au-NP films was decreased from 2.68 V μm-1 to a value as low as 0.96 V μm-1. On the other hand, UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) characterization revealed a decrease in the global work function of the Au-decorated g-MWCNT nanohybrids compared to that of bare g-MWCNT emitters. Surprisingly, the work function of g-MWCNT was found to decrease from 4.9 to 4.7 eV with the addition of Au-NPs—a value lower than the work function of both materials worth 5.2 and 4.9 eV for gold and g-MWCNT, respectively. Our results show that the NLp dependence of the FEE characteristics of the g-MWCNT/Au-NP emitters correlates well with their work function changes. Fowler-Nordheim-theory-based calculations suggest that the significant FEE enhancement of the emitters is also caused by the Au-NPs acting as nanoscale electric field enhancers.

  1. Field electron emission enhancement of graphenated MWCNTs emitters following their decoration with Au nanoparticles by a pulsed laser ablation process.

    PubMed

    Gautier, L-A; Le Borgne, V; Delegan, N; Pandiyan, R; El Khakani, M A

    2015-01-30

    A plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process was adapted to alter the growth of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) so that graphene sheets grow out of their tips. Gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) decoration of graphenated MWCNTs (g-MWCNTs) was obtained by subsequent decoration by a pulsed laser deposition (PLD) process. By varying the number of laser ablation pulses (N(Lp)) in the PLD process, we were able to control the size of the gold nanoparticles and the surface coverage of the decorated g-MWCNTs. The presence of Au-NPs, preferentially located at the tip of the g-MWCNTs emitters, is shown to significantly improve the field electron emission (FEE) properties of the global g-MWCNT/Au-NP nanohybrid films. Indeed, the electric field needed to extract a current density of 0.1 μA cm(-)(2) from the g-MWCNT/Au-NP films was decreased from 2.68 V μm(-1) to a value as low as 0.96 V μm(-1). On the other hand, UV photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS) characterization revealed a decrease in the global work function of the Au-decorated g-MWCNT nanohybrids compared to that of bare g-MWCNT emitters. Surprisingly, the work function of g-MWCNT was found to decrease from 4.9 to 4.7 eV with the addition of Au-NPs-a value lower than the work function of both materials worth 5.2 and 4.9 eV for gold and g-MWCNT, respectively. Our results show that the N(Lp) dependence of the FEE characteristics of the g-MWCNT/Au-NP emitters correlates well with their work function changes. Fowler-Nordheim-theory-based calculations suggest that the significant FEE enhancement of the emitters is also caused by the Au-NPs acting as nanoscale electric field enhancers. PMID:25567743

  2. Spectrum of classes of point emitters: new tool for nonparaxial optical field modeling.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Román; Muñoz, Hernán

    2016-08-01

    Numerical modeling of optical fields provides valuable support to both theoretical research and technological development in many optics fields. Fourier methods have been the most widely used tools of numerical modeling. However, important limitations have restricted their application in contemporary research that involve high numerical apertures, short propagation distances, and spatially partially coherent states of light, for instance. The spectrum of classes of point emitters is introduced as a numerical tool that overcomes such limitations for the design, analysis, and synthesis of nonparaxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this context, optical processing is realized as the filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence that could be implemented dynamically by using programmable devices.

  3. Fabrication of carbon nanotube emitters on the graphite rod and their high field emission performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Hoon Shin, Dong; Nam Yun, Ki; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2014-01-27

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters with small emission area were fabricated on graphite rods using CNT films. By introducing the edge polishing process, the field emission performance of the CNT emitter was much improved, which showed a very high emission current of 6.34 mA (1.6 A/cm{sup 2}) under an applied electric field of 5.3 V/μm. It also indicates good long-term emission stability, which reveals no degradation in the emission current for 20 h. The emission patterns demonstrate uniform and well-focused electron beam spots. The enhanced field emission performance is mainly attributed to the suppressed edge emission after the edge polishing process.

  4. Lambertian thermal emitter based on plasmonic enhanced absorption.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chih-Ming; Tsai, Din Ping

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, a narrow band thermal emission at 10 μm is demonstrated using a one dimensional metasurface. The proposed metasurface structure provides magnetic resonance mode that enhances the phonon absorption of SiO2. The proposed metasurface thermal emitter shows a Lambertian distribution. Additionally, 5.8-folds enhancement of emissivity is achieved by optimizing the cavity thickness of the metasurfaces. This type of thermal emitter will be useful for IR sensing applications. PMID:27505801

  5. Behavior of molecules and molecular ions near a field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Baptiste; Saxey, David W.; Ashton, Michael W.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Moody, Michael P.; Schreiber, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    The cold emission of particles from surfaces under intense electric fields is a process which underpins a variety of applications including atom probe tomography (APT), an analytical microscopy technique with near-atomic spatial resolution. Increasingly relying on fast laser pulsing to trigger the emission, APT experiments often incorporate the detection of molecular ions emitted from the specimen, in particular from covalently or ionically bonded materials. Notably, it has been proposed that neutral molecules can also be emitted during this process. However, this remains a contentious issue. To investigate the validity of this hypothesis, a careful review of the literature is combined with the development of new methods to treat experimental APT data, the modeling of ion trajectories, and the application of density-functional theory simulations to derive molecular ion energetics. It is shown that the direct thermal emission of neutral molecules is extremely unlikely. However, neutrals can still be formed in the course of an APT experiment by dissociation of metastable molecular ions. This work is a partial contribution of the US Government and therefore is not subject to copyright in the United States.

  6. Silicon based solar cells using a multilayer oxide as emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jie; Wu, Weiliang; Liu, Zongtao; Shen, Hui

    2016-08-01

    In this work, n-type silicon based solar cells with WO3/Ag/WO3 multilayer films as emitter (WAW/n-Si solar cells) were presented via simple physical vapor deposition (PVD). Microstructure and composition of WAW/n-Si solar cells were studied by TEM and XPS, respectively. Furthermore, the dependence of the solar cells performances on each WO3 layer thickness was investigated. The results indicated that the bottom WO3 layer mainly induced band bending and facilitated charge-carriers separation, while the top WO3 layer degraded open-circuit voltage but actually improved optical absorption of the solar cells. The WAW/n-Si solar cells, with optimized bottom and top WO3 layer thicknesses, exhibited 5.21% efficiency on polished wafer with area of 4 cm2 under AM 1.5 condition (25 °C and 100 mW/cm2). Compared with WO3 single-layer film, WAW multilayer films demonstrated better surface passivation quality but more optical loss, while the optical loss could be effectively reduced by implementing light-trapping structures. These results pave a new way for dopant-free solar cells in terms of low-cost and facile process flow.

  7. Enhanced Field-Emission Performance from Carbon Nanotube Emitters on Nickel Foam Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Han, Lijing; Yi, Lan; Wang, Xu; Li, Zhenhua; Shang, Xuefu; Wang, Xiumin; Wu, Huizhen; Zhao, Pei; Song, Yenan; Wang, Miao

    2016-04-01

    We present a three-dimensionally configured cathode with enhanced field-emission performance formed by combining carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters with a nickel foam (NiF) substrate via a conventional screen-printing technique. The CNT/NiF cathode has low turn-on electric field of 0.53 V μm-1 (with current density of 10 μA cm-2) and threshold electric field of 0.87 V μm-1 (with current density of 0.1 mA cm-2), and a very high field enhancement factor of 1.4 × 104. The porous structure of the NiF substrate can greatly improve the field-emission properties due to its large specific surface area that can accommodate more CNTs and increase the emitter density, as well as its high electrical and thermal conductivities that facilitate current transition and heat dissipation in the cathode. Most importantly, the local electric field was also enhanced by the multistage effect resulting from the rough metal surface, which furthermore leads to a high field enhancement factor. We believe that this improved field-emission performance makes such cathodes promising candidates for use in various field-emission applications.

  8. Robust Radar Emitter Recognition Based on the Three-Dimensional Distribution Feature and Transfer Learning

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhutian; Qiu, Wei; Sun, Hongjian; Nallanathan, Arumugam

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of electromagnetic signals, there exists a significant challenge for radar emitter signal recognition. To address this challenge, multi-component radar emitter recognition under a complicated noise environment is studied in this paper. A novel radar emitter recognition approach based on the three-dimensional distribution feature and transfer learning is proposed. The cubic feature for the time-frequency-energy distribution is proposed to describe the intra-pulse modulation information of radar emitters. Furthermore, the feature is reconstructed by using transfer learning in order to obtain the robust feature against signal noise rate (SNR) variation. Last, but not the least, the relevance vector machine is used to classify radar emitter signals. Simulations demonstrate that the approach proposed in this paper has better performances in accuracy and robustness than existing approaches. PMID:26927111

  9. Robust Radar Emitter Recognition Based on the Three-Dimensional Distribution Feature and Transfer Learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhutian; Qiu, Wei; Sun, Hongjian; Nallanathan, Arumugam

    2016-02-25

    Due to the increasing complexity of electromagnetic signals, there exists a significant challenge for radar emitter signal recognition. To address this challenge, multi-component radar emitter recognition under a complicated noise environment is studied in this paper. A novel radar emitter recognition approach based on the three-dimensional distribution feature and transfer learning is proposed. The cubic feature for the time-frequency-energy distribution is proposed to describe the intra-pulse modulation information of radar emitters. Furthermore, the feature is reconstructed by using transfer learning in order to obtain the robust feature against signal noise rate (SNR) variation. Last, but not the least, the relevance vector machine is used to classify radar emitter signals. Simulations demonstrate that the approach proposed in this paper has better performances in accuracy and robustness than existing approaches.

  10. Robust Radar Emitter Recognition Based on the Three-Dimensional Distribution Feature and Transfer Learning.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhutian; Qiu, Wei; Sun, Hongjian; Nallanathan, Arumugam

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing complexity of electromagnetic signals, there exists a significant challenge for radar emitter signal recognition. To address this challenge, multi-component radar emitter recognition under a complicated noise environment is studied in this paper. A novel radar emitter recognition approach based on the three-dimensional distribution feature and transfer learning is proposed. The cubic feature for the time-frequency-energy distribution is proposed to describe the intra-pulse modulation information of radar emitters. Furthermore, the feature is reconstructed by using transfer learning in order to obtain the robust feature against signal noise rate (SNR) variation. Last, but not the least, the relevance vector machine is used to classify radar emitter signals. Simulations demonstrate that the approach proposed in this paper has better performances in accuracy and robustness than existing approaches. PMID:26927111

  11. Field and laboratory evaluation of a diffusive emitter for semipassive release of PCE to an aquifer

    SciTech Connect

    Arildskov, N.P.; Devlin, J.F.

    2000-02-01

    In controlled field experiments or model aquifers, it is sometimes desirable to introduce solutes below the water table without perturbing the flow system. Diffusive emitters offer a means of achieving that goal. In this study, two laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate nylon tubing as a diffusive emitter for tetrachloroethene (PCE). The initial approach was to pump a saturated aqueous PCE solution through a piece of nylon tubing immersed in a flow-through contractor vessel. Millipore water was pumped through the contractor vessel at a constant rate. Due to PCE diffusion through the nylon, a steady-state concentration in the contractor vessel eventually developed. The process was well described by a computer model that accounted for retarded diffusion through the nylon. In a second experiment, pieces of nylon tubing were exposed to a relatively low concentration of PCE in water for 10 days in gently rotated hypovials. With the aid of a second diffusion model, the bulk diffusion coefficient was obtained from the concentration history of the solution. With the different experimental conditions taken into account, there was reasonably good agreement between the bulk diffusion coefficients in the two experiments. The results were used in the field design of a semipassive release system. Evaluation of this system showed a lower than expected steady-state concentration of PCE inside the releasing wells. The difference is likely due to lower temperature, variable PCE concentrations in the nylon tubing, and nonideal mixing in the wells. The work has shown that laboratory derived diffusion coefficients for polymeric materials are likely to be larger than, but within an order of magnitude of, the effective diffusion coefficients exhibited by emitters in the field. Nevertheless, with temperature corrections taken into account and proper well development, these values could be used to design emitters that would suit most practical applications.

  12. Planar ultrananocrystalline diamond field emitter in accelerator radio frequency electron injector: Performance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Sergey V. Antipov, Sergey; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shao, Jiahang; Liu, Wanming; Gai, Wei; Pérez Quintero, Kenneth J.; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Kanareykin, Alexei D.

    2014-11-17

    A case performance study of a planar field emission cathode (FEC) based on nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond, (N)UNCD, was carried out in an RF 1.3 GHz electron gun. The FEC was a 100 nm (N)UNCD film grown on a 20 mm diameter stainless steel disk with a Mo buffer layer. At surface gradients 45–65 MV/m, peak currents of 1–80 mA (equivalent to 0.3–25 mA/cm{sup 2}) were achieved. Imaging with two YAG screens confirmed emission from the (N)UNCD surface with (1) the beam emittance of 1.5 mm × mrad/mm-rms and (2) longitudinal FWHM and rms widths of non-Gaussian energy spread of 0.7% and 11% at an electron energy of 2 MeV. Current stability was tested over the course of 36 × 10{sup 3} RF pulses (equivalent to 288 × 10{sup 6 }GHz oscillations)

  13. Approach for fabricating microgated field-emission arrays with individual carbon nanotube emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Ming Q.; Shao, Wen S.; Li, Xing H.; Bai, Guo D.; Zhang, Fu Q.; Li, Han Y.; Feng, Jin J.

    2005-12-05

    We propose an approach for fabricating microgated field-emission arrays (FEAs) with individual carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters. Beginning with the fabrication of microgated cell arrays, the process involves depositing a sacrificial layer at a glancing angle to close in the aperture that a small area catalyst can be placed on the bottom of the cells (for type A) or on the predeposited Mo tips (for type B); then, vertically aligned CNTs are grown by a dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition following a lift-off process. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images of both types of CNT FEAs show a large percentage of emitters with single, double or triple CNTs. For a 5x5 type B CNT FEA, at a gate voltage of 100 V, an average anode current reaches 1.4 {mu}A per cell while the gate current is less than 5% of the anode current.

  14. Application of Anisotropic Conductive Film to Fabrication of Molybdenum Field Emitter Arrays Using Transfer Mold Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Eou Sik; Ahn, Min Hyung; Kwon, Sang Jik

    2008-08-01

    In the fabrication of molybdenum field emitter arrays (Mo FEA) by the transfer mold technique, anisotropic conductive film (ACF) was applied to the bond between the inverted mold structure and the transferred glass substrate. Without any electrical treatment of electrostatic bonding, the inverted mold was successfully bonded to an indium tin oxide (ITO) glass substrate under optimized thermal and pressure conditions. No additional conductive layers were used in the bonding process, and the bonded ACF was not chemically affected in the wet-etch process of the silicon inverted mold structure. The fabricated Mo FEA was structurally and electrically investigated and an anode current of 10 nA per emitter was obtained at a gate bias of 94 V. The results demonstrate the possibility of selective conduction in the fabrication of transfer mold FEA using ACF bonding.

  15. Ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction with laser-driven field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ropers, Claus

    2015-03-01

    Ultrafast structural dynamics in solids and nanostructures can be investigated by an increasing number of sophisticated electron and x-ray diffraction techniques. Electrons are particularly suited for this purpose, exhibiting high scattering cross-sections and allowing for beam control by versatile electrostatic or magnetic lens systems. The capabilities of time-resolved electron imaging techniques critically depend on the employed source of laser-driven ultrashort electron pulses. Nanoscopic sources offer exceptional possibilities for the generation of electron probe pulses with very short durations and high spatial beam coherence. In this talk, I will discuss recent progress in the development of ultrafast electron microscopy and diffraction based on nanoscopic photocathodes. In particular, we implemented ultrafast low-energy electron diffraction (ULEED) and ultrafast transmission electron microscopy (UTEM) driven by nonlinear photoemission from field emission tips. ULEED enables the study of structural changes with high temporal resolution and ultimate surface sensitivity, at sub-keV electron energies. As a first application of this technique, we studied the structural phase transition in a stripe-like polymer superstructure on freestanding monolayer graphene. An advanced UTEM instrument was realized by custom modifications of a standard transmission electron microscope, leading to electron focal spot sizes in the microscope's sample plane of about 10 nm and electron pulse durations of less than 700 fs. Utilizing these features, we investigate the quantum-coherent interaction between the ultrashort electron pulse and the optical near-field of an illuminated nanostructure. Finally, further applications and prospects of ultrafast electron imaging, diffraction and spectroscopy using nanoscale field emitters will be discussed.

  16. Determination of satellite valley position in GaN emitter from photoexcited field emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenenko, M.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Argon plasma etched GaN field-emitter rods with nanometer-scale diameter were fabricated on GaN grown on an n+-GaN substrate. Their electron field emission properties were investigated both without and under illumination by using light sources with various wavelengths. The Fowler-Nordheim current-voltage characteristics of the cathodes show a change in slope for illuminated cathodes. The electron affinity difference ΔE between the different valleys in the conduction band has been ascertained and is in the range from 1.18 up to 1.21 eV.

  17. Field Emission Characteristics Depending on Emitter Patterns of A Screen-Printed Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Sang Jik; Lee, Sang Heon

    2006-01-01

    We have fabricated carbon nanotube field-emission displays (CNT-FEDs) panel with a 2 in. diagonal size using a screen printing method and in-situ vacuum sealing technology. The field emission properties of the CNT-FED panel with square-type CNT emitters were characterized and compared with those of the panel with line-type CNT emitters. As results, the square-type CNT emitters showed a much larger emission current and more stable current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. Light emission started to occur at an electric field of 3.5 V/μm, for a corresponding to an anode-cathode voltage of 700 V. The vacuum level inside of the in-situ vacuum-sealed panel was 1.4× 10-5 Torr. The sealed panel showed similar I-V characteristics with the unsealed one and uniform light emission with very high brightness at a current density of 243 μA/cm2 obtained at an electric field of 10 V/μm.

  18. A digital miniature x-ray tube with a high-density triode carbon nanotube field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Kim, Jae-Woo; Song, Yoon-Ho; Ahn, Seungjoon

    2013-01-14

    We have fabricated a digital miniature x-ray tube (6 mm in diameter and 32 mm in length) with a high-density triode carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter for special x-ray applications. The triode CNT emitter was densely formed within a diameter of below 4 mm with the focusing-functional gate. The brazing process enables us to obtain and maintain a desired vacuum level for the reliable electron emission from the CNT emitters after the vacuum packaging. The miniature x-ray tube exhibited a stable and reliable operation over 250 h in a pulse mode at an anode voltage of above 25 kV.

  19. Demonstration of cathode emittance dominated high bunch charge beams in a DC gun-based photoinjector

    SciTech Connect

    Gulliford, Colwyn Bartnik, Adam Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-03-02

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (≥100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittances measured at 9–9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs and Free Electron Lasers.

  20. Demonstration of cathode emittance dominated high bunch charge beams in a DC gun-based photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulliford, Colwyn; Bartnik, Adam; Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Cultrera, Luca

    2015-03-01

    We present the results of transverse emittance and longitudinal current profile measurements of high bunch charge (≥100 pC) beams produced in the DC gun-based Cornell energy recovery linac photoinjector. In particular, we show that the cathode thermal and core beam emittances dominate the final 95% and core emittances measured at 9-9.5 MeV. Additionally, we demonstrate excellent agreement between optimized 3D space charge simulations and measurement, and show that the quality of the transverse laser distribution limits the optimal simulated and measured emittances. These results, previously thought achievable only with RF guns, demonstrate that DC gun based photoinjectors are capable of delivering beams with sufficient single bunch charge and beam quality suitable for many current and next generation accelerator projects such as Energy Recovery Linacs and Free Electron Lasers.

  1. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 4.86 IN THE COSMOS 2 SQUARE DEGREE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Shioya, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Nagao, T.; Saito, T.; Trump, J.; Sasaki, S. S.; Ideue, Y.; Nakajima, A.; Matsuoka, K.; Murayama, T.; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, P.; Ellis, R. S.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J.; Mobasher, B.; Aussel, H.; Koekemoer, A.; Carilli, C.; Garilli, B.

    2009-05-01

    We present results of a survey for Ly{alpha} emitters at z {approx} 4.86 based on optical narrowband ({lambda} {sub c} = 7126 A, {delta}{lambda} = 73 A) and broadband (B, V, r', i', and z') observations of the Cosmic Evolution Survey field using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. We find 79 Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) candidates at z {approx} 4.86 over a contiguous survey area of 1.83 deg{sup 2}, down to the Ly{alpha} line flux of 1.47 x 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. We obtain the Ly{alpha} luminosity function with a best-fit Schechter parameters of log L* = 42.9{sup +0.5} {sub -0.3} erg s{sup -1} and {phi}* = 1.2{sup +8.0} {sub -1.1} x 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3} for {alpha} = -1.5 (fixed). The two-point correlation function for our LAE sample is {xi}(r) = (r/4.4{sup +5.7} {sub -2.9} Mpc){sup -1.90{+-}}{sup 0.22}. In order to investigate the field-to-field variations of the properties of Ly{alpha} emitters, we divide the survey area into nine tiles of 0.{sup 0}5 x 0.{sup 0}5 each. We find that the number density varies with a factor of {approx_equal}2 from field to field with high statistical significance. However, we find no significant field-to-field variance when we divide the field into four tiles with 0.{sup 0}7 x 0.{sup 0}7 each. We conclude that at least 0.5 deg{sup 2} survey area is required to derive averaged properties of LAEs at z {approx} 5, and our survey field is wide enough to overcome the cosmic variance.

  2. Transmission-type microfocus x-ray tube using carbon nanotube field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Sung Hwan; Ihsan, Aamir; Cho, Sung Oh

    2007-04-30

    A microfocus x-ray tube that can generate x rays with the focal spot size less than 5 {mu}m has been demonstrated using carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters. A CNT cathode on a sharp tungsten tip, a magnetic solenoid lens, and a transmission-type x-ray target were adopted for the microfocus x-ray tube. The design characteristics and the operation performance of the microfocus x-ray tube are presented. Due to the small focal spot size, clear x-ray radiographic images of 6 {mu}m bars and x-ray images with the magnification factor of higher than 230 were obtained.

  3. Wide-range Vacuum Measurements from MWNT Field Emitters Grown Directly on Stainless Steel Substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Detian; Zhao, Yangyang; Cheng, Yongjun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-12-01

    The field emission properties and the vacuum measurement application are investigated from the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown directly on catalytic stainless steel substrates. The MWNT emitters present excellent emission properties after the acid treatment of the substrate. The MWNT gauge is able to work down to the extreme-high vacuum (XHV) range with linear measurement performance in wide range from 10(-11) to 10(-6) Torr. A modulating grid is attempted with improved gauge sensitivity. The extension of the lower pressure limit is attributed largely to low outgassing effect due to direct growth of MWNTs and justified design of the electron source.

  4. Macroscopic electrical field distribution and field-induced surface stresses of needle-shaped field emitters.

    PubMed

    Moy, Charles; Ranzi, Gianluca; Petersen, T C; Ringer, Simon

    2011-05-01

    One major concern since the development of the field ion microscope is the mechanical strength of the specimens. The macroscopic shape of the imaging tip greatly influences field-induced stresses and there is merit in further study of this phenomenon from a classical perspective. Understanding the geometrical, as opposed to localized electronic, factors that affect the stress might improve the quality and success rate of atom probe experiments. This study uses macroscopic electrostatic principles and finite element modelling to investigate field-induced stresses in relation to the shape of the tip. Three two-dimensional idealized models are considered, namely hyperbolic, parabolic and sphere-on-orthogonal-cone; the shapes of which are compared to experimental tips prepared by electro-polishing. Three dimensional morphologies of both a nano-porous and single-crystal aluminium tip are measured using electron tomography to quantitatively test the assumption of cylindrical symmetry for electro-polished tips. The porous tip was prepared and studied to demonstrate a fragile specimen for which such finite element studies could determine potential mechanical failure, prior to any exhaustive atom probe investigation. PMID:21664539

  5. Pepper-pot based emittance measurements of the AWA photoinjector.

    SciTech Connect

    Power, J. G.; Conde, M. E.; Gai, W.; Gao, F.; Konecny, D.; Liu, W.; Yusof, Z.; Rihaoui, M.; Piot, Ph.; High Energy Physics; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2008-01-01

    The Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) RF photocathode gun is a 1.5 cell, L-band, RF photocathode gun operating at 77 MV/m, with emittance compensating solenoids, a magnesium photocathode, and generates an 8 MeV, 1 nC - 100 nC beam. In this paper, we report on a parametric set of measurements to characterize the transverse trace space of the 1 nC electron beam directly out of the gun. We emphasize details of the experimental setup, image analysis, and end with a comparison of the measurements to PARMELA simulations.

  6. Fabrication of field emission display prototype utilizing printed carbon nanotubes/nanofibers emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, P. S.; Chen, T.; Chen, Y. W.; Zhang, Z. J.; Feng, T.; Wang, L. L.; Lin, L. F.; Sun, Z.; Zheng, Z. H.

    2008-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes/nanofibers (CNTs) used as emitters, diode-type field emission display (FED) prototypes of dot matrix and character images were fabricated by low-cost techniques and equipments, respectively. The technical development in the design and fabrication of the cathode, the anode, and the panel, is described. CNTs were produced by a simple, low-cost and easily-controllable thermal chemical vapor deposition. The cathode was prepared by the screen-printing method. The field emission characteristics were enhanced by a heat post-treatment in H2 gas atmosphere. The panel structure was packaged by a vacuum fluorescent display-like process and vacuum-sealed through an exhaust glass tube. The fully-sealed CNTs FED (c-FED) showed good emission properties. The brightness of 600 cd/m2 was achieved from the yellow phosphor at a relatively low applied electric field. The developed technology has a potential practical application in c-FED.

  7. Advances In Vertical Solid-State Current Limiters For Individual Field Emitter Regulation In High-Density Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Frances A.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-12-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of improved solid-state elements intended for individual regulation of field emitters part of high-density arrays. We demonstrate a high-yield, CMOS compatible fabrication process of single-crystal, vertical, ungated, n-type silicon field-effect transistors (FETs); each device behaves as a current source when is biased at a voltage larger than its drain-source saturation voltage. An ungated FET in saturation connected in series to a field emitter can compensate for the wide variation in current-voltage characteristics of the field emitters due to the tip radii spread present in any field emitter array, which should result in emitter burn-out protection, larger array utilization, and smaller array emission non-uniformity. Using 1-2 Ωcm single-crystal n-Si wafers, we fabricated arrays of 25 μm tall vertical ungated FETs with 0.5 μm diameter that span two orders of magnitude of array size. Experimental characterization of the arrays demonstrates that the current is limited with > 3.5 V bias voltage to the same ∼6 μA (6 A.cm-2) per-FET value. Finite element simulations of the device predict a saturation voltage close to the experimental value and a saturation current within a factor of two of the experimental value.

  8. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2013-10-29

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  9. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  10. Investigation of Field Emitter Array Vacuum Microtriodes for Space Electronics Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Mark A.; Kapoor, Vik J.

    1997-01-01

    Research into processing techniques for fabrication of vacuum microelectronic devices has been carried out, with special emphasis being given to the growth of silicon dioxide thin films. Oxide films ranging from 30 nm to approximately 2 micrometers have been grown on single crystal silicon wafers. Metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor test structures have been made from some of these oxide films, and current-versus-voltage plots for these structures have been measured. It has been observed that the rate of applied voltage across the oxide films produces marked differences in measured leakage current. Breakdown fields across two of the thinnest oxide films have been measured and are comparable with highest values reported in literature. Several silicon wafers were processed to make field- emitter array diodes, and were delivered to collaborators at NASA-Lewis Research Center for final fabrication steps and testing.

  11. Development of Fowler-Nordheim theory for a spherical field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgcombe, C. J.

    2005-07-01

    Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) theory has been extended to use a potential distribution approximating that outside a hemisphere supported on a shank, instead of planar field as widely used hitherto. The extended theory includes an effective angle of emission and a supply factor (relative to free-electron supply) that can be calculated when other parameters are known. If single values of the F-N slope and intercept are available, compatible sets of parameters including emitter radius, surface field, solid angle of emission, and supply factor can be deduced. Specific values can be estimated for these parameters when the change of slope over the experimental range is known with sufficient accuracy.

  12. Beam characteristics and a new operation method of a HARP field-emitter image sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanba, Masakazu; Yamagishi, Toshio; Okazaki, Saburo; Tanioka, Kenkichi; Takayama, Katsumi; Tanaka, Mitsuru; Itoh, Shigeo

    1999-04-01

    A new type of image sensor featuring a unique structure is studied with the aim of achieving both super-high sensitivity and ultrahigh-definition. This image sensor combines a field emitter array (FEA) and a high-gain avalanche rushing amorphous photoconductor target. We investigated the conditions for improving resolution in a vacuum chamber by inserting a mesh electrode between the FEA and the target. The results indicate that the resolution can be improved by strengthening the accelerating electric field between the FEA gate and the mesh, and by placing the mesh closer to the FEA. We also propose a new parallel readout system that is suitable for an ultrahigh-definition image sensor. Dividing the target into multiple segments and reading out signals for each segment simultaneously enables us to decrease the drive frequency. In our first attempt, we synthesized a good 60 X 60 pixel image from two 30 X 60 pixel segments.

  13. Effect of nonlinear radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on the emittance of bunched beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phadte, D. S.; Patidar, C. B.

    2013-07-01

    Gap transformations are frequently used in ion Linac codes, to efficiently describe the particle dynamics. Using similar approach, we analyze the uniformly bunched beam passing through an axis-symmetric radiofrequency (RF) cavity. The method can be used for other distributions as well using a similar six dimensional analysis. The effect of non-linear RF field in radial and axial directions in an RF cavity and the finite phase width of the bunch, on the transverse and longitudinal emittance growth have been studied. The expressions obtained have been verified for the two types of cavity cells namely the zero mode DTL and pi mode CCL type used frequently in ion linacs. The results are seen to be valid for the entire maximum phase acceptance up to 360 degrees. Simulations with the equivalent beams of non-uniform distributions namely Waterbag and Gaussian show that at synchronous phases closer to the wave crest, the results give a good approximation of emittance growth in both planes for non-uniform beams.

  14. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2015-12-01

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18-20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  15. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  16. IMPROVEMENTS IN EMITTANCE WAKE FIELD OPTIMIZATION FOR THE SLAC LINEAR COLLIDER

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, Franz-Josef

    2003-05-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time monitoring of the beam sizes. We show that the different tuning strategy provided significantly improved emittances at the interaction point of the SLC.

  17. Conditioning with α-emitter based radioimmunotherapy in canine allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Chen, Yun; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of nonmyeloablative conditioning, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has become a viable treatment option for patients who due to age or comorbidities are ineligible for high dose conditioning. However, relapse and toxicities are still major problems in HCT. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT)-based conditioning is a promising approach that has the ability to specifically target radiation to hematopoietic cells. The most widely investigated isotopes are the β-emitters, but because of long path lengths and low linear energy transfer, α-emitters which have more favorable physical characteristics, might prove to be a better alternative. In the current study we have investigated the efficacy and safety of α-emitter based RIT as the only form of conditioning in a preclinical model of canine allogeneic HCT. PMID:22772070

  18. Neutralization of Space Charge Effects for Low Energy Ion Beams Using Field Emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaescu, D.; Sakai, S.; Matsuda, K.; Gotoh, Y.; Ishikawa, J.

    2008-11-03

    The paper presents models and computations for neutralization of space charge effects using electrons provided by field emitter arrays. Different ion species ({sup 11}B{sup +},{sup 31}P{sup +},{sup 75}As{sup +}) with energy in the range E{sub ion} = 200 eV-1 keV have been considered. The ion beam divergence is studied as a function of electron beam geometry and physical parameters (electron and ion energy, electron/ion current ratio I{sub el}/I{sub ion}). The electron beam geometry takes into account electron source positions and initial launching angles. It is shown that optimal ion beam neutralization occurs for low energy electrons emitted parallel to the ion beam.

  19. Analysis of a laser post-process on a buckypaper field emitter for high and uniform electron emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yi Wen; Miao, H. Y.; Zhang, Mei; Liang, Richard; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben

    2009-08-01

    This study reports a laser irradiation process to enhance the field emission properties of buckypaper, which is a thin sheet of high-loading carbon nanotube networks. The scanning laser treated the selected regions of buckypaper to activate carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters. This post-process causes a decrease in turn-on field and increases the field enhancement factor (β), luminance intensity, and uniformity of buckypaper emitters. The phosphorescence luminance intensity and uniformity of buckypaper emitters are measured and characterized. The low turn-on field of 0.56 V µm-1, highest average luminance intensity of 235.9/255, and uniformity of 99.8% are achieved by adjusting the machining parameters of laser power, laser lens motion speed, laser resolution, laser beam size, and pattern orientation. Those parameters relate to the field emission properties of β, turn-on electric field, luminance intensity, and uniformity. Using design of experiment (DOE) methodology, the optimal parameter settings for high and uniform electron emission of a buckypaper emitter are obtained within fewer experimental runs.

  20. Large area InN terahertz emitters based on the lateral photo-Dember effect

    SciTech Connect

    Wallauer, Jan Grumber, Christian; Walther, Markus; Polyakov, Vladimir; Iannucci, Robert; Cimalla, Volker; Ambacher, Oliver

    2015-09-14

    Large area terahertz emitters based on the lateral photo-Dember effect in InN (indium nitride) are presented. The formation of lateral photo-Dember currents is induced by laser-illumination through a microstructured metal cover processed onto the InN substrate, causing an asymmetry in the lateral photogenerated charge carrier distribution. Our design uses simple metal structures, which are produced by conventional two-dimensional micro-structuring techniques. Having favoring properties as a photo-Dember material InN is particularly well-suited as a substrate for our emitters. We demonstrate that the emission intensity of the emitters can be significantly influenced by the structure of the metal cover leaving room for improvement by optimizing the masking structures.

  1. An ordered Si nanowire with NiSi2 tip arrays as excellent field emitters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chun-Yi; Li, Wun-Shan; Chu, Li-Wei; Lu, Ming-Yen; Tsai, Cho-Jen; Chen, Lih-Juann

    2011-02-01

    A method was developed to grow ordered silicon nanowire with NiSi(2) tip arrays by reacting nickel thin films on silica-coated ordered Si nanowire (NW) arrays. The coating of thin silica shell on Si NW arrays has the effect of limiting the diffusion of nickel during the silicidation process to achieve the single crystalline NiSi(2) NWs. In the meantime, it relieves the distortion of the NWs caused by the strain associated with formation of NiSi(2) to maintain the straightness of the nanowire and the ordering of the arrays. Other nickel silicide phases such as Ni(2)Si and NiSi were obtained if the silicidation processes were conducted on the ordered Si NWs without a thin silica shell. Excellent field emission properties were found for NiSi(2)/Si NW arrays with a turn on field of 0.82 V µm(-1) and a threshold field of 1.39 V µm(-1). The field enhancement factor was calculated to be about 2440. The stability test showed a fluctuation of about 7% with an applied field of 2.6 V µm(-1) for a period of 24 h. The excellent field emission characteristics are attributed to the well-aligned and highly ordered arrangement of the single crystalline NiSi(2)/Si heterostructure field emitters. In contrast to other growth methods, the present growth of ordered nickel silicide/Si NWs on silicon is compatible with silicon nanoelectronics device processes, and also provides a facile route to grow other well-aligned metal silicide NW arrays. The advantages will facilitate its applications as field emission devices. PMID:21178255

  2. Simulation of the enhancement factor from an individual 3D hemisphere-on-post field emitter by using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Roveri, D S; Sant'Anna, G M; Bertan, H H; Mologni, J F; Alves, M A R; Braga, E S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D computational framework for evaluating electrostatic properties of a single field emitter characterized by the hemisphere-on-post geometry. Numerical simulations employed the finite elements method by using Ansys-Maxwell software. Extensive parametric simulations were focused on the threshold distance from which the emitter field enhancement factor (γ) becomes independent from the anode-substrate gap (G). This investigation allowed demonstrating that the ratio between G and the emitter height (h) is a reliable reference for a broad range of emitter dimensions; furthermore, results permitted establishing G/h ≥ 2.2 as the threshold condition for setting the anode without affecting γ.

  3. Controlled growth of carbon nanotube-graphene hybrid materials for flexible and transparent conductors and electron field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Duc Dung; Tai, Nyan-Hwa; Chen, Szu-Ying; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2012-01-01

    We report a versatile synthetic process based on rapid heating and cooling chemical vapor deposition for the growth of carbon nanotube (CNT)-graphene hybrid materials where the thickness of graphene and density of CNTs are properly controlled. Graphene films are demonstrated as an efficient barrier layer for preventing poisoning of iron nanoparticles, which catalyze the growth of CNTs on copper substrates. Based on this method, the opto-electronic and field emission properties of graphene integrated with CNTs can be remarkably tailored. A graphene film exhibits a sheet resistance of 2.15 kΩ sq-1 with a transmittance of 85.6% (at 550 nm), while a CNT-graphene hybrid film shows an improved sheet resistance of 420 Ω sq-1 with an optical transmittance of 72.9%. Moreover, CNT-graphene films are demonstrated as effective electron field emitters with low turn-on and threshold electric fields of 2.9 and 3.3 V μm-1, respectively. The development of CNT-graphene films with a wide range of tunable properties presented in this study shows promising applications in flexible opto-electronic, energy, and sensor devices.

  4. Modeling of carbon nanotube-based devices: from nanoFETs to THz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, Aldo; Pecchia, Alessandro; Petrolati, Eleonora; Paoloni, Claudio

    2006-08-01

    In the first part of the present contribution, we will report on transport calculations of nanoscaled devices based on Carbon Nanotubes obtained via self-consistent density-functional method coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function approaches. In particular, density functional tight-binding techniques are very promising due to their intrinsic efficiency. This scheme allows treatment of systems comprising a large number of atoms and enables the computation of the current flowing between two or more contacts in a fully self-consistent manner with the open boundary conditions that naturally arise in transport problems. We will give a description of this methodology and application to field effect transistor based on Carbon nanotubes. The advances in manufacturing technology are allowing new opportunities even for vacuum electron devices producing radio-frequency radiation. Modern micro and nano-technologies can overcome the typical severe limitations of vacuum tube devices. As an example, Carbon Nanotubes used as cold emitters in micron-scaled triodes allow for frequency generation up to THz region. The purpose of the second part of this contribution will be a description of the modelling of Carbon Nanotube based vacuum devices such as triodes. We will present the calculation of important figures of merit and possible realizations.

  5. An electrically driven, ultrahigh-speed, on-chip light emitter based on carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mori, Tatsuya; Yamauchi, Yohei; Honda, Satoshi; Maki, Hideyuki

    2014-06-11

    The integration of high-speed light emitters on silicon chips is an important issue that must be resolved in order to realize on-chip or interchip optical interconnects. Here, we demonstrate the first electrically driven ultrafast carbon nanotube (CNT) light emitter based on blackbody radiation with a response speed (1-10 Gbps) that is more than 10(6) times higher than that of conventional incandescent emitters and is either higher than or comparable to that of light-emitting diodes or laser diodes. This high-speed response is explained by the extremely fast temperature response of the CNT film, which is dominated by the small heat capacity of the CNT film and its high heat dissipation to the substrate. Moreover, we experimentally demonstrate 140 ps width pulsed light generation and real-time optical communication. This CNT-based emitter with the advantages of ultrafast response speeds, a small footprint, and integration on silicon can enable novel architectures for optical interconnects, photonic, and optoelectronic integrated circuits.

  6. Emittance Theory for Thin Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature garnet materials such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with rare earths are currently being investigated as selective emitters. This paper presents a radiative transfer analysis of the thin film emitter. From this analysis the emitter efficiency and power density are calculated. Results based on measured extinction coefficients for erbium-YAG and holmium-YAG are presented. These results indicated that emitter efficiencies of 50 percent and power densities of several watts/sq cm are attainable at moderate temperatures (less than 1750 K).

  7. Breakdown voltage reliability improvement in gas-discharge tube surge protectors employing graphite field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žumer, Marko; Zajec, Bojan; Rozman, Robert; Nemanič, Vincenc

    2012-04-01

    Gas-discharge tube (GDT) surge protectors are known for many decades as passive units used in low-voltage telecom networks for protection of electrical components from transient over-voltages (discharging) such as lightning. Unreliability of the mean turn-on DC breakdown voltage and the run-to-run variability has been overcome successfully in the past by adding, for example, a radioactive source inside the tube. Radioisotopes provide a constant low level of free electrons, which trigger the breakdown. In the last decades, any concept using environmentally harmful compounds is not acceptable anymore and new solutions were searched. In our application, a cold field electron emitter source is used as the trigger for the gas discharge but with no activating compound on the two main electrodes. The patent literature describes in details the implementation of the so-called trigger wires (auxiliary electrodes) made of graphite, placed in between the two main electrodes, but no physical explanation has been given yet. We present experimental results, which show that stable cold field electron emission current in the high vacuum range originating from the nano-structured edge of the graphite layer is well correlated to the stable breakdown voltage of the GDT surge protector filled with a mixture of clean gases.

  8. Rapid field testing of low-emittance coated glazings for product verification

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, Brent; Kohler, Christian; Goudey, Howdy; Turler, Daniel; Arasteh, Dariush

    1998-02-01

    This paper analyzes prospects for developing a test device suitable for field verification of the types of low-emittance (low-e) coatings present on high-performance window products. Test devices are currently available that can simply detect the presence of low-e coatings and that can measure other important characteristics of high-performance windows, such as the thickness of glazing layers or the gap in dual glazings. However, no devices have yet been developed that can measure gas concentrations or distinguish among types of coatings. This paper presents two optical methods for verification of low-e coatings. The first method uses a portable, fiber-optic spectrometer to characterize spectral reflectances from 650 to 1,100 nm for selected surfaces within an insulated glazing unit (IGU). The second method uses an infrared-light-emitting diode and a phototransistor to evaluate the aggregate normal reflectance of an IGU at 940 nm. Both methods measure reflectance in the near (solar) infrared spectrum and are useful for distinguishing between regular and spectrally selective low-e coatings. The infrared-diode/phototransistor method appears promising for use in a low-cost, hand-held field test device.

  9. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  10. Application of the general thermal field model to simulate the behaviour of nanoscale Cu field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Eimre, Kristjan; Aabloo, Alvo; Parviainen, Stefan Djurabekova, Flyura; Zadin, Vahur

    2015-07-21

    Strong field electron emission from a nanoscale tip can cause a temperature rise at the tip apex due to Joule heating. This becomes particularly important when the current value grows rapidly, as in the pre-breakdown (the electrostatic discharge) condition, which may occur near metal surfaces operating under high electric fields. The high temperatures introduce uncertainties in calculations of the current values when using the Fowler–Nordheim equation, since the thermionic component in such conditions cannot be neglected. In this paper, we analyze the field electron emission currents as the function of the applied electric field, given by both the conventional Fowler–Nordheim field emission and the recently developed generalized thermal field emission formalisms. We also compare the results in two limits: discrete (atomistic simulations) and continuum (finite element calculations). The discrepancies of both implementations and their effect on final results are discussed. In both approaches, the electric field, electron emission currents, and Joule heating processes are simulated concurrently and self-consistently. We show that the conventional Fowler–Nordheim equation results in significant underestimation of electron emission currents. We also show that Fowler–Nordheim plots used to estimate the field enhancement factor may lead to significant overestimation of this parameter especially in the range of relatively low electric fields.

  11. Application of the general thermal field model to simulate the behaviour of nanoscale Cu field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eimre, Kristjan; Parviainen, Stefan; Aabloo, Alvo; Djurabekova, Flyura; Zadin, Vahur

    2015-07-01

    Strong field electron emission from a nanoscale tip can cause a temperature rise at the tip apex due to Joule heating. This becomes particularly important when the current value grows rapidly, as in the pre-breakdown (the electrostatic discharge) condition, which may occur near metal surfaces operating under high electric fields. The high temperatures introduce uncertainties in calculations of the current values when using the Fowler-Nordheim equation, since the thermionic component in such conditions cannot be neglected. In this paper, we analyze the field electron emission currents as the function of the applied electric field, given by both the conventional Fowler-Nordheim field emission and the recently developed generalized thermal field emission formalisms. We also compare the results in two limits: discrete (atomistic simulations) and continuum (finite element calculations). The discrepancies of both implementations and their effect on final results are discussed. In both approaches, the electric field, electron emission currents, and Joule heating processes are simulated concurrently and self-consistently. We show that the conventional Fowler-Nordheim equation results in significant underestimation of electron emission currents. We also show that Fowler-Nordheim plots used to estimate the field enhancement factor may lead to significant overestimation of this parameter especially in the range of relatively low electric fields.

  12. Nanofabrication of arrays of silicon field emitters with vertical silicon nanowire current limiters and self-aligned gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrera, S. A.; Akinwande, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We developed a fabrication process for embedding a dense array (108 cm-2) of high-aspect-ratio silicon nanowires (200 nm diameter and 10 μm tall) in a dielectric matrix and then structured/exposed the tips of the nanowires to form self-aligned gate field emitter arrays using chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Using this structure, we demonstrated a high current density (100 A cm-2), uniform, and long lifetime (>100 h) silicon field emitter array architecture in which the current emitted by each tip is regulated by the silicon nanowire current limiter connected in series with the tip. Using the current voltage characteristics and with the aid of numerical device models, we estimated the tip radius of our field emission arrays to be ≈4.8 nm, as consistent with the tip radius measured using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  13. Nanofabrication of arrays of silicon field emitters with vertical silicon nanowire current limiters and self-aligned gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrera, S. A.; Akinwande, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We developed a fabrication process for embedding a dense array (108 cm‑2) of high-aspect-ratio silicon nanowires (200 nm diameter and 10 μm tall) in a dielectric matrix and then structured/exposed the tips of the nanowires to form self-aligned gate field emitter arrays using chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Using this structure, we demonstrated a high current density (100 A cm‑2), uniform, and long lifetime (>100 h) silicon field emitter array architecture in which the current emitted by each tip is regulated by the silicon nanowire current limiter connected in series with the tip. Using the current voltage characteristics and with the aid of numerical device models, we estimated the tip radius of our field emission arrays to be ≈4.8 nm, as consistent with the tip radius measured using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  14. Nanofabrication of arrays of silicon field emitters with vertical silicon nanowire current limiters and self-aligned gates.

    PubMed

    Guerrera, S A; Akinwande, A I

    2016-07-22

    We developed a fabrication process for embedding a dense array (10(8) cm(-2)) of high-aspect-ratio silicon nanowires (200 nm diameter and 10 μm tall) in a dielectric matrix and then structured/exposed the tips of the nanowires to form self-aligned gate field emitter arrays using chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Using this structure, we demonstrated a high current density (100 A cm(-2)), uniform, and long lifetime (>100 h) silicon field emitter array architecture in which the current emitted by each tip is regulated by the silicon nanowire current limiter connected in series with the tip. Using the current voltage characteristics and with the aid of numerical device models, we estimated the tip radius of our field emission arrays to be ≈4.8 nm, as consistent with the tip radius measured using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). PMID:27292120

  15. Preservation of Ultra Low Emittances Using Adiabatic Matching in Future Plasma Wakefield-based Colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Gholizadeh, Reza; Muggli, Patric; Katsouleas, Tom; Mori, Warren

    2009-01-22

    The Plasma Wakefield Accelerator is a promising technique to lower the cost of the future high energy colliders by offering orders of magnitude higher gradients than the conventional accelerators. It has been shown that ion motion is an important issue to account for in the extreme regime of ultra high energies and ultra low emittances, characteristics of future high energy collider beams. In this regime, the transverse electric field of the beam is so high that in simulations, the plasma ions cannot be considered immobile at the time scale of electron plasma oscillation, thereby leading to a nonlinear focusing force. Therefore, the transverse emittance of a beam will not be preserved under these circumstances. However, we show that matched profile in case of a nonlinear focusing force still exists and can be derived from Vlasov equation. Furthermore, we introduce a plasma section that can reduce the emittance growth by adiabatically reducing the ion mass and hence increasing the nonlinear term in the focusing force. Simulation results are presented.

  16. Metamaterial-based integrated plasmonic absorber/emitter for solar thermo-photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chihhui; Neuner, Burton, III; John, Jeremy; Milder, Andrew; Zollars, Byron; Savoy, Steve; Shvets, Gennady

    2012-02-01

    We present the concept of a solar thermo-photovoltaic (STPV) collection system based on a large-area, nanoimprint-patterned film of plasmonic structures acting as an integrated solar absorber/narrow-band thermal emitter (SANTE). The SANTE film concept is based on integrating broad-band solar radiation absorption with selective narrow-band thermal IR radiation which can be efficiently coupled to a photovoltaic (PV) cell for power generation. By employing a low reflectivity refractory metal (e.g., tungsten) as a plasmonic material, we demonstrate that the absorption spectrum of the SANTE film can be designed to be broad-band in the visible range and narrow-band in the infrared range. A detailed balance calculation demonstrates that the total STPV system efficiency exceeds the Shockley-Queisser limit for emitter temperatures above Te = 1200 K, and achieves an efficiency as high as 41% for Te = 2300 K. Emitter temperatures in this range are shown to be achievable under modest sun concentrations (less than 1000 suns) due to the thermal insulation provided by the SANTE film. An experimental demonstration of the wide-angle, frequency-selective absorptivity is presented.

  17. Flexible three-dimensional SnO2 nanowire arrays: atomic layer deposition-assisted synthesis, excellent photodetectors, and field emitters.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kaimo; Lu, Hao; Shi, Zhiwei; Liu, Qiong; Li, Liang

    2013-08-28

    Flexible three-dimensional SnO2 nanowire arrays were synthesized on a carbon cloth template in combination with atomic layer deposition and vapor transport. The as-grown nanostructures were assembled by high density quasi-aligned nanowires with a large aspect ratio. Nanoscale photodetectors based on the flexible nanostructure demonstrate excellent ultraviolet light selectivity, a high speed response time less than 0.3 s, and dark current as low as 2.3 pA. Besides, field emission measurements of the hierarchical structure show a rather low turn-on field (3.3 Vμm(-1)) and threshold field (4.5 Vμm(-1)), as well as an excellent field enhancment factor (2375) with a long-term stability up to 20 h. These results indicate that the flexible three-dimensional SnO2 nanowire arrays can be used as functional building blocks for efficient photodetectors and field emitters. PMID:23879602

  18. Active spacecraft potential control: An ion emitter experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Goldstein, R.; Hamelin, M.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.; Olsen, R. C.; Pedersen, A.; Grard, R. J. L.; Schmidt, R.; Rudenauer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The cluster spacecraft are instrumented with ion emitters for charge neutralization. The emitters produce indium ions at 6 keV. The ion current is adjusted in a feedback loop with instruments measuring the spacecraft potential. The system is based on the evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. The design of the active spacecraft potential control instruments, and the ion emitters is presented.

  19. SEARCHING FOR z {approx} 7.7 Ly{alpha} EMITTERS IN THE COSMOS FIELD WITH NEWFIRM

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Hannah B.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Tilvi, Vithal; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James; Hibon, Pascale; Swaters, Rob

    2012-02-01

    The study of Ly{alpha} emission in the high-redshift universe is a useful probe of the epoch of reionization, as the Ly{alpha} line should be attenuated by the intergalactic medium (IGM) at low to moderate neutral hydrogen fractions. Here we present the results of a deep and wide imaging search for Ly{alpha} emitters in the Cosmological Evolution Survey field. We have used two ultra-narrowband filters (filter width of {approx}8-9 A) on the NOAO Extremely Wide-Field Infrared Mosaic camera, installed on the Mayall 4 m telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, in order to isolate Ly{alpha} emitters at z = 7.7; such ultra-narrowband imaging searches have proved to be excellent at detecting Ly{alpha} emitters. We found 5{sigma} detections of four candidate Ly{alpha} emitters in a survey volume of 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} Mpc{sup 3} (total survey area {approx}760 arcmin{sup 2}). Each candidate has a line flux greater than 8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. Using these results to construct a luminosity function and comparing to previously established Ly{alpha} luminosity functions at z = 5.7 and z = 6.5, we find no conclusive evidence for evolution of the luminosity function between z = 5.7 and z = 7.7. Statistical Monte Carlo simulations suggest that half of these candidates are real z = 7.7 targets, and spectroscopic follow-up will be required to verify the redshift of these candidates. However, our results are consistent with no strong evolution in the neutral hydrogen fraction of the IGM between z = 5.7 and z = 7.7, even if only one or two of the z = 7.7 candidates are spectroscopically confirmed.

  20. 3D-FEM electrical–thermal–mechanical analysis and experiment of Si-based MEMS infrared emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiang; Wang, Na; Chen, Ran-Bin; San, Hai-Sheng; Chen, Xu-Yuan

    2016-11-01

    Designs, simulations, and fabrications of silicon-based MEMS infrared (IR) emitters for gas sensing application are presented. A 3D finite element method (3D-FEM) was used to analyze the coupled electrical–thermal–mechanical properties of a bridge hotplate structure (BHS) IR emitter and closed hotplate structure (CHS) IR emitter using Joule heating and thermal expansion models of COMSOL™. The IR absorptions of n- and p-silicon were calculated for the design of self-heating structure. The BHS and CHS IR emitters were fabricated synchronously using micro-electromechanical systems technology for a direct performance comparison. Both types of IR emitters were characterized by electrical and optical measurements. The experimental results show that BHS IR emitters have higher radiation density, lower power consumption, and faster frequency-response than CHS IR emitters due to the use of a thermal isolation structure and self-heating structure. Meanwhile, the simulated results agree well with the corresponding measured results, which indicate that the 3D-FEM-model is effective and can be used in the optimal design of electro-thermal devices.

  1. Vertically aligned self-assembled gold nanorods as low turn-on, stable field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apte, Amey; Joshi, Padmashree; Bhaskar, Prashant; Joag, Dilip; Kulkarni, Sulabha

    2015-11-01

    In this work we have investigated field emission from self-assembled, vertically aligned, gold nanorod arrays, which were synthesized via a colloidal growth method. A field emission current density of ∼1 mA/cm2 was measured for these gold nanorod arrays using an anode-cathode separation of ∼3.5 mm. The field emission investigation of these gold nanorod arrays was carried out at a base pressure of ∼10-8 mbar. The turn on field, defined as the electric field required to obtain a current density of 1 μA/cm2, is observed to be 1.9 V/μm. Assuming a work function value of 5.3 eV, the field enhancement factor β is estimated to be ∼2931, which is higher than the reported values for other gold nanostructures/arrays.

  2. Integrated ZnO Nano-Electron-Emitter with Self-Modulated Parasitic Tunneling Field Effect Transistor at the Surface of the p-Si/ZnO Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tao; Luo, Laitang; Huang, Yifeng; Ye, Bing; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Chen, Jun; Xu, Ningsheng

    2016-09-01

    The development of high performance nano-electron-emitter arrays with well reliability still proves challenging. Here, we report a featured integrated nano-electron-emitter. The vertically aligned nano-emitter consists of two segments. The top segment is an intrinsically lightly n-type doped ZnO nano-tip, while the bottom segment is a heavily p-type doped Si nano-pillar (denoted as p-Si/ZnO nano-emitter). The anode voltage not only extracted the electron emission from the emitter apex but also induced the inter-band electron tunneling at the surface of the p-Si/ZnO nano-junction. The designed p-Si/ZnO emitter is equivalent to a ZnO nano-tip individually ballasted by a p-Si/ZnO diode and a parasitic tunneling field effect transistor (TFET) at the surface of the p-Si/ZnO junction. The parasitic TFET provides a channel for the supply of emitting electron, while the p-Si/ZnO diode is benefit for impeding the current overloading and prevent the emitters from a catastrophic breakdown. Well repeatable and stable field emission current were obtained from the p-Si/ZnO nano-emitters. High performance nano-emitters was developed using diamond-like-carbon coated p-Si/ZnO tip array (500 × 500), i.e., 178 μA (4.48 mA/cm2) at 75.7 MV/m.

  3. Integrated ZnO Nano-Electron-Emitter with Self-Modulated Parasitic Tunneling Field Effect Transistor at the Surface of the p-Si/ZnO Junction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tao; Luo, Laitang; Huang, Yifeng; Ye, Bing; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Chen, Jun; Xu, Ningsheng

    2016-01-01

    The development of high performance nano-electron-emitter arrays with well reliability still proves challenging. Here, we report a featured integrated nano-electron-emitter. The vertically aligned nano-emitter consists of two segments. The top segment is an intrinsically lightly n-type doped ZnO nano-tip, while the bottom segment is a heavily p-type doped Si nano-pillar (denoted as p-Si/ZnO nano-emitter). The anode voltage not only extracted the electron emission from the emitter apex but also induced the inter-band electron tunneling at the surface of the p-Si/ZnO nano-junction. The designed p-Si/ZnO emitter is equivalent to a ZnO nano-tip individually ballasted by a p-Si/ZnO diode and a parasitic tunneling field effect transistor (TFET) at the surface of the p-Si/ZnO junction. The parasitic TFET provides a channel for the supply of emitting electron, while the p-Si/ZnO diode is benefit for impeding the current overloading and prevent the emitters from a catastrophic breakdown. Well repeatable and stable field emission current were obtained from the p-Si/ZnO nano-emitters. High performance nano-emitters was developed using diamond-like-carbon coated p-Si/ZnO tip array (500 × 500), i.e., 178 μA (4.48 mA/cm2) at 75.7 MV/m. PMID:27654068

  4. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  5. A realistic fabrication and design concept for quantum gates based on single emitters integrated in plasmonic-dielectric waveguide structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewes, Günter; Schoengen, Max; Neitzke, Oliver; Lombardi, Pietro; Schönfeld, Rolf-Simon; Mazzamuto, Giacomo; Schell, Andreas W.; Probst, Jürgen; Wolters, Janik; Löchel, Bernd; Toninelli, Costanza; Benson, Oliver

    2016-07-01

    Tremendous enhancement of light-matter interaction in plasmonic-dielectric hybrid devices allows for non-linearities at the level of single emitters and few photons, such as single photon transistors. However, constructing integrated components for such devices is technologically extremely challenging. We tackle this task by lithographically fabricating an on-chip plasmonic waveguide-structure connected to far-field in- and out-coupling ports via low-loss dielectric waveguides. We precisely describe our lithographic approach and characterize the fabricated integrated chip. We find excellent agreement with rigorous numerical simulations. Based on these findings we perform a numerical optimization and calculate concrete numbers for a plasmonic single-photon transistor.

  6. A realistic fabrication and design concept for quantum gates based on single emitters integrated in plasmonic-dielectric waveguide structures.

    PubMed

    Kewes, Günter; Schoengen, Max; Neitzke, Oliver; Lombardi, Pietro; Schönfeld, Rolf-Simon; Mazzamuto, Giacomo; Schell, Andreas W; Probst, Jürgen; Wolters, Janik; Löchel, Bernd; Toninelli, Costanza; Benson, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Tremendous enhancement of light-matter interaction in plasmonic-dielectric hybrid devices allows for non-linearities at the level of single emitters and few photons, such as single photon transistors. However, constructing integrated components for such devices is technologically extremely challenging. We tackle this task by lithographically fabricating an on-chip plasmonic waveguide-structure connected to far-field in- and out-coupling ports via low-loss dielectric waveguides. We precisely describe our lithographic approach and characterize the fabricated integrated chip. We find excellent agreement with rigorous numerical simulations. Based on these findings we perform a numerical optimization and calculate concrete numbers for a plasmonic single-photon transistor. PMID:27364604

  7. A realistic fabrication and design concept for quantum gates based on single emitters integrated in plasmonic-dielectric waveguide structures

    PubMed Central

    Kewes, Günter; Schoengen, Max; Neitzke, Oliver; Lombardi, Pietro; Schönfeld, Rolf-Simon; Mazzamuto, Giacomo; Schell, Andreas W.; Probst, Jürgen; Wolters, Janik; Löchel, Bernd; Toninelli, Costanza; Benson, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Tremendous enhancement of light-matter interaction in plasmonic-dielectric hybrid devices allows for non-linearities at the level of single emitters and few photons, such as single photon transistors. However, constructing integrated components for such devices is technologically extremely challenging. We tackle this task by lithographically fabricating an on-chip plasmonic waveguide-structure connected to far-field in- and out-coupling ports via low-loss dielectric waveguides. We precisely describe our lithographic approach and characterize the fabricated integrated chip. We find excellent agreement with rigorous numerical simulations. Based on these findings we perform a numerical optimization and calculate concrete numbers for a plasmonic single-photon transistor. PMID:27364604

  8. Effect of increased crystallinity of single-walled carbon nanotubes used as field emitters on their electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoi, Norihiro

    2015-12-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) synthesized by arc discharge are expected to exhibit good field emission (FE) properties at a low driving voltage. We used a coating containing homogeneously dispersed highly crystalline SWCNTs produced by a high-temperature annealing process to fabricate an FE device by a wet-coating process at a low cost. Using the coating, we succeeded in reducing the power consumption of field emitters for planar lighting devices. SWCNTs synthesized by arc discharge have crystal defects in the carbon network, which are considered to induce inelastic electron tunneling that deteriorates the electrical conductivity of the SWCNTs. In this study, the blocking of the transport of electrons in SWCNTs with crystal defects is simulated using an inelastic electron tunneling model. We succeeded in clarifying the mechanism underlying the electrical conductivity of SWCNTs by controlling their crystallinity. In addition, it was confirmed that field emitters using highly crystalline SWCNTs can lead to new applications operating with low power consumption and new devices that may change our daily lives in the future.

  9. Intense nonneutral beam propagation in a periodic solenoidal field using a macroscopic fluid model with zero thermal emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, R.C.; Stoltz, P.; Chen, C.

    1997-08-01

    A macroscopic fluid model is developed to describe the nonlinear dynamics and collective processes in an intense high-current beam propagating in the z-direction through a periodic focusing solenoidal field B{sub z}(z + S) = B{sub z}(z), where S is the axial periodicity length. The analysis assumes that space-charge effects dominate the effects of thermal beam emittance, Kr{sub b}{sup 2} {much_gt} {epsilon}{sub th}{sup 2}, and is based on the macroscopic moment-Maxwell equations, truncated by neglecting the pressure tensor and higher-order moments. Assuming a thin beam with r{sub b} {much_lt} S, azimuthally symmetric beam equilibria with {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}t = 0 = {partial_derivative}/{partial_derivative}{theta} are investigated. To illustrate the considerable flexibility of the macroscopic formalism, assuming (nearly) uniform axial flow velocity V{sub b} over the beam cross section, beam equilibrium properties are calculated for two examples: (a) uniform radial density profile over the interval 0 {le} r < r{sub b}(z), and (b) an infinitesimally thin annular beam centered at r = r{sub b}(z). The analysis generally allows for the azimuthal flow velocity V{sub {theta}b}(r,z) to differ from the Larmor frequency, and the model is used to calculate the (leading-order) correction {delta}V{sub zb}(r,z) to the axial flow velocity for the step-function density profile in case (a) above.

  10. Role of the resistivity of insulating field emitters on the energy of field-ionised and field-evaporated atoms.

    PubMed

    Arnoldi, L; Silaeva, E P; Vurpillot, F; Deconihout, B; Cadel, E; Blum, I; Vella, A

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of laser atom probe analyses, it is important to understand all the physical processes induced by the combination of the high electrical field and the femtosecond laser beam during field evaporation. New information can be accessed from the energy of evaporated surface atoms or field-ionised atoms of an imaging gas. In order to study the ions energy, we combine La-APT and FIM analyses in a new experimental setup equipped with electrostatic lenses. We report measurements for semiconductors and oxides and we study the influence of the illumination conditions (laser power and wavelength), the evaporation rate, the sample geometry and the tip preparation processes. The results are discussed taking into account the resistive properties of non-metallic samples and the photo-stimulated conductivity. This work clarifies the role of the laser and DC field in the energy deficit of field evaporated ions. PMID:25484362

  11. The wave-field from an array of periodic emitters driven simultaneously by a broadband pulse.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Steve; Hill, Samuel; Fan, Yichao; Rowlands, George

    2013-06-01

    The use of phased array methods are commonplace in ultrasonic applications, where controlling the variation of the phase between the narrowband emitters in an array facilitates beam steering and focusing of ultrasonic waves. An approach is presented here whereby emitters of alternating polarity arranged in a one-dimensional array are pulsed simultaneously, and have sufficiently wide, controlled bandwidth to emit a two-dimensional wave. This pulsed approach provides a rapid means of simultaneously covering a region of space with a wave-front, whereby any wave that scatters or reflects off a body to a detector will have a distinct arrival time and frequency. This is a general wave phenomenon with a potential application in radar, sonar, and ultrasound. The key result is that one can obtain a smooth, continuous wave-front emitted from the array, over a large solid angle, whose frequency varies as a function of angle to the array. Analytic and finite element models created to describe this phenomenon have been validated with experimental results using ultrasonic waves in metal samples.

  12. The wave-field from an array of periodic emitters driven simultaneously by a broadband pulse.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Steve; Hill, Samuel; Fan, Yichao; Rowlands, George

    2013-06-01

    The use of phased array methods are commonplace in ultrasonic applications, where controlling the variation of the phase between the narrowband emitters in an array facilitates beam steering and focusing of ultrasonic waves. An approach is presented here whereby emitters of alternating polarity arranged in a one-dimensional array are pulsed simultaneously, and have sufficiently wide, controlled bandwidth to emit a two-dimensional wave. This pulsed approach provides a rapid means of simultaneously covering a region of space with a wave-front, whereby any wave that scatters or reflects off a body to a detector will have a distinct arrival time and frequency. This is a general wave phenomenon with a potential application in radar, sonar, and ultrasound. The key result is that one can obtain a smooth, continuous wave-front emitted from the array, over a large solid angle, whose frequency varies as a function of angle to the array. Analytic and finite element models created to describe this phenomenon have been validated with experimental results using ultrasonic waves in metal samples. PMID:23742324

  13. Highly Transparent Conducting Polymer Top Contacts for Future III-Nitride Based Single Photon Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riess, Sally; Mikulics, Martin; Winden, Andreas; Adam, Roman; Marso, Michel; Grützmacher, Detlev; Hardtdegen, Hilde

    2013-08-01

    In this paper we report on a simple conductive polymer based contacting technology for III-nitride based nanostructures with respect to the electrical operation within the telecommunication wavelength range. Singularly addressable InN/GaN pyramidal nanostructures were selectively grown by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) and subsequently integrated into a high-frequency device layout for future ultrafast electro-optical operation. The employment of the p-conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) is found to increase the light transmittance up to 89% at a wavelength of 1550 nm compared to 72% in the case of a conventional Ni/Au thin layer top contact. DC measurements using a quasi operation mode for 1000 h reveal no degradation and only a moderate increase of the dark currents. Thus, conducting polymer technology shows tremendous potential for future highly efficient and reliable room temperature operation of nitride based single photon emitters (SPEs).

  14. High Stability Electron Field Emitters Synthesized via the Combination of Carbon Nanotubes and N₂-Plasma Grown Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Films.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Hsun; Hsieh, Ping-Yen; Kunuku, Srinivasu; Lou, Shiu-Cheng; Manoharan, Divinah; Leou, Keh-Chyang; Lin, I-Nan; Tai, Nyan-Hwa

    2015-12-16

    An electron field emitter with superior electron field emission (EFE) properties and improved lifetime stability is being demonstrated via the combination of carbon nanotubes and the CH4/N2 plasma grown ultrananocrystalline diamond (N-UNCD) films. The resistance of the carbon nanotubes to plasma ion bombardment is improved by the formation of carbon nanocones on the side walls of the carbon nanotubes, thus forming strengthened carbon nanotubes (s-CNTs). The N-UNCD films can thus be grown on s-CNTs, forming N-UNCD/s-CNTs carbon nanocomposite materials. The N-UNCD/s-CNTs films possess good conductivity of σ = 237 S/cm and marvelous EFE properties, such as low turn-on field of (E0) = 3.58 V/μm with large EFE current density of (J(e)) = 1.86 mA/cm(2) at an applied field of 6.0 V/μm. Moreover, the EFE emitters can be operated under 0.19 mA/cm(2) for more than 350 min without showing any sign of degradation. Such a superior EFE property along with high robustness characteristic of these combination of materials are not attainable with neither N-UNCD films nor s-CNTs films alone. Transmission electron microscopic investigations indicated that the N-UNCD films contain needle-like diamond grains encased in a few layers of nanographitic phase, which enhanced markedly the transport of electrons in the N-UNCD films. Moreover, the needle-like diamond grains were nucleated from the s-CNTs without the necessity of forming the interlayer that facilitate the transport of electrons crossing the diamond-to-Si interface. Both these factors contributed to the enhanced EFE behavior of the N-UNCD/s-CNTs films.

  15. Large area photoconductive terahertz emitter for 1.55 μm excitation based on an InGaAs heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Mittendorff, Martin; Xu, Ming; Dietz, Roman J B; Künzel, Harald; Sartorius, Bernd; Schneider, Harald; Helm, Manfred; Winnerl, Stephan

    2013-05-31

    We present scalable large area terahertz (THz) emitters based on a nanoscale multilayer InGaAs/InAlAs heterostructure and a microstructured electrode pattern. The emitters are designed for pump lasers working at the telecommunication wavelength of 1.55 μm. Electric THz fields of more than 2.5 V cm⁻¹ are reached with moderate pump powers of 80 mW, the corresponding spectrum extends up to 3 THz. The saturation characteristics have been investigated for different pump laser spot sizes. For small pump powers of less than 50 mW the emitted THz field is nearly independent of the spot size, for higher pump powers and small spot sizes a clear saturation of the generated THz pulse can be observed. Hence the use of scalable emitters is especially promising for high power fibre laser systems. The spectral content of the generated radiation is nearly independent of the parameters spot size, pump power, and bias voltage, which allows for stable operation in spectroscopic applications.

  16. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  17. Bright white organic light-emitting diodes based on two blue emitters with similar molecular structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liduo; Lei, Gangtie; Qiu, Yong

    2005-06-01

    We show that highly efficient and chromatically stable white organic electroluminescent devices can be obtained, based on two blue emitters with similar structures: 9,10-di-(2-naphthyl)-anthracene (ADN) and 9,10-di-(2-naphthyl)-2-terbutyl-anthracene doped with yellow-orange emitting 5,6,11,12-tetraphenylnaphthacene (rubrene) at ultralow doping concentrations (0.01%-0.05%). The relative intensity of the blue and orange-yellow emissions could be fine-tuned by varying the doping concentrations of rubrene in the host to achieve pure white emission. The energy-transfer mechanism of ADN and rubrene with ultralow doping concentrations is discussed in terms of the long exciton diffusion distance of ADN.

  18. Time-resolved far-field analysis of a high power single emitter laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Unge, Glenn L.

    1992-01-01

    A system was developed which is capable of measuring the time-resolved far-field radiation patterns from a high-power semiconductor laser under intensity modulated conditions. Angular steering of the fundamental spatial mode was observed, with pointing variations as large as 0.5 deg, or 7.5 percent of the beamwidth, during the time of the optical pulse. The variations in pointing angle were directly related to gradients in the transverse index profile of the laser, which may oscillate based on lateral spatial hole burning of the gain and carrier density.

  19. Plume-based analysis of vehicle fleet air pollutant emissions and the contribution from high emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C.-H.; Zimmerman, N.; Healy, R. M.; Wang, D. K.; Ke, F.; Evans, G. J.

    2015-03-01

    An automated identification and integration method has been developed to investigate in-use vehicle emissions under real-world conditions. This technique was applied to high time resolution air pollutant measurements of in-use vehicle emissions performed under real-world conditions at a near-road monitoring station in Toronto, Canada during four seasons, through month-long campaigns in 2013-2014. Based on carbon dioxide measurements, over 100 000 vehicle-related plumes were automatically identified and fuel-based emission factors for nitrogen oxides; carbon monoxide; particle number, black carbon; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX); and methanol were determined for each plume. Thus the automated identification enabled the measurement of an unprecedented number of plumes and pollutants over an extended duration. Emission factors for volatile organic compounds were also measured roadside for the first time using a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer; this instrument provided the time resolution required for the plume capture technique. Mean emission factors were characteristic of the light-duty gasoline dominated vehicle fleet present at the measurement site, with mean black carbon and particle number emission factors of 35 mg kg-1 and 7.7 × 1014 kg-1, respectively. The use of the plume-by-plume analysis enabled isolation of vehicle emissions, and the elucidation of co-emitted pollutants from similar vehicle types, variability of emissions across the fleet, and the relative contribution from heavy emitters. It was found that a small proportion of the fleet (< 25%) contributed significantly to total fleet emissions; 95, 93, 76, and 75% for black carbon, carbon monoxide, BTEX, and particle number, respectively. Emission factors of a single pollutant may help classify a vehicle as a high emitter. However, regulatory strategies to more efficiently target multi-pollutants mixtures may be better developed by considering the co

  20. Plume-based analysis of vehicle fleet air pollutant emissions and the contribution from high emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. M.; Jeong, C.-H.; Zimmerman, N.; Healy, R. M.; Wang, D. K.; Ke, F.; Evans, G. J.

    2015-08-01

    An automated identification and integration method has been developed for in-use vehicle emissions under real-world conditions. This technique was applied to high-time-resolution air pollutant measurements of in-use vehicle emissions performed under real-world conditions at a near-road monitoring station in Toronto, Canada, during four seasons, through month-long campaigns in 2013-2014. Based on carbon dioxide measurements, over 100 000 vehicle-related plumes were automatically identified and fuel-based emission factors for nitrogen oxides; carbon monoxide; particle number; black carbon; benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX); and methanol were determined for each plume. Thus the automated identification enabled the measurement of an unprecedented number of plumes and pollutants over an extended duration. Emission factors for volatile organic compounds were also measured roadside for the first time using a proton transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer; this instrument provided the time resolution required for the plume capture technique. Mean emission factors were characteristic of the light-duty gasoline-dominated vehicle fleet present at the measurement site, with mean black carbon and particle number emission factors of 35 mg kg fuel-1 and 7.5 × 1014 # kg fuel-1, respectively. The use of the plume-by-plume analysis enabled isolation of vehicle emissions, and the elucidation of co-emitted pollutants from similar vehicle types, variability of emissions across the fleet, and the relative contribution from heavy emitters. It was found that a small proportion of the fleet (< 25 %) contributed significantly to total fleet emissions: 100, 100, 81, and 77 % for black carbon, carbon monoxide, BTEX, and particle number, respectively. Emission factors of a single pollutant may help classify a vehicle as a high emitter; however, regulatory strategies to more efficiently target multi-pollutant mixtures may be better developed by considering the co

  1. Effect of metal base layer on the absorptance and emittance of sputtered graded metal-carbon selective absorbing surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harding, G. L.; Craig, S.

    1981-08-01

    Solar absorptance and temperature-dependent emittance is measured for graded metal-carbon films deposited onto smooth aluminum, copper, nickel, and stainless steel base layers, sputter-deposited onto glass tubes at relatively low argon pressure (approximately 0.5 Pa), and deposited onto textured copper using argon pressures 3 to 40 Pa. Absorptance measurements are made on surfaces deposited onto small plane glass slides attached to a glass tube in the coating system, and emittance measurements are made on coated tubes, assembled into glass envelopes. Both the small planar specimens of selective surface and coated tubes were inserted in continuously evacuated glass envelopes and annealed at 500 C for approximately 1 hr. It is shown that solar absorptance varies by only 1-2% for the different base layers, whereas the emittance of surfaces based on nickel and stainless steel is considerably higher than for surfaces based on copper and aluminum. Small changes occur in absorptances and emittances after annealing. It is concluded that the optimum selective surface for evacuated collectors used with mirrors of low concentrations consists of graded metal-carbon overlaid with smooth copper.

  2. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  3. Effect of purity, edge length, and growth area on field emission of multi-walled carbon nanotube emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Shahi, Monika; Gautam, S.; Shah, P. V.; Jha, P.; Kumar, P.; Rawat, J. S.; Chaudhury, P. K.; Harsh; Tandon, R. P.

    2013-05-28

    Present report aims to study the effect of purity, edge length, and growth area on field emission of patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) emitter arrays. For development of four CNT emitter arrays (CEAs), low resistively silicon substrates were coated with thin film of iron catalyst using photolithography, sputtering, and lift off process. Four CEAs were synthesized on these substrates using thermal chemical vapor deposition with minor changes in pretreatment duration. Out of these, two CEAs have 10 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m and 40 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 40 {mu}m solid square dots of CNTs with constant 20 {mu}m inter-dot separation. Other two CEAs have ring square bundles of CNTs and these CEAs are envisioned as 10 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m square dots with 4 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 4 {mu}m scooped out area and 15 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 15 {mu}m square dots with 5 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 5 {mu}m lift out area with constant 20 {mu}m inter-dot spacing. Solid square dot structures have exactly constant edge length per unit area with more than four-fold difference in CNT growth area however ring square dot patterns have minor difference in edge length per unit area with approximately two times difference in CNT growth area. Quality and morphology of synthesized CEAs were assessed by scanning electron microscope and Raman characterization which confirm major differences. Field emission of all CEAs was carried out under same vacuum condition and constant inter-electrode separation. Field emission of solid square dot CEAs show approximately identical current density-electric field curves and Fowler-Nordheim plots with little difference in emission current density at same electric field. Similar results were observed for ring square structure CEAs when compared separately. Maximum emission current density observed from these four CEAs reduces from 14.53, 12.23, 11.01, to 8.66 mA/cm{sup 2} at a constant electric field of 5 V/{mu}m, according to edge

  4. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, Jerry A.; Sherwin, Marc E.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Weckwerth, Mark V.

    1998-01-01

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation.

  5. Resonant tunneling device with two-dimensional quantum well emitter and base layers

    DOEpatents

    Simmons, J.A.; Sherwin, M.E.; Drummond, T.J.; Weckwerth, M.V.

    1998-10-20

    A double electron layer tunneling device is presented. Electrons tunnel from a two dimensional emitter layer to a two dimensional tunneling layer and continue traveling to a collector at a lower voltage. The emitter layer is interrupted by an isolation etch, a depletion gate, or an ion implant to prevent electrons from traveling from the source along the emitter to the drain. The collector is similarly interrupted by a backgate, an isolation etch, or an ion implant. When the device is used as a transistor, a control gate is added to control the allowed energy states of the emitter layer. The tunnel gate may be recessed to change the operating range of the device and allow for integrated complementary devices. Methods of forming the device are also set forth, utilizing epoxy-bond and stop etch (EBASE), pre-growth implantation of the backgate or post-growth implantation. 43 figs.

  6. Undulator-Based Laser Wakefield Accelerator Electron Beam Energy Spread and Emittance Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bakeman, M.S.; Van Tilborg, J.; Nakamura, K.; Gonsalves, A.; Osterhoff, J.; Sokollik, T.; Lin, C.; Robinson, K.E.; Schroeder, C.B.; Toth, Cs.; Weingartner, R.; Gruner, F.; Esarey, E.; Leemans, W.P.

    2010-06-01

    The design and current status of experiments to couple the Tapered Hybrid Undulator (THUNDER) to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) laser plasma accelerator (LPA) to measure electron beam energy spread and emittance are presented.

  7. Tunable, Room Temperature CMOS-Compatible THz Emitters Based on Nonlinear Mixing in Microdisk Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Raju; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Ahmadivand, Arash; Al-Amin, Chowdhury; Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Shur, Michael; Pala, Nezih

    2016-03-01

    We propose and investigate in detail a novel tunable, compact, room temperature terahertz (THz) emitter using individual microdisk resonators for both optical and THz waves with the capability of radiating THz field in 0.5-10 THz range with tuning frequency resolution of 0.05 THz. Enhanced THz generation is achieved by employing a nonlinear optical disk resonator with a high value of second-order nonlinearity ( χ (2)) in order to facilitate the difference-frequency generation (DFG) via nonlinear mixing with the choice of two appropriate input infrared optical waves. Efficient coupling of infrared waves from bus to the nonlinear disk is ensured by satisfying critical coupling condition. Phase matching condition for efficient DFG process is also met by employing modal phase matching technique. Our simulations show that THz output power can be reached up to milliwatt (mW) level with high optical to THz conversion efficiency. The proposed source is Silicon on Insulator (SoI) technology compatible enabling the monolithic integration with Si complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) electronics including plasmonic THz detectors.

  8. The influence of emitter conditioning on the performance of a tungsten <111> cold field emission gun operating at 300 kV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, I. M.; Li, W.; Walther, T.

    2014-06-01

    In this contribution, we examine the influence of emitter conditioning for a <111> tungsten cold field emission gun on the emission and beam characteristics of a double aberration corrected electron microscope. By varying the post flash build-up parameters we can control the effective emitter tip radius. A sharp emitter yields an energy resolution of 0.31eV but relatively low beam current whereas an increased tip radius results in a reduction in energy resolution to 0.4eV but much higher potential beam current. Consequently, careful control of the build-up parameters can be used as a means of tailoring the emission to suit specific instrumental requirements.

  9. Reconstruction of exciton wave functions of coupled quantum emitters including spin with ultrafast spectroscopy using localized nanooptical fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specht, Judith F.; Richter, Marten

    2016-04-01

    Coulomb-induced resonance energy transfer mechanisms between coupled nanostructures lead to the formation of new, delocalized exciton states. Their hybrid wave functions can be decomposed into the basis of local states of the uncoupled system by the use of coherent, spatially resolved spectroscopy. The suggested quantum state tomography protocol combines nanooptical fields with a four-wave mixing technique: At least one pulse of the pulse sequence is spatially localized at a specific quantum emitter. It was suggested to use nanoplasmonic structures together with pulse-shaped fields for the localization. In this paper, the method is applied to a system of two coupled semiconductor quantum dots. The basic reconstruction concept first proposed in Richter et al. (Phys Rev B 86:085308, 2012) and Schlosser et al. (New J Phys 15:025004, 2013) is extended to the case of including different spin states of the excitons in the quantum dots. For this purpose, the theoretical scheme has to be modified and the localized fields need the ability to change their polarization. We show that the application of the developed reconstruction scheme to two-dimensional spectra gives full access to the internal structure of the interacting quantum states.

  10. The growth of graphite phase on an iridium field electron emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The growth of graphite on the surface of an iridium tip in pyrolysis of benzene to give a ribbed crystal has been found by the methods of field electron and desorption microscopy. The formation of a graphite crystal results in the electric field factor increasing. The adsorption of alkali metals on the surface of graphite is accompanied by the intercalation effect.

  11. Developing and using the field emitter as a high intensity electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charbonnier, Francis

    1996-03-01

    In the 1940's, Erwin Müller dominated field emission research. The 50's and 60's saw considerable growth in the number of scientists interested in field emission. While many made important contributions, three persons stood out who had different talents and interests. First and foremost: Erwin Müller, a very innovative, creative and skilled inventor and experimentalist. Second: Robert Gomer, equally adept at theory and experiment, with a unique mastery of fundamental physics concepts. Third: Walter Dyke, who was intrigued by the unique properties of field emission and resolved to develop field emission cathodes as high performance electron sources for a variety of electron beam devices. This paper summarizes Dyke's work at Linfield College, Linfield Research Institute and Field Emission Corporation from 1948 to 1972. However, while Dyke established a solid foundation for useful field emission cathodes and investigated several devices, particularly in microwaves, electron optics and flash radiography, he was unable to complete his work and produce commercial devices, except for flash radiography. Many groups have pursued this work in recent years, sometimes with great success. This paper briefly summarizes current work on field emission cathodes and device applications, as this puts Dyke's work in better perspective and adds to its significance.

  12. RF vacuum microelectronics based on thin film edge-emitter technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akinwande, Tayo

    1994-04-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and demonstration of thin-film-edge emitter vacuum diodes and transistors. The two-terminal device uses a thin-film-edge emitter as an electron source whose current density depends on the anode voltage. The three terminal device uses a thin-film-edge emitter as an electron source whose current density depends on the voltage applied to the extraction electrodes (gates). The emitted electrons are collected by the anode. All three electrodes (emitter, gate, and anode) are integrated on the same substrate. The devices have integrated on-chip resistors for bum-out prevention. The 3D microstructure was fabricated using IC and micromachining techniques. Contrasted with the usual vertical FEA structures, the particular vacuum transistor design invokes two dimensional vertical symmetry for the extraction electrodes (gate) using multi-layer thin film deposition techniques. The central thin-film-edge emitter is about 300 A thick and is surrounded by two gate electrodes, one above and one below.

  13. Fabrication of barium/strontium carbonate coated amorphous carbon nanotubes as an improved field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, S.; Jha, A.; Das, N. S.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2013-02-01

    Amorphous carbon nanotubes (aCNTs) were synthesized by a chemical reaction between ferrocene and ammonium chloride at a temperature ˜250 ∘C in an air furnace. As-synthesized aCNTs were coated with the barium/strontium carbonate through a simple chemical process. The coating of barium/strontium carbonate was confirmed by a high resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. Morphology of the as-prepared samples was studied by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Thermal gravimetric analysis showed that barium/strontium carbonate coated aCNTs are more stable than the pristine aCNTs. As-prepared barium/strontium carbonate coated aCNTs showed significantly improved field emission properties with a turn-on field as low as 2.5 V/μm. The variation of field emission characteristics of the barium/strontium carbonate coated aCNTs with interelectrode distances was also studied.

  14. A metal-insulator-metal electron emitter based on a porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} film

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Tao; Liang, Zhi-Hu Zhang, Xiao-Ning; Liu, Chun-Liang

    2015-04-20

    A metal-insulator-metal electron emitter containing a sandwiched insulator layer composed of porous aluminum oxide Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was fabricated. The electron emission characteristics of the electron emitter were investigated under vacuum and xenon. Treatment with H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and rapid thermal oxidation increased the electric field inside the insulator and improved the quality of porous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, resulting in higher efficiency and less fluctuation of electron emission. The maximum current and efficiency of electron emission reached 1.05 mA/cm{sup 2} and 51.2%, respectively, under a pressure of 1.0×10{sup −4} Pa. In addition, electrons were injected into xenon and 147 nm vacuum ultraviolet emission was detected in xenon at a pressure of 5.0 × 10{sup 2 }Pa. This electron emitter has a great potential for use as an ultraviolet radiation source.

  15. Simultaneous improvement of emission color, singlet-triplet energy gap, and quantum efficiency of blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent emitters using a 1-carbazolylcarbazole based donor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mounggon; Choi, Jeong Min; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2016-08-21

    Blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent (TADF) emitters having 1-carbazolylcarbazole based donor moieties were developed to resolve the low quantum efficiency and large singlet-triplet energy splitting issues of the linker free TADF emitters. Investigation of the 1-carbazolylcarbazole derived donors as the donor units of two blue TADF emitters in comparison with 3-carbazolylcarbazole demonstrated that the 1-carbazolylcarbazole based donors increased the triplet energy, decreased the singlet-triplet energy gap, blue-shifted the emission color, and enhanced the quantum efficiency of the blue TADF devices.

  16. Room-temperature single photon sources with definite circular and linear polarizations based on single-emitter fluorescence in liquid crystal hosts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissell, Luke J.; Lukishova, Svetlana G.; Schmid, Ansgar W.; Hahn, Megan A.; Evans, Chris M.; Krauss, Todd D.; Stroud, Carlos R., Jr.; Boyd, Robert W.

    2010-09-01

    Experimental results of two room-temperature, robust and efficient single-photon sources with definite circular and linear polarization using single-emitter fluorescence in cholesteric and nematic liquid crystal hosts are discussed. For single emitters, we used nanocrystal quantum dots, single color centers in nanodiamonds, and single dye molecules. Single-photon sources based on single emitters in liquid crystals are the room temperature alternatives to cryogenic single-photon sources base on semiconductor heterostructured quantum dots in microcavities prepared by molecular beam epitaxy.

  17. Electromagnetic near-field interactions of a dipolar emitter with metal and metamaterial nanoslabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakkarainen, Timo; Setälä, Tero; Friberg, Ari T.

    2011-09-01

    We investigate the emission properties of a polarizable point dipole placed within a subwavelength distance from a silver or a slightly absorbing, negative-index metamaterial nanoslab. Using electromagnetic theory we show that in the immediate vicinity of the slab the dipole-slab interaction prevents the dipole from radiating. For the metamaterial slab close to the perfect-lens arrangement, the interaction is relatively weak and of short range. In particular, a region exists in the near zone of the metamaterial slab where the dipole emission is not disturbed by the interaction, and a bright intensity distribution of subwavelength width is created on the opposite side of the slab. This suggests that a low-loss metamaterial slab can act as a near-field imaging device which does not disturb the object. For the silver slab the interaction is stronger and it reaches over the near-field zone, adversely influencing the imaging capabilities in terms of brightness and resolution. The results are important for the development of metal and metamaterial superlenses.

  18. Electromagnetic near-field interactions of a dipolar emitter with metal and metamaterial nanoslabs

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkarainen, Timo; Setaelae, Tero; Friberg, Ari T.

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the emission properties of a polarizable point dipole placed within a subwavelength distance from a silver or a slightly absorbing, negative-index metamaterial nanoslab. Using electromagnetic theory we show that in the immediate vicinity of the slab the dipole-slab interaction prevents the dipole from radiating. For the metamaterial slab close to the perfect-lens arrangement, the interaction is relatively weak and of short range. In particular, a region exists in the near zone of the metamaterial slab where the dipole emission is not disturbed by the interaction, and a bright intensity distribution of subwavelength width is created on the opposite side of the slab. This suggests that a low-loss metamaterial slab can act as a near-field imaging device which does not disturb the object. For the silver slab the interaction is stronger and it reaches over the near-field zone, adversely influencing the imaging capabilities in terms of brightness and resolution. The results are important for the development of metal and metamaterial superlenses.

  19. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters using parametric down-conversion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Guo-Jian

    2016-06-01

    Quantum repeater is the key element in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We design the compact quantum circuits for nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification, and discuss the feasibility of our protocols with current experimental technology. In our scheme, we use a parametric down-conversion source instead of ideal single-photon sources to realize the heralded quantum repeater. Moreover, our protocols can turn faulty events into the detection of photon polarization, and the fidelity can reach 100% in principle. Our scheme is attractive and scalable, since it can be realized with artificial solid-state quantum systems. With developed experimental technique on controlling emitter-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in long-distance quantum communication.

  20. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters using parametric down-conversion source.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Guo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Quantum repeater is the key element in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We design the compact quantum circuits for nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification, and discuss the feasibility of our protocols with current experimental technology. In our scheme, we use a parametric down-conversion source instead of ideal single-photon sources to realize the heralded quantum repeater. Moreover, our protocols can turn faulty events into the detection of photon polarization, and the fidelity can reach 100% in principle. Our scheme is attractive and scalable, since it can be realized with artificial solid-state quantum systems. With developed experimental technique on controlling emitter-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in long-distance quantum communication. PMID:27350159

  1. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters using parametric down-conversion source.

    PubMed

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Guo-Jian

    2016-06-28

    Quantum repeater is the key element in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We design the compact quantum circuits for nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification, and discuss the feasibility of our protocols with current experimental technology. In our scheme, we use a parametric down-conversion source instead of ideal single-photon sources to realize the heralded quantum repeater. Moreover, our protocols can turn faulty events into the detection of photon polarization, and the fidelity can reach 100% in principle. Our scheme is attractive and scalable, since it can be realized with artificial solid-state quantum systems. With developed experimental technique on controlling emitter-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in long-distance quantum communication.

  2. Heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters using parametric down-conversion source

    PubMed Central

    Song, Guo-Zhu; Wu, Fang-Zhou; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Guo-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Quantum repeater is the key element in quantum communication and quantum information processing. Here, we investigate the possibility of achieving a heralded quantum repeater based on the scattering of photons off single emitters in one-dimensional waveguides. We design the compact quantum circuits for nonlocal entanglement generation, entanglement swapping, and entanglement purification, and discuss the feasibility of our protocols with current experimental technology. In our scheme, we use a parametric down-conversion source instead of ideal single-photon sources to realize the heralded quantum repeater. Moreover, our protocols can turn faulty events into the detection of photon polarization, and the fidelity can reach 100% in principle. Our scheme is attractive and scalable, since it can be realized with artificial solid-state quantum systems. With developed experimental technique on controlling emitter-waveguide systems, the repeater may be very useful in long-distance quantum communication. PMID:27350159

  3. Analysis of possibilities for the development of ultraviolet emitters based on ethanol molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, D. S.; Tsymbalyuk, A. N.

    2013-03-01

    The possibility of development of ultraviolet emitters on hydroxyl radicals obtained in a glow discharge in ethanol and water-vapor mixture has been theoretically analyzed for the first time. It was shown that these lamps have a limited lifetime due to the irreversible dissociation of ethanol molecules and formation of stable hydrocarbons with higher electron-impact dissociation energy.

  4. GEANT4 simulations for beam emittance in a linear collider based on plasma wakefield acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Mete, O. Xia, G.; Hanahoe, K.; Labiche, M.

    2015-08-15

    Alternative acceleration technologies are currently under development for cost-effective, robust, compact, and efficient solutions. One such technology is plasma wakefield acceleration, driven by either a charged particle or laser beam. However, the potential issues must be studied in detail. In this paper, the emittance evolution of a witness beam through elastic scattering from gaseous media and under transverse focusing wakefields is studied.

  5. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports on a flexible Ni micro wire with CNTs embedded into its surface. By using micromachining technology, for the first time, we could implant nanoscale materials into micro-scale metal substrate at room temperature. Thanks to the effective direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate, field emission current of 1.11 mA (current density of 22.2 mA/cm(2)) could be achieved from the micro wire. Moreover, the wire shows excellent mechanical properties for large amplitude bending, which is beneficial for geometric designing. To check the practical application of the wire, a simplified X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a conventional tube. The gray shade that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the X-ray generation. PMID:27613070

  6. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on a flexible Ni micro wire with CNTs embedded into its surface. By using micromachining technology, for the first time, we could implant nanoscale materials into micro-scale metal substrate at room temperature. Thanks to the effective direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate, field emission current of 1.11 mA (current density of 22.2 mA/cm2) could be achieved from the micro wire. Moreover, the wire shows excellent mechanical properties for large amplitude bending, which is beneficial for geometric designing. To check the practical application of the wire, a simplified X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a conventional tube. The gray shade that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the X-ray generation.

  7. Extraction of emission parameters for large-area field emitters, using a technically complete Fowler-Nordheim-type equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2012-03-01

    In papers on cold field electron emission from large-area field emitters (LAFEs), it has become widespread practice to publish a misleading Fowler-Nordheim-type (FN-type) equation. This equation over-predicts the LAFE-average current density by a large highly variable factor thought to usually lie between 103 and 109. This equation, although often referenced to FN’s 1928 paper, is a simplified equation used in undergraduate teaching, does not apply unmodified to LAFEs and does not appear in the 1928 paper. Technological LAFE papers often do not cite any theoretical work more recent than 1928, and often do not comment on the discrepancy between theory and experiment. This usage has occurred widely, in several high-profile American and UK applied-science journals (including Nanotechnology), and in various other places. It does not inhibit practical LAFE development, but can give a misleading impression of potential LAFE performance to non-experts. This paper shows how the misleading equation can be replaced by a conceptually complete FN-type equation that uses three high-level correction factors. One of these, or a combination of two of them, may be useful as an additional measure of LAFE quality; this paper describes a method for estimating factor values using experimental data and discusses when it can be used. Suggestions are made for improved engineering practice in reporting LAFE results. Some of these should help to prevent situations arising whereby an equation appearing in high-profile applied-science journals is used to support statements that an engineering regulatory body might deem to involve professional negligence.

  8. Extraction of emission parameters for large-area field emitters, using a technically complete Fowler-Nordheim-type equation.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Richard G

    2012-03-01

    In papers on cold field electron emission from large-area field emitters (LAFEs), it has become widespread practice to publish a misleading Fowler-Nordheim-type (FN-type) equation. This equation over-predicts the LAFE-average current density by a large highly variable factor thought to usually lie between 10(3) and 10(9). This equation, although often referenced to FN's 1928 paper, is a simplified equation used in undergraduate teaching, does not apply unmodified to LAFEs and does not appear in the 1928 paper. Technological LAFE papers often do not cite any theoretical work more recent than 1928, and often do not comment on the discrepancy between theory and experiment. This usage has occurred widely, in several high-profile American and UK applied-science journals (including Nanotechnology), and in various other places. It does not inhibit practical LAFE development, but can give a misleading impression of potential LAFE performance to non-experts. This paper shows how the misleading equation can be replaced by a conceptually complete FN-type equation that uses three high-level correction factors. One of these, or a combination of two of them, may be useful as an additional measure of LAFE quality; this paper describes a method for estimating factor values using experimental data and discusses when it can be used. Suggestions are made for improved engineering practice in reporting LAFE results. Some of these should help to prevent situations arising whereby an equation appearing in high-profile applied-science journals is used to support statements that an engineering regulatory body might deem to involve professional negligence.

  9. Role of the optical pulse repetition rate in the efficiency of terahertz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reklaitis, Antanas

    2016-07-01

    Excitation of n-GaAs and p-InAs terahertz emitters by the series of optical pulses is studied by ensemble Monte Carlo simulations. It is found that the spatial separation of photoexcited electrons and holes dramatically reduces the recombination intensity in n-GaAs emitter, the operation of which is based on the surface field effect. The spatial separation of carriers does not affect the recombination intensity in p-InAs emitter, the operation of which is based on the photo-Dember effect. Therefore, the recovery time of equilibrium state after optical pulse in n-GaAs emitter significantly exceeds the corresponding recovery time in p-InAs emitter. This fact leads to a substantial reduction of photocurrent amplitude in n-GaAs emitter excited by the optical pulse series at high repetition rate.

  10. Chemical Vapor Deposited Few-Layer Graphene as an Electron Field Emitter.

    PubMed

    Behural, Sanjay K; Nayak, Sasmita; Yang, Qiaoqin; Hirose, Akira; Janil, Omkar

    2016-01-01

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of graphene on polycrystalline copper (Cu) foil in a low pressure conditions has been presented, aiming to achieve the highest quality with large-scale fabrications, which requires comprehensive understanding and effective controlling of the growth process. Herein, few-layer graphene (FLG) films with large-domain sizes were grown on Cu metal catalyst substrates using a vertical mass-flow hot-filament CVD reactor, with the intention of large scale production, by optimizing the CVD system and three of the process parameters: (i) gas flow compositions, (ii) substrate annealing time and (iii) graphene deposition time. The detailed scanning electron microscope and Raman spectroscopy analysis indicate that all the above mentioned process parameters affect growth of FLG film on Cu substrate. The presence of two intense peaks, G and 2D-band at 1583.6 and 2702.6 cm⁻¹ for synthesized sample at optimized conditions (H₂/CH₄ ratio of 50:1 at graphene deposition time of 10 minutes and substrate annealed time for 20 minutes) revealed the formation of FLG films with large domain size. These graphene films on Cu have shown the room temperature field electron emission characteristics, hence appears to be prospective candidate for vacuum nanoelectronics. PMID:27398456

  11. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-20

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent.

  12. Carbon nanotube electron field emitters for x-ray imaging of human breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidcumb, Emily; Gao, Bo; Shan, Jing; Inscoe, Christy; Lu, Jianping; Zhou, Otto

    2014-06-01

    For imaging human breast cancer, digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) has been shown to improve image quality and breast cancer detection in comparison to two-dimensional (2D) mammography. Current DBT systems have limited spatial resolution and lengthy scan times. Stationary DBT (s-DBT), utilizing an array of carbon nanotube (CNT) field emission x-ray sources, provides increased spatial resolution and potentially faster imaging than current DBT systems. This study presents the results of detailed evaluations of CNT cathodes for x-ray breast imaging tasks. The following were investigated: high current, long-term stability of CNT cathodes for DBT; feasibility of using CNT cathodes to perform a 2D radiograph function; and cathode performance through several years of imaging. Results show that a breast tomosynthesis system using CNT cathodes could run far beyond the experimentally tested lifetime of one to two years. CNT cathodes were found capable of producing higher currents than typical DBT would require, indicating that the s-DBT imaging time can be further reduced. The feasibility of using a single cathode of the s-DBT tube to perform 2D mammography in 4 s was demonstrated. Over the lifetime of the prototype s-DBT system, it was found that both cathode performance and transmission rate were stable and consistent.

  13. Radio and Millimeter Properties of z~5.7 Lyα Emitters in the COSMOS Field: Limits on Radio AGNs, Submillimeter Galaxies, and Dust Obscuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carilli, C. L.; Murayama, T.; Wang, R.; Schinnerer, E.; Taniguchi, Y.; Smolčić, V.; Bertoldi, F.; Ajiki, M.; Nagao, T.; Sasaki, S. S.; Shioya, Y.; Aguirre, J. E.; Blain, A. W.; Scoville, N.; Sanders, D. B.

    2007-09-01

    We present observations at 1.4 and 250 GHz of the z~5.7 Lyα emitters (LAEs) in the COSMOS field found by Murayama et al. At 1.4 GHz there are 99 LAEs in the lower noise regions of the radio field. We do not detect any individual source down to 3 σ limits of ~30 μJy beam-1 at 1.4 GHz, nor do we detect a source in a stacking analysis, to a 2 σ limit of 2.5 μJy beam-1. At 250 GHz we do not detect any of the 10 LAEs that are located within the central regions of the COSMOS field covered by MAMBO (20'×20') to a typical 2 σ limit of S250<2 mJy. The radio data imply that there are no low-luminosity radio AGNs with L1.4>6×1024 W Hz-1 in the LAE sample. The radio and millimeter observations also rule out any highly obscured, extreme starbursts in the sample, i.e., any galaxies with massive star formation rates >1500 Msolar yr-1 in the full sample (based on the radio data), or 500 Msolar yr-1 for the 10% of the LAE sample that falls in the central MAMBO field. The stacking analysis implies an upper limit to the mean massive star formation rate of ~100 Msolar yr-1. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan; the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.; the IRAM 30 m telescope; and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory.

  14. Recent Progress in Silicon-Based MEMS Field Emission Thrusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenard, Roger X.; Kravitz, Stanley H.; Tajmar, Martin

    2005-02-01

    The Indium Field Emission Thruster (In-FET) is a highly characterized and space-proven device based on space-qualified liquid metal ion sources. There is also extensive experience with liquid metal ion sources for high-brightness semiconductor fabrications and inspection Like gridded ion engines, In-FETs efficiently accelerate ions through a series of high voltage electrodes. Instead of a plasma discharge to generate ions, which generates a mixture of singly and doubly charged ions as well as neutrals, indium metal is melted (157°C) and fed to the tip of a capillary tube where very high local electric fields perform more-efficient field emission ionization, providing nearly 100% singly charged species. In-FETs do not have the associated losses or lifetime concerns of a magnetically confined discharge and hollow cathode in ion thrusters. For In-FETs, propellant efficiencies ˜100% stipulate single-emitter currents ⩽10μA, perhaps as low as 5μA of current. This low emitter current results in ⩽0.5 W/emitter. Consequently, if the In-FET is to be used for future Human and Robotic missions under President Bush's Exploration plan, a mechanism to generate very high power levels is necessary. Efficient high-power operation requires many emitter/extractor pairs. Conventional fabrication techniques allow 1-10 emitters in a single module, with pain-staking precision required. Properly designed and fabricated In-FETs possess electric-to-jet efficiency >90% and a specific mass <0.25 kg/kWe. MEMS techniques allow reliable batch processing with ˜160,000 emitters in a 10×10-cm array. Developing a 1.5kW 10×10-cm module is a necessary stepping-stone for >500 kWe systems where groups of 9 or 16 modules, with a single PPU/feed system, form the building blocks for even higher-power exploration systems. In 2003, SNL and ARCS produced a MEMS-based In-FET 5×5 emitter module with individually addressable emitter/extractor pairs on a 15×15mm wafer. The first MEMS thruster

  15. Hyperbolic metamaterial-based near-field thermophotovoltaic system for hundreds of nanometer vacuum gap.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seokmin; Lim, Mikyung; Lee, Seung S; Lee, Bong Jae

    2016-03-21

    Artificially designed hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) possesses extraordinary electromagnetic features different from those of naturally existing materials. In particular, the dispersion relation of waves existing inside the HMM is hyperbolic rather than elliptical; thus, waves that are evanescent in isotropic media become propagating in the HMM. This characteristic of HMMs opens a novel way to spectrally control the near-field thermal radiation in which evanescent waves in the vacuum gap play a critical role. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the performance of a near-field thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion system in which a W/SiO2-multilayer-based HMM serves as the emitter at 1000 K and InAs works as the TPV cell at 300 K. By carefully designing the thickness of constituent materials of the HMM emitter, the electric power of the near-field TPV devices can be increased by about 6 times at 100-nm vacuum gap as compared to the case of the plain W emitter. Alternatively, in regards to the electric power generation, HMM emitter at experimentally achievable 100-nm vacuum gap performs equivalently to the plain W emitter at 18-nm vacuum gap. We show that the enhancement mechanism of the HMM emitter is due to the coupled surface plasmon modes at multiple metal-dielectric interfaces inside the HMM emitter. With the minority carrier transport model, the optimal p-n junction depth of the TPV cell has also been determined at various vacuum gaps. PMID:27136882

  16. Hyperbolic metamaterial-based near-field thermophotovoltaic system for hundreds of nanometer vacuum gap.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seokmin; Lim, Mikyung; Lee, Seung S; Lee, Bong Jae

    2016-03-21

    Artificially designed hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) possesses extraordinary electromagnetic features different from those of naturally existing materials. In particular, the dispersion relation of waves existing inside the HMM is hyperbolic rather than elliptical; thus, waves that are evanescent in isotropic media become propagating in the HMM. This characteristic of HMMs opens a novel way to spectrally control the near-field thermal radiation in which evanescent waves in the vacuum gap play a critical role. In this paper, we theoretically investigate the performance of a near-field thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion system in which a W/SiO2-multilayer-based HMM serves as the emitter at 1000 K and InAs works as the TPV cell at 300 K. By carefully designing the thickness of constituent materials of the HMM emitter, the electric power of the near-field TPV devices can be increased by about 6 times at 100-nm vacuum gap as compared to the case of the plain W emitter. Alternatively, in regards to the electric power generation, HMM emitter at experimentally achievable 100-nm vacuum gap performs equivalently to the plain W emitter at 18-nm vacuum gap. We show that the enhancement mechanism of the HMM emitter is due to the coupled surface plasmon modes at multiple metal-dielectric interfaces inside the HMM emitter. With the minority carrier transport model, the optimal p-n junction depth of the TPV cell has also been determined at various vacuum gaps.

  17. Control of focusing forces and emittances in plasma-based accelerators using near-hollow plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl; Esarey, Eric; Benedetti, Carlo; Leemans, Wim

    2013-08-06

    A near-hollow plasma channel, where the plasma density in the channel is much less than the plasma density in the walls, is proposed to provide independent control over the focusing and accelerating forces in a plasma accelerator. In this geometry the low density in the channel contributes to the focusing forces, while the accelerating fields are determined by the high density in the channel walls. The channel also provides guiding for intense laser pulses used for wakefield excitation. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in a nearly symmetric fashion. Near-hollow plasma channels can effectively mitigate emittance growth due to Coulomb scattering for high energy physics applications.

  18. Control of focusing forces and emittances in plasma-based accelerators using near-hollow plasma channels

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, C. B.; Esarey, E.; Benedetti, C.; Leemans, W. P.

    2013-08-15

    A near-hollow plasma channel, where the plasma density in the channel is much less than the plasma density in the walls, is proposed to provide independent control over the focusing and accelerating forces in a plasma accelerator. In this geometry the low density in the channel contributes to the focusing forces, while the accelerating fields are determined by the high density in the channel walls. The channel also provides guiding for intense laser pulses used for wakefield excitation. Both electron and positron beams can be accelerated in a nearly symmetric fashion. Near-hollow plasma channels can effectively mitigate emittance growth due to Coulomb scattering for high-energy physics applications.

  19. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  20. Emitter-base bias dependence of the collector current ideality factor in abrupt Pnp AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekbote, S.; Cahay, M.; Roenker, K.

    2000-02-01

    Starting with the 4×4 Luttinger-Kohn Hamiltonian and making use of the axial approximation, we calculate the emitter current as a function of the applied forward emitter-base bias for a typical Pnp AlGaAs/GaAs single heterojunction bipolar transistor (HBT). While including the effects of emitter series resistance and recombination in the quasi-neutral base and emitter-base space-charge region, we then calculate the collector current density versus emitter to base bias and find it to be in excellent agreement with the experimental results for a Al0.4Ga0.6As/GaAs Pnp HBT recently reported in the literature. For that structure, the collector current ideality factor is found to increase from 1.1 at low forward bias VEB to 3.0 at large applied emitter-base forward bias approaching the built-in potential. Experimental values are equal to 1.2 and 2.25 at low and large VEB, respectively.

  1. Constraints on drivers for visible light communications emitters based on energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Del Campo-Jimenez, Guillermo; Perez-Jimenez, Rafael; Lopez-Hernandez, Francisco Jose

    2016-05-01

    In this work we analyze the energy efficiency constraints on drivers for Visible light communication (VLC) emitters. This is the main reason why LED is becoming the main source of illumination. We study the effect of the waveform shape and the modulation techniques on the overall energy efficiency of an LED lamp. For a similar level of illumination, we calculate the emitter energy efficiency ratio η (PLED/PTOTAL) for different signals. We compare switched and sinusoidal signals and analyze the effect of both OOK and OFDM modulation techniques depending on the power supply adjustment, level of illumination and signal amplitude distortion. Switched and OOK signals present higher energy efficiency behaviors (0.86≤η≤0.95) than sinusoidal and OFDM signals (0.53≤η≤0.79). PMID:27137609

  2. Fabrication of an infrared emitter using a generic integration platform based on wire bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, S.; Rödjegård, H.; Fischer, A. C.; Stemme, G.; Niklaus, F.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports a novel approach for the fabrication of infrared (IR) emitters for non-dispersive IR gas sensing. The proposed concept enables the integration of superior resistive heater materials with microelectromechanical system structures. In this study, non-bondable filaments made of nickel chromium are attached to mechanical attachment structures using a fully automated state-of-the-art wire bonder. Formation of electrical contact between the integrated filaments and the electrical contact pattern on the substrate is performed using conventional gold stud bumping technology. The placement accuracy of the integrated filaments is evaluated using white-light interferometry, while the contact formation using stud bumping to embed the filaments is investigated using focused ion beam milled cross-sections. A proof-of-concept IR emitter has been successfully operated and heated up to {{960}\\circ}\\text{C} in continuous mode for 3 h.

  3. Constraints on drivers for visible light communications emitters based on energy efficiency.

    PubMed

    Del Campo-Jimenez, Guillermo; Perez-Jimenez, Rafael; Lopez-Hernandez, Francisco Jose

    2016-05-01

    In this work we analyze the energy efficiency constraints on drivers for Visible light communication (VLC) emitters. This is the main reason why LED is becoming the main source of illumination. We study the effect of the waveform shape and the modulation techniques on the overall energy efficiency of an LED lamp. For a similar level of illumination, we calculate the emitter energy efficiency ratio η (PLED/PTOTAL) for different signals. We compare switched and sinusoidal signals and analyze the effect of both OOK and OFDM modulation techniques depending on the power supply adjustment, level of illumination and signal amplitude distortion. Switched and OOK signals present higher energy efficiency behaviors (0.86≤η≤0.95) than sinusoidal and OFDM signals (0.53≤η≤0.79).

  4. Current gain above 10 in sub-10 nm base III-Nitride tunneling hot electron transistors with GaN/AlN emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhichao; Zhang, Yuewei; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Rajan, Siddharth

    2016-05-01

    We report on a tunneling hot electron transistor amplifier with common-emitter current gain greater than 10 at a collector current density in excess of 40 kA/cm2. The use of a wide-bandgap GaN/AlN (111 nm/2.5 nm) emitter was found to greatly improve injection efficiency of the emitter and reduce cold electron leakage. With an ultra-thin (8 nm) base, 93% of the injected hot electrons were collected, enabling a common-emitter current gain up to 14.5. This work improves understanding of the quasi-ballistic hot electron transport and may impact the development of high speed devices based on unipolar hot electron transport.

  5. Two-stage plasma gun based on a gas discharge with a self-heating hollow emitter.

    PubMed

    Vizir, A V; Tyunkov, A V; Shandrikov, M V; Oks, E M

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents the results of tests of a new compact two-stage bulk gas plasma gun. The plasma gun is based on a nonself-sustained gas discharge with an electron emitter based on a discharge with a self-heating hollow cathode. The operating characteristics of the plasma gun are investigated. The discharge system makes it possible to produce uniform and stable gas plasma in the dc mode with a plasma density up to 3x10(9) cm(-3) at an operating gas pressure in the vacuum chamber of less than 2x10(-2) Pa. The device features high power efficiency, design simplicity, and compactness.

  6. The End of the Reionization Epoch Probed by Lyα Emitters at z = 6.5 in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Malkan, Matthew A.; Doi, Mamoru; Matsuda, Yuichi; Ouchi, Masami; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Ly, Chun; Nagao, Tohru; Iye, Masanori; Motohara, Kentaro; Murayama, Takashi; Murozono, Kouji; Nariai, Kyoji; Ohta, Kouji; Okamura, Sadanori; Sasaki, Toshiyuki; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Umemura, Masayuki

    2006-09-01

    We report an extensive search for Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z=6.5 in the Subaru Deep Field. Subsequent spectroscopy with Subaru and Keck identified eight more LAEs, giving a total of 17 spectroscopically confirmed LAEs at z=6.5. Based on this spectroscopic sample of 17, complemented by a photometric sample of 58 LAEs, we have derived a more accurate Lyα luminosity function of LAEs at z=6.5, which reveals an apparent deficit at the bright end of ~0.75 mag fainter L*, compared with that observed at z=5.7. The difference in the LAE luminosity functions between z=5.7 and 6.5 is significant at the 3 σ level, which is reduced to 2 σ when cosmic variance is taken into account. This result may imply that the reionization of the universe has not been completed at z=6.5. We found that the spatial distribution of LAEs at z=6.5 was homogeneous over the field. We discuss the implications of these results for the reionization of the universe. The data presented herein were partly obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation. Based in part on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  7. Single-peak narrow-bandwidth mid-infrared thermal emitters based on quantum wells and photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takuya; De Zoysa, Menaka; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2013-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate single-peak narrow-bandwidth thermal emission with a quality factor (Q factor) of more than 100 at a wavelength of 9.1 μm. The emission is significantly suppressed at all other wavelengths. Our emitter is based on an intersubband transition in a multiple quantum well structure combined with a single high-Q resonant mode in a two-dimensional photonic crystal slab, which allows strong light-matter interaction only at a specific wavelength. Strong thermal emission is exhibited only in a limited angular range (˜20°) from the normal direction. Our results have potential applications in bio- and environmental sensors.

  8. Brownian Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, Roumen

    2016-06-01

    A Brownian harmonic oscillator, which dissipates energy either by friction or via emission of electromagnetic radiation, is considered. This Brownian emitter is driven by the surrounding thermo-quantum fluctuations, which are theoretically described by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown how the Abraham-Lorentz force leads to dependence of the half-width on the peak frequency of the oscillator amplitude spectral density. It is found that for the case of a charged particle moving in vacuum at zero temperature, its root-mean-square velocity fluctuation is a universal constant, equal to roughly 1/18 of the speed of light. The relevant Fokker-Planck and Smoluchowski equations are also derived.

  9. Continuous and reversible operation of Bi2212 based THz emitters just below Tc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Hidetoshi; Orita, Naoki; Koike, Takashi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2010-12-01

    Continuous and reversible operation of the THz-light emitters comprised of the intrinsic Josephson junction (iJJ) system of high-Tc superconductor BiSrCaCuO (Bi2212) is reported. This reversible emission is observed in samples made of lightly underdoped crystals when a part of the mesa device is so overheated by Joule heating that the temperature reaches Tm near but still below Tc, while the irreversible type of emission occurs at less overheated condition. The large temperature gradient in the mesa due to overheating under high bias currents seems to be responsible for the new observed reversible emission.

  10. Midwave Infrared (2-6{micro}m) Emitter-Based Chemical Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Allerman, A.A.; Biefeld, R.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1999-02-01

    Long wavelength (2-6 {micro}m) diode emitters are desirable for many applications including monitoring of chemical species in the environment and manufacturing, long wavelength fiber-optic communications, lidar, and JR detector counter-measures. No practical diode lasers are available for any of these applications because the band structure of bulk III-V, II-VI, and IV-VI semiconductor alloys results in large Auger recombination rates at these wavelengths. Experimental and theoretical work at Sandia has resulted in new understanding of the electronic properties of narrow bandgap III-V heterostructures, and we have found methods of reducing the Auger rates in certain InAsSb superlattices and quantum wells. These devices enable us to begin chemical sensing demonstrations of important species such as CO-CO{sub 2} and numerous other compounds. This project will involve developing chemical sensing systems and determining the sensitivity and limitations of these systems. Concurrently, we will improve upon infrared emitters used in these systems.

  11. Electron beam collimation with a 40 000 tip metallic double-gate field emitter array and in-situ control of nanotip sharpness distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Helfenstein, P.; Guzenko, V. A.; Tsujino, S.; Fink, H.-W.

    2013-01-28

    The generation of highly collimated electron beams from a double-gate field emitter array with 40000 metallic tips and large collimation gate apertures is reported. Field emission beam measurements demonstrated the reduction of the beam envelope down to the array size by applying a negative potential to the on-chip gate electrode for the collimation of individual field emission beamlets. Owing to the optimized gate structure, the concomitant decrease of the emission current was minimal, leading to a net enhancement of the current density. Furthermore, a noble gas conditioning process was successfully applied to the double-gate device to improve the beam uniformity in-situ with orders of magnitude increase of the active emission area. The results show that the proposed double-gate field emission cathodes are promising for high current and high brightness electron beam applications such as free-electron lasers and THz power devices.

  12. An empirical study of the performance of APMOVPE AM0 InP homojunction solar cells as a function of emitter thickness and doping, and base doping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wanlass, M. W.; Gessert, T. A.; Emery, K. A.; Coutts, T. J.

    1989-01-01

    Their excellent radiation resistance and conversion efficiencies greater than 20 percent, measured under global conditions, make InP shallow-homojunction solar cells very attractive for space or terrestrial application. In addition, modeling studies show that, for optimized design, efficiencies of these devices should exceed 20 percent even under AM0 conditions. However, a systematic experimental investigation of the influence of the various cell design parameters on cell performance has not as yet been made. For the n+/p/p+ structures investigated in the previous modeling study, the design parameters include the impurity concentrations and thicknesses of the emitter and base layers. In the work reported here, researchers discuss an experimental investigation of the effects on cell performance of varying the impurity concentrations of the emitter and base and thickness of the emitter.

  13. Emittance Growth in the NLCTA First Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In this paper, the emittance growth in the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) first chicane region is evaluated by simulation studies. It is demonstrated that the higher order fields of the chicane dipole magnet and the dipole corrector magnet (which is attached on the quadrupoles) are the main contributions for the emittance growth, especially for the case with a large initial emittance ({gamma}{epsilon}{sub 0} = 5 {micro}m for instance). These simulation results agree with the experimental observations.

  14. Physical limitations of the electroluminescence mechanism in terbium-based light emitters: matrix and layer thickness dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebohle, L.; Lehmann, J.; Prucnal, S.; Sun, J. M.; Helm, M.; Skorupa, W.

    2010-02-01

    The physical limits of downscaling the SiO2 thickness of rare earth implanted metal-oxynitride-oxide-semiconductor-based light emitters are explored by investigating the drop down of the electroluminescence power efficiency with decreasing SiO2 thickness of Tb-implanted devices. It will be experimentally shown that there is a dark zone with an extension of about 20 nm behind the injecting interface in which the hot electrons have not yet gained enough kinetic energy in order to excite the Tb3+ luminescence centers. In addition, replacing the host matrix SiO2 by SiON results in a decrease of power efficiency by two orders of magnitude what is consistent with the experimental data about the hot energy distribution in these media.

  15. Current gain in sub-10 nm base GaN tunneling hot electron transistors with AlN emitter barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhichao Zhang, Yuewei; Nath, Digbijoy N.; Rajan, Siddharth; Khurgin, Jacob B.

    2015-01-19

    We report on Gallium Nitride-based tunneling hot electron transistor amplifier with common-emitter current gain greater than 1. Small signal current gain up to 5 and dc current gain of 1.3 were attained in common-emitter configuration with collector current density in excess of 50 kA/cm{sup 2}. The use of a combination of 1 nm GaN/3 nm AlN layers as an emitter tunneling barrier was found to improve the energy collimation of the injected electrons. These results represent demonstration of unipolar vertical transistors in the III-nitride system that can potentially lead to higher frequency and power microwave devices.

  16. Combining Transmission Geometry Laser Ablation and a Non Contact Continuous Flow Surface Sampling Probe/Electrospray Emitter for Mass Spectrometry-Based Chemical Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovchinnikova, Olga S; Kertesz, Vilmos; Van Berkel, Gary J

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the coupling of ambient pressure transmission geometry laser ablation with a liquid phase sample collection into a continuous flow surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter for mass spectrometry based chemical imaging. The flow probe/emitter device was placed in close proximity to the surface to collect the sample plume produced by laser ablation. The sample collected was immediately aspirated into the probe and on to the electrospray emitter, ionized and detected with the mass spectrometer. Freehand drawn ink lines and letters and an inked fingerprint on microscope slides were analyzed. The circular laser ablation area was about 210 m in diameter and under the conditions used in these experiments the spatial resolution, as determined by the size of the surface features distinguished in the chemical images, was about 100 m.

  17. Morphological Properties of Lyα Emitters at Redshift 4.86 in the Cosmos Field: Clumpy Star Formation or Merger?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Murayama, Takashi; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Kajisawa, Masaru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Scoville, Nick Z.; Nagao, Tohru; Capak, Peter L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate morphological properties of 61 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 4.86 identified in the COSMOS field, based on Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging data in the F814W band. Out of the 61 LAEs, we find the ACS counterparts for 54 LAEs. Eight LAEs show double-component structures with a mean projected separation of 0.″63 (˜4.0 kpc at z = 4.86). Considering the faintness of these ACS sources, we carefully evaluate their morphological properties, that is, size and ellipticity. While some of them are compact and indistinguishable from the point-spread function (PSF) half-light radius of 0.″07 (˜0.45 kpc), the others are clearly larger than the PSF size and spatially extended up to 0.″3 (˜1.9 kpc). We find that the ACS sources show a positive correlation between ellipticity and size and that the ACS sources with large size and round shape are absent. Our Monte Carlo simulation suggests that the correlation can be explained by (1) the deformation effects via PSF broadening and shot noise or (2) the source blending in which two or more sources with small separation are blended in our ACS image and detected as a single elongated source. Therefore, the 46 single-component LAEs could contain the sources that consist of double (or multiple) components with small spatial separation (i.e., ≲0.″3 or 1.9 kpc). Further observation with high angular resolution at longer wavelengths (e.g., rest-frame wavelengths of ≳4000 Å) is inevitable to decipher which interpretation is adequate for our LAE sample. Based on observations with NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and also based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  18. Aberration corrected emittance exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanni, E. A.; Graves, W. S.

    2015-08-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (rf) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by multiple orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dogleg emittance exchange setup with a five cell rf deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of an EEX line with emittances differing by four orders of magnitude, i.e., an initial transverse emittance of 1 pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of 10 nm-rad.

  19. Emittance Theory for Cylindrical Fiber Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1998-01-01

    A fibrous rare earth selective emitter is approximated as an infinitely long, cylinder. The spectral emittance, e(sub x), is obtained L- by solving the radiative transfer equations with appropriate boundary conditions and uniform temperature. For optical depth, K(sub R), where alpha(sub lambda), is the extinction coefficient and R is the cylinder radius, greater than 1 the spectral emittance depths, K(sub R) alpha(sub lambda)R, is nearly at its maximum value. There is an optimum cylinder radius, R(sub opt) for maximum emitter efficiency, n(sub E). Values for R(sub opt) are strongly dependent on the number of emission bands of the material. The optimum radius decreases slowly with increasing emitter temperature, while the maximum efficiency and useful radiated power increase rapidly with increasing, temperature.

  20. Transverse Emittance Reduction with Tapered Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Chao, Alex; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is proposed by J.M. Peterson in 1980s and recently by B. Carlsten. In this paper, we present the physical model of tapered energy-loss foil and analyze the emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance. The study shows that, to reduce transverse emittance, one should collimate at least 4% of particles which has either much low energy or large transverse divergence. The multiple coulomb scattering is not trivial, leading to a limited emittance reduction ratio. Small transverse emittances are of essential importance for the accelerator facilities generating free electron lasers, especially in hard X-ray region. The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is recently proposed by B. Carlsten [1], and can be traced back to J.M. Peterson's work in 1980s [2]. Peterson illustrated that a transverse energy gradient can be produced with a tapered energy-loss foil which in turn leads to transverse emittance reduction, and also analyzed the emittance growth from the associated multiple coulomb scattering. However, what Peterson proposed was rather a conceptual than a practical design. In this paper, we build a more complete physical model of the tapered foil based on Ref. [2], including the analysis of the transverse emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance and confirming the results by various numerical simulations. The eigen emittance equals to the projected emittance when there is no cross correlation in beam's second order moments matrix [3]. To calculate the eigen emittances, it requires only to know the beam distribution at the foil exit. Thus, the analysis of emittance reduction and the optics design of the subsequent beam line section can be separated. In addition, we can combine the effects of multiple coulomb scattering and transverse energy gradient together in the beam matrix and analyze their net effect. We find that,when applied to an

  1. Emittance concept and growth mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.

    1996-05-01

    The authors present an introduction to the subjects of emittance and space-charge effects in charged-particle beams. This is followed by a discussion of three important topics that are at the frontier of this field. The first is a simple model, describing space-charge-induced emittance growth, which yields scaling formulas and some physical explanations for some of the surprising results. The second is a discussion of beam halo, an introduction to the particle-core model, and a brief summary of its results. The third topic is an introduction to the hypothesis of equipartitioning for collisionless particle beams.

  2. Effect of external static magnetic field on the emittance and total charge of electron beams generated by laser-Wakefield acceleration.

    PubMed

    Hosokai, Tomonao; Kinoshita, Kenichi; Zhidkov, Alexei; Maekawa, Akira; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Uesaka, Mitsuru

    2006-08-18

    Significant enhancement of emittance and an increase of the total charge of femtosecond electron beams produced by a 12 TW, 40 fs laser pulse, tightly focused in a He gas jet, are observed after applying a static magnetic field, B> or =0.2 T, directed along the axis of laser pulse propagation. The effect appears when plasma produced by a laser prepulse becomes magnetized in the vicinity of the focus point: the electron Larmor frequency exceeds the collisional frequency, while periphery of the plasma remains unmagnetized. The entailed change in the shape of the plasma suppresses the diffraction of the main laser pulse that results in a much higher charge of electrons self-injected during the longitudinal wave breaking of the laser wake as well as the excellent stability of the beams.

  3. Influence Of Emitter-Collector Axial Asymmetry on the Temperature Distribution in a Thermionic Converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheglov, Alexander S.; Sinyavskiy, Victor V.; Allen, Daniel T.

    1994-07-01

    The emitters in real thermionic reactor TFEs are not ideally circular nor concentric within their collectors. Also, heat generation within the fuel inside the emitter is not uniform nor symmetric. A two-dimensional thermophysical computer program based upon finite element methods has been developed for calculation of the temperature field in a TFE with eccentricity of the electrodes. The paper presents details of the calculational method and typical results. In addition, we discuss some generalizations from these and other calculational investigations. Generally, it can be concluded that emitter-collector asymmetry is not a problem in TFEs.

  4. Auger effect in yellow light emitters based on InGaN-AlGaN-GaN quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huong Ngo, Thi; Gil, Bernard; Valvin, Pierre; Damilano, Benjamin; Lekhal, Kaddour; De Mierry, Philippe

    2016-05-01

    The Auger effect and its impact on the internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of yellow light emitters based on silicon-doped InGaN-AlGaN-GaN quantum wells are investigated by power dependence measurement and using an ABC model. Photoluminescence intensity recorded as a function of excitation power density follows a linear dependence up to a threshold P T that depends on the design of the sample. Above this threshold, the variation of the intensity becomes sublinear, which is characteristic of the onset of Auger recombination processes. After extracting the evolution of IQE with pump power from the experimental data, we use a modified ABC modeling that includes the residual n-type doping to estimate the contribution of different recombination channels. We find that the Auger effect dominates in the high-excitation regime. In addition, we find that intercalating an AlGaN-strain-compensating layer reduces not only the coefficient of nonradiative recombination rates but also reduces the onset of Auger recombination.

  5. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  6. Comparison between experimental and computer simulations of current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of dielectric-coated photon-stimulated field emitters.

    PubMed

    Mayer, A; Mousa, M S; Vigneron, J P

    2001-10-01

    For the purpose of simulating photon-stimulated field emission by taking account of three-dimensional aspects, a transfer-matrix formulation of electronic scattering was combined with a Floquet expansion of the wave function for taking account of quanta exchanges between the electrons and the external radiation. With specific techniques to preserve numerical stability, this transfer-matrix formalism is well suited to compute the transmission of the field-emitted/photon-stimulated electrons between two electrodes. This theory is applied to the computation of Fowler-Nordheim curves describing the photon-stimulated field emission of a tungsten plane emitter (described by z< or =0), which supports a nanometric protrusion and a dielectric coating. The extraction bias ranges from 12 to 24V, for an inter-electrode distance of 4nm. The electromagnetic radiation has a wavelength of 0.67 microm and a power flux density ranging from 5.96 x 10(10) to 5.96 x 10(12) W/m2. The effects due to the protrusion and the dielectric coating are studied. These theoretical results are compared with the experimental data.

  7. Si-based light emitter in an integrated photonic circuit for smart biosensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, S.; Cherkouk, C.; Rebohle, L.; Helm, M.; Skorupa, W.

    2013-05-01

    The motivation for integrated Silicon-based optoelectronics is the creation of low-cost photonics for mass-market applications. Especially, the growing demand for sensitive biochemical sensors in the environmental control or medicine leads to the development of integrated high resolution sensors. Here we present initial results in the integration and butt-coupling of a Si-based light emitting device (LED) [1-3] to a waveguide into a photonic circuit. Our first approach deals with the design, fabrication and characterization of the dielectric high contrast waveguide as an important component, beside the LED, for the development of a Si-based biodetection system. In this work we demonstrate design examples of Si3N4/SiO2-waveguides, which were calculated using MATLAB, the effective index method (EIM) and the finite element method (FEM), with a 0.45μm thick and 0.7μm wide core which shows a high confinement factor of ~74% and coupling efficiency of ~66% at 1.55μm, respectively. The fabrication was done by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD), optical lithography and reactive ion etching (RIE). Additionally, we characterized the deposited layers via ellipsometry and the etched structures by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The obtained results establish principles for Si-based LED butt-coupling to a powerful optical waveguide-based interconnect with effective light absorption and an adequate coupling efficiency.

  8. Emission current formation in plasma electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzdev, V. A.; Zalesski, V. G.

    2010-12-15

    A model of the plasma electron emitter is considered, in which the current redistribution over electrodes of the emitter gas-discharge structure and weak electric field formation in plasma are taken into account as functions of the emission current. The calculated and experimental dependences of the switching parameters, extraction efficiency, and strength of the electric field in plasma on the accelerating voltage and geometrical sizes of the emission channel are presented.

  9. Room-temperature near-infrared silicon carbide nanocrystalline emitters based on optically aligned spin defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muzha, A.; Fuchs, F.; Tarakina, N. V.; Simin, D.; Trupke, M.; Soltamov, V. A.; Mokhov, E. N.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; Krueger, A.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2014-12-01

    Bulk silicon carbide (SiC) is a very promising material system for bio-applications and quantum sensing. However, its optical activity lies beyond the near infrared spectral window for in-vivo imaging and fiber communications due to a large forbidden energy gap. Here, we report the fabrication of SiC nanocrystals and isolation of different nanocrystal fractions ranged from 600 nm down to 60 nm in size. The structural analysis reveals further fragmentation of the smallest nanocrystals into ca. 10-nm-size clusters of high crystalline quality, separated by amorphization areas. We use neutron irradiation to create silicon vacancies, demonstrating near infrared photoluminescence. Finally, we detect room-temperature spin resonances of these silicon vacancies hosted in SiC nanocrystals. This opens intriguing perspectives to use them not only as in-vivo luminescent markers but also as magnetic field and temperature sensors, allowing for monitoring various physical, chemical, and biological processes.

  10. Room-temperature near-infrared silicon carbide nanocrystalline emitters based on optically aligned spin defects

    SciTech Connect

    Muzha, A.; Fuchs, F.; Simin, D.; Astakhov, G. V.; Tarakina, N. V.; Trupke, M.; Soltamov, V. A.; Mokhov, E. N.; Baranov, P. G.; Dyakonov, V.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Bulk silicon carbide (SiC) is a very promising material system for bio-applications and quantum sensing. However, its optical activity lies beyond the near infrared spectral window for in-vivo imaging and fiber communications due to a large forbidden energy gap. Here, we report the fabrication of SiC nanocrystals and isolation of different nanocrystal fractions ranged from 600 nm down to 60 nm in size. The structural analysis reveals further fragmentation of the smallest nanocrystals into ca. 10-nm-size clusters of high crystalline quality, separated by amorphization areas. We use neutron irradiation to create silicon vacancies, demonstrating near infrared photoluminescence. Finally, we detect room-temperature spin resonances of these silicon vacancies hosted in SiC nanocrystals. This opens intriguing perspectives to use them not only as in-vivo luminescent markers but also as magnetic field and temperature sensors, allowing for monitoring various physical, chemical, and biological processes.

  11. Highly Efficient Sky-Blue Fluorescent Organic Light Emitting Diode Based on Mixed Cohost System for Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitter (2CzPN).

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin Won; Kim, Kwon-Hyeon; Moon, Chang-Ki; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-04-20

    The mixed cohosts of 1,3-bis(N-carbazolyl)benzene and 2,8-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)dibenzothiophene have been developed for a highly efficient blue fluorescent oragnic light emitting diode (OLED) doped with a thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter [4,5-di (9H-carbazol-9-yl) phthalonitrile (2CzPN)]. We have demonstrated one of the highest external quantum efficiency of 21.8% in blue fluorescent OLEDs, which is identical to the theoretically achievable maximum electroluminescence efficiency using the emitter. Interestingly, the efficiency roll-off is large even under the excellent charge balance in the device and almost the same as the single host based devices, indicating that the efficiency roll-off in 2CzPN based TADF host is related to the material characteristics, such as low reverse intesystem crossing rate rather than charge imbalance. PMID:27019330

  12. Perfluorinated nitrosopyrazolone-based erbium chelates: a new efficient solution processable NIR emitter.

    PubMed

    Beverina, Luca; Crippa, Maurizio; Sassi, Mauro; Monguzzi, Angelo; Meinardi, Francesco; Tubino, Riccardo; Pagani, Giorgio A

    2009-09-14

    We show the design and synthesis of new perfluorinated nitrosopyrazolone-based ligands and the original method employed for their complexation of erbium ions in the presence of the co-ligand perfluorotriphenylphosphine oxide; the resulting chelate is non-hygroscopic, solution processable and possesses a NIR emission with lifetimes as long as 16 micros.

  13. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  14. Microfluidic White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on Integrated Patterns of Greenish-Blue and Yellow Solvent-Free Liquid Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naofumi; Kasahara, Takashi; Edura, Tomohiko; Oshima, Juro; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Tsuwaki, Miho; Imato, Toshihiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated a novel microfluidic white organic light-emitting diode (microfluidic WOLED) based on integrated sub-100-μm-wide microchannels. Single-μm-thick SU-8-based microchannels, which were sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and cathode pairs, were fabricated by photolithography and heterogeneous bonding technologies. 1-Pyrenebutyric acid 2-ethylhexyl ester (PLQ) was used as a solvent-free greenish-blue liquid emitter, while 2,8-di-tert-butyl-5,11-bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)-6,12-diphenyltetracene (TBRb)-doped PLQ was applied as a yellow liquid emitter. In order to form the liquid white light-emitting layer, the greenish-blue and yellow liquid emitters were alternately injected into the integrated microchannels. The fabricated electro-microfluidic device successfully exhibited white electroluminescence (EL) emission via simultaneous greenish-blue and yellow emissions under an applied voltage of 100 V. A white emission with Commission Internationale de l’Declairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.40, 0.42) was also obtained; the emission corresponds to warm-white light. The proposed device has potential applications in subpixels of liquid-based microdisplays and for lighting. PMID:26439164

  15. Microfluidic White Organic Light-Emitting Diode Based on Integrated Patterns of Greenish-Blue and Yellow Solvent-Free Liquid Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Naofumi; Kasahara, Takashi; Edura, Tomohiko; Oshima, Juro; Ishimatsu, Ryoichi; Tsuwaki, Miho; Imato, Toshihiko; Shoji, Shuichi; Mizuno, Jun

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrated a novel microfluidic white organic light-emitting diode (microfluidic WOLED) based on integrated sub-100-μm-wide microchannels. Single-μm-thick SU-8-based microchannels, which were sandwiched between indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and cathode pairs, were fabricated by photolithography and heterogeneous bonding technologies. 1-Pyrenebutyric acid 2-ethylhexyl ester (PLQ) was used as a solvent-free greenish-blue liquid emitter, while 2,8-di-tert-butyl-5,11-bis(4-tert-butylphenyl)-6,12-diphenyltetracene (TBRb)-doped PLQ was applied as a yellow liquid emitter. In order to form the liquid white light-emitting layer, the greenish-blue and yellow liquid emitters were alternately injected into the integrated microchannels. The fabricated electro-microfluidic device successfully exhibited white electroluminescence (EL) emission via simultaneous greenish-blue and yellow emissions under an applied voltage of 100 V. A white emission with Commission Internationale de l’Declairage (CIE) color coordinates of (0.40, 0.42) was also obtained; the emission corresponds to warm-white light. The proposed device has potential applications in subpixels of liquid-based microdisplays and for lighting.

  16. Efficient single-photon emitters based on Bragg microcavities containing selectively positioned InAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gaisler, V. A. Gaisler, A. V.; Jaroshevich, A. S.; Derebezov, I. A.; Kachanova, M. M.; Zhivodkov, Yu. A.; Gavrilova, T. A.; Medvedev, A. S.; Nenasheva, L. A.; Grachev, K. V.; Sandyrev, V. K.; Kozhuhov, A. S.; Shayahmetov, V. M.; Kalagin, A. K.; Bakarov, A. K.; Dmitriev, D. V.; Toropov, A. I.; Shcheglov, D. V.; Latyshev, A. V.; Aseev, A. L.

    2015-01-15

    A semiconductor Bragg microcavity structure for single photon emitters is designed and implemented. The design provides the efficient current pumping of selectively positioned InAs quantum dots within a micrometer-size aperture, high external quantum yield, and low divergence of the emitted radiation.

  17. MEMS infrared approaches to detector based on nonlinear oscillation and wavelength selective emitter using surface plasmon polariton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Minoru; Kumagai, Shinya

    2014-03-01

    The suspended MEMS structure is suitable for reducing the energy loss due to the thermal conduction. There is the possibility that IR photon energy can be well-controlled to generate some physical effects. A new method bases on the nonlinear oscillation for the detector. The thin film torsional spring exhibits a large hard spring effect when the deflection occurs in the out-of-plane direction of the film. When IR is absorbed, the resonator bends due to the thermal expansion. The torsional spring becomes harder increasing the resonant frequency. The frequency measurement is suited for the precise sensing. The device response is measured using the laser (wavelength of 650nm). The resonant frequency is 88-94kHz. Q factor is about 1600 in vacuum (1Pa). The sensitivity is -0.144[kHz/(kW/m2)]. As for the emitter, nondispersive IR gas sensor is considered. The molecules have their intrinsic absorptions. CO2 absorbs the wavelength 4.2- 4.3μm. The major incandescent light bulbs have the broad spectrum emitting IR which is not used for gas sensing. The wavelength selectivity at the gas bandwidth will improve the efficiency. A new principle uses the microheater placed facing to the grating. SPP is excited carrying IR energy on the grating surface. IR emission is the reverse process of excitation occurring at the output end. The emission spectra show SPP related peak having the width of 190nm. When the input power increases from 0.3 to 1.9W, the peak at wavelength of 3.5μm becomes clearer.

  18. Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, S.K.; Jha, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.K.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). • Improved dispersion enhanced thermal conductivity of engine oil. • Again f-a-CNTs showed enhanced field emission property compared to pure a-CNTs. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were synthesized at low temperature in open atmosphere and further functionalized by treating them in thionyl chloride added stearic acid-dichloro methane solution. The as prepared functionalized a-CNTs (f-a-CNTs) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The nanofluid was prepared by dispersing f-a-CNTs in engine oil using ultrasonic treatment. The effective thermal conductivity of as prepared nanofluid was investigated at different loading (volume fraction of f-a-CNTs). Obtained experimental data of thermal conductivity were compared with the predicted values, calculated using existing theoretical models. Stability of the nanofluid was tested by means of zeta potential measurement to optimize the loading. The as prepared f-a-CNTs sample also showed improved field emission result as compared to pristine a-CNTs. Dependence of field emission behavior on inter electrode distance was investigated too.

  19. Design of a carbon-nanotube yarn field emitter for micro-focus X-ray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Lee, Choong Hun

    2016-08-01

    The field-emission (F-E) characteristics of multi-walled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT) yarn and its contribution to X-ray generation have been investigated in the current work. A dry spinning method was used to fabricateMWCNT yarn from superMWCNTs that had been fabricated by using microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-PECVD). The F-E behavior of the MWCNT yarn followed the Fowler-Nordheim model. Compared to a MWCNT, the MWCNT yarn displayed a significant F-E capability in both the diode and the triode X-ray generation structures. The low-voltage F-E of the MWCNT yarn can be attributed to the field-enhancing effect of the yarn due to its shape and to the contribution of the high-aspect-ratio nanotubes that protrude from the sides of the yarn. The effect of filters on the development of X-ray images has also been demonstrated. The amount of exposure of the samples to X-rays was also manipulated. Results of this study indicate that the MWCNT yarn may be a good candidate for use in low-voltage F-E applications for X-ray imaging.

  20. First Infrared-Based Implications for the Dust Attenuation and Star Formation of Typical Lyα Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusakabe, Haruka; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kimihiko; Ouchi, Masami

    2015-02-01

    By stacking publicly available deep Spitzer/MIPS 24 μm and Herschel/PACS images for 213 z≃ 2.18 Lyα Emitters (LAEs) in GOODS-South, we obtain a strong upper limit to the IR luminosity of typical LAEs and discuss their attenuation curve for the first time. The 3σ upper limit LTIR3σ = 1.1× {{10}10} {{L}⊙ }, determined from the MIPS data providing the lowest limit, gives IRX\\equiv {{L}TIR}/{{L}UV}≤slant 2.2. Here we assume that the local calibration between the 8 μm emission and the dust SED shape and metallicity applies at high redshifts and that our LAEs have low metallicities as suggested by previous studies. The inferred escape fractions of Lyα , 16-37%, and UV continuum, ≥slant 44%, are higher than the cosmic averages at the same epoch. The SMC attenuation curve is consistent with the IRX and the UV slope β =-1.4-0.2+0.2 of our stacked LAE, while the Meurer’s relation (Calzetti curve) predicts a 3.8 times higher IRX; we also discuss the validity of PACS-based LTIR3σ allowing the Meurer’s relation. SED fitting using the Calzetti curve also gives a ˜10 times higher SFR than from the LTIR3σ and {{L}UV}. With {{M}\\star }=6.3-2.0+0.8× {{10}8} {{M}⊙ }, our LAEs lie on a lower-mass extrapolation of the star formation main sequence at z˜ 2, suggesting that the majority of z˜ 2 LAEs are mildly star forming with relatively old ages of ˜200 Myr. The faint LTIR3σ implies that LAEs contribute little to the faint (≳ 100 μ Jy) submillimeter number counts by ALMA. Based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  1. Computer Based Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kenneth F.; Hosticka, Alice; Schriver, Martha; Bedell, Jackie

    This paper discusses computer based virtual field trips that use technologies commonly found in public schools in the United States. The discussion focuses on the advantages of both using and creating these field trips for an instructional situation. A virtual field trip to Cumberland Island National Seashore, St. Marys, Georgia is used as a point…

  2. Portable emittance measurement device

    SciTech Connect

    Liakin, D.; Seleznev, D.; Orlov, A.; Kuibeda, R.; Kropachev, G.; Kulevoy, T.; Yakushin, P.

    2010-02-15

    In Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) the portable emittance measurements device is developed. It provides emittance measurements both with ''pepper-pot'' and ''two slits'' methods. Depending on the method of measurements, either slits or pepper-pot mask with scintillator are mounted on the two activators and are installed in two standard Balzer's cross chamber with CF-100 flanges. To match the angle resolution for measured beam, the length of the stainless steel pipe between two crosses changes is adjusted. The description of the device and results of emittance measurements at the ITEP ion source test bench are presented.

  3. Transverse beam emittance measurement using quadrupole variation at KIRAMS-430

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Dong Hyun; Hahn, Garam; Park, Chawon

    2015-02-01

    In order to produce a 430 MeV/u carbon ion (12 C 6+) beam for medical therapy, the Korea Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences (KIRAMS) has carried out the development of a superconducting isochronous cyclotron, the KIRAMS-430. At the extraction of the cyclotron, an Energy Selection System (ESS) is located to modulate the fixed beam energy and to drive the ion beam through High Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) into the treatment room. The beam emittance at the ion beamline is to be measured to provide information on designing a beam with high quality. The well-known quadrupole variation method was used to determine the feasibility of measuring the transverse beam emittance. The beam size measured at the beam profile monitor (BPM) is to be utilized and the transformation of beam by transfer matrix is to be applied being taken under various transport condition of varying quadrupole magnetic strength. Two different methods where beam optics are based on the linear matrix formalism and particle tracking with a 3-D magnetic field distribution obtained by using OPERA3D TOSCA, are applied to transport the beam. The fittings for the transformation parameters are used to estimate the transverse emittance and the twiss parameters at the entrance of the quadrupole in the ESS. Including several systematic studies, we conclude that within the uncertainty the estimated emittances are consistent with the ones calculated by using Monte Carlo simulations.

  4. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  5. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-03-01

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based in combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth from CSR can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  6. Solution-phase synthesis of single-crystal Cu3Si nanowire arrays on diverse substrates with dual functions as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang-Wei; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Li, Guo-An; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chu, Li-Wei; Chen, Lih-Juann; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2013-09-01

    There is strong and growing interest in applying metal silicide nanowires as building blocks for a new class of silicide-based applications, including spintronics, nano-scale interconnects, thermoelectronics, and anti-reflective coating materials. Solution-phase environments provide versatile materials chemistry as well as significantly lower production costs compared to gas-phase synthesis. However, solution-phase synthesis of silicide nanowires remains challenging due to the lack of fundamental understanding of silicidation reactions. In this study, single-crystalline Cu3Si nanowire arrays were synthesized in an organic solvent. Self-catalyzed, dense single-crystalline Cu3Si nanowire arrays were synthesized by thermal decomposition of monophenylsilane in the presence of copper films or copper substrates at 420 to 475 °C and 10.3 MPa in supercritical benzene. The solution-grown Cu3Si nanowire arrays serve dual functions as field emitters and anti-reflective layers, which are reported on copper silicide materials for the first time. Cu3Si nanowires exhibit superior field-emission properties, with a turn-on-voltage as low as 1.16 V μm-1, an emission current density of 8 mA cm-2 at 4.9 V μm-1, and a field enhancement factor (β) of 1500. Cu3Si nanowire arrays appear black with optical absorption less than 5% between 400 and 800 nm with minimal reflectance, serving as highly efficient anti-reflective layers. Moreover, the Cu3Si nanowires could be grown on either rigid or flexible substrates (PI). This study shows that solution-phase silicide reactions are adaptable for high-quality silicide nanowire growth and demonstrates their promise towards fabrication of metal silicide-based devices.There is strong and growing interest in applying metal silicide nanowires as building blocks for a new class of silicide-based applications, including spintronics, nano-scale interconnects, thermoelectronics, and anti-reflective coating materials. Solution-phase environments

  7. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  8. Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

  9. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  10. A knife-edge array field emission cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, B.

    1994-08-01

    many cathode applications require a new type of cathode that is able to produce short pulsed electron beams at high emission current. Gated field emitter arrays of micrometer size are recognized as candidates to meet this need and have become the research focus of vacuum microelectronics. Existing fabrication methods produce emitters that are limited either in frequency response or in current emission. One reason is that the structure of these emitters are not sufficiently optimized. In this study, the author investigated the factors that affect the performance of field emitters. An optimum emitter structure, the knife-edge field emitter array, was developed from the analysis. Large field enhancement factor, large effective emission area, and small emitter capacitance are the advantages of the structure. The author next explored various options of fabricating the knife-edge emitter structure. He proposed a unique thin film process procedure and developed the fabrication techniques to build the emitters on (110) silicon wafers. Data from the initial cathode tests showed very low onset voltages and Fowler-Nordheim type emission. Emission simulation based on the fabricated emitter structure indicated that the knife-edge emitter arrays have the potential to produce high performance in modulation frequency and current emission. Several fabrication issues that await further development are discussed and possible solutions are suggested.

  11. Narrowband infrared emitters for combat ID

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pralle, Martin U.; Puscasu, Irina; Daly, James; Fallon, Keith; Loges, Peter; Greenwald, Anton; Johnson, Edward

    2007-04-01

    There is a strong desire to create narrowband infrared light sources as personnel beacons for application in infrared Identify Friend or Foe (IFF) systems. This demand has augmented dramatically in recent years with the reports of friendly fire casualties in Afghanistan and Iraq. ICx Photonics' photonic crystal enhanced TM (PCE TM) infrared emitter technology affords the possibility of creating narrowband IR light sources tuned to specific IR wavebands (near 1-2 microns, mid 3-5 microns, and long 8-12 microns) making it the ideal solution for infrared IFF. This technology is based on a metal coated 2D photonic crystal of air holes in a silicon substrate. Upon thermal excitation the photonic crystal modifies the emitted yielding narrowband IR light with center wavelength commensurate with the periodicity of the lattice. We have integrated this technology with microhotplate MEMS devices to yield 15mW IR light sources in the 3-5 micron waveband with wall plug efficiencies in excess of 10%, 2 orders of magnitude more efficient that conventional IR LEDs. We have further extended this technology into the LWIR with a light source that produces 9 mW of 8-12 micron light at an efficiency of 8%. Viewing distances >500 meters were observed with fielded camera technologies, ideal for ground to ground troop identification. When grouped into an emitter panel, the viewing distances were extended to 5 miles, ideal for ground to air identification.

  12. Transverse emittance-preserving arc compressor for high-brightness electron beam-based light sources and colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Mitri, S.; Cornacchia, M.

    2015-03-01

    Bunch length magnetic compression is used in high-brightness linacs driving free-electron lasers (FELs) and particle colliders to increase the peak current of the injected beam. To date, it is performed in dedicated insertions made of few degrees bending magnets and the compression factor is limited by the degradation of the beam transverse emittance owing to emission of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). We reformulate the known concept of CSR-driven optics balance for the general case of varying bunch length and demonstrate, through analytical and numerical results, that a 500 pC charge beam can be time-compressed in a periodic 180 deg arc at 2.4 GeV beam energy and lower, by a factor of up to 45, reaching peak currents of up to 2 kA and with a normalized emittance growth at the 0.1 μ \\text{m} rad level. The proposed solution offers new schemes of beam longitudinal gymnastics; an application to an energy recovery linac driving FEL is discussed.

  13. The Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate between Redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 for Narrowband Emitters in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matt A.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Doi, Mamoru; Nagao, Tohru; Iye, Masanori; Kodama, Tadayuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro

    2007-03-01

    SDF line-emitting galaxies in four narrowband filters at low and intermediate redshifts are presented. Broadband colors, follow-up optical spectroscopy, and multiple NB filters are used to distinguish Hα, [O II], and [O III] emitters at z=0.07-1.47 to construct their LFs. These LFs are derived down to faint magnitudes, allowing for an accurate determination of the faint-end slope. With a large (N~200-900) sample for each redshift interval, a Schechter profile is fitted to each LF. Prior to dust extinction corrections, the [O III] and [O II] LFs agree reasonably well with those of Hippelein et al. The z=0.08 Hα LF, which reaches 2 orders of magnitude fainter than Gallego et al., is steeper by 25%. This indicates that there are more low-luminosity star-forming galaxies for z<0.1. The faint-end slope α and φ* show a strong redshift evolution, while L* shows little evolution. The evolution in α indicates that low-luminosity galaxies have a stronger evolution compared to brighter ones. Integrated SFR densities are derived via Hα, [O III], and [O II] for 0.071, the SFR densities are similar. The latter is consistent with previous UV and [O II] measurements. Below z<0.4, the SFR densities are consistent with several Hα, [O II], and UV measurements, but others are a factor of 2 higher. For example, the z=0.066-0.092 LF agrees with Jones & Bland-Hawthorn, but at z=0.24 and 0.40, their number densities are twice as high. This discrepancy can be explained by cosmic variance. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  14. Cancer from internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.

  15. The Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate Between Redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 for Narrow-band Emitters in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, M.; Kashikawa, N.; Shimasaku, K.; Doi, M.; Nagao, T.; Iye, M.; Kodama, T.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.

    2006-06-01

    Subaru Deep Field line-emitting galaxies in four narrow-band filters at low and intermediate redshifts are presented. Broad-band colors, follow-up optical spectroscopy, and multiple narrow-band filters are used to distinguish Hα, [OII], and [OIII] emitters between redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 to construct their averaged rest-frame optical-to-UV SED and luminosity functions. These luminosity functions are derived down to faint magnitudes, which allows for a more accurate determination of the faint end slope. With a large (N 200-900) sample for each redshift interval, a Schechter profile is fitted to each luminosity function. Prior to dust extinction corrections, the [OIII] and [OII] luminosity functions reported in this paper agree reasonably well with those of Hippelein et al (2003). The z=0.066-0.092 Hα LF agrees with those of Jones & Bland-Hawthorn (2001), but for z=0.24 and 0.40, their number density is higher by a factor of two or more. The z=0.08 Hα LF, which reaches two orders of magnitude fainter than Gallego et al. (1995), is steeper by 25%. This indicates that there are more low luminosity star-forming galaxies for z<0.1 than predicted. The faint end slope α and φ* show a strong evolution with redshift while L* show little evolution. The evolution in α indicates that low-luminosity galaxies have a stronger evolution compared to brighter ones. Integrated star formation rate densities are derived via Hα for 0.07

  16. Specific absorbed fractions from the image-based VIP-Man body model and EGS4-VLSI Monte Carlo code: internal electron emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, T. C.; Xu, X. G.

    2001-04-01

    VIP-Man is a whole-body anatomical model newly developed at Rensselaer from the high-resolution colour images of the National Library of Medicine's Visible Human Project. This paper summarizes the use of VIP-Man and the Monte Carlo method to calculate specific absorbed fractions from internal electron emitters. A specially designed EGS4 user code, named EGS4-VLSI, was developed to use the extremely large number of image data contained in the VIP-Man. Monoenergetic and isotropic electron emitters with energies from 100 keV to 4 MeV are considered to be uniformly distributed in 26 organs. This paper presents, for the first time, results of internal electron exposures based on a realistic whole-body tomographic model. Because VIP-Man has many organs and tissues that were previously not well defined (or not available) in other models, the efforts at Rensselaer and elsewhere bring an unprecedented opportunity to significantly improve the internal dosimetry.

  17. Thermophotovoltaic emitter development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Robert E.

    1995-01-01

    Many refractory oxide ceramics in fibrous form are efficient converters of the heat of combustion into radiant energy. Rare earth oxide ceramics, which are refractory and stable in flames, exhibit selective emission in the near IR where semiconductor photoconverters are efficient in converting radiant energy directly into electrical power. Ytterbia emitters and silicon photoconverters, in particular, constitute the basis for a high performance thermophotovoltaic energy conversion system. Ceramic fiber fabrication techniques are described that yield mechanically durable emitters in classical mantle geometries and in a novel planar form. This work has been supported by the Basic Research Group of the Gas Research Institute, Chicago, Illinois.

  18. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N.

    2012-12-21

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  19. FACET Emittance Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Frederico, J; Hogan, M.J.; Nosochkov, Y.; Litos, M.D.; Raubenheimer, T.; /SLAC

    2011-04-05

    FACET, the Facility for Advanced Accelerator and Experimental Tests, is a new facility being constructed in sector 20 of the SLAC linac primarily to study beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration. The FACET beamline consists of a chicane and final focus system to compress the 23 GeV, 3.2 nC electron bunches to {approx}20 {micro}m long and {approx}10 {micro}m wide. Simulations of the FACET beamline indicate the short-duration and large, 1.5% rms energy spread beams may suffer a factor of four emittance growth from a combination of chromaticity, incoherent synchrotron radiation (ISR), and coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Emittance growth is directly correlated to head erosion in plasma wakefield acceleration and is a limiting factor in single stage performance. Studies of the geometric, CSR, and ISR components are presented. Numerical calculation of the rms emittance can be overwhelmed by long tails in the simulated phase space distributions; more useful definitions of emittance are given. A complete simulation of the beamline is presented as well, which agrees with design specifications.

  20. Sub-nm emittance lattice design for CANDLE storage ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargsyan, A.; Zanyan, G.; Sahakyan, V.; Tsakanov, V.

    2016-10-01

    The most effective way to increase the brilliance of synchrotron light sources is the reduction of beam emittance. Following the recent developments in low emittance lattice design, a new sub-nm emittance lattice based on implementation of multi-band achromat concept and application of longitudinal gradient bending magnets was developed for CANDLE storage ring. The paper presents the main design considerations, linear and non-linear beam dynamics aspects of the new lattice proposed.

  1. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  2. A methodology for experimentally based determination of gap shrinkage and effective lifetimes in the emitter and base of p-n junction solar cells and other p-n junction devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.; Sah, C.-T.; Godlewski, M. P.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An experimentally based methodology that determines the effective gap shrinkage and lifetime in the emitter of a p-n junction solar cell is described which provides an experimental means for assessing the importance of gap shrinkage relative to that of large recombination rates in the highly doped emitter. The base lifetime is also determined. The methodology pertains to a solar cell after the junction is formed, so that each material parameter determined includes the effects of the processing used in junction fabrication. The methodology consists of strategy and procedures for designing experiments and interpreting data consistently with the physical mechanisms governing device behavior. This careful linking to the device physics uncover the material parameters concealed in the data. To illustrate the procedures, they are applied to an n(+)-p solar cell having substrate resistivity of about 0.1 ohm-cm.

  3. Low-cost and high-throughput realization of metasurface-based absorber/emitter for thermal-photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Rezaei, Mohsen; Dexheimer, Eric; Mohseni, Hooman

    2015-08-01

    A thermal photovoltaic cell (TPV) is an optical heat engine that can extract energy from an emitter with elevated temperature. In theory, the efficiency of a TPV can reach to 80% by wavelength conversion, yet in practice, only 3.2% efficiency has been achieved. The main physical drawback is to maintain the device operation at very high temperature while managing total solar spectrum absorption and efficient coupling of the narrow-band thermal radiation into the photovoltaic cell. In this vein, utilizing of a nanophotonic structure to undergo the wavelength conversion of solar energy is inevitable. Furthermore, low cost, large area and high throughput realization of such a structure brings TPV beyond the research lab. Simultaneous tailoring of UV/visible and mid-infrared spectrums requires sub-100-nm feature size, which is challenging with conventional photolithography if it is not impossible. We have developed a microsphere deep-UV lithography that can produce minimum feature size of ~ 50 nm at extremely low cost and high throughput. In this work, we demonstrate a metasurface platform fabricated with this lithography technique which has omni-polarization and -angle absorption in visible spectrum and efficient emission at mid-infrared as confirmed both by FDTD simulation and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurement. The developed technique is promising technology to expedite TPV in real-life energy harvesting applications.

  4. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  5. Beam emittance measurements and simulations of injector line for radio frequency quadrupole.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Jose V; Rao, S V L S; Pande, Rajni; Singh, P

    2015-07-01

    A 400 keV deuteron (D(+)) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, built, and commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. A beam line has been developed for injecting deuterons into the 400 keV RFQ. This comprises of a RF plasma ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system, consisting of two solenoid magnets and two steerer magnets. The ion source is characterized in terms of transverse beam emittance. A slit-wire scanner based emittance measurement setup has been developed for the transverse emittance measurements of H(+) and D(+) beams. The measured emittance values are found to be well within the acceptance value for the RFQ. These measured emittance parameters are used to optimize the solenoid fields in LEBT to match the beam from the ion source to RFQ. TRACEWIN simulation code is used for the beam transport simulations. The simulations show 99% transmission of D(+) beam through the RFQ, while 95% transmission has been measured experimentally. PMID:26233371

  6. Beam emittance measurements and simulations of injector line for radio frequency quadrupole

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, Jose V. Rao, S. V. L. S.; Pande, Rajni; Singh, P.

    2015-07-15

    A 400 keV deuteron (D{sup +}) radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator has been designed, built, and commissioned at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. A beam line has been developed for injecting deuterons into the 400 keV RFQ. This comprises of a RF plasma ion source and a low energy beam transport (LEBT) system, consisting of two solenoid magnets and two steerer magnets. The ion source is characterized in terms of transverse beam emittance. A slit-wire scanner based emittance measurement setup has been developed for the transverse emittance measurements of H{sup +} and D{sup +} beams. The measured emittance values are found to be well within the acceptance value for the RFQ. These measured emittance parameters are used to optimize the solenoid fields in LEBT to match the beam from the ion source to RFQ. TRACEWIN simulation code is used for the beam transport simulations. The simulations show 99% transmission of D{sup +} beam through the RFQ, while 95% transmission has been measured experimentally.

  7. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  8. Integrated photonic crystal selective emitter for thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Yehia, Omar; Bermel, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Converting blackbody thermal radiation to electricity via thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is inherently inefficient. Photon recycling using cold-side filters offers potentially improved performance but requires extremely close spacing between the thermal emitter and the receiver, namely a high view factor. Here, we propose an alternative approach for thermal energy conversion, the use of an integrated photonic crystal selective emitter (IPSE), which combines two-dimensional photonic crystal selective emitters and filters into a single device. Finite difference time domain and current transport simulations show that IPSEs can significantly suppress sub-bandgap photons. This increases heat-to-electricity conversion for photonic crystal based emitters from 35.2 up to 41.8% at 1573 K for a GaSb photovoltaic (PV) diode with matched bandgaps of 0.7 eV. The physical basis of this enhancement is a shift from a perturbative to a nonperturbative regime, which maximized photon recycling. Furthermore, combining IPSEs with nonconductive optical waveguides eliminates a key difficulty associated with TPV: the need for precise alignment between the hot selective emitter and cool PV diode. The physical effects of both the IPSE and waveguide can be quantified in terms of an extension of the concept of an effective view factor.

  9. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-15

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup −} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup −} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup −} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  10. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H(-) ion source.

    PubMed

    Ueno, A; Koizumi, I; Ohkoshi, K; Ikegami, K; Takagi, A; Yamazaki, S; Oguri, H

    2014-02-01

    The prototype rf-driven H(-) ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H(-) ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (TPE) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used TPE of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H(-) ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  11. Emittance formula for slits and pepper-pot measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M.

    1996-10-01

    In this note, a rigid formula for slits and pepper-pot emittance measurement is derived. The derivation is based on the one- dimensional slit measurement setup. A mathematical generalization of the slit emittance formula to the pepper-pot measurement is discussed.

  12. Emitter space charge layer transit time in bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rustagi, S. C.; Chattopadhyaya, S. K.

    1981-04-01

    The charge defined emitter space charge layer transit times of double diffused transistors have been calculated using a regional approach, and compared with the corresponding base transit times. The results obtained for emitter space-charge layer transit times have been discussed with reference to the capacitance analysis of Morgan and Smit (1960) for graded p-n junctions.

  13. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  14. Surface-modified GaAs terahertz plasmon emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darmo, J.; Strasser, G.; Muller, T.; Bratschitsch, R.; Unterrainer, K.

    2002-07-01

    We studied the THz emission from n-GaAs plasmon emitters modified by low-temperature-grown (LT) GaAs surface layers. The THz emission is increased since the LT GaAs pins the Fermi level at a midgap position, increasing the surface depletion field. For a THz emitter with a 70-nm-thick LT GaAs layer we observe without external fields a THz emission intensity of 140 nW. In addition, the long-term performance of the modified emitters is improved by the LT GaAs surface layer.

  15. Observation of Picometer Vertical Emittance with a Vertical Undulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wootton, K. P.; Boland, M. J.; Dowd, R.; Tan, Y.-R. E.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Taylor, G. N.; Rassool, R. P.

    2012-11-01

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  16. Achieving a balance between small singlet-triplet energy splitting and high fluorescence radiative rate in a quinoxaline-based orange-red thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ling; Wu, Zhongbin; Xie, Guohua; Zhong, Cheng; Zhu, Zece; Cong, Hengjiang; Ma, Dongge; Yang, Chuluo

    2016-09-21

    A new orange-red thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitter is designed and synthesized by incorporating a fluorine-substituted quinoxaline as an electron-acceptor and a phenoxazine as an electron-donor. The rational molecular design enables small singlet-triplet energy splitting (ΔEST) and high fluorescence radiative rate (k) for long-wavelength TADF emitters. The organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) employing the new TADF emitter achieve maximum external quantum efficiencies (EQEs) of 13.9% and 9.0% for the vacuum- and solution-processed OLEDs, respectively.

  17. What is so super about super-emitters? Characterizing methane high emitters from natural gas infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavala Araiza, D.; Lyon, D. R.; Alvarez, R.; Harriss, R. C.; Palacios, V.; Hamburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions across the natural gas supply chain are dominated at any one time by a few high-emitters (super-emitters or fat-tail of the distribution), often underrepresented in published datasets used to construct emission inventories. Characterization of high-emitters is essential for improving emission estimates based on atmospheric data (top-down) and emission inventories (bottom-up). The population of high-emitters (e.g. 10-20% of sites that account for 80-90% of the emissions) is temporally and spatially dynamic. As a consequence, it is challenging to design sampling methods and construct estimates that accurately represent their frequency and magnitude of emissions. We present new methods to derive facility-specific emission distribution functions that explicitly integrate the influence of the relatively rare super-emitters. These methods were applied in the Barnett Shale region to construct a custom emission inventory that is then compared to top-down emission estimates for the region. We offer a methodological framework relevant to the design of future sampling campaigns, in which these high-emitters are seamlessly incorporated to representative emissions distributions. This framework can be applied to heterogeneous oil and gas production regions across geographies to obtain accurate regional emission estimates. Additionally, we characterize emissions relative to the fraction of a facility's total methane throughput; an effective metric to identify sites with excess emissions resulting from avoidable operating conditions, such as malfunctioning equipment (defined here as functional super-emitters). This work suggests that identifying functional super-emitters and correcting their avoidable operating conditions would result in significant emission reductions. However, due to their spatiotemporal dynamic behavior, achieving and maintaining uniformly low emissions across the entire population of sites will require mitigation steps (e.g. leak detection

  18. Anthropogenic Methane Emissions in California's San Joaquin Valley: Characterizing Large Point Source Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, F. M.; Duren, R. M.; Miller, C. E.; Aubrey, A. D.; Falk, M.; Holland, L.; Hook, S. J.; Hulley, G. C.; Johnson, W. R.; Kuai, L.; Kuwayama, T.; Lin, J. C.; Thorpe, A. K.; Worden, J. R.; Lauvaux, T.; Jeong, S.; Fischer, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Methane is an important atmospheric pollutant that contributes to global warming and tropospheric ozone production. Methane mitigation could reduce near term climate change and improve air quality, but is hindered by a lack of knowledge of anthropogenic methane sources. Recent work has shown that methane emissions are not evenly distributed in space, or across emission sources, suggesting that a large fraction of anthropogenic methane comes from a few "super-emitters." We studied the distribution of super-emitters in California's southern San Joaquin Valley, where elevated levels of atmospheric CH4 have also been observed from space. Here, we define super-emitters as methane plumes that could be reliably detected (i.e., plume observed more than once in the same location) under varying wind conditions by airborne thermal infrared remote sensing. The detection limit for this technique was determined to be 4.5 kg CH4 h-1 by a controlled release experiment, corresponding to column methane enhancement at the point of emissions greater than 20% above local background levels. We surveyed a major oil production field, and an area with a high concentration of large dairies using a variety of airborne and ground-based measurements. Repeated airborne surveys (n=4) with the Hyperspectral Thermal Emission Spectrometer revealed 28 persistent methane plumes emanating from oil field infrastructure, including tanks, wells, and processing facilities. The likelihood that a given source type was a super-emitter varied from roughly 1/3 for processing facilities to 1/3000 for oil wells. 11 persistent plumes were detected in the dairy area, and all were associated with wet manure management. The majority (11/14) of manure lagoons in the study area were super-emitters. Comparing to a California methane emissions inventory for the surveyed areas, we estimate that super-emitters comprise a minimum of 9% of inventoried dairy emissions, and 13% of inventoried oil emissions in this region.

  19. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  20. Robust multiplatform RF emitter localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Issa, Huthaifa; Ordóñez, Raúl

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, position based services has increase. Thus, recent developments in communications and RF technology have enabled system concept formulations and designs for low-cost radar systems using state-of-the-art software radio modules. This research is done to investigate a novel multi-platform RF emitter localization technique denoted as Position-Adaptive RF Direction Finding (PADF). The formulation is based on the investigation of iterative path-loss (i.e., Path Loss Exponent, or PLE) metrics estimates that are measured across multiple platforms in order to autonomously adapt (i.e. self-adjust) of the location of each distributed/cooperative platform. Experiments conducted at the Air-Force Research laboratory (AFRL) indicate that this position-adaptive approach exhibits potential for accurate emitter localization in challenging embedded multipath environments such as in urban environments. The focus of this paper is on the robustness of the distributed approach to RF-based location tracking. In order to localize the transmitter, we use the Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) data to approximate distance from the transmitter to the revolving receivers. We provide an algorithm for on-line estimation of the Path Loss Exponent (PLE) that is used in modeling the distance based on Received Signal Strength (RSS) measurements. The emitter position estimation is calculated based on surrounding sensors RSS values using Least-Square Estimation (LSE). The PADF has been tested on a number of different configurations in the laboratory via the design and implementation of four IRIS wireless sensor nodes as receivers and one hidden sensor as a transmitter during the localization phase. The robustness of detecting the transmitters position is initiated by getting the RSSI data through experiments and then data manipulation in MATLAB will determine the robustness of each node and ultimately that of each configuration. The parameters that are used in the functions are

  1. Terahertz near-field microscopy with subwavelength spatial resolution based on photoconductive antennas.

    PubMed

    Bitzer, Andreas; Ortner, Alex; Walther, Markus

    2010-07-01

    Imaging and sensing applications based on pulsed terahertz radiation have opened new possibilities for scientific and industrial applications. Many exploit the unique features of the terahertz (THz) spectral region, where common packaging materials are transparent and many chemical compounds show characteristic absorptions. Because of their diffraction limit, THz far-field imaging techniques lack microscopic resolution and, if subwavelength features have to be resolved, near-field techniques are required. Here, we present a THz near-field microscopy approach based on photoconductive antennas as the THz emitter and as a near-field probe. Our system allows us to measure amplitude, phase, and polarization of the electric fields in the vicinity of a sample with a spatial resolution on the micrometer scale (approximately lambda/20). Using a dielectric (plant leaf) and a metallic structure (microwire) as examples, we demonstrate the capabilities of our approach. PMID:20648112

  2. Using antennas separated in flight direction to avoid effect of emitter clock drift in geolocation

    DOEpatents

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Bickel, Douglas L

    2012-10-23

    The location of a land-based radio frequency (RF) emitter is determined from an airborne platform. RF signaling is received from the RF emitter via first and second antennas. In response to the received RF signaling, signal samples for both antennas are produced and processed to determine the location of the RF emitter.

  3. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T. Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-15

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g{sup (2)}(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  4. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler.

    PubMed

    Schlehahn, A; Krüger, L; Gschrey, M; Schulze, J-H; Rodt, S; Strittmatter, A; Heindel, T; Reitzenstein, S

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g((2))(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g((2))(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  5. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g(2)(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g(2)(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  6. Thin-Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy using a photovoltaic cell is called thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. One way to make this an efficient process is to have the thermal energy source be an efficient selective emitter of radiation. The emission must be near the band-gap energy of the photovoltaic cell. One possible method to achieve an efficient selective emitter is the use of a thin film of rare-earth oxides. The determination of the efficiency of such an emitter requires analysis of the spectral emittance of the thin film including scattering and reflectance at the vacuum-film and film-substrate interfaces. Emitter efficiencies (power emitted in emission band/total emitted power) in the range 0.35-0.7 are predicted. There is an optimum optical depth to obtain maximum efficiency. High emitter efficiencies are attained only for low (less than 0.05) substrate emittance values, both with and without scattering. The low substrate emittance required for high efficiency limits the choice of substrate materials to highly reflective metals or high-transmission materials such as sapphire.

  7. Terahertz waveguide emitter with subwavelength confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martl, Michael; Darmo, Juraj; Dietze, Daniel; Unterrainer, Karl; Gornik, Erich

    2010-01-01

    The generation of broadband terahertz pulses on the facet of waveguides is presented as an alternative to widely used coupling techniques. Dielectric loaded subwavelength waveguide structures with lateral confinement are investigated with respect to propagating modes and waveguide losses. The results show the terahertz waveguide emitter to be a promising tool for terahertz spectroscopy in the near field and for the probing of microstructured devices such as quantum cascade lasers.

  8. Photolithographic fabrication of gated self-aligned parallel electron beam emitters with a single-stranded carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Justin; Ono, Takahito; Tsai, Ching-Hsiang; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2008-09-01

    In this paper we report on the development of a photolithographic process to fabricate a gated-emitter array with single-stranded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) self-aligned to the center of the emitter gate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Si tips are formed on a silicon wafer by anisotropic etching of Si using SiO2 as a mask. Deposition of a SiO2 insulating layer and Cr-W electrode layers creates protrusions above the Si tips. This wafer is polished, and the Cr-W on the tips is removed. Etching of the SiO2 using hydrofluoric acid is performed to expose the gated Si tip. Incorporation of a novel diffusion process produces single-stranded CNTs by depositing a thin Ni layer on the Si tips and thermally diffusing the Ni layer to yield a catalyst particle for single-stranded CNT growth. The large surface to volume ratio at the apex of the Si tip allows a Ni particle to remain to act as a catalyst to grow a single-stranded CNT for fabricating the CNT based emitter structure. Diffusion of the Ni is carried out in situ during the heating phase of the PECVD CNT growth process at 600 °C. The diameters of the observed CNTs are on the order of 20 nm. The field emission characteristics of the gated field emitters are evaluated. The measured turn-on voltage of the gated emitter is 5 V.

  9. Emission Characteristics of Ion-Implanted Silicon Emitter Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Takayuki; Kanemaru, Seigo; Tanoue, Hisao; Itoh, Junji

    1995-12-01

    An ion implantation technique has been applied to control the energy band structure of Si field-emitter tip surface. B+ or P+ ions were implanted after fabrication of a gated emitter structure. No changes in emitter structure were observed after ion implantation and successive annealing at 800° C. Current-voltage ( I-V ) characteristics of n, p, p/n and n/p emitter tips were measured: p/n indicates an n-type tip with B+ ions implanted into the tip surface. It was found from the experimental results that n and p/n tips had I-V characteristics in agreement with the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The p and n/p tips, on the other hand, exhibited a current saturation property in high electric field. The present saturation mechanism is explained by considering the energy band structure of the tip surface.

  10. Single-knob beam line for transverse emittance partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Kester, O. K.; Groening, L.; Leibrock, H.; Maier, M.; Rottländer, P.

    2013-04-01

    Flat beams feature unequal emittances in the horizontal and vertical phase space. Such beams were created successfully in electron machines by applying effective stand-alone solenoid fringe fields in the electron gun. Extension of this method to ion beams was proposed conceptually. The present paper is on the decoupling capabilities of an ion beam emittance transfer line. The proposed beam line provides a single-knob tool to partition the horizontal and vertical rms emittances, while keeping the product of the two emittances constant as well as the transverse rms Twiss parameters (αx,y and βx,y) in both planes. It is shown that this single knob is the solenoid field strength.

  11. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOEpatents

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  12. Exciton dynamics of C60-based single-photon emitters explored by Hanbury Brown–Twiss scanning tunnelling microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Merino, P.; Große, C.; Rosławska, A.; Kuhnke, K.; Kern, K.

    2015-01-01

    Exciton creation and annihilation by charges are crucial processes for technologies relying on charge-exciton-photon conversion. Improvement of organic light sources or dye-sensitized solar cells requires methods to address exciton dynamics at the molecular scale. Near-field techniques have been instrumental for this purpose; however, characterizing exciton recombination with molecular resolution remained a challenge. Here, we study exciton dynamics by using scanning tunnelling microscopy to inject current with sub-molecular precision and Hanbury Brown–Twiss interferometry to measure photon correlations in the far-field electroluminescence. Controlled injection allows us to generate excitons in solid C60 and let them interact with charges during their lifetime. We demonstrate electrically driven single-photon emission from localized structural defects and determine exciton lifetimes in the picosecond range. Monitoring lifetime shortening and luminescence saturation for increasing carrier injection rates provides access to charge-exciton annihilation dynamics. Our approach introduces a unique way to study single quasi-particle dynamics on the ultimate molecular scale. PMID:26416705

  13. Organic light-emitting diode with an emitter based on a planar layer of CdSe semiconductor nanoplatelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashchenko, A. A.; Vitukhnovskii, A. G.; Lebedev, V. S.; Selyukov, A. S.; Vasiliev, R. B.; Sokolikova, M. S.

    2014-09-01

    Colloidal CdSe semiconductor nanoplatelets with characteristic longitudinal sizes of 20-70 nm and thicknesses of several atomic layers are synthesized. The spectra and kinetics of the photoluminescence of these quasi-two-dimensional nanostructures (quantum wells) at room and cryogenic temperatures are investigated. A hybrid light-emitting diode with the electron and hole transport layers based on TAZ and TPD organic compounds, respectively, and the active "emissive" element based on a layer of such single-component nanoplatelets is designed. The spectral and electrical characteristics of the fabricated device, emitting at a wavelength of λ = 515 nm, are determined. The use of quasi-two-dimensional nanostructures of this kind (nanoplatelets) is promising for the fabrication of hybrid light-emitting diodes with pure colors.

  14. Iridium(III) emitters based on 1,4-disubstituted-1H-1,2,3-triazoles as cyclometalating ligand: synthesis, characterization, and electroluminescent devices.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Hernández, Jesús M; Beltrán, Juan I; Lemaur, Vincent; Gálvez-López, Maria-Dolores; Chien, Chen-Han; Polo, Federico; Orselli, Enrico; Fröhlich, Roland; Cornil, Jérôme; De Cola, Luisa

    2013-02-18

    A series of blue and blue-green emitters based on neutral bis- and tris-cyclometalated Ir(III) complexes with 1-benzyl-4-(2,6-difluorophenyl)-1H-1,2,3-triazole (dfptrBn) as cyclometalating ligand is reported. The bis-cyclometalated complexes of the type [Ir(dfptrBn)(2)(L(^)X)] with different ancillary ligands, L(^)X = picolinate (pic) (2) or 2-(5-(perfluorophenyl)-2H-1,2,4-triazol-3-yl)pyridine (pytrF(5)) (3), are described and their photophysical properties compared with the analogous complexes containing the archetypal 2-(2,4-difluorophenyl)pyridinato (dfppy) as cyclometaled ligand (C(^)N). Complex 2 exhibits a marked solvatochromic behavior, from 475 nm in toluene to 534 nm in formamide, due to the strong MLCT character of its emissive excited state. Complex 3 displays a true-blue emission, narrower in the visible part than FIrpic. In addition, the homoleptic complex [Ir(dfprBn)(3)] (4) and the heteroleptic compounds with mixed arylpyridine/aryltriazole ligands, [Ir(dfptrBn)(2)(C(^)N)] (C(^)N = 2-phenylpyridinato (ppy) (5) or dfppy (6)), have been synthesized and fully characterized. The facial (fac) complex fac-4 is emissive at 77 K showing a deep-blue emission, but it is not luminescent in solution at room temperature similarly to their phenylpyrazole counterparts. However, the fac isomers, fac-5 and fac-6, are highly emissive in solution and thin films, reaching emission quantum yields of 76%, with emission colors in the blue to blue-green region. The photophysical properties for all complexes have been rationalized by means of quantum-chemical calculations. In addition, we constructed electroluminescent devices, organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) by sublimation of fac-6, and by solution processed polymer-based devices (PLEDs) using complexes fac-5 or fac-6 as dopants. PMID:23383706

  15. Facet engineering of high power single emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Levi, Moshe; Shamay, Moshe; Tesler, Renana; Rappaport, Noam; Don, Yaroslav; Karni, Yoram; Schnitzer, Itzhak; Sicron, Noam; Shusterman, Sergey

    2011-03-01

    The ever increasing demand for high-power, high-reliability operation of single emitters at 9xx nm wavelengths requires the development of laser diodes with improved facet regions immune to both catastrophic and wear-out failure modes. In our study, we have evaluated several laser facet definition technologies in application to 90 micron aperture single emitters in asymmetric design (In)GaAs/AlGaAs based material emitting at 915, 925 and 980nm. A common epitaxy and emitter design makes for a straightforward comparison of the facet technologies investigated. Our study corroborates a clear trend of increasing difficulty in obtaining reliable laser operation from 980nm down to 915nm. At 980nm, one can employ dielectric facet passivation with a pre-clean cycle delivering a device lifetime in excess of 3,000 hours at increasing current steps. At 925nm, quantum-well intermixing can be used to define non-absorbing mirrors giving good device reliability, albeit with a large efficiency penalty. Vacuum cleaved emitters have delivered excellent reliability at 915nm, and can be expected to perform just as well at 925 and 980nm. Epitaxial regrowth of laser facets is under development and has yet to demonstrate an appreciable reliability improvement. Only a weak correlation between start-of-life catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD) levels and reliability was established. The optimized facet design has delivered maximum powers in excess of 19 MW/sq.cm (rollover limited) and product-grade 980nm single emitters with a slope efficiency of >1 W/A and a peak efficiency of >60%. The devices have accumulated over 1,500 hours of CW operation at 11W. A fiber-coupled device emits 10W ex-fiber with 47% efficiency.

  16. Low Emittance Electron Gun for XFEL Application

    SciTech Connect

    Gough, C.; Paraliev, M.; Ivkovic, S.

    2009-08-04

    The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland is planning to build a cost-effective X-ray Free Electron Laser (XFEL) facility for 0.1-10 nm wavelength and 10-100 fsec pulse length, requiring only 6 GeV electron energy. The facility will consist of a Low Emittance electron Gun (LEG) with high gradient acceleration and advanced accelerator technology for preserving the emittance during acceleration and bunch compression. To demonstrate feasibility of the project, a 4 MeV test stand followed by a new 250 MeV test stand will be used at PSI. An emittance of <0.1 mm-mrad is desired, and this extreme value has prompted the development of several novel features: gated field emitting array, a pulsed high gradient gun, combined photo-field emission, pulsed solenoid focusing and a two-frequency cavity. The LEG should give stable emission of >200 pC, with >700 keV energy and >125 MV/m gradient.

  17. Transfer-printing-based integration of single-mode waveguide-coupled III-V-on-silicon broadband light emitters.

    PubMed

    De Groote, Andreas; Cardile, Paolo; Subramanian, Ananth Z; Fecioru, Alin M; Bower, Christopher; Delbeke, Danae; Baets, Roel; Roelkens, Günther

    2016-06-27

    We present the first III-V opto-electronic components transfer printed on and coupled to a silicon photonic integrated circuit. Thin InP-based membranes are transferred to an SOI waveguide circuit, after which a single-spatial-mode broadband light source is fabricated. The process flow to create transfer print-ready coupons is discussed. Aqueous FeCl3 at 5°C was found to be the best release agent in combination with the photoresist anchoring structures that were used. A thin DVS-BCB layer provides a strong bond, accommodating the post-processing of the membranes. The resulting optically pumped LED has a 3 dB bandwidth of 130 nm, comparable to devices realized using a traditional die-to-wafer bonding method. PMID:27410539

  18. Coherent Hot-Electron Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machida, Nobuya; Furuya, Kazuhito

    2001-01-01

    The structure and principle of an electron emitter ejecting electron waves with ultimate value of product of wavefront spread and current density in a solid-state condition is proposed. By introducing an additional electrode, the gate, to a double-barrier resonant-tunneling emitter, an electron flux with a single wavelength, a wide wavefront spread and high current density can be achieved. We justify the principle by electrostatic theory. This emitter might also be used for various types of solid-state spectroscopy.

  19. Remote detection of single emitters via optical waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Then, Patrick; Razinskas, Gary; Feichtner, Thorsten; Haas, Philippe; Wild, Andreas; Bellini, Nicola; Osellame, Roberto; Cerullo, Giulio; Hecht, Bert

    2014-05-01

    The integration of lab-on-a-chip technologies with single-molecule detection techniques may enable new applications in analytical chemistry, biotechnology, and medicine. We describe a method based on the reciprocity theorem of electromagnetic theory to determine and optimize the detection efficiency of photons emitted by single quantum emitters through truncated dielectric waveguides of arbitrary shape positioned in their proximity. We demonstrate experimentally that detection of single quantum emitters via such waveguides is possible, confirming the predicted behavior of the detection efficiency. Our findings blaze the trail towards efficient lensless single-emitter detection compatible with large-scale optofluidic integration.

  20. Altering the Conjugation Pathway for Improved Performance of Benzobisoxazole-Based Polymer Guest Emitters in Polymer Light-Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Intemann, Jeremy J.; Hellerich, Emily S.; Tlach, Brian C.; Ewan, Monique D.; Barnes, Charles A.; Bhuwalka, Achala; Cai, Min; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth; Jeffries-EL, Malika

    2012-08-27

    Benzobisoxazoles (BBOs) are known to increase the electron affinities and improve the electron transporting properties of materials containing them. However, BBO copolymers generally do not perform well as emissive guests in guest–host PLEDs due to inefficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between host and guest. The incomplete FRET results in a large amount of host emission and limits the potential efficiencies of the devices. In all previously reported BBO copolymers, the conjugation pathway was through the oxazole rings. Herein we report six new BBO copolymers with backbone connectivity directly on the central benzene ring, resulting in a conjugation pathway for the polymers that is perpendicular to the previously reported pathway. Guest–host PLEDs made using these polymers show that the new conjugation pathway improves FRET between the poly(N-vinylcarbazole) host and the BBO-containing polymer guest. Because of highly efficient FRET, no host emission is observed even at lower guest concentrations. The improved energy transfer results in devices with luminous efficiencies up to 3.1 Cd/A, a 3-fold improvement over previously reported BBO-based PLEDs. These results indicate that the conjugation pathway plays a critical role in designing emissive materials for guest–host PLEDs.

  1. Fabrication of fiber-optic broadband ultrasound emitters by micro-opto-mechanical technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belsito, L.; Vannacci, E.; Mancarella, F.; Ferri, M.; Veronese, G. P.; Biagi, E.; Roncaglia, A.

    2014-08-01

    A micro-opto-mechanical system (MOMS) technology for the fabrication of fiber-optic optoacoustic emitters is presented. The described devices are based on the thermoelastic generation of ultrasonic waves from patterned carbon films obtained by the controlled pyrolysis of photoresist layers and fabricated on miniaturized single-crystal silicon frames used to mount the emitters on the tip of an optical fiber. Thanks to the micromachining process adopted, high miniaturization levels are reached in the fabrication of the emitters, and self-standing devices on optical fiber with diameter around 350 µm are demonstrated, potentially suited to minimally invasive medical applications. The functional testing of fiber-optic emitter prototypes in water performed by using a 1064 nm Q-switched Nd-YAG excitation laser source is also presented, yielding broadband emission spectra extended from low frequencies up to more than 40 MHz, and focused emission fields with a maximum peak-to-peak pressure level of about 1.2 MPa at a distance of 1 mm from the devices.

  2. High-Performance Blue OLEDs Based on Phenanthroimidazole Emitters via Substitutions at the C6- and C9-Positions for Improving Exciton Utilization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Yuan, Yi; He, Dan; Huang, De-Yue; Luo, Cheng-Yuan; Zhu, Ze-Lin; Lu, Feng; Tong, Qing-Xiao; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2016-08-16

    Donor-acceptor (D-A) molecular architecture has been shown to be an effective strategy for obtaining high-performance electroluminescent materials. In this work, two D-A molecules, Ph-BPA-BPI and Py-BPA-BPI, have been synthesized by attaching highly fluorescent phenanthrene or pyrene groups to the C6- and C9-positions of a locally excited-state emitting phenylamine-phenanthroimidazole moiety. Equipped with good physical and hybridized local and charge-transfer properties, both molecules show high performances as blue emitters in nondoped organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). An OLED using Ph-BPA-BPI as the emitting layer exhibits deep-blue emission with CIE coordinates of (0.15, 0.08), and a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE), current efficiency (CE), and power efficiency (PE) of 4.56 %, 3.60 cd A(-1) , and 3.66 lm W(-1) , respectively. On the other hand, a Py-BPA-BPI-based, sky-blue OLED delivers the best results among nondoped OLEDs with CIEy values of < 0.3 reported so far, for which a very low turn-on voltage of 2.15 V, CIE coordinates of (0.17, 0.29), and maximum CE, PE, and EQE values of 10.9 cd A(-1) , 10.5 lm W(-1) , and 5.64 %, were achieved, respectively. More importantly, both devices show little or even no efficiency roll-off and high singlet exciton-utilizing efficiencies of 36.2 % for Ph-BPA-BPI and 39.2 % for Py-BPA-BPI.

  3. High-Performance Blue OLEDs Based on Phenanthroimidazole Emitters via Substitutions at the C6- and C9-Positions for Improving Exciton Utilization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Yuan, Yi; He, Dan; Huang, De-Yue; Luo, Cheng-Yuan; Zhu, Ze-Lin; Lu, Feng; Tong, Qing-Xiao; Lee, Chun-Sing

    2016-08-16

    Donor-acceptor (D-A) molecular architecture has been shown to be an effective strategy for obtaining high-performance electroluminescent materials. In this work, two D-A molecules, Ph-BPA-BPI and Py-BPA-BPI, have been synthesized by attaching highly fluorescent phenanthrene or pyrene groups to the C6- and C9-positions of a locally excited-state emitting phenylamine-phenanthroimidazole moiety. Equipped with good physical and hybridized local and charge-transfer properties, both molecules show high performances as blue emitters in nondoped organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs). An OLED using Ph-BPA-BPI as the emitting layer exhibits deep-blue emission with CIE coordinates of (0.15, 0.08), and a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE), current efficiency (CE), and power efficiency (PE) of 4.56 %, 3.60 cd A(-1) , and 3.66 lm W(-1) , respectively. On the other hand, a Py-BPA-BPI-based, sky-blue OLED delivers the best results among nondoped OLEDs with CIEy values of < 0.3 reported so far, for which a very low turn-on voltage of 2.15 V, CIE coordinates of (0.17, 0.29), and maximum CE, PE, and EQE values of 10.9 cd A(-1) , 10.5 lm W(-1) , and 5.64 %, were achieved, respectively. More importantly, both devices show little or even no efficiency roll-off and high singlet exciton-utilizing efficiencies of 36.2 % for Ph-BPA-BPI and 39.2 % for Py-BPA-BPI. PMID:27412733

  4. An ultracold low emittance electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, G.; Harvey, M.; Murray, A. J.; Bellan, L.; Bertsche, W.; Appleby, R. B.; Mete, O.; Chattopadhyay, S.

    2014-06-01

    Ultracold atom-based electron sources have recently been proposed as an alternative to the conventional photo-injectors or thermionic electron guns widely used in modern particle accelerators. The advantages of ultracold atom-based electron sources lie in the fact that the electrons extracted from the plasma (created from near threshold photo-ionization of ultracold atoms) have a very low temperature, i.e. down to tens of Kelvin. Extraction of these electrons has the potential for producing very low emittance electron bunches. These features are crucial for the next generation of particle accelerators, including free electron lasers, plasma-based accelerators and future linear colliders. The source also has many potential direct applications, including ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and electron microscopy, due to its intrinsically high coherence. In this paper, the basic mechanism of ultracold electron beam production is discussed and our new research facility for an ultracold, low emittance electron source is introduced. This source is based on a novel alternating current Magneto-Optical Trap (the AC-MOT). Detailed simulations for a proposed extraction system have shown that for a 1 pC bunch charge, a beam emittance of 0.35 mm mrad is obtainable, with a bunch length of 3 mm and energy spread 1%.

  5. Beam emittance measurements in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenski,A.; Bazilevsky, A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nemesure, S.; Russo, t.; Steski, D.; Sivertz, M.

    2009-05-04

    The RHIC proton polarimeters can operate in scanning mode, giving polarization profiles and transverse beam intensity profile (beam emittance) measurements. The polarimeters function as wire scanners, providing a very good signal/noise ratio and high counting rate. This allows accurate bunch-by-bunch emittance measurements during fast target sweeps (<1 s) through the beam. Very thin carbon strip targets make these measurements practically non-destructive. Bunch by bunch emittance measurements are a powerful tool for machine set-up; in RHIC, individual proton beam transverse emittances can only be measured by CNI polarimeter scans. We discuss the consistency of these measurements with Ionization Profile Monitors (IPMs) and vernier scan luminosity measurements. Absolute accuracy limitations and cross-calibration of different techniques are also discussed.

  6. Wavelength locking of single emitters and multi-emitter modules: simulation and experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Peleg, Ophir; Berk, Yuri; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Baskin, Ilya; Levy, Moshe

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-stabilized high-brightness single emitters are commonly used in fiber-coupled laser diode modules for pumping Yb-doped lasers at 976 nm, and Nd-doped ones at 808 nm. We investigate the spectral behavior of single emitters under wavelength-selective feedback from a volume Bragg (or hologram) grating (VBG) in a multi-emitter module. By integrating a full VBG model as a multi-layer thin film structure with commercial raytracing software, we simulated wavelength locking conditions as a function of beam divergence and angular alignment tolerances. Good correlation between the simulated VBG feedback strength and experimentally measured locking ranges, in both VBG misalignment angle and laser temperature, is demonstrated. The challenges of assembling multi-emitter modules based on beam-stacked optical architectures are specifically addressed, where the wavelength locking conditions must be achieved simultaneously with high fiber coupling efficiency for each emitter in the module. It is shown that angular misorientation between fast and slow-axis collimating optics can have a dramatic effect on the spectral and power performance of the module. We report the development of our NEON-S wavelength-stabilized fiber laser pump module, which uses a VBG to provide wavelength-selective optical feedback in the collimated portion of the beam. Powered by our purpose-developed high-brightness single emitters, the module delivers 47 W output at 11 A from an 0.15 NA fiber and a 0.3 nm linewidth at 976 nm. Preliminary wavelength-locking results at 808 nm are also presented.

  7. Bridging the terahertz near-field and far-field observations of liquid crystal based metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Ge, Shijun; Chen, Zhaoxian; Hu, Wei; Lu, Yanqing

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterial-based absorbers play a significant role in applications ranging from energy harvesting and thermal emitters to sensors and imaging devices. The middle dielectric layer of conventional metamaterial absorbers has always been solid. Researchers could not detect the near field distribution in this layer or utilize it effectively. Here, we use anisotropic liquid crystal as the dielectric layer to realize electrically fast tunable terahertz metamaterial absorbers. We demonstrate strong, position-dependent terahertz near-field enhancement with sub-wavelength resolution inside the metamaterial absorber. We measure the terahertz far-field absorption as the driving voltage increases. By combining experimental results with liquid crystal simulations, we verify the near-field distribution in the middle layer indirectly and bridge the near-field and far-field observations. Our work opens new opportunities for creating high-performance, fast, tunable, terahertz metamaterial devices that can be applied in biological imaging and sensing. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 61225026, 61490714, 11304151, and 61435008), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BK20150845 and 15KJB140004), the Open Foundation Project of National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, China (Grant No. M28003), and the Research Center of Optical Communications Engineering & Technology, Jiangsu Province, China.

  8. Bridging the terahertz near-field and far-field observations of liquid crystal based metamaterial absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei; Ge, Shijun; Chen, Zhaoxian; Hu, Wei; Lu, Yanqing

    2016-09-01

    Metamaterial-based absorbers play a significant role in applications ranging from energy harvesting and thermal emitters to sensors and imaging devices. The middle dielectric layer of conventional metamaterial absorbers has always been solid. Researchers could not detect the near field distribution in this layer or utilize it effectively. Here, we use anisotropic liquid crystal as the dielectric layer to realize electrically fast tunable terahertz metamaterial absorbers. We demonstrate strong, position-dependent terahertz near-field enhancement with sub-wavelength resolution inside the metamaterial absorber. We measure the terahertz far-field absorption as the driving voltage increases. By combining experimental results with liquid crystal simulations, we verify the near-field distribution in the middle layer indirectly and bridge the near-field and far-field observations. Our work opens new opportunities for creating high-performance, fast, tunable, terahertz metamaterial devices that can be applied in biological imaging and sensing. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2012CB921803), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grants Nos. 61225026, 61490714, 11304151, and 61435008), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangsu Province, China (Grant Nos. BK20150845 and 15KJB140004), the Open Foundation Project of National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures, China (Grant No. M28003), and the Research Center of Optical Communications Engineering & Technology, Jiangsu Province, China.

  9. Design and characterization of a movable emittance meter for low-energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Catani, Luciano; Chiadroni, Enrica; Cianchi, Alessandro; Tazzari, Sergio; Boscolo, Manuela; Castellano, Michele; Di Pirro, Giampiero; Ferrario, Massimo; Fusco, Valeria; Filippetto, Daniele; Palumbo, Luigi; Vaccarezza, Cristina; Vicario, Carlo; Ronsivalle, Concetta

    2006-09-15

    In order to characterize and optimize the beam emittance compensation scheme [L. Serafini and J. B. Rosenzweig, Phys. Rev. E 55, 7565 (1997)] of the Sorgente Pulsata Autoamplificata di Radiazione Coerente project [D. Alesini et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. A 507, 345 (2003)] high brightness preinjector a system to accurately measure the beam rms emittance evolution downstream of the rf gun has been developed. Since in a space charge dominated beam the quadrupole-scan method is not applicable, a movable emittance measurement device has been built based on the pepper-pot technique. The device consists of a double system of horizontal and vertical slit arrays and a downstream screen, all installed on a longitudinally movable support equipped with bellows and spanning the {approx_equal}1.2 m long drift space between gun and first accelerating section. The system allows the measuring of the beam rms emittance all along the spanned region so as to accurately reconstruct its evolution along the beam trajectory. More than a simple improvement over more conventional beam emittance measurement tools this device defines a new strategy for characterizing high performance photoinjectors as it allows a detailed analysis of the beam behavior over a section of the accelerator where crucial beam shaping takes place. Numerical simulations of the measurement, mainly based on PARMELA [J. Billen, PARMELA Report No. LA-UR 96-1835, 1996 (unpublished)], have been used to estimate the achievable accuracy and to optimize the experimental setup. Wake field effects induced by the beam propagation through the bellows have also been investigated with HOMDYN [M. Ferrario et al., LCLS Report No. SLAC-PUB 84000, 1999 (unpublished)]. A series of laboratory tests to evaluate its performance has been carried out at LNF in Frascati. The system was then moved to DESY Zeuthen and installed on the Photo Injector Test Facility PITZ, for further testing with beam. Design criteria and tests

  10. A Laboratory Goniometer System for Measuring Reflectance and Emittance Anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Roosjen, Peter P. J.; Clevers, Jan G. P. W.; Bartholomeus, Harm M.; Schaepman, Michael E.; Schaepman-Strub, Gabriela; Jalink, Henk; van der Schoor, Rob; de Jong, Arjan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a laboratory goniometer system for performing multi-angular measurements under controlled illumination conditions is described. A commercially available robotic arm enables the acquisition of a large number of measurements over the full hemisphere within a short time span making it much faster than other goniometers. In addition, the presented set-up enables assessment of anisotropic reflectance and emittance behaviour of soils, leaves and small canopies. Mounting a spectrometer enables acquisition of either hemispherical measurements or measurements in the horizontal plane. Mounting a thermal camera allows directional observations of the thermal emittance. This paper also presents three showcases of these different measurement set-ups in order to illustrate its possibilities. Finally, suggestions for applying this instrument and for future research directions are given, including linking the measured reflectance anisotropy with physically-based anisotropy models on the one hand and combining them with field goniometry measurements for joint analysis with remote sensing data on the other hand. The speed and flexibility of the system offer a large added value to the existing pool of laboratory goniometers. PMID:23443402

  11. Electrically pumped single-defect light emitters in WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, S.; Kozikov, A.; Withers, F.; Maguire, J. K.; Foster, A. P.; Dufferwiel, S.; Hague, L.; Makhonin, M. N.; Wilson, L. R.; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, K. S.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments in fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures enable new type of devices assembled by stacking atomically thin layers of two-dimensional materials. Using this approach, we fabricate light-emitting devices based on a monolayer WSe2, and also comprising boron nitride tunnelling barriers and graphene electrodes, and observe sharp luminescence spectra from individual defects in WSe2 under both optical and electrical excitation. This paves the way towards the realisation of electrically-pumped quantum emitters in atomically thin semiconductors. In addition we demonstrate tuning by more than 1 meV of the emission energy of the defect luminescence by applying a vertical electric field. This provides an estimate of the permanent electric dipole created by the corresponding electron–hole pair. The light-emitting devices investigated in our work can be assembled on a variety of substrates enabling a route to integration of electrically pumped single quantum emitters with existing technologies in nano-photonics and optoelectronics.

  12. Electrically pumped single-defect light emitters in WSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, S.; Kozikov, A.; Withers, F.; Maguire, J. K.; Foster, A. P.; Dufferwiel, S.; Hague, L.; Makhonin, M. N.; Wilson, L. R.; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, K. S.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments in fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures enable new type of devices assembled by stacking atomically thin layers of two-dimensional materials. Using this approach, we fabricate light-emitting devices based on a monolayer WSe2, and also comprising boron nitride tunnelling barriers and graphene electrodes, and observe sharp luminescence spectra from individual defects in WSe2 under both optical and electrical excitation. This paves the way towards the realisation of electrically-pumped quantum emitters in atomically thin semiconductors. In addition we demonstrate tuning by more than 1 meV of the emission energy of the defect luminescence by applying a vertical electric field. This provides an estimate of the permanent electric dipole created by the corresponding electron-hole pair. The light-emitting devices investigated in our work can be assembled on a variety of substrates enabling a route to integration of electrically pumped single quantum emitters with existing technologies in nano-photonics and optoelectronics.

  13. Emittance Preservation in the International Linear Collider Ring to Main Linac Transfer Line

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P.; Latina, A.; Smith, J.C.; Kubo, K.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-06-27

    The very small vertical beam emittance in the International Linear Collider (ILC) can be degraded by dispersion, xy coupling, transverse wakefields, and time-varying transverse fields introduced by elements with misalignments, strength errors, xy rotation errors, or yz rotation errors in the Ring to Main Linac (RTML) transfer line. We present a plan for emittance preservation in this beamline which uses local, quasi-local, and global correction schemes. Results of simulations of the emittance preservation algorithm are also presented and discussed.

  14. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica.

    PubMed

    Rabouw, Freddy T; Cogan, Nicole M B; Berends, Anne C; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A Femius; Krauss, Todd D; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots. PMID:26892489

  15. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    PubMed Central

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots. PMID:26892489

  16. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward Van Der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso De Mello

    2016-02-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters, do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.

  17. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    DOE PAGES

    Rabouw, Freddy T.; Cogan, Nicole M. B.; Berends, Anne C.; Stam, Ward van der; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Koenderink, A. Femius; Krauss, Todd D.; Donega, Celso de Mello

    2016-02-19

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at 532 nm. In a microscope image the defect emission is indistinguishable from spin-coated emitters. The emission spectrum is characterised by multiple peaks with the main peak between 2.05 and 2.20 eV, most likely due to coupling to a silica vibration with an energy that varies between 160 and 180 meV. The defects are single-photon emitters,more » do not blink, and have photoluminescence lifetimes of a few nanoseconds. Furthermore, photoluminescence from such defects may previously have been misinterpreted as originating from single nanocrystal quantum dots.« less

  18. Nanostructure-Induced Distortion in Single-Emitter Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kangmook; Ropp, Chad; Barik, Sabyasachi; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-09-14

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitter's far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Previous work has shown that these distortions can significantly degrade the imaging of the local density of states in metallic nanowires using polarization-resolved imaging. But unlike nanowires, nanoparticles do not have a well-defined axis of symmetry, which makes polarization-resolved imaging difficult to apply. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35 nm. The centroid position of the emitter generally shifts away from the nanoparticle position, which is in contradiction to the conventional wisdom that the nanoparticle is a scattering object that will pull in the diffraction spot of the emitter toward its center. These results suggest that dielectric distortion of the emission pattern dominates over scattering. We also show that by monitoring the distortion of the quantum dot diffraction spot we can obtain high-resolution spatial images of the nanoparticle, providing a new method for performing highly precise, subdiffraction spatial imaging. These results provide a better understanding of the

  19. Counter-Electrode-Free Thin Cu Film Deposition Based on Ballistic Electron Injection into CuSO4 Solution from Nanosilicon Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Toshiyuki; Gelloz, Bernard; Koshida, Nobuyoshi

    2011-01-01

    It is shown that a nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) ballistic electron emitter acts as an active electrode in a metal-salt solution (such as CuSO4 solution). The nc-Si emitter is composed of a thin Au film (10 nm thick), anodized polycrystalline layer (1 µm thick), and single-crystalline n+-Si substrate. In accordance with the results of an analysis by cyclic-voltammogram measurements under the standard three-electrode configuration, the electron injection effect into the solution is clearly observed at a potential within the electrochemical window where no electrolytic reactions appear. When the nc-Si emitter is driven alone in a CuSO4 solution without using any counter electrodes, a polycrystalline thin Cu film is uniformly formed on the emitting surface. This is presumably due to the preferential reduction of Cu2+ ions at the interface by injected energetic electrons. The observed deposition mode is different from both the conventional electroplating and electroless plating. This technique is an alternative low-temperature wet process that will be applicable to the deposition of various thin metal films.

  20. White organic light-emitting diodes with single active layer using a solution process based on a co-host emitter system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Beomjin; Park, Youngil; Park, Jongwook

    2014-11-01

    A two-color white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a co-host system in solution process method was demonstrated. The device configuration was ITO/PEDOT:PSS (40 nm)/emitting layer (50 nm)/TPBi (20 nm)/LiF (1 nm)/Al. The emitting layer consisted of TAT, (α- or β-) NPB, DPAVBi (blue dopant), and Rubrene (yellow dopant). The device using α-NPB or β-NPB showed a white color of CIE (0.29, 0.40) and (0.28, 0.39). The device using the α-NPB co-host showed a luminance efficiency of 3.39 cd/A, which is 21% higher than β-NPB (2.80 cd/A). Power efficiency was increased by 16% in α-NPB (2.34 Im/W) compared to β-NPB (2.02 Im/W). The Co-host emitter system of HTL and single blue emitter using a solution process for WOLED was shown before, but the HTL role was not understood clearly. From this study, the WOLED device efficiency can be attributed to the HTL's energy transfer property in the emitter mixing system. PMID:25958544

  1. Understanding the Impact of Field-Emitter Characteristics on Electron Beam Focusing in the VAPoR Time-of-Fight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southard, Adrian E.; Getty, Stephanie A.; Costen, Nicholas P.; Hidrobo, Gregory B.; Glavin, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of field emission of electrons from an electron gun are used to determine the angular distribution of the emitted electron beam and the percentage of charge transmitted through the grid. The simulations are a first step towards understanding the spherical aberration present after focusing the electron beam. The effect of offset of the cathode with respect to the grid and the separation between cathode and grid on the angular distributions of emitted electrons and transmission of the grid are explored.

  2. Field emission electron source

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  3. Knowledge-based flow field zoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Alison E.

    1988-01-01

    Automation flow field zoning in two dimensions is an important step towards easing the three-dimensional grid generation bottleneck in computational fluid dynamics. A knowledge based approach works well, but certain aspects of flow field zoning make the use of such an approach challenging. A knowledge based flow field zoner, called EZGrid, was implemented and tested on representative two-dimensional aerodynamic configurations. Results are shown which illustrate the way in which EZGrid incorporates the effects of physics, shape description, position, and user bias in a flow field zoning.

  4. Fabrication of tantalum and nitrogen codoped ZnO (Ta, N-ZnO) thin films using the electrospay: twin applications as an excellent transparent electrode and a field emitter.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Khalid; Park, Seung Bin; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2013-05-01

    The realization of stable p-type nitrogen-doped ZnO thin films with durable and controlled growth is important for the fabrication of nanoscale electronic and optoelectronic devices. ZnO thin films codoped with tantalum and nitrogen (Ta, N-ZnO) were fabricated by using the electrospraying method at an atmospheric pressure. X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies demonstrated that all the prepared films were polycrystalline in nature with hexagonal wurtzite structure. In addition, a shift in the XRD patterns was observed, and the crystal orientation was changed at a certain amount of nitrogen (>6 at.%) in the starting solution. Analysis of X-ray diffraction patterns and X-ray photoelectron spectra revealed that nitrogen which was combined with the zinc atom (N-Zn) was successfully doped into the ZnO crystal lattice. It was also observed that 2 at.% tantalum and 6 at.% nitrogen (2 at.% Ta and 6 at.% N) were the optimal dopant amounts to achieve the minimum resistivity of about 9.70 × 10(-5) Ω cm and the maximum transmittance of 98% in the visible region. Consequently, the field-emission characteristics of such a Ta, N-ZnO emitter can exhibit the higher current density of 1.33 mA cm(-2), larger field-enhancement factor (β) of 4706, lower turn-on field of 2.6 V μm(-1), and lower threshold field of 3.5 V μm(-1) attributed to the enhanced conductivity and better crystallinity of films. Moreover, the obtained values of resistivity were closest to the lowest resistivity values among the doped ZnO films as well as to the indium tin oxide (ITO) resistivity values that were previously studied. We confirmed that the tantalum and nitrogen atoms substitution in the ZnO lattice induced positive effects in terms of enhancing the free carrier concentration which will further improve the electrical, optical, and field-emission properties. The proposed electrospraying method was well suitable for the fabrication of Ta, N-ZnO thin films at optimum conditions with superior electrical

  5. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  6. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  7. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1989-07-01

    A support is discussed which was provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  8. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1990-05-22

    This patent describes a support provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  9. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1989-07-06

    This document discusses a support provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a larger metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs. 7 figs.

  10. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.T.

    1990-10-16

    A support is presented for use in a thermionic converted to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end is supported by a spring structure that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element at the front end, a large metal main support at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer captured between the Belleville springs.

  11. Radial arrays of nano-electrospray ionization emitters and methods of forming electrosprays

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-10-19

    Electrospray ionization emitter arrays, as well as methods for forming electrosprays, are described. The arrays are characterized by a radial configuration of three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters without an extractor electrode. The methods are characterized by distributing fluid flow of the liquid sample among three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters, forming an electrospray at outlets of the emitters without utilizing an extractor electrode, and directing the electrosprays into an entrance to a mass spectrometry device. Each of the nano-electrospray ionization emitters can have a discrete channel for fluid flow. The nano-electrospray ionization emitters are circularly arranged such that each is shielded substantially equally from an electrospray-inducing electric field.

  12. Observation of negative differential transconductance in tunneling emitter bipolar transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Veenhuizen, Marc J.; Locatelli, Nicolas; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Chang, Joonyeon

    2009-08-01

    We report on measurement of negative differential transconductance (NDTC) of iron (Fe)/magnesium-oxide (MgO)/silicon tunneling emitter NPN bipolar transistors. Device simulations reveal that the NDTC is a consequence of an inversion layer at the tunneling-oxide/P-silicon interface for low base voltages. Electrons travel laterally through the inversion layer into the base and give rise to an increase in collector current. The NDTC results from the recombination of those electrons at the interface between emitter and base contact which is dependent on the base voltage. For larger base voltages, the inversion layer disappears marking the onset of normal bipolar transistor behavior.

  13. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  14. Tuning the Magnetic Transport of an Induction LINAC using Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T L; Brown, C G; Ong, M M; Paul, A C; Wargo, P E; Zentler, J M

    2006-08-11

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Flash X-Ray (FXR) machine is a linear induction accelerator used to produce a nominal 18 MeV, 3 kA, 65 ns pulse width electron beam for hydrodynamic radiographs. A common figure of merit for this type of radiographic machine is the x-ray dose divided by the spot area on the bremsstrahlung converter where a higher FOM is desired. Several characteristics of the beam affect the minimum attainable x-ray spot size. The most significant are emittance (chaotic transverse energy), chromatic aberration (energy variation), and beam motion (transverse instabilities and corkscrew motion). FXR is in the midst of a multi-year optimization project to reduce the spot size. This paper describes the effort to reduce beam emittance by adjusting the fields of the transport solenoids and position of the cathode. If the magnetic transport is not correct, the beam will be mismatched and undergo envelope oscillations increasing the emittance. We measure the divergence and radius of the beam in a drift section after the accelerator by imaging the optical transition radiation (OTR) and beam envelope on a foil. These measurements are used to determine an emittance. Relative changes in the emittance can be quickly estimated from the foil measurements allowing for an efficient, real-time study. Once an optimized transport field is determined, the final focus can be adjusted and the new x-ray spot measured. A description of the diagnostics and analysis is presented.

  15. Study of Abnormal Vertical Emittance Growth in ATF Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Alabau, M.; Faus-Golfe, A.; Alabau, M.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Le Meur, G.; Rimbault, C.; Touze, F.; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.K.; Appleby, R.; Scarfe, A.; Kuroda, S.; White, G.R.; Woodley, M.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Since several years, the vertical beam emittance measured in the Extraction Line (EXT) of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK, that will transport the electron beam from the ATF Damping Ring (DR) to the future ATF2 Final Focus beam line, is significantly larger than the emittance measured in the DR itself, and there are indications that it grows rapidly with increasing beam intensity. This longstanding problem has motivated studies of possible sources of this anomalous emittance growth. One possible contribution is non-linear magnetic fields in the extraction region experimented by the beam while passing off-axis through magnets of the DR during the extraction process. In this paper, simulations of the emittance growth are presented and compared to observations. These simulations include the effects of predicted non-linear field errors in the shared DR magnets and orbit displacements from the reference orbit in the extraction region. Results of recent measurements using closed orbit bumps to probe the relation between the extraction trajectory and the anomalous emittance growth are also presented.

  16. Barium Depletion in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, James E.; Capece, Angela M.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira

    2009-01-01

    The effect of tungsten erosion, transport and redeposition on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in detailed examinations of the discharge cathode inserts from an 8200 hour and a 30,352 hour ion engine wear test. Erosion and subsequent re-deposition of tungsten in the electron emission zone at the downstream end of the insert reduces the porosity of the tungsten matrix, preventing the ow of barium from the interior. This inhibits the interfacial reactions of the barium-calcium-aluminate impregnant with the tungsten in the pores. A numerical model of barium transport in the internal xenon discharge plasma shows that the barium required to reduce the work function in the emission zone can be supplied from upstream through the gas phase. Barium that flows out of the pores of the tungsten insert is rapidly ionized in the xenon discharge and pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field and drag from the xenon ion flow. This barium ion flux is sufficient to maintain a barium surface coverage at the downstream end greater than 0.6, even if local barium production at that point is inhibited by tungsten deposits. The model also shows that the neutral barium pressure exceeds the equilibrium vapor pressure of the impregnant decomposition reaction over much of the insert length, so the reactions are suppressed. Only a small region upstream of the zone blocked by tungsten deposits is active and supplies the required barium. These results indicate that hollow cathode failure models based on barium depletion rates in vacuum dispenser cathodes are very conservative.

  17. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1999-08-10

    A novel field emitter device is disclosed for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials. 8 figs.

  18. Method of depositing multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.

    1999-01-01

    A novel field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications, comprising a multi-layer resistive carbon film. The multi-layered film of the present invention is comprised of at least two layers of a resistive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, such that the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure comprises a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film comprises a plurality of carbon layers, wherein adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. Field emitters made according the present invention display improved electron emission characteristics in comparison to conventional field emitter materials.

  19. Measurement of the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity using optical fiber DTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaros, Jakub; Papes, Martin; Liner, Andrej; Vašinek, Vladimir; Smira, Pavel; Nasswettrova, Andrea; Cubik, Jakub; Kepak, Stanislav

    2014-06-01

    Researcher's teams were dealing with the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity problem since the microwaves were used. One possible way, how to measure electromagnetic field is the measurement on inhomogeneous temperature distribution on the irradiated sample, which can cause problems as in other material processing, so in the undesirable change of properties and even security. Inhomogeneity of electromagnetic field is specific by creating spots with higher or lower temperature called "hot spots". This inhomogeneity strongly affects the temperature distribution in the cross section of the material and its resultant heating. Given the impossibility of using classical electronic devices with metal temperature sensors were various indirect methods used in the past. This paper deals with experimental measurement of the microwave emitter's inhomogeneity (2.45 GHz) using the optical fiber DTS. The greatest advantage of this sensor system is just in using of the optical fiber (electromagnetic resistance, small size, safety using in inflammable and explosive area, easy installation). Due to these properties of the optical fiber sensor it's possible to measure the temperature of the sample in real time. These sensor are able to measure the temperature along the fiber, in some cases they use nonlinear effect in optical fiber (Raman nonlinear effect). The verification of non-homogeneity consists in experimental measuring of the temperature distribution within the wooden sample. The method is based on heat exchange in an isolated system where wooden sample serves as an absorber of the irradiated energy. To identify locations with different power density was used DTS system, based on nonlinear phenomena in optical fibers.

  20. Emission Testing Results of Thermally Stable, Metamaterial, Selective-Emitters for Thermophotovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levinson, Katherine; Naka, Norihito; Pfiester, Nicole; Licht, Abigail; Vandervelde, Tom

    2015-03-01

    In thermophotovoltaics, the energy from a heated emitter is converted to electricity by a photovoltaic diode. A selective emitter can be used to emit a narrow band of wavelengths tailored to the bandgap of the photovoltaic diode. This spectral shaping improves the conversion efficiency of the diode and reduces undesirable diode heating. In our research, we study selective emitters based on metamaterials composed of repeating nanoscale structures. The emission characteristics of these materials vary based on the compositional structure, allowing the emitted spectrum to be tunable. Simulations were performed with CST Microwave Studio to design emitters with peak wavelengths ranging from 1-10 microns. The structures were then fabricated using physical vapor deposition and electron beam lithography on a sapphire substrate. Emitter materials studied include gold, platinum, and iridium. Here we report on the emission spectra of the selective emitters and the post-heating structural integrity.

  1. Junction-based field emission structure for field emission display

    DOEpatents

    Dinh, Long N.; Balooch, Mehdi; McLean, II, William; Schildbach, Marcus A.

    2002-01-01

    A junction-based field emission display, wherein the junctions are formed by depositing a semiconducting or dielectric, low work function, negative electron affinity (NEA) silicon-based compound film (SBCF) onto a metal or n-type semiconductor substrate. The SBCF can be doped to become a p-type semiconductor. A small forward bias voltage is applied across the junction so that electron transport is from the substrate into the SBCF region. Upon entering into this NEA region, many electrons are released into the vacuum level above the SBCF surface and accelerated toward a positively biased phosphor screen anode, hence lighting up the phosphor screen for display. To turn off, simply switch off the applied potential across the SBCF/substrate. May be used for field emission flat panel displays.

  2. Emittance of investment casting molds

    SciTech Connect

    Havstad, M.A.

    1994-07-15

    This document describes measurements of the directional spectral emittance of four ceramic mold materials. The work was performed with the samples at {approximately} 900{degree}C in a vacuum vessel pumped to {approximately}3 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}Torr. Results conform to expectations derived from prior work done with similar samples.

  3. Ultra Low Emittance Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson,J.

    2008-06-23

    This paper outlines the special issues for reaching sub-nm emittance in a storage ring. Effects of damping wigglers, intra-beam scattering and lifetime issues, dynamic aperture optimization, control of optics, and their interrelations are covered in some detail. The unique choices for the NSLS-II are given as one example.

  4. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Satellite measurements of the geomagnetic field began with the launch of Sputnik 3 in May 1958 and have continued sporadically in the intervening years. A list of spacecraft that have made significant contributions to an understanding of the near-earth geomagnetic field is presented. A new era in near-earth magnetic field measurements began with NASA's launch of Magsat in October 1979. Attention is given to geomagnetic field modeling, crustal magnetic anomaly studies, and investigations of the inner earth. It is concluded that satellite-based magnetic field measurements make global surveys practical for both field modeling and for the mapping of large-scale crustal anomalies. They are the only practical method of accurately modeling the global secular variation. Magsat is providing a significant contribution, both because of the timeliness of the survey and because its vector measurement capability represents an advance in the technology of such measurements.

  5. Transverse emittance dilution due to coupler kicks in linear accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Brandon; Hoffstaetter, Georg H.

    2007-11-01

    One of the main concerns in the design of low emittance linear accelerators (linacs) is the preservation of beam emittance. Here we discuss one possible source of emittance dilution, the coupler kick, due to transverse electromagnetic fields in the accelerating cavities of the linac caused by the power coupler geometry. In addition to emittance growth, the coupler kick also produces orbit distortions. It is common wisdom that emittance growth from coupler kicks can be strongly reduced by using two couplers per cavity mounted opposite each other or by having the couplers of successive cavities alternate from above to below the beam pipe so as to cancel each individual kick. While this is correct, including two couplers per cavity or alternating the coupler location requires large technical changes and increased cost for superconducting cryomodules where cryogenic pipes are arranged parallel to a string of several cavities. We therefore analyze consequences of alternate coupler placements. We show here that alternating the coupler location from above to below compensates the emittance growth as well as the orbit distortions. For sufficiently large Q values, alternating the coupler location from before to after the cavity leads to a cancellation of the orbit distortion but not of the emittance growth, whereas alternating the coupler location from before and above to behind and below the cavity cancels the emittance growth but not the orbit distortion. We show that cancellations hold for sufficiently large Q values. These compensations hold even when each cavity is individually detuned, e.g., by microphonics. Another effective method for reducing coupler kicks that is studied is the optimization of the phase of the coupler kick so as to minimize the effects on emittance from each coupler. This technique is independent of the coupler geometry but relies on operating on crest. A final technique studied is symmetrization of the cavity geometry in the coupler region with

  6. Structure-property relationships based on Hammett constants in cyclometalated iridium(III) complexes: their application to the design of a fluorine-free FIrPic-like emitter.

    PubMed

    Frey, Julien; Curchod, Basile F E; Scopelliti, Rosario; Tavernelli, Ivano; Rothlisberger, Ursula; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad K; Baranoff, Etienne

    2014-04-21

    While phosphorescent cyclometalated iridium(iii) complexes have been widely studied, only correlations between oxidation potential EOX and Hammett constant σ, and between the redox gap (ΔEREDOX = EOX-ERED) and emission or absorption wavelength (λabs, λem) have been reported. We present now a quantitative model based on Hammett parameters that rationalizes the effect of the substituents on the properties of cyclometalated iridium(iii) complexes. This simple model allows predicting the apparent redox potentials as well as the electrochemical gap of homoleptic complexes based on phenylpyridine ligands with good accuracy. In particular, the model accounts for the unequal effect of the substituents on both the HOMO and the LUMO energy levels. Consequently, the model is used to anticipate the emission maxima of the corresponding complexes with improved reliability. We demonstrate in a series of phenylpyridine emitters that electron-donating groups can effectively replace electron-withdrawing substituents on the orthometallated phenyl to induce a blue shift of the emission. This result is in contrast with the common approach that uses fluorine to blue shift the emission maximum. Finally, as a proof of concept, we used electron-donating substituents to design a new fluorine-free complex, referred to as EB343, matching the various properties, namely oxidation and reduction potentials, electrochemical gap and emission profile, of the standard sky-blue emitter FIrPic. PMID:24345847

  7. Emittance conservation by tailored focusing profiles in a plasma accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dornmair, I.; Floettmann, K.; Maier, A. R.

    2015-04-01

    Laser-plasma accelerators, providing high electric field gradients, are promising candidates to drive next-generation compact light sources and high-energy applications. However, conservation of beam emittance, a prerequisite for future applications, is very challenging, as the accelerated beam has to be matched to the plasma's strong focusing forces. Here we derive with simulations ideal laser and plasma density profiles to match an electron beam in and out of a plasma stage, thus relaxing required beta functions for injection and minimizing divergence and emittance growth after the plasma.

  8. 4D Emittance Measurements Using Multiple Wire and Waist Scan Methods in the ATF Extraction Line

    SciTech Connect

    Rimbault, C.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Alabau, M.; Kuroda, S.; Scarfe, A.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    Emittance measurements performed in the diagnostic section of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) extraction line since 1998 led to vertical emittances three times larger than the expected ones, with a strong dependence on intensity. An experimental program is pursued to investigate potential sources of emittance growth and find possible remedies. This requires efficient and reliable emittance measurement techniques. In the past, several phase-space reconstruction methods developed at SLAC and KEK have been used to estimate the vertical emittance, based on multiple location beam size measurements and dedicated quadrupole scans. These methods have been shown to be very sensitive to measurement errors and other fluctuations in the beam conditions. In this context new emittance measurements have been performed revisiting these methods and newly developed ones with a systematic approach to compare and characterise their performance in the ATF extraction line.

  9. Multiple emitter location and signal parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. O.

    1986-03-01

    Multiple signal classification (MUSIC) techniques involved in determining the parameters of multiple wavefronts arriving at an antenna array are discussed. A MUSIC algorithm is described, which provides asymptotically unbiased estimates of (1) the number of signals, (2) directions of arrival (or emitter locations), (3) strengths and cross correlations among the incident waveforms, and (4) the strength of noise/interference. The example of the use of the algorithm as a multiple frequency estimator operating on time series is examined. Comparisons of this method with methods based on maximum likelihood and maximum entropy, as well as conventional beamforming, are presented.

  10. Cool and warm hybrid white organic light-emitting diode with blue delayed fluorescent emitter both as blue emitter and triplet host

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong Joo; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with an external quantum efficiency above 20% was developed using a new blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent material, 4,6-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (DCzIPN), both as a blue emitter and a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. DCzIPN showed high quantum efficiency of 16.4% as a blue emitter and 24.9% as a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. The hybrid WOLEDs with the DCzIPN host based yellow emitting layer sandwiched between DCzIPN emitter based blue emitting layers exhibited high external quantum efficiency of 22.9% with a warm white color coordinate of (0.39, 0.43) and quantum efficiency of 21.0% with a cool white color coordinate of (0.31, 0.33) by managing the thickness of the yellow emitting layer. PMID:25598436

  11. Emittance Studies of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 Cell Photocathode RF Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, D.T.; Wang, X.J.; Miller, R.H.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Pellegrini, C.; Sheehan, J.; Skaritka, J.; Winick, H.; Woodle, M.; Yakimenko, V.; /Brookhaven

    2011-09-09

    The symmetrized 1.6 cell S-band photocathode gun developed by the BNL/SLAC/UCLA collaboration is in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A novel emittance compensation solenoid magnet has also been designed, built and is in operation at the ATF. These two subsystems form an emittance compensated photoinjector used for beam dynamics, advanced acceleration and free electron laser experiments at the ATF. The highest acceleration field achieved on the copper cathode is 150 MV/m, and the guns normal operating field is 130 MV/m. The maximum rf pulse length is 3 {mu}s. The transverse emittance of the photoelectron beam were measured for various injection parameters. The 1 nC emittance results are presented along with electron bunch length measurements that indicated that at above the 400 pC, space charge bunch lengthening is occurring. The thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub o}, of the copper cathode has been measured.

  12. Development of a compact neutron source based on field ionization processes

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Allen, Ian; Dickinson, Michael R.; Schenkel, Thomas; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali

    2010-11-25

    The authors report on the use of carbon nanofiber nanoemitters to ionize deuterium atoms for the generation of neutrons in a deuterium-deuterium reaction in a preloaded target. Acceleration voltages in the range of 50-80 kV are used. Field emission of electrons is investigated to characterize the emitters. The experimental setup and sample preparation are described and first data of neutron production are presented. Ongoing experiments to increase neutron production yields by optimizing the field emitter geometry and surface conditions are discussed.

  13. Differential emitter geolocation

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, John J.; Romero, Louis A.

    2015-08-18

    An unknown location of a transmitter of interest is determined based on wireless signals transmitted by both the transmitter of interest and a reference transmitter positioned at a known location. The transmitted signals are received at a plurality of non-earthbound platforms each moving in a known manner, and phase measurements for each received signal are used to determine the unknown location.

  14. A Broadband THz-TDS System Based on DSTMS Emitter and LTG InGaAs/InAlAs Photoconductive Antenna Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaoling; Li, Shaoxian; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Tian, Zhen; Ouyang, Chunmei; He, Mingxia; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a 4-f terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system using an organic crystal DSTMS as the THz emitter and a low temperature grown (LTG) InGaAs/InAlAs photoconductive antenna as the receiver. The system covers a frequency range from 0.2 up to 8 THz. The influences of the pump laser power, the probe laser power and the azimuthal angle of the DSTMS crystal on the time-domain THz amplitude are experimentally analyzed. The frequency accuracy of the system is verified by measuring two metamaterial samples and a lactose film in this THz-TDS system. The proposed combination of DSTMS emission and PC antenna detection realizes a compact and low-cost THz-TDS scheme with an ultra-broad bandwidth, which may promote the development and the applications of THz-TDS techniques.

  15. A Broadband THz-TDS System Based on DSTMS Emitter and LTG InGaAs/InAlAs Photoconductive Antenna Detector

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaoling; Li, Shaoxian; Gu, Jianqiang; Li, Yanfeng; Tian, Zhen; Ouyang, Chunmei; He, Mingxia; Han, Jiaguang; Zhang, Weili

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate a 4-f terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) system using an organic crystal DSTMS as the THz emitter and a low temperature grown (LTG) InGaAs/InAlAs photoconductive antenna as the receiver. The system covers a frequency range from 0.2 up to 8 THz. The influences of the pump laser power, the probe laser power and the azimuthal angle of the DSTMS crystal on the time-domain THz amplitude are experimentally analyzed. The frequency accuracy of the system is verified by measuring two metamaterial samples and a lactose film in this THz-TDS system. The proposed combination of DSTMS emission and PC antenna detection realizes a compact and low-cost THz-TDS scheme with an ultra-broad bandwidth, which may promote the development and the applications of THz-TDS techniques. PMID:27244689

  16. Photolithographic fabrication of gated self-aligned parallel electron beam emitters with a single-stranded carbon nanotube.

    PubMed

    Ho, Justin; Ono, Takahito; Tsai, Ching-Hsiang; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2008-09-10

    In this paper we report on the development of a photolithographic process to fabricate a gated-emitter array with single-stranded carbon nanotubes (CNTs) self-aligned to the center of the emitter gate using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Si tips are formed on a silicon wafer by anisotropic etching of Si using SiO(2) as a mask. Deposition of a SiO(2) insulating layer and Cr-W electrode layers creates protrusions above the Si tips. This wafer is polished, and the Cr-W on the tips is removed. Etching of the SiO(2) using hydrofluoric acid is performed to expose the gated Si tip. Incorporation of a novel diffusion process produces single-stranded CNTs by depositing a thin Ni layer on the Si tips and thermally diffusing the Ni layer to yield a catalyst particle for single-stranded CNT growth. The large surface to volume ratio at the apex of the Si tip allows a Ni particle to remain to act as a catalyst to grow a single-stranded CNT for fabricating the CNT based emitter structure. Diffusion of the Ni is carried out in situ during the heating phase of the PECVD CNT growth process at 600 °C. The diameters of the observed CNTs are on the order of 20 nm. The field emission characteristics of the gated field emitters are evaluated. The measured turn-on voltage of the gated emitter is 5 V. PMID:21828872

  17. Lyα Emitter Galaxies at z∼ 2.8 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. I. Tracing the Large-scale Structure via Lyα Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Wang, Jun-Xian; Jiang, Chun-Yan; Cai, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    We present a narrowband survey with three adjacent filters for z = 2.8–2.9 Lyman alpha (Lyα) emitter (LAE) galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), along with spectroscopic follow-up. With a complete sample of 96 LAE candidates in the narrowband NB466, we confirm the large-scale structure at z ∼ 2.8 suggested by previous spectroscopic surveys. Compared to the blank field detected with the other two narrowband filters NB470 and NB475, the LAE-density excess in NB466 (900 arcmin2) is ∼ 6.0 ± 0.8 times the standard deviation expected at z ∼ 2.8, assuming a linear bias of 2. The overdense large-scale structure in NB466 can be decomposed into four protoclusters, whose overdensities (each within an equivalent comoving volume 153 Mpc3) relative to the blank field (NB470+NB475) are in the range of 4.6–6.6. These four protoclusters are expected to evolve into a Coma-like cluster (M ≥ 1015 M ⊙) at z ∼ 0. We also investigate the various properties of LAEs at z = 2.8–2.9 and their dependence on the environment. The average star formation rates derived from the Lyα, rest-frame UV, and X-ray bands are ∼4, 10, and <16 M ⊙ yr‑1, respectively, implying a Lyα escape fraction of 25% ≲ {f}{{ESC}}{Lyα } ≲ 40% and a UV continuum escape fraction of {f}{{ESC}}{{UV,cont}} ≳ 62% for LAEs at z ∼ 2.8. The Lyα photon density calculated from the integrated Lyα luminosity function in the overdense field (NB466) is ∼50% higher than that in the blank field (NB470+NB475), and more bright LAEs are found in the overdense field. The three brightest LAEs, including a quasar at z = 2.81, are all detected in the X-ray band and in NB466. These three LAE-active galactic nuclei contribute an extra 20%–30% Lyα photon density compared to other LAE galaxies. Furthermore, we find that LAEs in overdense regions have larger equivalent width values, bluer U ‑ B and V ‑ R (∼2–3σ) colors compared with those in lower density regions, indicating

  18. Elastomeric Microchip Electrospray Emitter for Stable Cone-Jet Mode Operation in the Nanoflow Regime.

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Irimia, Daniel; Toner, Mehmet; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-05-15

    Despite widespread interest in applying lab-on-a-chip technologies to mass spectrometry (MS)-based analyses, the coupling of microfluidics to electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS remains challenging. We report a robust, integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) microchip interface for ESI-MS using simple and widely accessible microfabrication procedures. The interface uses an auxiliary channel to provide electrical contact in the Taylor cone of the electrospray without sample loss or dilution. The electric field at the channel terminus is enhanced by two vertical cuts that cause the interface to taper to a line rather than to a point, and the formation of small Taylor cones at the channel exit ensures sub-nL post-column dead volumes. While comparable ESI-MS sensitivities were achieved using both microchip and conventional fused silica capillary emitters, stable cone-jet mode electrospray could be established over a far broader range of flow rates (from 50–1000 nL/min) and applied potentials using the microchip emitters. This special feature of the microchip emitter should minimize the fine tuning required for electrospray optimization and make the stable electrospray more resistant to external perturbations.

  19. Rectangular computed tomography using a stationary array of CNT emitters: initial experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Brian; Spronk, Derrek; Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Xiaochuan; Beckmann, Moritz; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2013-03-01

    XinRay Systems Inc has a rectangular x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging setup using multibeam x-ray tubes. These multibeam x-ray tubes are based on cold cathodes using carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters. Due to their unique design, a CNT x-ray tube can contain a dense array of independently controlled electron emitters which generate a linear array of x-ray focal spots. XinRay uses a set of linear CNT x-ray tubes to design and construct a stationary CT setup which achieves sufficient CT coverage from a fixed set of views. The CT system has no moving gantry, enabling it to be enclosed in a compact rectangular tunnel. The fixed locations of the x-ray focal spots were optimized through simulations. The rectangular shape creates significant variation in path length from the focal spots to the detector for different x-ray views. The shape also results in unequal x-ray coverage in the imaged space. We discuss the impact of this variation on the reconstruction. XinRay uses an iterative reconstruction algorithm to account for this unique geometry, which is implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The fixed focal spots prohibit the use of an antiscatter grid. Quantitative measure of the scatter and its impact on the reconstruction will be discussed. These results represent the first known implementation of a completely stationary CT setup using CNT x-ray emitter arrays.

  20. Development of a compact high current low emittance RF ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Ranjini; Nabhiraj, P. Y.

    2013-12-01

    A 13.56 MHz inductively coupled plasma based RF ion source is developed for production of high brightness focused ion beams of heavy gaseous elements for high speed milling and light ions for high speed imaging. In order to obtain ion beams with low emittance, no magnetic field of any kind is used in the ion source. However, to achieve the high plasma density, the plasma chamber volume is reduced to couple RF power as high as 8-12 W/cm3 to the plasma. Measurements show that the normalized rms emittance of 0.6 mA Ar1+ beam to be as low as 0.0075 mm-mrad while it is 0.004 mm-mrad for 1.2 mA of ion beam from hydrogen plasma. With a simple parallel plate extraction system with an aperture of 2 mm diameter, 80 mA/cm2 of ion beam from hydrogen plasma could be extracted at 3.5 kV extraction potential and 300 W of RF power. The ion source has been operated with other heavy gases and results show that more than 1 mA of xenon and krypton ion beam could easily be extracted at 5 kV extraction potential and 200 W of RF power. In this article, the capability of the ion source to produce high current, low emittance heavy as well as light ion beams is presented.

  1. Infrared spectral normal emittance/emissivity comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanssen, L.; Wilthan, B.; Filtz, J.-R.; Hameury, J.; Girard, F.; Battuello, M.; Ishii, J.; Hollandt, J.; Monte, C.

    2016-01-01

    The National Measurement Institutes (NMIs) of the United States, Germany, France, Italy and Japan, have joined in an inter-laboratory comparison of their infrared spectral emittance scales. This action is part of a series of supplementary inter-laboratory comparisons (including thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity) sponsored by the Consultative Committee on Thermometry (CCT) Task Group on Thermophysical Quantities (TG-ThQ). The objective of this collaborative work is to strengthen the major operative National Measurement Institutes' infrared spectral emittance scales and consequently the consistency of radiative properties measurements carried out worldwide. The comparison has been performed over a spectral range of 2 μm to 14 μm, and a temperature range from 23 °C to 800 °C. Artefacts included in the comparison are potential standards: oxidized Inconel, boron nitride, and silicon carbide. The measurement instrumentation and techniques used for emittance scales are unique for each NMI, including the temperature ranges covered as well as the artefact sizes required. For example, all three common types of spectral instruments are represented: dispersive grating monochromator, Fourier transform and filter-based spectrometers. More than 2000 data points (combinations of material, wavelength and temperature) were compared. Ninety-eight percent (98%) of the data points were in agreement, with differences to weighted mean values less than the expanded uncertainties calculated from the individual NMI uncertainties and uncertainties related to the comparison process. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by the CCT, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  2. Metamaterial selective emitters for photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMeo, Dante F.; Pfeister, Nicole A.; Shemelya, Corey M.; Vandervelde, Thomas

    2014-03-01

    This work demonstrates metamaterial (MM) selective thermal emitters for potential use with energy harvesting photodiodes, such as thermophotovoltaic cells. Preliminary structures have been designed, simulated, and fabricated using CST Microwave Studio and microfabrication techniques including electron beam evaporation, atomic layer deposition, and electron beam lithography, respectively. Samples were tested to determine the effect of top layer metal thickness on the absorption of these devices. Preliminary simulation and testing was also performed to design a device for operation at 500°C.

  3. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  4. Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, John P.; Friedmann, Thomas A.

    1998-01-01

    A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced.

  5. Multi-layer carbon-based coatings for field emission

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, J.P.; Friedmann, T.A.

    1998-10-13

    A multi-layer resistive carbon film field emitter device for cold cathode field emission applications is disclosed. The multi-layered film of the present invention consists of at least two layers of a conductive carbon material, preferably amorphous-tetrahedrally coordinated carbon, where the resistivities of adjacent layers differ. For electron emission from the surface, the preferred structure can be a top layer having a lower resistivity than the bottom layer. For edge emitting structures, the preferred structure of the film can be a plurality of carbon layers, where adjacent layers have different resistivities. Through selection of deposition conditions, including the energy of the depositing carbon species, the presence or absence of certain elements such as H, N, inert gases or boron, carbon layers having desired resistivities can be produced. 8 figs.

  6. On conductance-based neural field models

    PubMed Central

    Pinotsis, Dimitris A.; Leite, Marco; Friston, Karl J.

    2013-01-01

    This technical note introduces a conductance-based neural field model that combines biologically realistic synaptic dynamics—based on transmembrane currents—with neural field equations, describing the propagation of spikes over the cortical surface. This model allows for fairly realistic inter-and intra-laminar intrinsic connections that underlie spatiotemporal neuronal dynamics. We focus on the response functions of expected neuronal states (such as depolarization) that generate observed electrophysiological signals (like LFP recordings and EEG). These response functions characterize the model's transfer functions and implicit spectral responses to (uncorrelated) input. Our main finding is that both the evoked responses (impulse response functions) and induced responses (transfer functions) show qualitative differences depending upon whether one uses a neural mass or field model. Furthermore, there are differences between the equivalent convolution and conductance models. Overall, all models reproduce a characteristic increase in frequency, when inhibition was increased by increasing the rate constants of inhibitory populations. However, convolution and conductance-based models showed qualitatively different changes in power, with convolution models showing decreases with increasing inhibition, while conductance models show the opposite effect. These differences suggest that conductance based field models may be important in empirical studies of cortical gain control or pharmacological manipulations. PMID:24273508

  7. Atmospheric corrections for TIMS estimated emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warner, T. A.; Levandowski, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The estimated temperature of the average of 500 lines of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data of the Pacific Ocean, from flight line 94, collected on 30 Sep. 1988, at 1931 GMT is shown. With no atmospheric corrections, estimated temperature decreases away from nadir (the center of the scan line). A LOWTRAN modeled correction, using local radiosonde data and instrument scan angle information, results in reversed limb darkening effects for most bands, and does not adequately correct all bands to the same temperature. The atmosphere tends to re-radiate energy at the wavelengths at which it most absorbs, and thus the overall difference between corrected and uncorrected temperatures is approximately 40 C, despite the average LOWTRAN calculated transmittance of only 60 percent between 8.1 and 11.6 microns. An alternative approach to atmospheric correction is a black body normalization. This is done by calculating a normalization factor for each pixel position and wavelength, which when applied results in a single calculated temperature, as would be expected for a gray body with near uniform emittance. The black body adjustment is based on the atmospheric conditions over the sea. The ground elevation profile along the remaining 3520 scan lines (approximately 10 km) of flight line 94, up the slopes of Kilauea, determined from aircraft pressure and laser altimeter data is shown. This flight line includes a large amount of vegetation that is clearly discernible on the radiance image, being much cooler than the surrounding rocks. For each of the 3520 scan lines, pixels were classified as vegetation or 'other'. A moving average of 51 lines was applied to the composite vegetation emittance for each scan line, to reduce noise. Assuming vegetation to be like water, and to act as gray body with an emittance of 0.986 across the spectrum, it is shown that that the LOWTRAN induced artifacts are severe, and other than for the 0.9.9 micron channel, not significantly

  8. Modal Coupling of Single Photon Emitters Within Nanofiber Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale generation of individual photons in confined geometries is an exciting research field aiming at exploiting localized electromagnetic fields for light manipulation. One of the outstanding challenges of photonic systems combining emitters with nanostructured media is the selective channelling of photons emitted by embedded sources into specific optical modes and their transport at distant locations in integrated systems. Here, we show that soft-matter nanofibers, electrospun with embedded emitters, combine subwavelength field localization and large broadband near-field coupling with low propagation losses. By momentum spectroscopy, we quantify the modal coupling efficiency identifying the regime of single-mode coupling. These nanofibers do not rely on resonant interactions, making them ideal for room-temperature operation, and offer a scalable platform for future quantum information technology. PMID:27203403

  9. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator - presentation slides

    SciTech Connect

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    Direct emittance measurement based on vertical undulator is discussed. Emittance was evaluated from peak ratios, the smallest measured being 𝜀𝑦 =0.9 ±0.3 pm rad. The angular distribution of undulator radiation departs from Gaussian approximations, a fact of which diffraction-limited light sources should be aware.

  10. Topology based methods for vector field comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batra, Rajesh Kumar

    Vector fields are commonly found in almost all branches of the physical sciences. Aerodynamics, dynamical systems, electromagnetism, and global climate modeling are a few examples. These multivariate data fields are often large, and no general, automated method exists for comparing these fields. Existing methods require either subjective visual judgments, or data interface compatibility, or domain specific knowledge. A topology based method intrinsically eliminates all of the above limitations and has the additional advantage of significantly compressing the vector field by representing only key features of the flow. Therefore, large databases are compactly represented and quickly searched. Topology is a natural framework for the study of many vector fields. It provides rules of an organizing principle, a flow grammar, that can describe and connect together the properties common to flows. Helman and Hesselink first introduced automated methods to extract and visualize this grammar. This work extends their method by introducing automated methods for vector topology comparison. Basic two-dimensional flows are first compared. The theory is extended to compare three-dimensional flow fields and the topology on no-slip surfaces. Concepts from graph theory and linear programming are utilized to solve these problems. Finally, the first automated method for higher order singularity comparisons is introduced using mathematical theories from geometric (Clifford) algebra.

  11. Hybrid genetic optimization for design of photonic crystal emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rammohan, R. R.; Farfan, B. G.; Su, M. F.; El-Kady, I.; Reda Taha, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    A unique hybrid-optimization technique is proposed, based on genetic algorithms (GA) and gradient descent (GD) methods, for the smart design of photonic crystal (PhC) emitters. The photonic simulation is described and the granularity of photonic crystal dimensions is considered. An innovative sliding-window method for performing local heuristic search is demonstrated. Finally, the application of the proposed method on two case studies for the design of a multi-pixel photonic crystal emitter and the design of thermal emitter in thermal photovoltaic is demonstrated. Discussion in the report includes the ability of the optimal PhC structures designed using the proposed method, to produce unprecedented high emission efficiencies of 54.5% in a significantly long wavelength region and 84.9% at significantly short wavelength region.

  12. Spectral analysis of the emission current noise exhibited by few layer WS2 nanosheets emitter.

    PubMed

    Suryawanshi, Sachin R; Kolhe, Pankaj S; Rout, Chandra S; Late, Dattatray J; More, Mahendra A

    2015-02-01

    Spectral analysis of the field emission (FE) current fluctuations has been carried out at the base pressure ~1×10(-8) mbar. The emission current stability investigated at preset value of 2 µA is characterized by 'step' like fluctuation. The spectral analysis performed on a FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) analyzer revealed that the observed noise is of 1/fα type, with the value of α as ~1.05. The estimated value of α implies that the current fluctuations are mainly due the various processes occurring on atomic scale like adsorption, migration, and/or desorption of the residual gas species on the emitter surface.

  13. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K.; Hung, S. B.; Lee, A. P.; Chou, C. S.; Huang, N. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  14. LOW EMITTANCE ELECTRON BEAMS FOR THE RHIC ELECTRON COOLER

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    An electron cooler, based on an Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under development for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RMIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This will be the first electron cooler operating at high energy with bunched beams. In order to achieve sufficient cooling of the ion beams the electron have to have a charge of 5 nC and a normalized emittance less than 4 {mu}. This paper presents the progress in optimizing the injector and the emittance improvements from shaping the charge distribution in the bunch.

  15. Pyrometric method for measuring emittances at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballestrín, J.; Rodríguez, J.; Carra, M. E.; Cañadas, I.; Roldan, M. I.; Barbero, J.; Marzo, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work an alternative method for emittance determination based on pyrometric measurements is presented. The measurement procedure has been applied to AISI 310S steel samples in the Plataforma Solar de Almería vertical axis solar furnace SF5. The experimental results show that emittance increases with increasing temperature and decreases with increasing wavelength. This behaviour is in agreement with experimental results obtained by other authors. Analysis of tests has revealed a good repeatability (1%) and accuracy (< 2%) of this measurement procedure.

  16. Generation of low-emittance electron beams in electrostatic accelerators for FEL applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Chen; Elias, Luis R.

    1995-02-01

    This paper reports results of transverse emittance studies and beam propagation in electrostatic accelerators for free electron laser applications. In particular, we discuss emittance growth analysis of a low current electron beam system consisting of a miniature thermoionic electron gun and a National Electrostatics Accelerator (NEC) tube. The emittance growth phenomenon is discussed in terms of thermal effects in the electron gun cathode and aberrations produced by field gradient changes occurring inside the electron gun and throughout the accelerator tube. A method of reducing aberrations using a magnetic solenoidal field is described. Analysis of electron beam emittance was done with the EGUN code. Beam propagation along the accelerator tube was studied using a cylindrically symmetric beam envelope equation that included beam self-fields and the external accelerator fields which were derived from POISSON simulations.

  17. Emittance measurements from the LLUMC proton accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coutrakon, G.; Gillespie, G. H.; Hubbard, J.; Sanders, E.

    2005-12-01

    A new method of calculating beam emittances at the extraction point of a particle accelerator is presented. The technique uses the optimization programs NPSOL and MINOS developed at Stanford University in order to determine the initial values of beam size, divergence and correlation parameters (i.e. beam sigma matrix, σij) that best fit measured beam parameters. These σij elements are then used to compute the Twiss parameters α, β, and the phase space area, ε, of the beam at the extraction point. Beam size measurements in X and Y throughout the transport line were input to the optimizer along with the magnetic elements of bends, quads, and drifts. The σij parameters were optimized at the accelerator's extraction point by finding the best agreement between these measured beam sizes and those predicted by TRANSPORT. This expands upon a previous study in which a "trial and error" technique was used instead of the optimizer software, and which yielded similar results. The Particle Beam Optics Laboratory (PBO Lab™) program used for this paper integrates particle beam optics and other codes into a single intuitive graphically-based computing environment. This new software provides a seamless interface between the NPSOL and MINOS optimizer and TRANSPORT calculations. The results of these emittance searches are presented here for the eight clinical energies between 70 and 250 MeV currently being used at LLUMC.

  18. Plasma treatment for producing electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Coates, Don Mayo; Walter, Kevin Carl

    2001-01-01

    Plasma treatment for producing carbonaceous field emission electron emitters is disclosed. A plasma of ions is generated in a closed chamber and used to surround the exposed surface of a carbonaceous material. A voltage is applied to an electrode that is in contact with the carbonaceous material. This voltage has a negative potential relative to a second electrode in the chamber and serves to accelerate the ions toward the carbonaceous material and provide an ion energy sufficient to etch the exposed surface of the carbonaceous material but not sufficient to result in the implantation of the ions within the carbonaceous material. Preferably, the ions used are those of an inert gas or an inert gas with a small amount of added nitrogen.

  19. Static analysis of possible emittance growth of intense charged particle beams with thermal equilibrium distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Kikuchi, Takashi; Horioka, Kazuhiko

    2009-05-15

    Possible emittance growths of intense, nonuniform beams during a transport in a focusing channel are derived as a function of nonlinear field energy and space charge tune depression factors. The nonlinear field energy of the beam with thermal equilibrium distribution is estimated by considering the particle distribution across the cross section of the beam. The results show that the possible emittance growth can be suppressed by keeping the beam particle in thermal equilibrium distribution during the beam transport.

  20. Fibre based integral field unit constructional techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Graham J.

    2006-06-01

    Presented here is a selected overview of constructional techniques and principles that have been developed and implemented at the University of Durham in the manufacture of successful fibre-based integral field units. The information contained herein is specifically intended to highlight the constructional methods that have been devised to assemble an efficient fibre bundle. Potential pitfalls that need to be considered when embarking upon such a deceptively simple instrument are also discussed.

  1. Fast two-dimensional super-resolution image reconstruction algorithm for ultra-high emitter density.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiaqing; Gumpper, Kristyn; Chi, Yuejie; Sun, Mingzhai; Ma, Jianjie

    2015-07-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy achieves sub-diffraction-limit resolution by localizing a sparse subset of stochastically activated emitters in each frame. Its temporal resolution is limited by the maximal emitter density that can be handled by the image reconstruction algorithms. Multiple algorithms have been developed to accurately locate the emitters even when they have significant overlaps. Currently, compressive-sensing-based algorithm (CSSTORM) achieves the highest emitter density. However, CSSTORM is extremely computationally expensive, which limits its practical application. Here, we develop a new algorithm (MempSTORM) based on two-dimensional spectrum analysis. With the same localization accuracy and recall rate, MempSTORM is 100 times faster than CSSTORM with ℓ(1)-homotopy. In addition, MempSTORM can be implemented on a GPU for parallelism, which can further increase its computational speed and make it possible for online super-resolution reconstruction of high-density emitters.

  2. Observations on the luminosity lifetimes, emittance growth rates and intra-beam scattering at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Paul L.G. Lebrun et al.

    2003-05-22

    A record luminosity of 4.2 10{sup 31}has been reached at the Fermilab p-{bar p} collider. The lifetime of this luminosity at the beginning of the store is about 10 hours. This lifetime can be explained by the measured loss of anti-protons and protons due to collisions and emittance growths. We report on transverse emittance growth rates based on our Synchrotron Light Monitor. Longitudinal emittance growth rate measurements are based on the TeV Sampled Bunch Display data. It is shown that Intra Beam Scattering is a significant source of emittance growth rates. We comment on other possible factors for these observed emittance growth rates. Finally, we comment on future luminosity lifetimes, as we hope to further increase our peak luminosity.

  3. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  4. PROTON BEAM EMITTANCE GROWTH AT RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,S.; PTITSYN, V.

    2007-06-25

    With significant beam intensity improvement in RHIC polarized proton runs in 2005 and 2006, the emittance growth becomes a luminosity limiting factor. The beam emittance growth has a dependence on the dynamic pressure rise, which in RHIC proton runs is mainly caused by the electron cloud. The beam instability is usually absent, and the emittance growth rate is much slower than the ones caused by the head-tail instability. It is suspected that the emittance growth is caused by the electron cloud below the instability threshold.

  5. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  6. A numerical simulation study of gallium-phosphide/silicon heterojunction passivated emitter and rear solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Hannes; Ohrdes, Tobias; Dastgheib-Shirazi, Amir; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; König, Dirk; Altermatt, Pietro P.

    2014-01-01

    The performance of passivated emitter and rear (PERC) solar cells made of p-type Si wafers is often limited by recombination in the phosphorus-doped emitter. To overcome this limitation, a realistic PERC solar cell is simulated, whereby the conventional phosphorus-doped emitter is replaced by a thin, crystalline gallium phosphide (GaP) layer. The resulting GaP/Si PERC cell is compared to Si PERC cells, which have (i) a standard POCl3 diffused emitter, (ii) a solid-state diffused emitter, or (iii) a high efficiency ion-implanted emitter. The maximum efficiencies for these realistic PERC cells are between 20.5% and 21.2% for the phosphorus-doped emitters (i)-(iii), and up to 21.6% for the GaP emitter. The major advantage of this GaP hetero-emitter is a significantly reduced recombination loss, resulting in a higher Voc. This is so because the high valence band offset between GaP and Si acts as a nearly ideal minority carrier blocker. This effect is comparable to amorphous Si. However, the GaP layer can be contacted with metal fingers like crystalline Si, so no conductive oxide is necessary. Compared to the conventional PERC structure, the GaP/Si PERC cell requires a lower Si base doping density, which reduces the impact of the boron-oxygen complexes. Despite the lower base doping, fewer rear local contacts are necessary. This is so because the GaP emitter shows reduced recombination, leading to a higher minority electron density in the base and, in turn, to a higher base conductivity.

  7. A numerical simulation study of gallium-phosphide/silicon heterojunction passivated emitter and rear solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, Hannes; Ohrdes, Tobias; Dastgheib-Shirazi, Amir; Puthen-Veettil, Binesh; König, Dirk; Altermatt, Pietro P.

    2014-01-28

    The performance of passivated emitter and rear (PERC) solar cells made of p-type Si wafers is often limited by recombination in the phosphorus-doped emitter. To overcome this limitation, a realistic PERC solar cell is simulated, whereby the conventional phosphorus-doped emitter is replaced by a thin, crystalline gallium phosphide (GaP) layer. The resulting GaP/Si PERC cell is compared to Si PERC cells, which have (i) a standard POCl{sub 3} diffused emitter, (ii) a solid-state diffused emitter, or (iii) a high efficiency ion-implanted emitter. The maximum efficiencies for these realistic PERC cells are between 20.5% and 21.2% for the phosphorus-doped emitters (i)–(iii), and up to 21.6% for the GaP emitter. The major advantage of this GaP hetero-emitter is a significantly reduced recombination loss, resulting in a higher V{sub oc}. This is so because the high valence band offset between GaP and Si acts as a nearly ideal minority carrier blocker. This effect is comparable to amorphous Si. However, the GaP layer can be contacted with metal fingers like crystalline Si, so no conductive oxide is necessary. Compared to the conventional PERC structure, the GaP/Si PERC cell requires a lower Si base doping density, which reduces the impact of the boron-oxygen complexes. Despite the lower base doping, fewer rear local contacts are necessary. This is so because the GaP emitter shows reduced recombination, leading to a higher minority electron density in the base and, in turn, to a higher base conductivity.

  8. Carbon nanotube based field emission X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Yuan

    This dissertation describes the development of field emission (FE) x-ray sources with a carbon-nanotube (CNT) cathode. Field emission x-rays have advantages over conventional x-rays by replacing the thermionic cathode with a cold cathode so that electrons are emitted at room temperature and emission is voltage controllable. CNTs are found to be excellent electron emitters with low threshold fields and high current density which makes them ideal for generate field emission x-rays. Macroscopic CNT cold cathodes are prepared and the parameters to tune their field emission properties are studied: structure and morphology of CNT cathodes, temperature as well as electronic work function of CNT. Macroscopic CNT cathodes with optimized performance are chosen to build a high-resolution x-ray imaging system. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution up to nanoseconds and spatial resolution down to 10 micron. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging and micro-computed tomography are also demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for non-destructive testing and for non-invasive small-animal imaging for biomedical research.

  9. Two-channel dansyl/tryptophan emitters with a cholic acid bridge as reporters for local hydrophobicity within supramolecular systems based on bile salts.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Mendoza, M; Marin, M Luisa; Miranda, Miguel A

    2014-11-14

    The aim of the present work is to develop two-channel emitters to probe local hydrophobicity by means of fluorescence quenching within different biomimetic supramolecular environments. To achieve this goal, the dansyl (Dns) and tryptophan (Trp) fluorophores have been covalently attached to cholic acid (CA) in order to ensure simultaneous incorporation of the two emitting units into the same compartment. In principle, the two fluorophores of the synthesized Dns-CA-Trp probes could either exhibit an orthogonal behavior or display excited state interactions. The fluorescence spectra of 3β-Dns-CA-Trp showed a residual Trp emission band at ca. 350 nm and an enhanced Dns maximum in the 500-550 nm region. This reveals a partial intramolecular energy transfer, which is consistent with the Dns and Trp singlet energies. Thus, the two photoactive units are not orthogonal; nevertheless, 3β-Dns-CA-Trp seems appropriate as a two-channel reporter for the supramolecular systems of interest. Fluorescence quenching of 3β-Dns-CA-Trp by iodide (which remains essentially in bulk water) was examined within sodium cholate, sodium taurocholate, sodium deoxycholate and mixed micelles. Interestingly, a decrease in the emission intensity of the two bands was observed with increasing iodide concentrations. The most remarkable effect was observed for mixed micelles, where the quenching rate constants were one order of magnitude lower than in solution. As anticipated, the quenching efficiency by iodide decreased with increasing hydrophobicity of the microenvironment, a trend that can be correlated with the relative accessibility of the probe to the ionic quencher.

  10. New light field camera based on physical based rendering tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Ming-Han; Chang, Shan-Ching; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2014-03-01

    Even though light field technology was first invented more than 50 years ago, it did not gain popularity due to the limitation imposed by the computation technology. With the rapid advancement of computer technology over the last decade, the limitation has been uplifted and the light field technology quickly returns to the spotlight of the research stage. In this paper, PBRT (Physical Based Rendering Tracing) was introduced to overcome the limitation of using traditional optical simulation approach to study the light field camera technology. More specifically, traditional optical simulation approach can only present light energy distribution but typically lack the capability to present the pictures in realistic scenes. By using PBRT, which was developed to create virtual scenes, 4D light field information was obtained to conduct initial data analysis and calculation. This PBRT approach was also used to explore the light field data calculation potential in creating realistic photos. Furthermore, we integrated the optical experimental measurement results with PBRT in order to place the real measurement results into the virtually created scenes. In other words, our approach provided us with a way to establish a link of virtual scene with the real measurement results. Several images developed based on the above-mentioned approaches were analyzed and discussed to verify the pros and cons of the newly developed PBRT based light field camera technology. It will be shown that this newly developed light field camera approach can circumvent the loss of spatial resolution associated with adopting a micro-lens array in front of the image sensors. Detailed operational constraint, performance metrics, computation resources needed, etc. associated with this newly developed light field camera technique were presented in detail.

  11. Emittance Characterization of a Hot-Cavity Laser Ion Source at HRIBF

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Baktash, Cyrus; Beene, James R; Havener, Charles C; Krause, Herbert F; Schultz, David Robert; Stracener, Daniel W; Vane, C Randy; Geppert, C.; Gottwald, T.; Kessler, T.; Wies, K.; Wendt, K.

    2009-01-01

    The first investigation of the transverse emittance of a hot-cavity laser ion source based on all-solid-state Ti:Sapphire lasers is presented. The emittances of 63Cu ion beams generated by three-photon resonant ionization are measured and compared with that of the 69Ga and 39K ion beams resulting from surface ionization in the same ion source. A Self-Consistent, Unbiased Elliptical Exclusion (SCUBEEx) method is adapted for noise reduction and emittance analysis. Typical values of the rms and 90% fractional emittances of the Cu ion beams at 20 keV energy are found to be about 2 -mm-mrad and 8 -mm-mrad, respectively, for the ion currents of 2 to 40 nA investigated. The emittances of the laser-produced Cu ion beams are smaller than those of the surface-ionized Ga and K ion beams.

  12. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths

    PubMed Central

    O’Regan, Bryan J.; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission. PMID:26293111

  13. Silicon photonic crystal thermal emitter at near-infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    O'Regan, Bryan J; Wang, Yue; Krauss, Thomas F

    2015-08-21

    Controlling thermal emission with resonant photonic nanostructures has recently attracted much attention. Most of the work has concentrated on the mid-infrared wavelength range and/or was based on metallic nanostructures. Here, we demonstrate the experimental operation of a resonant thermal emitter operating in the near-infrared (≈1.5 μm) wavelength range. The emitter is based on a doped silicon photonic crystal consisting of a two dimensional square array of holes and using silicon-on-insulator technology with a device-layer thickness of 220 nm. The device is resistively heated by passing current through the photonic crystal membrane. At a temperature of ≈1100 K, we observe relatively sharp emission peaks with a Q factor around 18. A support structure system is implemented in order to achieve a large area suspended photonic crystal thermal emitter and electrical injection. The device demonstrates that weak absorption together with photonic resonances can be used as a wavelength-selection mechanism for thermal emitters, both for the enhancement and the suppression of emission.

  14. Thermophotovoltaic Generators Using Selective Metallic Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraas, Lewis M.; Samaras, John E.; Avery, James E.; Ewell, Richard

    1995-01-01

    In the literature to date on thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generators, two types of infrared emitter's have been emphasized : gray body emitters and rare earth oxide selective emitters. The gray body emitter is defined as an emitter with a spectral emissivity independent of wavelength whereas the rare earth oxide selective emitter is idealized as a delta function emitter with a high emissivity at a select wavelength and a near zero emissivity at all other wavelengths. Silicon carbide is an example of a gray body emitter and ER-YAG is an example of a selective emitter. The Welsbach mantle in a common lantern is another example of an oxide selective emitter. Herein, we describe an alternative type of selective emitter, a selective metallic emitter. These metallic emitters are characterized by a spectral emissivity curve wherein the emissivity monotonically increases with shorter infrared wavelengths as is shown. The metal of curve "A", tungsten, typifies this class of selective metallic emitter's. In a thermophotovoltaic generator, a photovoltaic cell typically converts infrared radiation to electricity out to some cut-off wavelength. For example, Gallium Antimonide (GaSb) TPV cells respond out to 1.7 microns. The problem with gray body emitters is that they emit at all wavelengths. Therefore, a large fraction of the energy emitted will be outside of the response band of the TPV cell. The argument for the selective emitter is that, ideally, all the emitted energy can be in the cells response band. Unfortunately, rare earth oxide emitters are not ideal. In order to suppress the emissivity toward zero away from the select wavelength, the use of thin fiber's is necessary. This leads to a fragile emitter typical of a lantern mantle. Even given a thin ER-YAG emitter, the measured emissivity at the select wavelength of 1.5 microns has been reported to be 0.6 while the off wavelength background emissivity falls to only 0.2 at 5 microns. This gives a selectivity ratio of only 3

  15. Phase correlation of ensemble of quantum emitters and timed Dicke state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jae Seok; Hong, Suc-Kyoung; Nam, Seog Woo; Yang, Hyung Jin

    2016-06-01

    We study the phase-correlated state which is introduced by the instantaneous excitation of an ensemble of identical two-level quantum emitters and its relation with the Dicke states. Under weak coupling regime, the time evolution of the phase-correlated system of the emitters is also derived to see the characteristics of the collective spontaneous emission of the emitters. It is found that the effective coupling of the ensemble in the phase-correlated state with the emitted field is directly determined by the collective phase of the system. Hence, the collective phase is considered for several specified distributions in brief.

  16. Radiation risks from inhaled alpha emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Jack A.

    2001-06-01

    The alpha emitter that gives rise to the greatest concern over its link to the induction of lung cancer is radon. As noted by the ICRP, attempts to relate the risk of cancer induction to the dose delivered by the alpha particles result in a value for this risk which is unrealistically high. Instead, an estimate based on the epidemiology of radon in mines is preferred. The logical result, that the weighting factor for these alpha particles should be very much lesser than the recommended value of 20, appears to have been ignored. It will be shown that there are two fundamental reasons for this large discrepancy. The first is that the implied "linear non-threshold" hypothesis is not supported by recent investigations. The second is that the concept of "dose" is meaningless at the levels of exposure considered in this context. Alternative proposals in terms of fluence and the effect cross-section will be presented.

  17. Selective protected state preparation of coupled dissipative quantum emitters

    PubMed Central

    Plankensteiner, D.; Ostermann, L.; Ritsch, H.; Genes, C.

    2015-01-01

    Inherent binary or collective interactions in ensembles of quantum emitters induce a spread in the energy and lifetime of their eigenstates. While this typically causes fast decay and dephasing, in many cases certain special entangled collective states with minimal decay can be found, which possess ideal properties for spectroscopy, precision measurements or information storage. We show that for a specific choice of laser frequency, power and geometry or a suitable configuration of control fields one can efficiently prepare these states. We demonstrate this by studying preparation schemes for strongly subradiant entangled states of a chain of dipole-dipole coupled emitters. The prepared state fidelity and its entanglement depth is further improved via spatial excitation phase engineering or tailored magnetic fields. PMID:26549501

  18. High field - low energy muon ionization cooling channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamal Sayed, Hisham; Palmer, Robert B.; Neuffer, David

    2015-09-01

    Muon beams are generated with large transverse and longitudinal emittances. In order to achieve the low emittances required by a muon collider, within the short lifetime of the muons, ionization cooling is required. Cooling schemes have been developed to reduce the muon beam 6D emittances to ≈300 μ m -rad in transverse and ≈1 - 1.5 mm in longitudinal dimensions. The transverse emittance has to be further reduced to ≈50 - 25 μ m -rad with an upper limit on the longitudinal emittance of ≈76 mm in order to meet the high-energy muon collider luminosity requirements. Earlier studies of the transverse cooling of low energy muon beams in high field magnets showed a promising performance, but did not include transverse or longitudinal matching between the stages. In this study we present the first complete design of the high field-low energy ionization cooling channel with transverse and longitudinal matching. The channel design was based on strong focusing solenoids with fields of 25-30 T and low momentum muon beam starting at 135 MeV /c and gradually decreasing. The cooling channel design presented here is the first to reach ≈50 micron scale emittance beam. We present the channel's optimized design parameters including the focusing solenoid fields, absorber parameters and the transverse and longitudinal matching.

  19. Selective Emitter Pumped Rare Earth Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor); Patton, Martin O. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A selective emitter pumped rare earth laser provides an additional type of laser for use in many laser applications. Rare earth doped lasers exist which are pumped with flashtubes or laser diodes. The invention uses a rare earth emitter to transform thermal energy input to a spectral band matching the absorption band of a rare earth in the laser in order to produce lasing.

  20. Bright Single Photon Emitter in Silicon Carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lienhard, Benjamin; Schroeder, Tim; Mouradian, Sara; Dolde, Florian; Trong Tran, Toan; Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk

    Efficient, on-demand, and robust single photon emitters are of central importance to many areas of quantum information processing. Over the past 10 years, color centers in solids have emerged as excellent single photon emitters. Color centers in diamond are among the most intensively studied single photon emitters, but recently silicon carbide (SiC) has also been demonstrated to be an excellent host material. In contrast to diamond, SiC is a technologically important material that is widely used in optoelectronics, high power electronics, and microelectromechanical systems. It is commercially available in sizes up to 6 inches and processes for device engineering are well developed. We report on a visible-spectrum single photon emitter in 4H-SiC. The emitter is photostable at both room and low temperatures, and it enables 2 million photons/second from unpatterned bulk SiC. We observe two classes of orthogonally polarized emitters, each of which has parallel absorption and emission dipole orientations. Low temperature measurements reveal a narrow zero phonon line with linewidth < 0.1 nm that accounts for more than 30% of the total photoluminescence spectrum. To our knowledge, this SiC color emitter is the brightest stable room-temperature single photon emitter ever observed.

  1. Low-macroscopic field emission properties of wide bandgap copper aluminium oxide nanoparticles for low-power panel applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayan Banerjee, Arghya; Joo, Sang W.

    2011-09-01

    Field emission properties of CuAlO2 nanoparticles are reported for the first time, with a low turn-on field of approximately 2 V µm - 1 and field enhancement factor around 230. The field emission process follows the standard Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling of cold electron emission. The emission mechanism is found to be a combination of low electron affinity, internal nanostructure and large field enhancement at the low-dimensional emitter tips of the nanoparticles. The field emission properties are comparable to the conventional carbon-based field emitters, and thus can become alternative candidate for field emission devices for low-power panel applications.

  2. Low-macroscopic field emission properties of wide bandgap copper aluminium oxide nanoparticles for low-power panel applications.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Arghya Narayan; Joo, Sang W

    2011-09-01

    Field emission properties of CuAlO(2) nanoparticles are reported for the first time, with a low turn-on field of approximately 2 V µm(-1) and field enhancement factor around 230. The field emission process follows the standard Fowler-Nordheim tunnelling of cold electron emission. The emission mechanism is found to be a combination of low electron affinity, internal nanostructure and large field enhancement at the low-dimensional emitter tips of the nanoparticles. The field emission properties are comparable to the conventional carbon-based field emitters, and thus can become alternative candidate for field emission devices for low-power panel applications. PMID:21841217

  3. Directional emittance surface measurement system and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Puram, Chith K. (Inventor); Daryabeigi, Kamran (Inventor); Wright, Robert (Inventor); Alderfer, David W. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus and process for measuring the variation of directional emittance of surfaces at various temperatures using a radiometric infrared imaging system. A surface test sample is coated onto a copper target plate provided with selective heating within the desired incremental temperature range to be tested and positioned onto a precision rotator to present selected inclination angles of the sample relative to the fixed positioned and optically aligned infrared imager. A thermal insulator holder maintains the target plate on the precision rotator. A screen display of the temperature obtained by the infrared imager, and inclination readings are provided with computer calculations of directional emittance being performed automatically according to equations provided to convert selected incremental target temperatures and inclination angles to relative target directional emittance values. The directional emittance of flat black lacquer and an epoxy resin measurements obtained are in agreement with the predictions of the electromagnetic theory and with directional emittance data inferred from directional reflectance measurements made on a spectrophotometer.

  4. Shaping single emitter emission with metallic hole arrays: strong focusing of dipolar radiation.

    PubMed

    Moerland, Robert J; Eguiluz, Lur; Kaivola, Matti

    2013-02-25

    Nanoscale plasmonic structures allow for control of the emission of single emitters, such as fluorescent molecules and quantum dots, enabling phenomena such as lifetime reduction, emission redirection and color sorting of photons. We present single emitter emission tailored with arrays of holes of heterogeneous size, perforated in a gold film. With spatial control of the local amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic field radiated by the emitter, a desired near- or far-field distribution of the electromagnetic waves can be obtained. This control is established by varying the aspect ratio of the individual holes and the periodicity of the array surrounding the emitter. As an example showing the versatility of the technique, we present the strong focusing of the radiation of a highly divergent dipole source, for both p- and s-polarized waves.

  5. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.; Langstrom, B.

    1990-04-03

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  6. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  7. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Fowler, Joanna S.; MacGregor, Robert R.; Wolf, Alfred P.; Langstrom, Bengt

    1990-01-01

    This invention involves a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide inactivators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography.

  8. Prototype of a subsurface drip irrigation emitter: Manufacturing, hydraulic evaluation and experimental analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Wanderley De Jesus; Rodrigues Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Arriel Botrel, Tarlei; Duarte Coelho, Rubens

    2013-04-01

    Root and soil intrusion into the conventional emitters is one of the major disadvantages to obtain a good uniformity of water application in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI). In the last years, there have been different approaches to reduce these problems such as the impregnation of emitters with herbicide, and the search for an emitter geometry impairing the intrusion of small roots. Within the last this study, has developed and evaluated an emitter model which geometry shows specific physical features to prevent emitter clogging. This work was developed at the Biosystems Engineering Department at ESALQ-USP/Brazil, and it is a part of a research in which an innovated emitteŕs model for SDI has been developed to prevent root and soil particles intrusion. An emitter with a mechanical-hydraulic mechanism (opening and closing the water outlet) for SDI was developed and manufactured using a mechanical lathe process. It was composed by a silicon elastic membrane a polyethylene tube and a Vnyl Polychloride membrane protector system. In this study the performance of the developed prototype was assessed in the laboratory and in the field conditions. In the laboratory, uniformity of water application was calculated by the water emission uniformity coefficient (CUE), and the manufacturer's coefficient of variation (CVm). In addition, variation in the membrane diameter submitted to internal pressures; head losses along the membrane, using the energy equation; and, precision and accuracy of the equation model, analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), and by Willmott's concordance index (d) were also calculated with samples of the developed emitters. In the field, the emitters were installed in pots with and without sugar cane culture from October 2010 to January 2012. During this time, flow rate in 20 emitters were measured periodically, and the aspects of them about clogging at the end of the experiment. Emitters flow rates were measured quarterly to calculate

  9. SELFI: an object-based, Bayesian method for faint emission line source detection in MUSE deep field data cubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meillier, Céline; Chatelain, Florent; Michel, Olivier; Bacon, Roland; Piqueras, Laure; Bacher, Raphael; Ayasso, Hacheme

    2016-04-01

    We present SELFI, the Source Emission Line FInder, a new Bayesian method optimized for detection of faint galaxies in Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) deep fields. MUSE is the new panoramic integral field spectrograph at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) that has unique capabilities for spectroscopic investigation of the deep sky. It has provided data cubes with 324 million voxels over a single 1 arcmin2 field of view. To address the challenge of faint-galaxy detection in these large data cubes, we developed a new method that processes 3D data either for modeling or for estimation and extraction of source configurations. This object-based approach yields a natural sparse representation of the sources in massive data fields, such as MUSE data cubes. In the Bayesian framework, the parameters that describe the observed sources are considered random variables. The Bayesian model leads to a general and robust algorithm where the parameters are estimated in a fully data-driven way. This detection algorithm was applied to the MUSE observation of Hubble Deep Field-South. With 27 h total integration time, these observations provide a catalog of 189 sources of various categories and with secured redshift. The algorithm retrieved 91% of the galaxies with only 9% false detection. This method also allowed the discovery of three new Lyα emitters and one [OII] emitter, all without any Hubble Space Telescope counterpart. We analyzed the reasons for failure for some targets, and found that the most important limitation of the method is when faint sources are located in the vicinity of bright spatially resolved galaxies that cannot be approximated by the Sérsic elliptical profile. The software and its documentation are available on the MUSE science web service (muse-vlt.eu/science).

  10. Experimentally minimized beam emittance from an L-band photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasilnikov, M.; Stephan, F.; Asova, G.; Grabosch, H.-J.; Groß, M.; Hakobyan, L.; Isaev, I.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Jachmann, L.; Khojoyan, M.; Klemz, G.; Köhler, W.; Mahgoub, M.; Malyutin, D.; Nozdrin, M.; Oppelt, A.; Otevrel, M.; Petrosyan, B.; Rimjaem, S.; Shapovalov, A.; Vashchenko, G.; Weidinger, S.; Wenndorff, R.; Flöttmann, K.; Hoffmann, M.; Lederer, S.; Schlarb, H.; Schreiber, S.; Templin, I.; Will, I.; Paramonov, V.; Richter, D.

    2012-10-01

    High brightness electron sources for linac based free-electron lasers (FELs) are being developed at the Photo Injector Test facility at DESY, Zeuthen site (PITZ). Production of electron bunches with extremely small transverse emittance is the focus of the PITZ scientific program. The photoinjector optimization in 2008-2009 for a bunch charge of 1, 0.5, 0.25, and 0.1 nC resulted in measured emittance values which are beyond the requirements of the European XFEL [S. Rimjaem , Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., Sect. A 671, 62 (2012)NIMAER0168-900210.1016/j.nima.2011.12.101]. Several essential modifications were commissioned in 2010-2011 at PITZ, resulting in further improvement of the photoinjector performance. Significant improvement of the rf gun phase stability is a major contribution in the reduction of the measured transverse emittance. The old TESLA prototype booster was replaced by a new cut disk structure cavity. This allows acceleration of the electron beam to higher energies and supports much higher flexibility for stable booster operation as well as for longer rf pulses which is of vital importance especially for the emittance optimization of low charge bunches. The transverse phase space of the electron beam was optimized at PITZ for bunch charges in the range between 0.02 and 2 nC, where the quality of the beam measurements was preserved by utilizing long pulse train operation. The experimental optimization yielded worldwide unprecedented low normalized emittance beams in the whole charge range studied.

  11. Strongly coupling a cavity to inhomogeneous ensembles of emitters: Potential for long-lived solid-state quantum memories

    SciTech Connect

    Diniz, I.; Portolan, S.; Auffeves, A.

    2011-12-15

    We investigate theoretically the coupling of a cavity mode to a continuous distribution of emitters. We discuss the influence of the emitters' inhomogeneous broadening on the existence and on the coherence properties of the polaritonic peaks. We find that their coherence depends crucially on the shape of the distribution and not only on its width. Under certain conditions the coupling to the cavity protects the polaritonic states from inhomogeneous broadening, resulting in a longer storage time for a quantum memory based on emitter ensembles. When two different ensembles of emitters are coupled to the resonator, they support a peculiar collective dark state, which is also very attractive for the storage of quantum information.

  12. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP.

    PubMed

    Yorita, T; Hatanaka, K; Fukuda, M; Shimada, K; Yasuda, Y; Saito, T; Tamura, H; Kamakura, K

    2016-02-01

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  13. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  14. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  15. Filter-free nondispersive infrared sensing using narrow-bandwidth mid-infrared thermal emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takuya; De Zoysa, Menaka; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate filter-free nondispersive infrared (NDIR) sensing of organic solvents using single-peak narrow-bandwidth mid-infrared thermal emitters. Our emitters are based on multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) slabs, and show a single thermal emission peak with a quality factor of over 100 at the fingerprint wavelength (around 9 µm) of the target organic solvents. Using these narrow-bandwidth thermal emitters and commercial pyroelectric sensors without any optical bandpass filters, we successfully distinguish and determine the concentration of the target solvents among other solvents.

  16. Replacement of oxide glass with metallic glass for Ag screen printing metallization on Si emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se Yun; Jee, Sang Soo; Lim, Ka Ram; Kim, Won Tae; Kim, Do Hyang; Lee, Eun-Sung; Kim, Young Hwan; Lee, Sang Mock; Lee, Jun Ho; Eckert, Jürgen

    2011-05-01

    Cu-Zr-based metallic glass (MG) has been applied as a binding agent of Ag paste for front contact formation in Si solar cell by screen printing process. Use of electroconductive MG binder significantly improves the quality of the contact by the formation of highly dense 10-50 nm size Ag crystallites and the noncorrugation of the emitter surface with a very shallow Ag crystallite penetration depth of 10-30 nm. Nanoscale Ag crystallites form on the emitter surface by local Si-Cu-Ag eutectic melting, leading to the formation of pyramidal pits on the Si emitter surface, followed by precipitation of Ag crystallites during cooling.

  17. Electrochemical sharpening of field emission tips

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    A method for sharpening field emitter tips by electroetching/polishing. In gated field emitters, it is very important to initiate electron emission at the lowest possible voltage and thus the composition of the emitter and the gate, as well as the emitter-gate structure, are important factors. This method of sharpening the emitter tips uses the grid as a counter electrode in electroetching of the emitters, which can produce extremely sharp emitter tips as well as remove asperities and other imperfections in the emitters, each in relation to the specific grid hole in which it resides. This has the effect of making emission more uniform among the emitters as well as lowering the turn-on voltage.

  18. Transparent conductor-embedding nanocones for selective emitters: optical and electrical improvements of Si solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hyunyub; Cho, Yunae; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kumar, M Melvin David; Yi, Junsin; Anderson, Wayne A; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Periodical nanocone-arrays were employed in an emitter region for high efficient Si solar cells. Conventional wet-etching process was performed to form the nanocone-arrays for a large area, which spontaneously provides the graded doping features for a selective emitter. This enables to lower the electrical contact resistance and enhances the carrier collection due to the high electric field distribution through a nanocone. Optically, the convex-shaped nanocones efficiently reduce light-reflection and the incident light is effectively focused into Si via nanocone structure, resulting in an extremely improved the carrier collection performances. This nanocone-arrayed selective emitter simultaneously satisfies optical and electrical improvement. We report the record high efficiency of 16.3% for the periodically nanoscale patterned emitter Si solar cell.

  19. Transparent conductor-embedding nanocones for selective emitters: optical and electrical improvements of Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hyunyub; Cho, Yunae; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kumar, M. Melvin David; Yi, Junsin; Anderson, Wayne A.; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Periodical nanocone-arrays were employed in an emitter region for high efficient Si solar cells. Conventional wet-etching process was performed to form the nanocone-arrays for a large area, which spontaneously provides the graded doping features for a selective emitter. This enables to lower the electrical contact resistance and enhances the carrier collection due to the high electric field distribution through a nanocone. Optically, the convex-shaped nanocones efficiently reduce light-reflection and the incident light is effectively focused into Si via nanocone structure, resulting in an extremely improved the carrier collection performances. This nanocone-arrayed selective emitter simultaneously satisfies optical and electrical improvement. We report the record high efficiency of 16.3% for the periodically nanoscale patterned emitter Si solar cell.

  20. Multiple intrinsically identical single-photon emitters in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Rogers, L J; Jahnke, K D; Teraji, T; Marseglia, L; Müller, C; Naydenov, B; Schauffert, H; Kranz, C; Isoya, J; McGuinness, L P; Jelezko, F

    2014-01-01

    Emitters of indistinguishable single photons are crucial for the growing field of quantum technologies. To realize scalability and increase the complexity of quantum optics technologies, multiple independent yet identical single-photon emitters are required. However, typical solid-state single-photon sources are inherently dissimilar, necessitating the use of electrical feedback or optical cavities to improve spectral overlap between distinct emitters. Here we demonstrate bright silicon vacancy (SiV(-)) centres in low-strain bulk diamond, which show spectral overlap of up to 91% and nearly transform-limited excitation linewidths. This is the first time that distinct single-photon emitters in the solid state have shown intrinsically identical spectral properties. Our results have impact on the application of single-photon sources for quantum optics and cryptography. PMID:25162729

  1. Reduction of Thermal Emittance by using P-polarized Laser at Oblique Incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang,D.; Park, S.; Park, J.; Parc, Y.; Wang, X.

    2006-01-01

    High charge low emittance electron beam is crucial for the 4th generation light source. Conventionally the beam is generated by photoinjector with laser illuminating the cathode at nearly normal incidence. In this paper attention was called to the use of laser at oblique incidence, which we believe, may be more beneficial. It is found that when the laser illuminates the cathode at oblique incidence, the quantum efficiency (QE) and thermal emittance show strong dependence on incidence angle and polarization state. By using p-polarized laser at oblique incidence, surface photoemission is initiated by the presence of the normal electric field which results in a higher QE and lower thermal emittance. With this technique, the increase in QE by almost 5 times and the reduction of thermal emittance by 40% should be quite expectable for a Copper photo-cathode with atomically smooth surface.

  2. Transparent conductor-embedding nanocones for selective emitters: optical and electrical improvements of Si solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joondong; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Kim, Hyunyub; Cho, Yunae; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kumar, M. Melvin David; Yi, Junsin; Anderson, Wayne A.; Kim, Dong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Periodical nanocone-arrays were employed in an emitter region for high efficient Si solar cells. Conventional wet-etching process was performed to form the nanocone-arrays for a large area, which spontaneously provides the graded doping features for a selective emitter. This enables to lower the electrical contact resistance and enhances the carrier collection due to the high electric field distribution through a nanocone. Optically, the convex-shaped nanocones efficiently reduce light-reflection and the incident light is effectively focused into Si via nanocone structure, resulting in an extremely improved the carrier collection performances. This nanocone-arrayed selective emitter simultaneously satisfies optical and electrical improvement. We report the record high efficiency of 16.3% for the periodically nanoscale patterned emitter Si solar cell. PMID:25787933

  3. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, D.K.; Rankin, R.A.; Morgan, J.P.

    1994-05-31

    A magnetic field controller is described for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a Hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage. 1 fig.

  4. DC-based magnetic field controller

    DOEpatents

    Kotter, Dale K.; Rankin, Richard A.; Morgan, John P,.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic field controller for laboratory devices and in particular to dc operated magnetic field controllers for mass spectrometers, comprising a dc power supply in combination with improvements to a hall probe subsystem, display subsystem, preamplifier, field control subsystem, and an output stage.

  5. Thin-film ‘Thermal Well’ Emitters and Absorbers for High-Efficiency Thermophotovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Jonathan K.; Hsu, Wei-Chun; Huang, Yi; Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    A new approach is introduced to significantly improve the performance of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems using low-dimensional thermal emitters and photovoltaic (PV) cells. By reducing the thickness of both the emitter and the PV cell, strong spectral selectivity in thermal emission and absorption can be achieved by confining photons in trapped waveguide modes inside the thin-films that act as thermal analogs to quantum wells. Simultaneously, photo-excited carriers travel shorter distances across the thin-films reducing bulk recombination losses resulting in a lower saturation current in the PV cell. We predict a TPV efficiency enhancement with near-field coupling between the thermal emitter and the PV cell up to 38.7% using a thin-film germanium (Ge) emitter at 1000 K and an ultra-thin gallium antimonide (GaSb) cell supported by perfect back reflectors separated by 100 nm. Even in the far-field limit, the efficiency is predicted to reach 31.5%, which is over an order of magnitude higher than the Shockley Queisser limit of 1.6% for a bulk GaSb cell and a blackbody emitter at 1000 K. The proposed design approach does not require nanoscale patterning of the emitter and PV cell surfaces, but instead offers a simple low-cost solution to improve the performance of thermophotovoltaic systems. PMID:26030711

  6. Intrinsic emittance reduction in transmission mode photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyeri; Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan

    2016-03-01

    High quantum efficiency (QE) and low emittance electron beams provided by multi-alkali photocathodes make them of great interest for next generation high brightness photoinjectors. Spicer's three-step model well describes the photoemission process; however, some photocathode characteristics such as their thickness have not yet been completely exploited to further improve the brightness of the generated electron beams. In this work, we report on the emittance and QE of a multi-alkali photocathode grown onto a glass substrate operated in transmission and reflection modes at different photon energies. We observed a 20% reduction in the intrinsic emittance from the reflection to the transmission mode operation. This observation can be explained by inelastic electron-phonon scattering during electrons' transit towards the cathode surface. Due to this effect, we predict that thicker photocathode layers will further reduce the intrinsic emittance of electron beams generated by photocathodes operated in transmission mode.

  7. Development of a pepper pot emittance probe and its application for ECR ion beam studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Kondrashev, S.; Barcikowski, A.; Mustapha, B.; Ostroumov, P.N.; Vinogradov, N.; Northern Illinois Univ.

    2009-07-21

    A pepper pot-scintillator screen system has been developed and used to measure the emittance of DC ion beams extracted from a high-intensity permanent magnet ECR ion source. The system includes a fast beam shutter with a minimum dwell time of 18 ms to reduce the degradation of the CsI(Tl) scintillator by DC ion beam irradiation and a CCD camera with a variable shutter speed in the range of 1 {micro}s-65 s. On-line emittance measurements are performed by an application code developed on a LabVIEW platform. The sensitivity of the device is sufficient to measure the emittance of DC ion beams with current densities down to about 100 nA/cm{sup 2}. The emittance of all ion species extracted from the ECR ion source and post-accelerated to an energy of 75-90 keV/charge have been measured downstream of the LEBT. As the mass-to-charge ratio of ion species increases, the normalized RMS emittances in both transverse phase planes decrease from 0.5-1.0 {pi} mm mrad for light ions to 0.05-0.09 {pi} mm mrad for highly charged {sup 209}Bi ions. The dependence of the emittance on ion's mass-to-charge ratio follows very well the dependence expected from beam rotation induced by decreasing ECR axial magnetic field. The measured emittance values cannot be explained by only ion beam rotation for all ion species and the contribution to emittance of ion temperature in plasma, non-linear electric fields and non-linear space charge is comparable or even higher than the contribution of ion beam rotation.

  8. Energy efficiency of electron plasma emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesski, V. G.

    2011-12-15

    Electron emission influence from gas-discharge plasma on plasma emitter energy parameters is considered. It is shown, that electron emission from plasma is accompanied by energy contribution redistribution in the gas-discharge from plasma emitter supplies sources-the gas-discharge power supply and the accelerating voltage power supply. Some modes of electron emission as a result can be realized: 'a probe measurements mode,' 'a transitive mode,' and 'a full switching mode.'.

  9. Coaxial inverted geometry transistor having buried emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hruby, R. J.; Cress, S. B.; Dunn, W. R. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to an inverted geometry transistor wherein the emitter is buried within the substrate. The transistor can be fabricated as a part of a monolithic integrated circuit and is particularly suited for use in applications where it is desired to employ low actuating voltages. The transistor may employ the same doping levels in the collector and emitter, so these connections can be reversed.

  10. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  11. T-Shaped Emitter Metal Structures for HBTs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fung, King Man; Samoska, Lorene; Velebir, James; Muller, Richard; Echternach, Pierre; Siegel, Peter; Smith, Peter; Martin, Suzanne; Malik, Roger; Rodwell, Mark; Urteaga, Miguel; Paidi, Vamsi; Griffith, Zack

    2006-01-01

    Metal emitter structures in a class of developmental InP-based high-speed heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) have been redesigned to have T-shaped cross sections. T-cross-section metal features have been widely used in Schottky diodes and high-electron-mobility transistors, but not in HBTs. As explained, the purpose served by the present T cross-sectional shapes is to increase fabrication yields beyond those achievable with the prior cross-sectional shapes.

  12. Novel and efficient Mie-metamaterial thermal emitter for thermophotovoltaic systems.

    PubMed

    Ghanekar, Alok; Lin, Laura; Zheng, Yi

    2016-05-16

    We theoretically demonstrate a novel, efficient and cost effective thermal emitter using a Mie-resonance metamaterial for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. We propose for the first time the design of a thermal emitter which is based on nanoparticle-embedded thin film. The emitter consists of a thin film of SiO2 on the top of tungsten layer deposited on a substrate. The thin film is embedded with tungsten nanoparticles which alter the refractive index of the film. This gives rise to desired emissive properties in the wavelength range of 0.4 μm to 2 μm suitable for GaSb and InGaAs based photovoltaics. Effective dielectric properties are calculated using Maxwell-Garnett-Mie theory. Our calculations indicate this would significantly improve the efficiency of TPV cells. We introduce a new parameter to gauge the efficacy of thermal emitters and use it to compare different designs. PMID:27409959

  13. Novel and efficient Mie-metamaterial thermal emitter for thermophotovoltaic systems.

    PubMed

    Ghanekar, Alok; Lin, Laura; Zheng, Yi

    2016-05-16

    We theoretically demonstrate a novel, efficient and cost effective thermal emitter using a Mie-resonance metamaterial for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. We propose for the first time the design of a thermal emitter which is based on nanoparticle-embedded thin film. The emitter consists of a thin film of SiO2 on the top of tungsten layer deposited on a substrate. The thin film is embedded with tungsten nanoparticles which alter the refractive index of the film. This gives rise to desired emissive properties in the wavelength range of 0.4 μm to 2 μm suitable for GaSb and InGaAs based photovoltaics. Effective dielectric properties are calculated using Maxwell-Garnett-Mie theory. Our calculations indicate this would significantly improve the efficiency of TPV cells. We introduce a new parameter to gauge the efficacy of thermal emitters and use it to compare different designs.

  14. Magnetic space-based field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langel, R. A.

    1981-01-01

    Because the near Earth magnetic field is a complex combination of fields from outside the Earth of fields from its core and of fields from its crust, measurements from space prove to be the only practical way to obtain timely, global surveys. Due to difficulty in making accurate vector measurements, early satellites such as Sputnik and Vanguard measured only the magnitude survey. The attitude accuracy was 20 arc sec. Both the Earth's core fields and the fields arising from its crust were mapped from satellite data. The standard model of the core consists of a scalar potential represented by a spherical harmonics series. Models of the crustal field are relatively new. Mathematical representation is achieved in localized areas by arrays of dipoles appropriately located in the Earth's crust. Measurements of the Earth's field are used in navigation, to map charged particles in the magnetosphere, to study fluid properties in the Earth's core, to infer conductivity of the upper mantels, and to delineate regional scale geological features.

  15. Optimizing Optoelectronic Properties of Pyrimidine-Based TADF Emitters by Changing the Substituent for Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with External Quantum Efficiency Close to 25 % and Slow Efficiency Roll-Off.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kailong; Zhang, Tao; Zhan, Lisi; Zhong, Cheng; Gong, Shaolong; Jiang, Nan; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Yang, Chuluo

    2016-07-25

    A series of green butterfly-shaped thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters, namely PXZPM, PXZMePM, and PXZPhPM, are developed by integrating an electron-donor (D) phenoxazine unit and electron-acceptor (A) 2-substituted pyrimidine moiety into one molecule via a phenyl-bridge π linkage to form a D-π-A-π-D configuration. Changing the substituent at pyrimidine unit in these emitters can finely tune their emissive characteristics, thermal properties, and energy gaps between the singlet and triplet states while maintaining frontier molecular orbital levels, and thereby optimizing their optoelectronic properties. Employing these TADF emitters results in a green fluorescent organic light-emitting diode (OLED) that exhibits a peak forward-viewing external quantum efficiency (EQE) close to 25 % and a slow efficiency roll-off characteristic at high luminance. PMID:27331374

  16. Numerical model and analysis of transistors with polysilicon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Z.

    With the advent of Very Large Scale Integration (VLS) technology, innovative bipolar devices with shallow junctions and high performances are being developed both for silicon and compound semiconductor materials. In the composite structure, such as HBJT (Heterojunction Bipolar Junction Transistor), the device characteristics are controlled not only by the doping profile but also by the composition of the structure. A complete physical and numerical model was developed to handle the carrier transport in such composite structure. An analytical approach (the introduction of an effective recombination velocity) to analyze carrier transport in the emitter of the bipolar transistor is discussed. Both analytical and numerical methods are then applied to the analysis of the device characteristics of transistors with polysilicon emitters. Good agreement between simulations and experimental results is achieved, and a regime of carrier distribution in the base space charge region is revealed. The numerical implementation of the model--a general purpose, one dimensional device simulation program (SEDAN) is briefly discussed.

  17. Extended Emitter Target Tracking Using GM-PHD Filter

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Youqing; Zhou, Shilin; Gao, Gui; Zou, Huanxin; Lei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    If equipped with several radar emitters, a target will produce more than one measurement per time step and is denoted as an extended target. However, due to the requirement of all possible measurement set partitions, the exact probability hypothesis density filter for extended target tracking is computationally intractable. To reduce the computational burden, a fast partitioning algorithm based on hierarchy clustering is proposed in this paper. It combines the two most similar cells to obtain new partitions step by step. The pseudo-likelihoods in the Gaussian-mixture probability hypothesis density filter can then be computed iteratively. Furthermore, considering the additional measurement information from the emitter target, the signal feature is also used in partitioning the measurement set to improve the tracking performance. The simulation results show that the proposed method can perform better with lower computational complexity in scenarios with different clutter densities. PMID:25490206

  18. Optimization of receiver arrangements for passive emitter localization methods.

    PubMed

    Flückiger, M; Neild, A; Nelson, B J

    2012-03-01

    Passive localization of an object from its emission can be based on time difference of arrival or phase shift measurements for different receiver groups in sensor arrays. The accuracy of the localization primarily depends on accurate time and/or phase measurements. The frequency of the emission and the number and arrangement of the receivers mainly effect the resolution of the emitter localization. In this paper optimal receiver positions for passive localization methods are proposed, resulting in a maximal resolution for the emitter location estimate. The optimization is done by analyzing the uncertainty of the emitted signal, including its frequency. The technique has been developed specifically for ultrasound signals obtained from omnidirectional transducers, although the results apply for other application using passive localization techniques.

  19. Refractory absorber/emitter using monolayer of ceramic microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyachenko, P. N.; do Rosário, J. J.; Leib, E. W.; Petrov, A. Y.; Störmer, M.; Weller, H.; Vossmeyer, T.; Schneider, G. A.; Eich, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present a self-assembled refractory absorber/emitter without the necessity to structure the metallic surface itself, still retaining the feature of tailored optical properties for visible light emission and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. We have demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that monolayers of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) microparticles on a tungsten layer can be used as large area, efficient and thermally stable selective absorbers/emitters. The band edge of the absorption is based on critically coupled microsphere resonances. It can be tuned from visible to near-infrared range by varying the diameter of the microparticles. We demonstrated the optical functionality of the structure after annealing up to temperatures of 1000°C under vacuum conditions. In particular it opens up the route towards high efficiency TPV systems with emission matched to the photovoltaic cell.

  20. Crystalline silicon solar cells with high resistivity emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panek, P.; Drabczyk, K.; Zięba, P.

    2009-06-01

    The paper presents a part of research targeted at the modification of crystalline silicon solar cell production using screen-printing technology. The proposed process is based on diffusion from POCl3 resulting in emitter with a sheet resistance on the level of 70 Ω/□ and then, shaped by high temperature passivation treatment. The study was focused on a shallow emitter of high resistivity and on its influence on output electrical parameters of a solar cell. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been employed for appropriate distinguishing the total donor doped profile. The solar cell parameters were characterized by current-voltage characteristics and spectral response (SR) methods. Some aspects playing a role in suitable manufacturing process were discussed. The situation in a photovoltaic industry with emphasis on silicon supply and current prices of solar cells, modules and photovoltaic (PV) systems are described. The economic and quantitative estimation of the PV world market is shortly discussed.

  1. High efficiency rare-earth emitter for thermophotovoltaic applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sakr, E. S.; Zhou, Z.; Bermel, P.

    2014-09-15

    In this work, we propose a rare-earth-based ceramic thermal emitter design that can boost thermophotovoltaic (TPV) efficiencies significantly without cold-side filters at a temperature of 1573 K (1300 °C). The proposed emitter enhances a naturally occurring rare earth transition using quality-factor matching, with a quarter-wave stack as a highly reflective back mirror, while suppressing parasitic losses via exponential chirping of a multilayer reflector transmitting only at short wavelengths. This allows the emissivity to approach the blackbody limit for wavelengths overlapping with the absorption peak of the rare-earth material, while effectively reducing the losses associated with undesirable long-wavelength emission. We obtain TPV efficiencies of 34% using this layered design, which only requires modest index contrast, making it particularly amenable to fabrication via a wide variety of techniques, including sputtering, spin-coating, and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition.

  2. Preliminary Evaluation of a Field and Non-Field Based Social Studies Preservice Teacher Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napier, John D.; Vansickle, Ronald L.

    1978-01-01

    Comparison of pre-service social studies teachers in field and non-field based methods courses indicated no significant differences with regard to teaching skills, attitudes, or behaviors teachers should exhibit in the classroom. (Author/DB)

  3. Molybdenum nano emitters: the effect of the structural feature on oxygen damage immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yan; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Ye, Peng; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Fei; Chen, Jun; She, Juncong

    2016-04-01

    The structural feature of molybdenum (Mo) nano emitters has a significant effect on their field emission reliability in the oxidizing environment. Mo nanowalls have been studied to exhibit high oxygen damage immunity. The two-dimensional (2D) nanostructure has shown stable and recoverable field emission performance during oxygen exposure in the order of magnitude of 10‑4 Pa. By contrast, quasi 1D nanoscrews have more easily suffered irreversible emission degradation due to more serious oxygen molecule and ion erosion at a higher local electric field around the emitter surface. The 2D wall-like structure with a large emission edge has been proven to contribute to such strong immunity. The results indicate that the Mo nanowall emitter apparently could work properly in the vacuum environment with a certain amount of oxygen.

  4. An Improved Formulation for Calorimetric Emittance Testing of Spacecraft Thermal Control Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kauder, Lonny R.

    2008-01-01

    Spacecraft often really heavily on passive thermal control to maintain operating temperature. An important parameter in the spacecraft heat balance equation is the emittance of thermal control coatings as a function of coating temperature. One method for determining the emittance of spacecraft thermal control from elevated temperature to cryogenic temperatures relies on a calorimetric technique. The fundamental equation governing this test method can be found in numerous places in the literature and although it generally provides reasonable results, its formulation is based on a conceptual flaw that only becomes apparent when the sample temperature approaches the wall temperature during testing. This paper investigates the cause for this error and develops the correct formulation for calorimetric emittance testing. Experimental data will also be presented that illustrates the difference between the two formulations and the resulting difference in the calculated emittance.

  5. Time-Resolved Emittance Characterization of an Induction Linac Beam using Optical Transition Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Le Sage, G P

    2002-11-05

    An induction linac is used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to perform radiographic testing at the Flash X-ray Radiography facility. Emittance characterization is important since x-ray spot size impacts the resolution of shadow-graphs. Due to the long pulse length, high current, and beam energy, emittance measurement using Optical Transition Radiation is an attractive alternative for reasons that will be described in the text. The utility of OTR-based emittance measurement has been well demonstrated for both RF and induction linacs. We describe the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam. We have refined the optical collection system for the induction linac application, and have demonstrated a new technique for probing the divergence of a subset of the beam profile. The experimental apparatus, data reduction, and conclusions will be presented. Additionally, a new scheme for characterizing the correlation between beam divergence and spatial coordinates within the beam profile will be described.

  6. Optimization of the Dynamic Aperture for SPEAR3 Low-Emittance Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lanfa; Huang, Xiaobiao; Nosochkov, Yuri; Safranek, James A.; Borland, Michael; /Argonne

    2012-05-30

    A low emittance upgrade is planned for SPEAR3. As the first phase, the emittance is reduced from 10nm to 7nm without additional magnets. A further upgrade with even lower emittance will require a damping wiggler. There is a smaller dynamic aperture for the lower emittance optics due to a stronger nonlinearity. Elegant based Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA) is used to maximize the dynamic aperture. Both the dynamic aperture and beam lifetime are optimized simultaneously. Various configurations of the sextupole magnets have been studied in order to find the best configuration. The betatron tune also can be optimized to minimize resonance effects. The optimized dynamic aperture increases more than 15% from the nominal case and the lifetime increases from 14 hours to 17 hours. It is important that the increase of the dynamic aperture is mainly in the beam injection direction. Therefore the injection efficiency will benefit from this improvement.

  7. Theoretical studies on performance evaluation of solar thermoelectronic energy converter with graphene emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olawole, Olukunle; de, Dilip

    In this paper we consider detailed energy dynamics of solar thermoelectronic energy converter using graphene as the emitter. The emitter is heated by solar energy concentrated by a parabolic mirror concentrator. We study the performance evaluation of the energy conversion using temperature dependent work function of graphene and model the space charge problem by introducing a factor in the emitter and collector current densities. We present computations on power output and efficiency as function of solar insolation, height of emitter from the base of the mirror, reflection coefficient of the mirror, temperature and work function of collector. Effect of molecular doping on the performance of the graphene solar tech is also discussed. Please schedule our papers so that they are well separated in time for presentations.

  8. Got Mud? Field-based Learning in Wetland Ecology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Andrew H.

    2001-01-01

    Describes methods for teaching wetland ecology classes based mainly on direct, hands-on field experiences for students. Makes the case that classroom lectures are necessary but there is no substitute for field and laboratory experiences. (Author/MM)

  9. A highly efficient CMOS nanoplasmonic crystal enhanced slow-wave thermal emitter improves infrared gas-sensing devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, Andreas; de Luca, Andrea; Oh, Sang S.; Wuestner, Sebastian; Roschuk, Tyler; Chen, Yiguo; Boual, Sophie; Ali, Zeeshan; Phillips, Chris C.; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A.; Udrea, Florin; Hopper, Richard H.; Hess, Ortwin

    2015-12-01

    The application of plasmonics to thermal emitters is generally assisted by absorptive losses in the metal because Kirchhoff’s law prescribes that only good absorbers make good thermal emitters. Based on a designed plasmonic crystal and exploiting a slow-wave lattice resonance and spontaneous thermal plasmon emission, we engineer a tungsten-based thermal emitter, fabricated in an industrial CMOS process, and demonstrate its markedly improved practical use in a prototype non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas-sensing device. We show that the emission intensity of the thermal emitter at the CO2 absorption wavelength is enhanced almost 4-fold compared to a standard non-plasmonic emitter, which enables a proportionate increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the CO2 gas sensor.

  10. A highly efficient CMOS nanoplasmonic crystal enhanced slow-wave thermal emitter improves infrared gas-sensing devices.

    PubMed

    Pusch, Andreas; De Luca, Andrea; Oh, Sang S; Wuestner, Sebastian; Roschuk, Tyler; Chen, Yiguo; Boual, Sophie; Ali, Zeeshan; Phillips, Chris C; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A; Udrea, Florin; Hopper, Richard H; Hess, Ortwin

    2015-01-01

    The application of plasmonics to thermal emitters is generally assisted by absorptive losses in the metal because Kirchhoff's law prescribes that only good absorbers make good thermal emitters. Based on a designed plasmonic crystal and exploiting a slow-wave lattice resonance and spontaneous thermal plasmon emission, we engineer a tungsten-based thermal emitter, fabricated in an industrial CMOS process, and demonstrate its markedly improved practical use in a prototype non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas-sensing device. We show that the emission intensity of the thermal emitter at the CO(2) absorption wavelength is enhanced almost 4-fold compared to a standard non-plasmonic emitter, which enables a proportionate increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the CO(2) gas sensor. PMID:26639902

  11. A highly efficient CMOS nanoplasmonic crystal enhanced slow-wave thermal emitter improves infrared gas-sensing devices

    PubMed Central

    Pusch, Andreas; De Luca, Andrea; Oh, Sang S.; Wuestner, Sebastian; Roschuk, Tyler; Chen, Yiguo; Boual, Sophie; Ali, Zeeshan; Phillips, Chris C.; Hong, Minghui; Maier, Stefan A.; Udrea, Florin; Hopper, Richard H.; Hess, Ortwin

    2015-01-01

    The application of plasmonics to thermal emitters is generally assisted by absorptive losses in the metal because Kirchhoff’s law prescribes that only good absorbers make good thermal emitters. Based on a designed plasmonic crystal and exploiting a slow-wave lattice resonance and spontaneous thermal plasmon emission, we engineer a tungsten-based thermal emitter, fabricated in an industrial CMOS process, and demonstrate its markedly improved practical use in a prototype non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) gas-sensing device. We show that the emission intensity of the thermal emitter at the CO2 absorption wavelength is enhanced almost 4-fold compared to a standard non-plasmonic emitter, which enables a proportionate increase in the signal-to-noise ratio of the CO2 gas sensor. PMID:26639902

  12. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates. PMID:26808718

  13. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates.

  14. Ocean Wave Simulation Based on Wind Field

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Ocean wave simulation has a wide range of applications in movies, video games and training systems. Wind force is the main energy resource for generating ocean waves, which are the result of the interaction between wind and the ocean surface. While numerous methods to handle simulating oceans and other fluid phenomena have undergone rapid development during the past years in the field of computer graphic, few of them consider to construct ocean surface height field from the perspective of wind force driving ocean waves. We introduce wind force to the construction of the ocean surface height field through applying wind field data and wind-driven wave particles. Continual and realistic ocean waves result from the overlap of wind-driven wave particles, and a strategy was proposed to control these discrete wave particles and simulate an endless ocean surface. The results showed that the new method is capable of obtaining a realistic ocean scene under the influence of wind fields at real time rates. PMID:26808718

  15. Lattice-based flow field modeling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaoming; Zhao, Ye; Fan, Zhe; Li, Wei; Qiu, Feng; Yoakum-Stover, Suzanne; Kaufman, Arie E

    2004-01-01

    We present an approach for simulating the natural dynamics that emerge from the interaction between a flow field and immersed objects. We model the flow field using the Lattice Boltzmann Model (LBM) with boundary conditions appropriate for moving objects and accelerate the computation on commodity graphics hardware (GPU) to achieve real-time performance. The boundary conditions mediate the exchange of momentum between the flow field and the moving objects resulting in forces exerted by the flow on the objects as well as the back-coupling on the flow. We demonstrate our approach using soap bubbles and a feather. The soap bubbles illustrate Fresnel reflection, reveal the dynamics of the unseen flow field in which they travel, and display spherical harmonics in their undulations. Our simulation allows the user to directly interact with the flow field to influence the dynamics in real time. The free feather flutters and gyrates in response to lift and drag forces created by its motion relative to the flow. Vortices are created as the free feather falls in an otherwise quiescent flow. PMID:15527053

  16. Positioning with stationary emitters in a two-dimensional space-time

    SciTech Connect

    Coll, Bartolome; Ferrando, Joan Josep; Morales, Juan Antonio

    2006-11-15

    The basic elements of the relativistic positioning systems in a two-dimensional space-time have been introduced in a previous work [Phys. Rev. D 73, 084017 (2006)] where geodesic positioning systems, constituted by two geodesic emitters, have been considered in a flat space-time. Here, we want to show in what precise senses positioning systems allow to make relativistic gravimetry. For this purpose, we consider stationary positioning systems, constituted by two uniformly accelerated emitters separated by a constant distance, in two different situations: absence of gravitational field (Minkowski plane) and presence of a gravitational mass (Schwarzschild plane). The physical coordinate system constituted by the electromagnetic signals broadcasting the proper time of the emitters are the so called emission coordinates, and we show that, in such emission coordinates, the trajectories of the emitters in both situations, the absence and presence of a gravitational field, are identical. The interesting point is that, in spite of this fact, particular additional information on the system or on the user allows us not only to distinguish both space-times, but also to complete the dynamical description of emitters and user and even to measure the mass of the gravitational field. The precise information under which these dynamical and gravimetric results may be obtained is carefully pointed out.

  17. Longitudinal emittance measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, M. A.; Zocca, F.; Jones, R. M.; Pasini, M.; Posocco, P. A.; Voulot, D.; Wenander, F.

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of the longitudinal emittance at the Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) at ISOLDE, CERN. The rms longitudinal emittance was measured as 0.34±0.08 π ns keV/u at the output of the RFQ and as 0.36±0.04 π ns keV/ u in front of the third 7-gap split-ring resonator (7G3) using the three-gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are estimated at approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48±0.2 and 1.55±0.12 π ns keV/ u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread of the beam as it was manipulated by varying the voltage of the rebuncher (ReB) and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The transfer matrix for a multi-gap bunching cavity is derived and suitably truncated to allow for the accurate reconstruction of the beam parameters from measurement. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rigorously simulated and validated. A silicon detector, in its development phase, was also exploited to measure the longitudinal beam properties. The measured longitudinal emittance is compatible with the acceptance of the HIE-ISOLDE superconducting linac upgrade.

  18. ETAII 6 MEV PEPPERPOT EMITTANCE MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Paul, A C; Richardson, R; Weir, J

    2004-10-18

    We measured the beam emittance at the ETAII accelerator using a pepper-pot diagnostic at nominal parameters of 6 MeV and 2000 Amperes. During the coarse of these experiments, a ''new tune'' was introduced which significantly improved the beam quality. The source of a background pedestal was investigated and eliminated. The measured ''new tune'' emittance is {var_epsilon}= 8.05 {plus_minus} 0. 53 cm - mr or a normalized emittance of {var_epsilon}{sub n} = 943 {plus_minus} 63 mm - mr In 1990 the ETAII programmatic emphasis was on free electron lasers and the paramount parameter was whole beam brightness. The published brightness for ETAII after its first major rebuild was J = 1 - 3 x 10{sup 8} A/(m - rad){sup 2} at a current and energy of 1000-1400 Amperes and 2.5 MeV. The average normalized emittance derived from table 2 of that report is 864 mm-mr corresponding to a real emittance of 14.8 cm-mr.

  19. Variable emittance behavior of smart radiative coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Li; Fan, Desong; Li, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    Smart radiative coating on yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate was prepared by the sol-gel La{}1-xSr x MnO3 (x = 0.125, 0.175 and 0.2) nanoparticles and the binder composed of terpineol and ethyl cellulose. The crystallized structure, grain size, chemical compositions, magnetization and the surface morphology were characterized. The thermal radiative properties of coating in the infrared range was evaluated from infrared reflectance spectra at various temperatures. A single perovskite structure is detected in sol-gel nanoparticles with size 200 nm. Magnetization measurement reveals that room temperature phase transition samples can be obtained by appropriate Sr substitution. The influence of surface conditions and sintering temperature on the emittance of coating was observed. For rough coatings with root-mean-square roughness 640 nm (x = 0.125) and 800 nm (x = 0.175) , its emittance increment is 0.24 and 0.26 in in the temperature range of 173-373 K. Increasing sintering temperature to 1673 K, coating emittance variation improves to 0.3 and 0.302 respectively. After mechanical polishing treatment, the emittance increment of coatings are enhanced to 0.31 and 0.3, respectively. The results suggested that the emittance variation can be enhanced by reducing surface roughness and increasing sintering temperature of coating.

  20. Electron emitter pulsed-type cylindrical IEC

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.; Gu, Y.; Stubbers, R.; Zich, R.; Sved, J.; Anderl, R.; Hartwell, J.

    1997-12-31

    A cylindrical version of the single grid Inertial Electrostatic Confinement (IEC) device (termed the C-device) has been developed for use as a 2.5-MeV D-D fusion neutron source for neutron activation analysis. The C-device employs a hollow-tube type cathode with similar anodes backed up by ``reflector`` dishes. The resulting discharge differs from a conventional hollow cathode discharge, by creating an explicit ion beam which is ``pinched`` in the cathode region. Resulting fusion reactions generate {approximately}10{sup 6} neutron/s. A pulsed version is under development for applications requiring higher fluxes. Several pulsing techniques are under study, including an electron emitter (e-emitter) assisted discharge in a thorated tungsten wire emitter located behind a slotted area in the reflector dishes. Pulsing is initiated after establishing a low power steady-state discharge by pulsing the e-emitter current using a capacitor switch type circuit. The resulting electron jet, coupled with the discharge by the biased slot array, creates a strong pulse in the pinched ion beam. The pulse length/repetition rate are controlled by the e-emitter pulse circuit. Typical parameters in present studies are {approximately}30{micro}s, 10Hz and 1-amp ion current. Corresponding neutron measurements are an In-foil type activation counter for time averaged rates. Results for a wide variety of operating conditions are presented.

  1. Camera array based light field microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xing; Wu, Jiamin; Zheng, Guoan; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel approach for high-resolution light field microscopy imaging by using a camera array. In this approach, we apply a two-stage relay system for expanding the aperture plane of the microscope into the size of an imaging lens array, and utilize a sensor array for acquiring different sub-apertures images formed by corresponding imaging lenses. By combining the rectified and synchronized images from 5 × 5 viewpoints with our prototype system, we successfully recovered color light field videos for various fast-moving microscopic specimens with a spatial resolution of 0.79 megapixels at 30 frames per second, corresponding to an unprecedented data throughput of 562.5 MB/s for light field microscopy. We also demonstrated the use of the reported platform for different applications, including post-capture refocusing, phase reconstruction, 3D imaging, and optical metrology. PMID:26417490

  2. HETDEX: The Physical Properties of [O II] Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Gronwall, C.; Blanc, G.; Gebhardt, K.; Jogee, S.; HETDEX Collaboration

    2012-01-01

    Beginning in Fall 2012, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment (HETDEX) will map out 300 square degrees of sky via a blind integral-field spectroscopic survey. While the main goal of the project is to measure the power spectrum of 800,000 Lyα emitters between 1.9 < z < 3.5, the survey will also identify 1,000,000 [O II] emitting galaxies with z < 0.5. Together, these data will provide an unprecedented view of the emission-line universe and allow us to not only examine the history star formation, but to study the properties of star-forming galaxies as a function of environment. To prepare for HETDEX, a 3 year pilot survey was undertaken with a proto-type integral-field spectrograph (VIRUS-P) on the McDonald 2.7-m telescope. This program, which tested the HETDEX instrumentation, data reduction, target properties, observing procedures, and ancillary data requirements, produced R=800 spectra between 350 nm and 580 nm for 169 square arcmin of sky in the COSMOS, GOODS-N, MUNICS-S2, and XMM-LSS fields. The survey found 397 emission-line objects, including 104 Lyα emitters between 1.9 < z < 3.8 and 284 [O II] galaxies with z < 0.56. We present the properties of the [O II] emitters found in this survey, and detail their line strengths, internal extinction, and emission-line luminosity function. We use these data to show that over the past 5 Gyr, star-formation in the universe has decreased linearly, in both in an absolute and relative sense. We compare the star formation rates measured via [O II] fluxes to those determined via the rest-frame ultraviolet, explore the extinction corrections for our sample, and discuss the implications of our work for the main HETDEX survey.

  3. Lung cancer risk of low-level exposures to alpha emitters: critical reappraisal and experiments based on a new cytodynamic model

    SciTech Connect

    Bogen, Kenneth T.

    1999-02-20

    Ecologic U.S. county data suggest negative associations between residential radon exposure and lung cancer mortality (LCM)-inconsistent with clearly positive associations revealed by occupational data on individual miners, but perhaps explained by competing effects of cell killing vs. mutations in alpha-exposed bronchial epithelium. To assess the latter possibility, a biologically based "cytodynamic 2-stage" (CD2) cancer-risk model was fit to combined 1950-54 age- specific person-year data on lung cancer mortality (LCM) in white females of age 40+ y in 2,821 U.S. counties (-90% never-smokers), and in 5 cohorts of underground miners who never smoked. New estimates of household annual average radon exposure in U.S. counties were used, which were found to have a significant negative ecologic association with 1950-54 LCM in U.S. white females, adjusted for age and all subsets of two among 21 socioeconomic, climatic and other factors considered. A good CD2 fit was obtained to the combined residential/miner data, using biologically plausible parameter values. Without further optimization, the fit also predicted independent inverse dose-rate effects shown (for the first time) to occur in nonsmoking miners. Using the same U.S. county-level LCM data, a separate study revealed a positive ecologic association between LCM and bituminous coal use in the U.S., in agreement with epidemiological data on LCM in women in China. The modeling results obtained are consistent with the CD2-based hypothesis that residential radon exposure has a nonlinear U-shaped relation to LCM risk, and that current linear no-threshold extrapolation models substantially overestimate such risk. A U-shaped dose-response corresponds to a CD2-model prediction that alpha radiation kills more premalignant cells than it generates at low exposure levels, but not at higher levels. To test this hypothesis, groups of Japanese medaka (ricefish minnows) were exposed for 10 to 14 weeks to different concentrations of

  4. Generalized Fowler-Nordheim Theory of Field Emission of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Shi-Dong; Chen, Lu

    2008-07-01

    Based on the low-energy band structure of carbon nanotubes (CNs), we develop a generalized Fowler-Nordheim theory of the CN field emission, in which the behavior of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics depends on the electric field and the diameter of the CNs. This formalism reveals the key differences of field emission between conventional bulk metallic emitters and low-dimensional emitters and gives a clear physical understanding of the non-Fowler-Nordheim feature of the I-V characteristics of the CN field emission.

  5. Generalized Fowler-Nordheim theory of field emission of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shi-Dong; Chen, Lu

    2008-07-11

    Based on the low-energy band structure of carbon nanotubes (CNs), we develop a generalized Fowler-Nordheim theory of the CN field emission, in which the behavior of the current-voltage (I-V) characteristics depends on the electric field and the diameter of the CNs. This formalism reveals the key differences of field emission between conventional bulk metallic emitters and low-dimensional emitters and gives a clear physical understanding of the non-Fowler-Nordheim feature of the I-V characteristics of the CN field emission. PMID:18764229

  6. Variable Emittance Electrochromic Devices for Satellite Thermal Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiryont, Hulya; Shannon, Kenneth C.

    2007-01-01

    An all-solid-state electrochromic device (ECD) was designed for electronic variable emissivity (VE) control. In this paper, a low weight (5g/m2) electrochromic thermal control device, the EclipseVEECD™, is detailed as a viable thermal control system for spacecraft outer surface temperatures. Discussion includes the technology's performance, satellite applications, and preparations for space based testing. This EclipseVEECD™ system comprises substrate/mirror electrode/active element/IR transparent electrode layers. This system tunes and modulates reflection/emittance from 5 μm to 15 μm region. Average reflectance/emittance modulation of the system from the 400 K to 250 K region is about 75%, while at room temperature (9.5 micron) reflectance/emittance is around 90%. Activation voltage of the EclipseVEECD™ is around ±1 Volt. The EclipseVEECD™ can be used as a smart thermal modulator for the thermal control of satellites and spacecraft by monitoring and adjusting the amount of energy emitted from the outer surfaces. The functionality of the EclipseVEECD™ was successfully demonstrated in vacuum using a multi-purpose heat dissipation/absorption test module, the EclipseHEAT™. The EclipseHEAT™ has been successfully flight checked and integrated onto the United States Naval Alchemy MidSTAR satellite, scheduled to launch December 2006.

  7. Development of tomographic imaging systems using carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian

    2005-11-01

    Conventional thermionic x-ray sources use hot filament cathodes to generate electrons for x-ray production. The thermionic technology has several inherent limitations such as high operating temperature, slow response time, and difficulty for miniaturization. On the other hand, field emission provides an alternative to generate electrons without all these limitations. The concept of field emission x-ray source has been proposed and tested in the early 1970s. Unfortunately all of the early field emission x-ray systems failed due primarily to the limitations on the electron field emitters. Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have recently emerged as a promising class of electron emissive materials and field emission x-ray source based on CNTs are expected to have significantly improved properties. We have recently developed a CNT-based field emission micro-focus x-ray source. It shows stable tube current under high operating voltage, extraordinary dynamic imaging capability, and excellent potential for miniaturization. All of these new features make it very attractive for various potential industrial and medical applications. In order to demonstrate its applications, two sets of x-ray imaging systems using this field emission x-ray source were constructed in our lab. One is a micro-computed tomographic (micro-CT) imaging system using a single field emission x-ray source for dynamic radiographic and tomographic imaging applications. It shows great potential for the future development of dynamic micro-CT scanner. The other one is a multi-beam field emission x-ray source with multiple addressable focal spots which can provide scanning x-ray beams without mechanical movement. It can lead to fast data acquisition rates for future tomographic imaging systems with a simplified experimental set-up.

  8. Utilizing the Inherent Electrolysis in a Chip-Based Nanoelectrospray Emitter System to Facilitate Selective Ionization and Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Metallo Alkylporphyrins

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos

    2012-01-01

    A commercially available chip-based infusion nanoelectrospray ionization system was used to ionize metallo alkylporphyrins for mass spectrometric detection and structure elucidation by mass spectrometry. Different ionic forms of model compounds (nickel (II), vanadyl (II), copper (II) and cobalt (II) octaethylporphyrin) were created by using two different types of conductive pipette tips supplied with the device. These pipette tips provide the conductive contact to solution at which the electrolysis process inherent to electrospray takes places in the device. The original unmodified, bare carbon-impregnated plastic pipette tips, were exploited to intentionally electrochemically oxidize (ionize) the porphyrins to form molecular radical cations for detection. Use of modified pipette tips, with a surface coating devised to inhibit analyte mass transport to the surface, was shown to limit the ionic species observed in the mass spectra of these porphyrins largely, but not exclusively, to the protonated molecule. Under the conditions of these experiments, the effective upper potential limit for oxidation with the uncoated pipette tip was 1.1 V or less and the coated pipette tips effectively prevented the oxidation of analytes with redox potentials greater than about 0.25 V. Product ion spectra of either molecular ionic species could be used to determine the alkyl chain length on the porphyrin macrocycle. The utility of this electrochemical ionization approach for the analysis of naturally occurring samples was demonstrated using nickel geoporphyrin fractions isolated from Gilsonite bitumen. Acquiring neutral loss spectra as a means to improve the specificity of detection in these complex natural samples was also illustrated.

  9. Dipolar versus octupolar triphenylamine-based fluorescent organic nanoparticles as brilliant one- and two-photon emitters for (bio)imaging.

    PubMed

    Parthasarathy, Venkatakrishnan; Fery-Forgues, Suzanne; Campioli, Elisa; Recher, Gaëlle; Terenziani, Francesca; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille

    2011-11-18

    Two related triphenylamine-based dipolar and octupolar fluorophores are used to prepare aqueous suspensions of fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) via the reprecipitation method. The obtained spherical nanoparticles (30-40 nm in diameter) are fluorescent in aqueous solution (up to 15% fluorescence quantum yield) and exhibit extremely high one- and two-photon brightness, superior to those obtained for quantum dots. Despite the two chromophores showing similar fluorescence in solution, the fluorescence of FONs made from the octupolar derivative is significantly red-shifted compared to that generated by the dipolar FONs. In addition, the maximum two-photon absorption cross section of the FONs made from the octupolar derivative is 55% larger than that of the dipolar derivative FONs. The experimental observations provide evidence that the different molecular shape (rodlike versus three-branched) and charge distribution (dipolar versus octupolar) of the two chromophores strongly affect the packing inside the nanoparticles as well as their spectroscopic properties and colloidal stability in pure water. The use of these FONs as probes for biphotonic in-vivo imaging is investigated on Xenopus laevis tadpoles to test their utilization for angiography. When using FONs made from the octupolar dye, the formation of microagglomerates (2-5 μm scale) is observed in vivo, with subsequent lethal occlusion of the blood vessels. Conversely, the nanoparticles of the dipolar dye allow acute imaging of blood vessels thanks to their suitable size and brightness, while no toxic effect is observed. Such a goal cannot be achieved with the dissolved dye, which permeates the vessel walls.

  10. Mappings of Fields Based on Nominations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lenk, Peter

    1983-01-01

    Graphical representations of nominations and citations of colleagues in seven scientific fields--information science, human systems management, future studies, general systems, topology and differential geometry, and polymer chemistry--are presented. Conomination analysis and cocitation analysis are compared as techniques to study structure of…

  11. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  12. FIM/IAP/TEM studies of ion implanted nickel emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Walck, S.D.; Hren, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    Accurate depth profiling of implanted hydrogen and its isotopes in metals is extremely important. Field ion microscopy and atom-probe techniques provide the most accurate depth profiling analytical method of any available. In addition, they are extremely sensitive to hydrogen. This paper reports our early work on hydrogen trapping at defects in metals using the Field Ion Microscope/Imaging Atom Probe (FIM/IAP). Our results deal primarily with the control experiments required to overcome instrumental difficulties associated with in situ implantation and the influence of a high electric field. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) has been used extensively to independently examine the influence of high electric fields on emitters. 11 references, 7 figures.

  13. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1994-05-31

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer. 1 fig.

  14. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nanowires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

  15. Heterojunction solar cell with passivated emitter surface

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1994-01-01

    A high-efficiency heterojunction solar cell wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga.sub.0.52 In.sub.0.48 P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. A passivating window layer of defined composition is disposed over the emitter layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the window layer.

  16. Linear conjugate phase-locking of independent single-mode emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Gryaznov, N A; Kiselev, V M

    2000-05-31

    The problems of the construction of laser systems based on the methods of linear adaptive optics and designed for energy transport over large distances in outer space are analysed. New approaches are proposed to the organisation of the linear phase conjugation of output and beacon-signal radiations. For definite ratios of the beacon-signal ({omega}{sub b}), heterodyne ({omega}{sub h}), and power ({omega}{sub p}) radiations ({omega}{sub b} > {omega}{sub h} > {omega}{sub p} or {omega}{sub b} < {omega}{sub h} < {omega}{sub p}), the phase conjugation loop may play simultaneously the role of a precision frequency matching loop. This feature permits the phase locking of independent single-mode laser emitters, including phase locking in the far-field zone, to achieve the modular principle of system design and to generate the wavefront of radiation with a large cross section. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  17. Improved efficiency of photoconductive THz emitters by increasing the effective contact length of electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Abhishek; Surdi, Harshad; Nikesh, V. V.; Prabhu, S. S.; Döhler, G. H.

    2013-12-15

    We study the effect of a surface modification at the interface between metallic electrodes and semiconducting substrate in Semi-Insulating GaAs (SI-GaAs) based photoconductive emitters (PCE) on the emission of Tera-Hertz (THz) radiation. We partially etch out a 500 nm thick layer of SI-GaAs in grating like pattern with various periods before the contact deposition. By depositing the electrodes on the patterned surface, the electrodes follow the contour of the grating period. This increases the effective contact length of the electrodes per unit area of the active regions on the PCE. The maxima of the electric field amplitude of the THz pulses emitted from the patterned surface are enhanced by up to more than a factor 2 as compared to an un-patterned surface. We attribute this increase to the increase of the effective contact length of the electrode due to surface patterning.

  18. Antenna-coupled Photoemission from Single Quantum Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, Palash

    Optical antennas are analogs of their radiowave and microwave counterparts, and can be defined as devices that serve to efficiently convert free-propagating optical radiation to localized energy, and vice-versa. Colloidal metal nanoparticles with their strong plasmonic optical response offer a convenient realization of optical antennas. Such nanoparticle antennas serve to spatially enhance and localize fields, and modify the excitation rate and the radiative decay rate when placed close to single emitters (molecules, quantum dots, etc.). In addition, they can also cause undesirable losses, leading to an increase in the non-radiative decay rates of these emitters. This interplay of rates can lead to a strong modification of the emission characteristics over the intrinsic behavior. We study photoemission from single emitters coupled to antennas of different geometries made from colloidal metal nanoparticles. We demonstrate enhancements of fluorescence from single quantum emitters by a factor 10 to 100, with the highest enhancements resulting for molecules with very low intrinsic quantum yields. Such enhancements afford an improvement in resolution for fluorescence imaging down to lambda/40. We also investigate changes to fluorescence blinking of a colloidal quantum dots (QD) coupled to an antenna, as a function of antenna-QD distance. We find that power-law blinking is preserved unaltered even as the antenna drastically modifies the excitonic decay rate in the QD, and reduces the blinking probability. This resilience of the power-law to change provides evidence that blinking statistics are not swayed by environment-induced variations in kinetics, and offers clues towards identifying the as-yet unknown mechanism behind universal fluorescence intermittency. Finally, in analogy with traditional electromagnetic antennas, we excite proto-typical optical antennas using electrons (current) instead of photons (fields). We excite localized plasmons using low energy tunneling

  19. Determination and error analysis of emittance and spectral emittance measurements by remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Kumar, R.

    1977-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. From the theory of remote sensing of surface temperatures, an equation of the upper bound of absolute error of emittance was determined. It showed that the absolute error decreased with an increase in contact temperature, whereas, it increased with an increase in environmental integrated radiant flux density. Change in emittance had little effect on the absolute error. A plot of the difference between temperature and band radiance temperature vs. emittance was provided for the wavelength intervals: 4.5 to 5.5 microns, 8 to 13.5 microns, and 10.2 to 12.5 microns.

  20. Performance and durability of high emittance heat receiver surfaces for solar dynamic power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degroh, Kim K.; Roig, David M.; Burke, Christopher A.; Shah, Dilipkumar R.

    1994-01-01

    Haynes 188, a cobalt-based superalloy, will be used to make thermal energy storage (TES) containment canisters for a 2 kW solar dynamic ground test demonstrator (SD GTD). Haynes 188 containment canisters with a high thermal emittance (epsilon) are desired for radiating heat away from local hot spots, improving the heating distribution, which will in turn improve canister service life. In addition to needing a high emittance, the surface needs to be durable in an elevated temperature, high vacuum environment for an extended time period. Thirty-five Haynes 188 samples were exposed to 14 different types of surface modification techniques for emittance and vacuum heat treatment (VHT) durability enhancement evaluation. Optical properties were obtained for the modified surfaces. Emittance enhanced samples were exposed to VHT for up to 2692 hours at 827 C and less than or equal to 10(exp -6) torr with integral thermal cycling. Optical properties were taken intermittently during exposure, and after final VHT exposure. The various surface modification treatments increased the emittance of pristine Haynes 188 from 0.11 up to 0.86. Seven different surface modification techniques were found to provide surfaces which met the SD GTD receiver VHT durability requirement. Of the 7 surface treatments, 2 were found to display excellent VHT durability: an alumina based (AB) coating and a zirconia based coating. The alumina based coating was chosen for the epsilon enhancement surface modification technique for the SD GTD receiver. Details of the performance and vacuum heat treatment durability of this coating and other Haynes 188 emittance surface modification techniques are discussed. Technology from this program will lead to successful demonstration of solar dynamic power for space applications, and has potential for application in other systems requiring high emittance surfaces.