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Sample records for field estudio regional

  1. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  2. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  3. Vector Magnetic Field in Emerging Flux Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmieder, B.; Pariat, E.

    A crucial phase in magnetic flux emergence is the rise of magnetic flux tubes through the solar photosphere, which represents a severe transition between the very different environments of the solar interior and corona. Multi-wavelength observations with Flare Genesis, TRACE, SoHO, and more recently with the vector magnetographs at THEMIS and Hida (DST) led to the following conclusions. The fragmented magnetic field in the emergence region - with dipped field lines or bald patches - is directly related with Ellerman bombs, arch filament systems, and overlying coronal loops. Measurements of vector magnetic fields have given evidence that undulating "serpentine" fields are present while magnetic flux tubes cross the photosphere. See the sketch below, and for more detail see Pariat et al. (2004, 2007); Watanabe et al. (2008):

  4. Geopotential field anomalies and regional tectonic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandea, Mioara; Korte, Monika

    2016-07-01

    Maps of both gravity and magnetic field anomalies offer crucial information about physical properties of the Earth's crust and upper mantle, required in understanding geological settings and tectonic structures. Density and magnetization represent independent rock properties and thus provide complementary information on compositional and structural changes. Two regions are considered: southern Africa (encompassing South Africa, Namibia and Botswana) and Germany. This twofold choice is motivated firstly by the fact that these regions represent rather diverse geological and geophysical conditions (old Archean crust with strong magnetic anomalies in southern Africa, and much younger, weakly magnetized crust in central Europe) and secondly by our intimate knowledge of the magnetic vector ground data from these two regions. We take also advantage of the recently developed satellite potential field models and compare magnetic and gravity gradient anomalies of some 200 km resolution. Comparing short and long wavelength anomalies and the correlation of rather large scale magnetic and gravity anomalies, and relating them to known lithospheric structures, we generally find a better agreement over the southern African region than the German territory. This probably indicates a stronger concordance between near-surface and deeper structures in the former area, which can be perceived to agree with a thicker lithosphere.

  5. Focal region fields of distorted reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buris, N. E.; Kauffman, J. F.

    1988-01-01

    The problem of the focal region fields scattered by an arbitrary surface reflector under uniform plane wave illumination is solved. The physical optics (PO) approximation is used to calculate the current induced on the reflector. The surface of the reflector is described by a number of triangular domain-wise 5th degree bivariate polynomials. A 2-dimensional Gaussian quadrature is employed to numerically evaluate the integral expressions of the scattered fields. No Freshnel or Fraunhofer zone approximations are made. The relation of the focal fields problem to surface compensation techniques and other applications are mentioned. Several examples of distorted parabolic reflectors are presented. The computer code developed is included, together with instructions on its usage.

  6. Geostatistical Estimations of Regional Hydraulic Conductivity Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patriarche, D.; Castro, M. C.; Goovaerts, P.

    2004-12-01

    Direct and indirect measurements of hydraulic conductivity (K) are commonly performed, providing information on the magnitude of this parameter at the local scale (tens of centimeters to hundreds of meters) and at shallow depths. By contrast, field information on hydraulic conductivities at regional scales of tens to hundreds of kilometers and at greater depths is relatively scarce. Geostatistical methods allow for sparsely sampled observations of a variable (primary information) to be complemented by a more densely sampled secondary attribute. Geostatistical estimations of the hydraulic conductivity field in the Carrizo aquifer, a major groundwater flow system extending along Texas, are performed using available primary (e.g., transmissivity, hydraulic conductivity) and secondary (specific capacity) information, for depths up to 2.2 km, and over three regional domains of increasing extent: 1) the domain corresponding to a three-dimensional groundwater flow model previously built (model domain); 2) the area corresponding to the ten counties encompassing the model domain (County domain), and; 3) the full extension of the Carrizo aquifer within Texas (Texas domain). Two different approaches are used: 1) an indirect approach are transmissivity (T) is estimated first and (K) is retrieved through division of the T estimate by the screening length of the wells, and; 2) a direct approach where K data are kriged directly. Prediction performances of the tested geostatistical procedures (kriging combined with linear regression, kriging with known local means, kriging of residuals, and cokriging) are evaluated through cross validation for both log-transformed variables and back-transformed ones. For the indirect approach, kriging of log T residuals yields the best estimates for both log-transformed and back-transformed variables in the model domain. For larger regional scales (County and Texas domains), cokriging performs generally better than univariate kriging procedures

  7. Regional gravity field modelling from GOCE observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitoňák, Martin; Šprlák, Michal; Novák, Pavel; Tenzer, Robert

    2017-01-01

    In this article we discuss a regional recovery of gravity disturbances at the mean geocentric sphere approximating the Earth over the area of Central Europe from satellite gravitational gradients. For this purpose, we derive integral formulas which allow converting the gravity disturbances onto the disturbing gravitational gradients in the local north-oriented frame (LNOF). The derived formulas are free of singularities in case of r ≠ R . We then investigate three numerical approaches for solving their inverses. In the initial approach, the integral formulas are firstly modified for solving individually the near- and distant-zone contributions. While the effect of the near-zone gravitational gradients is solved as an inverse problem, the effect of the distant-zone gravitational gradients is computed by numerical integration from the global gravitational model (GGM) TIM-r4. In the second approach, we further elaborate the first scenario by reducing measured gravitational gradients for gravitational effects of topographic masses. In the third approach, we apply additional modification by reducing gravitational gradients for the reference GGM. In all approaches we determine the gravity disturbances from each of the four accurately measured gravitational gradients separately as well as from their combination. Our regional gravitational field solutions are based on the GOCE EGG_TRF_2 gravitational gradients collected within the period from November 1 2009 until January 11 2010. Obtained results are compared with EGM2008, DIR-r1, TIM-r1 and SPW-r1. The best fit, in terms of RMS (2.9 mGal), is achieved for EGM2008 while using the third approach which combine all four well-measured gravitational gradients. This is explained by the fact that a-priori information about the Earth's gravitational field up to the degree and order 180 was used.

  8. PFI-ZEKE (Pulsed Field Ionization-Zero Electron Kinetic Energy) para el estudio de iones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castaño, F.; Fernández, J. A.; Basterretxea, A. Longarte. F.; Sánchez Rayo, M. N.; Martínez, R.

    Entre las áreas hacia donde ha evolucionado la Química en los últimos años están los estudios de sistemas con especies reactivas de alta energía y los dominados por fuerzas intermoleculares débiles, con energías de unas pocas kcal/mol. En efecto, el estudio de las propiedades de los iones, comenzando por su relación con la molécula neutra de la que procede, la energía de ionización, los estados vibracionales y rotacionales, energías de enlace de Van der Waals entre el ión y una amplia variedad de otras moléculas, sus confórmeros o isómeros y sus reacciones o semi-reacciones químicas están en la raíz de la necesidad de la espectroscopía conocida como PFI-ZEKE, Pulsed Field Ionization-Zero Electron Kinetic Energy. Entre las aplicaciones que requieren estos conocimientos se encuentran la generación de plasmas para la fabricación de semiconductores, memorias magnéticas, etc, así como los sistemas astrofísicos, la ionosfera terrestre, etc. La espectroscopía ZEKE es una evolución de las de fluorescencia inducida por láser, LIF, ionización multifotónica acrecentada por resonancia, REMPI, con uno y dos colores y acoplada a un sistema de tiempo de vuelo, REMPI-TOF-MS, y las espectroscopías de doble resonancia IR-UV y UV-UV. Sus espectros y la ayuda de cálculos ab inicio permite determinar las energías de enlace de complejos de van der Waals en estados fundamental y excitados, identificar confórmeros e isómeros, obtener energías de ionización experimentales aproximadas (100 cm-1) y otras variables de interés. Al igual que con LIF, REMPI y dobles resonancias, es posible utilizar muestras gaseosas, pero los espectros están muy saturados de bandas y su interpretación es difícil o imposible. Se evitan estas dificultades estudiando las moléculas o complejos en expansiones supersónicas, donde la T de los grados de libertad solo alcanzan unos pocos K. Para realizar experimentos de ZEKE hay que utilizar una propiedad recientemente

  9. Small Field: dosimetry in electron disequilibrium region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Timothy C.

    2010-11-01

    Small fields are more commonly used for radiation therapy because of the development of IMRT, stereotactic radiosurgery, and other special equipments such as Cyberknife and Tomotherapy. The dosimetry in the sub-centimeter field can result in substantial uncertainties because of the presence of electron disequilibrium due to the large dose gradients in the field. It is further complicated by the introduction of various radiation detectors, which usually perturb the conditions of disequilibrium. Hence additional corrections are required to maintain the dosimetric accuracy previously achieved for standard radiation dosimetry. A review of small field dosimetry provides some insights into the methods to characterize the detector convolution kernel and other methods to characterize detector perturbation effect.

  10. E and F region electric fields over dip equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, S.; Muralikrishna, P.

    1981-04-01

    The horizontal east-west drift velocity of ionization irregularities in E region, and the vertical drift velocity of electrons in F region over Jicamarca (dip latitude approximately 1 deg N) are used to estimate the average diurnal variation of the east-west components of the electric fields in these two regions. The F region field is estimated from the vertical drift velocity by using the relationship derived earlier by Woodman (1970). The E region field is estimated from the horizontal east-west drift velocity by using a relationship derived by using realistic electrojet and conductivity models. The E region electric field thus obtained is found to be weaker at least by a factor of three than that estimated by Balsley and Woodman (1971). A comparative study shows that the east-west electric field in the F region is, most of the time, stronger than that in the E region, and also that the ratio of the E region field to the F region field systematically increases from forenoon to afternoon hours, and from pre-midnight to post-midnight hours.

  11. Wave fields and domination regions for the interior Lamb problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, S. V.; Terent'eva, E. O.

    2015-09-01

    The domination regions of wave fields in the epicentral region are analyzed for the interior Lamb problem on the action of a lumped force applied inside an elastic half-plane. The solutions obtained by integral representations and finite-element approximations are compared. The domination regions are distinguished for the first time for all types of acoustic waves observed near the epicenter.

  12. Magnetic field in the NGC7023 photodissociation region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Marta

    2015-10-01

    The far-UV radiation of massive stars illuminates molecular clouds creating photodissociation regions (PDRs), the transition layers between atomic and molecular media. Recent results based on Herschel observations reveal the presence of small regions at high gas pressure in the PDRs, whose origin is still not well understood, while polarization measurements towards a few PDRs indicate that magnetic fields can play a significant role in their structure. The limited number of existing polarization observations suggest that, when subject to a high gas and radiation pressure from the stars, the magnetic field tends to align and to be compressed in the PDR. As a consequence, bright PDRs should be magnetically dominated. However, this possibility has been the subject of very few studies due to the sparsity of relevant data. We propose to map the magnetic field in a nearby bright PDR, NGC 7023, using the unique capabilities of HAWC+ onboard SOFIA. For one, we wish to test the hypothesis that the magnetic field should be parallel to this PDR, which is illuminated by a radiation field of 2600 (in Habing units). Secondly, since NGC 7023 is a well studied region, its physical conditions (density, temperature) are known and can thus be related to the magnetic field across the PDR. We can investigate the relation between the field structure and the geometry of the PDR, and aided by Herschel observations we can also explore a possible connection between the magnetic field and the existence of high density regions in the PDR. SOFIA HAWC+ is the only instrument capable of imaging the polarized emission of extended objects, with structure at arcsecond scales. Moreover, it allows us trace the magnetic field within the PDR, owing to its 63micron band that traces the warm (40K) dust present at the illuminated surface. Our observations will be complementary to those led by the instrument team, who will observe NGC 7023 using the three highest wavelength filters.

  13. Regional magnetic fields as navigational markers for sea turtles.

    PubMed

    Lohmann, K J; Cain, S D; Dodge, S A; Lohmann, C M

    2001-10-12

    Young loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from eastern Florida undertake a transoceanic migration in which they gradually circle the north Atlantic Ocean before returning to the North American coast. Here we report that hatchling loggerheads, when exposed to magnetic fields replicating those found in three widely separated oceanic regions, responded by swimming in directions that would, in each case, help keep turtles within the currents of the North Atlantic gyre and facilitate movement along the migratory pathway. These results imply that young loggerheads have a guidance system in which regional magnetic fields function as navigational markers and elicit changes in swimming direction at crucial geographic boundaries.

  14. Twist of Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongqi; Bao, Shudong; Kuzanyan, Kirill M.

    2002-05-01

    We study the twist properties of photospheric magnetic fields in solar active regions using magnetographic data on 422 active regions obtained at the Huairou Solar Observing Station in 1988 1997. We calculate the mean twist (force-free field αf) of the active regions and compare it with the mean current-helicity density of these same active regions, h c =B ∥·(∇×B)∥. The latitude and longitude distributions and time dependence of these quantities is analyzed. These parameters represent two different tracers of the α effect in dynamo theory, so we might expect them to possess similar properties. However, apart from differences in their definitions, they also display differences associated with the technique used to recalculate the magnetographic data and with their different physical meanings. The distributions of the mean αf and h c both show hemispherical asymmetry—negative (positive) values in the northern (southern) hemisphere—although this tendency is stronger for h c. One reason for these differences may be the averaging procedure, when twists of opposite sign in regions with weak fields make a small contribution to the mean current-helicity density. Such transequatorial regularity is in agreement with the expectations of dynamo theory. In some active regions, the average αf and h c do not obey this transequatorial rule. As a whole, the mean twist of the magnetic fields αf of active regions does not vary significantly with the solar cycle. Active regions that do not follow the general behavior for αf do not show any appreciable tendency to cluster at certain longitudes, in contrast to results for h c noted in previous studies. We analyze similarities and differences in the distributions of these two quantities. We conclude that using only one of these tracers, such as αf, to search for signatures of the α effect can have disadvantages, which should be taken into account in future studies.

  15. Relationship between Birkeland current regions, particle precipitation, and electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Beaujardiere, O.; Watermann, J.; Newell, P.; Rich, F.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship of the large-scale dayside Birkeland currents to large-scale particle precipitation patterns, currents, and convection is examined using DMSP and Sondrestrom radar observations. It is found that the local time of the mantle currents is not limited to the longitude of the cusp proper, but covers a larger local time extent. The mantle currents flow entirely on open field lines. About half of region 1 currents flow on open field lines, consistent with the assumption that the region 1 currents are generated by the solar wind dynamo and flow within the surface that separates open and closed field lines. More than 80 percent of the Birkeland current boundaries do not correspond to particle precipitation boundaries. Region 2 currents extend beyond the plasma sheet poleward boundary; region 1 currents flow in part on open field lines; mantle currents and mantle particles are not coincident. On most passes when a triple current sheet is observed, the convection reversal is located on closed field lines.

  16. REGIONAL-SCALE WIND FIELD CLASSIFICATION EMPLOYING CLUSTER ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, L G; Glaser, R E; Chin, H S; Loosmore, G A

    2004-06-17

    The classification of time-varying multivariate regional-scale wind fields at a specific location can assist event planning as well as consequence and risk analysis. Further, wind field classification involves data transformation and inference techniques that effectively characterize stochastic wind field variation. Such a classification scheme is potentially useful for addressing overall atmospheric transport uncertainty and meteorological parameter sensitivity issues. Different methods to classify wind fields over a location include the principal component analysis of wind data (e.g., Hardy and Walton, 1978) and the use of cluster analysis for wind data (e.g., Green et al., 1992; Kaufmann and Weber, 1996). The goal of this study is to use a clustering method to classify the winds of a gridded data set, i.e, from meteorological simulations generated by a forecast model.

  17. Regional United States electric field and GIC hazard impacts (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gannon, J. L.; Balch, C. C.; Trichtchenko, L.

    2013-12-01

    Geomagnetically Induced Currents (GICs) are primarily driven by impulsive geomagnetic disturbances created by the interaction between the Earth's magnetosphere and sharp velocity, density, and magnetic field enhancements in the solar wind. However, the magnitude of the induced electric field response at the ground level, and therefore the resulting hazard to the bulk power system, is determined not only by magnetic drivers, but also by the underlying geology. Convolution techniques are used to calculate surface electric fields beginning from the spectral characteristics of magnetic field drivers and the frequency response of the local geology. Using these techniques, we describe historical scenarios for regions across the United States, and the potential impact of large events on electric power infrastructure.

  18. Chromospheric magnetic fields of an active region filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Z.; Solanki, S.; Lagg, A.

    2012-06-01

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament are co-spatially and co-temporally mapped in photosphere and upper chromosphere, by using spectro-polarimetric observations made by Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope (VTT). A Zeeman-based ME inversion is performed on the full Stokes vectors of both the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the chromospheric He I 1083.0 nm lines. We found that the strong magnetic fields, with the field strength of 600 - 800 G in the He I line formation height, are not uncommon among AR filaments. But such strong magnetic field is not always found in AR filaments.

  19. Chiral Effective Field Theory in the $\\Delta$-resonance region

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Pascalutsa

    2006-09-18

    I discuss the problem of constructing an effective low-energy theory in the vicinity of a resonance or a bound state. The focus is on the example of the $\\Delta(1232)$, the lightest resonance in the nucleon sector. Recent developments of the chiral effective-field theory in the $\\Delta$-resonance region are briefly reviewed. I conclude with a comment on the merits of the manifestly covariant formulation of chiral EFT in the baryon sector.

  20. The history, development, and regional significance of Ruston Field

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, J.A.; Herrmann, L.A.; Davenport, R.E. )

    1993-09-01

    The Ruston gas field lies just north of Ruston, Lincoln Parish, Louisiana, 70 mi east of Shreveport, Louisiana. The field covers a surface area of 64.5 sections or approximately 41,280 ac. The Ruston lies within a trend containing many Lower Cretaceous and Upper Jurassic gas reservoirs on the northern flank of the Gulf Coast geosyncline, along the northern flank of the North Louisiana Salt Dome basin. Within the belt of production, several prolific Cotton Valley strandline plays exist at Ruston along with many different Hosston pays. More than 40 zones produce natural gas and oil from seven formations in the field. Several of the sands are totally structurally controlled, but many have a minor to major stratigraphic trapping component. Ultimate recovery from the field is estimated to be 1,600,000 bbl of oil, 1,730,000 bbl of condensate and 614 bcf of gas. The most prolific reservoir is the strandline Cotton Valley [open quotes]D[close quotes] sand averaging over 12 bcf per well, a total of over 195 bcf of gas, and more than 600,000 bbl of condensate. The best well in the fields is the Arkansas Louisiana Gas No. 2 Dowling in Sec. 30, T19N, R2W, which has produced 22 bcf of gas and 110,000 bbl of condensate. The upper, middle, and lower Hosston produce at Ruston. The lower Hosston produces from approximately 14 fields in northern Louisiana and from 11 wells in the field. The middle Hosston produces from approximately 28 fields in the basin and has made over 46 bcf of gas from six sands. The upper Hosston is regionally the most extensive in northern Louisiana producing from approximately 41 fields. At Ruston, the Hosston has produced over 15 bcf of gas from seven sands.

  1. E region electric field dependence of the solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, C. M.; Moro, J.; Resende, L. C. A.; Chen, S. S.; Schuch, N. J.; Costa, J. E. R.

    2015-10-01

    We have being studying the zonal and vertical E region electric field components inferred from the Doppler shifts of type 2 echoes (gradient drift irregularities) detected with the 50 MHz backscatter coherent radar set at São Luis, Brazil (SLZ, 2.3°S, 44.2°W) during the solar cycle 24. In this report we present the dependence of the vertical and zonal components of this electric field with the solar activity, based on the solar flux F10.7. For this study we consider the geomagnetically quiet days only (Kp ≤ 3+). A magnetic field-aligned-integrated conductivity model was developed for proving the conductivities, using the IRI-2007, the MISIS-2000, and the IGRF-11 models as input parameters for ionosphere, neutral atmosphere, and Earth magnetic field, respectively. The ion-neutron collision frequencies of all the species are combined through the momentum transfer collision frequency equation. The mean zonal component of the electric field, which normally ranged from 0.19 to 0.35 mV/m between the 8 and 18 h (LT) in the Brazilian sector, show a small dependency with the solar activity. Whereas the mean vertical component of the electric field, which normally ranges from 4.65 to 10.12 mV/m, highlights the more pronounced dependency of the solar flux.

  2. Regional Geomagnetic Field Model for Croatia at 2009.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujić, Eugen; Brkić, Mario; Kovács, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Geomagnetic data of north, east, and vertical components at Croatian repeat stations and ground survey sites, as well as European geomagnetic observatories and repeat stations, were used to obtain a regional geomagnetic model over Croatia at 2009.5 epoch. Different models were derived, depending on input data, and three modelling techniques were used: Taylor Polynomial, Adjusted Spherical Harmonic Analysis, and Spherical Harmonic Analysis. It was derived that the most accurate model over Croatia was the one when only Croatian data were used, and by using the Adjusted Spherical Harmonic Analysis. Based on Croatian repeat stations' data in the interval 2007.5-2010.5, and a global Enhanced Magnetic Model, it was possible to estimate the crustal field at those sites. It was also done by taking into account the empirical adjustment for long-term external field variations. The higher crustal field values were found at those stations which are on or close to the Adriatic anomaly.

  3. A very strong magnetic field region in NOAA 11035

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggli, Sarah Amelia

    2015-04-01

    NOAA 11035 was a fairly typical active region that emerged near the central meridian 13-14 December 2009, early in solar cycle 24. During the active region’s rapid emergence and evolution, a deeply-rooted magnetic bipole emerged into the pre-existing leading polarity with spectacular consequences. Multi-wavelength imaging and spectropolarimetry from FIRS, IBIS, Hinode, TRACE, and SOHO allow for a comprehensive investigation of the physical processes present in this region. Intrusion of the opposite polarity into the leading sunspot’s penumbra resulted in a region of highly concentrated horizontal magnetic field, with a peak field strength larger than 3600 G based on Milne-Eddington inversion of Fe I spectropolarimetry at 6302 and 15650 Å. Photospheric velocity measurements show blueshifts of 4 km/sec along the neutral line, which are coincident with a dark chromospheric structure in He I 10830 and H I 6563 Å. We conclude that these signatures are the result of continuous magnetic reconnection near photospheric heights.

  4. Magnetic field configuration in a flaring active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Vieira, L. E.

    2015-10-01

    The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) provides continuous monitoring of the Sun's vector magnetic field through full-disk photospheric data with both high cadence and high spatial resolution. Here we investigate the evolution of AR 11249 from March 6 to March 7, 2012. We make use of HMI Stokes imaging, SDO/SHARPs, the HMI magnetic field line-of-sight (LOS) maps and the transverse components of the magnetic field as well as LOS velocity maps in order to detect regions with significant flux emergence and/or cancellation. In addition, we apply the Local Correlation Tracking (LCT) technique to the total and signed magnetic flux data and derive maps of horizontal velocity. From this analysis, we were able to pinpoint localized shear regions (and a shear channel) where penumbrae and pore formation areas, with strong linear polarization signals, are stretched and squeezed, showing also important downflows and upflows. We have also utilized Hinode/SP data and compared them to the HMI-SHARPs and the HMI-Stokes spectrograms. The aforementioned shear channel seems to correspond well with the X-class flare main channel of March 7 2012, as observed in AIA/SDO 171, 304 and 1600 Å.

  5. Magnetic fields in star-forming regions - Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heiles, Carl; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Mckee, Christopher F.; Zweibel, Ellen G.

    1993-01-01

    We review the observational aspects of magnetic fields in dense, star-forming regions. First we discuss ways to observe the field. These include direct methods, which consist of the measurement of both linear and circular polarization of spectral line and continuum radiation; and indirect methods, consisting of the angular distribution of H2O masers on the sky and the measurement of ambipolar diffusion. Next we discuss selected observational results, focusing on detailed discussions of a small number of points rather than a generalized discussion that covers the waterfront. We discuss the Orion/BN-KL region in detail, both on the small and large scales. Next we discuss the derivation of the complete magnetic vector, including both the systematic and fluctuating component, from a large sample of Zeeman and linear polarization measurements for the L204 dark cloud. We examine the virial theorem as it applies to dark clouds in general and one dark cloud, Barnard 1, in particular. We critically discuss the numerous claims for alignment of cloud structural features with the plane-of-the-sky component of the magnetic field, and find that many of these have not been definitively established.

  6. The HII regions and the velocity field of NGC 7331

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcelin, M.; Petrosian, A. R.; Amram, P.; Boulesteix, J.

    1994-02-01

    The galaxy NGC 7331 has been observed with an IPCS through an H alpha filter for direct imagery and through a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer at H aplha wavelength with the 2.60 m Byurakan telescope to study the main physical parameters of 47 H II regions, diameter and luminosity, as well as their velocities. The cumulative diameter distribution of H II regions is well represented by an exponential function with the parameters N0 = 272 and D0 = 95 pc. The H alpha luminosity function is described by a power law with index - 1.6. The H alpha velocity field of the galaxy is in good agreement with radio observations. Much less extended but offering a higher spatial resolution, it reveals non-circular motions, like the classical wiggles of the isovelocity lines when crossing a spiral arm, or the Z shape distortions of the isovelocity lines in the center possibly revealing an unseen bar.

  7. Stratwarm Effects in the Ionospheric D Region Wind Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vergasova, G. V.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis is made of the wind field structure in the strato-thermosphere over Eastern Siberia during the winter stratwarms of 1975-1977. It is found that coupling between dynamical processes in the stratosphere and lower thermosphere is effected through changes of the temperature regime of the atmosphere. The circulation regime both in the stratosphere and lower thermosphere depends on location of the source of perturbations that cause stratospheric warmings. The effect of warming-induced perturbations on the dynamics of above- and underlying layers and the meridional extent of the processes are determined by the altitude and region where anti-cyclones originate. In conditions of a warmer stratosphere, there is a considerable loss of wind stability in the ionospheric D-region. A time delay of 1 to 2 days of lower-thermosphere processes is found to occur with respect to stratospheric processes of temperature variation at 30 mb level.

  8. Measurements of the E region neutral wind field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogger, L. L.; Murphree, J. S.; Tepley, C. A.; Meriwether, J. W., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The neutral E-region wind field was measured at Calgary, Canada (51 N, 114 N) during 75 nights in 1982. Observations of the Doppler shift of the 5577-A emission line of atomic oxygen using a Fabry-Perot interferometer were converted to horizontal wind vectors. From the analysis of the data, four categories of wind characteristics were identified. In order of increasing magnetic activity these categories are: (1) wind field mostly variable in space and time; (2) predominantly equatorward flow throughout the night, (3) predominantly poleward flow throughout the night and (4) north-westward flow before midnight and southward after midnight. The wind magnitude was also variable and on some disturbed days exceeded 200 m/s.

  9. Plasma Equilibrium in a Magnetic Field with Stochastic Regions

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Krommes and Allan H. Reiman

    2009-04-23

    The nature of plasma equilibrium in a magnetic field with stochastic regions is examined. It is shown that the magnetic differential equation that determines the equilibrium Pfirsch-Schluter currents can be cast in a form similar to various nonlinear equations for a turbulent plasma, allowing application of the mathematical methods of statistical turbulence theory. An analytically tractable model, previously studied in the context of resonance-broadening theory, is applied with particular attention paid to the periodicity constraints required in toroidal configurations. It is shown that even a very weak radial diffusion of the magnetic field lines can have a significant effect on the equilibrium in the neighborhood of the rational surfaces, strongly modifying the near-resonant Pfirsch-Schluter currents. Implications for the numerical calculation of 3D equilibria are discussed

  10. Analysis of supersonic combustion flow fields with embedded subsonic regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dash, S.; Delguidice, P.

    1972-01-01

    The viscous characteristic analysis for supersonic chemically reacting flows was extended to include provisions for analyzing embedded subsonic regions. The numerical method developed to analyze this mixed subsonic-supersonic flow fields is described. The boundary conditions are discussed related to the supersonic-subsonic and subsonic-supersonic transition, as well as a heuristic description of several other numerical schemes for analyzing this problem. An analysis of shock waves generated either by pressure mismatch between the injected fluid and surrounding flow or by chemical heat release is also described.

  11. Neptune's polar cusp region - Observations and magnetic field analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepping, R. P.; Burlaga, L. F.; Lazarus, A. J.; Vasyliunas, V. M.; Szabo, A.; Steinberg, J.; Ness, N. F.; Krimigis, S. M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper confirms and extends the results of Szabo et al. (1991) (which demonstrated some similarities of the Neptune's polar cusp region to the earth's cusp), but uses a different approach requiring plasma and vector magnetic field quantities. In addition, various MHD properties of the cusp-magnetopause boundary, which separates the cusp from the magnetosheath allowing thermal anisotropy, are obtained, including the magnetopause (MP) normal, mass, and normal momentum flux, the boundary speed (and thickness), and their relationships. Results demonstrate that the MP velocity is composed of two components: a propagation speed and the other component consistent with the rotational motion of the magnetosphere.

  12. 5 CFR Appendix II to Part 1201 - Appropriate Regional or Field Office for Filing Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Appropriate Regional or Field Office for... Regional or Field Office for Filing Appeals All submissions shall be addressed to the Regional Director, if submitted to a regional office, or the Chief Administrative Judge, if submitted to a field office,...

  13. 5 CFR Appendix II to Part 1201 - Appropriate Regional or Field Office for Filing Appeals

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Appropriate Regional or Field Office for... Regional or Field Office for Filing Appeals All submissions shall be addressed to the Regional Director, if submitted to a regional office, or the Chief Administrative Judge, if submitted to a field office,...

  14. An analysis of the flow field in the region of the ASRM field joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dill, Richard A.; Whitesides, Harold R.

    1992-01-01

    The flow field in the region of a solid rocket motor field joint is very important since fluid dynamic and mechanical propellant stresses can couple to cause a motor failure at a joint. Presented here is an examination of the flow field in the region of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) field joints. The analyses were performed as a first step in assessing the design of the ASRM forward and aft field joints in order to assure the proper operation of the motor prior to further development of test firing. The analyses presented here were performed by employing a two-dimensional axisymmetric assumption. Fluent/BFC, a three dimensional full Navier-Stokes flow field code, was used to make the numerical calculations. This code utilizes a staggered grid formulation along with the SIMPLER numerical algorithm. Wall functions are used to determine the character of the laminar sublayer, and a standard kappa-epsilon turbulence model is used to close the fluid dynamic equations. The analyses performed to this date verify that the ASRM field joint design operates properly. The fluid dynamic stresses at the field joints are small due to the inherent design of the field joints. A problem observed in some other solid rocket motors is that large fluid dynamic stresses are generated at the motor joint on the downstream propellant grain due to forward facing step geometries. The design of the ASRM field joints are such that this is not a problem as shown by the analyses. Also, the analyses of the inhibitor stub left protruding into the port flow from normal propellant burn back show that more information is necessary to complete these analyses. These analyses were performed as parametric analyses in relation to the height of the inhibitor stub left protruding into the motor port. A better estimate of the amount of the inhibitor stub remaining at later burn times must be determined since the height which the inhibitor stub protrudes into the port flow drastically affects the fluid

  15. The effects of magnetic field in plume region on the performance of multi-cusped field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Peng Liu, Hui Yu, Daren; Gao, Yuanyuan; Mao, Wei

    2015-10-15

    The performance characteristics of a Multi-cusped Field Thruster depending on the magnetic field in the plume region were investigated. Five magnetic field shielding rings were separately mounted near the exit of discharge channel to decrease the strength of magnetic field in the plume region in different levels, while the magnetic field in the upstream was well maintained. The test results show that the electron current increases with the decrease of magnetic field strength in the plume region, which gives rise to higher propellant utilization and lower current utilization. On the other hand, the stronger magnetic field in the plume region improves the performance at low voltages (high current mode) while lower magnetic field improves the performance at high voltages (low current mode). This work can provide some optimal design ideas of the magnetic strength in the plume region to improve the performance of thruster.

  16. Magnetic field measurements in and above a limb active region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Judge

    2013-07-01

    We analyze spectropolarimetric data of a limb active region (NOAA 11302) obtained on September 22nd 2011 using the Facility Infrared Spectrometer (FIRS) at the Dunn Solar Telescope (DST). Stokes profiles including lines of Si I 1028.7 nm and He I 1083 nm were obtained in three scans over a 45"x75" area. Simultaneous narrow band Ca II K and G-band intensity data were acquired with a cadence of 5s at the DST. The He I data show not only typical active region polarization signatures, but also signatures in plumes -- cool post flare loops -- which extend many Mm into the corona across the visible limb. The plumes have remarkably uniform brightness, and the plume plasma is significantly Doppler shifted as it drains from the corona. Using carefully constructed observing and calibration sequences and applying Principal Component Analysis to remove instrumental artifacts, we achieved a polarization sensitivity approaching 0.02%. With this sensitivity we attempt to diagnose the vector magnetic fields and plasma properties of chromospheric and cool coronal material in and above NOAA 11302. Inversions using various radiative transfer models in the HAZEL code are remarkably consistent with the idea that plume spectra are formed in a simple, slab-like geometry, but that the ``disk'' spectra are formed under more traditional models (Milne-Eddington). The inverted magnetic data of He I lines are compared with photospheric inversions of DST Si I and Fe I data from the Solar Dynamics Observatory.

  17. Generation and Suppression of E Region Artificial Field Aligned Irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; Han, S.

    2012-12-01

    Artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs) were generated in the E region of the ionosphere above the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) facility during campaigns in May and August of 2012 and were quantified using a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar in Homer, Alaska. The purpose of the experiment was to analyze the X-mode suppression of FAIs generated from O-mode heating and to measure the threshold required to excite thermal parametric instabilities. The irregularities were excited by gradually increasing the power of a zenith pointing O-mode emission transmitted at a frequency of 2.75 MHz. To suppress the irregularities, a second X-mode emission at a higher frequency was added on alternating power cycles. The Homer radar measured the signal-to-noise ratio, Doppler shift, and spectral width of echoes reflected from the irregularities. We will calculate the threshold electric field required to excite the irregularities and compare with similar experiments in order to better understand the thermal parametric instability.

  18. Forecasting auroras from regional and global magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauristie, Kirsti; Myllys, Minna; Partamies, Noora; Viljanen, Ari; Peitso, Pyry; Juusola, Liisa; Ahmadzai, Shabana; Singh, Vikramjit; Keil, Ralf; Martinez, Unai; Luginin, Alexej; Glover, Alexi; Navarro, Vicente; Raita, Tero

    2016-06-01

    We use the connection between auroral sightings and rapid geomagnetic field variations in a concept for a Regional Auroral Forecast (RAF) service. The service is based on statistical relationships between near-real-time alerts issued by the NOAA Space Weather Prediction Center and magnetic time derivative (dB/dt) values measured by five MIRACLE magnetometer stations located in Finland at auroral and sub-auroral latitudes. Our database contains NOAA alerts and dB/dt observations from the years 2002-2012. These data are used to create a set of conditional probabilities, which tell the service user when the probability of seeing auroras exceeds the average conditions in Fennoscandia during the coming 0-12 h. Favourable conditions for auroral displays are associated with ground magnetic field time derivative values (dB/dt) exceeding certain latitude-dependent threshold values. Our statistical analyses reveal that the probabilities of recording dB/dt exceeding the thresholds stay below 50 % after NOAA alerts on X-ray bursts or on energetic particle flux enhancements. Therefore, those alerts are not very useful for auroral forecasts if we want to keep the number of false alarms low. However, NOAA alerts on global geomagnetic storms (characterized with Kp values > 4) enable probability estimates of > 50 % with lead times of 3-12 h. RAF forecasts thus rely heavily on the well-known fact that bright auroras appear during geomagnetic storms. The additional new piece of information which RAF brings to the previous picture is the knowledge on typical storm durations at different latitudes. For example, the service users south of the Arctic Circle will learn that after a NOAA ALTK06 issuance in night, auroral spotting should be done within 12 h after the alert, while at higher latitudes conditions can remain favourable during the next night.

  19. Wide Field Imaging of the Hubble Deep Field-South Region III: Catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palunas, Povilas; Collins, Nicholas R.; Gardner, Jonathan P.; Hill, Robert S.; Malumuth, Eliot M.; Rhodes, Jason; Teplitz, Harry I.; Woodgate, Bruce E.

    2002-01-01

    We present 1/2 square degree uBVRI imaging around the Hubble Deep Field - South. These data have been used in earlier papers to examine the QSO population and the evolution of the correlation function in the region around the HDF-S. The images were obtained with the Big Throughput Camera at CTIO in September 1998. The images reach 5 sigma limits of u approx. 24.4, B approx. 25.6, V approx. 25.3, R approx. 24.9 and I approx. 23.9. We present a catalog of approx. 22,000 galaxies. We also present number-magnitude counts and a comparison with other observations of the same field. The data presented here are available over the world wide web.

  20. Regional Ecorisk Field investigation, upper Clark Fork River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Pastorok, R.; LaTier, A.; Ginn, T.

    1995-12-31

    The Regional Ecorisk Field Investigation was conducted at the Clark Fork River Superfund Site (Montana) to evaluate the relationships between plant communities and tailings deposits in riparian habitats and to evaluate food-chain transfer of trace elements to selected wildlife species. Stations were selected to represent a range of vegetation biomass (or cover) values and apparent impact of trace elements, with some areas of lush vegetation, some areas of mostly unvegetated soil (e.g., < 30 percent plant cover), and a gradient in between. For the evaluation of risk to wildlife, bioaccumulation of metals was evaluated in native or naturalized plants, terrestrial invertebrates, and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus). Potential reproductive effects in the deer mouse were evaluated by direct measurements. For other wildlife species, bioaccumulation data were interpreted in the context of food web exposure models. Total biomass and species richness of riparian plant communities are related to tailings content of soil as indicated by pH and metals concentrations. Risk to populations of omnivorous small mammals such as the deer mouse was not significant. Relative abundance and reproductive condition of the deer mouse were normal, even in areas of high metals enrichment. Based on exposure models and site-specific tissue residue data for dietary species, risk to local populations of predators such as red fox and American kestrel that feed on deer mice and terrestrial invertebrates is not significant. Risk to herbivores related to metals bioaccumulation in plant tissues is not significant. Population level effects in deer and other large wildlife are not expected because of the large home ranges of such species and compensatory demographic factors.

  1. Regional assemblages of Lygus (Heteroptera: Miridae) in Montana canola fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sweep net sampling of canola (Brassica napus L.) was conducted in 2002 and 2003 to determine Lygus (Heteroptera: Miridae) species composition and parasitism levels in four regions of Montana. Regardless of region or seasonal change, Lygus elisus (Van Duzee) was the dominant species in all canola fi...

  2. Magnetic fields in non-convective regions of stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, Jonathan; Spruit, Henk C.

    2017-02-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of magnetic fields inside stars, concentrating on recent developments concerning magnetic fields in stably stratified (zones of) stars, leaving out convective dynamo theories and observations of convective envelopes. We include the observational properties of A, B and O-type main-sequence stars, which have radiative envelopes, and the fossil field model which is normally invoked to explain the strong fields sometimes seen in these stars. Observations seem to show that Ap-type stable fields are excluded in stars with convective envelopes. Most stars contain both radiative and convective zones, and there are potentially important effects arising from the interaction of magnetic fields at the boundaries between them; the solar cycle being one of the better known examples. Related to this, we discuss whether the Sun could harbour a magnetic field in its core. Recent developments regarding the various convective and radiative layers near the surfaces of early-type stars and their observational effects are examined. We look at possible dynamo mechanisms that run on differential rotation rather than convection. Finally, we turn to neutron stars with a discussion of the possible origins for their magnetic fields.

  3. Magnetic fields in non-convective regions of stars

    PubMed Central

    Braithwaite, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of magnetic fields inside stars, concentrating on recent developments concerning magnetic fields in stably stratified (zones of) stars, leaving out convective dynamo theories and observations of convective envelopes. We include the observational properties of A, B and O-type main-sequence stars, which have radiative envelopes, and the fossil field model which is normally invoked to explain the strong fields sometimes seen in these stars. Observations seem to show that Ap-type stable fields are excluded in stars with convective envelopes. Most stars contain both radiative and convective zones, and there are potentially important effects arising from the interaction of magnetic fields at the boundaries between them; the solar cycle being one of the better known examples. Related to this, we discuss whether the Sun could harbour a magnetic field in its core. Recent developments regarding the various convective and radiative layers near the surfaces of early-type stars and their observational effects are examined. We look at possible dynamo mechanisms that run on differential rotation rather than convection. Finally, we turn to neutron stars with a discussion of the possible origins for their magnetic fields. PMID:28386410

  4. Magnetic fields in non-convective regions of stars.

    PubMed

    Braithwaite, Jonathan; Spruit, Henk C

    2017-02-01

    We review the current state of knowledge of magnetic fields inside stars, concentrating on recent developments concerning magnetic fields in stably stratified (zones of) stars, leaving out convective dynamo theories and observations of convective envelopes. We include the observational properties of A, B and O-type main-sequence stars, which have radiative envelopes, and the fossil field model which is normally invoked to explain the strong fields sometimes seen in these stars. Observations seem to show that Ap-type stable fields are excluded in stars with convective envelopes. Most stars contain both radiative and convective zones, and there are potentially important effects arising from the interaction of magnetic fields at the boundaries between them; the solar cycle being one of the better known examples. Related to this, we discuss whether the Sun could harbour a magnetic field in its core. Recent developments regarding the various convective and radiative layers near the surfaces of early-type stars and their observational effects are examined. We look at possible dynamo mechanisms that run on differential rotation rather than convection. Finally, we turn to neutron stars with a discussion of the possible origins for their magnetic fields.

  5. Correlation between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the field-aligned current regions deduced from DE 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishii, M.; Sugiura, M.; Iyemori, T.; Slavin, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    The satellite-observed high correlations between magnetic and electric field perturbations in the high-latitude field-aligned current regions are investigated by examining the dependence of the relationship between Delta-B and E on spatial scale, using the electric and magnetic field data obtained by DE 2 in the polar regions. The results are compared with the Pedersen conductivity inferred from the international reference ionosphere model and the Alfven wave velocity calculated from the in situ ion density and magnetic field measurements.

  6. About Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services at EPA's Environmental Science Center

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Mission & contact information for EPA Region 3's Laboratory and Field Services located at EPA's Environmental Science Center: the Office of Analytical Services and Quality Assurance & Field Inspection Program

  7. 77 FR 16852 - Notice of Reclassification of Five Regional Offices to Investigative Field Offices: Seattle, WA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT Notice of Reclassification of Five Regional Offices to Investigative Field Offices... Field Offices: Louisville, KY and Jacksonville, FL; and Closure of Two Sub- Field Offices: Long Island... offices as field offices of investigation and the closing of the Louisville, Kentucky and...

  8. Optical singularities and power flux in the near-field region of planar evanescent-field superlenses.

    PubMed

    Perez-Molina, Manuel; Carretero, L; Acebal, P; Blaya, S

    2008-11-01

    We rigorously analyze the optical singularities and power flux in the near-field region of the novel superlenses reported in [Science317, 927 (2007)] For this purpose, we derive near-field expressions and a general criterion to classify the optical singularities in the vacuum, which are valid when the (s- or p-polarized) electromagnetic fields are generated by any planar field distribution with Cartesian or azimuthal symmetry. Such general results are particularized to the superlenses [Science317, 927 (2007)], for which we identify a sequence of optical vortices and saddles that arise from evanescent-field interference. While the saddles are always located around the focal region, the vortex locations depend on the source field. The features of the topological connection between vortices and saddles are also discussed.

  9. Regionalization: The Cure for an Ailing Intelligence Career Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Truth is, one cannot obtain regional expertise without knowledge of functional areas as they pertain to the political, military, social and economic...Reader’s Guide to Periodical Literature, which has: up-to-date subject indexes of congressional documents, social science publications, statistics, laws...three types of thinking: realism, liberalism, and constructivism . I found all of them helpful, though in different ways and in different

  10. Protection of Paddy Field and Recommendation of Regional Planning in Cianjur Regency, West Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munibah, Khursatul; Yudarwati, Rani; Dwi Wahyunie, Enni; Wijaya, Hermanu

    2016-11-01

    Cianjur Regency is one of “lumbung” paddies in West Java Province that can contribute to rice sufficiency for West Java 13.5%. However conversion of paddy field into other land use still happen in Indonesia because of land rent of paddy field less than other land use and also the low commitment of Government to protect the paddy field to get food self-sufficiency. Objectives are analysis of paddy field protection and recommendation of regional planning. Paddy field protection was determined based on existing paddy field, land suitability, economic value and Regional Spatial Planning (RTRW). Recommendation of regional planning was determined based on priority level of paddy field protection, Regional Spatial Planning (RTRW) and rice sufficiency status. The results showed that land suitability, economic value and also allocating land for paddy field in the RTRW can support realization of paddy field protection. The paddy field that included into the first and third priority is 30.14% and 38.45%, respectively. The other priorities of paddy field protection are around 15%. This research is recommended that 87.5% of the paddy field existing can be protected to get rice sufficiency with surplus around 48.782 ton.

  11. Ring currents and poloidal magnetic fields in nuclear regions of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesch, H.; Crusius, A.; Schlickeiser, R.; Wielebinski, R.

    1989-06-01

    The origin of observed strong poloidal magnetic fields R(z) in the central regions of galaxies which have gaseous rings is discussed. In the context of galactic disk dynamo models only weak poloidal fields but strong toroidal fields result. The strength of the poloidal fields is tied to the central activity and apply known and tested ideas rigorously. A battery process on galactic scales is discussed which ensures the existence of a large-scale magnetic field in the inner galactic region. The frozen-in field may be amplified by v x B compression and turbulent stretching; the resulting field is poloidal. The central activity provides a flow field which can produce B(z) equal to or greater than B(phi).

  12. A Diagnostic for Electric Field Measurements in the Near/Far-Field Regions of ICRF Antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, E. H.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Isler, R. C.

    2015-11-01

    The physics mechanisms of wave heating and current drive processes in the bulk hot plasma are generally well identified. However, details of the wave-plasma interaction with a material surface in the cold plasma edge are still not fully understood. The driver behind this interaction is the time-periodic wave electric field and is referred to as the near/far-field depending on the location with respect to the antenna. Various models have been formulated to capture the near/far-field physics but have not been tested experimentally. Thus, a diagnostic capable of measuring the electric field with temporal and 3D-spatial resolution is critical for confidence in the codes used to design next generation ICRF antennas. This research is focused on the development of a laser based spectroscopic technique, Doppler-free saturation spectroscopy (DFSS), and its implementation to study near/far-field physics. Using DFSS the spectra line profile of various electronic transitions are measured and fit to a quantum mechanical model incorporating both magnetic and dynamic electric field operators. The electric field direction and magnitude are extracted from the fit. The experimental setup and planned experiments will be discussed. Additionally, initial measurements of fitted Hδ spectrum under the influence of known electric and magnetic fields will be presented.

  13. Electric Field, Field-aligned Current and Electromagnetic Waves in the Dip Region in front of the Dipolarization Front

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, S.; Sun, W.; Zhou, X.; Zhao, D.; Zong, Q.; Yao, Z.; Pu, Z.; Parks, G. K.

    2015-12-01

    Dipolarization front (DF) is characterized by a strong increase of magnetic field Bz component often observed before the arrival of high-speed flows in the Earth's plasma sheet. The DF interfaces between the high-speed flowing transient plasma and the ambient plasma. Ahead of the DFs, magnetic field Bz decreases and it is, called the "dip region." However, unlike in the high-speed flow and the ambient plasma which can be described by MHD theory, kinetic effects are important in the dip region because the spatial scale is less than the ion gyroradius. Observation and simulation have demonstrated that the dip region is formed by the reflecting ions at the sharp front. Short lived electromagnetic waves are also observed here generated by the reflected ions. In addition, Hall electric field observed in this region is in the opposite direction of the electric field inside the DF. The dipolarization front and the dip region ahead of it formed a set of current systems and they are fundamentally important for understanding the cause of flow braking in the plasma sheet.

  14. Scaling up from field to region for wind erosion prediction using a field-scale wind erosion model and GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zobeck, T.M.; Parker, N.C.; Haskell, S.; Guoding, K.

    2000-01-01

    Factors that affect wind erosion such as surface vegetative and other cover, soil properties and surface roughness usually change spatially and temporally at the field-scale to produce important field-scale variations in wind erosion. Accurate estimation of wind erosion when scaling up from fields to regions, while maintaining meaningful field-scale process details, remains a challenge. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the feasibility of using a field-scale wind erosion model with a geographic information system (GIS) to scale up to regional levels and to quantify the differences in wind erosion estimates produced by different scales of soil mapping used as a data layer in the model. A GIS was used in combination with the revised wind erosion equation (RWEQ), a field-scale wind erosion model, to estimate wind erosion for two 50 km2 areas. Landsat Thematic Mapper satellite imagery from 1993 with 30 m resolution was used as a base map. The GIS database layers included land use, soils, and other features such as roads. The major land use was agricultural fields. Data on 1993 crop management for selected fields of each crop type were collected from local government agency offices and used to 'train' the computer to classify land areas by crop and type of irrigation (agroecosystem) using commercially available software. The land area of the agricultural land uses was overestimated by 6.5% in one region (Lubbock County, TX, USA) and underestimated by about 21% in an adjacent region (Terry County, TX, USA). The total estimated wind erosion potential for Terry County was about four times that estimated for adjacent Lubbock County. The difference in potential erosion among the counties was attributed to regional differences in surface soil texture. In a comparison of different soil map scales in Terry County, the generalised soil map had over 20% more of the land area and over 15% greater erosion potential in loamy sand soils than did the detailed soil map. As

  15. A viable non-axisymmetric non-force-free field to represent solar active regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, A.; Bhattacharyya, R.

    2016-11-01

    A combination of analytical calculations and vectormagnetogram data is utilized to develop a non-axisymmetric non-force-free magnetic field and assess its viability in describing solar active regions. For that purpose, we construct a local spherical shell where a planar surface, tangential to the inner sphere, represents a Cartesian cutout of an active region. The magnetic field defined on the surface is then correlated with magnetograms. The analysis finds that the non-axisymmetric non-force-free magnetic field, obtained by a superposition of two linear-force-free fields, correlates reasonably well with magnetograms.

  16. Regional Mapping of the Lunar Crustal Magnetic Field: Correlation of Strong Anomalies with Curvilinear Albedo Markings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hood, L. L.; Yingst, A.; Zakharian, A.; Lin, R. P.; Mitchell, D. L.; Halekas, J.; Acuna, M. H.; Binder, A. B.

    2000-01-01

    Using high-resolution regional Lunar Prospector magnetometer magnetic field maps, we report here a close correlation of the strongest individual crustal anomalies with unusual curvilinear albedo markings of the Reiner Gamma class.

  17. Structure in the DC and AC electric fields associated with the dayside cusp region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, N. C.

    1985-01-01

    The cusp region as seen in the AC and DC electric fields is one of intense variation. The intensity peaks within the soft particle precipitation. The only AC signal that appears to be unique to the cusp is broadband ULF-ELF magnetic noise. Other types of emissions are also found at other local times at high latitudes. The pattern of these signals, especially that of ULF-ELF broadband electrostatic noise (BEN), distinguishes the cusp region from other regions. BEN signatures are indicators of magnetosheath-like soft particle precipitation but not necessarily of open field lines. In addition, large spike-like features in the DC electric field are seen near local magnetic noon which appear to be related to the large convective electric fields that have been observed at the magnetopause. These features are not necessarily tied to convection reversals, but may appear within broader regions of zonal convective flow.

  18. On the Electron Diffusion Region in Asymmetric Reconnection with a Guide Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, Michael; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Li-Jen; Bessho, Naoki; Kuznetsova, Masha; Birn, Joachim; Burch, James L.

    2016-01-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations in a 2.5-D geometry and analytical theory are employed to study the electron diffusion region in asymmetric reconnection with a guide magnetic field. The analysis presented here demonstrates that similar to the case without guide field, in-plane flow stagnation and null of the in-plane magnetic field are well separated. In addition, it is shown that the electric field at the local magnetic X point is again dominated by inertial effects, whereas it remains dominated by nongyrotropic pressure effects at the in-plane flow stagnation point. A comparison between local electron Larmor radii and the magnetic gradient scale lengths predicts that distribution should become nongyrotropic in a region enveloping both field reversal and flow stagnation points. This prediction is verified by an analysis of modeled electron distributions, which show clear evidence of mixing in the critical region.

  19. On the electron diffusion region in asymmetric reconnection with a guide magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesse, Michael; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Chen, Li-Jen; Bessho, Naoki; Kuznetsova, Masha; Birn, Joachim; Burch, James L.

    2016-03-01

    Particle-in-cell simulations in a 2.5-D geometry and analytical theory are employed to study the electron diffusion region in asymmetric reconnection with a guide magnetic field. The analysis presented here demonstrates that similar to the case without guide field, in-plane flow stagnation and null of the in-plane magnetic field are well separated. In addition, it is shown that the electric field at the local magnetic X point is again dominated by inertial effects, whereas it remains dominated by nongyrotropic pressure effects at the in-plane flow stagnation point. A comparison between local electron Larmor radii and the magnetic gradient scale lengths predicts that distribution should become nongyrotropic in a region enveloping both field reversal and flow stagnation points. This prediction is verified by an analysis of modeled electron distributions, which show clear evidence of mixing in the critical region.

  20. SDO/HMI Vector Magnetic Field Observations of the Solar Polar Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X.; Hoeksema, J. T.; Liu, Y.; Norton, A. A.; Sainz Dalda, A.; Hayashi, K.

    2015-12-01

    SDO/HMI is now providing full-disk vector magnetograms of the Sun. Although the instrument is optimized for strong field in active regions, data from the quieter regions can still provide valuable diagnostics if treated carefully. Here we present our first attempt at inferring the vector field in the polar regions. Through deep averaging (96 min) of the Stokes profiles, we find that many unipolar patches reach 5-sigma signal-to-noise ratio, so magnetic field can be inferred with confidence. The inclination of the field in these patches appears to deviate from the radial direction. We discuss the implications for global coronal field topology and our next steps of work.

  1. Flexible gas insulated transmission line having regions of reduced electric field

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.; Fischer, William H.; Yoon, Kue H.; Meyer, Jeffry R.

    1983-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line having radially flexible field control means for reducing the electric field along the periphery of the inner conductor at predetermined locations wherein the support insulators are located. The radially flexible field control means of the invention includes several structural variations of the inner conductor, wherein careful controlling of the length to depth of surface depressions produces regions of reduced electric field. Several embodiments of the invention dispose a flexible connector at the predetermined location along the inner conductor where the surface depressions that control the reduced electric field are located.

  2. A region of intense plasma wave turbulence on auroral field lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurnett, D. A.; Frank, L. A.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents a detailed study of the plasma wave turbulence observed by HAWKEYE-1 and IMP-6 on high latitude auroral field lines and investigates the relationship of this turbulence to magnetic field and plasma measurements obtained in the same region.

  3. How Much Energy Can Be Stored in Solar Active Region Magnetic Fields?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, J.; Downs, C.; Torok, T.; Titov, V. S.; Lionello, R.; Mikic, Z.; Riley, P.

    2015-12-01

    Major solar eruptions such as X-class flares and very fast coronal mass ejections usually originate in active regions on the Sun. The energy that powers these events is believed to be stored as free magnetic energy (energy above the potential field state) prior to eruption. While coronal magnetic fields are not in general force-free, active regions have very strong magnetic fields and at low coronal heights the plasma beta is therefore very small, making the field (in equilibrium) essentially force-free. The Aly-Sturrock theorem shows that the energy of a fully force-free field cannot exceed the energy of the so-called open field. If the theorem holds, this places an upper limit on the amount of free energy that can be stored: the maximum free energy (MFE) is the difference between the open field energy and the potential field energy of the active region. In thermodynamic MHD simulations of a major eruption (the July 14, 2000 'Bastille' day event) and a modest event (February 13, 2009, we have found that the MFE indeed bounds the energy stored prior to eruption. We compute the MFE for major eruptive events in cycles 23 and 24 to investigate the maximum amount of energy that can be stored in solar active regions.Research supported by AFOSR, NASA, and NSF.

  4. Regional-Scale High-Latitude Extreme Geoelectric Fields Pertaining to Geomagnetically Induced Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulkkinen, Antti; Bernabeu, Emanuel; Eichner, Jan; Viljanen, Ari; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2015-01-01

    Motivated by the needs of the high-voltage power transmission industry, we use data from the high-latitude IMAGE magnetometer array to study characteristics of extreme geoelectric fields at regional scales. We use 10-s resolution data for years 1993-2013, and the fields are characterized using average horizontal geoelectric field amplitudes taken over station groups that span about 500-km distance. We show that geoelectric field structures associated with localized extremes at single stations can be greatly different from structures associated with regionally uniform geoelectric fields, which are well represented by spatial averages over single stations. Visual extrapolation and rigorous extreme value analysis of spatially averaged fields indicate that the expected range for 1-in-100-year extreme events are 3-8 V/km and 3.4-7.1 V/km, respectively. The Quebec reference ground model is used in the calculations.

  5. Regional-scale high-latitude extreme geoelectric fields pertaining to geomagnetically induced currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, Antti; Bernabeu, Emanuel; Eichner, Jan; Viljanen, Ari; Ngwira, Chigomezyo

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by the needs of the high-voltage power transmission industry, we use data from the high-latitude IMAGE magnetometer array to study characteristics of extreme geoelectric fields at regional scales. We use 10-s resolution data for years 1993-2013, and the fields are characterized using average horizontal geoelectric field amplitudes taken over station groups that span about 500-km distance. We show that geoelectric field structures associated with localized extremes at single stations can be greatly different from structures associated with regionally uniform geoelectric fields, which are well represented by spatial averages over single stations. Visual extrapolation and rigorous extreme value analysis of spatially averaged fields indicate that the expected range for 1-in-100-year extreme events are 3-8 V/km and 3.4-7.1 V/km, respectively. The Quebec reference ground model is used in the calculations.

  6. Diffusive alignment of the magnetic field in active regions of plasmas

    PubMed

    Nunez

    2000-11-01

    Regions of high magnetic field within plasmas tend to keep this field aligned in a dominant direction. This occurs both in observed phenomena and in simulations of kinematic and nonlinear dynamos. Although most of this effect is due to the particular dynamics of each case, magnetic diffusion also plays an important role. It is shown here that the unitary magnetic field vector satisfies a certain estimate that bounds its possible variations. The dependence of the bound on the plasma parameters is analyzed.

  7. Numerical analyses of trapped field magnet and stable levitation region of HTSC

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchimoto, M.; Kojima, T.; Waki, H.; Honma, T.

    1995-05-01

    Stable levitation with a permanent magnet and a bulk high {Tc} superconductor (HTSC) is examined numerically by using the critical state model and the frozen field model. Differences between a permanent magnet and a trapped field magnet are first discussed from property of levitation force. Stable levitation region of the HTSC on a ring magnet and on a solenoid coil are calculated with the numerical methods. Obtained results are discussed from difference of the magnetic field configuration.

  8. Convective-region geometry as the cause of Uranus' and Neptune's unusual magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Sabine; Bloxham, Jeremy

    2004-03-11

    The discovery of Uranus' and Neptune's non-dipolar, non-axisymmetric magnetic fields destroyed the picture--established by Earth, Jupiter and Saturn--that planetary magnetic fields are dominated by axial dipoles. Although various explanations for these unusual fields have been proposed, the cause of such field morphologies remains unexplained. Planetary magnetic fields are generated by complex fluid motions in electrically conducting regions of the planets (a process known as dynamo action), and so are intimately linked to the structure and evolution of planetary interiors. Determining why Uranus and Neptune have different field morphologies is not only critical for studying the interiors of these planets, but also essential for understanding the dynamics of magnetic-field generation in all planets. Here we present three-dimensional numerical dynamo simulations that model the dynamo source region as a convecting thin shell surrounding a stably stratified fluid interior. We show that this convective-region geometry produces magnetic fields similar in morphology to those of Uranus and Neptune. The fields are non-dipolar and non-axisymmetric, and result from a combination of the stable fluid's response to electromagnetic stress and the small length scales imposed by the thin shell.

  9. MAGNETIC FIELD TOPOLOGY AND THE THERMAL STRUCTURE OF THE CORONA OVER SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; DeRosa, Marc L.; Title, Alan M.

    2010-08-20

    Solar extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images of quiescent active-region coronae are characterized by ensembles of bright 1-2 MK loops that fan out from select locations. We investigate the conditions associated with the formation of these persistent, relatively cool, loop fans within and surrounding the otherwise 3-5 MK coronal environment by combining EUV observations of active regions made with TRACE with global source-surface potential-field models based on the full-sphere photospheric field from the assimilation of magnetograms that are obtained by the Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) on SOHO. We find that in the selected active regions with largely potential-field configurations these fans are associated with (quasi-)separatrix layers (QSLs) within the strong-field regions of magnetic plage. Based on the empirical evidence, we argue that persistent active-region cool-loop fans are primarily related to the pronounced change in connectivity across a QSL to widely separated clusters of magnetic flux, and confirm earlier work that suggested that neither a change in loop length nor in base field strengths across such topological features are of prime importance to the formation of the cool-loop fans. We discuss the hypothesis that a change in the distribution of coronal heating with height may be involved in the phenomenon of relatively cool coronal loop fans in quiescent active regions.

  10. Fresnel-region fields and antenna noise-temperature calculations for advanced microwave sounding units

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1982-01-01

    A transition from the antenna noise temperature formulation for extended noise sources in the far-field or Fraunhofer-region of an antenna to one of the intermediate near field or Fresnel-region is discussed. The effort is directed toward microwave antenna simulations and high-speed digital computer analysis of radiometric sounding units used to obtain water vapor and temperature profiles of the atmosphere. Fresnel-region fields are compared at various distances from the aperture. The antenna noise temperature contribution of an annular noise source is computed in the Fresnel-region (D squared/16 lambda) for a 13.2 cm diameter offset-paraboloid aperture at 60 GHz. The time-average Poynting vector is used to effect the computation.

  11. Calculation of electromagnetic fields in the near-field region of a moving scattering object

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, M. H.

    1990-07-01

    The problem of scattering of electromagnetic fields by perfectly conducting, moving objects is solved with the Lorentz transformation and the plane wave formulation. Apart from the physical optics approximation, the solution is exact. The result is subsequently applied to the special case of monostatic reflection by an object that moves slowly with respect to the velocity of light. The result can be used to predict the time dependent reflection from an aircraft that passes the antenna of a proximity fuze, and the optimum fuze algorithm can be selected.

  12. Unitary inhibitory field potentials in the CA3 region of rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Bazelot, Michaël; Dinocourt, Céline; Cohen, Ivan; Miles, Richard

    2010-06-15

    Glickfeld and colleagues (2009) suggested that single hippocampal interneurones generate field potentials at monosynaptic latencies. We pursued this observation in simultaneous intracellular and multiple extracellular records from the CA3 region of rat hippocampal slices. We confirmed that interneurones evoked field potentials at monosynaptic latencies. Pyramidal cells initiated disynaptic inhibitory field potentials, but did not initiate detectable monosynaptic excitatory fields. We confirmed that inhibitory fields were GABAergic in nature and showed they were suppressed at low external Cl(-), suggesting they originate at postsynaptic sites. Field potentials generated by a single interneuron were detected at multiple sites over distances of more than 800 mum along the stratum pyramidale of the CA3 region. We used arrays of extracellular electrodes to examine amplitude distributions of spontaneous inhibitory fields recorded at sites orthogonal to or along the CA3 stratum pyramidale. Cluster analysis of spatially distributed inhibitory field events let us separate events generated by interneurones terminating on distinct zones of somato-dendritic axis. Events generated at dendritic sites had similar amplitudes but occurred less frequently and had somewhat slower kinetics than perisomatic events generated near the stratum pyramidale. In records from multiple sites in the CA3 stratum pyramidale, we distinguished inhibitory fields that seemed to be initiated by interneurones with spatially distinct axonal arborisations.

  13. Model for the Coupled Evolution of Subsurface and Coronal Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Mackay, D. H.

    2007-04-01

    According to Babcock's theory of the solar dynamo, bipolar active regions are Ω-shaped loops emerging from a toroidal field located near the base of the convection zone. In this paper, a mean field model for the evolution of a twisted Ω-loop is developed. The model describes the coupled evolution of the magnetic field in the convection zone and the corona after the loop has fully emerged into the solar atmosphere. Such a coupled evolution is required to fully understand what happens to the coronal and subsurface fields as magnetic flux cancels at polarity inversion lines on the photosphere. The jump conditions for the magnetic field at the photosphere are derived from the magnetic stress balance between the convection zone and corona. The model reproduces the observed spreading of active region magnetic flux over the solar surface. At polarity inversion lines, magnetic flux submerges below the photosphere, but the component of magnetic field along the inversion line cannot submerge, because the field in the upper convection zone is nearly radial. Therefore, magnetic shear builds up in the corona above the inversion line, which eventually leads to a loss of equilibrium of the coronal fields and the ``lift-off'' of a coronal flux rope. Fields that submerge are transported back to the base of the convection zone, leading to the repair of the toroidal flux rope. Following Martens and Zwaan, interactions between bipoles are also considered.

  14. Stess field in Brazil: First and Second-Order Stress Patterns: Examples of Regional Forces Controlling the Stress Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F.; Assumpcao, M.

    2012-12-01

    The knowledge of stress field is fundamental not only to understand driving forces and plate deformation as also it helps in the study of intraplate seismicity. In Brazil, we find reverse, strike-slip and normal mechanisms that indicates a variable stress field. The stress field has been mainly obtained using focal mechanism results and a few breakout data and in-situ measurements. However the stress field is still poorly known in Brazil. Recent earthquake focal mechanisms were determinate using P-wave modeling of seismogram stacks of several teleseismic stations ( > 30°) grouped according to distance and azimuth and first motion polarities. Every record was visually inspected and those with a good signal/noise ratio (SNR) were grouped in latitude-longitude windows of ten degrees and stacked. We usually consider groups with at least two stations, but, in sometimes a good record of single station with different azimuth was also used to constrain the focal depth. The P, pP, sP wavetrains of the stacked signals were modelled using the hudson96 program of Herrman seismology package (Herrman, 2002). We also determinate moment tensor of same events in the central region. The major difficulty is to determinate focal mechanism of low magnitudes events (< 4.0 mb) using distants seismograph stations. The central region shows a purely compressional pattern which are predicted by regional theoretical models (Richardson & Coblentz, 1996 and the TD0 model of Lithgow& Bertelloni, 2004). Meanwhile in the Amazonic region we find a SHmax from E-W to SE-NW probably caused by Caribbean and South American plates interaction (Meijer, 1995). In NE region, the compression rotates following the coast line which indicates an important component regional present in stress field spreading effects due to the continental/oceanic crustal (Assumpção, 1998) and cases of stress caused by sedimentary load in Amazon Fan in agreement local theoretical models (Watts et al., 2009). We determinate the

  15. Study on the scale distribution of the field-aligned irregularities in E-region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Wanlin; Qi, Hao

    2016-12-01

    The field-aligned backscattering region in the ionospheric E-region is considered to contain many small irregularities, which are arrayed along the magnetic lines. The scale and number of these irregularities in the backscattering region are different. The irregularities of a certain scale can reflect the radio wave of the corresponding wavelength on the basis of the Bragg scattering theory. The more the irregularities of a scale, the stronger is the backscattered power. Thus, the scale distribution can be estimated by the function relationship between the scale and the echo amplitude, while the incidence direction of the wave path is perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. Moreover, the echoes with oblique incidence direction can also be used to estimate the scale distribution, considering the factor of the angle between the wave path and the perpendicular field direction.

  16. On open and closed field line regions in Tsyganenko's field model and their possible associations with horse collar auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birn, J.; Hones, E. W., Jr.; Craven, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Elphinstone, R. D.; Stern, D. P.

    1991-01-01

    The boundary between open and closed field lines is investigated in the empirical Tsyganenko (1987) magnetic field model. All field lines extending to distances beyond -70 R(E), the tailward velocity limit of the Tsyganenko model are defined as open, while all other field lines, which cross the equatorial plane earthward of -70 R(E) and are connected with the earth at both ends, are assumed closed. It is found that this boundary at the surface of the earth, identified as the polar cap boundary, can exhibit the arrowhead shape, pointed toward the sun, which is found in horse collar auroras. For increasing activity levels, the polar cap increases in area and becomes rounder, so that the arrowhead shape is less pronounced. The presence of a net B(y) component can also lead to considerable rounding of the open flux region. The arrowhead shape is found to be closely associated with the increase of B(z) from the midnight region to the flanks of the tail, consistent with a similar increase of the plasma sheet thickness.

  17. Determination of magnetic fields in broad line region of active galactic nuclei from polarimetric observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrovich, Mikhail; Silant'ev, Nikolai; Gnedin, Yuri; Natsvlishvili, Tinatin; Buliga, Stanislava

    2017-02-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in confining gas clouds in the broad line region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and in maintaining the stability of these clouds. Without magnetic fields the clouds would not be stable, and soon after their formation they would expand and disperse. We show that the strength of the magnetic field can be derived from the polarimetric observations. Estimates of magnetic fields for a number of AGNs are based on the observed polarization degrees of broad Hα lines and nearby continuum. The difference between their values allows us to estimate the magnetic field strength in the BLR using the method developed by Silant'ev et al. (2013). Values of magnetic fields in BLR for a number of AGNs have been derived.

  18. Regional-residual separation of potential field: An example from Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabtni, Hakim; Jallouli, Chokri

    2017-02-01

    We present a regional-residual separation procedure for potential field data (gravity or magnetic) based on the integration of least-squares polynomial, power density spectrum and Upward continuation techniques. The proposed procedure is composed by 6 fundamental steps: 1) gridding of the total potential field; 2) least-squares polynomial approximation to calculate polynomial regionals; 3) applying power density spectrum technique to estimate the depth of the deepest source; 4) upward continuation to attenuate the effect of shallower sources; 5) comparing the produced polynomial regional approximations and upward continuation to choose the suitable regional and finally 6) computation of the residual. The proposed procedure was applied to synthetic case and real gravity data from Tunisia.

  19. Regions of strongly enhanced perpendicular electric fields adjacent to auroral arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opgenoorth, H. J.; Haggstrom, I.; Williams, P. J. S.; Jones, G. O. L.

    1990-08-01

    A joint campaign involving EISCAT, the Cornell University Portable Radar Interferometer (CUPRI), and sounding rockets has observed short-lived elevations of E-region electron temperatures, indicating the presence of strong electric fields. The use of a new pulse-code technique has considerably improved the EISCAT data in regions of low ionospheric electron densities. It has been found that strong and apparently short-lived enhancements of electric fields and associated E-region electron temperatures occur more commonly than long-lived ones. However, earlier EISCAT data with simultaneous optical recordings (and also some CUPRI radar data from the ERRRIS campaign) indicate that many of these events are, in fact, not short-lived, but occur in localized regions and are associated with drifting auroral forms.

  20. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. II - NOAA active region 5747 (1989 October)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leka, K. D.; Canfield, Richard C.; Mcclymont, A. N.; De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Fan, Yuhong; Tang, F.

    1993-01-01

    The paper describes October 1989 observations in NOAA Active Region 5747 of the morphology of energetic electron precipitation and high-pressure coronal flare plasmas of three flares and their relation to the vector magnetic field and vertical electric currents. The H-alpha spectroheliograms were coaligned with the vector magnetograms using continuum images of sunspots, enabling positional accuracy of a few arcsec. It was found that, during the gradual phase, the regions of the H-alpha flare that show the effects of enhanced pressure in the overlying corona often encompass extrema of the vertical current density, consistent with earlier work showing a close relationship between H-alpha emission and line-of-sight currents. The data are also consistent with the overall morphology and evolution described by erupting-filament models such as those of Kopp and Pneuman (1976) and Sturrock (1989).

  1. The calculation of electromagnetic fields in the Fresnel and Fraunhofer regions using numerical integration methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1971-01-01

    Some results obtained with a digital computer program written at Goddard Space Flight Center to obtain electromagnetic fields scattered by perfectly reflecting surfaces are presented. For purposes of illustration a paraboloidal reflector was illuminated at radio frequencies in the simulation for both receiving and transmitting modes of operation. Fields were computed in the Fresnel and Fraunhofer regions. A dual-reflector system (Cassegrain) was also simulated for the transmitting case, and fields were computed in the Fraunhofer region. Appended results include derivations which show that the vector Kirchhoff-Kottler formulation has an equivalent form requiring only incident magnetic fields as a driving function. Satisfaction of the radiation conditions at infinity by the equivalent form is demonstrated by a conversion from Cartesian to spherical vector operators. A subsequent development presents the formulation by which Fresnel or Fraunhofer patterns are obtainable for dual-reflector systems. A discussion of the time-average Poynting vector is also appended.

  2. Electric field structure inside the secondary island in the reconnection diffusion region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, M.; Deng, X. H.; Huang, S. Y.

    2012-04-01

    Secondary islands have recently been intensively studied because of their essential role in dissipating energy during reconnection. Secondary islands generally form by tearing instability in a stretched current sheet, with or without guide field. In this article, we study the electric field structure inside a secondary island in the diffusion region using large-scale two-and-half dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation. Intense in-plane electric fields, which point toward the center of the island, form inside the secondary island. The magnitudes of the in-plane electric fields Ex and Ez inside the island are much larger than those outside the island in the surrounding diffusion region. The maximum magnitudes of the fields are about three times the B0VA, where B0 is the asymptotic magnetic field strength and VA is the Alfvén speed based on B0 and the initial current sheet density. Our results could explain the intense electric field (~100 mV/m) inside the secondary island observed in the Earth's magnetosphere. The electric field Ex inside the secondary island is primarily balanced by the Hall term (j × B)/ne, while Ez is balanced by a combination of (j × B)/ne, -(vi × B), and the divergence of electron pressure tensor, with (j × B)/ne term being dominant. This large Hall electric field is due to the large out-of-plane current density jy inside the island, which consists mainly of accelerated electrons forming a strong bulk flow in the -y direction. The electric field Ey shows a bipolar structure across the island, with negative Ey corresponding to negative Bz and positive Ey corresponding to positive Bz. It is balanced by (j × B)/ne and the convective electric field. There are significant parallel electric fields, forming a quadrupolar structure inside the island, with maximum amplitude of about 0.3B0VA.

  3. Knob fields in the Terra Cimmeria/Terra Sirenum region of Mars: Stratigraphy, mineralogy and morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, Lorenz; Bishop, Janice L.; Neukum, Gerhard

    2013-07-01

    We investigate the stratigraphy, morphology and mineralogy of five major knob fields in the region between Terra Cimmeria and Terra Sirenum on Mars based on HRSC, CTX, MOC and HiRISE imagery together with hyperspectral data from CRISM. The knob fields comprise Ariadnes Colles, Atlantis Chaos and Gorgonum Chaos and further, unnamed fields of mounds. They have been mapped in previous studies as Hesperian or Amazonian units and are located within the shoreline of the proposed "Eridania lake", the putative source of Ma'adim Vallis. The mounds contain Mg/Fe-bearing phyllosilicates and locally Al-rich phyllosilicates. Our geological mapping shows that the knob fields have a late Noachian age, which indicates later phyllosilicate formation than typically observed on Mars. The knob fields formed by alteration of the "Electris deposit", an airfall deposit possibly rich in basaltic glass (Grant, J.A., Schultz, P.H. [1990]. Icarus 84, 166-195), in local depressions, possibly in the Eridania lake. The spectroscopic detection of phyllosilicates here may indicate that liquid water persisted longer in this region than elsewhere on Mars. The knob fields are embayed by the Hesperian ridged plains. Numerous valleys carve into the ridged plains and document that the aqueous history of this region continued into the Hesperian and Amazonian. The study area is traversed by the Sirenum Fossae. These graben appear to post-date the aqueous activity in the study area except in the Gorgonum basin, where a lake developed after their formation.

  4. Amplification of magnetic fields in a primordial H II region and supernova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Daegene; Wise, John H.

    2016-10-01

    Magnetic fields permeate the Universe on all scales and play a key role during star formation. We study the evolution of magnetic fields around a massive metal-free (Population III) star at z ˜ 15 during the growth of its H II region and subsequent supernova explosion by conducting three cosmological magnetohydrodynamics simulations with radiation transport. Given the theoretical uncertainty and weak observational constraints of magnetic fields in the early universe, we initialize the simulations with identical initial conditions only varying the seed field strength. We find that magnetic fields grow as ρ2/3 during the gravitational collapse preceding star formation, as expected from ideal spherical collapse models. Massive Population III stars can expel a majority of the gas from the host halo through radiative feedback, and we find that the magnetic fields are not amplified above the spherical collapse scaling relation during this phase. However, afterwards when its supernova remnant can radiatively cool and fragment, the turbulent velocity field in and around the shell causes the magnetic field to be significantly amplified on average by ˜100 in the shell and up to 6 orders of magnitude behind the reverse shock. Within the shell, field strengths are on the order of a few nG at a number density of 1 cm-3. We show that this growth is primarily caused by small-scale dynamo action in the remnant. These strengthened fields will propagate into the first generations of galaxies, possibly affecting the nature of their star formation.

  5. Dune field pattern formation and recent transporting winds in the Olympia Undae Dune Field, north polar region of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewing, Ryan C.; Peyret, Aymeric-Pierre B.; Kocurek, Gary; Bourke, Mary

    2010-08-01

    High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery of the central Olympia Undae Dune Field in the north polar region of Mars shows a reticulate dune pattern consisting of two sets of nearly orthogonal dune crestlines, with apparent slipfaces on the primary crests, ubiquitous wind ripples, areas of coarse-grained wind ripples, and deflated interdune areas. Geomorphic evidence and dune field pattern analysis of dune crest length, spacing, defect density, and orientation indicates that the pattern is complex, representing two constructional generations of dunes. The oldest and best-organized generation forms the primary crestlines and is transverse to circumpolar easterly winds. Gross bed form-normal analysis of the younger pattern of crestlines indicates that it emerged with both circumpolar easterly winds and NE winds and is reworking the older pattern. Mapping of secondary flow fields over the dunes indicates that the most recent transporting winds were from the NE. The younger pattern appears to represent an influx of sediment to the dune field associated with the development of the Olympia Cavi reentrant, with NE katabatic winds channeling through the reentrant. A model of the pattern reformation based upon the reconstructed primary winds and resulting secondary flow fields shows that the development of the secondary pattern is controlled by the boundary condition of the older dune topography.

  6. Neutral wind acceleration in the polar lower E-region during an intense electric-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Takuo T.; Buchert, Stephan C.; Nozawa, Satonori; Oyama, Shin-ichiro; Ogawa, Yasunobu; Fujii, Ryoichi

    2016-04-01

    The Joule heating and ion drag effects are considered as important factors in the neutral wind dynamics in the polar E-region. However, quantitative evaluations for these effects are insufficient for correct understanding, particularly, in the lower E-region (100-110 km heights) where the anomalous heating effect, related with the electron Pedersen currents, can occur during the intense electric field. In the present study, using EISCAT Svalbard radar data, we have investigated, for the first time, the normal and anomalous heating effects to the neutral wind acceleration in the lower E-region.

  7. On some properties of force-free magnetic fields in infinite regions of space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aly, J. J.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques for solving boundary value problems (BVP) for a force free magnetic field (FFF) in infinite space are presented. A priori inequalities are defined which must be satisfied by the force-free equations. It is shown that upper bounds may be calculated for the magnetic energy of the region provided the value of the magnetic normal component at the boundary of the region can be shown to decay sufficiently fast at infinity. The results are employed to prove a nonexistence theorem for the BVP for the FFF in the spatial region. The implications of the theory for modeling the origins of solar flares are discussed.

  8. On open and closed field line regions in Tsyganenko's field model and their possible associations with horse collar auroras

    SciTech Connect

    Birn, J.; Hones, E.W. Jr. ); Craven, J.D.; Frank, L.A. ); Elphinstone, R.D. ); Stern, D.P. )

    1991-03-01

    Using the empirical Tsyganenko (1987) long model as a prime example of a megnetospheric field model, the authors have attempted to identify the boundary between open and closed field lines. They define as closed all field lines that are connested with the Earth at both ends and cross the equatorial plane earthward of x = {minus}70 R{sub E}, the tailward validity limit of the Tsyganenko model. They find that the form of the open/closed boundary at the Earth's surface, identified with the polar cap boundary, can exhibit the arrowhead shape, pointed toward the Sun, observed in horse collar auroras (Hones et al., 1989). The polar cap size in the Tsyganenko model increases with increasing K{sub p} values, and it becomes rounder and less pointed. The superposition of a net B{sub y} field, which is the expected consequence of an IMF B{sub y}, rotates the polar cap pattern and, for larger values, degrades the arrowhead shape, resulting in polar cap configurations consistent with known asymmetries in the aurora. The pointedness of the polar cap shape also diminishes or even completely disappears if the low-latitude magnetopause is assumed open and located considerably inside of the outermost magnetic flux surface in the Tsyganenko model. The arrowhead shape of the polar cap is found to be associated with a strong increase of B{sub z} from midnight toward the tail flanks, which is observed independently, and is possibly related to the NBZ field-aligned current system, observed during quiet times and strongly northward IMF B{sub z}. The larger B{sub z} values near the flanks of the tail cause more magnetic flux to close through these regions than through the midnight equatorial region.

  9. Statistical analysis of spatial and temporal variations in atmospheric electric fields from a regional array of field mills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucas, G. M.; Thayer, J. P.; Deierling, W.

    2017-01-01

    Electric fields and currents of the global electric circuit have been measured at different locations and time periods around the globe, but a long-term analysis from a regional array of electric field mills has never been performed. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida has an array of over 30 electric field mills that have been continuously operating and archiving data for over 18 years. KSC is also instrumented with many meteorological towers. With this initial statistical analysis of a long-term data set four unique observations are reported that encompass global as well as local effects. To quantitatively describe the effects, a model to determine near-surface electric fields, incorporating space charge, and conductivity perturbations is developed. Statistical autonomous grouping of the mills using the spatial array demonstrates a greater than 50 V/m spatial variation from coastal to inland mills caused by wind-advected space charge generated near the coast. A temporal analysis identified a strong, globally generated, diurnal signature, but only a weak annual signal is found. A realistic limit on conductivity reductions within clouds is estimated by analyzing overhead cloud cover in relation to near-surface electric field strengths. The estimated in-cloud conductivity reduction of approximately 1/3 is similar to observations but appreciably less than values estimated from microphysical cloud estimates. Finally, an enhancement in the electric field at sunrise is statistically well correlated with low wind speeds and high relative humidities. This paper provides a statistical description of local environmental effects on near-surface electric fields by which to base future studies.

  10. IAG Working Group on Regional Dense Velocity Fields: First Results and Steps Ahead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruyninx, Carine

    2010-05-01

    The IAG Working Group (WG) on "Regional Dense Velocity Fields" was created within IAG sub-commission 1.3 "Regional Reference Frames" at the IUGG General Assembly in Perugia in 2007. The goal of the Working Group is to densify the latest realization of the ITRS and provide regional dense velocity information in a common global reference frame. For that purpose, working group members join efforts with the regional sub-commissions (AFREF, NAREF, SIRGAS, EUREF, …) and analysis groups processing data from local/regional continuous and episodic GNSS stations. Up to now, dedicated region coordinators have gathered velocity solutions (in accordance with the WG requirements) for their region and combined these solutions with the sub-commission regional solutions to produce a regional cumulative combined solution. Two combination coordinators performed a first test combination of these regional solutions together with global solutions in order to identify the main problems when producing a dense velocity field based on multiple cumulative position and velocity solutions. First comparisons between different velocity solutions show an RMS agreement between 0.3 mm/yr and 0.5 mm/yr resp. for the horizontal and vertical velocities. In some cases, significant disagreements between the velocities of some of the networks are seen, but these are primarily caused by the inconsistent handling of discontinuity epochs and solution numbers. Consequently, this test identified the urgent need for a consensus on the attribution of discontinuity epochs for stations common to several solutions. Due to the use of different analysis strategies and software packages by the individual contributors, finding such a consensus is a challenge as most probably not the same discontinuities are seen by different people. A possible way to go ahead for the Working Group could be to combine solutions at the weekly level. This approach is one of the alternative procedures which are presently under

  11. Mapping land-surface fluxes of carbon, water and energy from field to regional scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A framework for routine mapping of land-surface fluxes of carbon, water, and energy at the field to regional scales has been established for drought monitoring, water resource management, yield forecasting and crop-growth monitoring. The framework uses the ALEXI/DisALEXI suite of land-surface model...

  12. 78 FR 26651 - Redelegation of Authority to Regional Public Housing Directors and Public Housing Field Office...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT Redelegation of Authority to Regional Public Housing Directors and Public Housing Field Office Directors AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Public and Indian Housing,...

  13. Functional evolution of scalar fields in bounded one-dimensional regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero G, J. Fernando; Margalef-Bentabol, Juan; Villaseñor, Eduardo J. S.

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the unitarity of the quantum evolution between arbitrary Cauchy surfaces of a 1  +  1 dimensional free scalar field defined on a bounded spatial region and subject to several types of boundary conditions including Dirichlet, Neumann and Robin.

  14. Zonal Flow Magnetic Field Interaction in the Semi-Conducting Region of Giant Planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hao; Stevenson, David J.

    2016-10-01

    All four giant planets in the Solar System feature zonal flows on the order of 100 m/s in the cloud deck, and large-scale intrinsic magnetic fields on the order of 1 Gauss near the surface. The vertical structure of the zonal flows remains obscure. The end-member scenarios are shallow flows confined in the radiative atmosphere and deep flows throughout the planet with constant velocity along the direction of the spin-axis. The electrical conductivity increases smoothly as a function of depth inside Jupiter and Saturn, while a discontinuity of electrical conductivity inside Uranus and Neptune cannot be ruled out. Deep zonal flows will inevitably interact with the magnetic field, at depth with even modest electrical conductivity. Here we investigate the interaction between zonal flows and magnetic fields in the semi-conducting region of giant planets. Employing mean-field electrodynamics, we show that the interaction will generate detectable poloidal magnetic field perturbations spatially correlated with the deep zonal flows. Assuming the peak amplitude of the dynamo α-effect to be 0.1 mm/s, deep zonal flows on the order of 0.1 - 1 m/s in the semi-conducting region of Jupiter and Saturn would generate poloidal magnetic perturbations on the order of 0.01 % - 1 % of the background dipole field. These poloidal perturbations should be detectable with the in-situ magnetic field measurements from the upcoming Juno mission and the Cassini Grand Finale. This implies that magnetic field measurements can be employed to constrain the properties of deep zonal flows in the semi-conducting region of giant planets.

  15. Thermal instabilities in the edge region of reversed-field pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Goedert, J.; Mondt, J.P.

    1984-04-01

    Thermal stability of the edge region of reversed-field pinch configurations is analyzed within the context of a two-fluid model. Two major sources of instability are identified in combination with a parallel electric field: either an electron temperature gradient and/or a density gradient that leads to rapid growth (of several to many ohmic heating rates) over a region of several millimeters around the mode-rational surfaces in the edge region. The basic signature of both instabilities is electrostatic. In the case of the density gradient mode, the signature relies on the effects of electron compressibility, whereas the temperature gradient mode can be identified as the current-convective instability by taking the limit of zero diamagnetic drift, density gradient, thermal force, drift heat flux, and electron compressibility.

  16. Extensive lava flow fields on Venus: Preliminary investigation of source elevation and regional slope variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magee-Roberts, K.; Head, James W., III; Lancaster, M. G.

    1992-01-01

    Large-volume lava flow fields have been identified on Venus, the most areally extensive of which are known as fluctus and have been subdivided into six morphologic types. Sheetlike flow fields (Type 1) lack the numerous, closely spaced, discrete lava flow lobes that characterize digitate flow fields. Transitional flow fields (Type 2) are similar to sheetlike flow fields but contain one or more broad flow lobes. Digitate flow fields are divided further into divergent (Types 3-5) and subparallel (Type 6) classes on the basis of variations in the amount of downstream flow divergence. As a result of our previous analysis of the detailed morphology, stratigraphy, and tectonic associations of Mylitta Fluctus, we have formulated a number of questions to apply to all large flow fields on Venus. In particular, we would like to address the following: (1) eruption conditions and style of flow emplacement (effusion rate, eruption duration), (2) the nature of magma storage zones (presence of neutral buoyancy zones, deep or shallow crustal magma chambers), (3) the origin of melt and possible link to mantle plumes, and (4) the importance of large flow fields in plains evolution. To answer these questions we have begun to examine variations in flow field dimension and morphology; the distribution of large flow fields in terms of elevation above the mean planetary radius; links to regional tectonic or volcanic structures (e.g., associations with large shield edifices, coronae, or rift zones); statigraphic relationships between large flow fields, volcanic plains, shields, and coronae; and various models of flow emplacement in order to estimate eruption parameters. In this particular study, we have examined the proximal elevations and topographic slopes of 16 of the most distinctive flow fields that represent each of the 6 morphologic types.

  17. Investigation of recurrent EUV jets from highly dynamic magnetic field region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Navin Chandra; Chandra, Ramesh; Guo, Yang; Magara, Tetsuya; Zhelyazkov, Ivan; Moon, Young-Jae; Uddin, Wahab

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we present observations and interpretations of recurrent extreme ultraviolet (EUV) jets that occurred between 2012 July 1 21:00 UT and 2012 July 2 10:00 UT from the western edge of the NOAA active region 11513. Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly ( SDO/AIA), SDO/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager ( SDO/HMI) and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager ( RHESSI) observations have been used for the present study. Observations as well as potential-field source-surface (PFSS) extrapolation suggest an open field configuration in the vicinity of the jet activity area. 18 EUV jets were observed from the western edge of the active region along the open field channel. All the jet events appeared to be non-homologous and show different morphological properties and evolution. Some of the jets were small and narrow in size while the others were huge and wide. The average speed of these jets ranges from {˜}47 to {˜}308 km s^{-1}. SDO/AIA 171 Å intensity profiles at the base of these jets show bumps corresponding to each jet, which is an evidence of recurrent magnetic reconnections. The magnetic field observation at the foot points of the jets revealed a very complex and dynamic magnetic activity which includes flux emergence, flux cancellation, dynamic motions, merging, separation, etc. We suggest that the recurrent jets are the result of recurrent magnetic reconnections among the various emerging bipolar fields themselves as well as with the open fields.

  18. Characteristics of ionospheric convection and field-aligned current in the dayside cusp region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, G.; Lyons, L. R.; Reiff, P. H.; Denig, W. F.; Beaujardiere, O. De LA; Kroehl, H. W.; Newell, P. T.; Rich, F. J.; Opgenoorth, H.; Persson, M. A. L.

    1995-01-01

    The assimilative mapping of ionospheric electrodynamics (AMIE) technique has been used to estimate global distributions of high-latitude ionospheric convection and field-aligned current by combining data obtained nearly simultaneously both from ground and from space. Therefore, unlike the statistical patterns, the 'snapshot' distributions derived by AMIE allow us to examine in more detail the distinctions between field-aligned current systems associated with separate magnetospheric processes, especially in the dayside cusp region. By comparing the field-aligned current and ionospheric convection patterns with the corresponding spectrograms of precipitating particles, the following signatures have been identified: (1) For the three cases studied, which all had an IMF with negative y and z components, the cusp precipitation was encountered by the DMSP satellites in the postnoon sector in the northern hemisphere and in the prenoon sector in the southern hemisphere. The equatorward part of the cusp in both hemispheres is in the sunward flow region and marks the beginning of the flow rotation from sunward to antisunward. (2) The pair of field-aligned currents near local noon, i.e., the cusp/mantle currents, are coincident with the cusp or mantle particle precipitation. In distinction, the field-aligned currents on the dawnside and duskside, i.e., the normal region 1 currents, are usually associated with the plasma sheet particle precipitation. Thus the cusp/mantle currents are generated on open field lines and the region 1 currents mainly on closed field lines. (3) Topologically, the cusp/mantle currents appear as an expansion of the region 1 currents from the dawnside and duskside and they overlap near local noon. When B(sub y) is negative, in the northern hemisphere the downward field-aligned current is located poleward of the upward current; whereas in the southern hemisphere the upward current is located poleward of the downward current. (4) Under the assumption of

  19. Three-dimensional magnetic field topology in a region of solar coronal heating.

    PubMed

    Solanki, S K; Lagg, A; Woch, J; Krupp, N; Collados, M

    2003-10-16

    Flares and X-ray jets on the Sun arise in active regions where magnetic flux emerges from the solar interior amd interacts with the ambient magnetic field. The interactions are believed to occur in electric current sheets separating regions of opposite magnetic polarity. The current sheets located in the corona or upper chromosphere have long been thought to act as an important source of coronal heating, requiring their location in the corona or upper chromosphere. The dynamics and energetics of these sheets are governed by a complex magnetic field structure that, until now, has been difficult to measure. Here we report the determination of the full magnetic vector in an interaction region near the base of the solar corona. The observations reveal two magnetic features that characterize young active regions on the Sun: a set of rising magnetic loops and a tangential discontinuity of the magnetic field direction, the latter being the observational signature of an electric current sheet. This provides strong support for coronal heating models based on the dissipation of magnetic energy at current sheets.

  20. EEG default mode network in the human brain: spectral regional field powers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Andrew C N; Feng, Weijia; Zhao, Huixuan; Yin, Yanling; Wang, Peipei

    2008-06-01

    Eyes-closed (EC) and eyes-open (EO) are essential behaviors in mammalians, including man. At resting EC-EO state, brain activity in the default mode devoid of task-demand has recently been established in fMRI. However, the corresponding comprehensive electrophysiological conditions are little known even though EEG has been recorded in humans for nearly 80 years. In this study, we examined the spatial characteristics of spectral distribution in EEG field powers, i.e., sitting quietly with an EC and EO resting state of 3 min each, measured with high-density 128-ch EEG recording and FFT signal analyses in 15 right-handed healthy college females. Region of interest was set at a threshold at 90% of the spectral effective value to delimit the dominant spatial field power of effective energy in brain activity. Low-frequency delta (0.5-3.5 Hz) EEG field power was distributed at the prefrontal area with great expansion of spatial field and enhancement of field power (t=-2.72, p<0.02) from the EC to the EO state. Theta (4-7 Hz) EEG field power was distributed over the fronto-central area and leaned forward from EC to the EO state but with drastic reduction in field power (t=4.04, p<0.01). The middle-frequency alpha-1 (7.5-9.5 Hz) and alpha-2 (10-12 Hz) EEG powers exhibited bilateral distribution over the posterior areas with an anterior field in lower alpha-1. Both showed significantly reduction of field powers (respectively, W=120, p<0.001 for alpha-1; t=4.12, p<0.001 for alpha-2) from EC to the EO state. Beta-1 (13-23 Hz) exhibited a similar spatial region over the posterior area as in alpha-2 and showed reduction of field power (t=4.42, p<0.001) from EC to the EO state. In contrast, high-frequency beta-2 and gamma band exhibited similar, mainly prefrontal distribution in field power, and exhibited no change from EC to the EO state. Corresponding correlation analyses indicated significant group association between EC and EO only in the field powers of delta (r=0.95, p<0

  1. Examining the Magnetic Field Strength and the Horizontal and Vertical Motions in an Emerging Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Yu-Che

    2016-03-01

    Earlier observational studies have used the time evolution of emerging magnetic flux regions at the photosphere to infer their subsurface structures, assuming that the flux structure does not change significantly over the near-surface layer. In this study, we test the validity of this assumption by comparing the horizontal and vertical motions of an emerging active region. The two motions would be correlated if the emerging structure is rigid. The selected active region (AR) NOAA 11645 is not embedded in detectable preexisting magnetic field. The observed horizontal motion is quantified by the separation of the two AR polarities and the width of the region. The vertical motion is derived from the magnetic buoyancy theory. Our results show that the separation of the polarities is fastest at the beginning with a velocity of {≈ }4 Mm hr^{-1} and decreases to ≤ 1 Mm hr^{-1} after the main growing phase of flux emergence. The derived thick flux-tube buoyant velocity is between 1 and 3 Mm hr^{-1}, while the thin flux-tube approximation results in an unreasonably high buoyant velocity, consistent with the expectation that the approximation is inappropriate at the surface layer. The observed horizontal motion is not found to directly correlate with either the magnetic field strength or the derived buoyant velocities. However, the percentage of the horizontally oriented fields and the temporal derivatives of the field strength and the buoyant velocity show some positive correlations with the separation velocity. The results of this study imply that the assumption that the emerging active region is the cross section of a rising flux tube whose structure can be considered rigid as it rises through the near-surface layer should be taken with caution.

  2. Flow-Field Survey in the Test Region of the SR-71 Aircraft Test Bed Configuration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mizukami, Masashi; Jones, Daniel; Weinstock, Vladimir D.

    2000-01-01

    A flat plate and faired pod have been mounted on a NASA SR-71A aircraft for use as a supersonic flight experiment test bed. A test article can be placed on the flat plate; the pod can contain supporting systems. A series of test flights has been conducted to validate this test bed configuration. Flight speeds to a maximum of Mach 3.0 have been attained. Steady-state sideslip maneuvers to a maximum of 2 deg have been conducted, and the flow field in the test region has been surveyed. Two total-pressure rakes, each with two flow-angle probes, have been placed in the expected vicinity of an experiment. Static-pressure measurements have been made on the flat plate. At subsonic and low supersonic speeds with no sideslip, the flow in the surveyed region is quite uniform. During sideslip maneuvers, localized flow distortions impinge on the test region. Aircraft sideslip does not produce a uniform sidewash over the test region. At speeds faster than Mach 1.5, variable-pressure distortions were observed in the test region. Boundary-layer thickness on the flat plate at the rake was less than 2.1 in. For future experiments, a more focused and detailed flow-field survey than this one would be desirable.

  3. Flow and magnetic field properties in the trailing sunspots of active region NOAA 12396

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Denker, C.; Böhm, F.; Balthasar, H.; Fischer, C. E.; Kuckein, C.; Bello González, N.; Berkefeld, T.; Collados, M.; Diercke, A.; Feller, A.; González Manrique, S. J.; Hofmann, A.; Lagg, A.; Nicklas, H.; Orozco Suárez, D.; Pator Yabar, A.; Rezaei, R.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Sigwarth, M.; Sobotka, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Waldmann, T.

    2016-11-01

    Improved measurements of the photospheric and chromospheric three-dimensional magnetic and flow fields are crucial for a precise determination of the origin and evolution of active regions. We present an illustrative sample of multi-instrument data acquired during a two-week coordinated observing campaign in August 2015 involving, among others, the GREGOR solar telescope (imaging and near-infrared spectroscopy) and the space missions Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS). The observations focused on the trailing part of active region NOAA 12396 with complex polarity inversion lines and strong intrusions of opposite polarity flux. The GREGOR Infrared Spectrograph (GRIS) provided Stokes IQUV spectral profiles in the photospheric Si I λ1082.7 nm line, the chromospheric He I λ1083.0 nm triplet, and the photospheric Ca I λ1083.9 nm line. Carefully calibrated GRIS scans of the active region provided maps of Doppler velocity and magnetic field at different atmospheric heights. We compare quick-look maps with those obtained with the ``Stokes Inversions based on Response functions'' (SIR) code, which furnishes deeper insight into the magnetic properties of the region. We find supporting evidence that newly emerging flux and intruding opposite polarity flux are hampering the formation of penumbrae, i.e., a penumbra fully surrounding a sunspot is only expected after cessation of flux emergence in proximity to the sunspots.

  4. Observations of photospheric magnetic fields and shear flows in flaring active regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tarbell, T.; Ferguson, S.; Frank, Z.; Title, A.; Topka, K.

    1988-01-01

    Horizontal flows in the photosphere and subsurface convection zone move the footpoints of coronal magnetic field lines. Magnetic energy to power flares can be stored in the corona if the flows drive the fields far from the potential configuration. Videodisk movies were shown with 0.5 to 1 arcsecond resolution of the following simultaneous observations: green continuum, longitudinal magnetogram, Fe I 5576 A line center (mid-photosphere), H alpha wings, and H alpha line center. The movies show a 90 x 90 arcsecond field of view of an active region at S29, W11. When viewed at speeds of a few thousand times real-time, the photospheric movies clearly show the active region fields being distorted by a remarkable combination of systematic flows and small eruptions of new flux. Magnetic bipoles are emerging over a large area, and the polarities are systematically flowing apart. The horizontal flows were mapped in detail from the continuum movies, and these may be used to predict the future evolution of the region. The horizontal flows are not discernable in H alpha. The H alpha movies strongly suggest reconnection processes in the fibrils joining opposite polarities. When viewed in combination with the magnetic movies, the cause for this evolution is apparent: opposite polarity fields collide and partially cancel, and the fibrils reconnect above the surface. This type of reconnection, driven by subphotospheric flows, complicates the chromospheric and coronal fields, causing visible braiding and twisting of the fibrils. Some of the transient emission events in the fibrils and adjacent plage may also be related.

  5. Importance of far-field topographic and isostatic corrections for regional density modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szwillus, Wolfgang; Ebbing, Jörg; Holzrichter, Nils

    2016-10-01

    The long-wavelength gravity field contains information about processes in the sublithospheric mantle. As satellite-derived gravity models now provide the long to medium-wavelength gravity field at unprecedented accuracy, techniques used to process gravity data need to be updated. We show that when determining these long-wavelengths, the treatment of topographic-isostatic effect (TIE) and isostatic effects (IE) is a likely source of error. We constructed a global isostatic model and calculated global TIE and IE. These calculations were done for ground stations as well as stations at satellite height. We considered both gravity and gravity gradients. Using these results, we determined how much of the gravity signal comes from distant sources. We find that a significant long-wavelength bias is introduced if far-field effects on the topographic effect are neglected. However, due to isostatic compensation far-field effects of the topographic effect are to a large degree compensated by the far-field IE. This means that far-field effects can be reduced effectively by always considering topographic masses together with their compensating isostatic masses. We show that to correctly represent the ultra-long wavelengths, a global background model should be used. This is demonstrated both globally and for a continental-scale case area in North America. In the case of regional modelling, where the ultra-long wavelengths are not of prime importance, gravity gradients can be used to help minimize correction errors caused by far-field effects.

  6. Magnetic field structure of IC 63 and IC 59 associated with H II region Sh 185

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soam, A.; Maheswar, G.; Lee, Chang Won; Neha, S.; Andersson, B.-G.

    2017-02-01

    Bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs) are formed at the periphery of H II regions as the radiation from the central star interacts with dense gas. The ionization and resulting compression of the clouds may lead to cloud disruption causing secondary star formation depending on the stellar and gas parameters. Here we use R-band polarimetry to probe the plane-of-the sky magnetic field for two nearby BRCs, IC 59 and IC 63. Both nebulae are illuminated by γ Cas with the direction of the ionizing radiation being orientated parallel or perpendicular to the local magnetic field, allowing us to probe the importance of magnetic field pressure in the evolution of BRCs. Because of the proximity of the system (˜200 pc), we have acquired a substantial sample of over 500 polarization measurements for stars that form the background to the nebulae. On large scales, the magnetic field geometries of both clouds are anchored to the ambient magnetic field. For IC 63, the magnetic field is aligned parallel to the head-tail morphology of the main condensation, with a convex morphology relative to the direction of the ionizing radiation. We estimate the plane-of-the-sky magnetic field strength in IC 63 to be ˜ 90 μG. In IC 59, the projected magnetic field follows the M-shape morphology of the cloud. Here, field lines present a concave shape with respect to the direction of the ionizing radiation from γ Cas. Comparing our observations to published theoretical models, we find good general agreement, supporting the importance of magnetic fields in BRC evolution.

  7. Ozone formation along the California-Mexican border region during Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guohui; Bei, Naifang; Zavala, Miguel; Molina, Luisa T.

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the ozone (O3) formation along the California-Mexico border region using the WRF-CHEM model in association with the Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign. Four two-day episodes in 2010 are chosen based on plume transport patterns: 1) May 15-16 (plume north), 2) May 29-30 (plume southwest), 3) June 4-5 (plume east), and 4) June 13-14 (plume southeast). Generally, the predicted O3 spatial patterns and temporal variations agree well with the observations at the ambient monitoring sites in the San Diego-Tijuana region, but in the Calexico-Mexicali region, the model frequently underestimates the observation. In the San Diego-Tijuana region, the morning anthropogenic precursor emissions in the urbanized coastal plain are carried inland and mixed with the local biogenic emissions during transport, causing the high O3 level over the mountain region. Biogenic emissions enhance the O3 concentrations by up to 40 ppb over the mountain region in the afternoon. The factor separation approach is used to evaluate the contributions of trans-boundary transport of emissions from California and Baja California to the O3 level in the California-Mexico border region. The Baja California emissions play a minor role in the O3 formation in the San Diego region and do not seem to contribute to the O3 exceedances in the region, but have large potential to cause O3 exceedances in the Calexico region. The California emissions can considerably enhance the O3 level in the Tijuana region. Generally, the California emissions play a more important role than the Baja California emissions on O3 formation in the border region (within 40 km to the California-Mexico border). On average, the O3 concentrations in the border region are decreased by 2-4 ppb in the afternoon due to the interactions of emissions from California and Baja California. Further studies need to be conducted to improve the sea breeze simulations in the border region for evaluating O3 formation.

  8. LOS COLEGIOS REGIONALES, OPORTUNIDADES DE ESTUDIO EN INSTITUCIONES DE NIVEL UNIVERSITARIO. (THE REGIONAL COLLEGES, OPPORTUNITIES FOR STUDY IN UNIVERSITY LEVEL INSTITUTIONS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BETANCOURT, ETHEL RIOS DE; AND OTHERS

    RECENT LEGISLATION IN PUERTO RICO HAS VALIDATED THE 2-YEAR REGIONAL COLLEGE CONCEPT, AND THE CHARACTER OF THE PROGRAM COMBINING LIBERAL ARTS TRANSFER CURRICULUMS AND VOCATIONAL EDUCATION HAS BEEN SET. TO IMPLEMENT THE PLANNING PHASES, THIS STUDY PREDICTS STUDENT ENROLLMENT BY REGION. TWO INDEXES ARE USED TO ESTIMATE STUDENT DEMAND--COLLEGE…

  9. Application of a generalized Leibniz rule for calculating electromagnetic fields within continuous source regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Marian

    1991-02-01

    In deriving the electric and magnetic fields in a continuous source region by differentiating the vector potential, Yaghjian (1985) explains that the central obstacle is the dependence of the integration limits on the differentiation variable. Since it is not mathematically rigorous to assume the curl and integral signs are interchangeable, he uses an integration variable substitution to circumvent this problematic dependence. Here, an alternative derivation is presented, which evaluates the curl of the vector potential volume integral directly, retaining the dependence of the limits of integration on the differentiation variable. It involves deriving a three-dimensional version of Leibniz' rule for differentiating an integral with variable limits of integration, and using the generalized rule to find the Maxwellian and cavity fields in the source region.

  10. Effect of Interhemispheric Field-Aligned Currents on Region-1 Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyatsky, Sonya; Lyatsky, Wladislaw; Khazanov, George V.

    2015-01-01

    An asymmetry in ionospheric conductivity between two hemispheres results in the formation of additional, interhemispheric field-aligned currents flowing between conjugate ionospheres within two auroral zones. These interhemispheric currents are especially significant during summer-winter conditions when there is a significant asymmetry in ionospheric conductivity in two hemispheres. In such conditions, these currents may be comparable in magnitude with the Region 1 field-aligned currents. In this case, the R1 current is the sum of two FACs: one is going from to the solar wind, and another is flowing between conjugate ionospheres. These interhemispheric currents can also cause the formation of auroras extended along the nightside polar cap boundary, which may be related to the so-called double auroral oval. In this study, we present the results of analytical and numerical solutions for the interhemispheric currents and their effect on the Region 1 currents.

  11. Geopotential field anomalies and regional tectonic features - two case studies: southern Africa and Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korte, Monika; Mandea, Mioara

    2016-05-01

    Maps of magnetic and gravity field anomalies provide information about physical properties of the Earth's crust and upper mantle, helpful in understanding geological conditions and tectonic structures. Depending on data availability, whether from the ground, airborne, or from satellites, potential field anomaly maps contain information on different ranges of spatial wavelengths, roughly corresponding to sources at different depths. Focussing on magnetic data, we compare amplitudes and characteristics of anomalies from maps based on various available data and as measured at geomagnetic repeat stations. Two cases are investigated: southern Africa, characterized by geologically old cratons and strong magnetic anomalies, and the smaller region of Germany with much younger crust and weaker anomalies. Estimating lithospheric magnetic anomaly values from the ground stations' time series (repeat station crustal biases) reveals magnetospheric field contributions causing time-varying offsets of several nT in the results. Similar influences might be one source of discrepancy when merging anomaly maps from different epochs. Moreover, we take advantage of recently developed satellite potential field models and compare magnetic and gravity gradient anomalies of ˜ 200 km resolution. Density and magnetization represent independent rock properties and thus provide complementary information on compositional and structural changes. Comparing short- and long-wavelength anomalies and the correlation of rather large-scale magnetic and gravity anomalies, and relating them to known lithospheric structures, we generally find a better agreement in the southern African region than the German region. This probably indicates stronger concordance between near-surface (down to at most a few km) and deeper (several kilometres down to Curie depth) structures in the former area, which can be seen to agree with a thicker lithosphere and a lower heat flux reported in the literature for the southern

  12. Four large-scale field-aligned current systmes in the dayside high-latitude region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohtani, S.; Potemra, T. A.; Newell, P.T.; Zanetti, L. J.; Iijima, T.; Watanabe, M.; Blomberg, L. G.; Elphinstone, R. D.; Murphree, J. S.; Yamauchi, M.

    1995-01-01

    A system of four current sheets of large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) was discovered in the data set of simultaneous Viking and Defense Meteorological Satellire Program-F7 (DMSP-F7) crossing of the dayside high-latitude region. This paper reports four examples of this system that were observed in the prenoon sector. The flow polarities of FACs are upward, downward, upward, and downward, from equatorward to poleward. The lowest-latitude upward current is flowing mostly in the central plasma sheet (CPS) precipitation region, often overlapping with the boundary plasma sheet (BPS) at its poleward edge, andis interpreted as a region 2 current. The pair of downward and upward FACs in the middle of te structure are collocated with structured electron precipitation. The precipitation of high-energy (greater than 1 keV) electrons is more intense in the lower-latitude downward current sheet. The highest-latitude downward flowing current sheet is located in a weak, low-energy particle precipitation region, suggesting that this current is flowing on open field lines. Simulaneous observations in the postnoon local time sector reveal the standard three-sheet structure of FACs, sometimes described as region 2, region 1, and mantle (referred to the midday region O) currents. A high correlation was found between the occurrence of the four FAC sheet structure and negative interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) B(sub Y). We discuss the FAC structurein terms of three types of convection cells: the merging, viscous, andlobe cells. During strongly negative IMF B(sub Y), two convection reversals exist in the prenoon sector; one is inside the viscous cell, and the other is between the viscous cell and the lobe cell. This structure of convection flow is supported by the Viking electric field and auroral UV image data. Based on the convection pattern, the four FAC sheet structure is interpreted as the latitude overlap of midday and morning FAC systems. We suggest that the for

  13. Gamma-Gamma Absorption in the Broad Line Region Radiation Fields of Gamma-Ray Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttcher, Markus; Els, Paul

    2016-04-01

    The expected level of γγ absorption in the Broad Line Region (BLR) radiation field of γ-ray loud Flat Spectrum Radio Quasars (FSRQs) is evaluated as a function of the location of the γ-ray emission region. This is done self-consistently with parameters inferred from the shape of the spectral energy distribution (SED) in a single-zone leptonic EC-BLR model scenario. We take into account all geometrical effects both in the calculation of the γγ opacity and the normalization of the BLR radiation energy density. As specific examples, we study the FSRQs 3C279 and PKS 1510-089, keeping the BLR radiation energy density at the location of the emission region fixed at the values inferred from the SED. We confirm previous findings that the optical depth due to γγ absorption in the BLR radiation field exceeds unity for both 3C279 and PKS 1510-089 for locations of the γ-ray emission region inside the inner boundary of the BLR. It decreases monotonically, with distance from the central engine and drops below unity for locations within the BLR. For locations outside the BLR, the BLR radiation energy density required for the production of GeV γ-rays rapidly increases beyond observational constraints, thus making the EC-BLR mechanism implausible. Therefore, in order to avoid significant γγ absorption by the BLR radiation field, the γ-ray emission region must therefore be located near the outer boundary of the BLR.

  14. Spatial Distribution of Ionospheric Plasma and Field Structures in the High-Latitude F Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivanc, O.; Heelis, R. A.

    1998-01-01

    Ion density and velocity measurements from the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) spacecraft are used to obtain the average magnetic local time versus invariant latitude distribution of irregularities in the high-latitude F region ionosphere. To study the small-scale structure and its relationship to background conditions in the ionosphere, we have formed a reduced database using 2-s (approx. = 16 km) segments of the ion density and velocity data. The background gradients associated with each 2-s segment and the spectral characteristics, such as power at 6 Hz (approx. = 1.3 km) and spectral index, are among the reduced parameters used in this study. The relationship between the observed plasma structure and its motion is complex and dependent on the externally applied fields as well as locally generated plasma structure. The evolution of plasma structures also depends critically on the conductivity of the underlying ionosphere. Observations indicate an enhancement of irregularity amplitudes in two spatially isolated regions in both the ion density and the velocity. Convective properties seem to play a more important role in winter hemisphere where smaller-scale structures are maintained outside the source regions. (Delta)V irregularity amplitudes are enhanced in the cusp and the polar cap during northward interplanetary magnetic field regardless of season. The power in (Delta)V is usually higher than that associated with local polarization electric fields, suggesting that the observed structure in (Delta)N/N is strongly influenced by (Delta)V structure applied to large density gradients.

  15. Orientation of hatchling loggerhead sea turtles to regional magnetic fields along a transoceanic migratory pathway.

    PubMed

    Fuxjager, Matthew J; Eastwood, Brian S; Lohmann, Kenneth J

    2011-08-01

    Young loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta) from the east coast of Florida, USA, undertake a transoceanic migration around the North Atlantic Gyre, the circular current system that flows around the Sargasso Sea. Previous experiments indicated that loggerhead hatchlings, when exposed to magnetic fields replicating those that exist at five widely separated locations along the migratory pathway, responded by swimming in directions that would, in each case, help turtles remain in the gyre and advance along the migratory route. In this study, hatchlings were exposed to several additional magnetic fields that exist along or outside of the gyre's northern boundary. Hatchlings responded to fields that exist within the gyre currents by swimming in directions consistent with their migratory route at each location, whereas turtles exposed to a field that exists north of the gyre had an orientation that was statistically indistinguishable from random. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that loggerhead turtles entering the sea for the first time possess a navigational system in which a series of regional magnetic fields sequentially trigger orientation responses that help steer turtles along the migratory route. By contrast, hatchlings may fail to respond to fields that exist in locations beyond the turtles' normal geographic range.

  16. On the Dependence of the Ionospheric E-Region Electric Field of the Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Moro, Juliano; Araujo Resende, Laysa Cristina; Chen, Sony Su; Costa, D. Joaquim

    2016-07-01

    We have being studying the zonal and vertical E region electric field components inferred from the Doppler shifts of type 2 echoes (gradient drift irregularities) detected with the 50 MHz backscatter coherent (RESCO) radar set at Sao Luis, Brazil (SLZ, 2.3° S, 44.2° W) during the solar cycle 24. In this report we present the dependence of the vertical and zonal components of this electric field with the solar activity, based on the solar flux F10.7. For this study we consider the geomagnetically quiet days only (Kp <= 3+). A magnetic field-aligned-integrated conductivity model was developed for proving the conductivities, using the IRI-2007, the MISIS-2000 and the IGRF-11 models as input parameters for ionosphere, neutral atmosphere and Earth magnetic field, respectively. The ion-neutron collision frequencies of all the species are combined through the momentum transfer collision frequency equation. The mean zonal component of the electric field, which normally ranged from 0.19 to 0.35 mV/m between the 8 and 18 h (LT) in the Brazilian sector, show a small dependency with the solar activity. Whereas, the mean vertical component of the electric field, which normally ranges from 4.65 to 10.12 mV/m, highlight the more pronounced dependency of the solar flux.

  17. Characteristics of parallel electric fields in the downward current region of the aurora.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, L.; Ergun, R. E.; Newman, D. L.; McFadden, J. P.; Carlson, C. W.; Su, Y.

    2002-05-01

    Direct measurements of parallel electric fields suggest that they are, in part, self-consistently supported as strong double layers in the auroral downward current region. The observed parallel electric fields have amplitudes reaching nearly 1 V/m and are confined to a thin layer of approximately ten Debye lengths. The structures are moving at roughly the ion acoustic speed in the direction of the accelerated electrons, i.e. anti-Earthward. On the high-potential side of the parallel electric field, there is a clear signature of an accelerated electron beam which rapidly plateaus within a few hundred Debye lengths from the parallel electric field. Strong wave turbulence is observed in the vicinity of the plateaued electron distribution. Fast solitary waves, identified as a signature of electron phase-space holes, are seen farther away from the parallel electric field on the high-potential side. The observed ion distributions also reflect the presence of the parallel electric field. On the low-potential side of the double layer an ion beam is observed moving in the opposite direction of the electron beam and ion conics appear to be trapped between their mirror point and the moving double layer. Interestingly, a reflected, or perhaps accelerated, ion population is moving with the structure on the high-potential side.

  18. Distribution of the Crustal Magnetic Field in Sichuan-Yunnan Region, Southwest China

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Chunhua; Kang, Guofa; Gao, Guoming

    2014-01-01

    Based on the new and higher degree geomagnetic model NGDC-720-V3, we have investigated the spatial distribution, the altitude decay characteristics of the crustal magnetic anomaly, the contributions from different wavelength bands to the anomaly, and the relationship among the anomaly, the geological structure, and the geophysical field in Sichuan-Yunnan region of China. It is noted that the most outstanding feature in this area is the strong positive magnetic anomaly in Sichuan Basin, a geologically stable block. Contrasting with this feature, a strong negative anomaly can be seen nearby in Longmen Mountain block, an active block. This contradiction implies a possible relationship between the magnetic field and the geological activity. Completely different feature in magnetic field distribution is seen in the central Yunnan block, another active region, where positive and negative anomalies distribute alternatively, showing a complex magnetic anomaly map. Some fault belts, such as the Longmen Mountain fault, Lijiang-Xiaojinhe fault, and the Red River fault, are the transitional zones of strong and weak or negative and positive anomalies. The corresponding relationship between the magnetic anomaly and the geophysical fields was confirmed. PMID:25243232

  19. Observations of the longitudinal magnetic field in the transition region and photosphere of a sunspot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henze, W., Jr.; Tandberg-Hanssen, E.; Hagyard, M. J.; West, E. A.; Woodgate, B. E.; Shine, R. A.; Beckers, J. M.; Bruner, M.; Hyder, C. L.; West, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectrometer and Polarimeter on the Solar Maximum Mission spacraft has observed for the first time the longitudinal component of the magnetic field by means of the Zeeman effect in the transition region above a sunspot. The data presented here were obtained on three days in one sunspot, have spatial resolutions of 10 arcsec and 3 arcsec, and yield maximum field strengths greater than 1000 G above the umbrae in the spot. The method of analysis, including a line-width calibration feature used during some of the observations, is described in some detail in an appendix; the line width is required for the determination of the longitudinal magnetic field from the observed circular polarization. The transition region data for one day are compared with photospheric magnetograms from the Marshall Space Flight Center. Vertical gradients of the magnetic field are compared from the two sets of data; the maximum gradients of 0.41 to 0.62 G/km occur above the umbra and agree with or are smaller than values observed previously in the photosphere and low chromosphere.

  20. Simulation of the low latitude ionosphere response to disturbed winds and electric fields: Brazilian region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Inez S.; Souza, Jonas; Bailey, Graham; Bravo, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    Modeling the ionosphere during disturbed periods is one of the most challenging tasks due to the complexity of the phenomena that affect the electric fields and the thermosphere environment as whole. It is well known that depending on the direction of the interplanetary magnetic field disturbance electric fields (undershielding or overshielding) can penetrate from high to low latitudes causing significant disturbances in the electron density distribution and in the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) development. Besides that, the large amount of energy deposited in the polar region during disturbed periods will be responsible for the generation of disturbed winds that will flow towards the equator where they produce a disturbance dynamo which also affects the EIA density distribution. The TIDs and TADs are also sources of disturbances that propagate at high velocity reaching the equator 2-3 hours after the beginning of the magnetic storm. In this work we use the Sheffield University Plasmasphere-Ionosphere Model at INPE (SUPIM-INPE), to simulate the drastic effects that were observed at the low latitude ionosphere in the Brazilian region during a very intense magnetic storm event. A few models are tested for the disturbed electric field and wind. The simulation results showed that the observations are better explained when considering a traveling waveform disturbance propagating from north to south at a velocity equal to 200 m/s.

  1. Generation of propagating spin waves from regions of increased dynamic demagnetising field near magnetic antidots

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, C. S. Kruglyak, V. V.; Sadovnikov, A. V.; Nikitov, S. A.; Grishin, S. V.; Sharaevskii, Yu. P.

    2015-10-19

    We have used Brillouin Light Scattering and micromagnetic simulations to demonstrate a point-like source of spin waves created by the inherently nonuniform internal magnetic field in the vicinity of an isolated antidot formed in a continuous film of yttrium-iron-garnet. The field nonuniformity ensures that only well-defined regions near the antidot respond in resonance to a continuous excitation of the entire sample with a harmonic microwave field. The resonantly excited parts of the sample then served as reconfigurable sources of spin waves propagating (across the considered sample) in the form of caustic beams. Our findings are relevant to further development of magnonic circuits, in which point-like spin wave stimuli could be required, and as a building block for interpretation of spin wave behavior in magnonic crystals formed by antidot arrays.

  2. STRUCTURE AND STABILITY OF MAGNETIC FIELDS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGION 12192 BASED ON NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, S.; Hayashi, K.; Kusano, K.

    2016-02-20

    We analyze a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure and its stability in large solar active region (AR) 12192, using the 3D coronal magnetic field constructed under a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) approximation. In particular, we focus on the magnetic structure that produced an X3.1-class flare, which is one of the X-class flares observed in AR 12192. According to our analysis, the AR contains a multiple-flux-tube system, e.g., a large flux tube, with footpoints that are anchored to the large bipole field, under which other tubes exist close to a polarity inversion line (PIL). These various flux tubes of different sizes and shapes coexist there. In particular, the latter are embedded along the PIL, which produces a favorable shape for the tether-cutting reconnection and is related to the X-class solar flare. We further found that most of magnetic twists are not released even after the flare, which is consistent with the fact that no observational evidence for major eruptions was found. On the other hand, the upper part of the flux tube is beyond a critical decay index, essential for the excitation of torus instability before the flare, even though no coronal mass ejections were observed. We discuss the stability of the complicated flux tube system and suggest the reason for the existence of the stable flux tube. In addition, we further point out a possibility for tracing the shape of flare ribbons, on the basis of a detailed structural analysis of the NLFFF before a flare.

  3. Structure and Stability of Magnetic Fields in Solar Active Region 12192 Based on the Nonlinear Force-free Field Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, S.; Hayashi, K.; Kusano, K.

    2016-02-01

    We analyze a three-dimensional (3D) magnetic structure and its stability in large solar active region (AR) 12192, using the 3D coronal magnetic field constructed under a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) approximation. In particular, we focus on the magnetic structure that produced an X3.1-class flare, which is one of the X-class flares observed in AR 12192. According to our analysis, the AR contains a multiple-flux-tube system, e.g., a large flux tube, with footpoints that are anchored to the large bipole field, under which other tubes exist close to a polarity inversion line (PIL). These various flux tubes of different sizes and shapes coexist there. In particular, the latter are embedded along the PIL, which produces a favorable shape for the tether-cutting reconnection and is related to the X-class solar flare. We further found that most of magnetic twists are not released even after the flare, which is consistent with the fact that no observational evidence for major eruptions was found. On the other hand, the upper part of the flux tube is beyond a critical decay index, essential for the excitation of torus instability before the flare, even though no coronal mass ejections were observed. We discuss the stability of the complicated flux tube system and suggest the reason for the existence of the stable flux tube. In addition, we further point out a possibility for tracing the shape of flare ribbons, on the basis of a detailed structural analysis of the NLFFF before a flare.

  4. Properties of magnetic field fluctuations in boundary regions of the Earth's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozak, Liudmyla; Savin, Sergey; Lui, Anthony Tat Yin; Igor, Gala

    Statistical properties of magnetic field fluctuations in boundary regions of the Earth’s magnetosphere at different timescales were considered. Data with high resolution (22,5 Hz) obtained by Cluster mission from 2004 to 2010 were used. As a characteristic of the fluctuations on various time scales, changes in the shape and parameters of the probability density function and wave analysis were studied. In order for investigations of features of the probability density functions of magnetic field fluctuations we analyzed the statistical properties of the absolute value of magnetic field variations in the different regions of near earth space. Amplitude of fluctuations in the magnetosheath just after crossing bow shock exceeds in a few time amplitude of fluctuations for non-perturbed solar wind or the foreshock. The analysis of the height of maximum of the probability density functions and of the kurtosis values have shown the presence of different asymptotic modes which are characterized by different power laws. The use of the technique of probability density function for magnetic fluctuations has shown that at high frequencies the structure of turbulence differs from that in the low-frequency region. The critical scale corresponds to the scales of the Larmor radius of ions. The research of the statistical properties of boundary layers allows to determine the role of turbulent processes in the interaction of plasma flows with the magnetic obstacles, whether these are fields of planets, stars, or laboratory traps, and to reveal the actual mechanisms of the energy transformation in collisionless plasma. The work is done in the frame of complex program of NAS of Ukraine on space researches for 2012-1016, within the framework of the educational program No.2201250 “Education, Training of students, PhD students, scientific and pedagogical staff abroad” launched by the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine and under a partial support of the grant No. F 53.2/039.

  5. Field significance of performance measures in the context of regional climate model evaluation. Part 2: precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Martin; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2017-02-01

    A new approach for rigorous spatial analysis of the downscaling performance of regional climate model (RCM) simulations is introduced. It is based on a multiple comparison of the local tests at the grid cells and is also known as `field' or `global' significance. The block length for the local resampling tests is precisely determined to adequately account for the time series structure. New performance measures for estimating the added value of downscaled data relative to the large-scale forcing fields are developed. The methodology is exemplarily applied to a standard EURO-CORDEX hindcast simulation with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model coupled with the land surface model NOAH at 0.11 ∘ grid resolution. Daily precipitation climatology for the 1990-2009 period is analysed for Germany for winter and summer in comparison with high-resolution gridded observations from the German Weather Service. The field significance test controls the proportion of falsely rejected local tests in a meaningful way and is robust to spatial dependence. Hence, the spatial patterns of the statistically significant local tests are also meaningful. We interpret them from a process-oriented perspective. While the downscaled precipitation distributions are statistically indistinguishable from the observed ones in most regions in summer, the biases of some distribution characteristics are significant over large areas in winter. WRF-NOAH generates appropriate stationary fine-scale climate features in the daily precipitation field over regions of complex topography in both seasons and appropriate transient fine-scale features almost everywhere in summer. As the added value of global climate model (GCM)-driven simulations cannot be smaller than this perfect-boundary estimate, this work demonstrates in a rigorous manner the clear additional value of dynamical downscaling over global climate simulations. The evaluation methodology has a broad spectrum of applicability as it is

  6. Singular surfaces in the open field line region of a diverted tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Reiman, A.

    1995-05-01

    The structure of the open field lines of a slightly nonaxisymmetric, poloidally diverted tokamak is explored by numerical integration of the field line equations for a simple model field. In practice, the nonaxisymmetry could be produced self-consistently by the nonlinear evolution of a free-boundary MHD mode, or it could be produced by field errors, or it could be imposed externally by design. In the presence of a nonaxisymmetric perturbation, the tokamak is shown to develop open field line regions of differing topology separated by singular surfaces. It is argued that the singular surfaces can be expected to play a role analogous to that of rational toroidal flux surfaces, in terms of constraining ideal MHD perturbations and thus constraining the free-energy that can be tapped by ideal MHD instabilities. The possibility of active control of free-boundary instabilities by means of currents driven on the open singular surfaces, which are directly accessible from the divertor plates, is discussed. Also discussed is the possibility of early detection of imminent disruptions through localized measurement of the singular surface currents.

  7. Characteristic magnetic field and speed properties of interplanetary coronal mass ejections and their sheath regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, M. J.; Cargill, P. J.; Pagel, C.; Siscoe, G. L.; Crooker, N. U.

    2005-01-01

    Prediction of the solar wind conditions in near-Earth space, arising from both quasi-steady and transient structures, is essential for space weather forecasting. To achieve forecast lead times of a day or more, such predictions must be made on the basis of remote solar observations. A number of empirical prediction schemes have been proposed to forecast the transit time and speed of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) at 1 AU. However, the current lack of magnetic field measurements in the corona severely limits our ability to forecast the 1 AU magnetic field strengths resulting from interplanetary CMEs (ICMEs). In this study we investigate the relation between the characteristic magnetic field strengths and speeds of both magnetic cloud and noncloud ICMEs at 1 AU. Correlation between field and speed is found to be significant only in the sheath region ahead of magnetic clouds, not within the clouds themselves. The lack of such a relation in the sheaths ahead of noncloud ICMEs is consistent with such ICMEs being skimming encounters of magnetic clouds, though other explanations are also put forward. Linear fits to the radial speed profiles of ejecta reveal that faster-traveling ICMEs are also expanding more at 1 AU. We combine these empirical relations to form a prediction scheme for the magnetic field strength in the sheaths ahead of magnetic clouds and also suggest a method for predicting the radial speed profile through an ICME on the basis of upstream measurements.

  8. Regional modelling of the Geomagnetic Field in Europe for the last 8000 years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavon-Carrasco, Francisco Javier; Osete, Maria Luisa; Miquel Torta, J.

    2010-05-01

    From a selected compilation of sedimentary and archaeomagnetic data a new low-degree regional geomagnetic model for the European Continent valid for the period 6000 BC to 1000 BC has been developed. This model provides information about the direction (declination and inclination) and intensity of the Earth's Magnetic Field in Europe during 5000 years, from 6000 BC to 1000 BC. By connecting it with our SCHA.DIF.3K previous model valid from 1000 BC to 1900 AD and the IGRF, we furnish continuous geomagnetic field information for the last 8000 years. The new model is called SCHA.DIF.8K. It has been developed using the Revised Spherical Cap Harmonic Analysis in 2 Dimensions technique (R-SCHA2D, Thébault, 2008, GJI) and the norm of the Earth's Magnetic Field to constrain the inversion problem. The size of the cap is 22°. The maximum degree of the expansion is 2. The linearization problem has been solved using the truncation Taylor's series applied to the expressions of the relationship between the declination, inclination and intensity data and the Cartesian component of the geomagnetic field. As initial or reference we used the Geocentric Axial Dipole field. In time, we used the classical sliding overlapping window method. The size of the window was set to 100 years shifted 50 years. We have compared the model's prediction with the input data and with the global CALS7K.2 model. The regional model shows a better fitting to the input data than the global model, especially for the intensity data.

  9. Advantages and Limitations of Cluster Analysis in Interpreting Regional GPS Velocity Fields in California and Elsewhere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thatcher, W. R.; Savage, J. C.; Simpson, R.

    2012-12-01

    Regional Global Positioning System (GPS) velocity observations are providing increasingly precise mappings of actively deforming continental lithosphere. Cluster analysis, a venerable data analysis method, offers a simple, visual exploratory tool for the initial organization and investigation of GPS velocities (Simpson et al., 2012 GRL). Here we describe the application of cluster analysis to GPS velocities from three regions, the Mojave Desert and the San Francisco Bay regions in California, and the Aegean in the eastern Mediterranean. Our goal is to illustrate the strengths and shortcomings of the method in searching for spatially coherent patterns of deformation, including evidence for and against block-like behavior in these 3 regions. The deformation fields from dense regional GPS networks can often be concisely described in terms of relatively coherent blocks bounded by active faults, although the choice of blocks, their number and size, is subjective and usually guided by the distribution of known faults. Cluster analysis applied to GPS velocities provides a completely objective method for identifying groups of observations ranging in size from 10s to 100s of km in characteristic dimension based solely on the similarities of their velocity vectors. In the three regions we have studied, statistically significant clusters are almost invariably spatially coherent, fault bounded, and coincide with elastic, geologically identified structural blocks. Often, higher order clusters that are not statistically significant are also spatially coherent, suggesting the existence of additional blocks, or defining regions of other tectonic importance (e.g. zones of localized elastic strain accumulation near locked faults). These results can be used to both formulate tentative tectonic models with testable consequences and to suggest focused new measurements in under-sampled regions. Cluster analysis applied to GPS velocities has several potential limitations, aside from the

  10. A Review of Magnetic Anomaly Field Data for the Arctic Region: Geological Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; vonFrese, Ralph; Roman, Daniel; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its inaccessibility and hostile physical environment remote sensing data, both airborne and satellite measurements, has been the main source of geopotential data over the entire Arctic region. Ubiquitous and significant external fields, however, hinder crustal magnetic field studies These potential field data have been used to derive tectonic models for the two major tectonic sectors of this region, the Amerasian and Eurasian Basins. The latter is dominated by the Nansen-Gakkel or Mid-Arctic Ocean Ridge and is relatively well known. The origin and nature of the Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges, Chukchi Borderland and Canada Basin of the former are less well known and a subject of controversy. The Lomonosov Ridge divides these large provinces. In this report we will present a summary of the Arctic geopotential anomaly data derived from various sources by various groups in North America and Europe and show how these data help us unravel the last remaining major puzzle of the global plate tectonic framework. While magnetic anomaly data represent the main focus of this study recently derived satellite gravity data are playing a major role in Arctic studies.

  11. A Review of Magnetic Anomaly Field Data for the Arctic Region: Geological Implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; vonFrese, Ralph; Roman, Daniel; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its inaccessibility and hostile physical environment remote sensing data, both airborne and satellite measurements, has been the main source of geopotential data over the entire Arctic region. Ubiquitous and significant external fields, however, hinder crustal magnetic field studies. These potential field data have been used to derive tectonic models for the two major tectonic sectors of this region, the Amerasian and Eurasian Basins. The latter is dominated by the Nansen-Gakkel or Mid-Arctic Ocean Ridge and is relatively well known. The origin and nature of the Alpha and Mendeleev Ridges, Chukchi Borderland and Canada Basin of the former are less well known and a subject of controversy. The Lomonosov Ridge divides these large provinces. In this report we will present a summary of the Arctic geopotential anomaly data derived from various sources by various groups in North America and Europe and show how these data help us unravel the last remaining major puzzle of the global plate tectonic framework. While Magnetic anomaly data represent the main focus of this study recently derived satellite gravity data (Laxon and McAdoo, 1998) are playing a major role in Arctic studies.

  12. Magnetic Field Perturbations from Currents in the Dark Polar Regions During Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Finlay, C. C.; Hesse, M.; Laundal, K. M.

    2017-03-01

    In the day-side sunlit polar ionosphere the varying and IMF dependent convection creates strong ionospheric currents even during quiet geomagnetic conditions. Observations during such times are often excluded when using satellite data to model the internal geomagnetic main field. Observations from the night-side or local winter during quiet conditions are, however, also influenced by variations in the IMF. In this paper we briefly review the large scale features of the ionospheric currents in the polar regions with emphasis on the current distribution during undisturbed conditions. We examine the distribution of scalar measurements of the magnetic field intensity minus predictions from a geomagnetic field model. These `residuals' fall into two main categories. One category is consistently distributed according to the well-known ionospheric plasma convection and its associated Birkeland currents. The other category represent contributions caused by geomagnetic activity related to the substorm current wedge around local magnetic midnight. A new observation is a strong IMF By control of the residuals in the midnight sector indicating larger ionospheric currents in the substorm current wedge in the northern polar region for By > 0 and correspondingly in the southern hemisphere for By < 0.

  13. Magnetic Field Perturbations from Currents in the Dark Polar Regions During Quiet Geomagnetic Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friis-Christensen, E.; Finlay, C. C.; Hesse, M.; Laundal, K. M.

    2017-02-01

    In the day-side sunlit polar ionosphere the varying and IMF dependent convection creates strong ionospheric currents even during quiet geomagnetic conditions. Observations during such times are often excluded when using satellite data to model the internal geomagnetic main field. Observations from the night-side or local winter during quiet conditions are, however, also influenced by variations in the IMF. In this paper we briefly review the large scale features of the ionospheric currents in the polar regions with emphasis on the current distribution during undisturbed conditions. We examine the distribution of scalar measurements of the magnetic field intensity minus predictions from a geomagnetic field model. These `residuals' fall into two main categories. One category is consistently distributed according to the well-known ionospheric plasma convection and its associated Birkeland currents. The other category represent contributions caused by geomagnetic activity related to the substorm current wedge around local magnetic midnight. A new observation is a strong IMF By control of the residuals in the midnight sector indicating larger ionospheric currents in the substorm current wedge in the northern polar region for By > 0 and correspondingly in the southern hemisphere for By < 0.

  14. Inputs of heavy metals due to agrochemical use in tobacco fields in Brazil's Southern Region.

    PubMed

    Zoffoli, Hugo José Oliveira; do Amaral-Sobrinho, Nelson Moura Brasil; Zonta, Everaldo; Luisi, Marcus Vinícius; Marcon, Gracioso; Tolón-Becerra, Alfredo

    2013-03-01

    Only a few studies have assessed the joint incorporation of heavy metals into agricultural systems based on the range of agrochemicals used on a specific agricultural crop. This study was conducted to assess the heavy metals input through application of the main agrochemicals used in Brazilian tobacco fields. A total of 56 samples of different batches of 5 fertilizers, 3 substrates, 8 insecticides, 3 fungicides, 2 herbicides, and 1 growth regulator commonly used in the cultivation of tobacco in Brazil's Southern Region were collected from 3 warehouses located in the States of Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina, and Paraná. The total As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and Zn content of the samples was then determined and compared with the regulations of different countries and information found in the available literature. The fertilizers were identified as the primary source of heavy metals among the agrochemicals used. Application of pesticides directly to the shoots of tobacco plants contributed very little to the supply of heavy metals. The agrochemicals used in Brazilian tobacco fields provide lower inputs of the main heavy metals that are nonessential for plants than those registered in the international literature for the majority of crop fields in different regions of the world.

  15. [Regenerative medicine in the fields of otolaryngology; head and neck regions].

    PubMed

    Kanemaru, Shin-ichi

    2006-01-01

    Because of the limitations of the present medicine, regenerative medicine has greatly been hoped. Regenerative medicine is an exciting emerging branch of medicine in which cell and tissue based therapies are applied to the treatments of disease. This has been supported by the development of tissue engineering that was a complex of medicine and engineering. Tissue engineering applies the principles and methods of engineering, material science, and cell and molecular biology toward the development of viable substitutes which restore, maintain, or improve the function of human tissues. According to the doctrine of tissue engineering, tissues and organs can be regenerated by manipulating three elements: cells, scaffolds and regulation factors. Understanding and manipulating the complex relationship among these elements, however, represents the great challenge for researches and doctors who engage in regenerative medicine. On the other hand, clinical applications of it have not made progress yet except limited tissues and organs. Especially, few clinical studies have reported in the fields of otolaryngology, head and neck regions. In our research group, clinical applications in these fields based on the new concept of in situ tissue engineering have been started from 2002 after approval of the ethical committee. Tissues and/or organs for clinical applications at present are trachea, cricoid cartilage, mastoid air cells, and, peripheral nerves including facial nerve, recurrent laryngeal nerve, chorda tympani nerve and so on. This article describes the researches and clinical studies at present and in the near future of regenerative medicine in the fields of otolaryngology, head and neck regions.

  16. Crustal Structure Beneath the Lake Ontario Region from Inverse Models of Potential Field and Seismic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarrete, L. C.; Benoit, M. H.; Ebinger, C. J.; Horowitz, F.

    2014-12-01

    The regions surrounding Lake Ontario (e.g. the Adirondack mountain region and its northern border with Canada) are among the most seismically active regions in the Eastern US. However, only scant knowledge exists of the location and geometry of faults, suture zones, or crustal thickness variations that may localize strain in the crust beneath sections of New York, Pennsylvania and Ontario. Our aim is to determine the crustal density and magnetic susceptibility contrasts (e.g., steep faults, intrusive bodies, Moho topography) which give rise to anomaly patterns and to place constraints on their geometries and locations. With a better understanding of these structures, we will examine how the distribution of the faults and steep contacts throughout the region compare with zones of active seismicity. Utilizing the North American Gravity Database, we created a profile that crosses a narrow Bouguer anomaly with steep gradients surrounded by Bouguer anomaly highs transecting the lake and extending onshore east of Rochester, subparallel to the seismically active Clarendon-Linden fault. Euler deconvolution and 'worm' analyses show that this narrow anomaly is bounded by east-dipping faults that extend to mid-crustal levels. We perform receiver function analyses of Earthscope TA stations in the region in order to constrain crustal thickness and lateral variations in Vp/Vs. These receiver functions at onshore sites in the area show complex Moho structure which partially explains our anomaly.Additionally, a vintage seismic profile coupled with the Lake Ontario bathymetry dataset was used to place constraints on sedimentary strata thicknesses and to identify structures within Proterozoic basement. Predictive models of crustal variations were created from a potential field profile, receiver functions, and a seismic profile to test interpretations. The Moho topography alone does not fully explain the short wavelength gravity anomaly, and a sedimentary basin of 3-5 km in depth is

  17. Simulating Turbulent Wind Fields for Offshore Turbines in Hurricane-Prone Regions (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Damiani, R.; Musial, W.

    2014-04-01

    Extreme wind load cases are one of the most important external conditions in the design of offshore wind turbines in hurricane prone regions. Furthermore, in these areas, the increase in load with storm return-period is higher than in extra-tropical regions. However, current standards have limited information on the appropriate models to simulate wind loads from hurricanes. This study investigates turbulent wind models for load analysis of offshore wind turbines subjected to hurricane conditions. Suggested extreme wind models in IEC 61400-3 and API/ABS (a widely-used standard in oil and gas industry) are investigated. The present study further examines the wind turbine response subjected to Hurricane wind loads. Three-dimensional wind simulator, TurbSim, is modified to include the API wind model. Wind fields simulated using IEC and API wind models are used for an offshore wind turbine model established in FAST to calculate turbine loads and response.

  18. Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data

    SciTech Connect

    Counce, D; Dunlap, C; Goff, F; Huebner, M; Janik, C; Johnson, S; Nimz, G

    1999-08-16

    Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicate several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (<20 ka) to recent (<50a). Valley groundwater is older than water from perennial springs and artesian wells in adjacent ranges, with Clan Alpine range (east) much younger (most <50a) than Stillwater range (west; most >1000a). Geothermal field fluids ({approximately}12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non-thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian wells (also -14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the ranges, more extensive interaction with deep-seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

  19. Regional hydrology of the Dixie Valley geothermal field, Nevada: preliminary interpretations of chemical and isotopic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimz, Gregory; Janik, Cathy; Goff, Fraser; Dunlap, Charles; Huebner, Mark; Counce, Dale; Johnson, Stuart D.

    1999-01-01

    Chemical and isotopic analyses of Dixie Valley regional waters indicated several distinct groups ranging in recharge age from Pleistocene (1000a). Geothermal field fluids (~12-14 ka) appear derived from water similar in composition to non thermal groundwater observed today in valley artesian well (also ~14 ka). Geothermal fluid interaction with mafic rocks (Humboldt Lopolith) appears to be common, and significant reaction with granodiorite may also occur. Despite widespread occurrence of carbonate rocks, large scale chemical interaction appears minor. Age asymmetry of the range, more extensive interaction with deep seated waters in the west, and distribution of springs and artesian wells suggest the existence of a regional upward hydrologic gradient with an axis in proximity to the Stillwater range.

  20. Feasibility Demonstration of Wide-Field Fourier-Spectroscopic-Imaging in Infrared Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wei; Takuma, Takashi; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Inui, Asuka; Kagiyama, Hiroyasu; Kojima, Daisuke; Nishiyama, Akira; Ishimaru, Ichirou

    We are aiming at the realization of living-environment sensor and non-invasive blood-sugar sensor by the proposed imaging type 2-D Fourier spectroscopy. This method is based on the phase-shift interference between the object beams. As a result, even if the object beams are spatially incoherent, we can observe the phase-shift interference phenomena. In the near infrared region, we can obtain the high-contrast blood vessel image of mouse's ear in the deeper part by InGaAs camera. Furthermore, in the mid-infrared region, we have successfully measured the radiation spectroscopic-imaging with wild field of view by the infrared module, such as the house plants.

  1. [Distribution of Regional Pollution and the Characteristics of Vertical Wind Field in the Pearl River Delta].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Wu, Dui; Fan, Shao-jia

    2015-11-01

    Based on the data of hourly PM2.5 concentration of 56 environmental monitoring stations and 9 cities over the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region, the distributions of PM2.5 pollution in PRD region were analyzed by systematic cluster analysis and correlational analysis. It was found that the regional pollution could be divided into 3 types. The first type was the pollution occurred in Dongguan, Guangzhou, Foshan and Jiangmen (I type), and the second type was the pollution occurred in Zhongshan, Zhuhai, Shenzhen and Huizhou (II type), while the last type was the pollution only occurred in Zhaoqing (III type). During the study period, they occurred 47, 7 and 128 days, respectively. During events of pollution type I, except Zhuhai, Shenzhen and Huizhou, the PM2.5 concentrations of other cities were generally high, while the PM2.5 concentration in whole PRD region was over 50.0 μg x m(-3) during events of pollution type II. The regions with higher PM2.5 concentration was mainly concentrated in Zhaoqing, Guangzhou and Foshan during events of pollution type III. The wind data from 4 wind profile radars located in PRD region was used to study the characteristics of vertical wind field of these 3 pollution types. It was found that the wind profiles of type I and III were similar that low layer and high layer were controlled by the southeast wind and the southwest wind, respectively. For type II, the low layer and high layer were influenced by northerly wind and westerly wind, respectively. Compared with other types, the wind speed and ventilation index of type II. were much higher, and the variation of wind direction at lower-middle-layer was much smaller. When PRD region was influenced by northerly winds, the PM2.5 concentration in the entire PRD region was higher. When PRD region was controlled by southeast wind, the PM2.5 concentrations of I and II areas were relatively lower, while the pollution in III area was relatively heavier.

  2. An Experimental Study of the Near Field Region of a Free Jet with Passive Mixing Tabs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohl, D. G.; Foss, J. F.

    1997-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the flow characteristics of a tabbed free jet. Results were acquired in the near field (nominally 2 tab widths upstream to 2 tab widths downstream of the exit plane) of a tabbed jet. Upstream pressure results showed static pressure distributions in both the x-and y-directions along the top surface of the tunnel. Hot-wire measurements showed rapid expansion of the core fluid into the ambient region. Two counter rotating regions of streamwise vorticity were shown on each side of the primary tab. An enhancement of the tabbed jet concept was proposed and tested. Specifically, two tabs, half the scale of the primary tab, were added to the primary tab to provide attachment surfaces for the normally occurring ejection of fluid. The secondary tabs caused a slight increase in the streamwise vorticity created from the upstream static pressure gradient while significantly increasing the re-oriented boundary layer vorticity. The combined pumping effect of the two counter rotating regions of vorticity caused a significant increase in the transport of the jet core fluid into the surrounding region.

  3. Double gate graphene nanoribbon field effect transistor with single halo pocket in channel region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    A new structure for graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistors (GNRFETs) is proposed and investigated using quantum simulation with a nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. Tunneling leakage current and ambipolar conduction are known effects for MOSFET-like GNRFETs. To minimize these issues a novel structure with a simple change of the GNRFETs by using single halo pocket in the intrinsic channel region, "Single Halo GNRFET (SH-GNRFET)", is proposed. An appropriate halo pocket at source side of channel is used to modify potential distribution of the gate region and weaken band to band tunneling (BTBT). In devices with materials like Si in channel region, doping type of halo and source/drain regions are different. But, here, due to the smaller bandgap of graphene, the mentioned doping types should be the same to reduce BTBT. Simulations have shown that in comparison with conventional GNRFET (C-GNRFET), an SH-GNRFET with appropriately halo doping results in a larger ON current (Ion), smaller OFF current (Ioff), a larger ON-OFF current ratio (Ion/Ioff), superior ambipolar characteristics, a reduced power-delay product and lower delay time.

  4. WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER OBSERVATIONS OF THE EVOLUTION OF MASSIVE STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Padgett, D. L.; Rebull, L. M.

    2012-01-10

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the 'fireworks hypothesis' since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  5. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Asslef, R. J.

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of II outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars. We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks. We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  6. Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer Observations of the Evolution of Massive Star-Forming Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, X. P.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Benford, D. J.; Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Assef, R. J.

    2011-01-01

    We present the results of a mid-infrared survey of 11 outer Galaxy massive star-forming regions and 3 open clusters with data from the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE). Using a newly developed photometric scheme to identify young stellar objects and exclude extragalactic contamination, we have studied the distribution of young stars within each region. These data tend to support the hypothesis that latter generations may be triggered by the interaction of winds and radiation from the first burst of massive star formation with the molecular cloud material leftover from that earlier generation of stars.We dub this process the "fireworks hypothesis" since star formation by this mechanism would proceed rapidly and resemble a burst of fireworks.We have also analyzed small cutout WISE images of the structures around the edges of these massive star-forming regions. We observe large (1-3 pc size) pillar and trunk-like structures of diffuse emission nebulosity tracing excited polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules and small dust grains at the perimeter of the massive star-forming regions. These structures contain small clusters of emerging Class I and Class II sources, but some are forming only a single to a few new stars.

  7. Systematic nuclear structure studies using relativistic mean field theory in mass region A ˜ 130

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, A.; Åberg, Sven; Bajpeyi, Awanish

    2017-02-01

    Nuclear structure studies for even-even nuclei in the mass region \\backsim 130, have been performed, with a special focus around N or Z = 64. On the onset of deformation and lying between two closed shell, these nuclei have attracted attention in a number of studies. A revisit to these experimentally accessible nuclei has been made via the relativistic mean field. The role of pairing and density depletion in the interior has been specially investigated. Qualitative analysis between two versions of relativistic mean field suggests that there is no significant difference between the two approaches. Moreover, the role of the filling {{{s}}}1/2 orbital in density depletion towards the centre has been found to be consistent with our earlier work on the subject Shukla and Åberg (2014 Phys. Rev. C 89 014329).

  8. A simple approach to spectrally resolved fluorescence and bright field microscopy over select regions of interest

    PubMed Central

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Boughter, Christopher T.; Faruk, Nabil F.; Hong, Lu; Koh, Young Hoon; Reyer, Matthew A.; Sherani, Aiman; Hammond, Adam T.

    2016-01-01

    A standard wide field inverted microscope was converted to a spatially selective spectrally resolved microscope through the addition of a polarizing beam splitter, a pair of polarizers, an amplitude-mode liquid crystal-spatial light modulator, and a USB spectrometer. The instrument is capable of simultaneously imaging and acquiring spectra over user defined regions of interest. The microscope can also be operated in a bright-field mode to acquire absorption spectra of micron scale objects. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated on three different samples. First, the instrument is used to resolve three differently labeled fluorescent beads in vitro. Second, the instrument is used to recover time dependent bleaching dynamics that have distinct spectral changes in the cyanobacteria, Synechococcus leopoliensis UTEX 625. Lastly, the technique is used to acquire the absorption spectra of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskites and measure differences between nanocrystal films and micron scale crystals. PMID:27910631

  9. A simple approach to spectrally resolved fluorescence and bright field microscopy over select regions of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahlberg, Peter D.; Boughter, Christopher T.; Faruk, Nabil F.; Hong, Lu; Koh, Young Hoon; Reyer, Matthew A.; Shaiber, Alon; Sherani, Aiman; Zhang, Jiacheng; Jureller, Justin E.; Hammond, Adam T.

    2016-11-01

    A standard wide field inverted microscope was converted to a spatially selective spectrally resolved microscope through the addition of a polarizing beam splitter, a pair of polarizers, an amplitude-mode liquid crystal-spatial light modulator, and a USB spectrometer. The instrument is capable of simultaneously imaging and acquiring spectra over user defined regions of interest. The microscope can also be operated in a bright-field mode to acquire absorption spectra of micron scale objects. The utility of the instrument is demonstrated on three different samples. First, the instrument is used to resolve three differently labeled fluorescent beads in vitro. Second, the instrument is used to recover time dependent bleaching dynamics that have distinct spectral changes in the cyanobacteria, Synechococcus leopoliensis UTEX 625. Lastly, the technique is used to acquire the absorption spectra of CH3NH3PbBr3 perovskites and measure differences between nanocrystal films and micron scale crystals.

  10. Field emission current fluctuations due to lithium adsorbed on the W(111) region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernat, T.; Kleint, Ch.; Mȩclewski, R.

    1991-04-01

    Field emission current fluctuations for lithium adsorbed on the tungsten (111) region were investigated by a probe-hole field emission microscope. The coverage dependence of the noise power as well as spectral density functions W(ƒ) at different temperatures were obtained. The spectral density functions have been analysed in terms of the Timm and van der Ziel concentration fluctuation model. Using Comer's method the surface diffusion energies and prefactors have been determined for submonolayer coverages of lithium. They are strongly coverage dependent. The activation energy varies non-monotonically between 0.41 and 0.53 eV and the prefactor between 2.4 × 10 -4 and 1.3 × 10 -2 cm 2/s in the Li surface concentration interval (0.5-3.7) × 10 14 cm -2. The results are compared with those obtained for the W(111)/K system.

  11. Positron annihilation studies in the field induced depletion regions of metal-oxide-semiconductor structures

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P.; Leung, T.C.; Lynn, K.G.; Nielsen, B.; Forcier, M.P. ); Weinberg, Z.A.; Rubloff, G.W. )

    1992-06-01

    The centroid shifts of positron annihilation spectra are reported from the depletion regions of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors at room temperature and at 35 K. The centroid shift measurement can be explained using the variation of the electric field strength and depletion layer thickness as a function of the applied gate bias. An estimate for the relevant MOS quantities is obtained by fitting the centroid shift versus beam energy data with a steady-state diffusion-annihilation equation and a derivative-gaussian positron implantation profile. Inadequacy of the present analysis scheme is evident from the derived quantities and alternate methods are required for better predictions.

  12. Crustal stress field in the Greek region inferred from inversion of moment tensor solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konstantinou, Konstantinos; Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Liang, Wen-Tzong; Heidbach, Oliver; Oncken, Onno; Suppe, John

    2016-04-01

    The Hellenic region is the seismically most active area in Europe, having experienced numerous large magnitude catastrophic earthquakes and associated devastating tsunamis. A means of mitigating these potential hazards is by better understanding the patterns of spatial and temporal deformation of the crust across the Hellenic orogenic system, over timescales that range from individual earthquakes to several tens of years. In this study for the first time we make collective use of the Global CMT (GCMT), Regional CMT (RCMT) and National Observatory of Athens (NOA) moment tensor databases in order to extract focal mechanism solutions that will be used to infer crustal stresses in the Greek region at an unprecedented resolution. We focus on the shallow seismicity within the upper plate (down to 42 km) and select solutions with good waveform fits and well-resolved hypocentral depths. In this way we obtained 1,614 focal mechanism solutions covering western Greece up to southern Albania, central and southern Greece, northern Aegean as well as the subduction trench west and east of Crete. These solutions are used as input to a regional-scale damped stress inversion over a grid whose node spacing is 0.35 degrees for the purpose of recovering the three principal stress axes and the stress ratio R for each node. Several sensitivity tests are performed where parameters such as damping, hypocentral depth, magnitude range are varied, in order to ascertain the robustness of our results. The final stress field model is then compared to the GPS-derived strain field revealing an excellent agreement between the two datasets. Additionally, maximum and minimum stress axes orientations are correlated with the strike and dip of known faults in order to improve our understanding of future fault rupture and corresponding seismic hazard.

  13. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-01

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface Btw reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (-Btw)/Bpw, where Bpw is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  14. Improved confinement region without large magnetohydrodynamic activity in TPE-RX reversed-field pinch plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2014-11-15

    We found that spontaneous improved confinement was brought about depending on the operating region in the Toroidal Pinch Experiment-Reversed eXperiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma [Y. Yagi et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 45, 421 (1999)]. Gradual decay of the toroidal magnetic field at plasma surface B{sub tw} reversal makes it possible to realize a prolonged discharge, and the poloidal beta value and energy confinement time increase in the latter half of the discharge, where reversal and pinch parameters become shallow and low, respectively. In the latter half of the discharge, the plasma current and volume-averaged toroidal magnetic field 〈B{sub t}〉 increase again, the electron density slowly decays, the electron temperature and soft X-ray radiation intensity increase, and the magnetic fluctuations are markedly reduced. In this period of improved confinement, the value of (〈B{sub t}〉-B{sub tw})/B{sub pw}, where B{sub pw} is the poloidal magnetic field at the plasma surface, stays almost constant, which indicates that the dynamo action occurs without large magnetohydrodynamic activities.

  15. Lobe cell convection and field-aligned currents poleward of the region 1 current system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eriksson, S.; Bonnell, J. W.; Blomberg, L. G.; Ergun, R. E.; Marklund, G. T.; Carlson, C. W.

    2002-08-01

    We present a case and statistical study of plasma convection in the Northern Hemisphere during summer conditions using electric field, magnetic field, and particle data taken during dawn-dusk directed orbits of the FAST satellite. To our knowledge, this set provides the most comprehensive combination of data as yet presented in support of lobe cell convection from an ionospheric perspective this far from the noon sector. In particular, we study the current systems and convection patterns for all passes in July 1997 that show evidence for six large-scale field-aligned currents (FACs) rather than the usual system of four FACs associated with the region 1/region 2 current systems. A total of 71 passes out of 232 in the study had the extra pair of FACs. The extra pair of FACs in 30 of the 71 cases lies either on the dawnside or on the duskside of the noon-midnight meridian, and their position is strongly correlated with the polarity of the IMF By (negative and positive, respectively). This is consistent with the IMF dependence of a three-cell convection pattern of coexisting merging, viscous, and lobe-type convection cells. The occurrence of the asymmetric FAC pair was also strongly linked to conditions of IMF |By/Bz| > 1. The extra pair of FACs in these cases was clearly associated with the lobe cell of the three-cell convection system. The remaining 41 cases had the pair of FACs straddling the noon-midnight meridian. The extra pair of FACs was often (20 cases out of 30) observed at magnetic local times more than three hours away from noon, rather than being confined to regions near noon and the typical location of the cusp. Such a current system consisting of a pair of FACs poleward of the nearest region 1 current is consistent with the IMF By-dependent global MHD model developed by Ogino et al. [1986] for southward IMF conditions, as well as with other magnetospheric and ionospheric convection models that include the effects of merging occuring simultaneously at

  16. Regional gravity fields on Venus from tracking of Magellan cycles 5 and 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaula, William M.

    From August 1993 to October 1994, Magellan was at heights 180 to 550 km. Products of the Deep Space Network (DSN) X band tracking are line-of-sight (LOS) Doppler frequencies and accelerations residual to a 40th degree gravity field. The intrinsic accuracy and abundance of these data may be good enough to push the resolution (half wavelength) to less than spacecraft height. The observation equation to infer gravity from LOS accelerations is simple. However, noise and non uniform geometry necessitate a singular value analysis cutoff or an a priori weighting; the latter was chosen for computational economy. Further, the non-Gaussian character of the noise necessitates a reject limit. Choices made were: (1) surface element size 100 km; (2) region size 1600 km; (3) buffer zone width 600 km; (4) reject limit 1 mGal (10-5 m/s); and (5) criterion for a priori weighting recovering a known solution; i.e., a field transferred from Earth to Venus (probably the most significant technical advance). This criterion was optimized by a priori increments to the normal main diagonal about 10% of the minimum main diagonal element, averaging about 0.5% of the maximum. Best resolutions, defined by spectral coherence of 0.7 for the known field, obtained were 110 km near the equator (from 51,285 points over Eisila) and 180 km at high latitudes (from 120,231 points over Maxwell and 162,000 over Akna/Freyja). The limitation on resolution near the equator is the cubic polynomial fitting over 335 km lengths to determine accelerations. However, environmental effects were the limiters elsewhere. Root-mean-square (rms) residuals to solutions had negative correlations with spacecraft altitude and the angle at the Earth between Venus and the Sun, and positive correlations with the Earth-Venus distance and latitude on Venus, indicating Venus's influence on its electromagnetic surroundings out to several 100 km, especially on its side toward the Sun. Correlations with DSN zenith angles and the Kp

  17. Velocity Fields in H II Regions Using High Resolution Imaging Fabry-Perot Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seema, P.

    1996-05-01

    The thesis comprises of two parts: I. Instrumentation II. Observations, results and discussion. An imaging Fabry-Perot spectrometer (IFPS) is designed and constructed for the studies on kinematics of extended astronomical objects (Seema et al., 1992). IFPS comprises of a field aperture, collimating lens and a two dimensional imaging sensor called Imaging Photon Detector (IPD). It is the first time that IPD which uses a resistive anode for position determination is being used in the spectroscopic studies of astronomical objects. Observations were made on Orion and Trifid nebula covering a wide field of view using a 35cm Celestron-14 telescope (f/11 cassegrain) at Gurushikhar, Mt.Abu, India. Orion Nebula: Observations were made in [OIII] 5007A, line with a spectral resolution of 6 km/sec and spatial resolution of 4" covering a field of view of 10.5', to study (i) general velocity flow (ii) high velocity flow and (iii)random motions. Line profiles generated for about 2000 positions showed an asymmetric shape with (a)a narrow component 20 +- 3 km/sec and (b) a broad component 50 +- 3 km/sec. The two components could be interpreted in terms of the interaction of the ionized gas (from the trapezium stars) with the condensations present in the nebula, resulting in the secondary flows. The iso-velocity contour map generated for both the components showed velocity flow in agreement with the champagne flow model (Tenorio-Tagle 1982). A model emission line profile constructed assuming a champagne flow in [OIII] 5007A, line for a position 2' away from theta-1 C Ori showed a reasonably good agreement with the narrow component of the observed profile. Certain high velocity flow (~50 km/s) regions are observed to be superimposed on the main flow of the narrow component. These flows are either radiation pressure driven stellar winds or jets generated during the formation phase of Young stellar objects. The radial velocity was found to be low with no high velocity flow regions in

  18. Field Studies of Broadband Aerosol Optical Extinction in the Ultraviolet Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washenfelder, R. A.; Attwood, A.; Brock, C. A.; Brown, S. S.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols influence the Earth's radiative budget by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation. The optical properties of aerosols vary as a function of wavelength, but few measurements have reported the wavelength dependence of aerosol extinction cross sections and complex refractive indices. In the case of brown carbon, its wavelength-dependent absorption in the ultraviolet spectral region has been suggested as an important component of aerosol radiative forcing. We describe a new field instrument to measure aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength, using cavity enhanced spectroscopy with a broadband light source. The instrument consists of two broadband channels which span the 360-390 and 385-420 nm spectral regions using two light emitting diodes (LED) and a grating spectrometer with charge-coupled device (CCD) detector. We deployed this instrument during the Fire Lab at Missoula Experiment during Fall 2012 to measure biomass burning aerosol, and again during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study in summer 2013 to measure organic aerosol in the Southeastern U.S. In both field experiments, we determined aerosol optical extinction as a function of wavelength and can interpret this together with size distribution and composition measurements to characterize the aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing.

  19. Magnetic Field Structures in a Facular Region Observed by THEMIS and Hinode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Y.; Schmieder, B.; Bommier, V.; Gosain, S.

    2010-03-01

    The main objective of this paper is to build and compare vector magnetic maps obtained by two spectral polarimeters, i.e. THEMIS/MTR and Hinode SOT/SP, using two inversion codes (UNNOFIT and MELANIE) based on the Milne - Eddington solar atmosphere model. To this end, we used observations of a facular region within active region NOAA 10996 on 23 May 2008, and found consistent results concerning the field strength, azimuth and inclination distributions. Because SOT/SP is free from the seeing effect and has better spatial resolution, we were able to resolve small magnetic polarities with sizes of 1″ to 2″, and we could detect strong horizontal magnetic fields, which converge or diverge in negative or positive facular polarities. These findings support models which suggest the existence of small vertical flux tube bundles in faculae. A new method is proposed to get the relative formation heights of the multi-lines observed by MTR assuming the validity of a flux tube model for the faculae. We found that the Fe i 6302.5 Å line forms at a greater atmospheric height than the Fe i 5250.2 Å line.

  20. Drift wave turbulence in the edge region of MST reversed field pinch plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuecks, D. J.; Almagri, A. F.; Sarff, J. S.; Terry, P. W.

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of electric field fluctuations reveal activity consistent with drift waves in the edge region of standard-confinement MST plasmas. The fluctuations are broadband and strongly anisotropic, with a power spectral index that is steeper in the direction parallel to the mean magnetic field direction than it is in the perpendicular direction. The power in the fluctuating kinetic energy, 1/2 minivẼ×B0 2 , exceeds the power in magnetic fluctuation energy for frequencies above 80 kHz. At lower frequencies (20-40 kHz), magnetic energy associated with unstable global tearing modes dominates. A lack of equipartition in the turbulent cascade coincides with measured signatures of independent fluctuation activity broadly consistent with drift-wave fluctuations. Statistical coherence measurements reveal mode activity at high frequencies (>=80 kHz) that is compressive, has high coherence in regions of the plasma with strong density gradients, and has a phase speed comparable to the electron drift speed. Elevated coherency associated with this fluctuation feature of the drift wave fluctuations return more quickly following magnetic reconnection events than corresponding coherence associated with the tearing activity. This suggests the drift-wave fluctuations may be excited by the large edge-localized thermal pressure gradient, but they could also be excited nonlinearly in a turbulent cascade driven by the tearing modes. Work supported by DOE and NSF.

  1. Correlation of Coronal Plasma Properties and Solar Magnetic Field in a Decaying Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Young, Peter R.; Muglach, Karin; Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio

    2016-08-01

    We present the analysis of a decaying active region observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode during 2009 December 7-11. We investigated the temporal evolution of its structure exhibited by plasma at temperatures from 300,000 to 2.8 million degrees, and derived the electron density, differential emission measure, effective electron temperature, and elemental abundance ratios of Si/S and Fe/S (as a measure of the First Ionization Potential (FIP) Effect). We compared these coronal properties to the temporal evolution of the photospheric magnetic field strength obtained from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory Michelson Doppler Imager magnetograms. We find that, while these coronal properties all decreased with time during this decay phase, the largest change was at plasma above 1.5 million degrees. The photospheric magnetic field strength also decreased with time but mainly for field strengths lower than about 70 Gauss. The effective electron temperature and the FIP bias seem to reach a “basal” state (at 1.5 × 106 K and 1.5, respectively) into the quiet Sun when the mean photospheric magnetic field (excluding all areas <10 G) weakened to below 35 G, while the electron density continued to decrease with the weakening field. These physical properties are all positively correlated with each other and the correlation is the strongest in the high-temperature plasma. Such correlation properties should be considered in the quest for our understanding of how the corona is heated. The variations in the elemental abundance should especially be considered together with the electron temperature and density.

  2. Companions and Environments of Low-Mass Stars: From Star-Forming Regions to the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward-Duong, Kimberly; Patience, Jenny; De Rosa, Robert J.; Bulger, Joanna; Rajan, Abhijith; Goodwin, Simon; Parker, Richard J.; McCarthy, Donald W.; Kulesa, Craig; van der Plas, Gerrit; Menard, Francois; Pinte, Christophe; Jackson, Alan Patrick; Bryden, Geoffrey; Turner, Neal J.; Harvey, Paul M.; Hales, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    We present results from two studies probing the multiplicity and environmental properties of low-mass stars: (1) The MinMs (M-dwarfs in Multiples) Survey, a large, volume-limited survey of 245 field M-dwarfs within 15 pc, and (2) the TBOSS (Taurus Boundary of Stellar/Substellar) Survey, an ongoing study of disk properties for the lowest-mass members within the Taurus star-forming region. The MinMs Survey provides new measurements of the companion star fraction, separation distribution, and mass ratio distribution for the nearest K7-M6 dwarfs, utilizing a combination of high-resolution adaptive optics imaging and digitized widefield archival plates to cover an unprecedented separation range of ~1-10,000 AU. Within these data, we also identify companions below the stellar/brown dwarf boundary, enabling characterization of the substellar companion population to low-mass field stars. For the much younger population in Taurus, we present results from ALMA Band 7 continuum observations of low-mass stellar and substellar Class II objects, spanning spectral types from M4-M7.75. The sub-millimeter detections of these disks provide key estimates of the dust mass in small grains, which is then assessed within the context of region age, environment, and viability for planet formation. This young population also includes a number of interesting young binary systems. Covering both young (1-2 Myr) and old (>5 Gyr) populations of low-mass stars, the results from these studies provide benchmark measurements on the population statistics of low-mass field stars, and on the early protoplanetary environments of their younger M-star counterparts.

  3. Probing the innermost regions of AGN jets and their magnetic fields: LBA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James M.; Lobanov, Andrei; Perez Torres, Miguel Angel; Ros, Eduardo; Alberdi, Antxon; Taylor, Greg; Zensus, Anton; Cawthorne, Tim; Kovalev, Yuri; Krichbaum, Thomas P.; Savolainen, Tuomas; Gomez, Jose Luis; Bach, Uwe; Bernhart, Simone; Clausen-Brown, Eric; Eilek, Jean; Fromm, Christian

    2013-10-01

    RadioAstron provides the first true full-polarization capabilities for space-VLBI. As part of our RadioAstron key science project to study magnetic fields in AGNs, we propose that the LBA participates in two global VLBI imaging observations (10 to 20 hours of total observing time) at K-band from a list of possible imaging targets (including OJ~287, 3C~273, 3C~279, and 3C~454.3 for the LBA) and sessions in the timerange 2013 October through 2014 April currently under consideration by other global VLBI stations. These measurements will exploit the unprecedented high-angular resolution polarization capabilities of RadioAstron to probe the innermost regions of AGN jets and their magnetic fields. Our initial target sample contains bright, strongly polarized AGN jets for which we confidently expect to measure polarization and be able to perform Faraday rotation synthesis analysis that will allow us to construct 3D maps of the magnetic field structure and strength in the vicinity of the central black hole. Comparison with 3D relativistic-MHD and emission simulations will allow us to obtain a better understanding of the jet formation and high-energy emission mechanisms. Perigee imaging with RadioAstron requires support from a truly global VLBI array that can co-observe for the full RadioAstron track. As very sensitive stations are required at all times to locate and track fringes to the weak RadioAstron K-band system, the LBA, including DSS-43, the ATCA, and Parkes, is crucial for the far eastern latitude region of the global array.

  4. Current regional stress field and the resultant crustal deformation in SE Korea and their tectonic implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, M. C.; Cho, H.; Son, M.

    2014-12-01

    To determine current regional stress field and to characterize the resultant crustal deformation in SE Korea, Quaternary fault, focal mechanism, and geotechnical in-situ stress data were synthetically analyzed. The Quaternary faults are extensively observed along major inherited fault zones and show compatible orientations with general trends of the inherited faults. Most of the Quaternary faults have a top-to-the-west thrust geometry and kinematics and show a tendency of upward-decreasing dip angle and upward-narrowing gouge zone. Slip-sense indicators and paleo-stress field reconstructions indicate that the faults resulted from reverse or transpressional faulting under an E-W compression. All the magnetic fabrics (AMS) of the fault gouges also indicate the prevailing reverse-slip faulting under an ENE-WNW compression. The dominant oblate magnetic fabrics parallel to fault plane and the degrees of anisotropy increasing in proportion to their oblatenesses indicate that the fabrics have formed by a progressive deformation due to continuous simple shear during the last reactivation stage as reverse faulting. The focal mechanism study in and around the Korean Peninsula show the horizontally clustered P-axes in ENE-WSW direction and the girdle-distributed T-axes in NNW trend. The geotechnical in-situ stress data in south Korea also show NE- or ENE-trending maximum horizontal stress. The current crustal deformation in Korea thus can be characterized by contractional structures produced under a regional E-W or ENE-WSW compression stress field, and most of the Quaternary faults resulted from the local re-activation of appropriately oriented inherited major faults. Considering the tectonic setting and structural features in Asia during the Neogene, the current stress regime is interpreted to have been caused by the cooperation of westward shallow subduction of Pacific Plate and collision of Indian and Eurasian continents since about 5-3.5 Ma.

  5. Reconnaissance of ground-water resources in the Western Coal Field Region, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Maxwell, Bruce William; Devaul, Robert Washburn

    1962-01-01

    In the Western Coal Field region of Kentucky, water is obtained from consolidated sedimentary rocks of Mississippian and Pennsylvanian ages and from unconsolidated sediments of Cenozoic age. Pennsylvanian rocks crop out in more than 95 percent of the area and consist of shale and sandstone interbedded with some limestone and coal. The Pennsylvanian strata are divided into five formations. They are, in ascending order: the Caseyville sandstone and the Tradewater, Carbondale, Lisman, and Henshaw formations. The Anvil Rock sandstone member of the Lisman formation and the Caseyville sandstone are the only bedrock aquifers in the region that are known to yield more than 100 gpm (gallons per minute) to wells. Most bedrock wells produce enough water for a modern domestic supply, more than 500 gpd (gallons per day), and few yield so little water as to be inadequate for hand pumps and bailers, less than 100 gpd. Unconsolidated Cenozoic deposits range from latest Pliocene(?) to Recent in age and consist of clay, silt, sand, and gravel. High gravels, tentatively considered to be late Pliocene and early Pleistacene in age by McFarlan (1950, p. 125), and loess of Pleistocene age are locally exposed, but nearly all of the alluvium is of late Pleistocene and Recent ages. The alluvium along the Ohio River generally yields from a few hundred to as much as 1,000 gpm to single vertical wells and as much as several thousand gallons per minute to wells that have multiple horizontal screens. Alluvium in the tributaries of the Ohio River generally is finer grained than that of the Ohio Valley. The highest known yield from a well in the alluvium of the tributaries is 56 gpm; other wells yield enough for domestic supplies. Availability of ground water in the region depends on the character and thickness of the aquifer penetrated, and, where the aquifer is bedrock on the depth of the water-bearing bed, and to a certain extent on the topographic situation. Most bedrock aquifers in the

  6. Stress Field in Brazil with Focal Mechanism: Regional and Local Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, F.; Assumpcao, M.

    2013-05-01

    The knowledge of stress field is fundamental not only to understand driving forces and plate deformation but also in the study of intraplate seismicity. The stress field in Brazil has been determined mainly using focal mechanisms and a few breakout data and in-situ measurements. However the stress field still is poorly known in Brazil. The focal mechanisms of recent earthquakes (magnitude lower than 5 mb) were studied using waveform modeling. We stacked the record of several teleseismic stations ( delta > 30°) stacked groups of stations separated according to distance and azimuth. Every record was visually inspected and those with a good signal/noise ratio (SNR) were grouped in windows of ten degrees distance and stacked. The teleseismic P-wave of the stacked signals was modeled using the hudson96 program of Herrmann seismology package (Herrmann, 2002) and the consistency of focal mechanism with the first-motion was checked. Some events in central Brazil were recorded by closer stations (~ 1000 km) and the moment tensor was determined with the ISOLA code (Sokos & Zahradnik, 2008). With the focal mechanisms available in literature and those obtained in this work, we were able to identify some patterns: the central region shows a purely compressional pattern (E-W SHmax), which is predicted by regional theoretical models (Richardson & Coblentz, 1996 and the TD0 model of Lithgow & Bertelloni, 2004). Meanwhile in the Amazon we find an indication of SHmax oriented in the SE-NW direction, probably caused by the Caribbean plate interaction (Meijer, 1995). In northern coastal region, the compression rotates following the coastline, which indicates an important local component related to spreading effects at the continental/oceanic transition (Assumpção, 1998) and flexural stresses caused by sedimentary load in Amazon Fan. We determine the focal mechanism of several events in Brazil using different techniques according to the available data. The major difficulty is to

  7. Analysis and prediction of the critical regions of antimicrobial peptides based on conditional random fields.

    PubMed

    Chang, Kuan Y; Lin, Tung-pei; Shih, Ling-Yi; Wang, Chien-Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are potent drug candidates against microbes such as bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses. The size of AMPs ranges from less than ten to hundreds of amino acids. Often only a few amino acids or the critical regions of antimicrobial proteins matter the functionality. Accurately predicting the AMP critical regions could benefit the experimental designs. However, no extensive analyses have been done specifically on the AMP critical regions and computational modeling on them is either non-existent or settled to other problems. With a focus on the AMP critical regions, we thus develop a computational model AMPcore by introducing a state-of-the-art machine learning method, conditional random fields. We generate a comprehensive dataset of 798 AMPs cores and a low similarity dataset of 510 representative AMP cores. AMPcore could reach a maximal accuracy of 90% and 0.79 Matthew's correlation coefficient on the comprehensive dataset and a maximal accuracy of 83% and 0.66 MCC on the low similarity dataset. Our analyses of AMP cores follow what we know about AMPs: High in glycine and lysine, but low in aspartic acid, glutamic acid, and methionine; the abundance of α-helical structures; the dominance of positive net charges; the peculiarity of amphipathicity. Two amphipathic sequence motifs within the AMP cores, an amphipathic α-helix and an amphipathic π-helix, are revealed. In addition, a short sequence motif at the N-terminal boundary of AMP cores is reported for the first time: arginine at the P(-1) coupling with glycine at the P1 of AMP cores occurs the most, which might link to microbial cell adhesion.

  8. On the High- and Low- Altitude Limits of the Auroral Electric Field Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Lu, G.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Craven, J. D.; Peterson, W. K.; Heelis, R. A.

    1993-01-01

    Using measurements from the High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) on the Dynamics-Explorer 1 (DE-1) spacecraft and the Low Altitude Plasma Instrument (LAPI) on Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2), we investigate both die high altitude and low altitude extents of the auroral acceleration region. To infer the high altitude limit, we searched the HAPI data base for evidence of upward-directed auroral electric fields located above the spacecraft when the HAPI spacecraft is above 9000 km altitude. We find that such acceleration is common when DE-1 flies through die auroral oval at an altitude of 9,000-11,000 km. At altitudes above 11,000 km, the fraction of the orbits with evidence of at least a 1000 V potential drop above the spacecraft falls, becoming essentially zero above an altitude of 15,000 km. Above that altitude, small (100 V) potential drops are frequently observed, but only rarely are approx. 1 kV potentials observed, typically associated with polar cap or 'theta' arcs or westward traveling surges. To investigate the low-altitude limit of the auroral acceleration region, we use conjunctions of DE 1 and DE 2 along auroral field lines and match the upgoing fluxes of ionospheric ions observed by DE 2 with the flux of accelerated upgoing ions observed at DE 1. Calculating the ionospheric scale height from the ion and electron temperatures and assuming that the parallel flow velocity is independent of height above 800 km, we calculate the altitude at which the upwelling ionospheric ions are effectively completely lost to upward acceleration. The initial lowest-altitude acceleration process could be either a perpendicular acceleration or a parallel electric field, but it must be sufficient to give the entire distribution escape energy. We find that in the two cases studied, near the region of peak auroral potential drop the altitude of this acceleration was around 1700 km (near the O/H neutral crossover altitude), but was significantly higher (approx. 2000 km) near the

  9. On the high- and low-altitude limits of the auroral electric field region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiff, P. H.; Lu, G.; Burch, J. L.; Winningham, J. D.; Frank, L. A.; Craven, J. D.; Peterson, W. K.; Heelis, R. A.

    Using measurements from the High Altitude Plasma Instrument (HAPI) on the Dynamics-Explorer 1 (DE-1) spacecraft and the Low Altitude Plasma Instrument (LAPI) on Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2), we investigate both the high altitude and low altitude extents of the auroral acceleration region. To infer the high altitude limit, we searched the HAPI data base for evidence of upward-directed auroral electric fields located above the spacecraft when the HAPI spacecraft is above 9000 km altitude. We find that such acceleration is common when DE-1 flies through the auroral oval at an altitude of 9,000-11,000 km. At altitudes above 11,000 km, the fraction of the orbits with evidence of at least a 1000 V potential drop above the spacecraft falls, becoming essentially zero above an altitude of 15,000 km. Above that altitude, small (100 V) potential drops are frequently observed, but only rarely are -1 kV potentials observed, typically associated with polar cap or "theta" arcs or westward traveling surges. To investigate the low-altitude limit of the auroral acceleration region, we use conjunctions of DE 1 and DE 2 along auroral field lines and match the upgoing fluxes of ionospheric ions observed by DE 2 with the flux of accelerated upgoing ions observed at DE 1. Calculating the ionospheric scale height from the ion and electron temperatures and assuming that the parallel flow velocity is independent of height above 800 km, we calculate the altitude at which the upwelling ionospheric ions are effectively completely lost to upward acceleration. The initial lowest-altitude acceleration process could be either a perpendicular acceleration or a parallel electric field, but it must be sufficient to give the entire distribution escape energy. We find that in the two cases studied, near the region of peak auroral potential drop the altitude of this acceleration was around 1700 km (near the O/H neutral crossover altitude), but was significantly higher (˜2000 km) near the edges of the arc

  10. Nonlinear effects of locally heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields on regional stream-aquifer exchanges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, J.; Winter, C. L.; Wang, Z.

    2015-11-01

    Computational experiments are performed to evaluate the effects of locally heterogeneous conductivity fields on regional exchanges of water between stream and aquifer systems in the Middle Heihe River basin (MHRB) of northwestern China. The effects are found to be nonlinear in the sense that simulated discharges from aquifers to streams are systematically lower than discharges produced by a base model parameterized with relatively coarse effective conductivity. A similar, but weaker, effect is observed for stream leakage. The study is organized around three hypotheses: (H1) small-scale spatial variations of conductivity significantly affect regional exchanges of water between streams and aquifers in river basins, (H2) aggregating small-scale heterogeneities into regional effective parameters systematically biases estimates of stream-aquifer exchanges, and (H3) the biases result from slow paths in groundwater flow that emerge due to small-scale heterogeneities. The hypotheses are evaluated by comparing stream-aquifer fluxes produced by the base model to fluxes simulated using realizations of the MHRB characterized by local (grid-scale) heterogeneity. Levels of local heterogeneity are manipulated as control variables by adjusting coefficients of variation. All models are implemented using the MODFLOW (Modular Three-dimensional Finite-difference Groundwater Flow Model) simulation environment, and the PEST (parameter estimation) tool is used to calibrate effective conductivities defined over 16 zones within the MHRB. The effective parameters are also used as expected values to develop lognormally distributed conductivity (K) fields on local grid scales. Stream-aquifer exchanges are simulated with K fields at both scales and then compared. Results show that the effects of small-scale heterogeneities significantly influence exchanges with simulations based on local-scale heterogeneities always producing discharges that are less than those produced by the base model

  11. Sediment and phosphorus fluxes - monitoring and modelling from field to regional scale - connectivity implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Miroslav; Zumr, David; Krása, Josef; Dostál, Tomáš; Jáchymová, Barbora; Rosendorf, Pavel

    2015-04-01

    Sediment and phosphorus fluxes - monitoring and modelling from field to regional scale - connectivity implications Miroslav Bauer1), David Zumr1), Josef Krása1), Tomáš Dostal1), Barbora Jáchymová1), Pavel Rosendorf2) Czech Technical University in Prague1, Water Research Institute of T.G.M. 2, Agricultural landscape management has a strong influences on sediment and nutrients flow paths from field to streams and reservoirs. According to many studies water erosion driven phosphorus can play important role in total phosphorous budgets in catchments and accelerate eutrophication process in vulnerable reservoirs. Research team of CTU Prague focuses on research of sediment transport processes from a small plot scale to regional scale. Using field rainfall simulator the data are collected to assess the fluxes in the scale from one to several square meters and to analyze the plot size effect on the runoff, solid particles and phosphorous transport processes (see corresponding posters of Jachymova et al., Kavka et al., Laburda et al., Zumr et al.). Running fully agricultural experimental catchment of 49 ha (Nucice, Czech Republic) and experimental soil erosion plots (Bykovice, Czech Republic) we analyze runoff and soil erosion with the aim to upscale the results from single plot studies to the catchment scale. Soil erosion is also monitored by means of spatially distributed soil sampling and photogrammetry analyses. The water flow pathways via subsurface and surface runoff and the temporary variable catchment connectivity are studied here. Finally the research team produced unique large extent study, performed by WATEM/SEDEM model adopted for erosion driven phosphorus fluxes modelling, for the area of 1/3 of the Czech Republic (ca 31500 km2) in the resolution (pixel size) of 10 by 10 meters, with estimated connectivity from single field to outlet reservoirs of large catchments, including stream topology, sediment trapping efficiencies of all ponds and reservoirs within

  12. Reconnaissance of ground-water resources in the Eastern Coal Field Region, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Price, William E.; Mull, D.S.; Kilburn, Chabot

    1962-01-01

    In the Eastern Coal Field region of Kentucky, water is obtained from consolidated sedimentary rocks ranging in age from Devonian to Pennsylvanian and from unconsolidated sediments of Quaternary age. About 95 percent of the area is underlain by shale, sandstone, and coal of Pennsylvanian age. Principal factors governing the availability of water in the region are depth, topographic location, and the lithology of the aquifer penetrated. In general, the yield of the well increases as the depth increases. Wells drilled in topographic lows, such as valleys, are likely to yield more water than wells drilled on topographic highs, such as hills. Sand and gravel, present in thick beds in the alluvium along the Ohio River, form the most productive aquifer in the Eastern Coal Field. Of the consolidated rocks in the region sandstone strata are the best aquifers chiefly because joints, openings along bedding planes, and intergranular pore spaces are best developed in them. Shale also supplies water to many wells in the region, chiefly from joints and openings along bedding planes. Coal constitutes a very small part of the sedimentary section, but it yields water from fractures to many wells. Limestone yields water readily from solution cavities developed along joint and bedding-plane openings. The availability of water in different parts of the region was determined chiefly by analyzing well data collected during the reconnaissance. The resulting water-availability maps, published as hydrologic investigations atlases (Price and others, 1961 a, b; Kilburn and others, 1961) were designed to be used in conjunction with this report. The maps were constructed by dividing the region into 5 physiographic areas, into 10 subareas based chiefly on lithologic facies, and, in the case of the Kanawha section, into 2 quality-of-water areas. The 5 physiographic areas are the Knobs, Mississippian Plateau, Cumberland Plateau section, Kanawha section, and Cumberland Mountain section. The 10

  13. Coherent structure diffusivity in the edge region of Reversed Field Pinch experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spolaore, M.; Antoni, V.; Spada, E.; Bergsåker, H.; Cavazzana, R.; Drake, J. R.; Martines, E.; Regnoli, G.; Serianni, G.; Vianello, N.

    2005-01-01

    Coherent structures emerging from the background turbulence have been detected by electrostatic measurements in the edge region of two Reversed Field Pinch experiments, RFX (Padua) and Extrap-T2R (Stockholm). Measurements have been performed by arrays of Langmuir probes which allowed simultaneous measurements of temperature, potential and density to be carried out. These structures have been interpreted as a dynamic balance of dipolar and monopolar vortices, whose relative population are found to depend on the local mean E × B flow shear. The contribution to the anomalous transport of these structures has been investigated and it has been found that the corresponding diffusion coeffcient accounts up to 50% of the total diffusivity. The experimental findings indicate that the diffusion coeffcient associated to the coherent structures depends on the relative population of the two types of vortices and is minimum when the two populations are equal. An interpretative model is proposed to explain this feature.

  14. Cusp region particle precipitation and ion convection for northward interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burch, J. L.; Reiff, P. H.; Spiro, R. W.; Heelis, R. A.; Fields, S. A.

    1981-01-01

    Data from Atmosphere Explorer D for periods of strong northward interplanetary magnetic field are discussed. In the dayside magnetospheric cusp region energy time spectrograms of suprathermal positive ion fluxes exhibit a characteristic 'V' pattern as the spacecraft moves toward higher latitudes; that is, with the peak in the energy spectrum falling in energy and then rising again. Convection velocities follow this pattern closely with strong eastwest flows (with antisunward components) occurring in the equatorward half of the 'V' and significant sunward flows occurring in the poleward half of the 'V'. These patterns can be understood qualitatively in terms of a model of ionospheric electric potential produced by the known dependence of Birkeland current densities on magnetic activity.

  15. Field Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Target Region in Xiemisitai Mountain, Xinjiang Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q. J.; Wei, Y. M.; Chen, Y.; Ma, X. L.; Zhou, H. Y.

    2017-02-01

    A fine mineral identification model using the field Hyperspectral remote sensing was proposed to solve the problem of low mineral identification accuracy. Results show that the accuracy was improved by spectral noises removal, endmember optimization and mineral absorptions enhancement. A regional endmember library was established to improve the reliability by systematically considering of the mineral assemblage relationships. A fine mineral identification system (FMIS) was developed to help geologists to quickly identify minerals and it was applied in the Xiemisitai Mountain, Xinjiang province, China in 2014 to newly find copper mineralized points. The improved model and the FMIS system are therefore not only of great significance to improve efficiency and save cost in remote sensing mineral exploration, but also of great economic value of the local economy development in the future.

  16. High-resolution regional gravity field recovery from Poisson wavelets using heterogeneous observational techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yihao; Luo, Zhicai; Chen, Wu; Chen, Yongqi

    2017-02-01

    We adopt Poisson wavelets for regional gravity field recovery using data acquired from various observational techniques; the method combines data of different spatial resolutions and coverage, and various spectral contents and noise levels. For managing the ill-conditioned system, the performances of the zero- and first-order Tikhonov regularization approaches are investigated. Moreover, a direct approach is proposed to properly combine Global Positioning System (GPS)/leveling data with the gravimetric quasi-geoid/geoid, where GPS/leveling data are treated as an additional observation group to form a new functional model. In this manner, the quasi-geoid/geoid that fits the local leveling system can be computed in one step, and no post-processing (e.g., corrector surface or least squares collocation) procedures are needed. As a case study, we model a new reference surface over Hong Kong. The results show solutions with first-order regularization are better than those obtained from zero-order regularization, which indicates the former may be more preferable for regional gravity field modeling. The numerical results also demonstrate the gravimetric quasi-geoid/geoid and GPS/leveling data can be combined properly using this direct approach, where no systematic errors exist between these two data sets. A comparison with 61 independent GPS/leveling points shows the accuracy of the new geoid, HKGEOID-2016, is around 1.1 cm. Further evaluation demonstrates the new geoid has improved significantly compared to the original model, HKGEOID-2000, and the standard deviation for the differences between the observed and computed geoidal heights at all GPS/leveling points is reduced from 2.4 to 0.6 cm. Finally, we conclude HKGEOID-2016 can be substituted for HKGEOID-2000 for engineering purposes and geophysical investigations in Hong Kong.

  17. Transforming Your Regional Economy through Uncertainty and Surprise: Learning from Complexity Science, Network Theory and the Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holley, June

    The field of regional development blossomed in the last decade, as researchers and practitioners increasingly asserted that the region was the most effective geographic unit for supporting the excellence and innovation of entrepreneurs. See, for example, the many studies by the European Union and the work by Michael Porter.

  18. The Target Model of Strategic Interaction of Kazan Federal University and the Region in the Field of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gabdulchakov, Valerian F.

    2016-01-01

    The subject of the study in the article is conceptual basis of construction of the target model of interaction between University and region. Hence the topic of the article "the Target model of strategic interaction between the University and the region in the field of education." The objective was to design a target model of this…

  19. Two-color field for the generation of an isolated attosecond pulse in water-window region.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wenxiang; Chen, Guanglong; Kim, Dong Eon

    2011-10-10

    For the investigation of various ultrafast electron dynamics, an isolated attosecond pulse in a broad spectral range is necessary. The generation of isolated attosecond pulses demands the manipulation of the electric field of a laser. We propose a two-color field scheme for generating an isolated attosecond pulse in the water-window region. Two-color fields are generated by mixing two equally-strong pulsed color fields. The investigation shows that an isolated attosecond pulse with a photon energy of near 500 eV and a pulse duration of 125 - 188 attoseconds can be generated using 10 - 15 fs FWHM laser fields.

  20. The Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000): Overview of the Dry Season Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swap, R. J.; Annegarn, H. J.; Suttles, J. T.; Haywood, J.; Helmlinger, M. C.; Hely, C.; Hobbs, P. V.; Holben, B. N.; Ji, J.; King, M. D.

    2002-01-01

    The Southern African Regional Science Initiative (SAFARI 2000) is an international project investigating the earth atmosphere -human system in southern Africa. The programme was conducted over a two year period from March 1999 to March 2001. The dry season field campaign (August-September 2000) was the most intensive activity involved over 200 scientist from eighteen countries. The main objectives were to characterize and quantify biogenic, pyrogenic and anthropogenic aerosol and trace gas emissions and their transport and transformations in the atmosphere and to validate NASA's Earth Observing System's Satellite Terra within a scientific context. Five aircraft-- two South African Weather Service Aeorcommanders, the University of Washington's CV-880, the U.K. Meteorological Office's C-130, and NASA's ER-2 --with different altitude capabilities, participated in the campaign. Additional airborne sampling of southern African air masses, that had moved downwind of the subcontinent, was conducted by the CSIRO over Australia. Multiple Observations were made in various geographical sections under different synoptic conditions. Airborne missions were designed to optimize the value of synchronous over-flights of the Terra Satellite platform, above regional ground validation and science targets. Numerous smaller scale ground validation activities took place throughout the subcontinent during the campaign period.

  1. PCA Analysis of the Geomagnetic Field at Mid-Latitude Regions during High Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natali, Maria Paula; Meza, Amalia Margarita

    2016-07-01

    Our study is focused on the analysis of the geomagnetic variability of the H, D and Z components in the Northern hemisphere at mid-latitudes. We analyze two different local times, noon and night, recorded by 22 permanent observatories distributed over Europe and North America during a period of four years of high solar activity comprising 2000-2003. We used Principal Component Analysis (PCA) in order to identify the spatial and temporal variations of the geomagnetic field components. This technique produces a quite compact representation of the data by defining an orthonormal base derived from correlation within the data set. This helps us to identify possible causes of seasonal variations and anomalies, linking them with already observed currents. In fact, the analysis of PCA amplitudes and modes support our interpretation of the spectral and statistical features of the geomagnetic field. Using the first two modes we reconstruct more than 90% of the original signal for the European and North American region. The obtained results reconfirm the existence of a latitudinal dependence in the geomagnetic components during nighttime hours, associated with the ring current. During noon, the first mode represent the dominant component of the current originated by the ionosphere, while the second mode show the presence of a longitudinal variation at both sides of the longitudes with zero declination for Europe and North America.

  2. Some properties of field-aligned electron events in high-altitude polar regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, ZiYing; Shi, JianKui; Zhou, MingQuan; Cheng, ZhengWei; Zhou, Hua

    2016-02-01

    Using data from the Cluster spacecraft from January 2003 to December 2004, we perform a statistical study on some properties of the field-aligned electron (FAE) events and interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By dependence of FAE events with different durations in high-altitude polar regions. A total of 1335 FAE events were observed by the C3 spacecraft. More down-flowing events were observed in the Southern Hemisphere, and more up-flowing events were observed in the Northern Hemisphere. It proves that down-flowing events mainly originate from magnetosphere or solar wind and up-flowing events are mainly derived from ionosphere. Short-lifetime events showed a morning concentration in the magnetic local time distribution, and long-lifetime events were concentrated both before and after noon. For the IMF By dependence of the FAE events, short-lifetime events were much affected by IMF By and resulted in a morning concentration, while the long-lifetime events were almost unaffected by IMF By. With further analysis, we determined that the short-lifetime and long-lifetime events had different sources.

  3. The origin of morphological asymmetries in bipolar active regions. [magnetic field in solar convective envelope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, Y.; Fisher, G. H.; Deluca, E. E.

    1993-01-01

    A series of 3D numerical simulations was carried out to examine the dynamical evolution of emerging flux loops in the solar convective envelope. The innermost portions of the loops are anchored beneath the base of the convective zone by the subadiabatic temperature gradient of the underlying overshoot region. It is found that, as the emerging loops approach the photosphere, the magnetic field strength of the leading side of each rising loop is about twice as large as that of the following side at the same depth. The evacuation of plasma out of the leading side of the rising loop results in an enhanced magnetic field strength there compared with the following side. It is argued that this result provides a natural explanation for the fact that the preceding (leading) polarity tends to have a less organized and more fragmented appearance, and that the preceding spots tend to be larger in area and fewer in number, and have a longer lifetime than the following spots.

  4. The concentrations of radionuclides, heavy metals, and poloychlorinated biphenyls in field mice collected from regional background areas. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, Philip R.

    2016-01-21

    Field mice are effective indicators of contaminant presence. This paper reports the concentrations of various radionuclides, heavy metals, polychlorinated biphenyls, high explosives, perchlorate, and dioxin/furans in field mice (mostly deer mice) collected from regional background areas in northern New Mexico. These data, represented as the regional statistical reference level (the mean plus three standard deviations = 99% confidence level), are used to compare with data from field mice collected from areas potentially impacted by Laboratory operations, as per the Environmental Surveillance Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  5. Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in γ-Fe temperature region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yan; Duan, Guosheng; Zhao, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Effects of magnetic field intensity on carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the γ-Fe temperature region were investigated using carburizing technology. The carbon penetration profiles from the iron surface to interior were measured by field emission electron probe microanalyzer. The carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron carburized with different magnetic field intensities was calculated according to the Fick's second law. It was found that the magnetic field intensity could obviously affect the carbon diffusion coefficient in pure iron in the γ-Fe temperature region, and the carbon diffusion coefficient decreased obviously with the enhancement of magnetic field intensity, when the magnetic field intensity was higher than 1 T, the carbon diffusion coefficient in field annealed specimen was less than half of that of the nonfield annealed specimen, further enhancing the magnetic field intensity, the carbon diffusion coefficient basically remains unchanged. The stiffening of lattice due to field-induced magnetic ordering was responsible for an increase in activation barrier for jumping carbon atoms. The greater the magnetic field intensity, the stronger the inhibiting effect of magnetic field on carbon diffusion.

  6. Field Significance of Performance Measures in the Context of Regional Climate Model Verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Martin; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to rigorously evaluate the skill of dynamically downscaled global climate simulations. We investigate a dynamical downscaling of the ERA-Interim reanalysis using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, coupled with the NOAH land surface model within the scope of EURO-CORDEX. WRF has a horizontal resolution of 11° and contains the following physics: the Yonsei university atmospheric boundary layer parameterization, the Morrison two-moment microphysics, the Kain-Fritsch-Eta convection and the Community Atmosphere Model radiation schemes. Daily precipitation is verified over Germany for summer and winter against high-resolution observation data from the German weather service for the first time. The ability of WRF to reproduce the statistical distribution of daily precipitation is evaluated using metrics based on distribution characteristics. Skill against the large-scale ERA-Interim data gives insight into the potential, additional skill of dynamical downscaling. To quantify it, we transform the absolute performance measures to relative skill measures against ERA-Interim. Their field significance is rigorously estimated and locally significant regions are highlighted. Statistical distributions are better reproduced in summer than in winter. In both seasons WRF is too dry over mountain tops due to underestimated and too rare high and underestimated and too frequent small precipitations. In winter WRF is too wet at windward sides and land-sea transition regions due to too frequent weak and moderate precipitation events. In summer it is too dry over land-sea transition regions due to underestimated small and too rare moderate precipitations, and too wet in some river valleys due to too frequent high precipitations. Additional skill relative to ERA-Interim is documented for overall measures as well as measures regarding the spread and tails of the statistical distribution, but not regarding mean seasonal precipitation. The added

  7. Faint star studies in the magellanic clouds. II. Field regions 9/sup 0/ northeast of the large magellanic cloud bar

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, L.L.

    1984-06-01

    Photographic photometry is reported for 16 halo field regions. These fields lie 9./sup 0/1 northeast of the LMC bar, surrounding the old globular cluster NGC 2257. Field color-magnitude diagrams show a red horizontal branch, a subgiant branch redder than that of the cluster, and a profusion of blue stars delineating a younger main-sequence. Possible sources of the blue stars are discussed. The field is significantly younger than the cluster, showing that star formation, even in the outer regions of the LMC where the gas density is presently minimal, proceeded long after the formation of the old clusters. It appears that the major portion of stars in the LMC is of intermediate age. That this is true of a region 9 kpc from the bar is of great importance to the eventual derivation of a global history of star formation in the LMC.

  8. Spatial relationships between region 2 field-aligned currents and electron and ion precipitation in the evening sector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, R.; Hoffman, R. A.; Sugiura, M.

    1990-01-01

    The equatorward cutoff of ion and electron precipitation in relation to the evening region 2 field-aligned current during isolated substorms has been investigated using the magnetic field and plasma data obtained from the Dynamics Explorer 2 satellite. The equatorward boundaries of the region 2 currents relative to those of central plasma sheet (CPS) electron precipitation are determined predominantly by magnetic local time and subsequently change with substorm phases. With approaching midnight, the equatorward boundary of CPS electron precipitation extends toward and eventually equatorward of that of the region 2 current. On the other hand, the equatorward boundary of the region 2 current coincides well with that of 10-20 keV ion precipitation during the whole course of substorms. It is proposed that these ions originate in the so-called Alfven layer and that the location of this inner boundary determines the lower latitude boundary of the region 2 current.

  9. Regional-Scale Salt Tectonics Modelling: Bench-Scale Validation and Extension to Field-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, A. J. L.; Yu, J. G.; Thornton, D. A.

    2010-05-01

    The role of salt in the evolution of the West African continental margin, and in particular its impact on hydrocarbon migration and trap formation, is an important research topic. It has attracted many researchers who have based their research on bench-scale experiments, numerical models and seismic observations. This research has shown that the evolution is very complex. For example, regional analogue bench-scale models of the Angolan margin (Fort et al., 2004) indicate a complex system with an upslope extensional domain with sealed tilted blocks, growth fault and rollover systems and extensional diapers, and a downslope contractional domain with squeezed diapirs, polyharmonic folds and thrust faults, and late-stage folding and thrusting. Numerical models have the potential to provide additional insight into the evolution of these salt driven passive margins. The longer-term aim is to calibrate regional-scale evolution models, and then to evaluate the effect of the depositional history on the current day geomechanical and hydrogeologic state in potential target hydrocarbon reservoir formations adjacent to individual salt bodies. To achieve this goal the burial and deformational history of the sediment must be modelled from initial deposition to the current-day state, while also accounting for the reaction and transport processes occurring in the margin. Accurate forward modeling is, however complex, and necessitates advanced procedures for the prediction of fault formation and evolution, representation of the extreme deformations in the salt, and for coupling the geomechanical, fluid flow and temperature fields. The evolution of the sediment due to a combination of mechanical compaction, chemical compaction and creep relaxation must also be represented. In this paper ongoing research on a computational approach for forward modelling complex structural evolution, with particular reference to passive margins driven by salt tectonics is presented. The approach is an

  10. Alignment method for fabricating a parallel flat-field grating used in soft x-ray region.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingbo; Liu, Zhengkun; Zheng, Yanchang; Chen, Huoyao; Wang, Yu; Liu, Ying; Hong, Yilin

    2015-06-20

    Parallel flat-field gratings consist of two flat-field gratings lying on one substrate, one for 5-20 nm and the other for 2-5 nm spectral regions, and thus can be widely used in various fields to record broader spectra in the soft x-ray region. The alignment of two subgratings directly determines the resolving power of parallel flat-field gratings. The theoretical resolving power is evaluated by means of the ray-tracing method and the maximal allowable alignment error is 0.366°. Alignment is based on diffraction patterns and moiré fringes and the total alignment error in our experiment is within 0.234°. The results demonstrate that this alignment method is an effective way for fabricating parallel flat-field gratings.

  11. CFORS - Regional Chemical and Weather Forecast System in Support of Field Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yienger, J. J.; Uno, I.; Guttikunda, S. K.; Carmichael, G. R.; Tang, Y.; Thongboonchoo, N.; Woo, J.; Dorwart, J.; Streets, D.

    2001-12-01

    In this paper we will present the development, evaluation, and use of improved modeling techniques and methodologies for the integration of meteorological forecasts with air pollution forecasts in support of field operations during the TRACE-P and Ace-Asia experiments in East Asia. During the campaign period we provided a variety of forecast products using our regional modeling system built upon the dynamic meteorological model RAMS and the 3-D regional chemical transport models STEM-III. These models were run in both on-line and off-line modes, and the results integrated into an interactive web-based data mining and analysis framework. This resulting Chemical Weather Forecasting System CFORS, was run operationally for the period February through May 2001, and provided 72-hr forecasts of a variety of aerosol, chemical and air mass and emission marker quantities. These included aerosol mass distribution and optical depth by major component (e.g., dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon, and sulfate), photochemical quantities including ozone and OH/HO2, and air mass & emissions markers including lightning, volcanic, mega-cities, and biomass burning. These model products were presented along with meteorological forecasts and satellite products, and used to help determine the flight plans, the positioning of the ship, and to alert surface stations of upcoming events (such as dust storms). The use of CFORS forecasts (along with other model results) models were shown to provide important new information and level of detail into mission planning. For example many of the mission objectives required designing flight paths that sampled across gradients of optical depth, or flew above, below and through vertical layers of aerosol, intercepted biomass emission plumes, or sampled dust storms. CFORS, forecasts of dust outbreaks and plume locations, etc., proved to be very useful in designing missions that meet these objective. In this paper we will present an overview of

  12. High-resolution regional gravity field modelling in a mountainous area from terrestrial gravity data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucha, Blažej; Janák, Juraj; Papčo, Juraj; Bezděk, Aleš

    2016-11-01

    We develop a high-resolution regional gravity field model by a combination of spherical harmonics, band-limited spherical radial basis functions (SRBFs) and the residual terrain model (RTM) technique. As the main input data set, we employ a dense terrestrial gravity database (3-6 stations km-2), which enables gravity field modelling up to very short spatial scales. The approach is based on the remove-compute-restore methodology in which all the parts of the signal that can be modelled are removed prior to the least-squares adjustment in order to smooth the input gravity data. To this end, we utilize degree-2159 spherical harmonic models and the RTM technique using topographic models at 2 arcsec resolution. The residual short-scale gravity signal is modelled via the band-limited Shannon SRBF expanded up to degree 21 600, which corresponds to a spatial resolution of 30 arcsec. The combined model is validated against GNSS/levelling-based height anomalies, independent surface gravity data, deflections of the vertical and terrestrial vertical gravity gradients achieving an accuracy of 2.7 cm, 0.53 mGal, 0.39 arcsec and 279 E in terms of the RMS error, respectively. A key aspect of the combined approach, especially in mountainous areas, is the quality of the RTM. We therefore compare the performance of two RTM techniques within the innermost zone, the tesseroids and the polyhedron. It is shown that the polyhedron-based approach should be preferred in rugged terrain if a high-quality RTM is required. In addition, we deal with the RTM computations at points located below the reference surface of the residual terrain which is known to be a rather delicate issue.

  13. Carbon mapping of Argentine savannas: Using fractional tree cover to scale from field to region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Roglich, M.; Swenson, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    Programs which intend to maintain or enhance carbon (C) stocks in natural ecosystems are promising, but require detailed and spatially explicit C distribution models to monitor the effectiveness of management interventions. Savanna ecosystems are significant components of the global C cycle, covering about one fifth of the global land mass, but they have received less attention in C monitoring protocols. Our goal was to estimate C storage across a broad savanna ecosystem using field surveys and freely available satellite images. We first mapped tree canopies at 2.5 m resolution with a spatial subset of high resolution panchromatic images to then predict regional wall-to-wall tree percent cover using 30-m Landsat imagery and the Random Forests algorithms. We found that a model with summer and winter spectral indices from Landsat, climate and topography performed best. Using a linear relationship between C and % tree cover, we then predicted tree C stocks across the gradient of tree cover, explaining 87 % of the variability. The spatially explicit validation of the tree C model with field-measured C-stocks revealed an RMSE of 8.2 tC/ha which represented ~30% of the mean C stock for areas with tree cover, comparable to studies based on more advanced remote sensing methods, such as LiDAR and RADAR. Sample spatial distribution highly affected the performance of the RF models in predicting tree cover, raising concerns regarding the predictive capabilities of the model in areas for which training data is not present. The 50,000 km2 has ~41 Tg C, which could be released to the atmosphere if agricultural pressure intensifies in this semiarid savanna.

  14. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDY OF A DELTA-SPOT. I. A REGION OF VERY STRONG, HORIZONTAL MAGNETIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Jaeggli, S. A.

    2016-02-10

    Active region NOAA 11035 appeared in 2009 December, early in the new solar activity cycle. This region achieved a delta sunspot (δ spot) configuration when parasitic flux emerged near the rotationally leading magnetic polarity and traveled through the penumbra of the largest sunspot in the group. Both visible and infrared imaging spectropolarimetry of the magnetically sensitive Fe i line pairs at 6302 and 15650 Å show large Zeeman splitting in the penumbra between the parasitic umbra and the main sunspot umbra. The polarized Stokes spectra in the strongest field region display anomalous profiles, and strong blueshifts are seen in an adjacent region. Analysis of the profiles is carried out using a Milne–Eddington inversion code capable of fitting either a single magnetic component with stray light or two independent magnetic components to verify the field strength. The inversion results show that the anomalous profiles cannot be produced by the combination of two profiles with moderate magnetic fields. The largest field strengths are 3500–3800 G in close proximity to blueshifts as strong as 3.8 km s{sup −1}. The strong, nearly horizontal magnetic field seen near the polarity inversion line in this region is difficult to understand in the context of a standard model of sunspot magnetohydrostatic equilibrium.

  15. Multi-wavelength Study of a Delta-spot. I. A Region of Very Strong, Horizontal Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeggli, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    Active region NOAA 11035 appeared in 2009 December, early in the new solar activity cycle. This region achieved a delta sunspot (δ spot) configuration when parasitic flux emerged near the rotationally leading magnetic polarity and traveled through the penumbra of the largest sunspot in the group. Both visible and infrared imaging spectropolarimetry of the magnetically sensitive Fe i line pairs at 6302 and 15650 Å show large Zeeman splitting in the penumbra between the parasitic umbra and the main sunspot umbra. The polarized Stokes spectra in the strongest field region display anomalous profiles, and strong blueshifts are seen in an adjacent region. Analysis of the profiles is carried out using a Milne-Eddington inversion code capable of fitting either a single magnetic component with stray light or two independent magnetic components to verify the field strength. The inversion results show that the anomalous profiles cannot be produced by the combination of two profiles with moderate magnetic fields. The largest field strengths are 3500-3800 G in close proximity to blueshifts as strong as 3.8 km s-1. The strong, nearly horizontal magnetic field seen near the polarity inversion line in this region is difficult to understand in the context of a standard model of sunspot magnetohydrostatic equilibrium.

  16. Study of the Photospheric Magnetic Field and Coronal Emission from Solar Active Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilera, Jordan Armando Guerra

    2016-01-01

    Solar explosive phenomena (flares and Coronal Mass Ejections, CMEs) are examples of how the most dynamical processes within the heliosphere are interconnected and powered by the Sun. Solar flares originate in active regions (AR) -- areas of strong magnetic field on the solar surface. The electromagnetic (EM) energy released during flares, along with the often-seen CMEs, propagate through the heliosphere. In the Earth's vicinity, EM radiation and charged particles have the potential to produce unfavorable conditions for humans and technology in space. From many points of view (scientific, operational, economical) it is thus important to understand and try to predict when solar flares and associated eruptive phenomena will occur. This dissertation explores how to best leverage the available observational data to provide predictive information about the future flaring activity. This dissertation consists of two main components: 1) investigation of the photosphere-corona coupling by analyzing photospheric magnetic field and coronal data in search for signals or behaviors that precede eruptions; and 2) the combination of existing flare prediction methods in order to develop a novel ensemble prediction. For the first part, the data employed correspond to line-of-sight (LOS) magnetograms from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and EUV intensity maps from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), both instruments onboard NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) satellite. Photospheric magnetic field and coronal EUV emissions were characterized by measuring the power-law decay of their spatio-temporal spectra and the data statistical associations (auto- and cross-correlations). These measures, calculated with high spatio-temporal resolution, appeared to characterize the AR evolution, provide information about the state of the photospheric plasma, reveal insights into the photospheric conditions for flares, and expose the potential of combining coronal and photospheric

  17. From field to region yield predictions in response to pedo-climatic variations in Eastern Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    JÉGO, G.; Pattey, E.; Liu, J.

    2013-12-01

    The increase in global population coupled with new pressures to produce energy and bioproducts from agricultural land requires an increase in crop productivity. However, the influence of climate and soil variations on crop production and environmental performance is not fully understood and accounted for to define more sustainable and economical management strategies. Regional crop modeling can be a great tool for understanding the impact of climate variations on crop production, for planning grain handling and for assessing the impact of agriculture on the environment, but it is often limited by the availability of input data. The STICS ("Simulateur mulTIdisciplinaire pour les Cultures Standard") crop model, developed by INRA (France) is a functional crop model which has a built-in module to optimize several input parameters by minimizing the difference between calculated and measured output variables, such as Leaf Area Index (LAI). STICS crop model was adapted to the short growing season of the Mixedwood Plains Ecozone using field experiments results, to predict biomass and yield of soybean, spring wheat and corn. To minimize the numbers of inference required for regional applications, 'generic' cultivars rather than specific ones have been calibrated in STICS. After the calibration of several model parameters, the root mean square error (RMSE) of yield and biomass predictions ranged from 10% to 30% for the three crops. A bit more scattering was obtained for LAI (20%

  18. Intestinal helminthic infections in striped field mice, Apodemus agrarius, from two southern regions of Korea.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Woon-Mok; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Song, Hyeon-Je; Kim, Chung-Mo; Nam, Gi-Jin

    2014-08-01

    The present study was performed to know the infection status of intestinal helminths in a most common species of field mice, Apodemus agrarius, from 2 southern regions of Korea. Total 133 and 103 mice were collected by the mouse trap in Hapcheon-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do and Gurye-gun, Jeollanam-do, respectively, from July 2005 to June 2006. The small intestine of each mouse was resected and longitudinally opened with a pair of scissors. The intestinal contents were washed with 0.85% saline until the supernatant became clear. Helminths were collected with naked eyes or under a stereomicroscope from the sediment of the intestinal content. More than 11 species of helminths (4 nematode spp., 5 trematode spp., and 2 cestode spp.) were recovered. Among these, heligmosomoid nematodes (97.5%) was the most highly and heavily infected species. As the members of trematodes, Plagiorchis muris, Brachylaima sp., Echinostoma hortense, Echinostoma cinetorchis, and unidentified echinostome larvae were found in the small intestines of 35 (14.8%), 12 (5.1%), 6 (2.5%), 1 (0.4%), and 1 (0.4%) mice respectively. Two species of tapeworms, Hymenolepis nana and Hymenolepis diminuta were also detected in 79 (33.5%) and 21 (8.9%) mice, respectively. Conclusively, heligmosomoid nematodes were the most prevalent (dominant) species among more than 11 helminth species detected, and Brachylaima sp. fluke is newly added in the list of intestinal trematodes in Korea.

  19. A sub-millimetre survey of dust enshrouded galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borys, Colin James Kelvin

    This thesis investigates the emission of sub-millimetre- wave radiation from galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North region. The data were obtained from dedicated observing runs from our group and others using the SCUBA camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The data were combined using techniques specifically developed here for low signal-to-noise source recovery. The sources found represent over 10% of all cosmological sources SCUBA has detected since it was commissioned. The number of sub-mm galaxies we detect account for a significant fraction of the sub-mm back-ground, and we show that mild extrapolations can reproduce it entirely. We comment on their clustering properties, both with themselves and other high-redshift galaxy types. A multi-wavelength analysis of these galaxies shows that SCUBA sources do not all have similar properties, and are made of a collection including: star-forming radio galaxies; optically invisible objects; active galactic nuclei; and extremely red objects. Reasonable attempts to determine the redshift distribution of the sample show that SCUBA galaxies have a median redshift of around 2, and suggest that the global star formation rate may be dominated by such objects at redshifts beyond about 1. The thesis summarises the current state of extra-galactic sub-mm astronomy, and comments on how new surveys and detectors will allow us to place stronger constraints on the evolution properties of the high-redshift Universe.

  20. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. III - NOAA active region 6233 (1990 August)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Canfield, Richard C.; Leka, K. D.

    1993-01-01

    We investigate the spatial relationship between vertical electric currents and flare phenomena in NOAA Active Region 6233, which was observed 1990, August 28-31 at Mees Solar Observatory. The two flares studied are the 1N/M1.8 flare on August 28, 22:30 UT and the 1N/M1.6 flare on August 29, 20:35 UT. Using Stokes polarimetry we make magnetograms of the region and compute the vertical current density. Using H-alpha imaging spectroscopy we identify sites of intense nonthermal electron precipitation or of high coronal pressure. The precipitation in these flares is barely strong enough to be detectable. We find that both precipitation and high pressure tend to occur near vertical currents, but that neither phenomenon is cospatial with current maxima. In contrast with the conclusion of other authors, we argue that these observations do not support a current-interruption model for flares, unless the relevant currents are primarily horizontal. The magnetic morphology and temporal evolution of these flares suggest that an erupting filament model may be relevant, but this model does not explicitly predict the relationship between precipitation, high pressure, and vertical currents.

  1. Dynamics of debye-scale nonstationary plasma structures in the region of auroral field-aligned currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bespalov, P. A.; Mizonova, V. G.

    2017-01-01

    We consider the formation of small-scale nonstationary plasma structures in the region of relatively strong field-aligned electric currents. The formation of these structures has been shown to be associated with the density instability developed when the current velocity exceeds a critical value. The conditions for the development of this instability can be most favorable in the region of low-density plasma. Numerical calculations have been performed for the initial nonlinear stage of the structure development. The main parameters of the structure, i.e., the times of its formation and destruction, spatial scales, and electric field, have been estimated. The features of the structures are consistent with the existing data from space experiments in the region of auroral field-aligned currents of the Earth.

  2. Filamentary field-aligned currents at the polar cap region during northward interplanetary magnetic field derived with the Swarm constellation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lühr, Hermann; Huang, Tao; Wing, Simon; Kervalishvili, Guram; Rauberg, Jan; Korth, Haje

    2016-10-01

    ESA's Swarm constellation mission makes it possible for the first time to determine field-aligned currents (FACs) in the ionosphere uniquely. In particular at high latitudes, the dual-satellite approach can reliably detect some FAC structures which are missed by the traditional single-satellite technique. These FAC events occur preferentially poleward of the auroral oval and during times of northward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) orientation. Most events appear on the nightside. They are not related to the typical FAC structures poleward of the cusp, commonly termed NBZ. Simultaneously observed precipitating particle spectrograms and auroral images from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites are consistent with the detected FACs and indicate that they occur on closed field lines mostly adjacent to the auroral oval. We suggest that the FACs are associated with Sun-aligned filamentary auroral arcs. Here we introduce in an initial study features of the high-latitude FAC structures which have been observed during the early phase of the Swarm mission. A more systematic survey over longer times is required to fully characterize the so far undetected field aligned currents.

  3. eHealth vision towards cooperative patient care--domain fields and architectural challenges of regional health care networks.

    PubMed

    Gusew, Nathalie; Gerlach, Annekatrin; Bartkiewicz, Thomas; Goldapp, Michael; Haux, Reinhold; Heller, Ulrich; Hellrung, Nils; Kierdorf, Horst-P; Kleinschmidt, Thorsten; Markurth, Ulrich; Marschollek, Michael; Plischke, Maik; Schubert, Rainer; Seidel, Christoph; Wiegmann, Holger

    2010-01-01

    Numerous eHealth projects and efforts to establish inter-organizational communication and to build up regional health care networks could be observed in the last ten years. Nevertheless the success of such efforts is profoundly different. The aim of this paper is to introduce the lately started regional initiative eHealth.Braunschweig compounding of the major health care players (hospitals, physician offices, nursing services and nursing homes) in the region of Braunschweig, participants from research institutions and industry. We propose in this paper the main goals of the regional initiative eHealth.Braunschweig, its constitution and major approaches. Based on respective literature and our former projects as well as experiences in this field we discuss our vision of a patient-oriented cooperative health care by depicting regional distinctions, identifying the major domain fields in this context and discussing the architectural challenges for the regional health care network eHealth.Braunschweig. In our view this work can be considered as a systematical approach to the establishment of regional health care networks with lasting and sustainable effects on patient-centered health care in a region.

  4. First in situ evidence of electron pitch angle scattering due to magnetic field line curvature in the Ion diffusion region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. C.; Shen, C.; Marchaudon, A.; Rong, Z. J.; Lavraud, B.; Fazakerley, A.; Yao, Z.; Mihaljcic, B.; Ji, Y.; Ma, Y. H.; Liu, Z. X.

    2016-05-01

    Theory predicts that the first adiabatic invariant of a charged particle may be violated in a region of highly curved field lines, leading to significant pitch angle scattering for particles whose gyroradius are comparable to the radius of the magnetic field line curvature. This scattering generates more isotropic particle distribution functions, with important impacts on the presence or absence of plasma instabilities. Using magnetic curvature analysis based on multipoint Cluster spacecraft observations, we present the first investigation of magnetic curvature in the vicinity of an ion diffusion region where reconnected field lines are highly curved. Electrons at energies > 8 keV show a clear pitch angle ordering between bidirectional and trapped distribution in surrounding regions, while we show that in the more central part of the ion diffusion region electrons above such energies become isotropic. By contrast, colder electrons (~1 keV) retain their bidirectional character throughout the diffusion regions. The calculated adiabatic parameter K2 for these electrons is in agreement with theory. This study provides the first observational evidence for particle pitch angle scattering due to magnetic field lines with well characterized curvature in a space plasma.

  5. Preface to the special issue on "Regional moment tensors and stress field in South and Central America"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Audemard, Franck; Zahradnik, Jiri; Assumpção, Marcelo

    2016-11-01

    This special issue follows from the Symposium "Regional Moment Tensor Solutions: advances and new applications" held in Bogotá, Colombia, at the I Regional Assembly of the IASPEI's Latin American and Caribbean Seismological Commission (LACSC) in 2014. Seven papers are presented dealing with determination of moment tensors, focal mechanisms and the stress field in Central and South America. The study areas of each paper are indicated in the index Map of Fig. 1.

  6. Seafloor Sounding in Polar and Remote Regions (SSPARR) Project - Initial Field Trials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rognstad, M. R.; Anderson, R. M.; Chayes, D. N.; Mayer, L. A.

    2005-12-01

    The Seafloor Sounding in Polar and Remote Regions (SSPARR) project, under sponsorship of the National Science Foundation, is developing the capability to acquire autonomous bathymetric observations in remote regions, by means of an inexpensive (expendable) depth sounder supported by a GPS navigation receiver and global satellite telemetry capability. The depth sounder component operates at 12 kHz and is packaged in a watertight housing suspended approximately 10 meters below the water surface. A sonar transducer is mounted on the bottom of the cylindrical sounder housing; electronics and batteries for powering the sounder are contained in the housing. A cable carrying data and control signals connects to the surface package, which houses the telemetry and control system, GPS receiver, and batteries. This surface package would include flotation, so the SSPARR system could be deployed as a drifting buoy or installed in suitable ice floes. The depth sounder electronics utilize a Freescale Semiconductor DSP56309 digital signal processor to synthesize the transmitted signal, and to acquire and process the acoustic echoes. The signal processing involves quadrature detection at 12 kHz, matched filtering and decimation; data are acquired for intervals ranging from 125 milliseconds to 8 seconds, depending upon the desired range. At present, the sounder software records data for the entire acquisition interval; this raw data is being used to test bottom detection algorithms. In order to minimize the likelihood that a mid-water scattering layer or ice keel mask the true bottom reflection, the desired algorithm will report multiple reflections to the control and telemetry processor when they are detected. The bottom detection function has been evaluated with field trial data will be incorporated into the final sounder design. A test of the sounder transducer was conducted in May 2004 aboard the R/V Kilo Moana, using electronics from the University of Hawaii's Integrated

  7. New Features of Time Domain Electric-Field Structures in the Auroral Acceleration Region

    SciTech Connect

    Mozer, F.S.; Ergun, R.; Temerin, M.; Cattell, C.; Dombeck, J.; Wygant, J.

    1997-08-01

    The Polar Satellite carries the first three-axis electric field detector flown in the magnetosphere. Its direct measurement of electric field components perpendicular and parallel to the local magnetic field has revealed new classes and features of electric field structures associated with the plasma acceleration that produces discrete auroras and that populates the magnetosphere with plasma of ionospheric origin. These structures, associated with the hydrogen ion cyclotron mode, include very large solitary waves, spiky field structures, wave envelopes of parallel electric fields, and very large amplitude, nonlinear, coherent ion cyclotron waves. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  8. Regional and reservoir-scale analysis of fault systems and structural development of Pagerungan Gas Field, East Java Sea, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.K.; Medwedeff, D.A. )

    1996-01-01

    Pagerungan gas field lies on a complexly faulted and folded anticline just north of the major Sakala-Paliat Fault System (SPFS) offshore Bali. The Eocene clastic reservoir is affected by two generations of faults: Eocene normal and Neogene compressional faults. Fault geometry, timing and connectivity is determined by combining regional and field-scale methods. Restored regional structure maps and sections indicate the field is located on the L. Eocene, footwall-paleo-high of the south-dipping SPFS. Within the field, smaller normal faults nucleated sub-parallel to the SPFS with both synthetic and antithetic dips. Neogene to Present compression folded the strata creating closure in the field, reversed slip on selected preexisting normal faults, and nucleated new reverse fault sets. Some normal faults are completely inverted, others have net normal offset after some reverse slip, and still others are not reactivated. Reverse faults strike sub-parallel to earlier formed normal faults. The eastern and western parts of the field are distinguished by the style and magnitude of early compressional deformation. 3D seismic analysis indicates the geometry of reservoir faults is similar to the regional fault systems: sub-parallel segments share displacement at their terminations either by distributed deformation in the rock between adjacent terminations or through short cross-faults oriented at a high angle to the principal fault sets. Anomalous trends in the contours of throw projected onto fault surfaces predict the connectivity of complex fault patterns. Integration of regional and field-scale analysis provides the most accurate prediction of fault geometry and lays the foundation for field development.

  9. Regional and reservoir-scale analysis of fault systems and structural development of Pagerungan Gas Field, East Java Sea, Indonesia

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, R.K.; Medwedeff, D.A.

    1996-12-31

    Pagerungan gas field lies on a complexly faulted and folded anticline just north of the major Sakala-Paliat Fault System (SPFS) offshore Bali. The Eocene clastic reservoir is affected by two generations of faults: Eocene normal and Neogene compressional faults. Fault geometry, timing and connectivity is determined by combining regional and field-scale methods. Restored regional structure maps and sections indicate the field is located on the L. Eocene, footwall-paleo-high of the south-dipping SPFS. Within the field, smaller normal faults nucleated sub-parallel to the SPFS with both synthetic and antithetic dips. Neogene to Present compression folded the strata creating closure in the field, reversed slip on selected preexisting normal faults, and nucleated new reverse fault sets. Some normal faults are completely inverted, others have net normal offset after some reverse slip, and still others are not reactivated. Reverse faults strike sub-parallel to earlier formed normal faults. The eastern and western parts of the field are distinguished by the style and magnitude of early compressional deformation. 3D seismic analysis indicates the geometry of reservoir faults is similar to the regional fault systems: sub-parallel segments share displacement at their terminations either by distributed deformation in the rock between adjacent terminations or through short cross-faults oriented at a high angle to the principal fault sets. Anomalous trends in the contours of throw projected onto fault surfaces predict the connectivity of complex fault patterns. Integration of regional and field-scale analysis provides the most accurate prediction of fault geometry and lays the foundation for field development.

  10. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Alaska Region: Highlights from the 2012 Summer Field Season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enders, M.; Bierma, R. M.; Boyce, E. S.; Willoughby, H.; Fend, M.; Feaux, K.

    2012-12-01

    UNAVCO has now completed its fourth year of operation and maintenance of the 138 continuous GPS stations, 12 tiltmeters and 31 data communications relays that comprise the Alaska region of the EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO). The successful operation of the autonomous GPS and tiltmeter network in Alaska continues to be a challenge, because of logistics, weather, and other difficulties related to working in Alaska. PBO engineers continue to work on network enhancements to make the stations more robust, while improving overall data quality and station uptime to better serve the EarthScope science community. In the summer of 2012, PBO engineers completed maintenance activities in Alaska, which resulted in a 95% operational status for the Alaska network within PBO. PBO engineers completed a total of 87 maintenance visits in the summer of FY2012, including 62 routine maintenance and 25 unscheduled maintenance visits to GPS and data communications stations. We present a number of highlights and accomplishments from the PBO 2012 summer field season in Alaska, for example the deployment of a newly designed methanol fuel cell at AV35, a critical station that serves as the main repeater for the real time network on Unimak Island. In addition, PBO engineers also completed the installation of three Inmarsat BGAN terminals for data telemetry following successful testing at AC60 Shemya. Lastly, PBO engineers completed scheduled battery replacements at most of the PBO stations on Unimak Island, in collaboration with the USGS/Alaska Volcano Observatory. In addition to routine maintenance and planned station improvements to sites in Alaska, numerous critical repairs were made at stations on Unimak Island and elsewhere to ensure that the PBO network continues to function well and continues to meet the requirements stipulated by the NSF. We also present some of the station failures unique to Alaska, which we encountered during the course of the 2012 field season, as well

  11. Electric fields and field-aligned currents in polar regions of the solar corona: 3-D MHD consideration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisanko, Yu. V.

    1995-01-01

    The calculation of the solar rotation electro-dynamical effects in the near-the-Sun solar wind seems more convenient from the non-inertial corotating reference frame. This implies some modification of the 3-D MHD equations generally on the base of the General Theory of Relativity. The paper deals with the search of stationary (in corotating non-inertial reference frame) solutions of the modified 3-D MHD equations for the in near-the-Sun high latitude sub-alfvenic solar wind. The solution is obtained requiring electric fields and field-aligned electric currents in the high latitude near-the-Sun solar wind. Various scenario are explored self-consistently via a number of numerical experiments. The analogy with the high latitude Earth's magnetosphere is used for the interpretation of the results. Possible observational manifestations are discussed.

  12. Region of interest correction factors improve reliability of diffusion imaging measures within and across scanners and field strengths.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Vijay K; Gonzalez, Christopher E; Landman, Bennett; Goh, Joshua; Reiter, David A; An, Yang; Resnick, Susan M

    2015-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) measures are commonly used as imaging markers to investigate individual differences in relation to behavioral and health-related characteristics. However, the ability to detect reliable associations in cross-sectional or longitudinal studies is limited by the reliability of the diffusion measures. Several studies have examined the reliability of diffusion measures within (i.e. intra-site) and across (i.e. inter-site) scanners with mixed results. Our study compares the test-retest reliability of diffusion measures within and across scanners and field strengths in cognitively normal older adults with a follow-up interval less than 2.25 years. Intra-class correlation (ICC) and coefficient of variation (CoV) of fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean diffusivity (MD) were evaluated in sixteen white matter and twenty-six gray matter bilateral regions. The ICC for intra-site reliability (0.32 to 0.96 for FA and 0.18 to 0.95 for MD in white matter regions; 0.27 to 0.89 for MD and 0.03 to 0.79 for FA in gray matter regions) and inter-site reliability (0.28 to 0.95 for FA in white matter regions, 0.02 to 0.86 for MD in gray matter regions) with longer follow-up intervals were similar to earlier studies using shorter follow-up intervals. The reliability of across field strengths comparisons was lower than intra- and inter-site reliabilities. Within and across scanner comparisons showed that diffusion measures were more stable in larger white matter regions (>1500 mm(3)). For gray matter regions, the MD measure showed stability in specific regions and was not dependent on region size. Linear correction factor estimated from cross-sectional or longitudinal data improved the reliability across field strengths. Our findings indicate that investigations relating diffusion measures to external variables must consider variable reliability across the distinct regions of interest and that correction factors can be used to improve consistency of measurement

  13. A sub-millimetre survey of dust enshrouded galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borys, C. J.

    2002-12-01

    This thesis investigates the emission of sub-millimetre-wave radiation from galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North region. The data were obtained from dedicated observing runs from our group and others using the SCUBA camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The data were combined using techniques specifically developed here for low signal-to-noise source recovery. The sources found represent over 10% of all cosmological sources SCUBA has detected since it was commissioned. The number of sub-mm galaxies we detect account for a significant fraction of the sub-mm background, and we show that mild extrapolations can reproduce it entirely. We comment on their clustering properties, both with themselves and other high-redshift galaxy types. A multi-wavelength analysis of these galaxies shows that SCUBA sources do not all have similar properties, and are made of a collection including: star-forming radio galaxies; optically invisible objects; active galactic nuclei; and extremely red objects. Reasonable attempts to determine the redshift distribution of the sample show that SCUBA galaxies have a median redshift of around 2, and suggest that the global star formation rate may be dominated by such objects at redshifts beyond about 1. The thesis summarises the current state of extra-galactic sub-mm astronomy, and comments on how new surveys and detectors will allow us to place stronger constraints on the evolution properties of the high-redshift Universe. The research described here was made possible from grants by the Natural Science and Engineering Research Council of Canada, and a generous scholarship from the University of British Columbia.

  14. Coastal Downscaling Experiments: Can CESM Fields Successfully Force Regional Coastal Ocean Simulations with Strong Freshwater Forcing?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacCready, P.; Bryan, F.; Tseng, Y. H.; Whitney, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    The coastal ocean accounts for about half of the global fish harvest, but is poorly resolved in global climate models (a one-degree grid barely sees the continental shelf). Moreover, coastal ocean circulation is strongly modified by river freshwater sources, often coming from estuarine systems that are completely unresolved in the coarse grid. River freshwater input in CESM is added in a practical but ad hoc way, by imposing a surface salinity sink over a region of the ocean approximating the plume area of a given river. Here we present results from a series of model experiments using a high-resolution (1.5 km) ROMS model of the NE Pacific, including the Columbia River and the inland waters of Puget Sound. The base model does multi-year hindcasts using the best available sources of atmospheric (MM5/WRF), ocean (NCOM), river (USGS), and tidal forcing. It has been heavily validated against observations of all sorts, and performs well, so it is an ideal test bed for downscaling experiments. The model framework also does biogeochemistry, including oxygen, and carbon chemistry is being added to make forecasts of Ocean Acidification.This high-resolution ROMS model is systematically run in downscaling experiments for the year 2005 with combinations of CESM forcing (CAM, POP, and rivers) swapped in. Skill is calculated using observations. It is found that the runs with CESM forcing generally retain much of the skill of the base model. A compact metric of response to freshwater forcing is used, which is the mechanical energy required to destratify a shallow coastal volume. This, along with the average temperature and salinity of the volume, are used to characterize and compare runs, including the original CESM-POP fields. Finally the model is run with projected CESM simulation forcing at the end of 21st century based on a set of RCP scenarios, and the compact metrics are used to quantify differences from 2005.

  15. The dynamics of region 1 field-aligned currents during periods of dayside and nightside reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, L. B. N.; Ruohoniemi, J. M.; Baker, J. B. H.; Milan, S. E.; Coxon, J.; Anderson, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    We use current density data from the Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) to identify the location of maximum region 1 current at all magnetic local times. We term this location the R1 oval. Comparing the R1 oval location with particle precipitation boundaries identified in DMSP data, we find that the R1 oval is located on average within 1° of particle signatures associated with the open/closed field line boundary (OCB) across dayside and nightside MLTs. We hence conclude that the R1 oval can be used as a proxy for the location of the OCB. Studying the amount of magnetic flux enclosed by the R1 oval during the substorm cycle, we find that the R1 oval flux is well organized by it: during the growth phase the R1 oval location moves equatorward as the amount of magnetic flux increases whereas after substorm expansion phase onset significant flux closure occurs as the R1 current location retreats to higher latitudes. For about 15 minutes after expansion phase onset the amount of open magnetic flux continues to increase indicating that dayside reconnection dominates over nightside reconnection. In the current density data we find evidence of the substorm current wedge and also show that the dayside R1 currents are stronger than their nightside counterpart during the substorm growth phase whereas after expansion phase onset the nightside R1 currents dominate. Our observations of the current distribution and OCB movement during the substorm cycle are in excellent agreement with the expanding/contracting polar cap paradigm.

  16. Investigating the Seismicity and Stress Field of the Truckee -- Lake Tahoe Region, California -- Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seaman, Tyler

    The Lake Tahoe basin is located in a transtensional environment defined by east-dipping range--bounding normal faults, northeast--trending sinistral, and northwest-trending dextral strike-slip faults in the northern Walker Lane deformation belt. This region accommodates as much as 10 mm/yr of dextral shear between the Sierra Nevada and Basin and Range proper, or about 20% of Pacific-North American plate motion. There is abundant seismicity north of Lake Tahoe through the Truckee, California region as opposed to a lack of seismicity associated with the primary normal faults in the Tahoe basin (i.e., West Tahoe fault). This seismicity study is focused on the structural transition zone from north-striking east-dipping Sierran Range bounding normal faults into the northern Walker Lane right-lateral strike-slip domain. Relocations of earthquakes between 2000-2013 are performed by initially applying HYPOINVERSE mean sea level datum and station corrections to produce higher confidence absolute locations as input to HYPODD. HYPODD applies both phase and cross-correlation times for a final set of 'best' event relocations. Relocations of events in the upper brittle crust clearly align along well-imaged, often intersecting, high-angle structures of limited lateral extent. In addition, the local stress field is modeled from 679 manually determined short-period focal mechanism solutions, between 2000 and 2013, located within a fairly dense local seismic network. Short-period focal mechanisms were developed with the HASH algorithm and moment tensor solutions using long-period surface waves and the MTINV code. Resulting solutions show a 9:1 ratio of strike-slip to normal mechanisms in the transition zone study area. Stress inversions using the application SATSI (USGS Spatial And Temporal Stress Inversion) generally show a T-axis oriented primarily E-W that also rotates about 30 degrees counterclockwise, from a WNW-ESE trend to ENE-WSW, moving west to east across the California

  17. Input in Tsunami Hazard for Far-East Coast of Russia from Regional and Far-Field Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusiakov, V. K.; Beisel, S. A.; Chubarov, L. B.

    2013-12-01

    The Probabilistic Tsunami Hazard Assessment (PTHA) methodology, having many features similar to the Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment (PSHA) methodology, differs from the latter in one important relation - far-field sources, ignored in PSHA, in some cases can be of great importance in PTHA. Tsunami hazard assessment for the Far East coast of Russia gives a typical example of this situation. While regional tsunamigenic earthquakes located along the Kuril-Kamchatka subduction zone and in the eastern part of the Sea of Japan represent the major hazard, most part of this coast is open to tsunami impact from other tsunamigenic regions of the Pacific, and, first of all, from the sources near South America. Analysis of real historical data shows that during the last 50 years only three far-field tsunamis (1960 Chilean, 1964 Alaska and 2011Tohoku) produced dangerous impact along the Far East coast of Russia. However, during this period 19 regional tsunami warnings were issued in relation to far-field tsunamigenic sources, 16 of them turned out to be false. This statistic shows that the problem of far-field sources is worth of a special consideration in relation to Far-East coast of Russia. The results of numerical modeling show that the real threat can come only from M9 class mega-events in the far-field. Tsunami run-up height expected from such events along the Kurile-Kamchatka coast can reach 4-5 m, however, its actual value strongly depends on the position and orientation of a far-field source relatively the region. In general, the expected maximum heights from far-field sources (up to 6 m) are not so large as possible maximum heights from the regional earthquakes with magnitudes M7.5-8.5 (15-20 m), however, the waves from trans-Pacific tsunamis affect all parts of the Far-East coastline. Another feature of far-field tsunamis is that the duration of dangerous sea level oscillations can be considerably longer (up to 48 hours) and the maximum height can be observed

  18. Regional lymph node radiotherapy in breast cancer: single anterior supraclavicular field vs. two anterior and posterior opposed supraclavicular fields

    PubMed Central

    Houshyari, Mohammad; Kashi, Amir Shahram Yousefi; Varaki, Sakineh Soleimani; Rakhsha, Afshin; Blookat, Eftekhar Rajab

    2015-01-01

    Background: The treatment of lymph nodes engaged in breast cancer with radiotherapy leads to improved locoregional control and enhanced survival rates in patients after surgery. The aim of this study was to compare two treatment techniques, namely single anterior posterior (AP) supraclavicular field with plan depth and two anterior and posterior opposed (AP/PA) supraclavicular fields. In the study, we also examined the relationships between the depth of supraclavicular lymph nodes (SCLNs) and the diameter of the wall of the chest and body mass index (BMI). Methods: Forty patients with breast cancer were analyzed using computed tomography (CT) scans. In planning target volume (PTV), the SCLNs and axillary lymph nodes (AXLNs) were contoured, and, with the attention to PTV, supraclavicular (SC) depth was measured. The dosage that reached the aforementioned lymph nodes and the level of hot spots were investigated using two treatment methods, i.e., 1) AP/PA and 2) AP with three-dimensional (3D) planning. Each of these methods was analyzed using the program Isogray for the 6 MV compact accelerator, and the diameter of the wall of the chest was measured using the CT scan at the center of the SC field. Results: Placing the plan such that 95% of the target volume with 95% or greater of the prescribed dose of 50 Gy (V95) had ≥95% concordance in both treatment techniques. According to the PTV, the depth of SCLNs and the diameter of the wall of the chest were 3–7 and 12–21cm, respectively. Regression analysis showed that the mean SC depth (the mean Plan depth) and the mean diameter of the wall of the chest were related directly to BMI (p<0.0001, adjusted R2=0.67) and (p<0.0001, adjusted R2=0.71), respectively. Conclusion: The AP/PA treatment technique was a more suitable choice of treatment than the AP field, especially for overweight and obese breast cancer patients. However, in the AP/PA technique, the use of a single-photon, low energy (6 MV) caused more hot spots

  19. Formation and eruption of an active region sigmoid. I. A study by nonlinear force-free field modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Chaowei; Feng, Xueshang; Wu, S. T.; Hu, Qiang E-mail: fengx@spaceweather.ac.cn E-mail: qh0001@uah.edu

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the formation and eruption of an active region (AR) sigmoid in AR 11283. To follow the quasi-static evolution of the coronal magnetic field, we reconstruct a time sequence of static fields using a recently developed nonlinear force-free field model constrained by vector magnetograms. A detailed analysis of the fields compared with observations suggests the following scenario for the evolution of the region. Initially, a new bipole emerges into the negative polarity of a preexisting bipolar AR, forming a null-point topology between the two flux systems. A weakly twisted flux rope (FR) is then built up slowly in the embedded core region, largely through flux cancellation, forming a bald patch separatrix surface (BPSS). The FR grows gradually until its axis runs into a torus instability (TI) domain, and the BPSS also develops a full S-shape. The combined effects of the TI-driven expansion of the FR and the line tying at the BP tear the FR into two parts with the upper portion freely expelled and the lower portion remaining behind the postflare arcades. This process dynamically perturbs the BPSS and results in the enhanced heating of the sigmoid and the rope. The accelerated expansion of the upper-portion rope strongly pushes its envelope flux near the null point and triggers breakout reconnection at the null, which further drives the eruption. We discuss the important implications of these results for the formation and disruption of the sigmoid region with an FR.

  20. Formation and Eruption of an Active Region Sigmoid. I. A Study by Nonlinear Force-free Field Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chaowei; Wu, S. T.; Feng, Xueshang; Hu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the formation and eruption of an active region (AR) sigmoid in AR 11283. To follow the quasi-static evolution of the coronal magnetic field, we reconstruct a time sequence of static fields using a recently developed nonlinear force-free field model constrained by vector magnetograms. A detailed analysis of the fields compared with observations suggests the following scenario for the evolution of the region. Initially, a new bipole emerges into the negative polarity of a preexisting bipolar AR, forming a null-point topology between the two flux systems. A weakly twisted flux rope (FR) is then built up slowly in the embedded core region, largely through flux cancellation, forming a bald patch separatrix surface (BPSS). The FR grows gradually until its axis runs into a torus instability (TI) domain, and the BPSS also develops a full S-shape. The combined effects of the TI-driven expansion of the FR and the line tying at the BP tear the FR into two parts with the upper portion freely expelled and the lower portion remaining behind the postflare arcades. This process dynamically perturbs the BPSS and results in the enhanced heating of the sigmoid and the rope. The accelerated expansion of the upper-portion rope strongly pushes its envelope flux near the null point and triggers breakout reconnection at the null, which further drives the eruption. We discuss the important implications of these results for the formation and disruption of the sigmoid region with an FR.

  1. The Major Project in the Field of Education in the Latin American and Caribbean Region. Bulletin 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    The Major Project in the Field of Education in Latin America and the Caribbean resulted from a consensus of the countries of the region concerning the necessity for a renewed, intensive, and sustained effort to meet unsatisfied basic educational needs between now and the year 2000. The five articles in this bulletin explore innovative alternatives…

  2. Analysis of the disturbed electric field effects in the sporadic E-layers at equatorial and low latitude regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo Resende, Laysa Cristina; Moro, Juliano; Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Carrasco, Alexander J.; Batista, Paulo; Chen, Sony Su; Batista, Inez S.; Andrioli, Vania Fatima

    2016-07-01

    In the present work we analyze the disturbed electric field effects in the sporadic E-layers at equatorial regions, Jicamarca (11.57°S, 76.52°O, I: -2°) and São Luís (2°S, 44° O, I: -2.3°), and at low latitude regions, Fortaleza (3.9°S, 38.45°O, I: -9°) and Cachoeira Paulista (22.42°S, 45°O, I: -15°). We have conducted a deep analysis to investigate these effects using a theoretical model for the ionospheric E region, called MIRE. This model is able to simulate the Es layers taking into account the E region winds and electric fields. It calculates the densities for the main molecular (NO^{+}, O_{2}^{+}, N_{2}^{+}) and metallic ions (Fe^{+}, Mg^{+}) by solving the continuity and momentum equations for each species. The main purpose of this analysis is to verify the disturbed electric fields role in the occurrence or disruption of Es layers through simulations. The analysis show that the Es layer formation and dynamics can be influenced by the prompt penetration electric fields that occur during magnetic disturbances. Therefore, the simulations present interesting results that helps to improve the understanding of Es layer behavior during the disturbed periods.

  3. B fields in OB stars (BOB): The discovery of a magnetic field in a multiple system in the Trifid nebula, one of the youngest star forming regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubrig, S.; Fossati, L.; Carroll, T. A.; Castro, N.; González, J. F.; Ilyin, I.; Przybilla, N.; Schöller, M.; Oskinova, L. M.; Morel, T.; Langer, N.; Scholz, R. D.; Kharchenko, N. V.; Nieva, M.-F.

    2014-04-01

    Aims: Recent magnetic field surveys in O- and B-type stars revealed that about 10% of the core-hydrogen-burning massive stars host large-scale magnetic fields. The physical origin of these fields is highly debated. To identify and model the physical processes responsible for the generation of magnetic fields in massive stars, it is important to establish whether magnetic massive stars are found in very young star-forming regions or whether they are formed in close interacting binary systems. Methods: In the framework of our ESO Large Program, we carried out low-resolution spectropolarimetric observations with FORS 2 in 2013 April of the three most massive central stars in the Trifid nebula, HD 164492A, HD 164492C, and HD 164492D. These observations indicated a strong longitudinal magnetic field of about 500-600 G in the poorly studied component HD 164492C. To confirm this detection, we used HARPS in spectropolarimetric mode on two consecutive nights in 2013 June. Results: Our HARPS observations confirmed the longitudinal magnetic field in HD 164492C. Furthermore, the HARPS observations revealed that HD 164492C cannot be considered as a single star as it possesses one or two companions. The spectral appearance indicates that the primary is most likely of spectral type B1-B1.5 V. Since in both observing nights most spectral lines appear blended, it is currently unclear which components are magnetic. Long-term monitoring using high-resolution spectropolarimetry is necessary to separate the contribution of each component to the magnetic signal. Given the location of the system HD 164492C in one of the youngest star formation regions, this system can be considered as a Rosetta Stone for our understanding of the origin of magnetic fields in massive stars. Based on observations obtained in the framework of the ESO Prg. 191.D-0255(A,B).

  4. The role of the convection electric field in filling the slot region between the inner and outer radiation belts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Zhao, H.; Kellerman, A.; Sarris, T. E.; Jaynes, A.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    The Van Allen Probes have reported frequent flux enhancements of 100s keV electrons in the slot region, with lower energy electrons exhibiting more dynamic behavior at lower L shells. Also, in situ electric field measurements from the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite, Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), and the Van Allen Probes have provided evidence for large-scale electric fields at low L shells during active times. We study an event on 19 February 2014 where hundreds of keV electron fluxes were enhanced by orders of magnitude in the slot region and electric fields of 1-2 mV/m were observed below L = 3. Using a 2-D guiding center particle tracer and a simple large-scale convection electric field model, we demonstrate that the measured electric fields can account for energization of electrons up to at least 500 keV in the slot region through inward radial transport.

  5. Variation of Magnetic Fluctuation due to Gas Puffing in Edge Region of Reversed-Field Pinch Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yambe, Kiyoyuki; Hirano, Yoichi; Sakakita, Hajime; Koguchi, Haruhisa

    2016-09-01

    We measured the variation of magnetic and electrostatic fluctuations observed during the gas puffing in the edge region of the toroidal pinch experiment-reversed experiment (TPE-RX) reversed-field pinch plasma. In the short period in which the electron density increased slowly just after the gas puffing, the confinement of fast electrons in the core region was maintained by the decrease in the fast radial magnetic fluctuation with the deepening of the reversal of the toroidal field. During the following period in which the electron density increased rapidly, the radial gradient of electron density decreased, and the loss of fast electrons from the core region increased owing to the increase in the toroidal and radial magnetic fluctuations in the high-frequency band, although the poloidal magnetic fluctuation decreased. Therefore, the confinement of fast electrons would be maintained by keeping the radial gradient of plasma thermal pressure with a moderate neutral particle supply of small quantity in a short time.

  6. Vertical neutral wind in the equatorial F-region deduced from electric field and ion density measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laakso, Harri; Aggson, Thomas L.; Herrero, F. A.; Pfaff, Robert F.; Hanson, William B.

    1995-01-01

    Direct current (DC) electric field and ion density measurements near density depletion regions (that is, equatorial plasma bubbles) are used to estimate the vertical neutral wind speed. The measured zonal electric field in a series of density depletions crossed by the San Marco D satellite at 01.47-01.52 Universal Time (UT) on 25 October 1988, can be explained if a downward neutral wind of 15-30 m/s exists. Simultaneously, the F-region plasma was moving downward at a speed of 30-50 m/s. These events appear in the local time sector of 23.00-23.15 in which strong downward neutral winds may occur. Indeed, airglow measurements suggest that downward neutral velocities of 25-50 m/s are possible at time near midnight in the equatorial F-region.

  7. The propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves through plasma in the near-field region of low-frequency loop antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, DongLin; Li, XiaoPing; Xie, Kai; Liu, ZhiWei

    2015-10-01

    A high-speed vehicle flying through the atmosphere between 100 and 20 km may suffer from a "communication blackout." In this paper, a low frequency system with an on-board loop antenna to receive signals is presented as a potential blackout mitigation method. Because the plasma sheath is in the near-field region of the loop antenna, the traditional scattering matrix method that is developed for the far-field region may overestimate the electromagnetic (EM) wave's attenuation. To estimate the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region, EM interference (EMI) shielding theory is introduced. Experiments are conducted, and the results verify the EMI shielding theory's effectiveness. Simulations are also conducted with different plasma parameters, and the results obtained show that the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region is far below than that in the far-field region. The EM wave's attenuation increases with the increase in electron density and decreases with the increase in collision frequency. The higher the frequency, the larger is the EM wave's attenuation. During the entire re-entry phase of a RAM-C module, the EM wave's attenuations are below 10 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 1 MHz and below 1 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 100 kHz. Therefore, the low frequency systems (e.g., Loran-C) may provide a way to transmit some key information to high-speed vehicles even during the communication "blackout" period.

  8. The propagation characteristics of electromagnetic waves through plasma in the near-field region of low-frequency loop antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, DongLin Li, XiaoPing; Xie, Kai; Liu, ZhiWei

    2015-10-15

    A high-speed vehicle flying through the atmosphere between 100 and 20 km may suffer from a “communication blackout.” In this paper, a low frequency system with an on-board loop antenna to receive signals is presented as a potential blackout mitigation method. Because the plasma sheath is in the near-field region of the loop antenna, the traditional scattering matrix method that is developed for the far-field region may overestimate the electromagnetic (EM) wave's attenuation. To estimate the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region, EM interference (EMI) shielding theory is introduced. Experiments are conducted, and the results verify the EMI shielding theory's effectiveness. Simulations are also conducted with different plasma parameters, and the results obtained show that the EM wave's attenuation in the near-field region is far below than that in the far-field region. The EM wave's attenuation increases with the increase in electron density and decreases with the increase in collision frequency. The higher the frequency, the larger is the EM wave's attenuation. During the entire re-entry phase of a RAM-C module, the EM wave's attenuations are below 10 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 1 MHz and below 1 dB for EM waves with a frequency of 100 kHz. Therefore, the low frequency systems (e.g., Loran-C) may provide a way to transmit some key information to high-speed vehicles even during the communication “blackout” period.

  9. X-Ray Properties of Lyman Break Galaxies in the Hubble Deep Field North Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nandra, K.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Arnaud, K.; Steidel, C. C.; Adelberger, K. L.; Gardner, J. P.; Teplitz, H. I.; Windhorst, R. A.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe the X-ray properties of a large sample of z approximately 3 Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) in the region of the Hubble Deep Field North, derived from the 1 Ms public Chandra observation. Of our sample of 148 LBGs, four are detected individually. This immediately gives a measure of the bright AGN (active galactic nuclei) fraction in these galaxies of approximately 3 per cent, which is in agreement with that derived from the UV (ultraviolet) spectra. The X-ray color of the detected sources indicates that they are probably moderately obscured. Stacking of the remainder shows a significant detection (6 sigma) with an average luminosity of 3.5 x 10(exp 41) erg/s per galaxy in the rest frame 2-10 keV band. We have also studied a comparison sample of 95 z approximately 1 "Balmer Break" galaxies. Eight of these are detected directly, with at least two clear AGN based on their high X-ray luminosity and very hard X-ray spectra respectively. The remainder are of relatively low luminosity (< 10(exp 42) erg/s, and the X-rays could arise from either AGN or rapid star-formation. The X-ray colors and evidence from other wavebands favor the latter interpretation. Excluding the clear AGN, we deduce a mean X-ray luminosity of 6.6 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, a factor approximately 5 lower than the LBGs. The average ratio of the UV and X-ray luminosities of these star forming galaxies L(sub UV)/L (sub X), however, is approximately the same at z = 1 as it is at z = 3. This scaling implies that the X-ray emission follows the current star formation rate, as measured by the UV luminosity. We use our results to constrain the star formation rate at z approximately 3 from an X-ray perspective. Assuming the locally established correlation between X-ray and far-IR (infrared) luminosity, the average inferred star formation rate in each Lyman break galaxy is found to be approximately 60 solar mass/yr, in excellent agreement with the extinction-corrected UV estimates. This provides an external

  10. Solar flare acceleration of solar wind: influence of active region magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Lundstedt, H; Wilcox, J M; Scherrer, P H

    1981-06-26

    The direction of the photospheric magnetic field at the site of a solar flare is a good predictor of whether the flare will accelerate solar wind plasma. If the field has a southward component, high-speed solar wind plasma is usually observed near the earth about 4 days later. If the field has a northward component, such high-speed solar wind is almost never observed. Southward-field flares may then be expected to have much larger terrestrial effects than northward flares.

  11. A Matched Field Processing Framework for Coherent Detection Over Local and Regional Networks (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-30

    the term " superresolution "). The single-phase matched field statistic for a given template was also demonstrated to be a viable detection statistic... Superresolution with seismic arrays using empirical matched field processing, Geophys. J. Int. 182: 1455–1477. Kim, K.-H. and Park, Y. (2010): The 20

  12. The field horizontal-branch star HD 109995: New results with coadded ultraviolet and optical region spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adelman, S. J.; Leckrone, D. S.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive ultraviolet and optical region abundance analysis of the field horizontal branch Population 2 A-type star HD 109995 is described. Coaddition of IUE high dispersion images and DAO 6.5 A/mm IIaO spectrograms improved the signal-to-noise ratio of the data. We have identified ultraviolet lines whose analysis will provide more complete and accurate elemental abundances than those obtained from optical region spectra alone. A preliminary elemental abundance analysis of the optical region shows that log Z/Z (solar) approx. = -2. A first attempt to synthesize two Fe 2 ultraviolet resonance lines yields an iron abundance a few tenths of a deg higher than the average obtained from optical region Fe 2 lines.

  13. Does regional diversity recover after disturbance? A field experiment in constructed ponds.

    PubMed

    Woods, Lauren M; Biro, Elizabeth G; Yang, Muxi; Smith, Kevin G

    2016-01-01

    The effects of disturbance on local species diversity have been well documented, but less recognized is the possibility that disturbances can alter diversity at regional spatial scales. Since regional diversity can dictate which species are available for recolonization of degraded sites, the loss of diversity at regional scales may impede the recovery of biodiversity following a disturbance. To examine this we used a chemical disturbance of rotenone, a piscicide commonly used for fish removal in aquatic habitats, on small fishless freshwater ponds. We focused on the non-target effects of rotenone on aquatic invertebrates with the goal of assessing biodiversity loss and recovery at both local (within-pond) and regional (across ponds) spatial scales. We found that rotenone caused significant, large, but short-term losses of species at both local and regional spatial scales. Using a null model of random extinction, we determined that species were selectively removed from communities relative to what would be expected if species loss occurred randomly. Despite this selective loss of biodiversity, species diversity at both local and regional spatial scales recovered to reference levels one year after the addition of rotenone. The rapid recovery of local and regional diversity in this study was surprising considering the large loss of regional species diversity, however many aquatic invertebrates disperse readily or have resting stages that may persist through disturbances. We emphasize the importance of considering spatial scale when quantifying the impacts of a disturbance on an ecosystem, as well as considering how regional species loss can influence recovery from disturbance.

  14. Does regional diversity recover after disturbance? A field experiment in constructed ponds

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Lauren M.; Biro, Elizabeth G.; Yang, Muxi

    2016-01-01

    The effects of disturbance on local species diversity have been well documented, but less recognized is the possibility that disturbances can alter diversity at regional spatial scales. Since regional diversity can dictate which species are available for recolonization of degraded sites, the loss of diversity at regional scales may impede the recovery of biodiversity following a disturbance. To examine this we used a chemical disturbance of rotenone, a piscicide commonly used for fish removal in aquatic habitats, on small fishless freshwater ponds. We focused on the non-target effects of rotenone on aquatic invertebrates with the goal of assessing biodiversity loss and recovery at both local (within-pond) and regional (across ponds) spatial scales. We found that rotenone caused significant, large, but short-term losses of species at both local and regional spatial scales. Using a null model of random extinction, we determined that species were selectively removed from communities relative to what would be expected if species loss occurred randomly. Despite this selective loss of biodiversity, species diversity at both local and regional spatial scales recovered to reference levels one year after the addition of rotenone. The rapid recovery of local and regional diversity in this study was surprising considering the large loss of regional species diversity, however many aquatic invertebrates disperse readily or have resting stages that may persist through disturbances. We emphasize the importance of considering spatial scale when quantifying the impacts of a disturbance on an ecosystem, as well as considering how regional species loss can influence recovery from disturbance. PMID:27781153

  15. MMS Electric Field Observations of Electron-Scale Magnetic Holes in the Earth's Bursty Bulk Flow Braking Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Katherine; Ergun, Robert; Wilder, Frederick; Sturner, Andrew; Holmes, Justin; Stawarz, Julia; Torbert, Roy; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Burch, Jim; Strangeway, Robert; Werner, Magnes; Le Contel, Olivier; Giles, Barbara; Gershman, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Electron-scale magnetic holes have been observed multiple times in the Earth's magnetosphere, particularly in the near-earth (6 RE to 12 RE) plasma sheet, or Bursty Bulk Flow (BBF) Braking region. This particular subset of magnetic holes has observed scale sizes perpendicular to the magnetic field (B) less than the environment's ion gyroradius. Previous observations from the THEMIS mission indicate that this subset of magnetic holes have negative potential in the center, which creates a diverging (outward) electric field at the boundary. The region of diverging electric field can drive an electron current via the ExB drift of electrons. Ions do not participate in the ExB drift due to the small scale size of the electric field. The Magnetospheric Multi-scale (MMS) spacecraft, launched March 2015, are currently orbiting the Earth with the objective of observing the microphysics of magnetic reconnection. During its commissioning phase (March - August 2015), all four spacecraft apogees were primarily in the BBF Braking region. MMS offers multi-spacecraft observations of electron-scale magnetic holes, which can possibly offer better insight to their structure and evolution.

  16. Evaluating Wind Fields from a Diagnostic Model Over Complex Terrain in the Phoenix Region and Implications to Dispersion Calculations for Regional Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Weiguo; Shaw, William J.

    2009-12-01

    This paper compares the wind field from a diagnostic model (CALMET) over complex terrain in the Phoenix region in the USA with observations that are gridded by a state-of-the-art Four-Dimensional Data Assimilation (FDDA) system. The wind difference between the CALMET and FDDA wind fields is larger at night than in the day. The magnitude of the wind difference can be smaller than 5% of the mean wind speed at low levels in areas with dense observational stations, while it can be larger than 80% in areas without observational stations or at high altitudes. The vector-mean wind direction difference over the domain is 15 deg on the surface level and 25 deg between 10 and 1500 m. To evaluate the effects of the wind difference on dispersion calculations, dispersion of a hypothetical passive tracer released from surface point sources is simulated by the second-order closure integrated puff (SCIPUFF) model driven by the CALMET and FDDA wind fields, respectively. Differences in the two simulated tracer concentration fields increase with time due to accumulation of effects of the wind differences both near the surface and at higher altitudes. Even for the release in the area with the densest distribution of surface stations, the relative difference in the peak surface concentration from CALMET-SCIPUFF and from FDDA-SCIPUFF is less than 10% only within 0.5 hr after the release in the afternoon, and increases to 70% at 1.5 hr; this is because of large differences in wind above the surface. For the release in the area with few stations, the difference can be larger than 100% or even larger after 1.5 hr from the release. To improve dispersion simulations driven by the CALMET wind in the region, observations at upper-air stations are needed and the current surface observation network needs to be reorganized or more stations are needed to account for the influence of terrain.

  17. Dynamics and characteristics of electric-field structures in the auroral return current region observed by Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marklund, G. T.; Karlsson, T.; Figueiredo, S.; Johansson, T.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; André, M.; Buchert, S.; Kistler, L. M.

    2006-02-01

    The temporal evolution and other characteristics of intense quasi-static electric fields in the return current region are discussed using Cluster observations. A narrow-scale, divergent electric field, the high-altitude signature of a positive U-shaped potential structure, was observed at the poleward edge of the central plasma sheet, close to magnetic midnight at a geocentric distance of about 4.2 Earth radii. Its acceleration potential increased from less than 1 to 3 kV on a 100 s timescale, similar to the formation time for ionospheric plasma density holes, and consistent with previous results for this kind of structure. In the adjacent upward current region, an energy decrease in inverted-V ions was observed some minutes prior to this. The inverted-V potential decrease was roughly equal to the subsequent perpendicular potential increase in the return current region, suggesting that a potential redistribution took place between the two adjacent current branches. Other characteristics of this and three other return current structures are summarized, to illustrate both common and different features of these. The structures are characterized by (all values have been mapped to the ionospheric level) peak electric-field magnitudes of ap1 V m-1, bipolar or unipolar profiles, occurrence at plasma boundaries associated with plasma density gradients, perpendicular scale sizes of ap10 km, downward field-aligned currents of ap10 μA m-2, and upward electron beams with characteristic energies of a few hundred to a few thousand eV. The bipolar and unipolar electric-field profiles are proposed to reflect whether plasma populations, dense enough to support upward field-aligned currents (by which the return current can close) exist on both sides, or on one side only of the boundary.

  18. Effects of external radiation fields on line emission—application to star-forming regions

    SciTech Connect

    Chatzikos, Marios; Ferland, G. J.; Williams, R. J. R.; Porter, Ryan; Van Hoof, P. A. M.

    2013-12-20

    A variety of astronomical environments contain clouds irradiated by a combination of isotropic and beamed radiation fields. For example, molecular clouds may be irradiated by the isotropic cosmic microwave background, as well as by a nearby active galactic nucleus. These radiation fields excite atoms and molecules and produce emission in different ways. We revisit the escape probability theorem and derive a novel expression that accounts for the presence of external radiation fields. We show that when the field is isotropic the escape probability is reduced relative to that in the absence of external radiation. This is in agreement with previous results obtained under ad hoc assumptions or with the two-level system, but can be applied to complex many-level models of atoms or molecules. This treatment is in the development version of the spectral synthesis code CLOUDY. We examine the spectrum of a Spitzer cloud embedded in the local interstellar radiation field and show that about 60% of its emission lines are sensitive to background subtraction. We argue that this geometric approach could provide an additional tool toward understanding the complex radiation fields of starburst galaxies.

  19. The role of waves and DC electric fields for electron heating and acceleration in the diffusion region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Daniel; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Vaivads, Andris; Norgren, Cecilia; Andre, Mats; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Le Contel, Olivier; Ergun, Robert; Goodrich, Katherine; Torbert, Roy; Burch, James; Russell, Christopher; Magnes, Werner; Giles, Barbara; Pollock, Craig; Mauk, Barry; Fuselier, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process in solar and astrophysical plasmas. The processes operating at electron spatial-scales, which enable magnetic field lines to reconnect, are generally difficult to resolve and identify. However, the recently launched Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) mission is specifically designed to resolve electron spatial scales. We use the MMS spacecraft to investigate the process operating within the diffusion region to determine the causes of electron heating and acceleration. In particular, we investigate the type of electrostatic and electromagnetic waves that develop and how they affect the electron distributions. We also compare the roles of wave-particle interactions with DC electric fields to determine which is responsible for the electron heating observed in diffusion regions.

  20. Transient behavior of a flare-associated solar wind. I - Gas dynamics in a radial open field region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    A numerical investigation is conducted into the way in which a solar wind model initially satisfying both steady state and energy balance conditions is disturbed and deformed, under the assumption of heating that correspoonds to the energy release of solar flares of an importance value of approximately 1 which occur in radial open field regions. Flare-associated solar wind transient behavior is modeled for 1-8 solar radii. The coronal temperature around the heat source region rises, and a large thermal conductive flux flows inward to the chromosphere and outward to interplanetary space along field lines. The speed of the front of expanding chromospheric material generated by the impingement of the conduction front on the upper chromosphere exceeds the local sound velocity in a few minutes and eventually exceeds 100 million cm/sec.

  1. Intercomparison 2013 on measurements of the personal dose equivalent Hp(10) in photon fields in the African region.

    PubMed

    Arib, M; Herrati, A; Dari, F; Ma, J; Lounis-Mokrani, Z

    2015-02-01

    An intercomparison exercise on the measurement of personal dose equivalent Hp(10) was jointly organised by the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Nuclear Research Centre of Algiers through its Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory in the African region. This intercomparison exercise was aimed at verifying the performance of the individual monitoring services of the participants in order to assess their capabilities to measure the quantity Hp(10) in photon (gamma and X ray) fields helping them to comply with dose limitation requirements. The scope of this intercomparison was aimed at passive dosemeters, which determine the personal dose equivalent in photon radiation fields, mainly for thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters. Twenty-seven countries from the Africa region and from outside Africa participated in this exercise. The intercomparison protocol, including the preparation of the dosemeters and the irradiation procedures, is described and the results are presented, analysed and discussed.

  2. Direct detection of a magnetic field in the innermost regions of an accretion disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donati, Jean-François; Paletou, Fréderic; Bouvier, Jérome; Ferreira, Jonathan

    2005-11-01

    Models predict that magnetic fields play a crucial role in the physics of astrophysical accretion disks and their associated winds and jets. For example, the rotation of the disk twists around the rotation axis the initially vertical magnetic field, which responds by slowing down the plasma in the disk and by causing it to fall towards the central star. The magnetic energy flux produced in this process points away from the disk, pushing the surface plasma outwards, leading to a wind from the disk and sometimes a collimated jet. But these predictions have hitherto not been supported by observations. Here we report the direct detection of the magnetic field in the core of the protostellar accretion disk FU Orionis. The surface field reaches strengths of about 1kG close to the centre of the disk, and it includes a significant azimuthal component, in good agreement with recent models. But we find that the field is very filamentary and slows down the disk plasma much more than models predict, which may explain why FU Ori fails to collimate its wind into a jet.

  3. Competition between winds and electric fields in the formation of blanketing sporadic E layers at equatorial regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resende, Laysa Cristina Araújo; Batista, Inez Staciarini; Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Carrasco, Alexander José; de Fátima Andrioli, Vânia; Moro, Juliano; Batista, Paulo Prado; Chen, Sony Su

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, we analyze the competition between tidal winds and electric fields in the formation of blanketing sporadic E layers (Esb) over São Luís, Brazil (2° 31' S, 44° 16' W), a quasi-equatorial station. To investigate this competition, we have used an ionospheric E region model (MIRE) that is able to model the Esb layers taking into account the E region winds and electric fields. The model calculates the densities for the main molecular and metallic ions by solving the continuity and momentum equations for each of the species. Thus, the main purpose of this analysis is to verify the electric fields role in the occurrence or disruption of Esb layers through simulations. The first results of the simulations show that the Esb layer is usually present when only the tidal winds were considered. In addition, when the zonal component of the electric field is introduced in the simulation, the Esb layers do not show significant changes. However, the simulations show the disruption of the Esb layers when the vertical electric field is included. In this study, we present two specific cases in which Esb layers appear during some hours over São Luís. We can see that these layers appear when the vertical electric field was weak, which means that the tidal components were more effective during these hours. Therefore, the vertical component of the electric field is the main agent responsible for the Esb layer disruption. [Figure not available: see fulltext. Caption: Ionograms from São Luís on January 5, 2005, show a clear case of the competition between electric fields and wind effects in the Es layer formation. In ionograms, the Esq trace is clearly seen and identified by a blue arrow. Besides the Esq, we can identify another Es trace at 1415 UT (identified by a black arrow) that persists until 1600 UT. This layer becomes stronger in each ionogram, as can be seen by its effect on partially blocking the reflection from the low-frequency end of F region above

  4. Characteristics and Evolution of the Magnetic Field and Chromospheric Emission in an Active Region Core Observed by Hinode

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-30

    Shiota, D., & Brooks, D. 2008, ApJ, 688, 669 Aschwanden, M. J. 2004, Physics of the Solar Corona . An Introduction (Springer-Verlag) Aschwanden, M. J...describe the characteristics and evolution of the magnetic field and chromospheric emission in an active region core observed by the Solar Optical Telescope...photosphere—Sun: chromosphere—Sun: corona 1. Introduction Significant progress in solving the decades old coronal heating problem could be made if one knew

  5. Abrupt Changes of the Photospheric Magnetic Field in Active Regions and the Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-09

    PHASE OF SOLAR FLARES (PREPRINT) E. W. Cliver, et al. 9 August 2012 Interim Report APPROVED FOR PUBLIC...the Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares (Preprint) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...public release; distribution is unlimited. Abrupt Changes of the Photospheric Magnetic Field in Active Regions and the Impulsive Phase of Solar

  6. A simple simulation approach to generate complex rainfall fields conditioned by elevation: example of the eastern Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oriani, Fabio; Ohana-Levi, Noa; Straubhaar, Julien; Renard, Philippe; Karnieli, Arnon; Mariethoz, Grégoire; Morin, Efrat; Marra, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Stochastically generating realistic rainfall fields is useful to study the uncertainty related to catchment recharge and its propagation to distributed hydrological models. To this end, it is critical to use weather radar images as training data, being the single most informative source for rainfall spatial heterogeneity. Generating realistic simulations is particularly important in regions like the eastern Mediterranean, where the synoptic conditions can lead to rainfall fields presenting various morphology, anisotropy and non-stationarity. The Direct Sampling (DS) technique [Mariethoz2010] is proposed here as a stochastic generator of spatial daily rainfall fields relying on the simulation of radar imagery. The technique is based on resampling of a training data set (in this case, a stack of radar images) and the generation of similar patterns to the ones found in the data. The strong point of DS, which makes it an attractive simulation approach for rainfall, is its capability to preserve the high-order statistical features present in the training image (e.g., rainfall cell shape, spatial non-stationarity) with minimal parameterization. Moreover, factors influencing rainfall, like elevation, can be used as conditioning variables, without the need of a complex statistical dependence model. A DS setup for radar image simulation is presented and tested for the simulation of daily rainfall fields using a 10-year radar-image record from the central region of Israel. Using a synoptic weather classification to train the model, the algorithm can generate realistic spatial fields for different rainfall types, preserving the variability and the covariance structure of the reference reasonably well. Moreover, the simulation is conditioned using the digital elevation model to preserve the complex relation between rainfall intensity and altitude that is characteristic for this region. [Mariethoz2010] G. Mariethoz, P. Renard, and J. Straubhaar. The direct sampling method to

  7. GOCO05c: A New Combined Gravity Field Model Based on Full Normal Equations and Regionally Varying Weighting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fecher, T.; Pail, R.; Gruber, T.

    2017-01-01

    GOCO05c is a gravity field model computed as a combined solution of a satellite-only model and a global data set of gravity anomalies. It is resolved up to degree and order 720. It is the first model applying regionally varying weighting. Since this causes strong correlations among all gravity field parameters, the resulting full normal equation system with a size of 2 TB had to be solved rigorously by applying high-performance computing. GOCO05c is the first combined gravity field model independent of EGM2008 that contains GOCE data of the whole mission period. The performance of GOCO05c is externally validated by GNSS-levelling comparisons, orbit tests, and computation of the mean dynamic topography, achieving at least the quality of existing high-resolution models. Results show that the additional GOCE information is highly beneficial in insufficiently observed areas, and that due to the weighting scheme of individual data the spectral and spatial consistency of the model is significantly improved. Due to usage of fill-in data in specific regions, the model cannot be used for physical interpretations in these regions.

  8. Radar observations of F region field-aligned irregularities over Hainan island, China in 2014-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, She-Ping; Wu, Qiongzhi; Chunxiao, Yan; Yan, Jingye; Shi, Jiankui; Yang, Guotao

    2016-07-01

    The morphology characteristics of low latitude F region 3-m scale field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) have been investigated by using the continuous observation of Hainan VHF radar (19.5ºN,109.1ºE,dip latitude:14.0ºN) in 2014-2015. The monthly mean F10.7 solar flux show the clear decrease from the peak in the start of 2014 to the foot in the end of 2015. F region FAIs can be further classified into the three cases: radar plumes (RP), broad spread F (BSF) and weak spread F (WSF), in which the first are mainly generated and developed within the field of view (FoV) of radar and the latter two generally originate outside of the FoV of radar and drift into the FoV of radar. They indicate the different phases of generation, evolution and decay of low latitude F region irregularities. The main results exhibit the F region FAIs mainly present in Feb.-Apr. and in Sep.-Nov. near the two equinoxes and are greatly reduced in May-Aug. near summer solstice, and almost completely disappeared in Dec.-Jan. near winter solstice, which are greatly affected by the solar activity. F region FAIs are more robust in spring equinox than in fall equinox, which can be shown as the occurrence rate, the structure and evolution, the duration time and so on. In spring equinox, the occurrence rate is far higher, and F region FAIs show the more structures and the longer duration time. RP near sunset are greatly enhanced. The following BSF and WSF can present intermittently and may persist into the post-midnight. F region FAIs in summer solstice mainly show BSF and WSF with the clear time delay. BSF mainly present in the pre-midnight, and there are mostly WSF in the post-midnight. The clear decrease of sola flux cause different effects to the occurrence of F region FAIs in the equinoxes and summer solstice. F region FAIs are greatly reduced in the equinoxes, in which RP are greatly reduced compared with BSF and WSF. F region FAIs seem not to be evidently affected in the summer solstice, in which

  9. Resonant phase jump with enhanced electric field caused by surface phonon polariton in terahertz region.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takanori; Nagai, Masaya; Tanaka, Koichiro

    2008-04-14

    We investigated surface phonon polariton in cesium iodide with terahertz time-domain attenuated total reflection method in Otto configuration, which gives us both information on amplitude and phase of surface electromagnetic mode directly. Systematic experiments with precise control of the distance between a prism and an active material show that the abrupt change of pi-phase jump appears sensitively under polariton picture satisfied when the local electric field at the interface becomes a maximum. This demonstration will open the novel phase-detection terahertz sensor using the active medium causing the strong enhancement of terahertz electric field.

  10. NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODELING OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION USING SDO/HMI AND SOLIS/VSM DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Thalmann, J. K.; Wiegelmann, T.; Pietarila, A.; Sun, X.

    2012-08-15

    We use SDO/HMI and SOLIS/VSM photospheric magnetic field measurements to model the force-free coronal field above a solar active region, assuming magnetic forces dominate. We take measurement uncertainties caused by, e.g., noise and the particular inversion technique, into account. After searching for the optimum modeling parameters for the particular data sets, we compare the resulting nonlinear force-free model fields. We show the degree of agreement of the coronal field reconstructions from the different data sources by comparing the relative free energy content, the vertical distribution of the magnetic pressure, and the vertically integrated current density. Though the longitudinal and transverse magnetic flux measured by the VSM and HMI is clearly different, we find considerable similarities in the modeled fields. This indicates the robustness of the algorithm we use to calculate the nonlinear force-free fields against differences and deficiencies of the photospheric vector maps used as an input. We also depict how much the absolute values of the total force-free, virial, and the free magnetic energy differ and how the orientation of the longitudinal and transverse components of the HMI- and VSM-based model volumes compare to each other.

  11. Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind. II - Gas dynamics in a nonradial open field region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagai, F.

    1984-01-01

    Transient behavior of flare-associated solar wind in the nonradial open field region is numerically investigated, taking into account the thermal and dynamical coupling between the chromosphere and the corona. A realistic steady solar wind is constructed which passes through the inner X-type critical point in the rapidly diverging region. The wind speed shows a local maximum at the middle, O-type, critical point. The wind's density and pressure distributions decrease abruptly in the rapidly diverging region of the flow tube. The transient behavior of the wind following flare energy deposition includes ascending and descending conduction fronts. Thermal instability occurs in the lower corona, and ascending material flows out through the throat after the flare energy input ceases. A local density distribution peak is generated at the shock front due to the pressure deficit just behind the shock front.

  12. THE IMPORTANCE OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD FROM AN SMA-CSO-COMBINED SAMPLE OF STAR-FORMING REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Patrick M.; Tang, Ya-Wen; Ho, Paul T. P.; Chen, Huei-Ru Vivien; Liu, Hau-Yu Baobab; Yen, Hsi-Wei; Lai, Shih-Ping; Zhang, Qizhou; Chen, How-Huan; Ching, Tao-Chung; Girart, Josep M.; Frau, Pau; Li, Hua-Bai; Li, Zhi-Yun; Padovani, Marco; Qiu, Keping; Rao, Ramprasad

    2014-12-20

    Submillimeter dust polarization measurements of a sample of 50 star-forming regions, observed with the Submillimeter Array (SMA) and the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory (CSO) covering parsec-scale clouds to milliparsec-scale cores, are analyzed in order to quantify the magnetic field importance. The magnetic field misalignment δ—the local angle between magnetic field and dust emission gradient—is found to be a prime observable, revealing distinct distributions for sources where the magnetic field is preferentially aligned with or perpendicular to the source minor axis. Source-averaged misalignment angles (|δ|) fall into systematically different ranges, reflecting the different source-magnetic field configurations. Possible bimodal (|δ|) distributions are found for the separate SMA and CSO samples. Combining both samples broadens the distribution with a wide maximum peak at small (|δ|) values. Assuming the 50 sources to be representative, the prevailing source-magnetic field configuration is one that statistically prefers small magnetic field misalignments |δ|. When interpreting |δ| together with a magnetohydrodynamics force equation, as developed in the framework of the polarization-intensity gradient method, a sample-based log-linear scaling fits the magnetic field tension-to-gravity force ratio (Σ {sub B}) versus (|δ|) with (Σ {sub B}) = 0.116 · exp (0.047 · (|δ|)) ± 0.20 (mean error), providing a way to estimate the relative importance of the magnetic field, only based on measurable field misalignments |δ|. The force ratio Σ {sub B} discriminates systems that are collapsible on average ((Σ {sub B}) < 1) from other molecular clouds where the magnetic field still provides enough resistance against gravitational collapse ((Σ {sub B}) > 1). The sample-wide trend shows a transition around (|δ|) ≈ 45°. Defining an effective gravitational force ∼1 – (Σ {sub B}), the average magnetic-field-reduced star formation efficiency is at least a

  13. A case study of a density structure over a vertical magnetic field region in the Martian ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Diéval, C.; Morgan, D. D.; Pisa, D.; Lundin, R.

    2016-05-01

    One of the discoveries made by the radar sounder on the Mars Express spacecraft is the existence of magnetically controlled structures in the ionosphere of Mars, which result in bulges in the ionospheric electron density contours. These bulges lead in turn to oblique echoes, which show up as hyperbola-shaped features in the echograms. A hyperbola-shaped feature observed over an isolated region of strong crustal magnetic field is associated with a plasma cavity in the upper ionosphere and a corresponding density enhancement in the lower levels of the ionosphere. We suggest that along open magnetic field lines, the solar wind electrons are accelerated downward and the ionospheric ions are accelerated upward in a manner similar to the field line-driven auroral acceleration at Earth. This heating due to precipitating electrons may cause an increase in the scale height and may drive a loss of ionospheric plasma at high altitudes.

  14. Influence of uncertainties of the empirical models for inferring the E-region electric fields at the dip equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, Juliano; Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Resende, Laysa Cristina Araújo; Chen, Sony Su; Schuch, Nelson Jorge

    2016-06-01

    Daytime E-region electric fields play a crucial role in the ionospheric dynamics at the geomagnetic dip latitudes. Due to their importance, there is an interest in accurately measuring and modeling the electric fields for both climatological and near real-time studies. In this work, we present the daytime vertical ( Ez) and eastward ( Ey) electric fields for a reference quiet day (February 7, 2001) at the São Luís Space Observatory, Brazil (SLZ, 2.31°S, 44.16°W). The component Ez is inferred from Doppler shifts of type II echoes (gradient drift instability) and the anisotropic factor, which is computed from ion and electron gyro frequencies as well as ion and electron collision frequencies with neutral molecules. The component Ey depends on the ratio of Hall and Pedersen conductivities and Ez. A magnetic field-line-integrated conductivity model is used to obtain the anisotropic factor for calculating Ez and the ionospheric conductivities for calculating Ey. This model uses the NRLMSISE-00, IRI-2007, and IGRF-11 empirical models as input parameters for neutral atmosphere, ionosphere, and geomagnetic field, respectively. Consequently, it is worth determining the uncertainties (or errors) in Ey and Ez associated with these empirical model outputs in order to precisely define the confidence limit for the estimated electric field components. For this purpose, errors of ±10 % were artificially introduced in the magnitude of each empirical model output before estimating Ey and Ez. The corresponding uncertainties in the ionospheric conductivity and electric field are evaluated considering the individual and cumulative contribution of the artificial errors. The results show that the neutral densities and temperature may be responsible for the largest changes in Ey and Ez, followed by changes in the geomagnetic field intensity and electron and ions compositions.

  15. Force-free field modeling of twist and braiding-induced magnetic energy in an active-region corona

    SciTech Connect

    Thalmann, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical concept that braided magnetic field lines in the solar corona may dissipate a sufficient amount of energy to account for the brightening observed in the active-region (AR) corona has only recently been substantiated by high-resolution observations. From the analysis of coronal images obtained with the High Resolution Coronal Imager, first observational evidence of the braiding of magnetic field lines was reported by Cirtain et al. (hereafter CG13). We present nonlinear force-free reconstructions of the associated coronal magnetic field based on Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager vector magnetograms. We deliver estimates of the free magnetic energy associated with a braided coronal structure. Our model results suggest (∼100 times) more free energy at the braiding site than analytically estimated by CG13, strengthening the possibility of the AR corona being heated by field line braiding. We were able to appropriately assess the coronal free energy by using vector field measurements and we attribute the lower energy estimate of CG13 to the underestimated (by a factor of 10) azimuthal field strength. We also quantify the increase in the overall twist of a flare-related flux rope that was noted by CG13. From our models we find that the overall twist of the flux rope increased by about half a turn within 12 minutes. Unlike another method to which we compare our results, we evaluate the winding of the flux rope's constituent field lines around each other purely based on their modeled coronal three-dimensional field line geometry. To our knowledge, this is done for the first time here.

  16. On the origin of the γ-ray fields in the ARA region.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Combi, J. A.; Romero, G. E.

    1995-11-01

    We report and discuss results of 1435MHz observations of the continuum emission from the Ara region. Using data from the previous 408MHz all-sky survey by Haslam et al. (1981) we have computed the spectral index distribution in the region. After the subtraction of a background component, several interesting features can be observed at both frequencies. We pay particular attention to an extended nonthermal source which is coincident with a strong γ-ray emission zone at 10deg from the galactic plane. We suggest that this feature could be the result of the interaction of a supernova remnant (SNR) with an interstellar cloud. Our interpretation can explain both the nonthermal nature of the radio source as well as the enhancement in the γ-ray flux. Several parameters are estimated for this context and other possible interpretations are briefly discussed.

  17. Stress field variations along the Maghreb region derived from inversion of fault plane solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousadou, Farida; Dorbath, Louis; Ayadi, abdelhakim; Dorbath, Catherine; Gharbi, Sofiane

    2014-05-01

    The analysis of the stress state along the Maghreb region is made on the basis of the inversion of focal solutions. We have inverted the main shock and aftershock focal mechanisms of the strongest seismic events that occurred in five seismogenic zones from west to east : Al Hoceima (2004), Cheliff (1980), Tipasa-Chenoua (1989), Zemmouri (2003) and Constantine (1985). Most of the focal mechanisms of the aftershock sequences have been constructed within this study. Compressive stress regime is observed in the central part of Algeria between Cheliff and Zemmouri. On both edges of the Maghreb region, the stress regime becomes strike-slip in Constantine region and in the Moroccan Rif. These different regimes seem to be linked to the free-edge effect (Ionian slab subduction) and to the dynamics of the Alboran Sea in the eastern and western part of the study area respectively. The sigma1 directions experience an anticlockwise rotation of about 20° from eastern to central Algeria. We observe that the difference between the direction of sigma1 and the direction of convergence decreases towards the west. In central Algeria, where the collision is not perturbated by edge effects, both directions are the closest.

  18. Near-Field Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis of Metropolitan Tehran Using Region-Specific Directivity Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdani, Azad; Nicknam, Ahmad; Dadras, Ehsan Yousefi; Eftekhari, Seyed Nasrollah

    2017-01-01

    Ground motions are affected by directivity effects at near-fault regions which result in low-frequency cycle pulses at the beginning of the velocity time history. The directivity features of near-fault ground motions can lead to significant increase in the risk of earthquake-induced damage on engineering structures. The ordinary probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) does not take into account such effects; recent studies have thus proposed new frameworks to incorporate directivity effects in PSHA. The objective of this study is to develop the seismic hazard mapping of Tehran City according to near-fault PSHA procedure for different return periods. To this end, the directivity models required in the modified PSHA were developed based on a database of the simulated ground motions. The simulated database was used in this study because there are no recorded near-fault data in the region to derive purely empirically based pulse prediction models. The results show that the directivity effects can significantly affect the estimate of regional seismic hazard.

  19. Chromatic compensation in the near-field region: shape and size tunability.

    PubMed

    Mínguez-Vega, G; Fernández-Alonso, M; Tajahuerce, E; Lancis, J; Jaroszewicz, Z; Andrés, P

    2005-11-10

    We report a diffractive-lens triplet with which to achieve wavelength compensation in the near field diffracted by any aperture. On the one hand, the all-diffractive triplet allows us to tune, in a sequential way, the Fresnel-irradiance shape to be achromatized by changing the focal length of one diffractive lens. On the other hand, we can adjust the scale of the chromatically compensated Fresnel diffraction field by shifting the aperture along the optical axis. Within this framework, we present an extremely flexible white-light Fresnel-plane array illuminator based on the kinoform sampling filter. A variable compression ratio and continuous selection of the output pitch are the most appealing features of this novel application.

  20. OBSERVATION OF A NON-RADIAL PENUMBRA IN A FLUX EMERGING REGION UNDER CHROMOSPHERIC CANOPY FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Yurchyshyn, Vasyl; Goode, Philip; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2013-05-20

    The presence of a penumbra is one of the main properties of a mature sunspot, but its formation mechanism has been elusive due to a lack of observations that fully cover the formation process. Utilizing the New Solar Telescope at the Big Bear Solar Observatory, we observed the formation of a partial penumbra for about 7 hr simultaneously at the photospheric (TiO; 7057 A) and the chromospheric (H{alpha} - 1 A) spectral lines with high spatial and temporal resolution. From this uninterrupted, long observing sequence, we found that the formation of the observed penumbra was closely associated with flux emergence under the pre-existing chromospheric canopy fields. Based on this finding, we suggest a possible scenario for penumbra formation in which a penumbra forms when the emerging flux is constrained from continuing to emerge, but rather is trapped at the photospheric level by the overlying chromospheric canopy fields.

  1. Regional neural response differences in the determination of faces or houses positioned in a wide visual field.

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Yan, Tianyi; Wu, Jinglong; Chen, Kewei; Imajyo, Satoshi; Ohno, Seiichiro; Kanazawa, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    In human visual cortex, the primary visual cortex (V1) is considered to be essential for visual information processing; the fusiform face area (FFA) and parahippocampal place area (PPA) are considered as face-selective region and places-selective region, respectively. Recently, a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study showed that the neural activity ratios between V1 and FFA were constant as eccentricities increasing in central visual field. However, in wide visual field, the neural activity relationships between V1 and FFA or V1 and PPA are still unclear. In this work, using fMRI and wide-view present system, we tried to address this issue by measuring neural activities in V1, FFA and PPA for the images of faces and houses aligning in 4 eccentricities and 4 meridians. Then, we further calculated ratio relative to V1 (RRV1) as comparing the neural responses amplitudes in FFA or PPA with those in V1. We found V1, FFA, and PPA showed significant different neural activities to faces and houses in 3 dimensions of eccentricity, meridian, and region. Most importantly, the RRV1s in FFA and PPA also exhibited significant differences in 3 dimensions. In the dimension of eccentricity, both FFA and PPA showed smaller RRV1s at central position than those at peripheral positions. In meridian dimension, both FFA and PPA showed larger RRV1s at upper vertical positions than those at lower vertical positions. In the dimension of region, FFA had larger RRV1s than PPA. We proposed that these differential RRV1s indicated FFA and PPA might have different processing strategies for encoding the wide field visual information from V1. These different processing strategies might depend on the retinal position at which faces or houses are typically observed in daily life. We posited a role of experience in shaping the information processing strategies in the ventral visual cortex.

  2. A CRITICAL ASSESSMENT OF NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODELING OF THE SOLAR CORONA FOR ACTIVE REGION 10953

    SciTech Connect

    DeRosa, Marc L.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; Cheung, Mark C. M.; Lites, Bruce W.; Amari, Tahar; Canou, Aurelien; McTiernan, James M.; Regnier, Stephane; Thalmann, Julia K.; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd; Tadesse, Tilaye; Valori, Gherardo; Wheatland, Michael S.; Conlon, Paul A.; Fuhrmann, Marcel

    2009-05-10

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are thought to be viable tools for investigating the structure, dynamics, and evolution of the coronae of solar active regions. In a series of NLFFF modeling studies, we have found that NLFFF models are successful in application to analytic test cases, and relatively successful when applied to numerically constructed Sun-like test cases, but they are less successful in application to real solar data. Different NLFFF models have been found to have markedly different field line configurations and to provide widely varying estimates of the magnetic free energy in the coronal volume, when applied to solar data. NLFFF models require consistent, force-free vector magnetic boundary data. However, vector magnetogram observations sampling the photosphere, which is dynamic and contains significant Lorentz and buoyancy forces, do not satisfy this requirement, thus creating several major problems for force-free coronal modeling efforts. In this paper, we discuss NLFFF modeling of NOAA Active Region 10953 using Hinode/SOT-SP, Hinode/XRT, STEREO/SECCHI-EUVI, and SOHO/MDI observations, and in the process illustrate three such issues we judge to be critical to the success of NLFFF modeling: (1) vector magnetic field data covering larger areas are needed so that more electric currents associated with the full active regions of interest are measured, (2) the modeling algorithms need a way to accommodate the various uncertainties in the boundary data, and (3) a more realistic physical model is needed to approximate the photosphere-to-corona interface in order to better transform the forced photospheric magnetograms into adequate approximations of nearly force-free fields at the base of the corona. We make recommendations for future modeling efforts to overcome these as yet unsolved problems.

  3. Relationships among seismic velocity, metamorphism, and seismic and aseismic fault slip in the Salton Sea Geothermal Field region

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Jeffrey J.; Lohman, Rowena B.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Rymer, Michael J.; Goldman, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    The Salton Sea Geothermal Field is one of the most geothermally and seismically active areas in California and presents an opportunity to study the effect of high-temperature metamorphism on the properties of seismogenic faults. The area includes numerous active tectonic faults that have recently been imaged with active source seismic reflection and refraction. We utilize the active source surveys, along with the abundant microseismicity data from a dense borehole seismic network, to image the 3-D variations in seismic velocity in the upper 5 km of the crust. There are strong velocity variations, up to ~30%, that correlate spatially with the distribution of shallow heat flow patterns. The combination of hydrothermal circulation and high-temperature contact metamorphism has significantly altered the shallow sandstone sedimentary layers within the geothermal field to denser, more feldspathic, rock with higher P wave velocity, as is seen in the numerous exploration wells within the field. This alteration appears to have a first-order effect on the frictional stability of shallow faults. In 2005, a large earthquake swarm and deformation event occurred. Analysis of interferometric synthetic aperture radar data and earthquake relocations indicates that the shallow aseismic fault creep that occurred in 2005 was localized on the Kalin fault system that lies just outside the region of high-temperature metamorphism. In contrast, the earthquake swarm, which includes all of the M > 4 earthquakes to have occurred within the Salton Sea Geothermal Field in the last 15 years, ruptured the Main Central Fault (MCF) system that is localized in the heart of the geothermal anomaly. The background microseismicity induced by the geothermal operations is also concentrated in the high-temperature regions in the vicinity of operational wells. However, while this microseismicity occurs over a few kilometer scale region, much of it is clustered in earthquake swarms that last from

  4. Integral field spectroscopy of the circum-nuclear region of the radio Galaxy Pictor A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couto, Guilherme S.; Storchi-Bergmann, Thaisa; Robinson, Andrew; Riffel, Rogemar A.; Kharb, Preeti; Lena, Davide; Schnorr-Müller, Allan

    2016-05-01

    We present optical integral field spectroscopy of the inner 2.5 × 3.4 kpc2 of the broad-line radio galaxy Pictor A, at a spatial resolution of ≈400 pc. Line emission is observed over the whole field of view, being strongest at the nucleus and in an elongated linear feature (ELF) crossing the nucleus from the south-west to the north-east along PA ≈70°. Although the broad double-peaked Hα line and the [O I]6300/Hα and [S II]6717+31/Hα ratios are typical of active galactic nuclei (AGNs), the [N II]6584/Hα ratio (0.15-0.25) is unusually low. We suggest that this is due to the unusually low metallicity of the gas. Centroid velocity maps show mostly blueshifts to the south and redshifts to the north of the nucleus, but the velocity field is not well fitted by a rotation model. Velocity dispersions are low (<100 km s- 1 ) along the ELF, ruling out a jet-cloud interaction as the origin of this structure. The ELF shows both blueshifts and redshifts in channel maps, suggesting that it is close to the plane of the sky. The ELF is evidently photoionized by the AGN, but its kinematics and inferred low metallicity suggest that this structure may have originated in a past merger event with another galaxy. We suggest that the gas acquired in this interaction may be feeding the ELF.

  5. Structure and Dynamics of the Sub-corotating Region of Saturn's Magnetosphere: Cassini Magnetic Field Observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, E. J.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Measurements of the azimuthal magnetic field component, BΦ, enable the study of the sub-corotating magnetosphere, the associated global current system, the ionospheric Pedersen current, IP, and a comparison with the Cowley-Vasyliunas model. The study is strongly dependent on Cassini's highly elliptical orbits that restrict useful observations to specific orbits and parts of orbits to avoid weak azimuthal fields associated with the magnetopause or other magnetospheric currents. An example is the selection of thirteen identical orbits near 22 +/- 2 hours Local Time and restriction of the data to 4 to 10 Saturn radii. Inferred IP profiles between 10° and 25° ionospheric co-latitude, θi , when averaged, are similar in shape to model predictions with a peak value of 5 million amperes. However, the individual profiles vary significantly, the result of dynamics associated with large-scale motions of the magnetospheric field. The Cowley-Vasyliunas model also relates IP(θi) to magnetospheric rotation rates, ΩS, equivalent to the SKR period, and the sub-corotation rate, ω, and provides a means of estimating ω / ΩS in the night-side magnetosphere as compared to the dayside rotation rates obtained from azimuthal plasma velocity measurements, VΦ. Other carefully- selected orbits extend these results to different ranges in θi and Local Times and provide further values of important magnetospheric parameters and allow additional testing of the model.

  6. Inhomogeneities of plasma density and electric field as sources of electrostatic turbulence in the auroral region

    SciTech Connect

    Ilyasov, Askar A.; Chernyshov, Alexander A. Mogilevsky, Mikhail M.; Golovchanskaya, Irina V. Kozelov, Boris V.

    2015-03-15

    Inhomogeneities of plasma density and non-uniform electric fields are compared as possible sources of a sort of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves that can be identified with broadband extremely low frequency electrostatic turbulence in the topside auroral ionosphere. Such waves are excited by inhomogeneous energy-density-driven instability. To gain a deeper insight in generation of these waves, computational modeling is performed with various plasma parameters. It is demonstrated that inhomogeneities of plasma density can give rise to this instability even in the absence of electric fields. By using both satellite-observed and model spatial distributions of plasma density and electric field in our modeling, we show that specific details of the spatial distributions are of minor importance for the wave generation. The solutions of the nonlocal inhomogeneous energy-density-driven dispersion relation are investigated for various ion-to-electron temperature ratios and directions of wave propagation. The relevance of the solutions to the observed spectra of broadband extremely low frequency emissions is shown.

  7. L1599B: Cloud Envelope and C+ Emission in a Region of Moderately Enhanced Radiation Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Langer, William D.; Liu, Tie; Requena-Torres, Miguel; Ricken, Oliver; Riquelme, Denise

    2016-06-01

    We study the effects of an asymmetric radiation field on the properties of a molecular cloud envelope. We employ observations of carbon monoxide (12CO and 13CO), atomic carbon, ionized carbon, and atomic hydrogen to analyze the chemical and physical properties of the core and envelope of L1599B, a molecular cloud forming a portion of the ring at ≃27 pc from the star Λ Ori. The O8 star provides an asymmetric radiation field that produces a moderate enhancement of the external radiation field. Observations of the [C ii] fine structure line with the GREAT instrument on SOFIA indicate a significant enhanced emission on the side of the cloud facing the star, while the [C i], 12CO and 13CO J = 1-0 and 2-1, and 12CO J = 3-2 data from the Purple Mountain Observatory and APEX telescopes suggest a relatively typical cloud interior. The atomic, ionic, and molecular line centroid velocities track each other very closely, and indicate that the cloud may be undergoing differential radial motion. The H i data from the Arecibo GALFA survey and the SOFIA/GREAT [C ii] data do not suggest any systematic motion of the halo gas, relative to the dense central portion of the cloud traced by 12CO and 13CO.

  8. Seismotectonics of the Armutlu peninsula (Marmara Sea, NW Turkey) from geological field observation and regional moment tensor inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinscher, J.; Krüger, F.; Woith, H.; Lühr, B. G.; Hintersberger, E.; Irmak, T. S.; Baris, S.

    2013-11-01

    The Armutlu peninsula, located in the eastern Marmara Sea, coincides with the western end of the rupture of the 17 August 1999, İzmit MW 7.6 earthquake which is the penultimate event of an apparently westward migrating series of strong and disastrous earthquakes along the NAFZ during the past century. We present new seismotectonic data of this key region in order to evaluate previous seismotectonic models and their implications for seismic hazard assessment in the eastern Marmara Sea. Long term kinematics were investigated by performing paleo strain reconstruction from geological field investigations by morphotectonic and kinematic analysis of exposed brittle faults. Short term kinematics were investigated by inverting for the moment tensor of 13 small to moderate recent earthquakes using surface wave amplitude spectra. Our results confirm previous models interpreting the eastern Marmara Sea Region as an active transtensional pull-apart environment associated with significant NNE-SSW extension and vertical displacement. At the northern peninsula, long term deformation pattern did not change significantly since Pliocene times contradicting regional tectonic models which postulate a newly formed single dextral strike slip fault in the Marmara Sea Region. This area is interpreted as a horsetail splay fault structure associated with a major normal fault segment that we call the Waterfall Fault. Apart from the Waterfall Fault, the stress strain relation appears complex associated with a complicated internal fault geometry, strain partitioning, and reactivation of pre-existing plane structures. At the southern peninsula, recent deformation indicates active pull-apart tectonics constituted by NE-SW trending dextral strike slip faults. Earthquakes generated by stress release along large rupture zones seem to be less probable at the northern, but more probable at the southern peninsula. Additionally, regional seismicity appears predominantly driven by plate boundary

  9. Celtic field agriculture and Early Anthropogenic Environmental change in the Meuse-Demer-Scheldt region, NW Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van der Sanden, Germaine; Kluiving, Sjoerd; Roymans, Nico

    2016-04-01

    The field of Archaeology remains focused on historical issues while underexploring its potential contribution on currently existing societal problems, e.g. climate change. The aim of this paper is to show the relevance of archeological studies for the research of the 'human species as a significant moving agent' in terms of the changing natural environment during a much earlier time frame. This research is based on the study area of the Meuse-Demer-Scheldt region in the Netherlands and Belgium and exhibits the period from the Late Bronze Age to the Early Roman period. This period is characterized by the widespread introduction and use of an agricultural system, often referred to as the Celtic Field system that served as one of the most modifying systems in terms of anthropogenic-environmental change during this period. Emphasis in this research is given to results generated by the use of the remote sensing technology, LiDAR. New information is reported considering a correlation between singular field size and the overall surface of the agricultural complexes and secondly, the presentation of newly identified Celtic field systems in the Meuse-Demer-Scheldt region are presented. The study of the dynamics of the Celtic Field agricultural system provides evidence for a significant anthropogenic footprint on the natural environment due to land cover dominance, soil degeneration, increased soil acidification and forest clearance. Soil exhaustion forced the inhabitants to re-establish their relationship with the landscape in terms of fundamental changes in the habitation pattern and the agrarian exploitations of the land.

  10. Using coronal loops to reconstruct the magnetic field of an active region before and after a major flare

    SciTech Connect

    Malanushenko, A.; Schrijver, C. J.; DeRosa, M. L.; Wheatland, M. S.

    2014-03-10

    The shapes of solar coronal loops are sensitive to the presence of electrical currents that are the carriers of the non-potential energy available for impulsive activity. We use this information in a new method for modeling the coronal magnetic field of active region (AR) 11158 as a nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF). The observations used are coronal images around the time of major flare activity on 2011 February 15, together with the surface line-of-sight magnetic field measurements. The data are from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. The model fields are constrained to approximate the coronal loop configurations as closely as possible, while also being subject to the force-free constraints. The method does not use transverse photospheric magnetic field components as input and is thereby distinct from methods for modeling NLFFFs based on photospheric vector magnetograms. We validate the method using observations of AR 11158 at a time well before major flaring and subsequently review the field evolution just prior to and following an X2.2 flare and associated eruption. The models indicate that the energy released during the instability is about 1 × 10{sup 32} erg, consistent with what is needed to power such a large eruptive flare. Immediately prior to the eruption, the model field contains a compact sigmoid bundle of twisted flux that is not present in the post-eruption models, which is consistent with the observations. The core of that model structure is twisted by ≈0.9 full turns about its axis.

  11. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop 2: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region and Field Trips in the Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P. (Editor); Edgett, K. S. (Editor); Rice, J. W. , Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will place a single lander on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997, following a December 1996 launch. As a result of the very successful first Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop, the project has selected the Ares Vallis outflow channel in Chryse Planitia as the landing site. This location is where a large catastrophic outflow channel debouches into the northern lowlands. A second workshop and series of field trips, entitled Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop 2: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region and Field Trips in the Channeled Scabland, Washington, were held in Spokane and Moses Lake, Washington. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a focus for learning as much as possible about the Ares Vallis region on Mars before landing there. The rationale is that the more that can be learned about the general area prior to landing, the better scientists will be able interpret the observations made by the lander and rover and place them in the proper geologic context. The field trip included overflights and surface investigations of the Channeled Scabland (an Earth analog for the martian catastrophic outflow channels), focusing on areas particularly analogous to Ares Vallis and the landing site. The overflights were essential for placing the enormous erosional and depositional features of the Channeled Scabland into proper three-dimensional context. The field trips were a joint educational outreach activity involving K-12 science educators, Mars Pathfinder scientists and engineers, and interested scientists from the Mars scientific community. Part 1 of the technical report on this workshop includes a description of the Mars Pathfinder mission, abstracts accepted for presentation at the workshop, an introduction to the Channeled Scabland, and field trip guides for the overflight and two field trips. This part, Part 2, includes the program for the workshop, summaries of the workshop technical sessions, a summary of the field trips and ensuing

  12. CHARACTERISTICS AND EVOLUTION OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD AND CHROMOSPHERIC EMISSION IN AN ACTIVE REGION CORE OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2010-09-10

    We describe the characteristics and evolution of the magnetic field and chromospheric emission in an active region core observed by the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) on Hinode. Consistent with previous studies, we find that the moss is unipolar, the spatial distribution of magnetic flux evolves slowly, and that the magnetic field is only moderately inclined. We also show that the field-line inclination and horizontal component are coherent, and that the magnetic field is mostly sheared in the inter-moss regions where the highest magnetic flux variability is seen. Using extrapolations from spectropolarimeter magnetograms, we show that the magnetic connectivity in the moss is different from that in the quiet Sun because most of the magnetic field extends to significant coronal heights. The magnetic flux, field vector, and chromospheric emission in the moss also appear highly dynamic but actually show only small-scale variations in magnitude on timescales longer than the cooling times for hydrodynamic loops computed from our extrapolations, suggesting high-frequency (continuous) heating events. Some evidence is found for flux (Ca II intensity) changes on the order of 100-200 G (DN) on timescales of 20-30 minutes that could be taken as indicative of low-frequency heating. We find, however, that only a small fraction (10%) of our simulated loops would be expected to cool on these timescales, and we do not find clear evidence that the flux changes consistently produce intensity changes in the chromosphere. Using observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS), we also determine that the filling factor in the moss is {approx}16%, consistent with previous studies and larger than the size of an SOT pixel. The magnetic flux and chromospheric intensity in most individual SOT pixels in the moss vary by less than {approx}20% and {approx}10%, respectively, on loop cooling timescales. In view of the high energy requirements of the chromosphere, we suggest that these

  13. Agricultural terraces montoring and modeling: a field survey in Chianti region, Firenze, Italy - First part

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preti, Federico; Caruso, Marco; Dani, Andrea; Errico, Alessandro; Guastini, Enrico; Trucchi, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The two abstracts present the design and set-up of an experimental field plant whose aim is the study and modeling of water circulation in a terraced slope together with its influence on the stability of the retaining dry stone walls. The pilot plant is located at "Fattoria di Lamole" (Greve in Chianti, Firenze, Italy) where both ancient and recently restored or rebuilt dry stone retaining walls are present. The intense vineyards cultivation makes it very representative in terms of range of external stresses that affect both hillslopes and walls. The research is developed within a bigger framework of landscape preservation as a way to prevent hydrogeological instabilities and landslide risks. First Part A first/preliminary field survey was carried out in order to estimate the hydraulic and mechanical soil characteristics. Field saturated hydraulic conductivity measurements with the Simplified Falling Head (SFH) method on a terrace along an alignment were performed. Infiltrometer tests with a double ring device and soil texture determinations with both fine particle-size and skeleton fraction distributions were also performed. The Direct shear test on undisturbed and reconstituted soil samples will offer an estimation of the Mohr-Coulomb failure envelope parameters (friction angle and cohesion). A reference portion of a dry stone wall will be also monitored. Lateral earth pressure at backfill-retaining wall interface (compared to temperature and air pressure measured values), backfill volumetric water content (both in saturated and unsaturated states) and ground-water level are measured. Acknowledgements Italian Research Project of Relevant Interest (PRIN2010-2011), prot. 20104ALME4, National network for monitoring, modeling, and sustainable management of erosion processes in agricultural land and hilly-mountainous area

  14. Global and Regional Gravity Field Determination from GOCE Kinematic Orbit by Means of Spherical Radial Basis Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucha, Blažej; Bezděk, Aleš; Sebera, Josef; Janák, Juraj

    2015-11-01

    We present global and regional gravity field models to degree 130 based on the GOCE kinematic orbit from the period 01 November 2009 to 11 January 2010. The gravity field models are parameterized in terms of the Shannon and Kaula's spherical radial basis functions. The relation between the unknown expansion coefficients and the kinematic orbit of the satellite is established by the acceleration approach. We show that our global GOCE-only solutions free from prior information can compete with unconstrained spherical harmonic models in terms of accuracy. Furthermore, we utilize our low-degree global GOCE-based models to introduce prior information into the least-squares adjustment. This procedure substantially improves the zonal and near-zonal spherical harmonic coefficients, which are usually degraded due to the polar gap problem. As an unwanted side effect, low-pass filtering of the geopotential may occur, but this can be adjusted by the spectral content of the prior information. We show that the regional enhancement of the global solutions reduces noise in the final model between degrees 70 and 130 by ~10 % in terms of RMS error. In general, our Shannon-based solutions systematically outperform the Kaula-based ones. To validate our results, we use the EIGEN-6S model, which is superior to the solutions from kinematic orbits at least by one order of magnitude. Both the global and the regional models satisfy the GOCE-only strategy.

  15. Surficial geology of the Safsaf region, south-central Egypt, derived from remote-sensing and field data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, P.A.; Breed, C.S.; McCauley, J.F.; Schaber, G.G.

    1993-01-01

    We used a decorrelation-stretched image of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) Bands 1, 4, and 7 and field data to map and describe the main surficial units in the hyperarid Safsaf region in south-central Egypt. We show that the near-infrared bands on Landsat TM, which are sensitive to very subtle changes in mineralogy common to arid regions, significantly improve the geologist's capability to discriminate geologic units in desert regions. These data also provide the spatial and spectral information necessary to determine the migration patterns and provenance of eolian materials. The Safsaf area was the focus of our post flight field studies using Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) data following the discovery of buried paleochannels in North Africa. Most of the channels discernible on SIR images are not expressed in TM data, but traces of a few channels are present in both the SIR and the TM data within the Wadi Safsaf area. Here we present a detailed digital examination of the SIR and the TM-band reflectance and reflectance-ratio data at three locations of the more obvious surface expressions of the buried channels. Our results indicate that the TM expressions of the channels are not purely topographic but are more compositional in nature. Two possibilities may account for the TM expressions of the buried channels: 1) concentrations of windblown, iron-rich materials that accumulated along subtle curvilinear topograpohic traps, or 2) curvilinear exposures of an iron-rich underlying unit of the flat sand sheet. ?? 1993.

  16. Impacts of cloud overlap assumptions on radiative budgets and heating fields in convective regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, XiaoCong; Liu, YiMin; Bao, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Impacts of cloud overlap assumptions on radiative budgets and heating fields are explored with the aid of a cloud-resolving model (CRM), which provided cloud geometry as well as cloud micro and macro properties. Large-scale forcing data to drive the CRM are from TRMM Kwajalein Experiment and the Global Atmospheric Research Program's Atlantic Tropical Experiment field campaigns during which abundant convective systems were observed. The investigated overlap assumptions include those that were traditional and widely used in the past and the one that was recently addressed by Hogan and Illingworth (2000), in which the vertically projected cloud fraction is expressed by a linear combination of maximum and random overlap, with the weighting coefficient depending on the so-called decorrelation length Lcf. Results show that both shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcings (SWCF/LWCF) are significantly underestimated under maximum (MO) and maximum-random (MRO) overlap assumptions, whereas remarkably overestimated under the random overlap (RO) assumption in comparison with that using CRM inherent cloud geometry. These biases can reach as high as 100 Wm- 2 for SWCF and 60 Wm- 2 for LWCF. By its very nature, the general overlap (GenO) assumption exhibits an encouraging performance on both SWCF and LWCF simulations, with the biases almost reduced by 3-fold compared with traditional overlap assumptions. The superiority of GenO assumption is also manifested in the simulation of shortwave and longwave radiative heating fields, which are either significantly overestimated or underestimated under traditional overlap assumptions. The study also pointed out the deficiency of constant assumption on Lcf in GenO assumption. Further examinations indicate that the CRM diagnostic Lcf varies among different cloud types and tends to be stratified in the vertical. The new parameterization that takes into account variation of Lcf in the vertical well reproduces such a relationship and

  17. Secular variation of the Earth's magnetic field in the Balkan region during the last eight millennia based on archaeomagnetic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tema, E.; Kondopoulou, D.

    2011-08-01

    The first archaeomagnetic secular variation (SV) curves for the whole Southern Balkan Peninsula are presented. These are based on all data within a 700 km circle centred at Thessaloniki (40.60oN, 23.00oE). This data set consists of 325 directional and 625 intensity data mainly from Greece, Bulgaria, Serbia and southern Hungary. Some data from southern Italy are also included. The sliding moving window technique, was used to calculate a continuous SV curve for intensity while the directional SV curves were calculated using the bivariate extension of the Fisher statistics. These curves are well constrained and clearly show the main features of the geomagnetic field variation in this region during the last eight millennia. Comparisons with the predictions of the SCHA.DIF.3K and SCHA.DIF.8K regional and the CALS7K.2 and ARCH3K.1 global geomagnetic field models show a good agreement for the last 3000 years but differences for older times. The Balkan SV curves identify several rapid changes of the geomagnetic field in eastern Europe and can be used as reference curves for archaeomagnetic dating in the Balkan Peninsula.

  18. Relationship of magnetic field strength and brightness of fine-structure elements in the solar temperature minimum region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Ewing, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative relationship was determined between magnetic field strength (or magnetic flux) from photospheric magnetograph observations and the brightness temperature of solar fine-structure elements observed at 1600 A, where the predominant flux source is continuum emission from the solar temperature minimum region. A Kitt Peak magnetogram and spectroheliograph observations at 1600 A taken during a sounding rocket flight of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph from December 11, 1987 were used. The statistical distributions of brightness temperature in the quiet sun at 1600 A, and absolute value of magnetic field strength in the same area were determined from these observations. Using a technique which obtains the best-fit relationship of a given functional form between these two histogram distributions, a quantitative relationship was determined between absolute value of magnetic field strength B and brightness temperature which is essentially linear from 10 to 150 G. An interpretation is suggested, in which a basal heating occurs generally, while brighter elements are produced in magnetic regions with temperature enhancements proportional to B.

  19. [Effects of mulching and fertilization on winter wheat field soil moisture in dry highland region of Loess Plateau].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Feng; Tian, Xiao-Hong; Chen, Zi-Hui; Chen, Hui-Lin; Wang, Zhao-Hui

    2009-05-01

    A field experiment was conducted in a winter wheat field in Weibei dry highland region of Loess Plateau to study the effects of different mulching and fertilization treatments on soil moisture regime. The treatments were 1) no fertilization, 2) conventional fertilization, 3) recommended fertilization, 4) recommended fertilization + manure, 5) recommended fertilization + plastic mulch on soil ridges, 6) recommended fertilization + plastic mulch on soil ridges and straw mulch in furrows, and 7) recommended fertilization + straw mulch on entire plot. Soil moisture content was determined regularly with a neutron probe. Among the treatments, recommended fertilization plus plastic mulch on soil ridges and straw mulch in furrows in dry season (spring) resulted in the greatest increase of soil water storage and maintained the storage to the critical stage crops needed, followed by recommended fertilization plus plastic mulch on soil ridges. These two treatments could store more precipitation in field, and would benefit the development of rainfed agriculture in dry highland region of Loess Plateau. As for recommended fertilization plus manure, it had the least increase of soil water storage, with a difference of 48.2 mm to the recommended fertilization plus plastic mulch on soil ridges and straw mulch in furrows in dry season.

  20. A Case Study of the Density Structure over a Vertical Magnetic Field Region in the Martian Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duru, F.; Gurnett, D. A.; Morgan, D. D.; Dieval, C.; Pisa, D.; Lundin, R. N. A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the discoveries made by Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) on the Mars Express spacecraft is the existence of magnetically controlled structures in the ionosphere of Mars, which result in irregularities in the ionospheric electron density contours. These irregularities lead in turn to oblique echoes, which show up as hyperbola-shaped features on the plots of echo intensity measured by MARSIS as a function of altitude and universal time. The study of a hyperbola-shaped feature observed in a pass over an isolated region of strong crustal magnetic field shows that this kind of feature can be associated with a plasma cavity in the upper ionosphere and a corresponding density enhancement in the lower levels of the ionosphere. At the location where the hyperbola-shaped echo is observed, the electron and ion fluxes measured by ASPERA-3 at the location of the spacescraft are depleted and the local electron density from MARSIS shows a small decrease, as well. However, the peak ionospheric density obtained by MARSIS remote sounding shows a clear increase as Mars Express passes over the same region. We conclude that through the open magnetic field lines, the electrons are accelerated downward and ions are accelerated upward in a manner similar to the field-line driven auroral acceleration at Earth. This heating due to precipitating electrons causes a bulge at the altitude of the main ionosphere, which in turn leads to a hyperbola shaped echo, and loss of ionospheric plasma at high altitudes.

  1. Classical dynamics and localization of resonances in the high-energy region of the hydrogen atom in crossed fields.

    PubMed

    Schweiner, Frank; Main, Jörg; Cartarius, Holger; Wunner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    When superimposing the potentials of external fields on the Coulomb potential of the hydrogen atom, a saddle point (called the Stark saddle point) appears. For energies slightly above the saddle point energy, one can find classical orbits that are located in the vicinity of this point. We follow those so-called quasi-Penning orbits to high energies and field strengths, observing structural changes and uncovering their bifurcation behavior. By plotting the stability behavior of those orbits against energy and field strength, the appearance of a stability apex is reported. A cusp bifurcation, located in the vicinity of the apex, will be investigated in detail. In this cusp bifurcation, another orbit of similar shape is found. This orbit becomes completely stable in the observed region of positive energy, i.e., in a region of parameter space, where the Kepler-like orbits located around the nucleus are already unstable. By quantum mechanically exact calculations, we prove the existence of signatures in quantum spectra belonging to those orbits. Husimi distributions are used to compare quantum-Poincaré sections with the extension of the classical torus structure around the orbits. Since periodic orbit theory predicts that each classical periodic orbit contributes an oscillating term to photoabsorption spectra, we finally give an estimation for future experiments, which could verify the existence of the stable orbits.

  2. Field Survey of Health Perception and Complaints of Pennsylvania Residents in the Marcellus Shale Region

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Pouné; Propert, Kathleen Joy; Powers, Martha; Emmett, Edward; Green-McKenzie, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Pennsylvania Marcellus Shale region residents have reported medical symptoms they believe are related to nearby Unconventional Natural Gas Development (UNGD). Associations between medical symptoms and UNGD have been minimally explored. The objective of this descriptive study is to explore whether shale region Pennsylvania residents perceive UNGD as a health concern and whether they attribute health symptoms to UNGD exposures. A questionnaire was administered to adult volunteers with medical complaints in a primary-care medical office in a county where UNGD was present. Participants were asked whether they were concerned about health effects from UNGD, and whether they attributed current symptoms to UNGD or to some other environmental exposure. There were 72 respondents; 22% perceived UNGD as a health concern and 13% attributed medical symptoms to UNGD exposures. Overall, 42% attributed one or more of their medical symptoms to environmental causes, of which UNGD was the most frequent. A medical record review conducted on six participants who attributed their medical symptoms to UNGD revealed that only one of these records documented both the symptoms in question and the attribution to UNGD. The results of this pilot study suggest that there is substantial concern about adverse health effects of UNGD among Pennsylvania Marcellus Shale residents, and that these concerns may not be adequately represented in medical records. Further efforts to determine the relationship between UNGD and health are recommended in order to address community concerns. PMID:25003172

  3. Disturbance diurnal electric field in Indian and American equatorial electrojet regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rastogi, R. G.

    1998-10-01

    The yearly mean Disturbance Daily (SD) variation, i.e., solar daily variation on International Disturbed days (Sd) minus that on International Quiet days (Sq) of the geomagnetic H field at Huancayo, an equatorial electrojet station in American zone, for any of the years 1954-61 shows a dawn-maximum and a dusk-minimum as observed at any low and middle latitude station. Contrary to this, the SD(H) variation at Kodaikanal, an equatorial station in the Indian zone, shows a prominent minimum around noon hours besides the usual dawn-maximum and dusk-minimum for any of these years. The amplitude of SD(H) at Huancayo or at Kodaikanal decreases with the decreasing solar activity. Seasonally, SD(H) is larger during equinoctial than during solsticial months. For any particular season, the SD(H) averaged for all hours of the day is lower at Huancayo than at Kodaikanal, while the Sq(H) at Huancayo is always greater than the corresponding amplitude of Sq(H) at Kodaikanal. Thus the sources of electrojet electric fields on quiet and on disturbed days seem to be different and need to be identified.

  4. THE HST EXTREME DEEP FIELD (XDF): COMBINING ALL ACS AND WFC3/IR DATA ON THE HUDF REGION INTO THE DEEPEST FIELD EVER

    SciTech Connect

    Illingworth, G. D.; Magee, D.; Oesch, P. A.; Stiavelli, M.; Van Dokkum, P. G.; Trenti, M.; Carollo, C. M.; Gonzalez, V.

    2013-11-01

    The eXtreme Deep Field (XDF) combines data from 10 years of observations with the Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and the Wide-Field Camera 3 Infra-Red (WFC3/IR) into the deepest image of the sky ever in the optical/near-IR. Since the initial observations of the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field (HUDF) in 2003, numerous surveys and programs, including supernovae follow-up, HUDF09, CANDELS, and HUDF12, have contributed additional imaging data across this region. However, these images have never been combined and made available as one complete ultra-deep image dataset. We combine them now with the XDF program. Our new and improved processing techniques provide higher quality reductions of the total dataset. All WFC3/IR and optical ACS data sets have been fully combined and accurately matched, resulting in the deepest imaging ever taken at these wavelengths, ranging from 29.1 to 30.3 AB mag (5σ in a 0.''35 diameter aperture) in 9 filters. The combined image therefore reaches to 31.2 AB mag 5σ (32.9 at 1σ) for a flat f {sub ν} source. The gains in the optical for the four filters done in the original ACS HUDF correspond to a typical improvement of 0.15 mag, with gains of 0.25 mag in the deepest areas. Such gains are equivalent to adding ∼130 to ∼240 orbits of ACS data to the HUDF. Improved processing alone results in a typical gain of ∼0.1 mag. Our 5σ (optical+near-IR) SExtractor catalogs reveal about 14,140 sources in the full field and about 7121 galaxies in the deepest part of the XDF.

  5. Seismogenic stress field estimation in the Calabrian Arc region (south Italy) from a Bayesian approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Totaro, C.; Orecchio, B.; Presti, D.; Scolaro, S.; Neri, G.

    2016-09-01

    A new high-quality waveform inversion focal mechanism database of the Calabrian Arc region has been compiled by integrating 292 mechanisms selected from literature and catalogs with 146 newly computed solutions. The new database has then been used for computation of posterior density distributions of stress tensor components by a Bayesian method never applied in south Italy before the present study. The application of this method to the enhanced database has allowed us to provide a detailed picture of seismotectonic stress regimes in this very complex area where lithospheric unit configuration and geodynamic engines are still strongly debated. Our results well constrain the extensional domain of Calabrian Arc and the compressional one of the southernmost Tyrrhenian Sea. In addition, previously undetected transcurrent regimes have been identified in the Ionian offshore. The new information released here will furnish useful tools and constraints for future geodynamic investigations.

  6. Performances and failure of field-aged PV modules operating in Saharan region of Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadok, M.; Benyoucef, B.; Othmani, M.; Mehdaoui, A.

    2016-07-01

    This article deals with behaviour of PV modules, of different technologies and manufacturers, exposed for long periods in Saharan region of Algeria. These modules are exposed in Adrar in the south-western part of Algeria. The study uses experimental I-V curves of PV modules for determining their performances. The datasheet information of modules will be useful in determination of degradation rates of the modules. Three types of modules have been tested: Photowatt (PWX 500), UDTS-50 and Isofoton (I-75 and I-100 serials). Results showed that Isofoton I-100 modules present the highest degradation rate while the lowest degradation rate was reached with I-75 serial. However, these rates tallies with other studies. The visual inspection of the modules has revealed various kinds of failures and defects responsible of performances drop (EVA browning, delamination, burn marks,…).

  7. Field Test of a Hybrid Finite-Difference and Analytic Element Regional Model.

    PubMed

    Abrams, D B; Haitjema, H M; Feinstein, D T; Hunt, R J

    2016-01-01

    Regional finite-difference models often have cell sizes that are too large to sufficiently model well-stream interactions. Here, a steady-state hybrid model is applied whereby the upper layer or layers of a coarse MODFLOW model are replaced by the analytic element model GFLOW, which represents surface waters and wells as line and point sinks. The two models are coupled by transferring cell-by-cell leakage obtained from the original MODFLOW model to the bottom of the GFLOW model. A real-world test of the hybrid model approach is applied on a subdomain of an existing model of the Lake Michigan Basin. The original (coarse) MODFLOW model consists of six layers, the top four of which are aggregated into GFLOW as a single layer, while the bottom two layers remain part of MODFLOW in the hybrid model. The hybrid model and a refined "benchmark" MODFLOW model simulate similar baseflows. The hybrid and benchmark models also simulate similar baseflow reductions due to nearby pumping when the well is located within the layers represented by GFLOW. However, the benchmark model requires refinement of the model grid in the local area of interest, while the hybrid approach uses a gridless top layer and is thus unaffected by grid discretization errors. The hybrid approach is well suited to facilitate cost-effective retrofitting of existing coarse grid MODFLOW models commonly used for regional studies because it leverages the strengths of both finite-difference and analytic element methods for predictions in mildly heterogeneous systems that can be simulated with steady-state conditions.

  8. Poloidal Rotation Dynamics, Radial Electric Field, and Neoclassical Theory in the Jet Internal-Transport-Barrier Region

    SciTech Connect

    Crombe, K.; Oost, G. van; Andrew, Y.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N. C.; Parail, V.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Hacquin, S.; Nave, M.F.F.; Ongena, J.

    2005-10-07

    Results from the first measurements of a core plasma poloidal rotation velocity (v{sub {theta}}) across internal transport barriers (ITB) on JET are presented. The spatial and temporal evolution of the ITB can be followed along with the v{sub {theta}} radial profiles, providing a very clear link between the location of the steepest region of the ion temperature gradient and localized spin-up of v{sub {theta}}. The v{sub {theta}} measurements are an order of magnitude higher than the neoclassical predictions for thermal particles in the ITB region, contrary to the close agreement found between the determined and predicted particle and heat transport coefficients [K.-D. Zastrow et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 46, B255 (2004)]. These results have significant implications for the understanding of transport barrier dynamics due to their large impact on the measured radial electric field profile.

  9. Investigation into the regional wrench tectonics of inner East Anatolia (Turkey) using potential field data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büyüksaraç, Aydın

    2007-01-01

    The residual aeromagnetic and gravity anomalies of inner East Anatolia, surveyed by the Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA) of Turkey, display complexities. Some faults, which are known and new lineaments, are drawn from maxspot map derived from the location of the horizontal gradient of gravity anomalies. Tectonic lineaments of inner East Anatolia exhibit similarities to the direction of East Anatolian Fault Zone. Anticlockwise rotation, approximately -30°, defined from disorientations of aeromagnetic anomalies. The lineaments obtained from maxspots map produced from the gravity anomalies and disoriented aeromagnetic anomalies are in-line with the mobilistic system revealed by the palaeomagnetic data. These Alpine age continental rotations caused westward wrenching of the global lithosphere and led to significant tectonic reactivation and deformations. GPS measurements, current tectonic knowledge and the results of the evaluation of potential field data were combined in a base map to demonstrate similarities.

  10. Field-based high throughput phenotyping rapidly identifies genomic regions controlling yield components in rice

    PubMed Central

    Tanger, Paul; Klassen, Stephen; Mojica, Julius P.; Lovell, John T.; Moyers, Brook T.; Baraoidan, Marietta; Naredo, Maria Elizabeth B.; McNally, Kenneth L.; Poland, Jesse; Bush, Daniel R.; Leung, Hei; Leach, Jan E.; McKay, John K.

    2017-01-01

    To ensure food security in the face of population growth, decreasing water and land for agriculture, and increasing climate variability, crop yields must increase faster than the current rates. Increased yields will require implementing novel approaches in genetic discovery and breeding. Here we demonstrate the potential of field-based high throughput phenotyping (HTP) on a large recombinant population of rice to identify genetic variation underlying important traits. We find that detecting quantitative trait loci (QTL) with HTP phenotyping is as accurate and effective as traditional labor-intensive measures of flowering time, height, biomass, grain yield, and harvest index. Genetic mapping in this population, derived from a cross of an modern cultivar (IR64) with a landrace (Aswina), identified four alleles with negative effect on grain yield that are fixed in IR64, demonstrating the potential for HTP of large populations as a strategy for the second green revolution. PMID:28220807

  11. Quality traits analysis and protein profiling of field pea (Pisum sativum) germplasm from Himalayan region.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shagun; Singh, Narpinder; Virdi, Amardeep Singh; Rana, Jai Chand

    2015-04-01

    The grain and flour characteristics of different field pea (FP) accessions were evaluated. Accessions with higher grain weight had less compact structure with a greater proportion of large-sized starch granules. Accessions with higher protein content had lower starch content, blue value and λ(max) whereas accessions with higher amylose showed higher resistant starch (RS) and final viscosity and lower rapidly digestible starch (RDS). Ca, Zn, K and Fe content vary significantly amongst different accessions and creamish green and white seeds accessions showed higher Fe and Zn content. Yellow coloured accessions (1.36-3.71%) showed lower antioxidant activity as compared to brownish and green coloured accessions (4.06-9.30%). Out of 21 major polypeptides observed (9-100 kDa), 11 showed differential trypsin inhibitory activity (TIA) under non-reducing conditions. Polypeptides of 68, 46, 33 and 22 kDa showed prominent TIA.

  12. Effects of He-Ne regional irradiation on 53 cases in the field of pediatric surgery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing-Zhen

    1991-06-01

    We report the clinical observation of the effect on 53 surgical cases with Helium-Neon laser local irradiation therapy. Of those cases 15 were suffered from chronic and acute infection, 5 were traumatic, 15 of hemangioma had been treated by solid CO freezing therapy and sclerosing injection previously. 18 cases were received incisional irradiation postoperatively. All showed remarkable results. There were no infection, and the healing process was shortened by Helium-Neon laser local irradiation for 2-3 days. The results showed that the curative rate was 88.68%, the marked effective rate was 9.43%, and the fair was 1.89$. We emphasize that because of the characteristic of anatomical physiology and histology in children. so the result in children is better than in adults. Thus, we strongly recommend using Helium-Laser local irradiation in surgical pediatric field. It is reliable, safe, painless, convenient, economic, and no side effects at all.

  13. Equatorial E region electric fields at the dip equator: 1. Variabilities in eastern Brazil and Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, J.; Denardini, C. M.; Resende, L. C. A.; Chen, S. S.; Schuch, N. J.

    2016-10-01

    The equatorial electrojet (EEJ) is an intense eastward ionospheric electric current centered at about 105 km of altitude along the dip equator, set up by the global neutral wind dynamo that generates the eastward zonal (Ey) and the daytime vertical (Ez) electric fields. The temporal variation of the EEJ is believed to be well understood. However, the longitudinal variability of the Ey and Ez between 100 and 110 km is still quite scarce. Due to their importance overall phenomenology of the equatorial ionosphere, we investigate the variabilities of the Ey and Ez inferred from measurements of the Doppler frequency of Type II echoes provided by coherent backscatter radars installed in locations close to the magnetic equator in the eastern Brazil (2.33°S, 44.20°W) and Peru (11.95°S, 76.87°W). This study is based on long-term (609 days for both systems) radar soundings collected from 2001 to 2010. The variabilities of the electric fields are studied in terms of the position of the soundings with respect to the dip equator and the magnetic declination angle. Among the results, Ey and Ez show longitudinal dependence, being higher in Peru than east Brazil. Under quiet geomagnetic activity, the mean diurnal variations of Ey ranged from 0.21 to 0.35 mV/m between 8 and 18 h (LT) in Brazil and from 0.23 mV/m to 0.45 mV/m in Peru, while the mean diurnal variations of the Ez ranges from 7.09 to 8.80 mV/m in Brazil and from 9.00 to 11.18 mV/m in Peru.

  14. VHF coherent scatter radar observations of mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities over South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Y.; Yang, T.; Lee, J.; Hwang, J.; Kil, H.; Park, Y.

    2011-12-01

    We examine the mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularity (FAI) activity during 2010-2011 by using the VHF coherent scatter radar data in Daejeon (36.2°N, 127.1°E; dip latitude 26.7°N), South Korea. The VHF radar has been operated since December 2009 and provides a unique opportunity to investigate the variability of the FAI activity with local time, season, solar flux, and magnetic activity. Our preliminary results during the solar minimum show that FAIs preferentially occur at post-sunset and pre-sunrise and during the June solstice. The seasonal variation of the FAI occurrence frequency is similar to that of the electron density irregularities observed by the C/NOFS satellite. For one event, we observed the association of the FAIs with a medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbance (MSTID). Our study extends to the investigation of the correlations between the irregularities in the equatorial region and middle latitudes and between the conjugate F regions, and the causal linkage of the FAIs with the E-region perturbations. For this purpose, we analyze the VHF radar and C/NOFS data during 2010-2011.

  15. Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds, and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS) Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, B.; Flynn, C.

    2016-03-01

    Studies of Emissions and Atmospheric Composition, Clouds and Climate Coupling by Regional Surveys (SEAC4RS), a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign, was based out of Ellington Field in Houston, Texas, during August and September 2013. The study focused on pollution emissions and the evolution of gases and aerosols in deep convective outflow, and the influences and feedbacks of aerosol particles from anthropogenic pollution and biomass burning on meteorology, clouds, and climate. The project required three aircraft to accomplish these goals. The NASA DC-8 provided observations from near the surface to 12 km, while the NASA ER-2 provided high-altitude observations reaching into the lower stratosphere as well as important remote-sensing observations connecting satellites with observations from lower-flying aircraft and surface sites. The SPEC, Inc. Learjet obtained aerosol and cloud microphysical measurement in convective clouds and convective outflow.

  16. Parabolic cylinder antennas. [discussed in terms of wave conversions, field divergence, and wavefronts in Fresnel and Fraunhofer regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    Some of the features of single and dual parabolic-cylinder reflector antenna systems are discussed in terms of wave conversions, field divergence, and wavefronts in Fresnel and Fraunhofer regions. Beam-squinting, by mechanical displacement and electrical phase gradient methods, is introduced together with the combination of these methods. In the case of dual parabolic cylinders there is also a discussion of surface-truncation, parametric representation of surface intersections, main-aperture blockage by the subsystem, and beam squinting. A few diffraction patterns are presented to illustrate the type of data available via a formulation equivalent to the complex-vector Kirchhoff-Kottler formulation. Main and cross-polarization components of the solution are available as they are inherently part of the field solution in the Cartesian coordinate system. A means of displaying main and cross-polarization components for arbitrary beam-scanning in space is outlined. Extensions to monopulse tracking with variable-beamwidth (zooming) capability are introduced.

  17. Comparison of geology of Jurassic Norphlet Mary Ann field, Mobile Bay, Alabama, to onshore regional Norphlet trends

    SciTech Connect

    Marzono, M.; Pense, G.; Andronaco, P.

    1988-09-01

    The geology of the Mary Ann field is better understood in light of regional studies, which help to establish a depositional model in terms of both facies and thickness variations. These studies also illustrate major differences between onshore and offshore Norphlet deposits concerning topics such as diagenesis, hydrocarbon trapping, and migration. The Jurassic Norphlet sandstone was deposited in an arid basin extending from east Texas to Florida by a fluvial-eolian depositional system, prior to the transgression of the Smackover Formation. Until discovery of the Mary Ann field in 1979, Norphlet production was restricted to onshore areas, mostly along the Pickens-Pollard fault system in Mississippi, Alabama, and Florida. The Mary Ann field is a Norphlet dry-gas accumulation, and was the first offshore field in the Gulf of Mexico to establish economic reserves in the Jurassic. The field is located in Mobile Bay, approximately 25 mi (40 km) south of Mobile, Alabama. Formed by a deep-seated (more than 20,000 ft or 6096 m) faulted salt pillow, Mary Ann field produces from a series of stacked eolian dune sands situated near the Norphlet paleocoastline. Five lithofacies have been recognized in cores from the Mobil 76 No. 2 well. Each lithofacies has a distinct reservoir quality. Optimum reservoir faces are the dune and sheet sands. Nonreservoir facies are interdune (wet and dry), marine reworked, and evaporitic sands. Following deposition, these sediments have undergone varying amounts of diagenesis. Early cementation of well-sorted sands supported the pore system during compaction. However, late cementation by chlorite, silica, and alteration of liquid hydrocarbons to an asphaltic residue have completely occluded the pore system in parts of the reservoir.

  18. Effects of field-aligned potential drops on region-2 currents, shielding, and the decoupling of magnetospheric and ionospheric flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, R.; Sazykin, S. Y.

    2013-12-01

    It is technically difficult to include field-aligned potential drops in simulations of inner-magnetospheric electric fields, because the potential drops are most important in thin, intense sheets of Birkeland current, which are hard to resolve accurately on a large-scale grid. However, we have found a highly idealized situation that can be treated almost completely analytically, with the numerical work confined to solving a 1D differential equation. The calculation is set up as follows: (i) in the zero-order configuration, the inner edge of the plasma-sheet ions is circular, and the ions near the inner edge all gradient/curvature-drift west at the same angular rate; (ii) the convection potential is a small perturbation, in the sense that ExB drift near the inner edge is slow compared to gradient/curvature drift; (iii) the field-aligned potential drop is proportional to the density of field-aligned current; (iv) we look for steady-state solutions. The results indicate that the field-aligned potential drop has the following effects: (i) it decreases the total region-2 current but spreads it out in latitude; (ii) it reduces the efficiency with which the inner edge shields the inner magnetosphere from magnetospheric convection; (iii) it causes particles on the magnetospheric portions of field lines near the inner edge to ExB drift zonally at different rates than particles in the topside ionosphere. Results from these quasi-analytic calculations will be compared with compared with Rice Convection Model simulations of the same idealized physical situation.

  19. Photon-dominated regions around cool stars: The effects of the color temperature of the radiation field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaans, Marco; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Dishoeck, Ewine F. Van; Bakes, E. L. O.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of the color temperature of the illuminating radiation field on the chemical and thermal structure of photon-dominated regions (PDRs). We present the results of a study of the photoelectric efficiency of heating by large molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains for radiation fields characterized by different effective temperatures. We show that the efficiency for cooler (T(sub eff) approximately = 6000-10,000 K) stars is at most an order of magnitude smaller than that for hotter (T(sub eff) approximately = 20,000-30,000 K) stars. While cooler radiation fields result in less ultraviolet photons capable of heating, the efficiency per absorbed photon is higher, because the grains become less positively charged. We also present detailed calculations of the chemistry and thermal balance for generic PDRs (n(sub 0) approximately = 10(exp 3), G(sub 0) approximately = 10(exp 3)). For cooler radiation fields, the H/H2 and C(+)/C/CO transition layers shift toward the surface of the PDR, because fewer photons are available to photodissociate H2 and CO and to ionize C. The dominant cooling lines are the (C II) 158 micron and the (O I) 63 micron lines for the hotter radiation fields, but cooling by CO becomes dominant for a color temperature of 6000 K or lower. The (C II)/CO and (O I)/CO ratios are found to be very good diagnostics for the color temperature of the radiation field.

  20. Exploration of Quench Initiation Due to Intentional Geometrical Defects in a High Magnetic Field Region of an SRF Cavity

    SciTech Connect

    J. Dai, K. Zhao, G.V. Eremeev, R.L. Geng, A.D. Palczewski; Dai, J.; Palczewski, A. D.; Eremeev, G. V.; Geng, R. L.; Zhao, K.

    2011-07-01

    A computer program which was used to simulate and analyze the thermal behaviors of SRF cavities has been developed at Jefferson Lab using C++ code. This code was also used to verify the quench initiation due to geometrical defects in high magnetic field region of SRF cavities. We built a CEBAF single cell cavity with 4 artificial defects near equator, and this cavity has been tested with T-mapping. The preheating behavior and quench initiation analysis of this cavity will be presented here using the computer program.

  1. Mapping rainfall fields and their ENSO variation in data-sparse tropical south-west Pacific Ocean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basher, Reid E.; Zheng, Xiaogu

    1998-03-01

    Rainfall fields for the data-sparse tropical south-west Pacific Ocean region have been mapped by partial thin-plate smoothing spline surface modelling applied to island rainfall measurements, enhanced by the use of satellite observations of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) as a regression covariate. The aim is to obtain spatially realistic rainfall maps, especially in the data-sparse areas between island groups, through a fully objective and statistically valid method that includes error estimates. The method has been applied to the region 4°N-24°S, 168°E-154°W. The rainfall data set initially comprised 57 stations, most with 40 year records. As a first step, a regression of annual OLR and rainfall for atolls only was formed and used to eliminate outlier rainfall stations, all of which are on mountainous islands and thus are probably influenced orographically.The maps clearly show the spatial patterns and seasonal behaviour of the regions key meteorological features, namely, the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the southern edge of the Inter-tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), and the wedge shaped region of divergent easterlies lying between them. To identify ENSO variations, maps of 3-month seasonal rainfall were constructed from composites of eight El Niño (negative SOI) episodes and nine La Niña (positive SOI) episodes. These maps are relatively rough in appearance, but nevertheless they show the evolution of the spatial patterns through each composite episode and the strong and symmetrically opposite differences between them. Marked variations in the strength and position of the SPCZ are evident and the isohyets in the equatorial dry zone exhibit east-west shifts of nearly 3000 km relative to the average field. The rainfall variation at a particular location may be understood in terms of competition of influence among the changing features of the pattern, rather than as a simple linear function of the SOI.

  2. Regional stratigraphy of Smackover limestone (Jurassic) in south Arkansas and north Louisiana, and geology of Chalybeat Springs oil field

    SciTech Connect

    Troell, A.R.; Robinson, J.D.

    1987-09-01

    Prior to 1960, the Reynolds oolite of the Smackover Formation of south Arkansas, was correlated with the Smackover B oolite of north Louisiana. The absence of anticlines with structural closure and the paucity of untested fault closures along the Arkansas-Louisiana boundary provided little exploratory interest in the area. Discovery of oil at Lick Creek field in 1960 and at Walker Creek in 1968 revealed a trend of traps and led to the geologic investigation that resulted in the discovery, in 1972, of Chalybeat Springs field, in Columbia County, Arkansas. Chalybeat Springs field is a combination stratigraphic-structural trap in oolitic calcarenite at a depth of 10,250 ft in the Smackover B limestone. Production is limited by the combination of a tilted anticline with porosity pinch-out on its flank. The field originally had 28 producing wells and 10 dry holes, and covered approximately 4500 productive acres. Original oil in place is estimated to have been 37 million bbl and cumulative production through 1985 was approximately 12 million bbl. The geologic relationships and principles observed in the Smackover Limestone of south Arkansas and north Louisiana have been successfully applied to other regions and in carbonate strata of different age, in the search for oil and gas production. Practical geologic studies of carbonate rocks, aided by examination of drill cuttings, cores, and thin sections, combined with mechanical log evaluation, result in lower finding costs for oil and gas reserves.

  3. The Correlation Between Electron Density and Temperature in Low and High Strength Crustal Magnetic Field Regions at Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamandy, T.; Andersson, L.; Fowler, C. M.; Ergun, R.; Connerney, J. E. P.; Brain, D. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Langmuir Probe and Waves Instrument (LPW) onboard the MAVEN spacecraft is the first Langmuir probe to map out the upper atmosphere of Mars. The instrument provides measurements (amongst other variables) of electron density (Ne) and temperature (Te). The overarching scientific goal of MAVEN is to determining how Mars lost its atmosphere and to understand the physical processes governing this escape and the above quantities play a crucial role in understanding this. Ne and Te information is critical for determining the efficiency of the different photochemical reaction rates and thereby in understanding the upper atmospheric composition. Understanding the upper atmosphere allows the MAVEN mission to calculate escape rates. Photochemical reactions and collisions dominate below the exobase region (~150-~180 km). Above the exobase, particles with energies greater than the Mars gravity well can escape. On the dayside solar EUV heats the atmosphere at lower altitudes and produces the ionosphere. It is of great interest to understand the how the electron density and temperature correlate. The presented study therefore shows the correlation between Ne and Te. This study investigates how different solar zenith angles affect these quantities and evaluates if closed magnetic field lines (as expected to occur over crustal magnetic fields) change the correlation between the two. Many previous studies have shown that crustal fields affect the plasma at high altitudes. In this study we present how the magnetic field influences the photochemical and the plasma processes close to the exobase via analyzing Ne and Te.

  4. Analysis of gene expression in mouse brain regions after exposure to 1.9 GHz radiofrequency fields

    PubMed Central

    McNamee, James P.; Bellier, Pascale V.; Konkle, Anne T. M.; Thomas, Reuben; Wasoontarajaroen, Siriwat; Lemay, Eric; Gajda, Greg B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To assess 1.9 GHz radiofrequency (RF) field exposure on gene expression within a variety of discrete mouse brain regions using whole genome microarray analysis. Materials and methods: Adult male C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 1.9 GHz pulse-modulated or continuous-wave RF fields for 4 h/day for 5 consecutive days at whole body average (WBA) specific absorption rates of 0 (sham), ∼0.2 W/kg and ∼1.4 W/kg. Total RNA was isolated from the auditory cortex, amygdala, caudate, cerebellum, hippocampus, hypothalamus, and medial prefrontal cortex and differential gene expression was assessed using Illumina MouseWG-6 (v2) BeadChip arrays. Validation of potentially responding genes was conducted by RT-PCR. Results: When analysis of gene expression was conducted within individual brain regions when controlling the false discovery rate (FDR), no differentially expressed genes were identified relative to the sham control. However, it must be noted that most fold changes among groups were observed to be less than 1.5-fold and this study had limited ability to detect such small changes. While some genes were differentially expressed without correction for multiple-comparisons testing, no consistent pattern of response was observed among different RF-exposure levels or among different RF-modulations. Conclusions: The current study provides the most comprehensive analysis of potential gene expression changes in the rodent brain in response to RF field exposure conducted to date. Within the exposure conditions and limitations of this study, no convincing evidence of consistent changes in gene expression was found in response to 1.9 GHz RF field exposure. PMID:27028625

  5. Impact of E4 Training and Field Auditing of GSA Heartland Region Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Gowri, Krishnan; Underhill, Ronald M.; Goddard, James K.

    2012-04-01

    To assess the impact of energy efficiency expert evaluation (E4) training and field audits performed since 2007, the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) undertook a follow-up study on the implementation of E4 recommendations and an analysis of energy savings. The building property manager and O and M contractor of each facility were interviewed to obtain feedback and implementation status of the E4 recommendations. Overall, there were more than 160 recommendations documented in the E4 reports; about 50% of these recommendations were fully implemented and the remaining 50% either partially implemented or not implemented. In four buildings, the E4 recommendations were aligned with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) projects replacing HVAC equipment or upgrading the building control system. The E4 recommendations were not followed-up in two buildings because of uncertainty of the long-term use of the facility or personnel changes. Results of this followon study are reported in this document.

  6. Structure of pre-Caspian depression and major oil and gas fields of the region

    SciTech Connect

    Krylov, N.A. ); Avrov, V.P. ); Lisovsky, N.N.

    1991-03-01

    As a single unified depression, the pre-Caspian basin has been formed from Paleozoic to Cenozoic time. The basin is superimposed on two large pre-Permian depressions. On the Astrakhan-Aktyubinsk zone of uplifts between them is found sharply reduced Carboniferous and Devonian sections. Modern structural plan clearly displays two major structural stages: Subsalt (Paleozoic) and post (post-Kungurian). The post-salt stage is characterized by wide development of salt dome tectonics. It corresponds with its own petroliferous stage containing numerous, mostly small oil accumulations in terrigenous Mesozoic reservoirs. Large recent discoveries-Astrakhan condensate, Karachaganak and Kanazhol-Sinelnikov oil/condensate, Tengiz oil, and other fields-are associated with the Subsalt Paleozoic complex ranging from Lower Permian to the top of Upper Devonian. The Subsalt stage has its own regularities in hydrocarbon phase differentiation; large reserves concentration; dominantly productive carbonates with various reservoirs; and presence of structural, depositional, and erosional factors controlling formation of oil and gas traps. The paper describes major distributional features of the various arc-and-type Permian and Carboniferous formations, which in conjunction with Subsalt paleotemperature data and geochemistry of organic matter represents a basis for the forecast of new discoveries.

  7. Regional implications of the Bashkerian-Serpukhovian reservoir architecture at Tengiz field; Kazakhstan

    SciTech Connect

    Lomando, A.J.; Suisenov, K.; Shilin, A.

    1995-08-01

    The super-giant Tengiz Field is a complex Carboniferous-Devonian reservoir. The most common occurrence of higher porosity zones is in the uppermost portion of the reservoir within the Bashkerian to Serpukhovian section. The suite of porous textures containing preserved primary porosity ranges from skeletal and coated grain to mixed particle grainstones, and packstones which display little or no compaction due to early isopachous marine cementation. In some areas, the amount of primary preserved porosity is inversely proportional to th occurrence and amount of crinoids and associated syntaxial overgrowths. Early and late secondary porosity is most pronounced in the upper portions of the reservoir associated with features ranging from multiple short-term exposure events to long-duration unconformities. Lower energy wackestones and mudstones interbedded with higher energy facies cause verticle permeability barriers and baffles. In areas of stacked shoaling cycles in the platform interior, lateral correlation of porosity zones is good. Muddy biolithites tend to be concentrated along the north and eastern portions of the structure and generally contain lower reservoir quality and cause lateral changes in reservoir continuity. Preliminary analysis of facies distribution patterns indicates that the higher energy {open_quotes}windward{close_quotes} direction is not facing into the North Caspian basin, but to the east-northeast into the Emba sub-basin. This allows for a separate exploration play concept around the Emba sub-basin {open_quotes}rim{close_quotes} which would be separate and distinct from the rest of the North Caspian Basin.

  8. Investigating Alfvénic wave propagation in coronal open-field regions

    PubMed Central

    Morton, R. J.; Tomczyk, S.; Pinto, R.

    2015-01-01

    The physical mechanisms behind accelerating solar and stellar winds are a long-standing astrophysical mystery, although recent breakthroughs have come from models invoking the turbulent dissipation of Alfvén waves. The existence of Alfvén waves far from the Sun has been known since the 1970s, and recently the presence of ubiquitous Alfvénic waves throughout the solar atmosphere has been confirmed. However, the presence of atmospheric Alfvénic waves does not, alone, provide sufficient support for wave-based models; the existence of counter-propagating Alfvénic waves is crucial for the development of turbulence. Here, we demonstrate that counter-propagating Alfvénic waves exist in open coronal magnetic fields and reveal key observational insights into the details of their generation, reflection in the upper atmosphere and outward propagation into the solar wind. The results enhance our knowledge of Alfvénic wave propagation in the solar atmosphere, providing support and constraints for some of the recent Alfvén wave turbulence models. PMID:26213234

  9. Field studies of isoprene emissions from vegetation in the Northwest Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen, Susan M.; Boissard, C.; Hagenlocher, B.; Hewitt, C. Nicholas

    1998-10-01

    During the Biogenic Emissions in the Mediterranean Area (BEMA) project field campaigns (1993-1997), 40 native Mediterranean plant species were screened for emissions of isoprene and monoterpenes using a branch enclosure sampling method with subsequent gas chromatographic-flame ionization detector (GC-FID) and GC-mass selective detector (MS) analysis. Thirteen species emitted more than 0.5 μg (C) g-1 dw h-1 isoprene at 30°C and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), of which nine species emitted more than 20 μg (C) g-1 dw h-1. Emissions of isoprene were strongly correlated with temperature and PAR, and were reasonably well predicted by existing algorithms. There was little intraspecies and day to day variation in base emission rates. In general, median base emission rates were higher in summer compared to autumn for most species. Significant difference in aggregated habitat base emission rates was found between dunes, garrigue, woodland, and riverside sample sites. Although considerable unexplained variability in base emission rates remains to be explored, first estimates of base emission rates for Mediterranean shrublands are presented here.

  10. Effects of a Magnetic Field on Turbulent Flow in the Mold Region of a Steel Caster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ramnik; Thomas, Brian G.; Vanka, Surya P.

    2013-10-01

    Electromagnetic braking (EMBr) greatly influences turbulent flow in the continuous casting mold and its transient stability, which affects level fluctuations and inclusion entrainment. Large eddy simulations are performed to investigate these transient flow phenomena using an accurate numerical scheme implemented on a graphics processing unit. The important effect of the current flow through the conducting solid steel shell on stabilizing the fluid flow pattern is investigated. The computational model is first validated with measurements made in a scaled physical model with a low melting point liquid metal and is then applied to a full-scale industrial caster. The overall flow field in the scale model was matched in the real caster by keeping only the Stuart number constant. The free surface-level behaviors can be matched by scaling the results using a similarity criterion based on the ratio of the Froude numbers. The transient behavior of the mold flow reveals the effects of EMBr on stability of the jet, top surface velocities, surface-level profiles, and surface-level fluctuations.

  11. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Middletown Air Field, Pennsylvania (first remedial action), December 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-12-31

    The Middletown Air Field site covers what is now the Harrisburg International Airport (HIA), located between the town of Middletown and Nighspire, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania. The airport is owned and operated by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania Department of Transportation. The area surrounding the base is characterized as mixed residential/industrial. Between 1898 and 1962, the property was owned by the U.S. Government and used by the military. HIA and several other entities occupy what was referred to as the Olmsted Air Force Base. In March 1983, TCA contamination caused six of the ten onsite production wells supplying HIA to be taken out of service. Studies initiated under the Department of Defense Installation Restoration Program indicate that while ground-water contamination due to volatile organic compounds exists, the exact source(s) of contamination cannot be clearly defined. Ground water contamination may result from one or more, possibly current, sources in the 'industrial area'. To date, HIA has been able to temporarily meet the water requirements of the facility by taking the most contaminated well off-line as a potable water source, and by blending potable water from a number of wells.

  12. Investigating Alfvénic wave propagation in coronal open-field regions.

    PubMed

    Morton, R J; Tomczyk, S; Pinto, R

    2015-07-27

    The physical mechanisms behind accelerating solar and stellar winds are a long-standing astrophysical mystery, although recent breakthroughs have come from models invoking the turbulent dissipation of Alfvén waves. The existence of Alfvén waves far from the Sun has been known since the 1970s, and recently the presence of ubiquitous Alfvénic waves throughout the solar atmosphere has been confirmed. However, the presence of atmospheric Alfvénic waves does not, alone, provide sufficient support for wave-based models; the existence of counter-propagating Alfvénic waves is crucial for the development of turbulence. Here, we demonstrate that counter-propagating Alfvénic waves exist in open coronal magnetic fields and reveal key observational insights into the details of their generation, reflection in the upper atmosphere and outward propagation into the solar wind. The results enhance our knowledge of Alfvénic wave propagation in the solar atmosphere, providing support and constraints for some of the recent Alfvén wave turbulence models.

  13. Microbial processes in the Savuiskoe oil field in the Ob` region

    SciTech Connect

    Rozanova, E.P.; Savvichev, A.S.; Karavaiko, S.G.; Miller, Y.M.

    1995-01-01

    Ecotopes of a terrigenous stratum of the Savuiskoe oil field flooded with coproduced water, having a temperature of 35{degrees}C and devoid of dissolved O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and SO{sup 2-}{sub 4}, were studied. The stratal water was of a chloride-calcium type, had a mineralization value of 11-17 g/l, and contained 2-138 mg SO{sup 2-}{sub 4}/l but no H{sub 2}S. the near-bottom zones of two injection wells investigated had a temperature of 37-42{degrees}C (type 1 ecotopes); the temperature of the stratal water in the area of producing wells (type 2 ecotopes) was greater than 60{degrees}C. In stratal waters, sulfate-reducing and methanogenic bacteria prevailed. In the water of type 2 ecotopes, the rate of thermophilic sulfate reduction (measured by the radioisotope method) was lower, and that of methanogenesis was higher than the corresponding rates of mesophilic processes in type 1 ecotopes. The share of acetate-derived carbon in the biogenic methane in the water of producing wells was as low as 2-10%. The possible sources of organic matter consumed in the anaerobic processes in the strata and the reasons for the predominance of bicarbonate carbon in the biogenic methane are discussed. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Present-day Focal Mechanisms and Stress Field of the Sichuan-Yunnan Active Block and Its Adjacent Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    zhao, cuiping; luo, jun; zhou, lianqing

    2013-04-01

    Focal mechanism solutions together with the depths of 66 M 3.5 moderate earthquakes occurred in the Sichuan Yunnan active block and its adjacent regions from Aug.1st, 2007 to Sep.15th, 2012was obtained by CAP method. Furthermore, by combining the results with the focal mechanism solutions from Harvard University, we investigated the characteristics of the stress field in the study area. We discussed the spatial distribution of the focal mechanisms and the focal depths, and then analyzed its dynamics. Four conclusions are drawn as follows. (1)Focal mechanism solutions show zoning characteristic. Along the ANH-ZMH-XJ faults(the eastern border of Sichuan-Yunnan block), the earthquakes are mostly left-lateral strike-slip mechanism. Along the HSH fault, the earthquakes are mostly right-lateral strike-slip mechanism. Around the XGLL block and in its interior, there exists remarkable normal fault mechanism with different fault striking and direction of P and T stress axis. Along the arc boundary of Sichuan-Yunnan block with the Sichuan basin, the earthquakes are reverse fault mechanism. (2) The inversed regional stress field shows complicated local feature. On and to the east side of the eastern border of Sichuan-Yunnan block, the stress field is similar with the stress field of the Eastern China block, which is from the relative motion of Philippine plate towards the Urasia plate. Whereas to the west side of the eastern border of Sichuan-Yunnan block, the stress field is much more complicated, indicting the strong influence of local structures to the stress field, especially the NE striking of JPS-YL over-thrusting tectonic structure located in the interior of Sichuan-Yunnan block.(3)The moment center depths of events occurred in the Sichuan-Yunnan active block are within 15km deep, and mostly among 5~15km, suggesting that the brittle seismic layer is among the depth of 5~15km in the upper and middle crust.

  15. Regional electric field induced by electroconvulsive therapy in a realistic finite element head model: Influence of white matter anisotropic conductivity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Hee; Deng, Zhi-De; Kim, Tae-Seong; Laine, Andrew F.; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first computational study investigating the electric field (E-field) strength generated by various electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) electrode configurations in specific brain regions of interest (ROIs) that have putative roles in the therapeutic action and/or adverse side effects of ECT. This study also characterizes the impact of the white matter (WM) conductivity anisotropy on the E-field distribution. A finite element head model incorporating tissue heterogeneity and WM anisotropic conductivity was constructed based on structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and diffusion tensor MRI data. We computed the spatial E-field distributions generated by three standard ECT electrode placements including bilateral (BL), bifrontal (BF), and right unilateral (RUL) and an investigational electrode configuration for focal electrically administered seizure therapy (FEAST). The key results are that (1) the median E-field strength over the whole brain is 3.9, 1.5, 2.3, and 2.6 V/cm for the BL, BF, RUL, and FEAST electrode configurations, respectively, which coupled with the broad spread of the BL E-field suggests a biophysical basis for observations of superior efficacy of BL ECT compared to BF and RUL ECT; (2) in the hippocampi, BL ECT produces a median E-field of 4.8 V/cm that is 1.5–2.8 times stronger than that for the other electrode configurations, consistent with the more pronounced amnestic effects of BL ECT; and (3) neglecting the WM conductivity anisotropy results in E-field strength error up to 18% overall and up to 39% in specific ROIs, motivating the inclusion of the WM conductivity anisotropy in accurate head models. This computational study demonstrates how the realistic finite element head model incorporating tissue conductivity anisotropy provides quantitative insight into the biophysics of ECT, which may shed light on the differential clinical outcomes seen with various forms of ECT, and may guide the development of novel stimulation

  16. Preliminary Analysis of Observations on the Ultra-Low Frequency Electric Field in the Beijing Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuang, Jiancang; Vere-Jones, David; Guan, Huaping; Ogata, Yosihiko; Ma, Li

    2005-06-01

    This paper presents a preliminary analysis of observations on ultra-low frequency ground electric signals from stations operated by the China Seismological Bureau over the last 20 years. A brief description of the instrumentation, operating procedures and data processing procedures is given. The data analyzed consists of estimates of the total strengths (cumulated amplitudes) of the electric signals during 24-hour periods. The thresholds are set low enough so that on most days a zero observation is returned. Non-zero observations are related to electric and magnetic storms, occasional man-made electrical effects, and, apparently, some pre-, co-, or postseismic signals. The main purpose of the analysis is to investigate the extent that the electric signals can be considered as preseismic in character. For this purpose the electric signals from each of five stations are jointly analyzed with the catalogue of local earthquakes within circular regions around the selected stations. A version of Ogata’s Lin-Lin algorithm is used to estimate and test the existence of a pre-seismic signal. This model allows the effect of the electric signals to be tested, even after allowing for the effects of earthquake clustering. It is found that, although the largest single effect influencing earthquake occurrence is the clustering tendency, there remains a significant preseismic component from the electrical signals. Additional tests show that the apparent effect is not postseismic in character, and persists even under variations of the model and the time periods used in the analysis. Samples of the data are presented and the full data sets have been made available on local websites.

  17. Quantification and regionalization of groundwater recharge in South-Central Kansas: Integrating field characterization, statistical analysis, and GIS

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.

    2000-01-01

    A practical methodology for recharge characterization was developed based on several years of field-oriented research at 10 sites in the Great Bend Prairie of south-central Kansas. This methodology combines the soil-water budget on a storm-by-storm year-round basis with the resulting watertable rises. The estimated 1985-1992 average annual recharge was less than 50mm/year with a range from 15 mm/year (during the 1998 drought) to 178 mm/year (during the 1993 flood year). Most of this recharge occurs during the spring months. To regionalize these site-specific estimates, an additional methodology based on multiple (forward) regression analysis combined with classification and GIS overlay analyses was developed and implemented. The multiple regression analysis showed that the most influential variables were, in order of decreasing importance, total annual precipitation, average maximum springtime soil-profile water storage, average shallowest springtime depth to watertable, and average springtime precipitation rate. Therefore, four GIS (ARC/INFO) data "layers" or coverages were constructed for the study region based on these four variables, and each such coverage was classified into the same number of data classes to avoid biasing the results. The normalized regression coefficients were employed to weigh the class rankings of each recharge-affecting variable. This approach resulted in recharge zonations that agreed well with the site recharge estimates. During the "Great Flood of 1993," when rainfall totals exceeded normal levels by -200% in the northern portion of the study region, the developed regionalization methodology was tested against such extreme conditions, and proved to be both practical, based on readily available or easily measurable data, and robust. It was concluded that the combination of multiple regression and GIS overlay analyses is a powerful and practical approach to regionalizing small samples of recharge estimates.

  18. ABRUPT CHANGES OF THE PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FIELD IN ACTIVE REGIONS AND THE IMPULSIVE PHASE OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Cliver, E. W.; Petrie, G. J. D.; Ling, A. G.

    2012-09-10

    We compared time profiles of changes of the unsigned photospheric magnetic flux in active regions with those of their associated soft X-ray (SXR) bursts for a sample of 75 {>=} M5 flares well observed by Global Oscillation Network Group longitudinal magnetographs. Sixty-six of these events had stepwise changes in the spatially integrated unsigned flux during the SXR flares. In superposed epoch plots for these 66 events, there is a sharp increase in the unsigned magnetic flux coincident with the onset of the flare impulsive phase while the end of the stepwise change corresponds to the time of peak SXR emission. We substantiated this result with a histogram-based comparison of the timing of flux steps (onset, midpoint of step, and end) for representative points in the flaring regions with their associated SXR event time markers (flare onset, onset of impulsive phase, time of peak logarithmic derivative, maximum). On an individual event basis, the principal part of the stepwise magnetic flux change occurred during the main rise phase of the SXR burst (impulsive phase onset to SXR peak) for {approx}60% of the 66 cases. We find a close timing agreement between magnetic flux steps and >100 keV emission for the three largest hard X-ray (>100 keV) bursts in our sample. These results identify the abrupt changes in photospheric magnetic fields as an impulsive phase phenomenon and indicate that the coronal magnetic field changes that drive flares are rapidly transmitted to the photosphere.

  19. Abrupt Changes of the Photospheric Magnetic Field in Active Regions and the Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Petrie, G. J. D.; Ling, A. G.

    2012-09-01

    We compared time profiles of changes of the unsigned photospheric magnetic flux in active regions with those of their associated soft X-ray (SXR) bursts for a sample of 75 >= M5 flares well observed by Global Oscillation Network Group longitudinal magnetographs. Sixty-six of these events had stepwise changes in the spatially integrated unsigned flux during the SXR flares. In superposed epoch plots for these 66 events, there is a sharp increase in the unsigned magnetic flux coincident with the onset of the flare impulsive phase while the end of the stepwise change corresponds to the time of peak SXR emission. We substantiated this result with a histogram-based comparison of the timing of flux steps (onset, midpoint of step, and end) for representative points in the flaring regions with their associated SXR event time markers (flare onset, onset of impulsive phase, time of peak logarithmic derivative, maximum). On an individual event basis, the principal part of the stepwise magnetic flux change occurred during the main rise phase of the SXR burst (impulsive phase onset to SXR peak) for ~60% of the 66 cases. We find a close timing agreement between magnetic flux steps and >100 keV emission for the three largest hard X-ray (>100 keV) bursts in our sample. These results identify the abrupt changes in photospheric magnetic fields as an impulsive phase phenomenon and indicate that the coronal magnetic field changes that drive flares are rapidly transmitted to the photosphere.

  20. Estudio del CH interestelar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olano, C.; Lemarchand, G.; Sanz, A. J.; Bava, J. A.

    El objetivo principal de este proyecto consiste en el estudio de la distribución y abundancia del CH en nubes interestelares a través de la observación de las líneas hiperfinas del CH en 3,3 GHz. El CH es una molécula de amplia distribución en el espacio interestelar y una de las pocas especies que han sido observadas tanto con técnicas de radio como ópticas. Desde el punto de vista tecnológico se ha desarrollado un cabezal de receptor que permitirá la realización de observaciones polarimétricas en la frecuencia de 3,3 GHz, con una temperatura del sistema de 60 K y un ancho de banda de 140 MHz, y que será instalado en el foco primario de la antena parabólica del IAR. El cabezal del receptor es capaz de detectar señales polarizadas, separando las componentes de polarización circular derecha e izquierda. Para tal fin el cabezal consta de dos ramas receptoras que amplificarán la señal y la trasladarán a una frecuencia más baja (frecuencia intermedia), permitiendo de esa forma un mejor transporte de la señal a la sala de control para su posterior procesamiento. El receptor además de tener características polarimétricas, podrá ser usado en el continuo y en la línea, utilizando las ventajas observacionales y de procesamiento de señal que actualmente posee el IAR.

  1. CO2 Fluxes Monitoring at the Level of Field Agroecosystem in Moscow Region of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshalkina, Joulia; Mazirov, Ilya; Samardzic, Miljan; Yaroslavtsev, Alexis; Valentini, Riccardo; Vasenev, Ivan

    2014-05-01

    The Central Russia is still one of the less GHG-investigated European areas especially in case of agroecosystem-level carbon dioxide fluxes monitoring by eddy covariance method. The eddy covariance technique is a statistical method to measure and calculate vertical turbulent fluxes within atmospheric boundary layers. The major assumption of the metod is that measurements at a point can represent an entire upwind area. Eddy covariance researches, which could be considered as repeated for the same area, are very rare. The research has been carried out on the Precision Farming Experimental Field of the Russian Timiryazev State Agricultural University (Moscow, Russia) in 2013 under the support of RF Government grant No. 11.G34.31.0079. Arable derno-podzoluvisls have around 1 The results have shown high daily and seasonal dynamic of agroecosystem CO2 emission. Sowing activates soil microbiological activity and the average soil CO2 emission and adsorption are rising at the same time. CO2 streams are intensified after crop emerging from values of 3 to 7 μmol/s-m2 for emission, and from values of 5 to 20 μmol/s-m2 for adsorption. Stabilization of the flow has come at achieving plants height of 10-12 cm. The vegetation period is characterized by high average soil CO2 emission and adsorption at the same time, but the adsorption is significantly higher. The resulted CO2 absorption during the day is approximately 2-5 times higher than emissions at night. For example, in mid-June, the absorption value was about 0.45 mol/m2 during the day-time, and the emission value was about 0.1 mol/m2 at night. After harvesting CO2 emission is becoming essentially higher than adsorption. Autumn and winter data are fluctuate around zero, but for some periods a small predominance of CO2 emissions over the absorption may be observed. The daily dynamics of CO2 emissions depends on the air temperature with the correlation coefficient changes between 0.4 and 0.8. Crop stage, agrotechnological

  2. Wide-field retinal optical coherence tomography with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for enhanced imaging of targeted regions

    PubMed Central

    Polans, James; Keller, Brenton; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M.; LaRocca, Francesco; Cole, Elijah; Whitson, Heather E.; Lad, Eleonora M.; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    The peripheral retina of the human eye offers a unique opportunity for assessment and monitoring of ocular diseases. We have developed a novel wide-field (>70°) optical coherence tomography system (WF-OCT) equipped with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) for enhancing the visualization of smaller (<25°) targeted regions in the peripheral retina. We iterated the WSAO algorithm at the speed of individual OCT B-scans (~20 ms) by using raw spectral interferograms to calculate the optimization metric. Our WSAO approach with a 3 mm beam diameter permitted primarily low- but also high- order peripheral wavefront correction in less than 10 seconds. In preliminary imaging studies in five normal human subjects, we quantified statistically significant changes with WSAO correction, corresponding to a 10.4% improvement in average pixel brightness (signal) and 7.0% improvement in high frequency content (resolution) when visualizing 1 mm (~3.5°) B-scans of the peripheral (>23°) retina. We demonstrated the ability of our WF-OCT system to acquire non wavefront-corrected wide-field images rapidly, which could then be used to locate regions of interest, zoom into targeted features, and visualize the same region at different time points. A pilot clinical study was conducted on seven healthy volunteers and two subjects with prodromal Alzheimer’s disease which illustrated the capability to image Drusen-like pathologies as far as 32.5° from the fovea in un-averaged volume scans. This work suggests that the proposed combination of WF-OCT and WSAO may find applications in the diagnosis and treatment of ocular, and potentially neurodegenerative, diseases of the peripheral retina, including diabetes and Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:28101398

  3. Wide-field retinal optical coherence tomography with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics for enhanced imaging of targeted regions.

    PubMed

    Polans, James; Keller, Brenton; Carrasco-Zevallos, Oscar M; LaRocca, Francesco; Cole, Elijah; Whitson, Heather E; Lad, Eleonora M; Farsiu, Sina; Izatt, Joseph A

    2017-01-01

    The peripheral retina of the human eye offers a unique opportunity for assessment and monitoring of ocular diseases. We have developed a novel wide-field (>70°) optical coherence tomography system (WF-OCT) equipped with wavefront sensorless adaptive optics (WSAO) for enhancing the visualization of smaller (<25°) targeted regions in the peripheral retina. We iterated the WSAO algorithm at the speed of individual OCT B-scans (~20 ms) by using raw spectral interferograms to calculate the optimization metric. Our WSAO approach with a 3 mm beam diameter permitted primarily low- but also high- order peripheral wavefront correction in less than 10 seconds. In preliminary imaging studies in five normal human subjects, we quantified statistically significant changes with WSAO correction, corresponding to a 10.4% improvement in average pixel brightness (signal) and 7.0% improvement in high frequency content (resolution) when visualizing 1 mm (~3.5°) B-scans of the peripheral (>23°) retina. We demonstrated the ability of our WF-OCT system to acquire non wavefront-corrected wide-field images rapidly, which could then be used to locate regions of interest, zoom into targeted features, and visualize the same region at different time points. A pilot clinical study was conducted on seven healthy volunteers and two subjects with prodromal Alzheimer's disease which illustrated the capability to image Drusen-like pathologies as far as 32.5° from the fovea in un-averaged volume scans. This work suggests that the proposed combination of WF-OCT and WSAO may find applications in the diagnosis and treatment of ocular, and potentially neurodegenerative, diseases of the peripheral retina, including diabetes and Alzheimer's disease.

  4. Space Technology 5 (ST-5) Observations of the Imbalance of Region 1 and 2 Field-Aligned Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan

    2010-01-01

    Space Technology 5 (ST-5) is a three micro-satellite constellation deployed into a 300 x 4500 km, dawn-dusk, sun-synchronous polar orbit from March 22 to June 21, 2006, for technology validations. In this study, we use the in-situ magnetic field observations from Space Technology 5 mission to quantify the imbalance of Region 1 (R1) and Region 2 (R2) currents. During the three-month duration of the ST5 mission, geomagnetic conditions range from quiet to moderately active. We find that the R1 current intensity is consistently stronger than the R2 current intensity both for the dawnside and the duskside large-scale field-aligned current system. The net currents flowing into (out of) the ionosphere in the dawnside (duskside) are in the order of 5% of the total RI currents. We also find that the net currents flowing into or out of the ionosphere are controlled by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction in the same way as the field-aligned currents themselves are. Since the net currents due to the imbalance of the R1 and R2 currents require that their closure currents flow across the polar cap from dawn to dusk as Pedersen currents, our results indicate that the total amount of the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents is in the order of approx. 0.1 MA. This study, although with a very limited dataset, is one of the first attempts to quantify the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents. Given the importance of the Joule heating due to Pedersen currents to the high-latitude ionospheric electrodynamics, quantifying the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents and associated Joule heating is needed for developing models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  5. Far-field model of the regional influence of affluent plumes from Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D. P.

    1985-07-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants discharge large volumes of cold water into the upper ocean. A three-dimensional, limited-area model was developed to investigate the regional influence of the far-field effluent plume created by the negatively buoyant discharge. The model was applied to discharges from a 40-MW sub e OTEC plant into coastal waters characterized by various ambient ocean conditions. A typical ambient temperature structure and nutrient distribution, as well as the behavior of the effluent plume itself, were strongly modified by the discharge-induced circulation. Although temperature perturbations in the plume were small, upward entrainment of nutrients from below the thermocline was significant. The regional influence of discharges from an 80-MW sub e OTEC plant, the interactions between the discharges from two adjacent 40-MW sub e OTEC plants, and the effects of coastal boundary and bottom discharge were examined with respect to the regional influence of a 40-MW sub e OTEC plant located in deep water off a coast (base case).

  6. Far-field model of the regional influence of effluent plumes from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, D.P.

    1985-07-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants discharge large volumes of cold water into the upper ocean. A three-dimensional, limited-area model was developed to investigate the regional influence of the far-field effluent plume created by the negatively buoyant discharge. The model was applied to discharges from a 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant into coastal waters characterized by various ambient ocean conditions. A typical ambient temperature structure and nutrient distribution, as well as the behavior of the effluent plume itself, were strongly modified by the discharge-induced circulation. Although temperature perturbations in the plume were small, upward entrainment of nutrients from below the thermocline was significant. The regional influence of discharges from an 80-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant, the interactions between the discharges from two adjacent 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plants, and the effects of coastal boundary and bottom discharge were examined with respect to the regional influence of a 40-MW/sub e/ OTEC plant located in deep water off a coast (base case).

  7. Monitoring soil erosion in terraced catchments in Mediterranean regions: a field experiment in Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camera, Corrado; Djuma, Hakan; Zoumides, Christos; Eliades, Marinos; Bruggeman, Adriana; Abate, Dante; Faka, Marina; Hermon, Sorin

    2016-04-01

    Terraces retained by dry-stone walls are very common features in mountainous Mediterranean environments. These structures provide accessible agricultural land on steep slopes, favoring water infiltration and reducing water runoff and soil erosion. However, during the last decades, an increasing trend of agricultural land abandonment has resulted in a lack of maintenance of the terrace walls and the onset of a general process of land degradation. The objective of this study is the quantification of soil erosion in a small terraced catchment (10,000 m2), located on the north-eastern slope of the Troodos Mountains (Cyprus), at an elevation of 1,300 m a.s.l. The catchment is cultivated with vineyards and it is representative of the main agricultural land use in the Troodos region. Soil erosion is measured by sediment traps and laser scans are made to assess changes in terrace geometry. In addition, a weather station measuring rainfall, temperature and relative humidity has been installed in the catchment, along with 18 soil moisture sensors, to relate soil erosion processes with climate and (sub)surface hydrology. A total of 10 sediment traps, five pairs, have been installed in the study site, catching five well-maintained sections of a dry-stone wall and five degraded (collapsed) sections. Each trap is 1 m wide. In detail, two terraces, 11 and 14 m long, located at the same elevation and separated by a strip of natural vegetation, are monitored with four and six traps, respectively. To get a complete picture of the erosion processes occurring on the selected area, the trap pairs collect sediment from both the collapsed and the well maintained wall sections of the two terraces. In addition, terrace area of two traps is delineated by metal borders (1x4 m2) to relate erosion rates to a known drainage area. The sediment traps are emptied after all rainfall events. At the beginning and end of the rainy season, a laser scanning survey of a terrace located uphill of the ones

  8. Regional Impacts of Woodland Expansion on Nitrogen Oxide Emissions from Texas Savannahs: Combining Field, Modeling and Remote Sensing Approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asner, Gregory P. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Woody encroachment has contributed to documented changes world-wide and locally in the southwestern U.S. Specifically, in North Texas rangelands encroaching mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa var. glandulosa) a known N-fixing species has caused changes in aboveground biomass. While measurements of aboveground plant production are relatively common, measures of soil N availability are scarce and vary widely. N trace gas emissions (nitric and nitrous oxide) flom soils reflect patterns in current N cycling rates and availability as they are stimulated by inputs of organic and inorganic N. Quantification of N oxide emissions from savanna soils may depend upon the spatial distribution of woody plant canopies, and specifically upon the changes in N availability and cycling and subsequent N trace gas production as influenced by the shift from herbaceous to woody vegetation type. The main goal of this research was to determine whether remotely sensible parameters of vegetation structure and soil type could be used to quantify biogeochemical changes in N at local, landscape and regional scales. To accomplish this goal, field-based measurements of N trace gases were carried out between 2000-2001, encompassing the acquisition of imaging spectrometer data from the NASA Airborne Visible and Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) on September 29, 2001. Both biotic (vegetation type and soil organic N) and abiotic (soil type, soil pH, temperature, soil moisture, and soil inorganic N) controls were analyzed for their contributions to observed spatial and temporal variation in soil N gas fluxes. These plot level studies were used to develop relationships between spatially extensive, field-based measurements of N oxide fluxes and remotely sensible aboveground vegetation and soil properties, and to evaluate the short-term controls over N oxide emissions through intensive field wetting experiments. The relationship between N oxide emissions, remotely-sensed parameters (vegetation cover, and

  9. Large differences in global and regional soil carbon stocks estimated by different products: intercomparison and evaluation with field measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tifafi, M.; Guenet, B.

    2015-12-01

    Soils are the major component of the terrestrial ecosystem and the largest organic carbon reservoir on Earth. However, it's a non-renewable natural resource and quite reactive to human disturbance and climate change. Even small modifications, of less than a percent, of the huge amount of carbon contained in soils may lead to sources or sinks of greenhouse gases that could be significant relative to those released by fossil fuel combustion. Consequently, soil carbon dynamic is an important source of uncertainties for future climate predictions. To tackle this difficulty, there is a growing need for global and specific information on the soils to better understand the mechanisms controlling soil carbon dynamic and better constraints the Earth system models. Several global information systems on soil parameters already exist but these products are not always consistent and lack of spatial details. The aim of our work is to compare the soil organic carbon stock given by different products : The World Soil Information (ISRIC), the Harmonized World Soil Database (HWSD) and The Northern Circumpolar Soil Carbon Database (NCSCD) and better understand what are the main differences that may explain the inconstencies between the products. We calculated global and regional soil carbon stocks with the three products at different depths and we observed that they may largely differ in particular in boreal regions. We also observed bigger differences in the stocks estimated for surface soils compare to deep soils. Differences in boreal regions may be due to high disparities in soil organic carbon concentration whereas differences in other regions may be more likely due to different bulk densities. Finally, we compared the three products with field data available within the International Soil Carbon Network and we observed that each products present important drawbacks in representing the spatial variability. The estimation of the global soil carbon stocks is still quite uncertain

  10. The nature of magmatism at Palinpinon geothermal field, Negros Island, Philippines: implications for geothermal activity and regional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rae, Andrew J.; Cooke, David R.; Phillips, David; Zaide-Delfin, Maribel

    2004-01-01

    The Palinpinon geothermal field, Negros Island, Philippines is a high-temperature, liquid-dominated geothermal system in an active island-arc volcanic setting. This paper presents a regional context for the Palinpinon geology, discusses the petrogenetic evolution of magmatism in the district and assesses the genetic relationships between intrusion and geothermal circulation. The oldest rock formation, the Lower Puhagan Volcanic Formation (Middle Miocene), is part of a volcanic sequence that is traceable throughout the Visayas region and is related to subduction of the Sulu Sea oceanic basin in a southeasterly direction beneath the Sulu arc. Late Miocene to Early Pliocene times mark a period of regional subsidence and marine sedimentation. A thick sequence of calcareous sediments (Okoy Formation) was deposited during this period. Magmatism in Early Pliocene to Recent times coincided with commencement of subduction at the Negros-Sulu Arc. This produced basaltic andesites and andesites belonging to the Southern Negros and Cuernos Volcanic Formations. During this time the Puhagan dikes and the Nasuji Pluton intruded Middle Miocene, Late Miocene and Early-Late Pliocene formations. Based on radiogenic ( 40Ar/ 39Ar) dating of hornblende, the Puhagan dikes are 4.1-4.2 Ma and the Nasuji Pluton 0.3-0.7 Ma. This age difference confirms these intrusions are not genetically related. The Early Pliocene age of the Puhagan dikes also confirms they are not the heat source for the current geothermal system and that a much younger intrusion is situated beyond drill depths. Igneous rock formations in southern Negros are the products of regional island-arc magmatism with medium K, calc-alkaline, basaltic to dacitic compositions. Their adakitic affinity implies that the melting of subducted oceanic basalt has influenced magmatism in this region. Considering the regional tectonic history the most likely scenarios for the generation of slab melts are: (1) during the Middle Miocene, by the

  11. Abdominal wall Type-I complex regional pain syndrome treated effectively with peripheral nerve field stimulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linqiu; Chou, Henry; Holder, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a well-documented complication of abdominal surgery. However, abdominal wall complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare medical condition. We present a case of abdominal wall CRPS and its treatment with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNfS). A 34-year-old female presented with right periumbilical pain for 2 years. She developed burning, sharp and stabbing pain with allodynia (extremely sensitive to wind and light touch) and erythema or pallor 2 weeks after an exploratory appendectomy. The extensive evaluation ruled out the underlining pathology. After she failed conservative therapies, she underwent a 7-day trial of thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and abdominal wall PNfS. Thoracic SCS failed to provide pain relief; however, PNfS provided significant relief (>90%) of burning sensation. It has now been 5 years since the PNfS was implanted and she continues to demonstrate substantial pain relief. PMID:28044002

  12. Calculation of population doses with RADTRAN for route segments that have an unpopulated near-field region

    SciTech Connect

    Kanipe, F.L.; Neuhauser, S.; Sprung, J.L.

    1998-03-01

    The RADTRAN code (Neuhauser and Kanipe, 1994) models the radiological consequences of the transportation of radioactive materials, both the exposures that will occur if the transport occurs without incident, and the exposures that may occur should the transport vehicle be involved in an accident while en route. Because accidents might occur at any point along a transportation route, RADTRAN divides the route into segments (links) and uses a uniform population density and constant meteorological conditions (wind speed and atmospheric stability) to represent the population and weather characteristics of each route segment. A way to perform RADTRAN calculations, that allows an unpopulated near-field region along a transportation link to be approximately modeled, is described, validated, and then illustratively applied to a coastal sailing route.

  13. Enhancement of cross-field transport into the private region of detached-divertor in Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, H.; Ohno, N.; Tsuji, Y.; Kajita, S.; Masuzaki, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Morisaki, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Komori, A.; LHD Experimental Group

    2010-10-01

    The fluctuation of ion saturation currents in the attached- and detached-divertor plasmas of the Large Helical Device [Fujiwara et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1355 (2001)] has been measured using a Langmuir probe array embedded in a divertor plate. Analytical results indicate that these fluctuation properties differ considerably from each other; for instance, the mean value distribution expands to and positive spikes propagate toward a private region from the divertor leg in the detached-divertor. We investigated the magnetic field lines traced from probe electrodes by using the KMAG code [Nakamura et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. 69, 41 (1993)], and it is then confirmed that the propagation direction of positive spikes corresponds to that predicted by the theory of blobby plasma transport. This phenomenon is expected to lead to the broadening of plasma particle and heat fluxes to the divertor plate.

  14. Enhancement of cross-field transport into the private region of detached-divertor in Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Ohno, N.; Tsuji, Y.; Kajita, S.; Masuzaki, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Morisaki, T.; Tsuchiya, H.; Komori, A.

    2010-10-15

    The fluctuation of ion saturation currents in the attached- and detached-divertor plasmas of the Large Helical Device [Fujiwara et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 1355 (2001)] has been measured using a Langmuir probe array embedded in a divertor plate. Analytical results indicate that these fluctuation properties differ considerably from each other; for instance, the mean value distribution expands to and positive spikes propagate toward a private region from the divertor leg in the detached-divertor. We investigated the magnetic field lines traced from probe electrodes by using the KMAG code [Nakamura et al., J. Plasma Fusion Res. 69, 41 (1993)], and it is then confirmed that the propagation direction of positive spikes corresponds to that predicted by the theory of blobby plasma transport. This phenomenon is expected to lead to the broadening of plasma particle and heat fluxes to the divertor plate.

  15. Characterization of field and vaccine infectious bursal disease viruses from Nigeria revealing possible virulence and regional markers in the VP2 minor hydrophilic peaks.

    PubMed

    Adamu, J; Owoade, A A; Abdu, P A; Kazeem, H M; Fatihu, M Y

    2013-01-01

    Outbreaks of infectious bursal disease in vaccinated chicken flocks are frequent in Nigeria. For the control of infectious bursal disease, live vaccines based on foreign infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) strains are used. The present study investigated the phylogenetic relationship between field and vaccine IBDV strains from northwestern Nigeria. Thirty field IBDV strains and three commercial vaccines strains were characterized through sequencing the VP2 hypervariable region. In addition, the complete genome segment A coding region for two vaccines and two field strains was sequenced. The deduced amino acid sequences (position 212 to 331) of IBDV strains from Nigeria and other regions of the world were aligned and possible regional and virulence markers were identified associated with VP2 minor hydrophilic peaks. Reversion to virulence of a vaccine strain with a Q to L mutation at position 253 was observed. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a unique cluster of northwest Nigerian field IBDV strains alone or related to imported characterized classical and very virulent IBDV vaccines. The results suggest that when IBDV strains spread from their region of origin to a different region they mutate alongside indigenous field strains but may retain their identity on the VP2 region.

  16. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop 2: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region and Field Trips in the Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P. (Editor); Edgett, K. S. (Editor); Rice, J. W., Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This volume, the first of two comprising the technical report for this workshop, contains papers that have been accepted for presentation at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop 2: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region, September 24-30, 1995, in Spokane, Washington. The Mars Pathfinder Project received a new start in October 1993 as one of the next missions in NASA's long-term Mars exploration program. The mission involves landing a single vehicle on the surface of Mars in 1997. The project is one of the first Discovery-class missions and is required to be a quick, low-cost mission and achieve a set of significant but focused engineering, science, and technology objectives. The primary objective is to demonstrate a low-cost cruise, entry, descent, and landing system required to place a payload on the martian surface in a safe, operational configuration. Additional objectives include the deployment and operation of various science instruments and a microrover. Pathfinder paves the way for a cost-effective implementation of future Mars lander missions. Also included in this volume is the field trip guide to the Channeled Scabland and Missoula Lake Break-out. On July 4, 1997, Mars Pathfinder is scheduled to land near 19.5 deg N, 32.8 deg W, in a portion of Ares Vallis. The landing ellipse covers a huge (100 x 200 km) area that appears to include both depositional and erosional landforms created by one or more giant, catastrophic floods. One of the best known terrestrial analogs to martian outflow channels (such as Ares Vallis) is the region known as the Channeled Scabland. The field trip guide describes some of the geomorphological features of the Channeled Scabland and adjacent Lake Missoula break-out area near Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

  17. Continuous day-time time series of E-region equatorial electric fields derived from ground magnetic observatory data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Chulliat, A.; Maus, S.

    2012-12-01

    The day-time eastward equatorial electric field (EEF) in the ionospheric E-region plays an important role in equatorial ionospheric dynamics. It is responsible for driving the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) current system, equatorial vertical ion drifts, and the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). Due to its importance, there is much interest in accurately measuring and modeling the EEF. However, there are limited sources of direct EEF measurements with full temporal and spatial coverage of the equatorial ionosphere. In this work, we propose a method of estimating a continuous day-time time series of the EEF at any longitude, provided there is a pair of ground magnetic observatories in the region which can accurately track changes in the strength of the EEJ. First, we derive a climatological unit latitudinal current profile from direct overflights of the CHAMP satellite and use delta H measurements from the ground observatory pair to determine the magnitude of the current. The time series of current profiles is then inverted for the EEF by solving the governing electrodynamic equations. While this method has previously been applied and validated in the Peruvian sector, in this work we demonstrate the method using a pair of magnetometers in Africa (Samogossoni, SAM, 0.18 degrees magnetic latitude and Tamanrasset, TAM, 11.5 degrees magnetic latitude) and validate the resulting EEF values against the CINDI ion velocity meter (IVM) instrument on the C/NOFS satellite. We find a very good 80% correlation with C/NOFS IVM measurements and a root-mean-square difference of 9 m/s in vertical drift velocity. This technique can be extended to any pair of ground observatories which can capture the day-time strength of the EEJ. We plan to apply this work to more observatory pairs around the globe and distribute real-time equatorial electric field values to the community.

  18. Temperature field and heat flow of the Danish-German border region - borehole measurements and numerical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, Sven; Balling, Niels

    2016-04-01

    We present a regional 3D numerical crustal temperature model and analyze the present-day conductive thermal field of the Danish-German border region located in the North German Basin. A comprehensive analysis of borehole and well-log data on a regional scale is conducted to derive both the model parameterization with a spatial distribution of rock thermal conductivity and new heat-flow values. The latter one are used to setup the numerical lower boundary condition. Measured heat flow and borehole temperature observations (59 values from 24 wells) are used to constrain the modelling results (calibration and validation). The prediction uncertainties between observed and modelled temperatures at deep borehole sites are small (rms = 3.5°C). For eight deep boreholes, new values of terrestrial surface heat flow are derived, ranging between 72 and 84 mW/m² (mean of 80 ± 5 mW/m²). Those values are up to 20 mW/m² higher than low values reported in some previous studies for this region. Heat flow from the mantle is estimated to be between 33 and 40 mW/m² (q1-q3; mean of 37 ± 7 mW/m²). Pronounced lateral temperature variations are caused mainly by complex geological structures, including a large amount of salt structures and marked lateral variations in the thickness of basin sediments. The associated variations in rock thermal conductivity generate significant variations in model heat flow and large variations in temperature gradients. Major geothermal sandstone reservoirs (e.g. Rhaetian and Middle Buntsandstein) are mainly found with temperatures within the range of 40-80°C, which is suitable for low enthalpy heating purposes in most of the area. Higher temperatures of up to 120-160°C, of interest for the production of electricity, are observed only in the very south-eastern part of the study area (Glückstadt-Graben area). In combination with the structural geological model and information on reservoir hydraulic properties, the presented temperature model will

  19. NEAR-INFRARED PERIODIC AND OTHER VARIABLE FIELD STARS IN THE FIELD OF THE CYGNUS OB7 STAR-FORMING REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Wolk, Scott J.; Rice, Thomas S.; Aspin, Colin A.

    2013-04-15

    We present a subset of the results of a three-season, 124 night, near-infrared monitoring campaign of the dark clouds Lynds 1003 and Lynds 1004 in the Cygnus OB7 star-forming region. In this paper, we focus on the field star population. Using three seasons of UKIRT J, H, and K-band observations spanning 1.5 years, we obtained high-quality photometry on 9200 stars down to J = 17 mag, with photometric uncertainty better than 0.04 mag. After excluding known disk-bearing stars we identify 149 variables-1.6% of the sample. Of these, about 60 are strictly periodic, with periods predominantly <2 days. We conclude this group is dominated by eclipsing binaries. A few stars have long period signals of between 20 and 60 days. About 25 stars have weak modulated signals, but it was not clear if these were periodic. Some of the stars in this group may be diskless young stellar objects with relatively large variability due to cool starspots. The remaining {approx}60 stars showed variations which appear to be purely stochastic.

  20. Diffraction of high-intensity field in focal region as dynamics of nonlinear system with low-frequency dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudenko, O. V.; Hedberg, C. M.

    2015-01-01

    The stationary profile in the focal region of a focused nonlinear acoustic wave is described. Three models following from the Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya (KZ) equation with three independent variables are used: (i) the simplified one-dimensional Ostrovsky-Vakhnenko equation, (ii) the system of equations for paraxial series expansion of the acoustic field in powers of transverse coordinates, and (iii) the KZ equation reduced to two independent variables. The structure of the last equation is analogous to the Westervelt equation. Linearization through the Legendre transformation and reduction to the well-studied Euler-Tricomi equation is shown. At high intensities the stationary profiles are periodic sequences of arc sections having singularities of derivative in their matching points. The occurrence of arc profiles was pointed out by Makov. These appear in different nonlinear systems with low-frequency dispersion. Profiles containing discontinuities (shock fronts) change their form while passing through the focal region and are non-stationary waves. The numerical estimations of maximum pressure and intensity in the focus agree with computer calculations and experimental measurements.

  1. Study of novel junctionless Ge n-Tunneling Field-Effect Transistors with lightly doped drain (LDD) region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangyu; Hu, Huiyong; Wang, Bin; Wang, Meng; Han, Genquan; Cui, Shimin; Zhang, Heming

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a novel junctionless Ge n-Tunneling Field-Effect Transistors (TFET) structure is proposed. The simulation results show that Ion = 5.5 × 10-5A/μm is achieved. The junctionless device structure enhances Ion effectively and increases the region where significant BTBT occurs, comparing with the normal Ge-nTEFT. The impact of the lightly doped drain (LDD) region is investigated. A comparison of Ion and Ioff of the junctionless Ge n-TFET with different channel doping concentration ND and LDD doping concentration NLDD is studied. Ioff is reduced 1 order of magnitude with the optimized ND and NLDD are 1 × 1018cm-3 and 1 × 1017 cm-3, respectively. To reduce the gate induced drain leakage (GIDL) current, the impact of the sloped gate oxide structure is also studied. By employing the sloped gate oxide structure, the below 60 mV/decade subthreshold swing S = 46.2 mV/decade is achieved at Ion = 4.05 × 10-5A/μm and Ion/Ioff = 5.7 × 106.

  2. Polarization signatures of relativistic magnetohydrodynamic shocks in the blazar emission region. I. Force-free helical magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Deng, Wei; Li, Hui; Bottcher, Markus

    2016-01-20

    The optical radiation and polarization signatures in blazars are known to be highly variable during flaring activities. It is frequently argued that shocks are the main driver of the flaring events. However, the spectral variability modelings generally lack detailed considerations of the self-consistent magnetic field evolution modeling; thus, so far the associated optical polarization signatures are poorly understood. We present the first simultaneous modeling of the optical radiation and polarization signatures based on 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of relativistic shocks in the blazar emission environment, with the simplest physical assumptions. By comparing the results with observations, we find that shocks in a weakly magnetized environment will largely lead to significant changes in the optical polarization signatures, which are seldom seen in observations. Hence an emission region with relatively strong magnetization is preferred. In such an environment, slow shocks may produce minor flares with either erratic polarization fluctuations or considerable polarization variations, depending on the parameters; fast shocks can produce major flares with smooth polarization angle rotations. In addition, the magnetic fields in both cases are observed to actively revert to the original topology after the shocks. In addition, all these features are consistent with observations. Future observations of the radiation and polarization signatures will further constrain the flaring mechanism and the blazar emission environment.

  3. Polarization signatures of relativistic magnetohydrodynamic shocks in the blazar emission region. I. Force-free helical magnetic fields

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Haocheng; Deng, Wei; Li, Hui; ...

    2016-01-20

    The optical radiation and polarization signatures in blazars are known to be highly variable during flaring activities. It is frequently argued that shocks are the main driver of the flaring events. However, the spectral variability modelings generally lack detailed considerations of the self-consistent magnetic field evolution modeling; thus, so far the associated optical polarization signatures are poorly understood. We present the first simultaneous modeling of the optical radiation and polarization signatures based on 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of relativistic shocks in the blazar emission environment, with the simplest physical assumptions. By comparing the results with observations, we find that shocks inmore » a weakly magnetized environment will largely lead to significant changes in the optical polarization signatures, which are seldom seen in observations. Hence an emission region with relatively strong magnetization is preferred. In such an environment, slow shocks may produce minor flares with either erratic polarization fluctuations or considerable polarization variations, depending on the parameters; fast shocks can produce major flares with smooth polarization angle rotations. In addition, the magnetic fields in both cases are observed to actively revert to the original topology after the shocks. In addition, all these features are consistent with observations. Future observations of the radiation and polarization signatures will further constrain the flaring mechanism and the blazar emission environment.« less

  4. On the applicability of the standard approaches for evaluating a neoclassical radial electric field in a tokamak edge region

    DOE PAGES

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Simakov, A. N.; ...

    2013-08-27

    The use of the standard approaches for evaluating a neoclassical radial electric field Er, i.e., the Ampere (or gyro-Poisson) equation, requires accurate calculation of the difference between the gyroaveraged electron and ion particle fluxes (or densities). In the core of a tokamak, the nontrivial difference appears only in high-order corrections to a local Maxwellian distribution due to the intrinsic ambipolarity of particle transport. The evaluation of such high-order corrections may be inconsistent with the accuracy of the standard long wavelength gyrokinetic equation (GKE), thus imposing limitations on the applicability of the standard approaches. However, in the edge of a tokamak,more » charge-exchange collisions with neutrals and prompt ion orbit losses can drive non-intrinsically ambipolar particle fluxes for which a nontrivial (Er-dependent) difference between the electron and ion fluxes appears already in a low order and can be accurately predicted by the long wavelength GKE. As a result, the parameter regimes where the radial electric field dynamics in the tokamak edge region is dominated by the non-intrinsically ambipolar processes, thus allowing for the use of the standard approaches, are discussed.« less

  5. On the applicability of the standard approaches for evaluating a neoclassical radial electric field in a tokamak edge region

    SciTech Connect

    Dorf, M. A.; Cohen, R. H.; Simakov, A. N.; Joseph, I.

    2013-08-27

    The use of the standard approaches for evaluating a neoclassical radial electric field Er, i.e., the Ampere (or gyro-Poisson) equation, requires accurate calculation of the difference between the gyroaveraged electron and ion particle fluxes (or densities). In the core of a tokamak, the nontrivial difference appears only in high-order corrections to a local Maxwellian distribution due to the intrinsic ambipolarity of particle transport. The evaluation of such high-order corrections may be inconsistent with the accuracy of the standard long wavelength gyrokinetic equation (GKE), thus imposing limitations on the applicability of the standard approaches. However, in the edge of a tokamak, charge-exchange collisions with neutrals and prompt ion orbit losses can drive non-intrinsically ambipolar particle fluxes for which a nontrivial (Er-dependent) difference between the electron and ion fluxes appears already in a low order and can be accurately predicted by the long wavelength GKE. As a result, the parameter regimes where the radial electric field dynamics in the tokamak edge region is dominated by the non-intrinsically ambipolar processes, thus allowing for the use of the standard approaches, are discussed.

  6. POLARIZATION SIGNATURES OF RELATIVISTIC MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC SHOCKS IN THE BLAZAR EMISSION REGION. I. FORCE-FREE HELICAL MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haocheng; Deng, Wei; Li, Hui; Böttcher, Markus

    2016-01-20

    The optical radiation and polarization signatures in blazars are known to be highly variable during flaring activities. It is frequently argued that shocks are the main driver of the flaring events. However, the spectral variability modelings generally lack detailed considerations of the self-consistent magnetic field evolution modeling; thus, so far the associated optical polarization signatures are poorly understood. We present the first simultaneous modeling of the optical radiation and polarization signatures based on 3D magnetohydrodynamic simulations of relativistic shocks in the blazar emission environment, with the simplest physical assumptions. By comparing the results with observations, we find that shocks in a weakly magnetized environment will largely lead to significant changes in the optical polarization signatures, which are seldom seen in observations. Hence an emission region with relatively strong magnetization is preferred. In such an environment, slow shocks may produce minor flares with either erratic polarization fluctuations or considerable polarization variations, depending on the parameters; fast shocks can produce major flares with smooth polarization angle rotations. In addition, the magnetic fields in both cases are observed to actively revert to the original topology after the shocks. All these features are consistent with observations. Future observations of the radiation and polarization signatures will further constrain the flaring mechanism and the blazar emission environment.

  7. NEW YOUNG STAR CANDIDATES IN THE TAURUS-AURIGA REGION AS SELECTED FROM THE WIDE-FIELD INFRARED SURVEY EXPLORER

    SciTech Connect

    Rebull, L. M.; Padgett, D. L.; Noriega-Crespo, A. E-mail: alberto@ipac.caltech.edu E-mail: karl.r.stapelfeldt@nasa.gov

    2011-09-01

    The Taurus Molecular Cloud subtends a large solid angle on the sky, in excess of 250 deg{sup 2}. The search for legitimate Taurus members to date has been limited by sky coverage as well as the challenge of distinguishing members from field interlopers. The Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer has recently observed the entire sky, and we take advantage of the opportunity to search for young stellar object (YSO) candidate Taurus members from a {approx}260 deg{sup 2} region designed to encompass previously identified Taurus members. We use near- and mid-infrared colors to select objects with apparent infrared excesses and incorporate other catalogs of ancillary data to present a list of rediscovered Taurus YSOs with infrared excesses (taken to be due to circumstellar disks), a list of rejected YSO candidates (largely galaxies), and a list of 94 surviving candidate new YSO-like Taurus members. There is likely to be contamination lingering in this candidate list, and follow-up spectra are warranted.

  8. Coordinated observations of F region 3 m field-aligned plasma irregularities associated with medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, F. F.; Wang, C. Y.; Su, C. L.; Shiokawa, K.; Saito, S.; Chu, Y. H.

    2016-04-01

    Three meter field-aligned irregularities (3 m FAIs) associated with medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) that occurred on 5 February 2008 were observed by using the Chung-Li 52 MHz coherent scatter radar. Interferometry measurements show that the plasma structures responsible for the 3 m FAI echoes are in a clumpy shape with a horizontal dimension of about 10-78 km in a height range of 220-300 km. In order to investigate the dynamic behaviors of the plasma irregularities at different scales in the bottomside of F region, the VHF radar echo structures from the 3 m FAIs combined with the 630 nm airglow images provided by the Yonaguni all-sky imager are compared and analyzed. The results show that the radar echoes were located at the west edge of the depletion zones of the 630 nm airglow image of the MSTIDs. The bulk echo structures of the 3 m FAIs drifted eastward at a mean trace velocity of about 30 m/s that is in general agreement with the zonal trace velocity of the MSTIDs shown in the 630 nm airglow images. These results suggest that the observed F region 3 m FAIs for the present case can be regarded as the targets that are frozen in the local region of the MSTIDs. In addition, the radar-observed 3 m FAI echo intensity and spectral width bear high correlations to the percentage variations of the 630 nm emission intensity. These results seem to suggest that through the nonlinear turbulence cascade process, the MSTID-associated 3 m FAIs are very likely generated from the kilometer-scale plasma irregularities with large amplitude excited by the gradient drift instability.

  9. A directional Secular Variation Curve for Greece for the last 4500 years: Comparison with regional and global geomagnetic field models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Marco, E.; Tema, E.; Lanos, P.; Kondopoulou, D.

    2009-12-01

    A total of 64 Greek archaeomagnetic directional data have been used for the establishment of the variation of the Earth’s magnetic field in Greece over the past 4500 years. Most of the data come from archaeological material but some data from Santorini lava flows are also included. The data ages range from Minoan times (~2500 BC) up to the last century with a gap around 10th to 6th century BC. All data have been relocated to Athens (37.97° N, 23.72° E) using the virtual geomagnetic pole method. Data coming from direct measurements available in Greece for the last four centuries have been also added. The secular variation (SV) curves for declination and inclination have been obtained using hierarchical Bayesian modelling. For comparison, the dataset has been also analysed using the bi-variate moving average window technique with 150 years time window shifted by 75 years. The obtained smoothed curves accompanied by a 95 % confidence envelope are compared with archaeomagnetic data from Mediterranean area and with SV curves from nearby countries. The Greek curves have also been compared with the predictions of the SCHA.DIF.3K regional and the CALS7K and ARCH3K global geomagnetic field models. Despite the differences recognised between these models, the Greek archaeomagnetic SV curve is in reasonably good agreement with their basic trends. The proposed directional SV curve can contribute, together with the intensity SV curve previously published for Greece, to the reliable archaeomagnetic dating of Greek artefacts based on the full description of the Earth’s magnetic field (declination, inclination, intensity). It is clear that the continuous update of the dataset with new results from well-dated archaeological material will increase the precision of the SV curve, especially for the time periods poorly covered by data.

  10. HAIC/HIWC field campaign - investigating ice microphysics in high ice water content regions of mesoscale convective systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroy, Delphine; Fontaine, Emmanuel; Schwarzenboeck, Alfons; Strapp, J. Walter; Lilie, Lyle; Dezitter, Fabien; Grandin, Alice

    2015-04-01

    Despite existing research programs focusing on tropical convection, high ice water content (IWC) regions in Mesoscale Convective Systems (MCS) - potentially encountered by commercial aircraft and related to reported in-service events - remain poorly documented either because investigation of such high IWC regions was not of highest priority or because utilized instrumentation was not capable of providing accurate cloud microphysical measurements. To gather quantitative data in high IWC regions, a multi-year international HAIC/HIWC (High Altitude Ice Crystals / High Ice Water Content) field project has been designed including a first field campaign conducted out of Darwin (Australia) in 2014. The French Falcon 20 research aircraft had been equipped among others with a state-of-the-art in situ microphysics package including the IKP (isokinetic evaporator probe which provides a reference measurement of IWC and TWC), the CDP (cloud droplet spectrometer probe measuring particles in the range 2-50 µm), the 2D-S (2D-Stereo, 10-1280 µm) and PIP (precipitation imaging probe, 100-6400 µm) optical array probes. Microphysical data collection has been performed mainly at -40°C and -30°C levels, whereas little data could be sampled at -50°C and at -15C/-10°C. The study presented here focuses on ice crystal size properties, thereby analyzing in detail the 2D image data from 2D-S and PIP optical array imaging probes. 2D images recorded with 2D-S and PIP were processed in order to extract a large variety of geometrical parameters, such as maximum diameter (Dmax), 2D surface equivalent diameter (Deq), and the corresponding number particle size distribution (PSD). Using the PSD information from both probes, a composite size distribution was then built, with sizes ranging from few tens of µm to roughly 10 mm. Finally, mass-size relationships for ice crystals in tropical convection were established in terms of power laws in order to compute median mass diameters MMDmax and

  11. Hydrological and erosion processes in terraced agricultural fields: observations from a wet Mediterranean region in northern Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, João Pedro; Bernard-Jannin, Léonard; Rodriguez-Blanco, María Luz; Marisa Santos, Juliana; Oliveira Alves Coelho, Celeste; Keizer, Jan Jacob

    2015-04-01

    Traditional agriculture in the mountainous humid regions of the northwestern Iberian peninsula has relied on terraces for soil retention. In the last decades, a strong afforestation (in many cases with commercial species) has led to the appearance of large forest areas coexisting with traditional agricultural landscapes. Soil erosion research in this region has therefore focused on the impact of forest management practices and associated disturbances such as wildfires. However, there has been little research on the impacts of traditional terracing practices on erosion, and therefore it has been difficult to connect forest research with the wider issue of sediment connectivity in this complex agroforestry landscape. This work tried to address this research gap by monitoring an agricultural terrace in the Caramulo mountains, northern Portugal, during two years. The field site is located in a humid Mediterranean climate region, with c. 1500 mm/y rainfall, overlaying granite bedrock; agricultural practices are a traditional rotation between winter pasture and summer (irrigated) corn cultivation. During this period, the soil properties of the terrace were characterized, and there was a continuous monitoring of rainfall, soil moisture and surface runoff at the outlet, as well as 1 or 2-weekly collections of runoff to measure sediment yield. Occasional measurements of vegetation cover and erosion features (rills) within the plot were also made. Preliminary results indicate that runoff generation occurred mostly due to saturation-excess, possibly linked with the accumulation of groundwater in the lower layers of the soil. After one of the largest events, there was a clear inflow of runoff from outside the terrace, through either the irrigation network linking all terraces or by resurfacing of groundwater. Sediment yield was linked with runoff, but sediment concentration was linked with vegetation cover and was highest during the early stages of pasture growth. However

  12. Horizontal flow fields in and around a small active region. The transition period between flux emergence and decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, M.; Denker, C.; Balthasar, H.; Kuckein, C.; González Manrique, S. J.; Sobotka, M.; Bello González, N.; Hoch, S.; Diercke, A.; Kummerow, P.; Berkefeld, T.; Collados, M.; Feller, A.; Hofmann, A.; Kneer, F.; Lagg, A.; Löhner-Böttcher, J.; Nicklas, H.; Pastor Yabar, A.; Schlichenmaier, R.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, W.; Schubert, M.; Sigwarth, M.; Solanki, S. K.; Soltau, D.; Staude, J.; Strassmeier, K. G.; Volkmer, R.; von der Lühe, O.; Waldmann, T.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The solar magnetic field is responsible for all aspects of solar activity. Thus, emergence of magnetic flux at the surface is the first manifestation of the ensuing solar activity. Aims: Combining high-resolution and synoptic observations aims to provide a comprehensive description of flux emergence at photospheric level and of the growth process that eventually leads to a mature active region. Methods: The small active region NOAA 12118 emerged on 2014 July 17 and was observed one day later with the 1.5-m GREGOR solar telescope on 2014 July 18. High-resolution time-series of blue continuum and G-band images acquired in the blue imaging channel (BIC) of the GREGOR Fabry-Pérot Interferometer (GFPI) were complemented by synoptic line-of-sight magnetograms and continuum images obtained with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). Horizontal proper motions and horizontal plasma velocities were computed with local correlation tracking (LCT) and the differential affine velocity estimator (DAVE), respectively. Morphological image processing was employed to measure the photometric and magnetic area, magnetic flux, and the separation profile of the emerging flux region during its evolution. Results: The computed growth rates for photometric area, magnetic area, and magnetic flux are about twice as high as the respective decay rates. The space-time diagram using HMI magnetograms of five days provides a comprehensive view of growth and decay. It traces a leaf-like structure, which is determined by the initial separation of the two polarities, a rapid expansion phase, a time when the spread stalls, and a period when the region slowly shrinks again. The separation rate of 0.26 km s-1 is highest in the initial stage, and it decreases when the separation comes to a halt. Horizontal plasma velocities computed at four evolutionary stages indicate a changing pattern of inflows. In LCT maps we find persistent flow patterns

  13. A Chandra view of non-thermal emission in the northwestern region of supernova remnant RCW 86: Particle acceleration and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, Daniel; Lopez, Laura A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Slane, Patrick O.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico

    2013-12-10

    The shocks of supernova remnants are believed to accelerate particles to cosmic ray (CR) energies. The amplification of the magnetic field due to CRs propagating in the shock region is expected to have an impact on both the emission from the accelerated particle population as well as the acceleration process itself. Using a 95 ks observation with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, we map and characterize the synchrotron emitting material in the northwest region of RCW 86. We model spectra from several different regions, both filamentary and diffuse, where emission appears to be dominated by synchrotron radiation. The fine spatial resolution of Chandra allows us to obtain accurate emission profiles across three different non-thermal rims in this region. The narrow width (l ≈ 10''-30'') of these filaments constrains the minimum magnetic field strength at the post-shock region to approximately 80 μG.

  14. Improved regionalization of soil surface properties using multi-frequency remote sensing data and geo-statistics at field scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Swen; Marzahn, Philip; Krüger, Karsten; Duttmann, Rainer; Ludwig, Ralf

    2010-05-01

    Land Surface Models (LSM) have become indispensable tools to quantify the most important physical, chemical and biological processes to determine water and nutrient fluxes in support of land management strategies or the prediction of climate change impacts. However, the utilization of LSM requires numerous soil and vegetation parameters, which are seldom available in spatial distribution or an appropriate temporal frequency. The quality of these model input parameters, especially the spatial heterogeneity and temporal variability of soil parameters, has a strong effect on LSM simulations. Conventional measurements of soil characteristics (texture, bulk density, moisture) remain time consuming and non-cost effective and are therefore continuously reduced. Thus, the presentation focuses on the regionalization of soil physical properties such as surface texture, bulk density, soil roughness and soil moisture using microwave airborne SAR data at different frequencies and polarisations, calculated terrain attributes from a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) and geo-statistical approaches. Stochastic and deterministic approaches comprised different prediction methods, such as IDW, linear- and multiple linear regressions, Simple Kriging and Ordinary Kriging as well as hybrid approaches such as Regression Kriging. Different co- variables were integrated in the spatial prediction process using the Regression-Kriging Models A, B and C first introduced by Odeh et al. (1995). Co-variables were derived using: a.) An interferometric high resolution DEM and its quantified first and second order terrain attributes. b.) Spatially distributed dielectric properties of the soil surface derived from SAR imagery following a semi empirical approach (Oh et al. 1992) and a physically based approach (Hajnsek et al. 2003). The developed approach was validated against in-situ data from different field campaigns carried out over a test site located in the young moraine area in northern Mecklenburg

  15. A statistical analysis of low frequency geomagnetic field pulsations at two Antarctic geomagnetic observatories in the polar cap region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrolungo, M.; Lepidi, S.; Cafarella, L.; Di Mauro, D.

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the characteristics of low frequency (˜0.5-5 mHz) geomagnetic field fluctuations as recorded at two Antarctic stations within the polar cap: the Italian observatory Mario Zucchelli Station (TNB) and the French-Italian observatory Dome C (DMC) in order to investigate the spatial extension and propagation characteristics of the phenomena observed at very high latitude. The stations have approximately the same geographic latitude, but a very different corrected geomagnetic latitude, being DMC close to the geomagnetic pole and TNB closer to the auroral oval. Our study focused on power spectra, coherence and phase difference between low frequency fluctuations analyzing the horizontal H component measured during the entire year 2006. The fluctuation power behavior during the day can be explained according to the positions of the stations with respect to the polar cap; indeed in the dayside sector it is higher in the cusp region, while in the nightside sector it is higher close to the geomagnetic pole. Furthermore the study of coherent fluctuations, focusing on their phase difference, indicated that the propagation direction within the cap is variable during the day: in the dayside and nightside regions it is from the auroral oval toward the geomagnetic pole, while in the magnetic local morning and afternoon sectors it is from the geomagnetic pole toward the dawn-dusk meridian. Finally the analysis of two individual pulsation events, consisting of short duration wave packets, is shown; it confirms the statistical considerations on the propagation direction and allows to estimate the wave number and apparent phase velocity, whose values are of the order of 3-4 and 30-15 km/s, respectively.

  16. A formula for human average whole-body SARwb under diffuse fields exposure in the GHz region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamba, A.; Joseph, W.; Vermeeren, G.; Thielens, A.; Tanghe, E.; Martens, L.

    2014-12-01

    A simple formula to determine the human average whole-body SAR (SARwb) under realistic propagation conditions is proposed in the GHz region, i.e. from 1.45 GHz to 5.8 GHz. The methodology is based on simulations of ellipsoidal human body models. Only the exposure (incident power densities) and the human mass are needed to apply the formula. Diffuse scattered illumination is addressed for the first time and the possible presence of a Line-of-Sight (LOS) component is addressed as well. As validation, the formula is applied to calculate the average whole-body SARwb in 3D heterogeneous phantoms, i.e. the virtual family (34 year-old male, 26 year-old female, 11 year-old girl, and 6 year-old boy) and the results are compared with numerical ones—using the Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method—at 3 GHz. For the LOS exposure, the average relative error varies from 28% to 12% (resp. 14-12%) for the vertical polarization (resp. horizontal polarization), depending on the heteregeneous phantom. Regarding the diffuse illumination, relative errors of -39.40%, -11.70%, 10.70%, and 10.60% are obtained for the 6 year-old boy, 11 year-old girl, 26 year-old female, and 34 year-old male, respectively. The proposed formula estimates well (especially for adults) the SARwb induced by diffuse illumination in realistic conditions. In general, the correctness of the formula improves when the human mass increases. Keeping the uncertainties of the FDTD simulations in mind, the proposed formula might be important for the dosimetry community to assess rapidly and accurately the human absorption of electromagnetic radiation caused by diffuse fields in the GHz region. Finally, we show the applicability of the proposed formula to personal dosimetry for epidemiological research.

  17. Large field-of-view and depth-specific cortical microvascular imaging underlies regional differences in ischemic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jia; Shi, Lei; Dziennis, Suzan; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2014-02-01

    Ability to non-invasively monitor and quantify of blood flow, blood vessel morphology, oxygenation and tissue morphology is important for improved diagnosis, treatment and management of various neurovascular disorders, e.g., stroke. Currently, no imaging technique is available that can satisfactorily extract these parameters from in vivo microcirculatory tissue beds, with large field of view and sufficient resolution at defined depth without any harm to the tissue. In order for more effective therapeutics, we need to determine the area of brain that is damaged but not yet dead after focal ischemia. Here we develop an integrated multi-functional imaging system, in which SDW-LSCI (synchronized dual wavelength laser speckle imaging) is used as a guiding tool for OMAG (optical microangiography) to investigate the fine detail of tissue hemodynamics, such as vessel flow, profile, and flow direction. We determine the utility of the integrated system for serial monitoring afore mentioned parameters in experimental stroke, middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) in mice. For 90 min MCAO, onsite and 24 hours following reperfusion, we use SDW-LSCI to determine distinct flow and oxygenation variations for differentiation of the infarction, peri-infarct, reduced flow and contralateral regions. The blood volumes are quantifiable and distinct in afore mentioned regions. We also demonstrate the behaviors of flow and flow direction in the arterials connected to MCA play important role in the time course of MCAO. These achievements may improve our understanding of vascular involvement under pathologic and physiological conditions, and ultimately facilitate clinical diagnosis, monitoring and therapeutic interventions of neurovascular diseases, such as ischemic stroke.

  18. [Effects of different mulching measures on winter wheat field soil respiration in Loess Plateau dry land region].

    PubMed

    Guan, Qing; Wang, Jun; Song, Shu-Ya; Liu, Wen-Zhao

    2011-06-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of different mulching measures on the diurnal and seasonal variations of winter wheat field soil respiration in dry land region of Loess Plateau. Four treatments were installed, i. e., 300 kg x hm(-2) straw mulching (M300), 600 kg x hm(-2) straw mulching (M600), plastic film mulching (PM), and no mulching (CK). In all treatments, the soil respiration rate had a decreasing trend from autumn to winter, but increased rapidly after winter and peaked at jointing stage. Comparing with CK, treatments mulching promoted the soil respiration obviously from wintering to maturing stage, with significant differences between treatment PM and the others. The average soil respiration rate in treatments M300, and M600 in whole growth period was 1. 52 micromol CO2 x m(-2) x s(-1) and 1. 47 micromol CO2 x m(-2) x s(-1), being 10. 2% and 6.6% higher than the CK (1.38 micromol CO2 x m(-2) s(-1)) , respectively, and that in treatment PM was 3. 63 micromol CO2 x m(-2) x s(-1), 163% higher than CK. The diurnal variation of soil respiration rate in CK and in M300 and M600 presented a single peak curve and peaked at 12:00 and 14:00, respectively, but for PM treatment, the diurnal variation of soil respiration rate was similar with that in CK at jointing stage while presented a bimodal curve at maturing stage, with the peaks at 12:00 and 16:00, respectively. Soil respiration rate had an exponential correlation with soil temperature, and a parabolic correlation with soil moisture.

  19. Photospheric Magnetic Field Properties of Flaring vs. Flare-Quiet Active Regions I: Data, General Approach, and Statistical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leka, K. D.; Barnes, G.

    2003-05-01

    Photospheric vector magnetic field data from the U. Hawai`i Imaging Vector Magnetograph are examined for pre-event signatures unique to solar energetic phenomena. Parameters are constructed from B(x,y) to describe (for example) the distributions of the field, spatial gradients of the field, vertical current, current helicity, ''twist'' parameter α and magnetic shear angles. A quantitative statistical approach employing discriminant analysis and Hotelling's T2-test is applied to the magnitude and temporal evolution of parameters from 24 flare-event and flare-quiet epochs from seven active regions. We demonstrate that (1) when requiring a flare-unique signature, numerous candidate parameters are nullified by considering flare-quiet epochs, (2) a more robust method exists for estimating error rates than conventional ''truth tables'', (3) flaring and flare-quiet populations do not necessarily have low error rates for classification even when statistically distinguishable, and that (4) simultaneous consideration of a large number of variables is required to produce acceptable error rates. That is, when the parameters are considered individually, they show little ability to differentiate between the two populations; multi-variable combinations can discriminate the populations and/or result in perfect classification tables. In lieu of constructing a single all-variable discriminant function to quantify the flare-predictive power of the parameters considered, we devise a method whereby all permutations of the four-variable discriminant functions are ranked by Hotelling's T2. We present those parameters (e.g. the temporal increase of the kurtosis of the spatial distribution of the vertical current density) which consistently appear in the best combinations, indicating that they may play an important role in defining a pre-event photospheric state. While no single combination is clearly the best discriminator, we demonstrate here the requisite approach: include flare

  20. Spatial-temporal variability of the microbial respiration at the regional scale: comparison of field and laboratory approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasenev, Viacheslav; Stoorvogel, Jetse; Ananyeva, Nadezhda D.; Valentini, Riccardo

    2013-04-01

    Regional carbon assessments are increasingly important. Soil respiration is a predominant carbon efflux of terrestrial ecosystems. The total carbon efflux from soils includes autotrophic respiration of root systems and heterotrophic microbial respiration (MR). MR usually refers to 60-80% of the total efflux and thus plays a key role in regional carbon balance. Quite a few studies report high sensitivity of MR to climate conditions and land-use. Different approaches to analyze MR exist. The methods differ in the procedures to consider space and time variability. We evaluated two approaches to assess MR variability. One approach uses field measurements on a limited number of locations with chambers. The other approach samples more intensively and derives basal respiration (BR) from measurements under standard conditions in the laboratory. The chamber approach includes periodic measurements at a limited number of sites. As such, the methodology provides appropriate information on temporal dynamics. Spatial variability although, is underrepresented .. In our case chambers were mounted in forest, cropland and urban sites (n=48) located in the north of Moscow city. Roots were removed and geotextile (1 micron mesh) bags were inserted in soil to segregate MR. The flux was measured weekly by Li-6400-XT from July till September 2012. In contrast, standardized BR techniques minimize the diversity of initial conditions. This allows to increase the number of observations considerably. However, the temporal variance is avoided. BR was analyzed in mixed topsoil (0-10 cm) and subsoil (10-150 cm) samples (n=182) collected in forest, cropland and urban sites from different bioclimatic zones of Moscow region. After preincubation (T=22°C, 55% water content, 7 days) soil MR (in μg ?O2-? g-1) was measured after incubating 2g soil with 0.2 μl distilled water as the rate of ?O2 production (22° ?, 24 h) by gas chromatography. Both approaches can be used to describe MR variability in

  1. Three-dimensional Mechanical Modeling of the GPS Velocity Field around the Northeastern Tibet and Surrounding Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, J.; Li, Y.; Teng, C.

    2004-12-01

    The northeastern Tibet and surrounding region is an intense active tectonic area with great potential of strong earthquakes. Active tectonics is featured mainly by left-lateral transpressive deformation along the Qilian Shan and right-lateral transtensional deformation between the Alashan and the Ordos blocks out of the Tibet. This region gives a good example to investigate how the strain rate is partitioning around the plateau edge and how the remainder strain rate of Tibetan deformation is propagating towards the interior of the Eurasia plate with relative to the Indian-Eurasia convergence. In this study, we use three-dimensional mechanical models incorporated the main active faults as Coulomb-type friction zones to simulate the surface velocity field as dense GPS data shown. We simplify the rheological structure of lithosphere as a frictional upper crust underlying with the viscoelastic lower crust with available heat flow. Topographic loading on the model surface and hydrostatic pressure on the model base are added. The models are solved with Adeli finite element code, and modeled velocities are checked using the chi-square merit function with dense GPS data. We test the model with fault friction ranged from 0.4 to 0.01 on different major fault systems. Results show: (1) with a relatively high fault friction ~0.4-0.2, the northeastern Tibet and surrounding region could behave like diffusive deformation, but the modeled velocities and the strain rate seem unable to fit the GPS data and the seismic data, respectively. (2) To best fit the GPS data, a relatively low fault friction ~0.05-0.02 is needed. At this condition, the deformation is localized mainly around the Qilian Shan in northeastern Tibet and between the Alashan and the Ordos blocks out of the Tibet, consistent with the active tectonics and the strong earthquake distribution. (3) Changes of the fault friction out of the Tibet seem to affect the modeled velocity quite small, suggesting that the

  2. In Situ Nitrogen Mineralization, Nitrification, and Ammonia Volatilization in Maize Field Fertilized with Urea in Huanghuaihai Region of Northern China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xuelin; Wang, Qun; Xu, Jun; Gilliam, Frank S.; Tremblay, Nicolas; Li, Chaohai

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fertilization potentially affects soil N mineralization and leaching, and can enhance NH3 volatilization, thus impacting crop production. A fertilizer experiment with five levels of N addition (0, 79, 147, 215 and 375 kg N ha-1) was performed in 2009 and 2010 in a maize field in Huanghuaihai region, China, where > 300 kg N ha-1 has been routinely applied to soil during maize growth period of 120 days. Responses of net N mineralization, inorganic N flux (0–10cm), NH3 volatilization, and maize yield to N fertilization were measured. During the growth period, net N mineralization and nitrification varied seasonally, with higher rates occurring in August and coinciding with the R1 stage of maize growth. Soil NO3−-N contributed to more than 60% of inorganic N flux during maize growth. Cumulative NH3 volatilization increased with N additions, with total NH3 volatilization during maize growth accounting for about 4% of added N. Relative to the control, mean maize yield in the fertilizer treatments increased by 17% and 20% in 2009 and 2010, respectively. However, grain yield, aboveground biomass, and plant N accumulation did not increase with added N at levels > 215 kg N ha-1. These results suggest that the current N rate of 300 kg N ha-1 is not only excessive, but also reduces fertilizer efficacy and may contribute to environmental problems such as global warming and eutrophication of ground water and streams. PMID:25635864

  3. Field performance of nine soil water content sensors on a sandy loam soil in new brunswick, maritime region, Canada.

    PubMed

    Chow, Lien; Xing, Zisheng; Rees, Herb W; Meng, Fanrui; Monteith, John; Stevens, Lionel

    2009-01-01

    An in situ field test on nine commonly-used soil water sensors was carried out in a sandy loam soil located in the Potato Research Center, Fredericton, NB (Canada) using the gravimetric method as a reference. The results showed that among the tested sensors, regardless of installation depths and soil water regimes, CS615, Trase, and Troxler performed the best with the factory calibrations, with a relative root mean square error (RRMSE) of 15.78, 16.93, and 17.65%, and a r(2) of 0.75, 0.77, and 0.65, respectively. TRIME, Moisture Point (MP917), and Gopher performed slightly worse with the factory calibrations, with a RRMSE of 45.76, 26.57, and 20.41%, and a r(2) of 0.65, 0.72, and 0.78, respectively, while the Gypsum, WaterMark, and Netafim showed a frequent need for calibration in the application in this region.

  4. The protons and electrons trapped in the Jovian dipole magnetic field region and their interaction with Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, J. A.; Hamilton, D. C.; Mckibben, R. B.; Mogro-Campero, A.; Pyle, K. R.; Tuzzolino, A. J.

    1974-01-01

    Detailed analysis of electrons equal to or greater than 3 MeV and of protons 0.5 to 1.8 MeV and equal to or greater than 35 MeV for both the inbound and the outbound passes of the Pioneer 10 spacecraft. Conclusive evidence is obtained that the trapped radiation in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere is maintained and supplied by inward diffusion from the outer regions of the trapped radiation zone. It is shown that the time required for isotropization of an anisotropic flux by pitch angle scattering inside L approximately equal to 6 is long in comparison with the time required for particles to diffuse inward from L approximately equal to 6 to L approximately equal to 3, that the high-energy protons were not injected at high energies by the Crand (cosmic ray albedo neutron decay) process but were accelerated in the magnetosphere of Jupiter, and that the main conclusions of this analysis are unaffected by use of either the D sub 1 or the D sub 2 magnetic field models. Theoretical studies of the capture of trapped electrons and protons by Io have been carried out, and it is found that the probability of capture by Io depends strongly upon the particle species and kinetic energy.

  5. Far field R-wave sensing in Myotonic Dystrophy type 1: right atrial appendage versus Bachmann's bundle region lead placement.

    PubMed

    Russo, Vincenzo; Nigro, Gerardo; Antonio Papa, Andrea; Rago, Anna; Di Meo, Federica; Cristiano, Anna; Molino, Antonio; Calabrò, Raffaele; Giovanna Russo, Maria; Politano, Luisa

    2014-10-01

    Aim of the present study was to investigate far field R-wave sensing (FFRS) timing and characteristics in 34 Myotonic Dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients undergoing dual chamber pacemaker implantation, comparing Bachmann's bundle (BB) stimulation (16 patients) site with the conventional right atrial appendage (RAA) pacing site (18 patients). All measurements were done during sinus rhythm and in supine position, with unipolar (UP) and bipolar (BP) sensing configuration. The presence, amplitude threshold (FFRS trsh) and FFRS timing were determined. There were no differences between both atrial sites in the Pmin and Pmean values of sensed P-wave amplitudes, as well as between UP and BP sensing configurations. The FFRS trsh was lower at the BB region in comparison to the RAA site. The mean BP FFRS trsh was significantly lower than UP configuration in both atrial locations. There were no significant differences in atrial pacing threshold, sensing threshold and atrial lead impedances at the implant time and at FFRS measurements. Bachmann's bundle area is an optimal atrial lead position for signal sensing as well as conventional RAA, but it offers the advantage of reducing the oversensing of R-wave on the atrial lead, thus improving functioning of standard dual chamber pacemakers in DM1 patients.

  6. Isotopically constrained soil carbon and nitrogen budgets in a soybean field chronosequence in the Brazilian Amazon region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, Adelaine M. e. Silva; Davidson, Eric A.; Nagy, R. Chelsea; Riskin, Shelby H.; Martinelli, Luiz A.

    2016-10-01

    The impacts of large-scale conversion of cattle pastures to cropland on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stocks are poorly understood in the Amazon region. The objective of this research was to determine whether soybean cultivation on a previously deforested and pastured soil has changed C and N stocks and dynamics. We sampled a chronosequence of soybean fields in 2009 and again in 2013. We hypothesized that detecting statistically significant changes in total soil C and N stocks would be difficult but that fluxes of C and N through the soil would be sufficiently large to significantly decrease the stable isotope ratios of soil organic matter. We observed statistically significant decreases in the 13C and 15N enrichments and C:N ratio. When combined with estimates of crop biomass production, harvest yield, and biological nitrogen fixation, these measurements provided sufficient constraints for C and N budgets to infer modest rates of net change in soil N (+15 to +27 kg N ha-1 yr-1) and soil C (-0.15 to -0.30 Mg C ha-1 yr-1) in the top 10 cm of soil. These results indicate that this intensive soybean cropping system is having minimal impacts on N loss to the environment but likely is a small net source of C to the atmosphere.

  7. Contribution to the Study of Regional Magnetization of Satellite Magnetic Measurement: Magsat, Orsted, and Champ (with Gravity Field)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.

    2004-01-01

    A discussion of and introduction to satellite-altitude geopotential field studies and their interpretation with emphasis on results from metalliferous regions will be given. The magnetic and gravimetric measurements from satellite altitudes show heterogeneity in deeper parts of the lithosphere. These patterns of magnetic anomalies do not only reveal the largest iron ore deposits such as Kiruna, Sweden, Kursk, Russia, and Banugi, Central African Republic but also linear features indicating structural discontinuities. Changes of magnetic amplitude of these patterns are caused by intersecting transverse fractures localizing magmatism and concentration of metals. In addition satellite altitude data are related to variations in crustal thickness and heat flow. Deep-rooted structural discontinuities, defined by combination of geological and geophysical criteria, with spacing of several hundred kilometers, reveal a quite uniform pattern in the deeper parts of the lithosphere. As these structures provide favorable pathways for the ascent of heat, magmas and ore-forming fluids, their recognition is of crucial importance and can be used in the compilation of a new type of mineral prognosis map. An example from Europe includes a pattern of east west trending structural discontinuities or belts and their junction with the NW-trending Tornqvist-Teisseyre Line. The Upper Silesian-Cracovian Zn-Pb district occurs along one of the latitudinal belts. Leslaw Teper of the University of Silesia has been invited to show the fractures in crystalline basement beneath the sediments hosting the Zn-Pb ores.

  8. Dust mobilization due to density currents in the Atlas region: Observations from the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment 2006 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knippertz, P.; Deutscher, C.; Kandler, K.; Müller, T.; Schulz, O.; Schütz, L.

    2007-11-01

    Evaporation of precipitation is a ubiquitous feature of dry and hot desert environments. The resulting cooling often generates density currents with strong turbulent winds along their leading edges, which can mobilize large amounts of dust. Mountains support this process by triggering convection, by downslope acceleration of the cool air, and by fostering the accumulation of fine-grained sediments along their foothills through the action of water. For the Sahara, the world's largest dust source, this mechanism has been little studied because of the lack of sufficiently high resolution observational data. The present study demonstrates the frequent occurrence of density currents along the Sahara side of the Atlas Mountain chain in southern Morocco using the unique data set collected during the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment (SAMUM) field campaign in May/June 2006. The density currents are related to convection over the mountains in the afternoon hours and have lifetimes on the order of 10 h. The passage of the sharp leading edge that sometimes reaches several hundred kilometers in length is usually associated with a marked increase in dew point and wind speed, a change in wind direction, and a decrease in temperature and visibility due to suspended dust. It is conceivable that this mechanism is relevant for other mountainous regions in northern Africa during the warm season. This would imply that simulations of the dust cycle with numerical models need a reliable representation of moist convective processes in order to generate realistic dust emissions from the Sahara.

  9. Sampling and Studying Permafrost in Alaska and on Mars: Mars Arctic Regions Science Field Experience for Secondary Teachers (MARSFEST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, J. M.; Buxner, S. R.; Douglas, T. A.; Lombardi, D. A.; Shaner, A. J.

    2006-12-01

    Both neutron and gamma ray data from the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) instrument suite aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft provide compelling evidence for the presence of water ice buried within the upper few tens of centimeters of Mars at high latitudes.^{1-3} In May 2008, the Phoenix Mars Lander mission will arrive at the northern high latitudes of Mars to ground-truth the presence of this water ice. The mission will use a robotic arm to deliver samples of permafrost to several instruments on the deck of the spacecraft for detailed chemical and microscopic analyses. Two primary science objectives at the landing site are to study the history of water in all its phases and to characterize soil habitability.4 As part of the Education and Public Outreach efforts for both the Phoenix and Odyssey missions, 20 secondary science teachers from across the U.S. and Canada were selected to spend a week in Summer 2006 immersed in arctic region science around Fairbanks, Alaska. The focal point of the experience involved investigations conducted at the Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) Permafrost Tunnel.5 Teacher participants combined remote sensing and in situ observations of permafrost regions, conducted sample collection and analyses to investigate research questions generated by participants at the Permafrost Tunnel, explored comparisons between the terrestrial and Martian arctic, and completed inquiry- based classroom curriculum activities related to Mars and arctic science. A video documentary of the field experience is being produced by the NASA Mars Public Engagement program for education and public outreach purposes. The ten teacher teams involved in the workshop will now serve as educational ambassadors for the Phoenix Mars Lander mission over the next two years through to the completion of surface operations for the mission. They will be supported through monthly teleconferences updating them on mission status and continued research

  10. Reservoir quality, sediment source, and regional aspects of Norphlet Formation, South State Line field, Greene County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, A.; Stancliffe, R.J.; Shew, R.D.

    1987-05-01

    South State Line field, discovered in 1970, is centrally located in the productive Jurassic Norphlet trend of the eastern Gulf Coast. The Norphlet Formation at South State Line has produced gas and condensate from normally pressured eolian sandstones at depths of more than 17,900 ft (5455 m). The 600-ft- (183-m) thick Norphlet Formation is composed of 100% sandstone and consists of two reservoir types: a poorer quality upper sandstone having low permeability (0.6 md) and a good-quality lower sandstone with better permeability (15.5 md). The upper sandstone exhibits tighter compaction of framework grains and more cement than the lower sandstone. Significantly, the upper sandstone contains authigenic illite (which promotes pressure solution), whereas the lower sandstone contains authigenic chlorite (which inhibits cementation and possibly pressure solution). On a regional scale, illite is the principal diagenetic clay mineral in the western area of the Norphlet trend (Mississippi to Texas), whereas chlorite is the principal diagenetic clay mineral in the east (Alabama to Florida). Not surprisingly, reservoir quality is poorer in the western portion of the trend. A comparison of framework grains in the upper and lower sandstones shows no significant compositional differences. Both are mature arkosic sandstones with a transitional-continental source (eastern Appalachians). No evidence was seen of a quartz-rich Ouachita or cratonic source. Volcanic and plutonic rock fragments are slightly more abundant in the lower sandstone, possibly reflecting a shifting of compositional terranes within a single source area along the eastern side of the Appalachians. The lower Norphlet sandstone may have been derived from Triassic volcanics, whereas the upper sandstone may have been derived from a more metamorphic source.

  11. Three-dimensional mechanical modeling of the GPS velocity field around the northeastern Tibetan plateau and surrounding regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jiankun; Lu, Shuangjiang; Wang, Weimin

    2013-01-01

    The northeastern corner of the Tibetan plateau is a complex tectonic region with different fault mechanisms from left-lateral thrusting of the Qilian Shan, left-lateral strike slipping of the Haiyuan fault along the plateau edge, and right-lateral extension across the Alashan and the Ordos out of the northeastern Tibetan plateau. Here, we use 3D finite element models incorporating fault as Coulomb-type friction zone to investigate mechanical relation between crustal rheology and long-term deformation of the main active fault systems. Models are constrained with GPS velocity field and available geological slip rates. Crustal rheology is simplified as an elastobrittle upper part, underlying with viscoelastic crust. We test models with fault frictions (μ) from 0.4 to 0.02 on different fault systems, and mean viscosities (η) of the lower crust from 1019 Pa.s to 1021 Pa.s in the Tibetan plateau and 1021 Pa.s to 1023 Pa.s out of the Tibetan plateau. A common feature from the numerical experiments is that the Haiyuan fault reflects a low fault friction (μ < 0.1-0.08). The predicted low fault friction associated with the mean viscosities of the lower crust of ~ 1019 Pa.s in the Tibetan plateau and ~ 1021 Pa.s out of the Tibetan plateau can fit the geological slip rates well for the active faults. This suggests that slip partitioning around northeastern boundary of the Tibetan plateau is related mechanically to the low fault friction. Numerical experiments also show that after strain rates are absorbed by the main fault systems, the rest are strongly affected by crustal rheology. Finally, even the fault friction decreases to ~ 0.05, the mean viscosities of lower crust attain to 1021 Pa.s and 1023 Pa.s in and out of the Tibetan plateau, the northeastern Tibetan plateau and the Alashan still deforms diffusively, except that the Ordos behaves more like a rigid block.

  12. Channel response to tectonic forcing: field analysis of stream morphology and hydrology in the Mendocino triple junction region, northern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Noah P.; Whipple, Kelin X.; Tucker, Gregory E.; Merritts, Dorothy J.

    2003-07-01

    An empirical calibration of the shear stress model for bedrock incision is presented, using field and hydrologic data from a series of small, coastal drainage basins near the Mendocino triple junction in northern California. Previous work comparing basins from the high uplift zone (HUZ, uplift rates around 4 mm/year) to ones in the low uplift zone (LUZ, ˜0.5 mm/year) indicates that the HUZ channels are about twice as steep for a given drainage area. This observation suggests that incision processes are more effective in the HUZ. It motivates a detailed field study of channel morphology in the differing tectonic settings to test whether various factors that are hypothesized to influence incision rates (discharge, channel width, lithology, sediment load) change in response to uplift or otherwise differ between the HUZ and LUZ. Analysis of regional stream gaging data for mean annual discharge and individual floods yields a linear relationship between discharge and drainage area. Increased orographic precipitation in the HUZ accounts for about a twofold increase in discharge in this area, corresponding to an assumed increase in the erosional efficiency of the streams. Field measurements of channel width indicate a power-law relationship between width and drainage area with an exponent of ˜0.4 and no significant change in width between the uplift rate zones, although interpretation is hampered by a difference in land use between the zones. The HUZ channel width dataset reveals a scaling break interpreted to be the transition between colluvial- and fluvial-dominated incision processes. Assessments of lithologic resistance using a Schmidt hammer and joint surveys show that the rocks of the study area should be fairly similar in their susceptibility to erosion. The HUZ channels generally have more exposed bedrock than those in the LUZ, which is consistent with protection by sediment cover inhibiting incision in the LUZ. However, this difference is likely the result of a

  13. The Stratiform Region of an MCS on 19 June in TELEX 2004 Observed With Polarimetric and Doppler Radars, Electric Field Soundings, and a Lightning Mapping Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramig, N.; Macgorman, D.; Rust, D.; Schuur, T.; Bruning, E.; Krehbiel, P.; Rison, W.; Hamlin, T.; Straka, J.; Payne, C.; Apostolakopoulos, I.; Biggerstaff, M. I.; Biermann, N.; Carey, L.

    2005-12-01

    Polarimetric and Doppler radar data, balloon-borne soundings of the electric field, and three-dimensional lightning mapping array data were acquired from a mesoscale convective system (MCS) on 19 June 2004 during the Thunderstorm Electrification and Lightning Experiment (TELEX). A total of 10 partial and complete vertical soundings through the storm were obtained from the flights of four instrumented balloons: two launched in the convective region, one in the transition zone, and one in the stratiform region. Each balloon recorded ascent and descent soundings and the transition zone balloon recorded an additional two partial soundings due to a downdraft. At times, multiple soundings were in progress simultaneously. This study focuses on the stratiform region of the MCS, which was sampled by the last two soundings of balloon three and both soundings of balloon four. A comparison of the electrical structure of the stratiform region of this MCS with that of previously published conceptual models suggests that, during at least part of the MCS's lifetime, its electrical structure was Type A, which is more complex than Type B. The main difference between these classifications is the number of charge regions in the cloud. A one-dimensional analysis with Gauss's law indicates six vertically stacked charge layers that alternated polarity within the stratiform region during balloon four's ascent. The vector electric field pattern verified the 1-D Gauss analysis and showed the electric field structure to be primarily horizontally stratified. The maximum magnitude of the electric field was approximately 105 kV/m. The second stratiform sounding sampled by balloon three began fifty minutes after the first stratiform sounding. It showed a very different electric field profile, consistent with neither Type A nor Type B electrical structure, perhaps because the sounding was far from the front of the MCS. There were only three charge layers as opposed to the four charge layers

  14. Geology, geochronology, and paleogeography of the southern Sonoma volcanic field and adjacent areas, northern San Francisco Bay region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, D.L.; Saucedo, G.J.; Clahan, K.B.; Fleck, R.J.; Langenheim, V.E.; McLaughlin, R.J.; Sarna-Wojcicki, A. M.; Allen, J.R.; Deino, A.L.

    2011-01-01

    Recent geologic mapping in the northern San Francisco Bay region (California, USA) supported by radiometric dating and tephrochronologic correlations, provides insights into the framework geology, stratigraphy, tectonic evolution, and geologic history of this part of the San Andreas transform plate boundary. There are 25 new and existing radiometric dates that define three temporally distinct volcanic packages along the north margin of San Pablo Bay, i.e., the Burdell Mountain Volcanics (11.1 Ma), the Tolay Volcanics (ca. 10-8 Ma), and the Sonoma Volcanics (ca. 8-2.5 Ma). The Burdell Mountain and the Tolay Volcanics are allochthonous, having been displaced from the Quien Sabe Volcanics and the Berkeley Hills Volcanics, respectively. Two samples from a core of the Tolay Volcanics taken from the Murphy #1 well in the Petaluma oilfield yielded ages of 8.99 ?? 0.06 and 9.13 ?? 0.06 Ma, demonstrating that volcanic rocks exposed along Tolay Creek near Sears Point previously thought to be a separate unit, the Donnell Ranch volcanics, are part of the Tolay Volcanics. Other new dates reported herein show that volcanic rocks in the Meacham Hill area and extending southwest to the Burdell Mountain fault are also part of the Tolay Volcanics. In the Sonoma volcanic field, strongly bimodal volcanic sequences are intercalated with sediments. In the Mayacmas Mountains a belt of eruptive centers youngs to the north. The youngest of these volcanic centers at Sugarloaf Ridge, which lithologically, chemically, and temporally matches the Napa Valley eruptive center, was apparently displaced 30 km to the northwest by movement along the Carneros and West Napa faults. The older parts of the Sonoma Volcanics have been displaced at least 28 km along the RodgersCreek fault since ca. 7 Ma. The Petaluma Formation also youngs to the north along the Rodgers Creek-Hayward fault and the Bennett Valley fault. The Petaluma basin formed as part of the Contra Costa basin in the Late Miocene and was

  15. Predicting regional emissions and near-field air concentrations of soil fumigants using modest numerical algorithms: a case study using 1,3-dichloropropene.

    PubMed

    Cryer, S A; van Wesenbeeck, I J; Knuteson, J A

    2003-05-21

    Soil fumigants, used to control nematodes and crop disease, can volatilize from the soil application zone and into the atmosphere to create the potential for human inhalation exposure. An objective for this work is to illustrate the ability of simple numerical models to correctly predict pesticide volatilization rates from agricultural fields and to expand emission predictions to nearby air concentrations for use in the exposure component of a risk assessment. This work focuses on a numerical system using two U.S. EPA models (PRZM3 and ISCST3) to predict regional volatilization and nearby air concentrations for the soil fumigant 1,3-dichloropropene. New approaches deal with links to regional databases, seamless coupling of emission and dispersion models, incorporation of Monte Carlo sampling techniques to account for parametric uncertainty, and model input sensitivity analysis. Predicted volatility flux profiles of 1,3-dichloropropene (1,3-D) from soil for tarped and untarped fields were compared against field data and used as source terms for ISCST3. PRZM3 can successfully estimate correct order of magnitude regional soil volatilization losses of 1,3-D when representative regional input parameters are used (soil, weather, chemical, and management practices). Estimated 1,3-D emission losses and resulting air concentrations were investigated for five geographically diverse regions. Air concentrations (15-day averages) are compared with the current U.S. EPA's criteria for human exposure and risk assessment to determine appropriate setback distances from treated fields. Sensitive input parameters for volatility losses were functions of the region being simulated.

  16. The Archean crust in the Wawa-Chapleau-Timmins region. A field guidebook prepared for the 1983 Archean Geochemistry-Early Crustal Genesis Field Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Percival, J. A.; Card, K. D.; Sage, R. P.; Jensen, L. S.; Luhta, L. E.

    1983-01-01

    This guidebook describes the characteristics and interrelationships of Archean greenstone-granite and high-grade gneiss terrains of the Superior Province. A 300-km long west to east transect between Wawa and Timmins, Ontario will be used to illustrate regional-scale relationships. The major geological features of the Superior Province are described.

  17. The Major Project in the Field of Education in the Latin American and Caribbean Region. Bulletin #13.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    This document addresses several of the problems of educational planning in Latin America. Emilia Ferreiro, in "Alternatives to Understanding Illiteracy in the Region," suggests that illiteracy in this region is preventing the attainment of democracy. As social inequality increases, so does the percentage of illiterate adults.…

  18. Megacity impacts on regional ozone formation: observations and WRF-Chem modeling for the MIRAGE-Shanghai field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, X.; Geng, F.; Guenther, A.; Cao, J.; Greenberg, J.; Zhang, R.; Apel, E.; Li, G.; Weinheimer, A.; Chen, J.; Cai, C.

    2013-01-01

    The MIRAGE-Shanghai experiment was designed to characterize the factors controlling regional air pollution near a Chinese Megacity (Shanghai) and was conducted during September 2009. This paper provides an overview of the measurements conducted for this study. In addition to the measurements, a regional chemical/dynamical model (version 3 of Weather Research and Forecasting Chemical model - WRF-Chemv3) is applied for this study. The model results are intensively compared with the measurements to evaluate the model capability for calculating air pollutants in the Shanghai region, especially the chemical species related to ozone formation. The results show that the model is able to calculate the general distributions (the level and the variability) of air pollutants in the Shanghai region, and the difference between the model calculation and the measurement are mostly smaller than 30%, except the calculations of HONO at PD (Pudong) and CO at DT (Dongtan). The main scientific focus is the study of ozone chemical formation not only in the urban area, but also on a regional scale of the surrounding area of Shanghai. The results show that during the experiment period, the ozone photochemical formation was strongly under the VOC-limited condition in the urban area of Shanghai. Moreover, the VOC-limited condition occurred not only in the city, but also in the larger regional area. There was a continuous enhancement of ozone concentrations in the downwind of the megacity of Shanghai, resulting in a significant enhancement of ozone concentrations in a very large regional area in the surrounding region of Shanghai. The sensitivity study of the model suggests that there is a threshold value for switching from VOC-limited condition to NOx-limited condition. The threshold value is strongly dependent on the emission ratio of NOx/VOCs. When the ratio is about 0.4, the Shanghai region is under a strong VOC-limited condition over the regional scale. In contrast, when the ratio is

  19. Megacity impacts on regional ozone formation: observations and WRF-Chem modeling for the MIRAGE-Shanghai field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tie, X.; Geng, F.; Guenther, A.; Cao, J.; Greenberg, J.; Zhang, R.; Apel, E.; Li, G.; Weinheimer, A.; Chen, J.; Cai, C.

    2013-06-01

    The MIRAGE-Shanghai experiment was designed to characterize the factors controlling regional air pollution near a Chinese megacity (Shanghai) and was conducted during September 2009. This paper provides information on the measurements conducted for this study. In order to have some deep analysis of the measurements, a regional chemical/dynamical model (version 3 of Weather Research and Forecasting Chemical model - WRF-Chemv3) is applied for this study. The model results are intensively compared with the measurements to evaluate the model capability for calculating air pollutants in the Shanghai region, especially the chemical species related to ozone formation. The results show that the model is able to calculate the general distributions (the level and the variability) of air pollutants in the Shanghai region, and the differences between the model calculation and the measurement are mostly smaller than 30%, except the calculations of HONO (nitrous acid) at PD (Pudong) and CO (carbon monoxide) at DT (Dongtan). The main scientific focus is the study of ozone chemical formation not only in the urban area, but also on a regional scale of the surrounding area of Shanghai. The results show that during the experiment period, the ozone photochemical formation was strongly under the VOC (volatile organic compound)-limited condition in the urban area of Shanghai. Moreover, the VOC-limited condition occurred not only in the city, but also in the larger regional area. There was a continuous enhancement of ozone concentrations in the downwind of the megacity of Shanghai, resulting in a significant enhancement of ozone concentrations in a very large regional area in the surrounding region of Shanghai. The sensitivity study of the model suggests that there is a threshold value for switching from VOC-limited condition to NOx (nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide)-limited condition. The threshold value is strongly dependent on the emission ratio of NOx / VOCs. When the ratio is about

  20. Magnetic fluid-filled microhole in the collapsed region of a photonic crystal fiber for the measurement of a magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Gao, R; Jiang, Y

    2013-08-15

    A method for measurement of a magnetic field by filling a microhole with magnetic fluid (MF) in a photonic crystal fiber (PCF) is presented and experimentally demonstrated. A microhole is created in the collapsed region between the PCF and the single-mode fiber by using femtosecond laser micromachining, and a PCF-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer is formed. The MF is filled into the microhole. Due to the tunable refractive index property of the MF, the mode field diameter of the propagation light is changed with the external magnetic field, and the magnetic field can be detected by measuring the visibility contrast of the white light interferogram. The experimental results show that sensitivity of up to 0.042 dB/Oe is achieved.

  1. Cluster Multipoint Observations of the Spatial Structure and Time Development of Auroral Acceleration Region Field-aligned Current Systems, Potentials, and Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, A. J.; Chaston, C. C.; Fillingim, M. O.; Frey, H. U.; Bonnell, J. W.; Mozer, F.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The auroral acceleration region is an integral part of the magnetosphere-ionosphere electrodynamic system, and plays a key role in the transport of plasma and energy between Earth and space. This region is embedded with field-aligned currents that couple the magnetosphere to the ionosphere and is where parallel electric fields form that accelerate plasma to and from these regions. Though considerable progress has been made, the complex interplay between field-aligned current system formation, the development of parallel electric fields, changes in the plasma constituents, and auroral emissions consequences are not fully understood. The Cluster mission is well suited for studying the structure and dynamics of the auroral acceleration region. Over its lifetime, Cluster has sampled much of this region with closely spaced probes enabling the distinction between temporal effects from spatial variations. Moreover, this data when combined with auroral images from IMAGE or THEMIS GBO-ASI enable an assessment of the auroral emission response to spatial morphology and temporal development of structures seeded in the auroral acceleration region. In this study we present a survey of Cluster multi-point traversals within and just above the auroral acceleration region (≤ 3 Re altitude). In particular we highlight the spatial morphology and developmental sequence of auroral acceleration current systems, potentials and plasma constituents, with the aim of identifying controlling factors, and assessing ionospheric consequences under different conditions. Our results suggest that the "Alfvénic" activity may be an important precursor and perhaps may be playing an essential role in the development of "quasi-static" current systems during quiet and substorm active times. Such events are generally the result of an injection mediated process at or near the plasma sheet boundary layer, resulting in the local expansion of the plasma sheet. Key features of the conversion from Alfv

  2. The Cenozoic stress/deformation field of the Donets coal basin and Northern Azov region and its probable sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, M.; Korchemagin, V.; Kolesnichenko, A.

    2009-04-01

    Studies of structure, development and dynamics of formation of the little-investigated Cenozoic (Alpine) deformations of the Donets Herzinic intraplate orogen (Donets Coal Basin, or Donbass) and Northern Azov region, which were accompanied by mass mesotectonic measurement, revealed traces of two independent Cenozoic orogenies: the Laramic one of the Early Alpine (Latest Cretaceous — Paleocene), and the Recent one of the Late Alpine (Neogene — Quaternary). The orogenies differ in area of manifestation and peculiarities of stress/deformation field. The first orogeny in its pure state developed only in the western Donbass and adjacent relic part of the Dnieper-Donets aulacogene where gentle folds of the Mesozoic strata of the WNW - ESE strike were formed. The folds (so-called Izyum-Kramatorsk structural unit) are sharply overprinted by the Eocene beds and confined to salt diapirs gradually uplifting from the Devonian. According the mesotectonic data, in the post-Cretaceous time they however developed under slight transversal compression with some horizontal shear. The Laramic movements occurred also to the east where they together with the Recent ones participated in formation of the Severodonetskij and Persianovskij border reverse faults of the Donbass. However, as a whole the Recent orogeny developed independently and far to the east of the Laramic one. The Donets-North Azov neotectonic swell which appeared at that time occupies not only the eastern Donets intraplate orogen arised from the Dnieper-Donets aulacogene but strongly crosses the southern aulacogene border extending far into the Ukrainian shield. The different areas of the Laramic and Recent orogenic movements in the Donbass suggest that they raised from different sources. The eastern distribution of the Late Alpine deformation and its more intense manifestation (the well noticeable neotectonic uplift as well as the extension outside the aulacogene and the activization of the Ukrainian shield basement

  3. Study of built-in electric field in active region of GaN/InGaN/AlGaNLEDs by electroreflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avakyants, Lev P.; Aslanyan, Artem E.; Bokov, Pavel Yu.; Chervyakov, Anatoly V.; Polozhentsev, Kirill Yu.

    2017-04-01

    Nitride-based heterostructures with InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells in active region were investigated by electroreflectance spectroscopy. Two spectral lines with the stable difference between their phase parameters and slightly different energies were observed in the electroreflectance spectra under various bias voltages. Using models taking into account interference effects it was shown that electroreflectance signal at low amplitude of modulation voltage originates from the first and the last quantum wells in active region. The difference between built-in electric field strengths in these two quantum wells were estimated as 270-320 kV/cm.

  4. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-11-01

    This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

  5. Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

    1999-06-01

    This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

  6. Study of the 3D Coronal Magnetic Field of Active Region 11117 Around the Time of a Confined Flare Using a Data-Driven CESE-MHD Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Feng, X.; Wu, S.; Hu, Q.

    2012-12-01

    Non-potentiality of the solar coronal magnetic field accounts for the solar explosion like flares and CMEs. We apply a data-driven CESE-MHD model to investigate the three-dimensional (3D) coronal magnetic field of NOAA active region (AR) 11117 around the time of a C-class confined flare occurred on 2010 October 25. The CESE-MHD model, based on the spacetime conservation-element and solution-element scheme, is designed to focus on the magnetic-field evolution and to consider a simplified solar atomsphere with finite plasma β. Magnetic vector-field data derived from the observations at the photoshpere is inputted directly to constrain the model. Assuming that the dynamic evolution of the coronal magnetic field can be approximated by successive equilibria, we solve a time sequence of MHD equilibria basing on a set of vector magnetograms for AR 11117 taken by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO) around the time of flare. The model qualitatively reproduces the basic structures of the 3D magnetic field, as supported by the visual similarity between the field lines and the coronal loops observed by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), which shows that the coronal field can indeed be well characterized by the MHD equilibrium in most time. The magnetic configuration changes very limited during the studied time interval of two hours. A topological analysis reveals that the small flare is correlated with a bald patch (BP, where the magnetic field is tangent to the photoshpere), suggesting that the energy release of the flare can be understood by magnetic reconnection associated with the BP separatrices. The total magnetic flux and energy keep increasing slightly in spite of the flare, while the magnetic free energy drops during the flare with an amount of 1.7 × 1030 erg, which can be interpreted as the energy budget released by the minor C-class flare.

  7. Obliquely propagating ion acoustic waves in the auroral E region: Further evidence of irregularity production by field-aligned electron streaming

    SciTech Connect

    Villain, J.P. ); Hanuise, C. ); Greenwald, R.A.; Baker, K.B.; Ruohoniemi, J.M. )

    1990-06-01

    Common volume observations of E region high-latitude irregularities at decameter wavelengths have been obtained with the JHU/APL HF radar located at Goose Bay, Labrador, and the SHERPA HF radar located at Schefferville, Quebec. In this paper, the authors analyze an event with characteristics similar to those of a distinctive type of event described by Villain et al. (1987). The experimental configuration, which combines the azimuthal-scanning capability of the Goose Bay radar with the frequency-scanning operation of the Schefferville radar, has provided unambiguous evidence of the existence of two irregularity layers at different altitudes within the E region. The layers, which exhibit different characteristics, can be related to the action of the gradient drift and ion acoustic instability mechanisms. It is shown that the ion acoustic modes have phase velocities in the range of 400 to 550 m/s and are produced in regions of subcritical perpendicular electron Hall drift. They infer that the observed irregularities are produced through a combination of perpendicular and field-aligned relative electron-ion drifts. Features previously observed but no t satisfactorily explained by perpendicular drift excitation alone can be understood in terms of field-aligned drift excitation. They conclude that the role of electron-ion field-aligned drift may be much more important than previously realized.

  8. Genetic relationships of grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) in the Prudhoe Bay region of Alaska: inference from microsatellite DNA, mitochondrial DNA, and field observations.

    PubMed

    Cronin, M; Shideler, R; Hechtel, J; Strobeck, C; Paetkau, D

    1999-01-01

    Grizzly bears are abundant in the region of the Prudhoe Bay oil fields in northern Alaska. We used field observations and molecular genetic data to identify parent-offspring and sibling relationships among bears in this region. We determined genotypes at 14 microsatellite DNA loci and the cytochrome b gene of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) for 36 bears. We identified 17 possible mother-offspring pairs and 8 possible father-offspring pairs. This includes verification of the relationships of 14 mother-offspring pairs identified from field observations. Three additional mother-offspring pairs and all eight father-offspring pairs were determined from genetic and age data. Relatedness coefficients based on numbers of shared alleles between individuals were as expected: approximately 0.50 for parent-offspring and sibling pairs and approximately 0.75 for a father-offspring pair resulting from a father-daughter mating. The level of genetic variation (mean number of alleles per locus = 6.6, mean heterozygosity = 70%) and allele frequencies in grizzly bears in the Prudhoe Bay region are similar to those in other parts of the species' range.

  9. Guided Discharge Path by Weak Ionized Region between Two Plasmas Produced by YAG Laser in Atmospheric Air Gap with Non-Uniform DC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Daisuke

    1998-11-01

    Guided Discharge Path by Weak Ionized Region between Two Plasmas Produced by YAG Laser in Atmospheric Air Gap with Non-Uniform DC Electric Field*, Daisuke Okano, Kyushu Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, Japan. -----We have studied on guiding discharge path by weak ionized region between plasmas produced by a visible laser, that is, a YAG laser with wavelength 532nm, in an atmospheric air gap with DC non-uniform electric field using a rod-to-plate electrode. We succeeded in capturing the framing images in the temporal evolution on guiding discharge along the YAG laser light path. From the results of experiments, the region between two plasmas produced by a YAG laser can guide a discharge path, and the region between two plasmas on the laser light path is considered as well as a weak ionized one [1] produced by an excimer laser. [1]J.Sasaki, S.Kubodera, R.Ozaki and T.Uchiyama, J. Appl. Phys., 60 (1986) 3845. *This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)-no.10650295 of The Ministry of education, Science Sports and Culture in japan.

  10. Identification of vortical structures inside the human pharynx/larynx region from POD-reconstructed velocity fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinneeb, A.-M.; Pollard, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of the vortical structures in the pharynx/larynx region of an idealised human extra-thoracic airway obtained using particle image velocimetry (PIV). The inlet velocity was 0.13 m/s yielding a Reynolds number, based on the inlet condition, of 670. Two thousand images were acquired at each location at a framing rate of 2 Hz. The proper orthogonal decomposition method was applied to the PIV data. Only a few modes were used for POD reconstruction which recovered about 60 % of the turbulent kinetic energy. A vortex identification algorithm was employed to identify and measure properties of the structures. This step was followed by a statistical analysis of the distribution of number, size, and strength of these vortices. The results reveal the formation of a large number of structures identified along two planes in the pharynx/larynx region. This study also revealed an increased strength in the counter-clockwise structures as compared to clockwise structures in the pharynx region. As well, there is some evidence to suggest that the vortical structures, whose axes are perpendicular to the sagittal plane, change their orientation as they proceed further into the laryngeal region.

  11. Application of thermal-based two-source energy balance model for estimating vineyard evapotranspiration at field and regional scales

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Due to limited water availability in much of California, particularly in the Central Valley region where one-third of the produce consumed in the United States is grown, improvements in water and irrigation management practices are greatly needed. This, in turn, requires the development of tools and...

  12. Field-Lines-Threaded Model for: (1) the Low Solar Corona; (2) Electrons in the Transition Region; and (3) Solar Energetic Particle Acceleration and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolov, I.; van der Holst, B.; Jin, M.; Gombosi, T. I.; Taktakishvili, A.; Khazanov, G. V.

    2013-12-01

    In numerical simulations of the solar corona, both for the ambient state and especially for dynamical processes the most computational resources are spent for maintaining the numerical solution in the Low Solar Corona and in the transition region, where the temperature gradients are very sharp and the magnetic field has a complicated topology. The degraded computational efficiency is caused by the need in a highest resolution as well as the use of the fully three-dimensional implicit solver for electron heat conduction. On the other hand, the physical nature of the processes involved is rather simple (which still does not facilitate the numerical methods) as long as the heat fluxes as well as slow plasma motional velocities are aligned with the magnetic field. The Alfven wave turbulence, which is often believed to be the main driver of the solar wind and the main source of the coronal heating, is characterized by the Poynting flux of the waves, which is also aligned with the magnetic field. Therefore, the plasma state in any point of the three-dimensional grid in the Low Solar Corona can be found by solving a set of one-dimensional equations for the magnetic field line ('thread'), which passes through this point and connects it to the chromosphere and to the global Solar Corona. In the present paper we describe an innovative computational technology based upon the use of the magnetic-field-line-threads to find the local solution. We present the development of the AWSoM code of the University of Michigan with the field-lines-threaded Low Solar Corona. In the transition region, where the essentially kinetic description of the electron energy fluxes is required, we solve the Fokker-Plank equation on the system of threads, to achieve the physically consistent description of chromosphere evaporation. The third application for the field-lines-treaded model is the Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) acceleration and transport. Being the natural extension of the Field

  13. Anti-Stokes effect CCD camera and SLD based optical coherence tomography for full-field imaging in the 1550nm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kredzinski, Lukasz; Connelly, Michael J.

    2012-06-01

    Full-field Optical coherence tomography is an en-face interferometric imaging technology capable of carrying out high resolution cross-sectional imaging of the internal microstructure of an examined specimen in a non-invasive manner. The presented system is based on competitively priced optical components available at the main optical communications band located in the 1550 nm region. It consists of a superluminescent diode and an anti-stokes imaging device. The single mode fibre coupled SLD was connected to a multi-mode fibre inserted into a mode scrambler to obtain spatially incoherent illumination, suitable for OCT wide-field modality in terms of crosstalk suppression and image enhancement. This relatively inexpensive system with moderate resolution of approximately 24um x 12um (axial x lateral) was constructed to perform a 3D cross sectional imaging of a human tooth. To our knowledge this is the first 1550 nm full-field OCT system reported.

  14. Determination of E/N Influence on K0 Values within the Low Field Region of Ion Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Brian C; Siems, William F; Harden, Charles S; McHugh, Vincent M; Hill, Herbert H

    2017-03-23

    The established theory of ion motion within weak electric fields predicts that reduced ion mobility (K0) remains constant as a function of the ratio of electric field strength to drift gas number density (E/N). However, upon increasing the accuracy and precision of K0 value measurements during a previous study, a new relationship was seen in which the K0 values of ions decreased as a function of increasing E/N at field strengths below 4 Td. Here the effect of E/N on the K0 value of an ion has been investigated in order to validate the reality of the phenomenon and determine its cause. The pertinent measurements of voltage and drift time were verified in order to ensure the authenticity of the trend and that it was not a result of a systematic error in parametric measurements. The trend was also replicated on a separate ion mobility spectrometer drift tube in order to further validate its authenticity. As a result, the theory of ion motion within weak electric fields should be revised to reflect the behavior seen here.

  15. The Major Project in the Field of Education in the Latin American and Caribbean Region. Bulletin 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and Caribbean.

    The initiative and activities carried out by 29 countries in Latin and South America and the Caribbean in the UNESCO Major Project in the Field of Education to correct deficiencies and meet unsatisfied basic educational needs are summarized. Many summaries reflect revisions made during 1983 in National Plans of Action with respect to enhancing…

  16. The Major Project in the Field of Education in the Latin American and Caribbean Region. Bulletin 10-11.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Santiago (Chile). Regional Office for Education in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    The Major Project in the Field of Education stresses renewed and intensive efforts by Latin American and Caribbean Island countries to provide the resources and training necessary to meet basic education needs by the year 2000. This document examines project achievements, innovations, and problems through 1986 in the areas of rural education,…

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 4): Naval Air Station Cecil Field, Operable Unit 6, Jacksonville, FL, September 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The site name is the Golf Course Pesticide Disposal Area, Site 11, Operable Unit (OU) 6. The site is located in a wooded area between the 11th fairway and the 17th green at the Naval Air Station (NAS) Cecil Field golf course, Jacksonville, Florida. The purpose of the interim remedial action is to remove buried containers of pesticides and associated contaminated soil.

  18. The Zeeman effect in astrophysical water masers and the observation of strong magnetic fields in regions of star formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1992-01-01

    The present study solves the transfer equations for the polarized radiation of astrophysical 22-GHz water masers in the presence of a magnetic field which causes a Zeeman splitting that is much smaller than the spectral line breadth. The emphasis is placed on the relationship between the recently detected circular polarization in this maser radiation and the strength of the magnetic field. When the observed spectral line breadth is smaller than about 0.8 km/s (FWHM), it is calculated that the uncertainty is less than a factor of about 2. The accuracy is improved significantly when the angle between the line of sight and the direction of the magnetic field does not exceed about 45 deg. Uncertainty in the strength of the magnetic field due to lack of knowledge about which hyperfine transition is the source of the 22-GHz masers is removed. The 22-GHz maser feature is found to be the result of a merger of the three strongest hyperfine components.

  19. Field data observed during the geological excursion in the west-central region of the Sul-Riogrande Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Ohara, T.

    1984-01-01

    Outcrops are studied in the Copper Project test area of the Rio Grande do Sul State of Brazil. The accuracy of LANDSAT-MSS data is checked against field data. A preliminary geological map is included on a scale of 1:500,000 that describes 820 outcrop over an area of 1,700 kilometers.

  20. Comparison of regional and local horizontal strain field on the area of Central Europe determined from GPS data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontny, B.

    2012-04-01

    Permanent GPS observations on EPN stations are being continued already about 15 years and so velocities of horizontal and vertical movements of the sites are determined with the great credibility. However density of the EPN sites on the area of Central Europe allow to determine only a very general model of deformation field. For determining the local strain field epoch-making GPS observations in local research networks can be used. As en example the GEOSUD GPS Network located in the area of the Sudeten mountains in South-West Poland were used. Velocities of GPS points were estimated from observations of annually repeated two-day measuring campaigns, connected to the EPN stations. On the basis of these velocities local velocity field and local strain field were estimated. The toolbox grid_strain (Teza, Pesci and Galgaro, 2008) was used. Areas of the maximum compressions and extensions were outlined as well as they were confronted with the tectonic structure of area. In the picture of the deformation field clearly four principal zones of deformations are standing out. The presence of the Sudetic Marginal Fault is becoming scratched slightly in south-eastern his parts. Values of deformations in the vicinity of fault zone are generally smaller than in more distant area. It is proving the hypothesis on interseismic character of changes and the weak tectonic activity of the fault. Such an image of horizontal deformations in which extensions are perpendicular to main direction of the fault line, is matching with the hypothesis on normal character of the SMF. On the entire research area however compression deformations are dominating.

  1. Quasi-static three-dimensional magnetic field evolution in solar active region NOAA 11166 associated with an X1.5 flare

    SciTech Connect

    Vemareddy, P.; Wiegelmann, T. E-mail: wiegelmann@mps.mpg.de

    2014-09-01

    We study the quasi-static evolution of coronal magnetic fields constructed from the non-linear force-free field (NLFFF) approximation aiming to understand the relation between the magnetic field topology and ribbon emission during an X1.5 flare in active region (AR) NOAA 11166. The flare with a quasi-elliptical and two remote ribbons occurred on 2011 March 9 at 23:13 UT over a positive flux region surrounded by negative flux at the center of the bipolar AR. Our analysis of the coronal magnetic structure with potential and NLFFF solutions unveiled the existence of a single magnetic null point associated with a fan-spine topology and is co-spatial with the hard X-ray source. The footpoints of the fan separatrix surface agree with the inner edge of the quasi-elliptical ribbon and the outer spine is linked to one of the remote ribbons. During the evolution, the slow footpoint motions stressed the field lines along the polarity inversion line and caused electric current layers in the corona around the fan separatrix surface. These current layers trigger magnetic reconnection as a consequence of dissipating currents, which are visible as cusp-shaped structures at lower heights. The reconnection process reorganized the magnetic field topology whose signatures are observed at the separatrices/quasi-separatrix layer structure in both the photosphere and the corona during the pre-to-post flare evolution. In agreement with previous numerical studies, our results suggest that the line-tied footpoint motions perturb the fan-spine system and cause null point reconnection, which eventually causes the flare emission at the footpoints of the field lines.

  2. MAGNETIC FIELDS OF AN ACTIVE REGION FILAMENT FROM FULL STOKES ANALYSIS OF Si I 1082.7 nm AND He I 1083.0 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Z.; Liu, Y.

    2012-04-20

    Vector magnetic fields of an active region filament in the photosphere and upper chromosphere are obtained from spectro-polarimetric observations recorded with the Tenerife Infrared Polarimeter (TIP II) at the German Vacuum Tower Telescope. We apply Milne-Eddington inversions on full Stokes vectors of the photospheric Si I 1082.7 nm and the upper chromospheric He I triplet at 1083.0 nm to obtain the magnetic field vector and velocity maps in two atmosphere layers. We find that (1) a complete filament was already present in H{alpha} at the beginning of the TIP II data acquisition. Only a partially formed one, composed of multiple small threads, was present in He I. (2) The AR filament comprises two sections. One shows strong magnetic field intensities, about 600-800 G in the upper chromosphere and 800-1000 G in the photosphere. The other exhibits only comparatively weak magnetic field strengths in both layers. (3) The Stokes V signal is indicative of a dip in the magnetic field strength close to the chromospheric PIL. (4) In the chromosphere, consistent upflows are found along the PIL flanked by downflows. (5) The transversal magnetic field is nearly parallel to the PIL in the photosphere and inclined by 20 Degree-Sign -30 Degree-Sign in the chromosphere. (6) The chromospheric magnetic field around the filament is found to be in normal configuration, while the photospheric field presents a concave magnetic topology. The observations are consistent with the emergence of a flux rope with a subsequent formation of a filament.

  3. Stress field variations along the Maghreb region derived from inversion of major seismic crisis fault plane solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ousadou, Farida; Dorbath, Louis; Ayadi, Abdelhakim; Dorbath, Catherine; Gharbi, Sofiane

    2014-09-01

    This study is devoted to the analysis of the stress state along the Maghreb region based on the inversion of focal solutions. We have inverted the main shock and aftershock focal mechanisms of the strongest seismic events that occurred in five seismogenic zones, from west to east: Al Hoceima (2004), Cheliff (1980), Tipasa-Chenoua (1989), Zemmouri (2003) and Constantine (1985). Most of the focal mechanisms of the aftershock sequences have been constructed within this study. Compressive stress regime is observed in the central part of Algeria between Cheliff and Zemmouri. On both edges of the Maghreb region, the stress regime becomes strike-slip in the Constantine region and in the Moroccan Rift. These different regimes seem to be linked to the free-edge effect (Ionian slab subduction) and to the dynamics of the Alboran Sea in the eastern and western parts of the study area respectively. The σ1 directions experience an anticlockwise rotation of about 20° from eastern to central Algeria. We observe that the direction of σ1 and the direction of convergence are the closest in central Algeria, where the collision is not perturbed by edge effect.

  4. A Wide-Field Narrowband Optical Survey of the Braid Nebula Star Formation Region in Cygnus OB7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magakian, Tigran Yu.; Nikogossian, Elena H.; Aspin, Colin; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Khanzadyan, Tigran; Movsessian, Tigran; Smith, Michael D.; Mitchison, Sharon; Davis, Chris J.; Beck, Tracy L.; Moriarty-Schieven, Gerald H.

    2010-03-01

    We study the population of Herbig-Haro (HH) flows and jets in an area of Cygnus OB7 designated the Braid Nebula star formation region. This complex forms part of the L 1003 dark cloud, and hosts two FU Orionis (FUor)-like objects as well as several other active young stars. To trace outflow activity and to relate both known and newly discovered flows to young star hosts we intercompare new, deep, narrowband Hα and [S II] optical images taken on the Subaru 8 m Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Our images show that there is considerable outflow and jet activity in this region suggesting the presence of an extensive young star population. We confirm that both of the FUor-like objects drive extensive HH flows and document further members of the flows in both objects. The L 1003 star formation complex is a highly kinematically active region with young stars in several different stages of evolution. We trace collimated outflows from numerous young stars although the origin of some HH objects remains elusive. Based on data collected at the Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  5. Dual-illumination mode, wide-field probe imaging scheme for imaging irido-corneal angle region inside eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinoj, V. K.; Murukeshan, V. M.; Hong, Jesmond; Baskaran, M.; Aung, Tin

    2015-07-01

    Noninvasive medical imaging techniques have generated great interest and high potential in the research and development of ocular imaging and follow up procedures. It is well known that angle closure glaucoma is one of the major ocular diseases/ conditions that causes blindness. The identification and treatment of this disease are related primarily to angle assessment techniques. In this paper, we illustrate a probe-based imaging approach to obtain the images of the angle region in eye. The proposed probe consists of a micro CCD camera and LED/NIR laser light sources and they are configured at the distal end to enable imaging of iridocorneal region inside eye. With this proposed dualmodal probe, imaging is performed in light (white visible LED ON) and dark (NIR laser light source alone) conditions and the angle region is noticeable in both cases. The imaging using NIR sources have major significance in anterior chamber imaging since it evades pupil constriction due to the bright light and thereby the artificial altering of anterior chamber angle. The proposed methodology and developed scheme are expected to find potential application in glaucoma disease detection and diagnosis.

  6. A WIDE-FIELD NARROWBAND OPTICAL SURVEY OF THE BRAID NEBULA STAR FORMATION REGION IN CYGNUS OB7

    SciTech Connect

    Magakian, Tigran Yu.; Nikogossian, Elena H.; Movsessian, Tigran; Aspin, Colin; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Khanzadyan, Tigran; Smith, Michael D.; Mitchison, Sharon; Davis, Chris J.; Beck, Tracy L.; Moriarty-Schieven, Gerald H. E-mail: elena@bao.sci.am E-mail: pyo@subaru.naoj.org E-mail: smm23@kent.ac.uk E-mail: c.davis@jach.hawaii.edu E-mail: gerald.schieven@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca

    2010-03-15

    We study the population of Herbig-Haro (HH) flows and jets in an area of Cygnus OB7 designated the Braid Nebula star formation region. This complex forms part of the L 1003 dark cloud, and hosts two FU Orionis (FUor)-like objects as well as several other active young stars. To trace outflow activity and to relate both known and newly discovered flows to young star hosts we intercompare new, deep, narrowband H{alpha} and [S II] optical images taken on the Subaru 8 m Telescope on Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Our images show that there is considerable outflow and jet activity in this region suggesting the presence of an extensive young star population. We confirm that both of the FUor-like objects drive extensive HH flows and document further members of the flows in both objects. The L 1003 star formation complex is a highly kinematically active region with young stars in several different stages of evolution. We trace collimated outflows from numerous young stars although the origin of some HH objects remains elusive.

  7. Wide field-of-view, multi-region two-photon imaging of neuronal activity in the mammalian brain

    PubMed Central

    Stirman, Jeffrey N.; Smith, Ikuko T.; Kudenov, Michael W.; Smith, Spencer L.

    2016-01-01

    Two-photon calcium imaging provides an optical readout of neuronal activity in populations of neurons with subcellular resolution. However, conventional two-photon imaging systems are limited in their field of view to ~1 mm2, precluding the visualization of multiple cortical areas simultaneously. Here, we demonstrate a two-photon microscope with an expanded field of view (>9.5 mm2) for rapidly reconfigurable simultaneous scanning of widely separated populations of neurons. We custom designed and assembled an optimized scan engine, objective, and two independently positionable, temporally multiplexed excitation pathways. We used this new microscope to measure activity correlations between two cortical visual areas in mice during visual processing. PMID:27347754

  8. The variations of geomagnetic field in the region of the Sulaksky cascade of hydro-electric power station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniyalov, M. G.; Suleymanov, A. I.

    2012-04-01

    Technogenic intervention in nature while creation of large water basins disturbs developed dynamic balance in rock mass and activates seismic processes, i.e. causes the so-called exited earthquakes which are connected with water basin operation. Local changes of a magnetic field of the Earth can be the result of various physical processes, but the most probable - electromagnetic and piezomagnetic processes. In our case the rock piezomagnetism is considered to be the principal cause of local geomagnetic variations - change of their magnetization under the influence of mechanical pressure. The measurements were made 2 times a day at the same time to reveal the connection of geomagnetic field components variations with water basin level fluctuations. According to geomagnetic measurements of 1983-1989 it is determined, that relative changes of a vertical component δΖ much more exceed respective alterations of the module of a full vector δT that is indirect acknowledgement of magnetoelastic effect under natural conditions. We determined that in the period of intensive rising of water level and weight the sharp reduction of a vertical component in water basin is observed which depends not only on loading value, but also on filling speed. At stable level of a water basin slight increase of δΖ is observed which is explained by internal pressure relaxation process in the water basin basis. The empirical formula for calculation of changes of a vertical component of a field ΔΖ under the influence of loading during the water basin filling is observed. The numerical value of coefficient k,, calculated by the least square method as the interconnection coefficient between vertical component changes and changes of level of the Chirkeysky water basin according to measurements of 1983-1989 is: 5, 66 10-4 nano-tesla / Pa. Ju. Skovorodkin obtained the numerical value of k coefficient: 6, 3 10-6 nano-tesla / Pa during the variations measurements of full vector module of

  9. High resolution field monitoring in coastal wetlands of the U.S. Mid-Atlantic to support quantification of storm surge attenuation at the regional scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paquier, A. E.; Haddad, J.; Lawler, S.; Garzon Hervas, J. L.; Ferreira, C.

    2015-12-01

    Hurricane Sandy (2012) demonstrated the vulnerability of the US East Coast to extreme events, and motivated the exploration of resilient coastal defenses that incorporate both hard engineering and natural strategies such as the restoration, creation and enhancement of coastal wetlands and marshes. Past laboratory and numerical studies have indicated the potential of wetlands to attenuate storm surge, and have demonstrated the complexity of the surge hydrodynamic interactions with wetlands. Many factors control the propagation of surge in these natural systems including storm characteristics, storm-induced hydrodynamics, landscape complexity, vegetation biomechanical properties and the interactions of these different factors. While previous field studies have largely focused on the impact of vegetation characteristics on attenuation processes, few have been undertaken with holistic consideration of these factors and their interactions. To bridge this gap of in-situ field data and to support the calibration of storm surge and wave numerical models such that wetlands can be correctly parametrized on a regional scale, we are carrying out high resolution surveys of hydrodynamics (pressure, current intensity and direction), morphology (topo-bathymetry, micro-topography) and vegetation (e.g. stem density, height, vegetation frontal area) in 4 marshes along the Chesapeake Bay. These areas are representative of the ecosystems and morphodynamic functions present in this region, from the tidal Potomac marshes to the barrier-island back-bays of the Delmarva Peninsula. The field monitoring program supports the investigation of the influence of different types of vegetation on water level, swell and wind wave attenuation and morphological evolution during storm surges. This dataset is also used to calibrate and validate numerical simulations of hurricane storm surge propagation at regional and local scales and to support extreme weather coastal resilience planning in the region

  10. SIGMOIDAL ACTIVE REGION ON THE SUN: COMPARISON OF A MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICAL SIMULATION AND A NONLINEAR FORCE-FREE FIELD MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Savcheva, A.; Van Ballegooijen, A.; DeLuca, E.; Pariat, E.; Aulanier, G.

    2012-05-01

    In this paper we show that when accurate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) models are analyzed together with high-resolution magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, we can determine the physical causes for the coronal mass ejection (CME) eruption on 2007 February 12. We compare the geometrical and topological properties of the three-dimensional magnetic fields given by both methods in their pre-eruptive phases. We arrive at a consistent picture for the evolution and eruption of the sigmoid. Both the MHD simulation and the observed magnetic field evolution show that flux cancellation plays an important role in building the flux rope. We compute the squashing factor, Q, in different horizontal maps in the domains. The main shape of the quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs) is very similar between the NLFFF and MHD models. The main QSLs lie on the edge of the flux rope. While the QSLs in the NLFFF model are more complex due to the intrinsic large complexity in the field, the QSLs in the MHD model are smooth and possess lower maximum value of Q. In addition, we demonstrate the existence of hyperbolic flux tubes (HFTs) in both models in vertical cross sections of Q. The main HFT, located under the twisted flux rope in both models, is identified as the most probable site for reconnection. We also show that there are electric current concentrations coinciding with the main QSLs. Finally, we perform torus instability analysis and show that a combination between reconnection at the HFT and the resulting expansion of the flux rope into the torus instability domain is the cause of the CME in both models.

  11. Simulation study of wave phenomena from the sheath region in single frequency capacitively coupled plasma discharges; field reversals and ion reflection

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.; Turner, M. M.

    2013-07-15

    Capacitively coupled radio-frequency (RF) discharges have great significance for industrial applications. Collisionless electron heating in such discharges is important, and sometimes is the dominant mechanism. This heating is usually understood to originate in a stochastic interaction between electrons and the electric fields. However, other mechanisms may also be important. There is evidence of wave emission with a frequency near the electron plasma frequency, i.e., ω{sub pe}, from the sheath region in collisionless capacitive RF discharges. This is the result of a progressive breakdown of quasi-neutrality close to the electron sheath edge. These waves are damped in a few centimeters during their propagation from the sheath towards the bulk plasma. The damping occurs because of the Landau damping or some related mechanism. This research work reports that the emission of waves is associated with a field reversal during the expanding phase of the sheath. Trapping of electrons near to this field reversal region is observed. The amplitude of the wave increases with increasing RF current density amplitude J(tilde sign){sub 0} until some maximum is reached, beyond which the wave diminishes and a new regime appears. In this new regime, the density of the bulk plasma suddenly increases because of ion reflection, which occurs due to the presence of strong field reversal near sheath region. Our calculation shows that these waves are electron plasma waves. These phenomena occur under extreme conditions (i.e., higher J(tilde sign){sub 0} than in typical experiments) for sinusoidal current waveforms, but similar effects may occur with non-sinusoidal pulsed waveforms for conditions of experimental interest, because the rate of change of current is a relevant parameter. The effect of electron elastic collisions on plasma waves is also investigated.

  12. [Effect of tillage patterns on the structure of weed communities in oat fields in the cold and arid region of North China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Zhang, Li; Wu, Dong-Xia; Zhang, Jun-Jun

    2014-06-01

    In order to clarify the effects of tillage patterns on farmland weed community structure and crop production characteristics, based on 10 years location experiment with no-tillage, subsoiling and conventional tillage in the cold and arid region of North China, and supplementary experiment of plowing after 10 years no-tillage and subsoiling, oat was planted in 2 soils under different tillage patterns, and field weed total density, dominant weed types, weed diversity index, field weed biomass and oats yield were measured. The results showed that the regional weed community was dominated by foxtail weed (Setaira viridis); the weed density under long-term no-tillage was 2.20-5.14 times of tillage at different growing stages of oat, but there were no significant differences between conditional tillage and plowing after long-term no-tillage and subsoiling. Field weed Shannon diversity indices were 0.429 and 0.531, respectively, for sandy chestnut soil and loamy meadow soil under no-tillage conditions, and field weed biomass values were 1.35 and 2.26 times of plowing treatment, while the oat biomass values were only 2807.4 kg x hm(-2) and 4053.9 kg x hm(-2), decreased by 22.3% and 46.2%, respectively. The results showed that the weed community characteristics were affected by both tillage patterns and soil types. Long-term no-tillage farmland in the cold and arid region of North China could promote the natural evolution of plant communities by keeping more perennial weeds, and the plowing pattern lowered the annual weed density, eliminated perennial weeds with shallow roots, and stimulated perennial weeds with deep roots.

  13. An integrated exploration model for Council Run field analogs: Regional geology and seismic stratigraphy of Devonian 6th Elk sandstones

    SciTech Connect

    Kelleher, G.; Johnson, R. )

    1991-08-01

    A geologic study of the Devonian Lock Haven 6th Elk formation along the structural front of Pennsylvania and Maryland suggest that present-day structures were active at the time of deposition. These structures barred deposition to the west and helped to localize sands in a northeast-southwest fairway. The 6th Elk sandstones occur in two major depositional lobes (located in Centre and Somerset counties in Pennsylvania, and Garret County, Maryland) and were deposited on a shallow-marine shelf by turbidity currents and later modified by storm-generated currents. Deposition of 6th Elk sands may also have been influenced by cross-strike discontinuities. A seismic study of the Council Run field aids in subsurface identification of the 6th Elk. A high-amplitude seismic anomaly across the Council Run field is correlated with increasing san thickness. Two dimensional modeling suggests that the seismic response is extremely sensitive to specific acquisition and processing techniques including filter and phase variability. Additional attribute analysis integrates the seismic data with the forward models. This results in a predictive method for potentially identifying 6th Elk sandstone development from seismic data. Applying the results of the seismic modeling at Council Run field to a seismic grid across the previously defined 6th Elk depositional fairway has identified many exploratory prospects in Lycoming and Bradford counties, Pennsylvania. This area coincides with the site of a third, previously documented, Upper Devonian depositional lobe.

  14. A systematic analysis of neurons with large somatosensory receptive fields covering multiple body regions in the secondary somatosensory area of macaque monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Toda, T.; Hihara, S.; Tanaka, M.; Iriki, A.; Iwamura, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Previous neurophysiological studies performed in macaque monkeys have revealed complex somatosensory responses in the secondary somatosensory area (SII), such as large receptive fields (RFs), as well as bilateral ones. However, systematic analyses of neurons with large RFs have not been performed. In the present study, we recorded single-unit activities in SII of awake macaque monkeys to investigate systematically large RFs by dividing the whole body into four body regions (head, trunk, forelimb, and hindlimb). Recorded neurons were classified into two types, according to whether the RFs were confined to one body region: single (n = 817) and combined (n = 282) body-region types. These two types were distinct in terms of the percentage of bilateral RFs: 55% in the single-region type and 90% in the combined type, demonstrating that two types of RF enlargement occur simultaneously in the combined type, namely, RF convergence from different body regions and RF convergence from both hemibodies. Among the combined-type RFs, two tendencies of RF convergence were found: 1) the distal parts of the limbs (i.e., hand and foot) and the mouth are interconnected, and 2) the trunk RFs extend continuously toward the distal parts of the limb and head to cover the entire body surface. Our distribution analysis on unfolded maps clarified that neurons having RFs with these two tendencies were distributed within specific subregions in SII. PMID:27559139

  15. Statistical characteristics of nighttime mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities observed by Daejeon VHF coherent scattering radar in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, T. Y.; Kwak, Y. S.; Kil, H.; Lee, Y.; Lee, W. K.; Park, Y. D.

    2014-12-01

    We report statistical characteristics of mid-latitude nighttime F-region field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) based on more than three-year observations by Daejeon VHF coherent backscatter radar. This radar has built at Daejeon (36.18°N, 127.14°E, dip lat. 26.7°N) in 2009 with 40.8 MHz operating frequency for continuous monitoring of the behavior of electron density irregularities in the middle latitude. By using long-term observations from January 2010 to December 2013, we obtained the annual, diurnal and seasonal characteristics of a variety of a percentage occurrence, signal-to-noise ratio, and Doppler velocities from the nighttime F-region irregularities over Korea peninsular. From almost four-year observations, the F-region nighttime irregularities occurred most frequently during post-sunset period. These nighttime irregularities usually appeared with occupying different height levels according to local time. This height variation of F-region FAIs was correlated with hmf2 of ionosonde in Icheon, South Korea. The irregularities were least active near the winter solstice and most active near summer solstice. From the annual occurrence variations, F-region nighttime irregularities seem to have tendency with solar activity.

  16. Some learnings from post-event field investigations after the june 2013 floods in the Pyrenees region in France.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payrastre, Olivier; Bonnifait, Laurent; Gaume, Eric; Le Boursicaut, Raphael

    2014-05-01

    In June 2013 catastrophic floods occurred in south of France in the Pyrenees mountainous area. These floods were due to the combination of a high initial discharge due to snowmelt with a significant rainfall event (up to 200mm rainfall), which effects may have been enhanced by an increase of snowmelt. Although the dynamics of this flood are not really similar, some of its features clearly remind what may be observed in the case of flash floods: significant contribution of relatively small watersheds, high solid transport, very limited information on the reality of flood magnitudes due to the small size of catchments contributing to the flood and the destruction of a significant part of the gauging network. This contribution presents the results of a post event field survey conducted in July 2013 in order to document this flood in terms of intensities of hydrologic reactions. The methods used are those described in Gaume et al. [2008, 2009], with a specific focus on the exploitation of videos from weatnesses. The dataset builded includes 31 peak discharge estimates, illustrating the relatively limited intensity of hydrologic reactions if compared to flash floods, but also providing some interesting complements for the consolidation of the methodology used for post-event field investigations: - several opportunities of comparison of the peak discharge estimates obtained from post event field investigations and from the gauging network, showing an overall good coherence - possibility of very significant flow velocities (up to 6 m/s-2) in the specific context observed here (slopes reaching up to 5%). - possibility to get information on flow surface velocities fields from videos provided by weatnesses. - significant influence of space-time rainfall distribution on the features of the flood, stressing the importance of a detailed information on the contribution of the sub-catchments. Gaume E., Borga M., 2008. Post flood field investigations after major flash floods

  17. Near Surface Magnetic Field Mapping over the Swirls in the SPA Region on the Moon Using Kaguya LMAG Low Altitude Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, H.; Tsunakawa, H.; Takahashi, F.; Shimizu, H.; Matsushima, M.

    2010-12-01

    We have reported the correlation between the high albedo marking (HAM) on the moon surface and the strength of horizontal component (Bh) of the near surface lunar magnetic field, at 2009 AGU Fall meeting, using the Lunar Prospector magnetometer data (LP-MAG). The correlation is further examined using the lowest altitude data at the latest orbits of Kaguya magnetometer data (KG-MAG). The Kaguya spacecraft (launched on September 14, 2007) dropped to the Moon at 65.5S and 80.4E on Jun 11, 2009. On the last few weeks, it flies over SPA with low altitudes as 10km, and the magnetometer acquired beautiful data. The magnetic field on the Mare Ingenii, on which we can see one of the most enhanced HAM, is restored using equivalent pole reduction (EPR) technique. First, EPR model is examined by comparing the model field and the other observations of LP-MAG and KG-MAG. They agree each other not only the shape but also the amplitude of the peaks. It indicates that the lunar magnetic field is well reproduced in 3-dimension. The magnetic field at the altitude of 5km is mapped over the Mare Ingenii and adjacent region where the HAM is clearly seen from Clementine albedo images. The coincidence of the HAM and the Bh is incredibly well, especially for the HAM in the flat crater floors. In some region, some of the detailed shapes of HAM match with the small bulge in the Bh contour. The HAM seems to be correlated maximas of Bh rather than its absolute strength. This result further support that the HMA is formed by magnetic shielding of the solar wind particles.

  18. Stress and fluid-pressure changes associated with oil-field operations: A critical assessment of effects in the focal region of the earthquake

    SciTech Connect

    Segall, P.; Yerkes, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    The proximity of the May 2 earthquake to the active oil fields on Anticline Ridge has led to speculation that this earthquake might have been triggered by oil-field operations. Elsewhere, earthquakes have been associated with pore-pressure increases resulting from fluid injection and with subsidence resulting from fluid extraction. Simple calculations show that shale units, which underlie the oil-producing strata, hydraulically isolate the oil field from the earthquake focal region. The large volumes of fluid extracted from the oil fields caused a 50% decline in reservoir pressures from 1938 to 1983. These observations independently rule out substantial increases in pore pressure at focal depths due to fluid injection. The authors use a theoretical method, based on Biot's constitutive theory for fluid-infiltrated elastic media, to evaluate the change in stresses acting in the focal region resulting from fluid extraction in the overlying oil fields. As an independent check on this method, the subsidence of the Earth's surface in response to fluid withdrawal is calculated and compared with measured elevation changes on Anticline Ridge. The producing horizons are taken to be horizontal permeable layers, bounded above and below by impermeable horizons. Strains within the producing layers are related to extraction-induced changes in pore-fluid mass. Contraction of the producing layers causes the free surface to subside and strains the elastic surroundings. The calculated subsidence rate of Anticline Ridge between 1933 and 1972 if 3 mm/yr, in good agreement with the measured subsidence rate of 3.3 {plus minus} 0.7 mm/yr.

  19. Source Regions of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field and Variability in Heavy-Ion Elemental Composition in Gradual Solar Energetic Particle Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Tylka, Allan J.; Ng, Chee K.; Wang, Yi-Ming; Dietrich, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Gradual solar energetic particle (SEP) events are those in which ions are accelerated to their observed energies by interactions with a shock driven by a fast coronal mass-ejection (CME). Previous studies have shown that much of the observed event-to-event variability can be understood in terms of shock speed and evolution in the shock-normal angle. But an equally important factor, particularly for the elemental composition, is the origin of the suprathermal seed particles upon which the shock acts. To tackle this issue, we (1) use observed solar-wind speed, magnetograms, and the PFSS model to map the Sun-L1 interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) line back to its source region on the Sun at the time of the SEP observations; and (2) then look for correlation between SEP composition (as measured by Wind and ACE at approx. 2-30 MeV/nucleon) and characteristics of the identified IMF-source regions. The study is based on 24 SEP events, identified as a statistically-significant increase in approx. 20 MeV protons and occurring in 1998 and 2003-2006, when the rate of newly-emergent solar magnetic flux and CMEs was lower than in solar-maximum years and the field-line tracing is therefore more likely to be successful. We find that the gradual SEP Fe/O is correlated with the field strength at the IMF-source, with the largest enhancements occurring when the footpoint field is strong, due to the nearby presence of an active region. In these cases, other elemental ratios show a strong charge-to-mass (q/M) ordering, at least on average, similar to that found in impulsive events. These results lead us to suggest that magnetic reconnection in footpoint regions near active regions bias the heavy-ion composition of suprathermal seed ions by processes qualitatively similar to those that produce larger heavy-ion enhancements in impulsive SEP events. To address potential technical concerns about our analysis, we also discuss efforts to exclude impulsive SEP events from our event sample.

  20. The morphology of flare phenomena, magnetic fields, and electric currents in active regions. I - Introduction and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canfield, Richard C.; De La Beaujardiere, J.-F.; Fan, Yuhong; Leka, K. D.; Mcclymont, A. N.; Metcalf, Thomas R.; Mickey, Donald L.; Wuelser, Jean-Pierre; Lites, Bruce W.

    1993-01-01

    Electric current systems in solar active regions and their spatial relationship to sites of electron precipitation and high-pressure in flares were studied with the purpose of providing observational evidence for or against the flare models commonly discussed in the literature. The paper describes the instrumentation, the data used, and the data analysis methods, as well as improvements made upon earlier studies. Several flare models are overviewed, and the predictions yielded by each model for the relationships of flares to the vertical current systems are discussed.

  1. Susceptibility to the Cry1F toxin of field populations of Sesamia nonagrioides (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) in Mediterranean maize cultivation regions.

    PubMed

    Farinós, G P; De la Poza, M; Ortego, F; Castañera, P

    2012-02-01

    Maize hybrids expressing the Cry1F toxin provide efficient control of lepidopteran pests. The Mediterranean corn borer, Sesamia nonagrioides (Lefèvre), is one of the most damaging pests of maize in the Mediterranean basin. In this work we firstly determined the efficacy of maize hybrids expressing the Cry1F toxin (event TC1507) to control neonates of S. nonagrioides. Leaf tissue feeding bioassays revealed that TC1507 maize is highly effective against this pest, and the percentage mortality obtained was comparable to that obtained with a Cry1Ab-expressing maize hybrid (Compa CB, event 176), which is known to be highly efficacious against S. nonagrioides. Secondly, interpopulation variation in the susceptibility to the Cry1F insecticidal protein was established for nine field-collected populations of S. nonagrioides (three Spanish, two French, two Italian, one Greek, and one Turkish). Estimates of the susceptibility of larvae to the Cry1F toxin showed low variability in lethal concentrations and growth inhibition concentrations among field populations. Moreover, no significant differences were found when they were grouped by geographical areas [Western Mediterranean (Spain and France) versus Eastern Mediterranean (Italy, Greece and Turkey)] or by history of exposure to Bt plants (Spanish vs. other populations). Therefore, the minor differences found in field populations can be attributed to natural variation in sensitivity to Cry1F. The importance of establishing baselines of susceptibility for resistance detection is discussed. Future changes in susceptibility of S. nonagrioides populations to Cry1F could be documented based on this baseline data.

  2. Departures from plane-wave-like coupling to a Maverick missile in the radiating near-field region of a horn antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, D. E.; Koslover, R. A.; Cremer, C. D.; Silvestro, J.; Miner, L. M.

    1990-05-01

    The High Power Microwaves (HPM) susceptibility testing often requires irradiating test objects at the highest fluences possible. For aperture antennas, the highest fluences are generally found in the radiating near field region. For valid effects testing, the energy coupled to the object interior must accurately replicate that which would occur in a true weapon environment (plane wave illumination). Some believe that valid testing requires object placement at distances from the aperture exceeding 2 D squared/lambda (D=antenna effective diameter). Many also believe testing at farther away than 2 D squared/lambda guarantees plane wave-like coupling conditions. Neither view is correct. Testing in the reactive field region (less than lambda from the aperture) is generally invalid due to dominance of reactive coupling. For testing in the radiating near field, determination of validity is less trivial. An investigation was performed quantifying deviations from plane wave coupling. The measurements, using an instrumented Maverick missile in an anechoic chamber, and supported by theory, indicate conditions for which testing the Maverick missile accurately simulates plane wave coupling.

  3. Frequency Dependent Non- Thermal Effects of Oscillating Electric Fields in the Microwave Region on the Properties of a Solvated Lysozyme System: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    Floros, Stelios; Liakopoulou-Kyriakides, Maria; Karatasos, Kostas

    2017-01-01

    The use of microwaves in every day’s applications raises issues regarding the non thermal biological effects of microwaves. In this work we employ molecular dynamics simulations to advance further the dielectric studies of protein solutions in the case of lysozyme, taking into consideration possible frequency dependent changes in the structural and dynamic properties of the system upon application of electric field in the microwave region. The obtained dielectric spectra are identical with those derived in our previous work using the Fröhlich-Kirkwood approach in the framework of the linear response theory. Noticeable structural changes in the protein have been observed only at frequencies near its absorption maximum. Concerning Cα position fluctuations, different frequencies affected different regions of the protein sequence. Furthermore, the influence of the field on the kinetics of protein-water as well as on the water-water hydrogen bonds in the first hydration shell has been studied; an extension of the Luzar-Chandler kinetic model was deemed necessary for a better fit of the applied field results and for the estimation of more accurate hydrogen bond lifetime values. PMID:28129348

  4. Wnt/β-catenin signaling directs the regional expansion of first and second heart field-derived ventricular cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Buikema, Jan Willem; Mady, Ahmed S.; Mittal, Nikhil V.; Atmanli, Ayhan; Caron, Leslie; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Domian, Ibrahim J.

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, cardiac development proceeds from the formation of the linear heart tube, through complex looping and septation, all the while increasing in mass to provide the oxygen delivery demands of embryonic growth. The developing heart must orchestrate regional differences in cardiomyocyte proliferation to control cardiac morphogenesis. During ventricular wall formation, the compact myocardium proliferates more vigorously than the trabecular myocardium, but the mechanisms controlling such regional differences among cardiomyocyte populations are not understood. Control of definitive cardiomyocyte proliferation is of great importance for application to regenerative cell-based therapies. We have used murine and human pluripotent stem cell systems to demonstrate that, during in vitro cellular differentiation, early ventricular cardiac myocytes display a robust proliferative response to β-catenin-mediated signaling and conversely accelerate differentiation in response to inhibition of this pathway. Using gain- and loss-of-function murine genetic models, we show that β-catenin controls ventricular myocyte proliferation during development and the perinatal period. We further demonstrate that the differential activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway accounts for the observed differences in the proliferation rates of the compact versus the trabecular myocardium during normal cardiac development. Collectively, these results provide a mechanistic explanation for the differences in localized proliferation rates of cardiac myocytes and point to a practical method for the generation of the large numbers of stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes necessary for clinical applications. PMID:24026118

  5. Wnt/β-catenin signaling directs the regional expansion of first and second heart field-derived ventricular cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Buikema, Jan Willem; Mady, Ahmed S; Mittal, Nikhil V; Atmanli, Ayhan; Caron, Leslie; Doevendans, Pieter A; Sluijter, Joost P G; Domian, Ibrahim J

    2013-10-01

    In mammals, cardiac development proceeds from the formation of the linear heart tube, through complex looping and septation, all the while increasing in mass to provide the oxygen delivery demands of embryonic growth. The developing heart must orchestrate regional differences in cardiomyocyte proliferation to control cardiac morphogenesis. During ventricular wall formation, the compact myocardium proliferates more vigorously than the trabecular myocardium, but the mechanisms controlling such regional differences among cardiomyocyte populations are not understood. Control of definitive cardiomyocyte proliferation is of great importance for application to regenerative cell-based therapies. We have used murine and human pluripotent stem cell systems to demonstrate that, during in vitro cellular differentiation, early ventricular cardiac myocytes display a robust proliferative response to β-catenin-mediated signaling and conversely accelerate differentiation in response to inhibition of this pathway. Using gain- and loss-of-function murine genetic models, we show that β-catenin controls ventricular myocyte proliferation during development and the perinatal period. We further demonstrate that the differential activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway accounts for the observed differences in the proliferation rates of the compact versus the trabecular myocardium during normal cardiac development. Collectively, these results provide a mechanistic explanation for the differences in localized proliferation rates of cardiac myocytes and point to a practical method for the generation of the large numbers of stem cell-derived cardiac myocytes necessary for clinical applications.

  6. Detection of amitraz and malathion resistance in field populations of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in Jammu region of India.

    PubMed

    Dutta, S; Godara, R; Katoch, R; Yadav, A; Katoch, M; Singh, N K

    2017-03-01

    Detection of resistance levels against amitraz and malathion in Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus collected from four districts of Jammu region (India) was carried out using the adult immersion test. The regression graphs of probit mortality of ticks plotted against log values of concentration of drugs were utilised for the determination of slope of mortality, lethal concentration for 50% (LC50), 95% (LC95) and resistance factor (RF). On the basis of the data generated on variables (mortality, egg mass weight, reproductive index and percentage inhibition of oviposition) the resistance level was categorised as I, II, III and IV. Out of these four districts, resistance to amitraz was detected at level I in Udhampur (RF = 2.81), Jammu (RF = 2.53) and Samba isolates (RF = 2.24) whereas Rajouri isolate was found susceptible (RF = 1.0). Resistance to malathion was detected at level I in Udhampur (RF = 4.01) and Jammu isolates (RF = 1.76) whereas Rajouri (RF = 0.472) and Samba (RF = 0.199) isolates were found susceptible. The data generated on amitraz and malathion resistance status will help in formulating a tick control strategy in the region.

  7. Effectiveness of natural treatment in a wastewater irrigation district of the Mexico City region: A synoptic field survey

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, T.J.; Cifuentes, E.; Ruth, E.; Suffet, I.

    2000-02-01

    Untreated wastewater from Mexico City has been used for decades to irrigate the Mezquital Valley, Hidalgo, Mexico. A synoptic survey of the natural treatment systems was carried out using the criteria of 24 trace metals, 67 target base/neutral/acid (BNA) semivolatile organic compounds, nontarget BNA semivolatile organics, nitrate, 23 chlorinated pesticides, and a 20 congener polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) suite. Data suggest the irrigation region is acting as a huge open-system slow sand filter, the main reservoir as a large waste stabilization lagoon, and he canals as extremely long, narrow stabilization channels. The BNA levels in surface water (SW) after reservoir retention were much lower than before it, while levels in groundwater (GW) were significantly lower than SW. All GW nitrate levels exceeded them for only a few metals. Low to moderate levels of organochlorine pesticides and PCBs were found.

  8. A study of aspect angle effects in the E-region irregularity velocity using multi-point electric field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, R. A.; Senior, A.; Koustov, A. V.; Uspensky, M.; Honary, F.; Dyson, P. L.

    2006-11-01

    E-region irregularity velocity measured by the STARE Norway VHF radar is considered as a function of magnetic aspect angle α and EISCAT-derived electron drift velocity at 7 locations with α between 0.38° and 2.64°. It is shown that the irregularity line-of-sight (l-o-s) velocity normalized to the electron velocity component Ve0 comp exhibits a decrease with an increasing aspect angle for Ve0 comp exceeding 500 m/s. The rate of velocity decrease is greater than those reported previously and is close to that predicted by the linear theory of electrojet irregularities without assuming anomalously large collision frequencies.

  9. A Conceptual Model to Link Anomalously High Temperature Gradients in the Cerros del Rio Volcanic Field to Regional Flow in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillingham, E. J.; Keller, S. N.; McCullough, K. R.; Watters, J.; Weitering, B.; Wilce, A. M.; Folsom, M.; Kelley, S.; Pellerin, L.

    2015-12-01

    Temperature-depth well data along with electromagnetic (EM) data were collected by students of the Summer of Applied Geophysics Experience (SAGE) 2015 field season in the Espanola Basin, New Mexico. The data from this year, in addition to data acquired since 2013, were used to construct a conceptual east-west cross-section of the Espanola Basin and the adjacent highlands in order to evaluate the regional flow system. Vertical geothermal gradients from several monitoring wells were measured using a thermistor. Anomalously warm geothermal gradients were mapped in the Cerros del Rio volcanic field in the basin just east of the Rio Grande. Temperature gradients are up to 70℃/km, while the background geothermal gradients in the Rio Grande rift zone generally show 28℃-35℃/km. This anomaly extends to the Buckman well field, which supplies water to the city of Santa Fe. Overpumping of this well field has led to subsidence in the past. However, discharge temperature plots indicate that the temperature gradients of the Buckman field may be rebounding as pumping is reduced. Audiomagnetotelluric (AMT) and transient electromagnetic (TEM) data were acquired in the vicinity of three monitoring wells. TEM and AMT methods complement each other with the former having depths of investigation of less than ten to hundreds of meters and AMT having depths of investigation comparable to the wells deeper than 500m. These datasets were used collectively to image the subsurface stratigraphy and, more specifically, the hydrogeology related to shallow aquifers. The EM data collected at these wells showed a trend indicating a shallow aquifer with a shallower resistive layer of approximately 100 ohm-m at 70-100 meters depth. Beneath this resistive layer we resolved a more conductive, clay-rich layer of 10 ohm-m. These resistivity profiles compliment the electrical logs provided by Jet West, which indicate shallower sandstone interbedded with silt on top of more silt-dominant layers. Our

  10. Photoinduced current in n-AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction field-effect transistor driven by local illumination in edge regions of Schottky metal gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazu, Takuya; Noda, Takeshi; Sakuma, Yoshiki

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the photoresponses of the Schottky gate region of an n-AlGaAs/GaAs field-effect transistor (FET) by local illumination with a near-infrared (IR) laser beam. We examined (1) the Schottky photocurrent J SG from the source to the metal gate and (2) the lateral photocurrent J SD from the source to the drain under the open gate condition. We found that the magnitudes of J SG and J SD rapidly increase as the laser spot approaches the edges of the metal gate; IR photoresponses are enhanced in the regions near the gate edges. Experimental findings are well explained by a simple model considering the IR photoresponses with the gate edge effect.

  11. Communication: dynamical embedding: correct quantum response from coupling TDDFT for a small cluster with classical near-field electrodynamics for an extended region.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-05-14

    We show how to obtain the correct electronic response of a large system by embedding; a small region is propagated by TDDFT (time-dependent density functional theory) simultaneously with a classical electrodynamics evolution using the Near-Field method over a larger external region. The propagations are coupled through a combined time-dependent density yielding a common Coulomb potential. We show that the embedding correctly describes the plasmonic response of a Mg(0001) slab and its influence on the dynamical charge transfer between an adsorbed H2O molecule and the substrate, giving the same spectral shape as full TDDFT (similar plasmon peak and molecular-dependent differential spectra) with much less computational effort. The results demonstrate that atomistic embedding electrodynamics is promising for nanoplasmonics and nanopolaritonics.

  12. Communication: Dynamical embedding: Correct quantum response from coupling TDDFT for a small cluster with classical near-field electrodynamics for an extended region

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Yi; Neuhauser, Daniel

    2013-05-14

    We show how to obtain the correct electronic response of a large system by embedding; a small region is propagated by TDDFT (time-dependent density functional theory) simultaneously with a classical electrodynamics evolution using the Near-Field method over a larger external region. The propagations are coupled through a combined time-dependent density yielding a common Coulomb potential. We show that the embedding correctly describes the plasmonic response of a Mg(0001) slab and its influence on the dynamical charge transfer between an adsorbed H{sub 2}O molecule and the substrate, giving the same spectral shape as full TDDFT (similar plasmon peak and molecular-dependent differential spectra) with much less computational effort. The results demonstrate that atomistic embedding electrodynamics is promising for nanoplasmonics and nanopolaritonics.

  13. [First analysis of the deployment of the ethical approach in the field of mental health in the Nord Pas-de-Calais region].

    PubMed

    Boury, Dominique; François, Guillaume; Danel, Thierry; Cobbaut, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    For 3 years, the Regional Federation of Mental Health Research (F2RSM) has led a space ethics reflexion Department of mental health (ERESM) to federate structures that ethical institutions and mental health services have been creating in the Nord-Pas de Calais. This approach is, in many ways, revealing issues that involve the institutionalisation of ethical reflection in care facilities. In this article, after referring to the major developments in this field, we describe the conditions for the emergence of ethical bodies in the region. Through the choice of development and operation of the ethical reflexion department, we highlight a number of points of attention that illustrate the complex articulation between institutional expectations and concerns of professionals. The trajectory of the ERESM is thus revealed as a process of reflective learning open to all stakeholders, providers and users of mental health.

  14. Theory of photoionization of two-electron quantum dots in the resonance region in THz and mid-IR fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikolopoulos, L. A. A.; Bachau, H.

    2016-11-01

    In this work we present an ab initio nonperturbative theory for the description of the two-electron dynamics of a spherical quantum dot (QD) in THz and mid-IR ultrashort laser fields. We have approximated the QD's confinement potential to have a Gaussian-like spatial dependence and have calculated its electronic structure and photoionization one-electron cross sections with an ab initio configuration-interaction approach. We have also calculated the ionization yields following the interaction with a laser pulse by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. All results show a strong dependence on the dot size. We have also identified resonances, of the Fano-type, in the photoionization spectrum with properties varying along with the QD size.

  15. A TIEGCM numerical study of the source and evolution of ionospheric F-region tongues of ionization: Universal time and interplanetary magnetic field dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jing; Wang, Wenbin; Burns, Alan; Liu, Libo; McInerney, Joe

    2017-04-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research Thermosphere-Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIEGCM) has been employed to systematically study the source and evolution of the ionospheric F-region Tongue of Ionization (TOI), which is electron density enhancement in the polar region. The model is run for different Universal Times (UT), season and Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) conditions. It is found that: (1) The TOI formation is critically dependent on UT, preferentially near 2000 UT in the Northern Hemisphere (NH) and near 1600 UT in the Southern Hemisphere (SH). These are the intervals when the high-latitude ion convection throat is closer to the middle-latitude high plasma density source region, so that more plasma can be directly transported into the polar cap region; (2) this different UT dependence between the two Hemispheres occurs, not only because of the different separation of the magnetic poles from the geographic poles in the two hemispheres, but also because of the UT dependence of the mid-latitude source locations (local time, latitude) and the magnitude of plasma density enhancements; (3) the TOI is generally stronger in the SH than it is in the NH, and in winter than in summer; (4) IMF By operates in the opposite sense in the two hemispheres in terms of the TOI pattern such that positive/negative IMF By tends to deflect the TOI toward the morning/afternoon sector in the NH. The opposite condition occurs in the SH.

  16. Peak divergence in the curve of magnetoelectric coefficient versus dc bias magnetic field at resonance region for bi-layer magnetostrictive/piezoelectric composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zuo, Z. J.; Pan, D. A. Zhang, S. G.; Qiao, L. J.; Jia, Y. M.

    2013-12-15

    Magnetoelectric (ME) coefficient dependence on the bias magnetic field at resonance frequencies for the bi-layered bonded Terfenol-D/Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} composite was investigated. The resonance frequency decreases first and then increases with the bias magnetic field (H{sub DC}), showing a “V” shape in the range of 0 ∼ 5 kOe. Below the resonance frequency, the pattern of ME coefficient dependence on the H{sub DC} shows a single peak, but splits into a double-peak pattern when the testing frequency increases into a certain region. With increasing the frequency, a divergent evolution of the H{sub DC} patterns was observed. Domain motion and ΔE effect combined with magnetostriction-piezoelectric coupling effect were employed to explain this experimental result.

  17. Secondary succession and its effects on soil moisture and nutrition in abandoned old-fields of hilly region of Loess Plateau, China.

    PubMed

    Du, Feng; Shao, Hong-Bo; Shan, Lun; Liang, Zong-Suo; Shao, Ming-An

    2007-08-01

    Floristic composition, community structure and soil moisture and nutrient contents in abandoned fields of different ages were analyzed to clarify the regenerative aspects of succession as a tool for vegetation restoration. The results indicated that secondary succession in this region can be interpreted as an auto-succession: there are main changes in species-relative abundance and species turnover. Annual or biennial species (e.g. Artemisia scoparia), acted as pioneers and strongly dominated the early stages. Then, they underwent a progressive decline, while forbs (e.g. Artemisia sacrorum) and grasses (e.g. Xanthium sibiricum) had their peak abundance at intermediate stages. Dwarf shrubs (e.g. Lespedeza dahurica) and short rhizome grass (e.g. Bothriochloa ischaemum) appeared at mid-succession stage and gradually increased in abundance during succession, becoming dominant at late stages. The first axis of detrended correspondence canonical analysis arranged the sites according to their fallow time, indicating a successional sere. The second axis, associated with diverging pathways of regeneration, correlated with topographic factors and soil moisture and nutrition. Structural divergence between plots increased as succession went on, attained the highest at the mid-succession stage, decreased at the late stage. Soil moisture and available phosphorus content decreased steadily with field age after their abandonment, whereas pools of organic matter, total and available nitrogen, potassium and total phosphorus increased with field age. The pace and direction of recovery of native vegetation and natural soil properties in these abandoned fields resembled classic old-field succession, which is a form of secondary succession that often serves as a template for guiding restoration efforts. Interface between the abandoned field soil and plant system was crucial to the above process. Our current study supported the generally accepted hypothesis in the succession literature.

  18. The magnetic field of active region 11158 during the 2011 February 12-17 flares: Differences between photospheric extrapolation and coronal forward-fitting methods

    SciTech Connect

    Aschwanden, Markus J.; Sun, Xudong; Liu, Yang E-mail: xudongs@stanford.edu

    2014-04-10

    We developed a coronal nonlinear force-free field (COR-NLFFF) forward-fitting code that fits an approximate nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) solution to the observed geometry of automatically traced coronal loops. In contrast to photospheric NLFFF codes, which calculate a magnetic field solution from the constraints of the transverse photospheric field, this new code uses coronal constraints instead, and this way provides important information on systematic errors of each magnetic field calculation method, as well as on the non-force-freeness in the lower chromosphere. In this study we applied the COR-NLFFF code to NOAA Active Region 11158, during the time interval of 2011 February 12-17, which includes an X2.2 GOES-class flare plus 35 M- and C-class flares. We calculated the free magnetic energy with a 6 minute cadence over 5 days. We find good agreement between the two types of codes for the total nonpotential E{sub N} and potential energy E{sub P} but find up to a factor of 4 discrepancy in the free energy E {sub free} = E{sub N} – E{sub P} and up to a factor of 10 discrepancy in the decrease of the free energy ΔE {sub free} during flares. The coronal NLFFF code exhibits a larger time variability and yields a decrease of free energy during the flare that is sufficient to satisfy the flare energy budget, while the photospheric NLFFF code shows much less time variability and an order of magnitude less free-energy decrease during flares. The discrepancy may partly be due to the preprocessing of photospheric vector data but more likely is due to the non-force-freeness in the lower chromosphere. We conclude that the coronal field cannot be correctly calculated on the basis of photospheric data alone and requires additional information on coronal loop geometries.

  19. Second solar spectrum of the Sr I 4607 Å line: depth probing of the turbulent magnetic field strength in a quiet region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derouich, M.; Bommier, V.; Malherbe, J. M.; Landi Degl'Innocenti, E.

    2006-10-01

    Aims.This paper is devoted to an interpretation of Quiet-Sun, spatially-resolved spectropolarimetric observations of the Hanle effect in terms of turbulent weak magnetic field determination. Methods: . Observations: the slit was positioned perpendicular to the limb, and the spatial resolution along the slit was 1 arcsec, leading to a depth probing along 132 different limb distances. The new polarimeter of the Pic-du-Midi Turret Dome was used on May 14, 2004 to observe a quiet region at the East limb equator in the resonance line of neutral Strontium at 4607 Å. Results: . For each limb distance, we properly adjusted the theoretical intensity profile obtained by applying a zero-field model to the observed one. Micro- and macroturbulent velocities were thus derived (average values v{micro}=1.77 km s-1 and v{macro}=1.95 km s-1). The magnetic field was determined in a second step by interpreting the Hanle effect on the line center linear polarization degree. The depolarizing collisions with neutral hydrogen were taken fully into account through a semi-classical calculation of their rates. An average value of B=38 Gauss was thus derived. Finally, error bars on the magnetic field values were evaluated from a) the polarimetric inaccuracy, b) the limb distance determination inaccuracy, and c) the uncertainty on our theoretical collisional depolarizing rates that we evaluated. This combination leads to 10-20% as total relative error on the magnetic field determination by the Hanle effect method. Since the inaccuracy due to the model itself was hard to properly evaluate, it was ignored. An uncertainty of ±60 km on the line formation depth was, however, derived from the contribution functions. The magnetic field is found to increase slowly with height in the height range 220-300 km above τ5000=1 and then decrease in the height range 300-370 km.

  20. Near-field tsunami forecast system based on near real-time seismic moment tensor estimation in the regions of Indonesia, the Philippines, and Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inazu, Daisuke; Pulido, Nelson; Fukuyama, Eiichi; Saito, Tatsuhiko; Senda, Jouji; Kumagai, Hiroyuki

    2016-05-01

    We have developed a near-field tsunami forecast system based on an automatic centroid moment tensor (CMT) estimation using regional broadband seismic observation networks in the regions of Indonesia, the Philippines, and Chile. The automatic procedure of the CMT estimation has been implemented to estimate tsunamigenic earthquakes. A tsunami propagation simulation model is used for the forecast and hindcast. A rectangular fault model based on the estimated CMT is employed to represent the initial condition of tsunami height. The forecast system considers uncertainties due to two possible fault planes and two possible scaling laws and thus shows four possible scenarios with these associated uncertainties for each estimated CMT. The system requires approximately 15 min to estimate the CMT after the occurrence of an earthquake and approximately another 15 min to make the tsunami forecast results including the maximum tsunami height and its arrival time at the epicentral region and near-field coasts available. The retrospectively forecasted tsunamis were evaluated by the deep-sea pressure and tide gauge observations, for the past eight tsunamis ( M w 7.5-8.6) that occurred throughout the regional seismic networks. The forecasts ranged from half to double the amplitudes of the deep-sea pressure observations and ranged mostly within the same order of magnitude as the maximum heights of the tide gauge observations. It was found that the forecast uncertainties increased for greater earthquakes (e.g., M w > 8) because the tsunami source was no longer approximated as a point source for such earthquakes. The forecast results for the coasts nearest to the epicenter should be carefully used because the coasts often experience the highest tsunamis with the shortest arrival time (e.g., <30 min).

  1. THE NONPOTENTIALITY OF CORONAE OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS, THE DYNAMICS OF THE SURFACE MAGNETIC FIELD, AND THE POTENTIAL FOR LARGE FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Schrijver, Carolus J.

    2016-04-01

    Flares and eruptions from solar active regions (ARs) are associated with atmospheric electrical currents accompanying distortions of the coronal field away from a lowest-energy potential state. In order to better understand the origin of these currents and their role in M- and X-class flares, I review all AR observations made with Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager and SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly from 2010 May through 2014 October within ≈40° from the disk center. I select the roughly 4% of all regions that display a distinctly nonpotential coronal configuration in loops with a length comparable to the scale of the AR, and all that emit GOES X-class flares. The data for 41 regions confirm, with a single exception, that strong-field, high-gradient polarity inversion lines (SHILs) created during emergence of magnetic flux into, and related displacement within, pre-existing ARs are associated with X-class flares. Obvious nonpotentiality in the AR-scale loops occurs in six of ten selected regions with X-class flares, all with relatively long SHILs along their primary polarity inversion line, or with a long internal filament there. Nonpotentiality can exist in ARs well past the flux-emergence phase, often with reduced or absent flaring. I conclude that the dynamics of the flux involved in the compact SHILs is of pre-eminent importance for the large-flare potential of ARs within the next day, but that their associated currents may not reveal themselves in AR-scale nonpotentiality. In contrast, AR-scale nonpotentiality, which can persist for many days, may inform us about the eruption potential other than those from SHILs which is almost never associated with X-class flaring.

  2. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Pat Fort; Don L. Hanosh

    2003-11-01

    A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. Resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain oil fields located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP), determine if this system can reduce lift costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improved the economics. Three Phases of work have been defined in the DOE Form 4600.1 Notice of Financial Assistance Award for this project, in which the project objectives are to be attained through a joint venture between Enerdyne LLC (Enerdyne), owner and operator of the fields and Pumping Solutions Inc. (PSI), developer of the submersible pumping system. Upon analysis of the results of each Phase, the DOE will determine if the results justify the continuation of the project and approve the next Phase to proceed or terminate the project and request that the wells be plugged. This topical report shall provide the DOE with Phase I results and conclusions reached by Enerdyne and PSI.

  3. Multi-site study of diffusion metric variability: effects of site, vendor, field strength, and echo time on regions-of-interest and histogram-bin analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, K. G.; Chou, M.-C.; Preciado, R. I.; Gimi, B.; Rollins, N. K.; Song, A.; Turner, J.; Mori, S.

    2016-03-01

    It is now common for magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) based multi-site trials to include diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) as part of the protocol. It is also common for these sites to possess MR scanners of different manufacturers, different software and hardware, and different software licenses. These differences mean that scanners may not be able to acquire data with the same number of gradient amplitude values and number of available gradient directions. Variability can also occur in achievable b-values and minimum echo times. The challenge of a multi-site study then, is to create a common protocol by understanding and then minimizing the effects of scanner variability and identifying reliable and accurate diffusion metrics. This study describes the effect of site, scanner vendor, field strength, and TE on two diffusion metrics: the first moment of the diffusion tensor field (mean diffusivity, MD), and the fractional anisotropy (FA) using two common analyses (region-of-interest and mean-bin value of whole brain histograms). The goal of the study was to identify sources of variability in diffusion-sensitized imaging and their influence on commonly reported metrics. The results demonstrate that the site, vendor, field strength, and echo time all contribute to variability in FA and MD, though to different extent. We conclude that characterization of the variability of DTI metrics due to site, vendor, field strength, and echo time is a worthwhile step in the construction of multi-center trials.

  4. Multi-site study of diffusion metric variability: effects of site, vendor, field strength, and echo time on regions-of-interest and histogram-bin analyses

    PubMed Central

    Helmer, K. G.; Chou, M-C.; Preciado, R. I.; Gimi, B.; Rollins, N. K.; Song, A.; Turner, J.; Mori, S.

    2016-01-01

    It is now common for magnetic-resonance-imaging (MRI) based multi-site trials to include diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) as part of the protocol. It is also common for these sites to possess MR scanners of different manufacturers, different software and hardware, and different software licenses. These differences mean that scanners may not be able to acquire data with the same number of gradient amplitude values and number of available gradient directions. Variability can also occur in achievable b-values and minimum echo times. The challenge of a multi-site study then, is to create a common protocol by understanding and then minimizing the effects of scanner variability and identifying reliable and accurate diffusion metrics. This study describes the effect of site, scanner vendor, field strength, and TE on two diffusion metrics: the first moment of the diffusion tensor field (mean diffusivity, MD), and the fractional anisotropy (FA) using two common analyses (region-of-interest and mean-bin value of whole brain histograms). The goal of the study was to identify sources of variability in diffusion-sensitized imaging and their influence on commonly reported metrics. The results demonstrate that the site, vendor, field strength, and echo time all contribute to variability in FA and MD, though to different extent. We conclude that characterization of the variability of DTI metrics due to site, vendor, field strength, and echo time is a worthwhile step in the construction of multi-center trials. PMID:27330240

  5. Using MODIS and AVHRR data to determine regional surface heating field and heat flux distributions over the heterogeneous landscape of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yaoming; Han, Cunbo; Zhong, Lei; Wang, Binbin; Zhu, Zhikun; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Lang; Meng, Chunchun; Xu, Chao; Amatya, Pukar Man

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a parameterization methodology based on Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), and in situ data is proposed and tested for deriving the regional surface heating field, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux over a heterogeneous landscape. In this case study, this method is applied to the whole Tibetan Plateau (TP) area. Four sets of AVHRR data and four sets of MODIS data (collected on 17 January 2003, 14 April 2003, 23 July 2003, and 16 October 2003) were used in this study to make comparisons between winter, spring, summer, and autumn values. The satellite-derived results were also validated using the "ground truth" as measured in the stations of CAMP/Tibet (Coordinated Enhanced Observing Period (CEOP) and Asia-Australia Monsoon Project on the Tibetan Plateau). The results show that the surface heating field, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux in the four seasons across the TP are in close accordance with its land surface status. These parameters range widely due to the strongly contrasting surface features found within the TP region. Also, the estimated surface heating field, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux all agree with the ground truth data, and usually, the absolute percentage difference between the two sets of data is less than 10 % at the validation stations. The AVHRR results were also in agreement with the MODIS data, with the latter usually displaying a higher level of accuracy. We have thus concluded that the proposed method was successful in retrieving surface heating field, sensible heat flux, and latent heat flux values using AVHRR, MODIS, and in situ data over the heterogeneous land surface of the TP. Shortcomings and possible further improvements in the method are also discussed.

  6. Developing of Regional Tectonic Stress Map for Two Oil Fields in Western part of Persian Gulf, Acquisition and Preparation of the General Structure of Stress Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghi, A.; Heidbach, O.; Kharrat, R.; Asef, M.

    2011-12-01

    Recently, application of stress field data in petroleum industry has significantly increased. Field stress databases are prerequisite data to study reservoir compaction and deformations, wellbore stability, reservoir stimulation, CO2 sequestration and the like. This has convinced petroleum industries and many sponsors to allocate investment for acquiring accurate stress field data and developing stress maps. In southern part of Iran, large scale sedimentation from different geological periods and intense tectonic activities create huge petroleum fields. Persian Gulf located in south to south-west of Iran, contains a great number of the most giant offshore oil and gas reservoirs in the world. The objective of this research is development of a regional tectonic stress map for two fields in western part of the Persian Gulf. For this purpose, standard stress indicators including earthquake focal mechanism solutions, well-bore breakouts and drilling-induced fractures, in-situ stress measurements (LOT, hydraulic fracturing), young geologic data (fault-slip analysis) and core tests (ASR, DSCA, Petal Centerline Fractures) were used to collect and rearrange field stress data. The data are quality ranked according to World Stress Map quality ranking scheme 2008 based on their standard deviation and a tectonic regime is assigned where possible. In these fields some stress indicators like hydraulic fracturing and core tests was not employed before. Primary stress data gathered from focal mechanism confirmed a TF regime in the area mainly with the quality C. WSM database only provides around 14 SH measurement from the northern border of our area. All these data gathered from FMS with quality C. In our study we will add several new stress measurements from other standard stress indicators including LOT, well-bore breakout, drilling induced fractures and core tests with higher quality than C. Almost SH orientation varied between 0 to 90°N based on primary information. On the

  7. Quality of water in mines in the Western Middle Coal Field, Anthracite Region, east-central Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, L.A.; Beard, M.M.; Growitz, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The quality of mine water in the 75 sq-mi Western Middle anthracite field, Pennsylvania was determined by sampling discharges and boreholes at 60 abandoned and flooded mines during 1975-78. The Vulcan-Buck Mountain mine, east-northeast of Mahanoy City, contains an estimated 6,100 acre-ft of water with a specific conductance of 380 to 460 micromhos and a pH of 4.4 to 4.6 units. Twenty-two mines are in a 15-sq mi area between Mahanoy City and Girardville, all of which closed prior to 1958. Seven of these mines in the Mahanoy Basin may contain 30,000 acre-ft of water. Specific conductance ranges from 630 micromhos in the Tunnel mine to 1,800 micromhos in the Gilberton mine. Fifteen of these mines are in the Shenandoah complex; specific conductance ranges from 240 to 310 micromhos in mines in the eastern end of the complex to 2,400 micromhos in the western end. The specific conductance of water in 25 mines in the Mount Carmel-Shamokin area ranges from 460 to 980 micromhos. The North Franklin mine near Trevorton contains about 4,900 acre-ft of water with a specific conductance of about 1,100 micromhos. (USGS)

  8. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 2): Rockaway Borough Well Field, Rockaway Borough, New Jersey, September 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-09-29

    The Rockaway Borough Well Field site is located in Rockaway Borough, Morris County, New Jersey, and consists of three municipal supply wells which are in a glacial aquifer designated by EPA as the sole source aquifer for Rockaway Borough and the surrounding communities. High concentrations of TCE and PCE have been detected in the aquifer since 1980, but no sources of contamination have been identified. In 1981, the Borough of Rockaway constructed a three-bed granular activated-carbon adsorption system to treat contaminated well water. Treatment has effectively reduced volatile organic contaminant concentrations in finished water to less than 1 part per billion (ppb). Although thirteen VOCs have been detected in the well water, TCE and PCE are the primary contaminants of concern. The site was listed on the NPL in December of 1982, and the RI/FS was initiated in 1985. The remedial action for the Rockaway Borough site includes maintaining the existing filtration system and modifying operations to ensure compliance with Safe Drinking Water Act standards and EPA continuing the RI/FS in an attempt to identify the source and extent of contamination and evaluate alternatives to address source control. Estimated capital cost of remedial action is zero with annual OandM costs of $74,800.

  9. Very large array and green bank telescope observations of Orion B (NGC 2024, W12): photodissociation region properties and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Roshi, D. Anish; Goss, W. M.; Jeyakumar, S. E-mail: mgoss@nrao.edu

    2014-10-01

    We present images of C110α and H110α radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 4.8 GHz and images of H166α, C166α, and X166α RRL emission at 1.4 GHz, observed toward the star-forming region NGC 2024. The 1.4 GHz image with angular resolution ∼70'' is obtained using Very Large Array (VLA) data. The 4.8 GHz image with angular resolution ∼17'' is obtained by combining VLA and Green Bank Telescope data in order to add the short and zero spacing data in the uv plane. These images reveal that the spatial distributions of C110α line emission is confined to the southern rim of the H II region close to the ionization front whereas the C166α line emission is extended in the north-south direction across the H II region. The LSR velocity of the C110α line is 10.3 km s{sup –1} similar to that of lines observed from molecular material located at the far side of the H II region. This similarity suggests that the photodissociation region (PDR) responsible for C110α line emission is at the far side of the H II region. The LSR velocity of C166α is 8.8 km s{sup –1}. This velocity is comparable with the velocity of molecular absorption lines observed from the foreground gas, suggesting that the PDR is at the near side of the H II region. Non-LTE models for carbon line-forming regions are presented. Typical properties of the foreground PDR are T {sub PDR} ∼ 100 K, n{sub e}{sup PDR}∼5 cm{sup –3}, n {sub H} ∼ 1.7 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup –3}, and path length l ∼ 0.06 pc, and those of the far side PDR are T {sub PDR} ∼ 200 K, n{sub e}{sup PDR}∼ 50 cm{sup –3}, n {sub H} ∼ 1.7 × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3}, and l ∼ 0.03 pc. Our modeling indicates that the far side PDR is located within the H II region. We estimate the magnetic field strength in the foreground PDR to be 60 μG and that in the far side PDR to be 220 μG. Our field estimates compare well with the values obtained from OH Zeeman observations toward NGC 2024. The H166α spectrum shows narrow (1

  10. Challenges of using electrical resistivity method to locate karst conduits-A field case in the Inner Bluegrass Region, Kentucky

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhu, J.; Currens, J.C.; Dinger, J.S.

    2011-01-01

    Conduits serve as major pathways for groundwater flow in karst aquifers. Locating them from the surface, however, is one of the most challenging tasks in karst research. Geophysical methods are often deployed to help locate voids by mapping variations of physical properties of the subsurface. Conduits can cause significant contrasts of some physical properties that can be detected; other subsurface features such as water-bearing fractures often yield similar contrasts, which are difficult to distinguish from the effects of the conduits. This study used electrical resistivity method to search for an unmapped karst conduit that recharges Royal Spring in the Inner Bluegrass karst region, Kentucky, USA. Three types of resistivity techniques (surface 2D survey, quasi-3D survey, and time-lapse survey) were used to map and characterize resistivity anomalies. Some of the major anomalies were selected as drilling targets to verify the existence of the conduits. Drilling near an anomaly identified by an electrical resistivity profile resulted in successful penetration of a major water-filled conduit. The drilling results also suggest that, in this study area, low resistivity anomalies in general are associated with water-bearing features. However, differences in the anomaly signals between the water-filled conduit and other water-bearing features such as water-filled fracture zones were undistinguishable. The electrical resistivity method is useful in conduit detection by providing potential drilling targets. Knowledge of geology and hydrogeology about the site and professional judgment also played important roles in locating the major conduit. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  11. Occurrence climatology of F region field-aligned irregularities in middle latitudes as observed by a 40.8 MHz coherent scatter radar in Daejeon, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tae-Yong; Kwak, Young-Sil; Kil, Hyosub; Lee, Young-Sook; Lee, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Jae-jin

    2015-11-01

    A new 40.8 MHz coherent scatter radar was built in Daejeon, South Korea (36.18°N, 127.14°E, dip latitude: 26.7°N) on 29 December 2009 and has since been monitoring the occurrence of field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) in the northern middle latitudes. We report on the occurrence climatology of the F region FAIs as observed by the Daejeon radar between 2010 and 2014. The F region FAIs preferentially occur around 250-350 km at 18:00-21:00 local time (postsunset FAI), around 350-450 km near midnight (nighttime FAI), around 250-350 km before sunrise (presunrise FAI), and around 160-300 km after 05:00 local time (postsunrise FAI). The occurrence rates of nighttime and presunrise FAIs are maximal during summer, though the occurrence rates of postsunset and postsunrise FAIs are maximal during the equinoxes. FAIs rarely occur during local winter. The occurrence rate of F region FAIs increases in concert with increases in solar activity. Medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) are known as an important source of the F region FAIs in middle latitudes. The high occurrence rate of the nighttime FAIs in local summer is consistent with the high occurrence rate of MSTIDs in that season. However, the dependence of the FAI activity on the solar cycle is inconsistent with the MSTID activity. The source of the F region FAIs in middle latitudes is an open question. Our report of different types of FAIs and their occurrence climatology may provide a useful reference for the identification of the source of the middle latitude FAIs.

  12. Field scale interaction and nutrient exchange between surface water and shallow groundwater in the Baiyang Lake region, North China Plain.

    PubMed

    Brauns, Bentje; Bjerg, Poul L; Song, Xianfang; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2016-07-01

    Fertilizer input for agricultural food production, as well as the discharge of domestic and industrial water pollutants, increases pressures on locally scarce and vulnerable water resources in the North China Plain. In order to: (a) understand pollutant exchange between surface water and groundwater, (b) quantify nutrient loadings, and (c) identify major nutrient removal pathways by using qualitative and quantitative methods, including the geochemical model PHREEQC) a one-year study at a wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and maize (Zea mays L.) double cropping system in the Baiyang Lake area in Hebei Province, China, was undertaken. The study showed a high influence of low-quality surface water on the shallow aquifer. Major inflowing pollutants into the aquifer were ammonium and nitrate via inflow from the adjacent Fu River (up to 29.8mg/L NH4-N and 6.8mg/L NO3-N), as well as nitrate via vertical transport from the field surface (up to 134.8mg/L NO3-N in soil water). Results from a conceptual model show an excess nitrogen input of about 320kg/ha/a. Nevertheless, both nitrogen species were only detected at low concentrations in shallow groundwater, averaging at 3.6mg/L NH4-N and 1.8mg/L NO3-N. Measurement results supported by PHREEQC-modeling indicated cation exchange, denitrification, and anaerobic ammonium oxidation coupled with partial denitrification as major nitrogen removal pathways. Despite the current removal capacity, the excessive nitrogen fertilization may pose a future threat to groundwater quality. Surface water quality improvements are therefore recommended in conjunction with simultaneous monitoring of nitrate in the aquifer, and reduced agricultural N-inputs should be considered.

  13. Paleomagnetic Study of a Miocene Deformation in a Region Close to the Camargo Volcanic Field, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wogau-Chong, K.; Bohnel, H.; Aranda Gomez, J.

    2009-05-01

    The Sierra the Aguachile is a Miocene volcanic sequence located in the SE of Chihuahua State NW of the Camargo volcanic field and belongs to the Agua Mayo Group, which unconformably overlays Mesozoic calcareous units. The Sierra de Aguachile sequence defines a structure that may be interpreted as a plunging fold, which could be the result of a reactivation of the San Marcos Fault. This major fault is well known more to the east but may extend into the study area where it would be covered by the younger volcanic sequences; its main activity has been reported to be during the the Neocomian with reactivation phases in the Paleogene and Miocene. To test if the observed structure is the result of a tectonic deformation that happened after the emplacement of the volcanic sequence, a paleomagnetic study was carried out. A total of 14 sites were sampled from different parts of the structure, all in the capping ignimbrite layers. Site mean directions were determined using AF demagnetization. The fold test was applied to analyze if the remanence was acquired in situ or before the proposed folding. Precision parameters k before and after application of the tectonic corrections are 25.38 and 31.43, respectively. This indicates that the Sierra de Aguachile indeed was folded after emplacement of the ignimbrites, which restricts the age of the corresponding tectonic event to be younger than 31.3 +/- 0.7 Ma. Due to the gentle folding though, the difference in precision parameters is not significant at the 95% probability level.

  14. ST5 Observations of the Imbalance of Region 1 and 2 Field-Aligned Currents and its Implication to Ionospheric Closure Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, G.

    2008-01-01

    A major unsolved question in the physics of ionosphere-magnetosphere coupling is how field-aligned currents (FACs) close. In order to maintain the divergence free condition, overall downward FACs (carried mainly by upward electrons) must eventually balance the overall upward FACs associated with the precipitating electrons through ionospheric Pedersen currents. Although much of the current closure may take place via local Pedersen currents flowing between Region 1 (R1) and Region 2 (R2) FACs, there is a generally an imbalance, i.e., more currents in R1 than in R2, in total currents between them. The net currents may be closed within R1 via cross-polar cap Pedersen currents. In this study, we use the magnetic field observations from Space Technology 5 mission to quantify the imbalance of R1 and R2 currents. We will determine the net R1-R2 currents under various solar wind conditions and discuss the implication of such imbalance to the ionospheric closure currents.

  15. 3D Cloud Radiative Effects on Aerosol Optical Thickness Retrievals in Cumulus Cloud Fields in the Biomass Burning Region in Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, Guo-Yong; Marshak, Alexander; Cahalan, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol amount in clear regions of a cloudy atmosphere is a critical parameter in studying the interaction between aerosols and clouds. Since the global cloud cover is about 50%, cloudy scenes are often encountered in any satellite images. Aerosols are more or less transparent, while clouds are extremely reflective in the visible spectrum of solar radiation. The radiative transfer in clear-cloudy condition is highly three- dimensional (3D). This paper focuses on estimating the 3D effects on aerosol optical thickness retrievals using Monte Carlo simulations. An ASTER image of cumulus cloud fields in the biomass burning region in Brazil is simulated in this study. The MODIS products (i-e., cloud optical thickness, particle effective radius, cloud top pressure, surface reflectance, etc.) are used to construct the cloud property and surface reflectance fields. To estimate the cloud 3-D effects, we assume a plane-parallel stratification of aerosol properties in the 60 km x 60 km ASTER image. The simulated solar radiation at the top of the atmosphere is compared with plane-parallel calculations. Furthermore, the 3D cloud radiative effects on aerosol optical thickness retrieval are estimated.

  16. Results from IAG's Joint Study Group JSG0.3 on the Comparison of Current Methodologies in Regional Gravity Field Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Michael; Gerlach, Christian; Bentel, Katrin; Dettmering, Denise; Eicker, Annette; Herceg, Matija; Kusche, Jürgen; Lieb, Verena; Schall, Judith; Tscherning, Carl Christian

    2014-05-01

    For the period 2011-2015, the International Association of Geodesy (IAG) has established under the roof of its Inter-Commission Committee on Theory (ICCT) a Joint Study Group (JSG0.3) on the Comparison of Current Methodologies in Regional Gravity Field Modeling. The main objectives of JSG0.3 are (1) to collect information of available methodologies and strategies for regional modelling, (2) to analyze the collected information in order to find specific properties of the different approaches and to find, why certain strategies have been chosen, (3) to create a benchmark data set for comparative numerical studies, (4) to carry out numerical comparisons between different solution strategies for estimating the model parameters and to validate the results with other approaches, and (5) to quantify and interpret the differences of the comparisons with a focus on detection, explanation and treatment of inconsistencies and possible instabilities of the different approaches. Meanwhile the group has provided a set of synthetic gravity field observations representing data from terrestrial, airborne and satellite sensors. This benchmark data set is publicly available (http://jsg03.dgfi.badw.de) and free to all interested researchers to test and validate their modelling procedures. The aim of the present contribution is to analyze and compare results from different methodologies employing local basis functions of wavelet and spline type as well as reduced point mass modeling and the classical collocation approach following the above mentioned objectives of JSG0.3.

  17. INTERVALS OF RADIAL INTERPLANETARY MAGNETIC FIELDS AT 1 AU, THEIR ASSOCIATION WITH RAREFACTION REGIONS, AND THEIR APPARENT MAGNETIC FOOT POINTS AT THE SUN

    SciTech Connect

    Orlove, Steven T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Schwadron, Nathan A.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Zurbuchen, Thomas H.; Zhao Liang E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: N.Schwadron@unh.edu E-mail: thomasz@umich.edu

    2013-09-01

    We have examined 226 intervals of nearly radial interplanetary magnetic field orientations at 1 AU lasting in excess of 6 hr. They are found within rarefaction regions as are the previously reported high-latitude observations. We show that these rarefactions typically do not involve high-speed wind such as that seen by Ulysses at high latitudes during solar minimum. We have examined both the wind speeds and the thermal ion composition before, during and after the rarefaction in an effort to establish the source of the flow that leads to the formation of the rarefaction. We find that the bulk of the measurements, both fast- and slow-wind intervals, possess both wind speeds and thermal ion compositions that suggest they come from typical low-latitude sources that are nominally considered slow-wind sources. In other words, we find relatively little evidence of polar coronal hole sources even when we examine the faster wind ahead of the rarefaction regions. While this is in contrast to high-latitude observations, we argue that this is to be expected of low-latitude observations where polar coronal hole sources are less prevalent. As with the previous high-latitude observations, we contend that the best explanation for these periods of radial magnetic field is interchange reconnection between two sources of different wind speed.

  18. Differentiation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains by nucleotide sequence analysis of a hypervariable region in the spaA gene: discrimination of a live vaccine strain from field isolates.

    PubMed

    Nagai, Shinya; To, Ho; Kanda, Akira

    2008-05-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae causes erysipelas in swine and is considered a reemerging disease contributing substantially to economic losses in the swine industry. Since an attenuated live vaccine was commercialized in 1974 in Japan, outbreaks of acute septicemia or subacute urticaria of erysipelas have decreased dramatically. In contrast, a chronic form of erysipelas found during meat inspections in slaughterhouses has been increasing. In this study, a new strain-typing method was developed based on nucleotide sequencing of a hypervariable region in the surface protective antigen (spaA) gene for discrimination of the live vaccine strain from field isolates. Sixteen strains isolated from arthritic lesions found in slaughtered pigs were segregated into 4 major patterns: 1) identical nucleotide sequence with the vaccine strain: 3 isolates; 2) 1 nucleotide substitution (C to A) at position 555: 5 isolates; 3) 1 nucleotide substitution at various positions: 5 isolates; and 4) 2 nucleotide substitutions: 3 isolates. Isolates with the same nucleotide sequence as the vaccine strain were further characterized by other properties, including the mouse pathogenicity test. One strain isolated from pigs on a farm where the live vaccine had been used was found to be closely related to the vaccine strain. The phylogenetic tree constructed based on the spaA sequence suggests that the evolutionary distance of the isolates is related to the pathogenicity in mice. The new strain-typing system based on nucleotide sequencing of the spaA region is useful to discriminate the vaccine strain from field isolates.

  19. Equatorial E region electric fields at the dip equator: 2. Seasonal variabilities and effects over Brazil due to the secular variation of the magnetic equator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moro, J.; Denardini, C. M.; Resende, L. C. A.; Chen, S. S.; Schuch, N. J.

    2016-10-01

    In this work, the seasonal dependency of the E region electric field (EEF) at the dip equator is examined. The eastward zonal (Ey) and the daytime vertical (Ez) electric fields are responsible for the overall phenomenology of the equatorial and low-latitude ionosphere, including the equatorial electrojet (EEJ) and its plasma instability. The electric field components are studied based on long-term backscatter radars soundings (348 days for both systems) collected during geomagnetic quiet days (Kp ≤ 3+), from 2001 to 2010, at the São Luís Space Observatory (SLZ), Brazil (2.33°S, 44.20°W), and at the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO), Peru (11.95°S, 76.87°W). Among the results, we observe, for the first time, a seasonal difference between the EEF in these two sectors in South America based on coherent radar measurements. The EEF is more intense in summer at SLZ, in equinox at JRO, and has been highly variable with season in the Brazilian sector compared to the Peruvian sector. In addition, the secular variation on the geomagnetic field and its effect on the EEJ over Brazil resulted that as much farther away is the magnetic equator from SLZ, later more the EEJ is observed (10 h LT) and sooner it ends (16 h LT). Moreover, the time interval of type II occurrence decreased significantly after the year 2004, which is a clear indication that SLZ is no longer an equatorial station due to the secular variation of the geomagnetic field.

  20. Within-field and regional-scale accuracies of topsoil organic carbon content prediction from an airborne visible near-infrared hyperspectral image combined with synchronous field spectra for temperate croplands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaudour, Emmanuelle; Gilliot, Jean-Marc; Bel, Liliane; Lefevre, Josias; Chehdi, Kacem

    2016-04-01

    This study was carried out in the framework of the TOSCA-PLEIADES-CO of the French Space Agency and benefited data from the earlier PROSTOCK-Gessol3 project supported by the French Environment and Energy Management Agency (ADEME). It aimed at identifying the potential of airborne hyperspectral visible near-infrared AISA-Eagle data for predicting the topsoil organic carbon (SOC) content of bare cultivated soils over a large peri-urban area (221 km2) with intensive annual crop cultivation and both contrasted soils and SOC contents, located in the western region of Paris, France. Soils comprise hortic or glossic luvisols, calcaric, rendzic cambisols and colluvic cambisols. Airborne AISA-Eagle images (400-1000 nm, 126 bands) with 1 m-resolution were acquired on 17 April 2013 over 13 tracks. Tracks were atmospherically corrected then mosaicked at a 2 m-resolution using a set of 24 synchronous field spectra of bare soils, black and white targets and impervious surfaces. The land use identification system layer (RPG) of 2012 was used to mask non-agricultural areas, then calculation and thresholding of NDVI from an atmospherically corrected SPOT4 image acquired the same day enabled to map agricultural fields with bare soil. A total of 101 sites, which were sampled either at the regional scale or within one field, were identified as bare by means of this map. Predictions were made from the mosaic AISA spectra which were related to SOC contents by means of partial least squares regression (PLSR). Regression robustness was evaluated through a series of 1000 bootstrap data sets of calibration-validation samples, considering those 75 sites outside cloud shadows only, and different sampling strategies for selecting calibration samples. Validation root-mean-square errors (RMSE) were comprised between 3.73 and 4.49 g. Kg-1 and were ~4 g. Kg-1 in median. The most performing models in terms of coefficient of determination (R²) and Residual Prediction Deviation (RPD) values were the

  1. ST5 Observations of the Imbalance of Region 1 and 2 Field-Aligned Currents and Its Implication to the Cross-Polar Cap Pedersen Currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Le, Guan; Slavin, J. A.; Strangeway, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we use the in-situ magnetic field observations from Space Technology 5 mission to quantify the imbalance of Region 1 (R1) and Region 2 (R2) currents. During the three-month duration of the ST5 mission, geomagnetic conditions range from quiet to moderately active. We find that the R1 current intensity is consistently stronger than the R2 current intensity both for the dawnside and the duskside large-scale field-aligned current system. The net currents flowing into (out of) the ionosphere in the dawnside (duskside) are in the order of 5% of the total R1 currents. We also find that the net currents flowing into or out of the ionosphere are controlled by the solar wind-magnetosphere interaction in the same way as the field-aligned currents themselves are. Since the net currents due to the imbalance of the R1 and R2 currents require that their closure currents flow across the polar cap from dawn to dusk as Pedersen currents, our results indicate that the total amount of the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents is in the order of 0.1 MA. This study, although with a very limited dataset, is one of the first attempts to quantify the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents. Given the importance of the Joule heating due to Pedersen currents to the high-latitude ionospheric electrodynamics, quantifying the cross-polar cap Pedersen currents and associated Joule heating is needed for developing models of the magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling.

  2. Turbulent generation and mechanism analysis of forced-convective heat transfer enhancement by applying electric fields in the restricted region near the wall

    SciTech Connect

    Hasegawa, Masato; Yabe, Akira; Nariai, Hideki

    1999-07-01

    The heat transfer enhancement method of applying electric fields only near a heat transfer wall was numerically investigated. Generation of additional turbulence in the near-wall region occurs by the interaction between migrating electric charges and the turbulent flow of weakly electrically conductive fluids such as refrigerants, oils, and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) alternatives. Based on electrostatic probe experiments, the authors assumed that the current was mainly transferred by the negative charges. They solved the Navier-Stokes equation with a Coulomb force term, the conservation equation of electric current, the Poisson equation of electric potential, and the energy equation. They used the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method to represent the turbulence. The numerical analysis showed a heat transfer enhancement of 2.8 times for turbulent flow (Re = 1.8 x 10{sup 4}) when applying 5 kV to the near-wall region, 5 mm from the wall. The simulations for different distances between the coupled electrodes showed that an optimum location of the electrodes exists for achieving the lowest electric power input for a given electric field strength. They also evaluated the heat efficiency in a simple heat exchanger system using this heat transfer enhancement method. For the 5 kV/5 mm condition, where 19% of the total input power was consumed by the electric field, they achieved a heat transfer enhancement of 27 times compared to the case when an equivalent, additional amount of input power would be consumed by the pump to increase the flow rate of the heat-transfer fluid.

  3. Imaging observations of nighttime mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities by an MU radar ultra-multi-channel system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Hashiguchi, H.

    2008-08-01

    Mid-latitude F-region field-aligned irregularities (FAIs) were studied by using the middle-and-upper atmosphere (MU) radar ultra-multi-channel system with the radar imaging technique. On 12 June 2006, F-region FAI echoes with a period of about one hour were observed intermittently. These echoes were found to be embedded in medium-scale traveling ionospheric disturbances (MSTIDs) observed as variations of total electron content (TEC). The echoes drifting away from (toward) the radar were observed in the depletion (enhancement) phase of the MSTID. The Doppler velocity of the echoes is consistent with the range rates in the the range-time-intensity (RTI) maps. Fine scale structures with a spatial scale of 10 km or less were found by the radar imaging analysis. Those structures with positive Doppler velocities (moving away from the radar) appeared to drift north- (up-) westward, and those with negative Doppler velocities south- (down-) eastward approximately along the wavefronts of the MSTID. FAIs with positive Doppler velocities filling TEC depletion regions were observed.

  4. Case study of simultaneous observations of sporadic sodium layer, E-region field-aligned irregularities and sporadic E layer at low latitude of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, H. Y.; Ning, B. Q.; Zhao, X. K.; Hu, L. H.

    2017-03-01

    Using the Na lidar at Haikou (20.0°N, 110.3°E), the VHF coherent radar and the digital ionosonde both at Sanya (18.4°N, 109.6°E), cases of simultaneous observations of sporadic sodium layer (SSL), E-region field-aligned irregularities (FAI) and sporadic E layer (Es) in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) region at low latitude of China are studied. It is found that SSL occurs simultaneously or follows the enhancement of Es and FAI. The Es, FAI and SSL descend slowly with time which is mostly controlled by the diurnal tide (DT). Besides, the interaction of gravity wave (GW) with tides can cause oscillations in FAI and SSL. Our observations support the neutralization of ions for SSL formation: when the metallic ions layer descents to the altitudes where models predict, the sodium ions convert rapidly to atomic Na that may form an SSL event. Moreover, the SSL peak density will increase (decrease) in the convergence (divergence) vertical shear region of zonal wind.

  5. Impacts of using an ensemble Kalman filter on air quality simulations along the California-Mexico border region during Cal-Mex 2010 field campaign.

    PubMed

    Bei, Naifang; Li, Guohui; Meng, Zhiyong; Weng, Yonghui; Zavala, Miguel; Molina, L T

    2014-11-15

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) on air quality simulations in the California-Mexico border region on two days (May 30 and June 04, 2010) during Cal-Mex 2010. The uncertainties in ozone (O3) and aerosol simulations in the border area due to the meteorological initial uncertainties were examined through ensemble simulations. The ensemble spread of surface O3 averaged over the coastal region was less than 10ppb. The spreads in the nitrate and ammonium aerosols are substantial on both days, mostly caused by the large uncertainties in the surface temperature and humidity simulations. In general, the forecast initialized with the EnKF analysis (EnKF) improved the simulation of meteorological fields to some degree in the border region compared to the reference forecast initialized with NCEP analysis data (FCST) and the simulation with observation nudging (FDDA), which in turn leading to reasonable air quality simulations. The simulated surface O3 distributions by EnKF were consistently better than FCST and FDDA on both days. EnKF usually produced more reasonable simulations of nitrate and ammonium aerosols compared to the observations, but still have difficulties in improving the simulations of organic and sulfate aerosols. However, discrepancies between the EnKF simulations and the measurements were still considerably large, particularly for sulfate and organic aerosols, indicating that there are still ample rooms for improvement in the present data assimilation and/or the modeling systems.

  6. Photospheric Magnetic Field Properties of Flaring vs. Flare-Quiet Active Regions II: A Magnetic Charge Topology Model and Statistical Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, G.; Leka, K. D.; Longcope, D. W.

    2003-05-01

    The complexity of the coronal magnetic field extrapolated from a Magnetic Charge Topology (MCT) model, is examined for pre-event signatures unique to solar energetic phenomena. Although extensive use has been made of quantities measured at the photosphere, it is important to consider the magnetic field in the corona, where (for example) the hard X-ray signatures of energy release in solar flares are observed. By quantifying the inferred coronal magnetic topology we are no longer limited to considering solely the magnetic state of the photosphere. MCT is applied to temporally sampled photospheric magnetic data from the U. Hawai`i Imaging Vector Magnetograph, for 24 flare-event and flare-quiet epochs from seven active regions. We outline the methodology employed for automating the application of MCT to large data sets of complex active regions: partitioning the observed Bz at the photosphere, assigning a charge to each partition, and using this charge distribution to extrapolate the field in the corona. From the resulting field we compute the connectivity matrix ψ ij, the location of null points and the intersection of separatrix surfaces, i.e. separator field lines. Parameters are constructed to describe, for example, the magnetic connectivities, the magnetic flux in those connections, and the number of separators. Examining particular events results in no obvious trends in the magnitude and temporal evolution of the parameters just prior to flare events. Thus, we employ the same quantitative statistical approach outlined in Leka and Barnes [this session], i.e. applying discriminant analysis and Hotelling's T2-test, and ranking all four-variable discriminant functions as a proxy for a single all-variable discriminant function. We present those parameters which consistently appear in the best combinations, indicating that they may play an important role in defining a pre-event coronal state. This work was performed under Air Force Office of Scientific Research

  7. MATLAB-based program for optimization of quantum cascade laser active region parameters and calculation of output characteristics in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smiljanić, J.; Žeželj, M.; Milanović, V.; Radovanović, J.; Stanković, I.

    2014-03-01

    A strong magnetic field applied along the growth direction of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) active region gives rise to a spectrum of discrete energy states, the Landau levels. By combining quantum engineering of a QCL with a static magnetic field, we can selectively inhibit/enhance non-radiative electron relaxation process between the relevant Landau levels of a triple quantum well and realize a tunable surface emitting device. An efficient numerical algorithm implementation is presented of optimization of GaAs/AlGaAs QCL region parameters and calculation of output properties in the magnetic field. Both theoretical analysis and MATLAB implementation are given for LO-phonon and interface roughness scattering mechanisms on the operation of QCL. At elevated temperatures, electrons in the relevant laser states absorb/emit more LO-phonons which results in reduction of the optical gain. The decrease in the optical gain is moderated by the occurrence of interface roughness scattering, which remains unchanged with increasing temperature. Using the calculated scattering rates as input data, rate equations can be solved and population inversion and the optical gain obtained. Incorporation of the interface roughness scattering mechanism into the model did not create new resonant peaks of the optical gain. However, it resulted in shifting the existing peaks positions and overall reduction of the optical gain. Catalogue identifier: AERL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AERL_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 37763 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2757956 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MATLAB. Computer: Any capable of running MATLAB version R2010a or higher. Operating system: Any platform

  8. The use of MODIS data to derive acreage estimations for larger fields: A case study in the south-western Rostov region of Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritz, S.; Massart, M.; Savin, I.; Gallego, J.; Rembold, F.

    2008-12-01

    Recent developments in remote sensing technology, in particular improved spatial and temporal resolution, open new possibilities for estimating crop acreage over larger areas. Remotely sensed data allow in some cases the estimation of crop acreage statistics independently of sub-national survey statistics, which are sometimes biased and incomplete. This work focuses on the use of MODIS data acquired in 2001/2002 over the Rostov Oblast in Russia, by the Azov Sea. The region is characterised by large agricultural fields of around 75 ha on average. This paper presents a methodology to estimate crop acreage using the MODIS 16-day composite NDVI product. Particular emphasis is placed on a good quality crop mask and a good quality validation dataset. In order to have a second dataset which can be used for cross-checking the MODIS classification a Landsat ETM time series for four different dates in the season of 2002 was acquired and classified. We attempted to distinguish five different crop types and achieved satisfactory and good results for winter crops. Three hundred and sixty fields were identified to be suitable for the training and validation of the MODIS classification using a maximum likelihood classification. A novel method based on a pure pixel field sampling is introduced. This novel method is compared with the traditional hard classification of mixed pixels and was found to be superior.

  9. A regional field-based assessment of organic C sequestration and GHG balances in irrigated agriculture in Mediterranean semi-arid land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virto, Inigo; Antón, Rodrigo; Arias, Nerea; Orcaray, Luis; Enrique, Alberto; Bescansa, Paloma

    2016-04-01

    In a context of global change and increasing food demand, agriculture faces the challenge of ensuring food security making a sustainable use of resources, especially arable land and water. This implies in many areas a transition towards agricultural systems with increased and stable productivity and a more efficient use of inputs. The introduction of irrigation is, within this framework, a widespread strategy. However, the C cycle and the net GHG emissions can be significantly affected by irrigation. The net effect of this change needs to be quantified at a regional scale. In the region of Navarra (NE Spain) more than 22,300 ha of rainfed agricultural land have been converted to irrigation in the last years, adding to the previous existing irrigated area of 70,000 ha. In this framework the project Life+ Regadiox (LIFE12 ENV/ES/000426, http://life-regadiox.es/) has the objective of evaluating the net GHG balances and atmospheric CO2 fixation rates of different management strategies in irrigated agriculture in the region. The project involved the identification of areas representative of the different pedocllimatic conditions in the region. This required soil and climate characterizations, and the design of a network of agricultural fields representative of the most common dryland and irrigation managements in these areas. This was done from available public datasets on climate and soil, and from soil pits especially sampled for this study. Two areas were then delimited, mostly based on their degree of aridity. Within each of those areas, fields were selected to allow for comparisons at three levels: (i) dryland vs irrigation, (ii) soil and crop management systems for non-permanent crops, and (iii) soil management strategies for permanent crops (namely olive orchards and vineyards). In a second step, the objective of this work was to quantify net SOC variations and GHG balances corresponding to the different managements identified in the previous step. These

  10. In-situ investigation of the influence of the long-term shear strength of faults on the regional stress field in a granite rock mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Bruno; Cornet, Francois; Lamas, Luís; Muralha, José

    2016-04-01

    A case study is presented to show how stress field measurements may be used to assess the long-term rheological behaviour of an equivalent geo-material. The example concerns a granitic rock mass at the km3 scale, where an underground hydropower scheme including a new 10 km long power conduit and a powerhouse complex will be constructed. For design of the underground cavern and hydraulic pressure tunnel, several in situ stress measurements were carried out, using hydraulic borehole testing, overcoring and flat jack techniques. A first continuum mechanics model, with a homogenous material, was developed to integrate the several in situ test results and to assess the regional stress field. This model is based on elasticity and relaxation of the elastic properties measured through laboratory tests conducted on cores. Results of integration show that the long-term behavior of this granite rock mass differs markedly from the short-term behaviour as defined by laboratory tests. This suggests that the in-situ stress field depends mostly on the softer material that fills up the faults and hence results from the shear stress relaxation over a large number of pre-existing fractures and faults. A second continuum mechanics model, with consideration of two fault planes located nearby the hydraulic tests, was studied. This model is based on elasticity for the overall rock mass, with the elastic properties extracted from laboratory measurements, and visco-elasticity with small long-term shear strength for the two fault planes. Results show that the overall granite rock mass may be viewed as a combination of stiff elastic blocks separated by soft low strength material, leading to a fairly large scale homogeneous axisymmetrical stress field with vertical axis. Advantages and limita