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Sample records for field stimulation device

  1. In vitro Magnetic Stimulation: A Simple Stimulation Device to Deliver Defined Low Intensity Electromagnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Grehl, Stephanie; Martina, David; Goyenvalle, Catherine; Deng, Zhi-De; Rodger, Jennifer; Sherrard, Rachel M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive brain stimulation (NIBS) by electromagnetic fields appears to benefit human neurological and psychiatric conditions, although the optimal stimulation parameters and underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Although, in vitro studies have begun to elucidate cellular mechanisms, stimulation is delivered by a range of coils (from commercially available human stimulation coils to laboratory-built circuits) so that the electromagnetic fields induced within the tissue to produce the reported effects are ill-defined. Here, we develop a simple in vitro stimulation device with plug-and-play features that allow delivery of a range of stimulation parameters. We chose to test low intensity repetitive magnetic stimulation (LI-rMS) delivered at three frequencies to hindbrain explant cultures containing the olivocerebellar pathway. We used computational modeling to define the parameters of a stimulation circuit and coil that deliver a unidirectional homogeneous magnetic field of known intensity and direction, and therefore a predictable electric field, to the target. We built the coil to be compatible with culture requirements: stimulation within an incubator; a flat surface allowing consistent position and magnetic field direction; location outside the culture plate to maintain sterility and no heating or vibration. Measurements at the explant confirmed the induced magnetic field was homogenous and matched the simulation results. To validate our system we investigated biological effects following LI-rMS at 1 Hz, 10 Hz and biomimetic high frequency, which we have previously shown induces neural circuit reorganization. We found that gene expression was modified by LI-rMS in a frequency-related manner. Four hours after a single 10-min stimulation session, the number of c-fos positive cells increased, indicating that our stimulation activated the tissue. Also, after 14 days of LI-rMS, the expression of genes normally present in the tissue was differentially modified

  2. Potent stimulation of blood flow in fingers of volunteers after local short-term treatment with low-frequency magnetic fields from a novel device.

    PubMed

    Funk, Richard H W; Knels, Lilla; Augstein, Antje; Marquetant, Rainer; Dertinger, Hermann F

    2014-01-01

    A novel hand-held low-frequency magnetic stimulator (MagCell-SR) was tested for its ability to stimulate microcirculation in fingers of healthy volunteers. Blood flow during and after 5 minutes exposure was quantified using Laser Doppler Perfusion Imaging Technique. The device was positioned between the wrist and the dorsal part of the backhand. Because the increase in blood flow could be caused by a release of nitric oxide (NO) from the vascular endothelial cells we tested NO production with a fluorescence marker and quantified the measurements in cell cultures of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). Exposure increased blood flow significantly, persisted several minutes, and then disappeared gradually. In order to assess the effect of a static magnetic field, the measurements were also carried out with the device shutoff. Here, only a small increase in blood flow was noted. The application of the rotating MagCell-SR to the HUVEC cultures leads to a rapid onset and a significant increase of NO release after 15 minutes. Thus, frequencies between 4 and 12 Hz supplied by the device improve microcirculation significantly. Therefore, this device can be used in all clinical situations where an improvement of the microcirculation is useful like in chronic wound healing deficits.

  3. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Raghavan, S.; Duesberg, G. S.; Pratap, R.

    2014-09-08

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ∼10 nA μm{sup −1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  4. Susceptibility study of audio recording devices to electromagnetic stimulations

    SciTech Connect

    Halligan, Matthew S.; Grant, Steven L.; Beetner, Daryl G.

    2014-02-01

    Little research has been performed to study how intentional electromagnetic signals may couple into recording devices. An electromagnetic susceptibility study was performed on an analog tape recorder, a digital video camera, a wired computer microphone, and a wireless microphone system to electromagnetic interference. Devices were subjected to electromagnetic stimulations in the frequency range of 1-990 MHz and field strengths up to 4.9 V/m. Carrier and message frequencies of the stimulation signals were swept, and the impacts of device orientation and antenna polarization were explored. Message signals coupled into all devices only when amplitude modulated signals were used as stimulation signals. Test conditions that produced maximum sensitivity were highly specific to each device. Only narrow carrier frequency ranges could be used for most devices to couple messages into recordings. A basic detection technique using cross-correlation demonstrated the need for messages to be as long as possible to maximize message detection and minimize detection error. Analysis suggests that detectable signals could be coupled to these recording devices under realistic ambient conditions.

  5. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  6. Nanostructured cavity devices for extracellular stimulation of HL-1 cells.

    PubMed

    Czeschik, Anna; Rinklin, Philipp; Derra, Ulrike; Ullmann, Sabrina; Holik, Peter; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Wolfrum, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are state-of-the-art devices for extracellular recording and stimulation on biological tissue. Furthermore, they are a relevant tool for the development of biomedical applications like retina, cochlear and motor prostheses, cardiac pacemakers and drug screening. Hence, research on functional cell-sensor interfaces, as well as the development of new surface structures and modifications for improved electrode characteristics, is a vivid and well established field. However, combining single-cell resolution with sufficient signal coupling remains challenging due to poor cell-electrode sealing. Furthermore, electrodes with diameters below 20 µm often suffer from a high electrical impedance affecting the noise during voltage recordings. In this study, we report on a nanocavity sensor array for voltage-controlled stimulation and extracellular action potential recordings on cellular networks. Nanocavity devices combine the advantages of low-impedance electrodes with small cell-chip interfaces, preserving a high spatial resolution for recording and stimulation. A reservoir between opening aperture and electrode is provided, allowing the cell to access the structure for a tight cell-sensor sealing. We present the well-controlled fabrication process and the effect of cavity formation and electrode patterning on the sensor's impedance. Further, we demonstrate reliable voltage-controlled stimulation using nanostructured cavity devices by capturing the pacemaker of an HL-1 cell network.

  7. 2-Dimensional MEMS dielectrophoresis device for osteoblast cell stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zou, H; Mellon, S; Syms, R R A; Tanner, K E

    2006-12-01

    A fixed microelectrode device for cell stimulation has been designed and fabricated using micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Dielectrophoretic forces obtained from non-uniform electric fields were used for manipulating and positioning osteoblasts. The experiments show that the osteoblasts experience positive dielectrophoresis (p-DEP) when suspended in iso-osmotic culture medium and exposed to AC fields at 5 MHz frequency. Negative dielectrophoresis (n-DEP) is obtained at 0.1 MHz. The viability of osteoblasts under dielectrophoresis has been investigated. The viability values for cells exposed to DEP are nearly three times higher than the control values, indicating that dielectrophoresis may have an anabolic effect on osteoblasts.

  8. Nanostructured cavity devices for extracellular stimulation of HL-1 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czeschik, Anna; Rinklin, Philipp; Derra, Ulrike; Ullmann, Sabrina; Holik, Peter; Steltenkamp, Siegfried; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Wolfrum, Bernhard

    2015-05-01

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are state-of-the-art devices for extracellular recording and stimulation on biological tissue. Furthermore, they are a relevant tool for the development of biomedical applications like retina, cochlear and motor prostheses, cardiac pacemakers and drug screening. Hence, research on functional cell-sensor interfaces, as well as the development of new surface structures and modifications for improved electrode characteristics, is a vivid and well established field. However, combining single-cell resolution with sufficient signal coupling remains challenging due to poor cell-electrode sealing. Furthermore, electrodes with diameters below 20 µm often suffer from a high electrical impedance affecting the noise during voltage recordings. In this study, we report on a nanocavity sensor array for voltage-controlled stimulation and extracellular action potential recordings on cellular networks. Nanocavity devices combine the advantages of low-impedance electrodes with small cell-chip interfaces, preserving a high spatial resolution for recording and stimulation. A reservoir between opening aperture and electrode is provided, allowing the cell to access the structure for a tight cell-sensor sealing. We present the well-controlled fabrication process and the effect of cavity formation and electrode patterning on the sensor's impedance. Further, we demonstrate reliable voltage-controlled stimulation using nanostructured cavity devices by capturing the pacemaker of an HL-1 cell network.Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) are state-of-the-art devices for extracellular recording and stimulation on biological tissue. Furthermore, they are a relevant tool for the development of biomedical applications like retina, cochlear and motor prostheses, cardiac pacemakers and drug screening. Hence, research on functional cell-sensor interfaces, as well as the development of new surface structures and modifications for improved electrode characteristics, is a vivid and

  9. Why do some promising brain-stimulation devices fail the next steps of clinical development?

    PubMed

    Edelmuth, Rodrigo C L; Nitsche, Michael A; Battistella, Linamara; Fregni, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    Interest in techniques of noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS) has been growing exponentially in the last decade. Recent studies have shown that some of these techniques induce significant neurophysiological and clinical effects. Although recent results are promising, there are several techniques that have been abandoned despite positive initial results. In this study, we performed a systematic review to identify NIBS methods with promising preliminary clinical results that were not fully developed and adopted into clinical practice, and discuss its clinical, research and device characteristics. We identified five devices (transmeatal cochlear laser stimulation, transcranial micropolarization, transcranial electrostimulation, cranial electric stimulation and stimulation with weak electromagnetic fields) and compared them with two established NIBS devices (transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial direct current stimulation) and with well-known drugs used in neuropsychiatry (pramipexole and escitalopram) in order to understand the reasons why they failed to reach clinical practice and further steps of research development. Finally, we also discuss novel NIBS devices that have recently showed promising results: brain ultrasound and transcranial high-frequency random noise stimulation. Our results show that some of the reasons for the failure of NIBS devices with promising clinical findings are the difficulty to disseminate results, lack of controlled studies, duration of research development, mixed results and lack of standardization.

  10. Portable device for magnetic stimulation: Assessment survival and proliferation in human lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, H.; Cordova-Fraga, T.; López-Briones, S.; Martínez-Espinosa, J. C.; Rosas, E. F.; Espinoza, A.; Villagómez-Castro, J. C.; Sosa, M.; Topsu, S.; Bernal-Alvarado, J. J.

    2013-09-01

    A device's instrumentation for magnetic stimulation on human lymphocytes is presented. This is a new procedure to stimulate growing cells with ferrofluid in vortices of magnetic field. The stimulation of magnetic vortices was provided at five different frequencies, from 100 to 2500 Hz and intensities from 1.13 to 4.13 mT. To improve the stimulation effects, a paramagnetic ferrofluid was added on the cell culture medium. The results suggest that the frequency changes and the magnetic field variation produce an important increase in the number of proliferating cells as well as in the cellular viability. This new magnetic stimulation modality could trigger an intracellular mechanism to induce cell proliferation and cellular survival only on mitogen stimulated cells.

  11. External trial deep brain stimulation device for the application of desynchronizing stimulation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauptmann, C.; Roulet, J.-C.; Niederhauser, J. J.; Döll, W.; Kirlangic, M. E.; Lysyansky, B.; Krachkovskyi, V.; Bhatti, M. A.; Barnikol, U. B.; Sasse, L.; Bührle, C. P.; Speckmann, E.-J.; Götz, M.; Sturm, V.; Freund, H.-J.; Schnell, U.; Tass, P. A.

    2009-12-01

    In the past decade deep brain stimulation (DBS)—the application of electrical stimulation to specific target structures via implanted depth electrodes—has become the standard treatment for medically refractory Parkinson's disease and essential tremor. These diseases are characterized by pathological synchronized neuronal activity in particular brain areas. We present an external trial DBS device capable of administering effectively desynchronizing stimulation techniques developed with methods from nonlinear dynamics and statistical physics according to a model-based approach. These techniques exploit either stochastic phase resetting principles or complex delayed-feedback mechanisms. We explain how these methods are implemented into a safe and user-friendly device.

  12. Magnetic fields in noninvasive brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Vidal-Dourado, Marcos; Conforto, Adriana Bastos; Caboclo, Luis Otávio Sales Ferreira; Scaff, Milberto; Guilhoto, Laura Maria de Figueiredo Ferreira; Yacubian, Elza Márcia Targas

    2014-04-01

    The idea that magnetic fields could be used therapeutically arose 2000 years ago. These therapeutic possibilities were expanded after the discovery of electromagnetic induction by the Englishman Michael Faraday and the American Joseph Henry. In 1896, Arsène d'Arsonval reported his experience with noninvasive brain magnetic stimulation to the scientific French community. In the second half of the 20th century, changing magnetic fields emerged as a noninvasive tool to study the nervous system and to modulate neural function. In 1985, Barker, Jalinous, and Freeston presented transcranial magnetic stimulation, a relatively focal and painless technique. Transcranial magnetic stimulation has been proposed as a clinical neurophysiology tool and as a potential adjuvant treatment for psychiatric and neurologic conditions. This article aims to contextualize the progress of use of magnetic fields in the history of neuroscience and medical sciences, until 1985.

  13. Implantable optical-electrode device for stimulation of spinal motoneurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, M. V.; Erofeev, A. I.; Zakharova, O. A.; Pyatyshev, E. N.; Kazakin, A. N.; Vlasova, O. L.

    2016-08-01

    Recent years, optogenetic method of scientific research has proved its effectiveness in the nerve cell stimulation tasks. In our article we demonstrate an implanted device for the spinal optogenetic motoneurons activation. This work is carried out in the Laboratory of Molecular Neurodegeneration of the Peter the Great St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, together with Nano and Microsystem Technology Laboratory. The work of the developed device is based on the principle of combining fiber optic light stimulation of genetically modified cells with the microelectrode multichannel recording of neurons biopotentials. The paper presents a part of the electrode implant manufacturing technique, combined with the optical waveguide of ThorLabs (USA).

  14. Neuron Stimulation Device Integrated with Silicon Nanowire-Based Photodetection Circuit on a Flexible Substrate.

    PubMed

    Jung, Suk Won; Shin, Jong Yoon; Pi, Kilwha; Goo, Yong Sook; Cho, Dong-Il Dan

    2016-12-01

    This paper proposes a neural stimulation device integrated with a silicon nanowire (SiNW)-based photodetection circuit for the activation of neurons with light. The proposed device is comprised of a voltage divider and a current driver in which SiNWs are used as photodetector and field-effect transistors; it has the functions of detecting light, generating a stimulation signal in proportion to the light intensity, and transmitting the signal to a micro electrode. To show the applicability of the proposed neural stimulation device as a high-resolution retinal prosthesis system, a high-density neural stimulation device with a unit cell size of 110 × 110 μ m and a resolution of 32 × 32 was fabricated on a flexible film with a thickness of approximately 50 μm. Its effectiveness as a retinal stimulation device was then evaluated using a unit cell in an in vitro animal experiment involving the retinal tissue of retinal Degeneration 1 (rd1) mice. Experiments wherein stimulation pulses were applied to the retinal tissues successfully demonstrate that the number of spikes in neural response signals increases in proportion to light intensity.

  15. Neuron Stimulation Device Integrated with Silicon Nanowire-Based Photodetection Circuit on a Flexible Substrate

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Suk Won; Shin, Jong Yoon; Pi, Kilwha; Goo, Yong Sook; Cho, Dong-il “Dan”

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a neural stimulation device integrated with a silicon nanowire (SiNW)-based photodetection circuit for the activation of neurons with light. The proposed device is comprised of a voltage divider and a current driver in which SiNWs are used as photodetector and field-effect transistors; it has the functions of detecting light, generating a stimulation signal in proportion to the light intensity, and transmitting the signal to a micro electrode. To show the applicability of the proposed neural stimulation device as a high-resolution retinal prosthesis system, a high-density neural stimulation device with a unit cell size of 110×110 μm and a resolution of 32×32 was fabricated on a flexible film with a thickness of approximately 50 μm. Its effectiveness as a retinal stimulation device was then evaluated using a unit cell in an in vitro animal experiment involving the retinal tissue of retinal Degeneration 1 (rd1) mice. Experiments wherein stimulation pulses were applied to the retinal tissues successfully demonstrate that the number of spikes in neural response signals increases in proportion to light intensity. PMID:27916963

  16. Field errors in hybrid insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Schlueter, R.D.

    1995-02-01

    Hybrid magnet theory as applied to the error analyses used in the design of Advanced Light Source (ALS) insertion devices is reviewed. Sources of field errors in hybrid insertion devices are discussed.

  17. A pneumatic vibrotactile stimulation device for fMRI.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Richard W; Dy-Liacco, Iona; Malcolm, Matthew P; Lee, Hyunsook; Peck, Kyung K; Gopinath, Kaundinya S; Himes, Nathan C; Soltysik, David A; Browne, Paul; Tran-Son-Tay, Roger

    2004-03-01

    Mapping the functional response of the somatosensory cortex is useful both for characterizing normal brain activity and for determining the functional integrity of damaged cortex compromised by stroke or other neurological insults. A variety of stimulators have been used to produce somatosensory cortex activation in functional brain imaging, including brushes and swabs operated manually, pneumatically and mechanically powered mechanical vibrators, air puffs, and vibrating ceramic piezoelectric wafers and benders. A closed-system, pneumatically driven rubber diaphragm is reported that overcomes many of the limitations of existing vibrotactile devices and produces robust sensory cortex activation in an fMRI experiment.

  18. Sensor devices comprising field-structured composites

    DOEpatents

    Martin, James E.; Hughes, Robert C.; Anderson, Robert A.

    2001-02-27

    A new class of sensor devices comprising field-structured conducting composites comprising a textured distribution of conducting magnetic particles is disclosed. The conducting properties of such field-structured materials can be precisely controlled during fabrication so as to exhibit a large change in electrical conductivity when subject to any environmental influence which changes the relative volume fraction. Influences which can be so detected include stress, strain, shear, temperature change, humidity, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and the presence or absence of certain chemicals. This behavior can be made the basis for a wide variety of sensor devices.

  19. A compact electroencephalogram recording device with integrated audio stimulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukkunen, Antti K. O.; Kurttio, Anttu A.; Leminen, Miika M.; Sepponen, Raimo E.

    2010-06-01

    A compact (96×128×32 mm3, 374 g), battery-powered, eight-channel electroencephalogram recording device with an integrated audio stimulation system and a wireless interface is presented. The recording device is capable of producing high-quality data, while the operating time is also reasonable for evoked potential studies. The effective measurement resolution is about 4 nV at 200 Hz sample rate, typical noise level is below 0.7 μVrms at 0.16-70 Hz, and the estimated operating time is 1.5 h. An embedded audio decoder circuit reads and plays wave sound files stored on a memory card. The activities are controlled by an 8 bit main control unit which allows accurate timing of the stimuli. The interstimulus interval jitter measured is less than 1 ms. Wireless communication is made through bluetooth and the data recorded are transmitted to an external personal computer (PC) interface in real time. The PC interface is implemented with LABVIEW® and in addition to data acquisition it also allows online signal processing, data storage, and control of measurement activities such as contact impedance measurement, for example. The practical application of the device is demonstrated in mismatch negativity experiment with three test subjects.

  20. A compact electroencephalogram recording device with integrated audio stimulation system.

    PubMed

    Paukkunen, Antti K O; Kurttio, Anttu A; Leminen, Miika M; Sepponen, Raimo E

    2010-06-01

    A compact (96 x 128 x 32 mm(3), 374 g), battery-powered, eight-channel electroencephalogram recording device with an integrated audio stimulation system and a wireless interface is presented. The recording device is capable of producing high-quality data, while the operating time is also reasonable for evoked potential studies. The effective measurement resolution is about 4 nV at 200 Hz sample rate, typical noise level is below 0.7 microV(rms) at 0.16-70 Hz, and the estimated operating time is 1.5 h. An embedded audio decoder circuit reads and plays wave sound files stored on a memory card. The activities are controlled by an 8 bit main control unit which allows accurate timing of the stimuli. The interstimulus interval jitter measured is less than 1 ms. Wireless communication is made through bluetooth and the data recorded are transmitted to an external personal computer (PC) interface in real time. The PC interface is implemented with LABVIEW and in addition to data acquisition it also allows online signal processing, data storage, and control of measurement activities such as contact impedance measurement, for example. The practical application of the device is demonstrated in mismatch negativity experiment with three test subjects.

  1. Emerging Techniques for Field Device Security

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, Moses; Mulder, John; Chavez, Adrian R.; Allan, Benjamin A.

    2014-11-01

    Critical infrastructure, such as electrical power plants and oil refineries, rely on embedded devices to control essential processes. State of the art security is unable to detect attacks on these devices at the hardware or firmware level. We provide an overview of the hardware used in industrial control system field devices, look at how these devices have been attacked, and discuss techniques and new technologies that may be used to secure them. We follow three themes: (1) Inspectability, the capability for an external arbiter to monitor the internal state of a device. (2) Trustworthiness, the degree to which a system will continue to function correctly despite disruption, error, or attack. (3) Diversity, the use of adaptive systems and complexity to make attacks more difficult by reducing the feasible attack surface.

  2. Emerging Techniques for Field Device Security

    DOE PAGES

    Schwartz, Moses; Bechtel Corp.; Mulder, John; ...

    2014-11-01

    Critical infrastructure, such as electrical power plants and oil refineries, rely on embedded devices to control essential processes. State of the art security is unable to detect attacks on these devices at the hardware or firmware level. We provide an overview of the hardware used in industrial control system field devices, look at how these devices have been attacked, and discuss techniques and new technologies that may be used to secure them. We follow three themes: (1) Inspectability, the capability for an external arbiter to monitor the internal state of a device. (2) Trustworthiness, the degree to which a systemmore » will continue to function correctly despite disruption, error, or attack. (3) Diversity, the use of adaptive systems and complexity to make attacks more difficult by reducing the feasible attack surface.« less

  3. Spatial Chemical Stimulation Control in Microenvironment by Microfluidic Probe Integrated Device for Cell-Based Assay

    PubMed Central

    Horayama, Masayuki; Shinha, Kenta; Kabayama, Kazuya; Fujii, Teruo

    2016-01-01

    Cell—cell interactions play an important role in the development and function of multicellular organisms. To investigate these interactions in detail, it is necessary to evaluate the behavior of a cell population when the minimum number of cells in the population is stimulated by some chemical factors. We propose a microfluidic device integrated with microfluidic probe (MFP) functionality; this device is capable of imparting a chemical stimulus to cells within a microenvironment, for cell-based assays. The device contains MFP channels at the walls of the cell culture microchannels, and it can control a localized chemical stimulation area at the scale of a single cell to a few cells using MFP fluid control in a microspace. The results of a finite element method-based simulation indicated that it is possible to control the chemical stimulation area at the scale of a single cell to a few cells by optimizing the MFP channel apex width and the flow ratio. In addition, localized cell staining was demonstrated successfully using a spatial chemical stimulus. We confirmed the device functionality as a novel cell-based assay tool. We succeeded in performing localized cell collection using this method, which suggested that the single cell analysis of a cell monolayer that is subjected to a specific chemical stimulus is possible. The method proposed in this paper can contribute significantly to the fields of cell biology and drug development. PMID:27930750

  4. Molecular hyperfine fields in organic magnetoresistance devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giro, Ronaldo; Rosselli, Flávia P.; dos Santos Carvalho, Rafael; Capaz, Rodrigo B.; Cremona, Marco; Achete, Carlos A.

    2013-03-01

    We calculate molecular hyperfine fields in organic magnetoresistance (OMAR) devices using ab initio calculations. To do so, we establish a protocol for the accurate determination of the average hyperfine field Bhf and apply it to selected molecular ions: NPB, TPD, and Alq3. Then, we make devices with precisely the same molecules and perform measurements of the OMAR effect, in order to address the role of hole-transport layer in the characteristic magnetic field B0 of OMAR. Contrary to common belief, we find that molecular hyperfine fields are not only caused by hydrogen nuclei. We also find that dipolar contributions to the hyperfine fields can be comparable to the Fermi contact contributions. However, such contributions are restricted to nuclei located in the same molecular ion as the charge carrier (intramolecular), as extramolecular contributions are negligible.

  5. New cosurface capacitive stimulators for the development of active osseointegrative implantable devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soares Dos Santos, Marco P.; Marote, Ana; Santos, T.; Torrão, João; Ramos, A.; Simões, José A. O.; da Cruz E Silva, Odete A. B.; Furlani, Edward P.; Vieira, Sandra I.; Ferreira, Jorge A. F.

    2016-07-01

    Non-drug strategies based on biophysical stimulation have been emphasized for the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions. However, to date, an effective stimulation system for intracorporeal therapies has not been proposed. This is particularly true for active intramedullary implants that aim to optimize osseointegration. The increasing demand for these implants, particularly for hip and knee replacements, has driven the design of innovative stimulation systems that are effective in bone-implant integration. In this paper, a new cosurface-based capacitive system concept is proposed for the design of implantable devices that deliver controllable and personalized electric field stimuli to target tissues. A prototype architecture of this system was constructed for in vitro tests, and its ability to deliver controllable stimuli was numerically analyzed. Successful results were obtained for osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation in the in vitro tests. This work provides, for the first time, a design of a stimulation system that can be embedded in active implantable devices for controllable bone-implant integration and regeneration. The proposed cosurface design holds potential for the implementation of novel and innovative personalized stimulatory therapies based on the delivery of electric fields to bone cells.

  6. New cosurface capacitive stimulators for the development of active osseointegrative implantable devices

    PubMed Central

    Soares dos Santos, Marco P.; Marote, Ana; Santos, T.; Torrão, João; Ramos, A.; Simões, José A. O.; da Cruz e Silva, Odete A. B.; Furlani, Edward P.; Vieira, Sandra I.; Ferreira, Jorge A. F.

    2016-01-01

    Non-drug strategies based on biophysical stimulation have been emphasized for the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal conditions. However, to date, an effective stimulation system for intracorporeal therapies has not been proposed. This is particularly true for active intramedullary implants that aim to optimize osseointegration. The increasing demand for these implants, particularly for hip and knee replacements, has driven the design of innovative stimulation systems that are effective in bone-implant integration. In this paper, a new cosurface-based capacitive system concept is proposed for the design of implantable devices that deliver controllable and personalized electric field stimuli to target tissues. A prototype architecture of this system was constructed for in vitro tests, and its ability to deliver controllable stimuli was numerically analyzed. Successful results were obtained for osteoblastic proliferation and differentiation in the in vitro tests. This work provides, for the first time, a design of a stimulation system that can be embedded in active implantable devices for controllable bone-implant integration and regeneration. The proposed cosurface design holds potential for the implementation of novel and innovative personalized stimulatory therapies based on the delivery of electric fields to bone cells. PMID:27456818

  7. Validation of a Portable Low-power Deep Brain Stimulation Device through Anxiolytic Effects in a Laboratory Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Kouzani, Abbas Z; Kale, Rajas P; Zarate-Garza, Pablo Patricio; Berk, Michael; Walder, Ken; Tye, Susannah J

    2016-11-15

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices deliver electrical pulses to neural tissue through an electrode. To study the mechanisms and therapeutic benefits of deep brain stimulation, murine preclinical research is necessary. However, conducting naturalistic long-term, uninterrupted animal behavioral experiments can be difficult with bench-top systems. The reduction of size, weight, power consumption, portability, and cost of DBS devices can assist the progress of this research in animal studies. A low power, low weight, miniature DBS device is presented in this paper. This device consists of electronic hardware and software components including a low-power microcontroller, an adjustable current source, an n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor, a coin-cell battery, electrode wires and a software program to operate the device. Evaluation of the performance of the device in terms of battery lifetime and device functionality through bench and in vivo tests was conducted. The bench test revealed that this device can deliver continuous stimulation current pulses of strength 200 μA, width 90 μs, and frequency 130 Hz for 22.75 days. The in vivo tests demonstrated that chronic stimulation of the nucleus accumbens (NAc) with this device significantly increased psychomotor activity, together with a dramatic reduction in anxiety-like behavior in the elevated zero-maze test.

  8. flexTMS--a novel repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation device with freely programmable stimulus currents.

    PubMed

    Gattinger, Norbert; Moessnang, Georg; Gleich, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is able to noninvasively excite neuronal populations due to brief magnetic field pulses. The efficiency and the characteristics of stimulation pulse shapes influence the physiological effect of TMS. However, commercial devices allow only a minimum of control of different pulse shapes. Basically, just sinusoidal and monophasic pulse shapes with fixed pulse widths are available. Only few research groups work on TMS devices with controllable pulse parameters such as pulse shape or pulse width. We describe a novel TMS device with a full-bridge circuit topology incorporating four insulated-gate bipolar transistor (IGBT) modules and one energy storage capacitor to generate arbitrary waveforms. This flexible TMS (flexTMS ) device can generate magnetic pulses which can be adjusted with respect to pulse width, polarity, and intensity. Furthermore, the equipment allows us to set paired pulses with a variable interstimulus interval (ISI) from 0 to 20 ms with a step size of 10  μs. All user-defined pulses can be applied continually with repetition rates up to 30 pulses per second (pps) or, respectively, up to 100 pps in theta burst mode. Offering this variety of flexibility, flexTMS will allow the enhancement of existing TMS paradigms and novel research applications.

  9. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, S.L.

    1990-02-13

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180[degree] from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180[degree] from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils. 16 figs.

  10. Magnetic field transfer device and method

    DOEpatents

    Wipf, Stefan L.

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field transfer device includes a pair of oppositely wound inner coils which each include at least one winding around an inner coil axis, and an outer coil which includes at least one winding around an outer coil axis. The windings may be formed of superconductors. The axes of the two inner coils are parallel and laterally spaced from each other so that the inner coils are positioned in side-by-side relation. The outer coil is outwardly positioned from the inner coils and rotatable relative to the inner coils about a rotational axis substantially perpendicular to the inner coil axes to generate a hypothetical surface which substantially encloses the inner coils. The outer coil rotates relative to the inner coils between a first position in which the outer coil axis is substantially parallel to the inner coil axes and the outer coil augments the magnetic field formed in one of the inner coils, and a second position 180.degree. from the first position, in which the augmented magnetic field is transferred into the other inner coil and reoriented 180.degree. from the original magnetic field. The magnetic field transfer device allows a magnetic field to be transferred between volumes with negligible work being required to rotate the outer coil with respect to the inner coils.

  11. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  12. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, L. J.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Jiles, D. C.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  13. Formation of nanofilament field emission devices

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Contolini, Robert J.; Musket, Ronald G.; Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    A process for fabricating a nanofilament field emission device. The process enables the formation of high aspect ratio, electroplated nanofilament structure devices for field emission displays wherein a via is formed in a dielectric layer and is self-aligned to a via in the gate metal structure on top of the dielectric layer. The desired diameter of the via in the dielectric layer is on the order of 50-200 nm, with an aspect ratio of 5-10. In one embodiment, after forming the via in the dielectric layer, the gate metal is passivated, after which a plating enhancement layer is deposited in the bottom of the via, where necessary. The nanofilament is then electroplated in the via, followed by removal of the gate passification layer, etch back of the dielectric, and sharpening of the nanofilament. A hard mask layer may be deposited on top of the gate metal and removed following electroplating of the nanofilament.

  14. The Flow Field Inside Ventricle Assist Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Einav, Shmuel; Rosenfeld, Moshe; Avrahami, Idit

    2000-11-01

    The evaluation of innovative ventricle assist devices (VAD), is of major importance. A New Left Heart Assist Device, with an improved energy converter unit, has been investigated both numerically and experimentally. For this purpose, an experimental Continuous Digital Particle Imagining Velocimetry (CDPIV) is combined with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. These tools complement each other to result into a comprehensive description of the complex 3D, viscous and time-dependent flow field inside the artificial ventricle. A 3D numerical model was constructed to simulate the VAD pump and a time-depended CFD analysis with moving walls was performed to predict the flow behaviour in the VAD during the cardiac cycle. A commercial finite element package was used to solve the Navier-Stokes equations (FIDAP, Fluent Inc., Evanston). In the experimental analysis, an optically clear elastic model of the VAD was placed inside a 2D CDPIV system. The CDPIV system is capable of sampling 15 velocity vector fields per second based on image-pairs intervals lower than 0.5 millisecond. Continuous sequences of experimental images, followed by their calculated velocity transient fields, are given as animated presentation of the distensible VAD. These results are used for validating the CFD simulations. Once validated, the CFD results provide a detailed 3D and time dependent description of the flow field, allowing the identification of stagnation or high shear stress regions.

  15. Novel Air Stimulation MR-Device for Intraoral Quantitative Sensory Cold Testing.

    PubMed

    Brönnimann, Ben; Meier, Michael L; Hou, Mei-Yin; Parkinson, Charles; Ettlin, Dominik A

    2016-01-01

    The advent of neuroimaging in dental research provides exciting opportunities for relating excitation of trigeminal neurons to human somatosensory perceptions. Cold air sensitivity is one of the most frequent causes of dental discomfort or pain. Up to date, devices capable of delivering controlled cold air in an MR-environment are unavailable for quantitative sensory testing. This study therefore aimed at constructing and evaluating a novel MR-compatible, computer-controlled cold air stimulation apparatus (CASA) that produces graded air puffs. CASA consisted of a multi-injector air jet delivery system (AJS), a cold exchanger, a cooling agent, and a stimulus application construction. Its feasibility was tested by performing an fMRI stimulation experiment on a single subject experiencing dentine cold sensitivity. The novel device delivered repetitive, stable air stimuli ranging from room temperature (24.5°C ± 2°C) to -35°C, at flow rates between 5 and 17 liters per minute (l/min). These cold air puffs evoked perceptions similar to natural stimuli. Single-subject fMRI-analysis yielded brain activations typically associated with acute pain processing including thalamus, insular and cingulate cortices, somatosensory, cerebellar, and frontal brain regions. Thus, the novel CASA allowed for controlled, repetitive quantitative sensory testing by using air stimuli at graded temperatures (room temperature down to -35°C) while simultaneously recording brain responses. No MR-compatible stimulation device currently exists that is capable of providing non-contact natural-like stimuli at a wide temperature range to tissues in spatially restricted areas such as the mouth. The physical characteristics of this novel device thus holds promise for advancing the field of trigeminal and spinal somatosensory research, namely with respect to comparing therapeutic interventions for dentine hypersensitivity.

  16. Novel Air Stimulation MR-Device for Intraoral Quantitative Sensory Cold Testing

    PubMed Central

    Brönnimann, Ben; Meier, Michael L.; Hou, Mei-Yin; Parkinson, Charles; Ettlin, Dominik A.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of neuroimaging in dental research provides exciting opportunities for relating excitation of trigeminal neurons to human somatosensory perceptions. Cold air sensitivity is one of the most frequent causes of dental discomfort or pain. Up to date, devices capable of delivering controlled cold air in an MR-environment are unavailable for quantitative sensory testing. This study therefore aimed at constructing and evaluating a novel MR-compatible, computer-controlled cold air stimulation apparatus (CASA) that produces graded air puffs. CASA consisted of a multi-injector air jet delivery system (AJS), a cold exchanger, a cooling agent, and a stimulus application construction. Its feasibility was tested by performing an fMRI stimulation experiment on a single subject experiencing dentine cold sensitivity. The novel device delivered repetitive, stable air stimuli ranging from room temperature (24.5°C ± 2°C) to −35°C, at flow rates between 5 and 17 liters per minute (l/min). These cold air puffs evoked perceptions similar to natural stimuli. Single-subject fMRI-analysis yielded brain activations typically associated with acute pain processing including thalamus, insular and cingulate cortices, somatosensory, cerebellar, and frontal brain regions. Thus, the novel CASA allowed for controlled, repetitive quantitative sensory testing by using air stimuli at graded temperatures (room temperature down to −35°C) while simultaneously recording brain responses. No MR-compatible stimulation device currently exists that is capable of providing non-contact natural-like stimuli at a wide temperature range to tissues in spatially restricted areas such as the mouth. The physical characteristics of this novel device thus holds promise for advancing the field of trigeminal and spinal somatosensory research, namely with respect to comparing therapeutic interventions for dentine hypersensitivity. PMID:27445771

  17. Microprocessor-controlled optical stimulating device to improve the gait of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Ferrarin, M; Brambilla, M; Garavello, L; Di Candia, A; Pedotti, A; Rabuffetti, M

    2004-05-01

    Different types of visual cue for subjects with Parkinson's disease (PD) produced an improvement in gait and helped some of them prevent or overcome freezing episodes. The paper describes a portable gait-enabling device (optical stimulating glasses (OSGs) that provides, in the peripheral field of view, different types of continuous optic flow (backward or forward) and intermittent stimuli synchronised with external events. The OSGs are a programmable, stand-alone, augmented reality system that can be interfaced with a PC for program set-up. It consists of a pair of non-corrective glasses, equipped with two matrixes of 70 micro light emitting diodes, one on each side, controlled by a microprocessor. Two foot-switches are used to synchronise optical stimulation with specific gait events. A pilot study was carried out on three PD patients and three controls, with different types of optic flow during walking along a fixed path. The continuous optic flow in the forward direction produced an increase in gait velocity in the PD patients (up to + 11% in average), whereas the controls had small variations. The stimulation synchronised with the swing phase, associated with an attentional strategy, produced a remarkable increase in stride length for all subjects. After prolonged testing, the device has shown good applicability and technical functionality, it is easily wearable and transportable, and it does not interfere with gait.

  18. Heart Stimulation by Time-Varying Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masuhiro; Andoh, Tomio; Goto, Tsuneaki; Hosono, Akihiko; Kawakami, Tadashi; Okumura, Fukuichiro; Takenaka, Toshifumi; Yamamoto, Isao

    1992-07-01

    A strong magnetic stimulator adopted for cardiac muscle was constructed with the stored energy of 50 kJ. Pulsed magnetic fields were applied to dog hearts with normal activity from outside of the body. The magnetic stimulus triggered on the T wave of the electrocardiograph caused arrhythmias in the first and second beats after the stimulus. It has been confirmed that this magnetic effect is due to a direct stimulation of cardiac muscle, not to an indirect stimulation on the vagus nerve. The threshold strength was determined for different pulse durations. The obtained strength-duration relationship is comparable to that for the electric stimulation of the dog heart.

  19. A Low Power Micro Deep Brain Stimulation Device for Murine Preclinical Research

    PubMed Central

    Abulseoud, Osama A.; Tye, Susannah J.; Hosain, Md Kamal; Berk, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation has emerged as an effective medical procedure that has therapeutic efficacy in a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Preclinical research involving laboratory animals is being conducted to study the principles, mechanisms, and therapeutic effects of deep brain stimulation. A bottleneck is, however, the lack of deep brain stimulation devices that enable long term brain stimulation in freely moving laboratory animals. Most of the existing devices employ complex circuitry, and are thus bulky. These devices are usually connected to the electrode that is implanted into the animal brain using long fixed wires. In long term behavioral trials, however, laboratory animals often need to continuously receive brain stimulation for days without interruption, which is difficult with existing technology. This paper presents a low power and lightweight portable microdeep brain stimulation device for laboratory animals. Three different configurations of the device are presented as follows: 1) single piece head mountable; 2) single piece back mountable; and 3) two piece back mountable. The device can be easily carried by the animal during the course of a clinical trial, and that it can produce non-stop stimulation current pulses of desired characteristics for over 12 days on a single battery. It employs passive charge balancing to minimize undesirable effects on the target tissue. The results of bench, in-vitro, and in-vivo tests to evaluate the performance of the device are presented. PMID:27170861

  20. Electric field stimulated growth of Zn whiskers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niraula, D.; McCulloch, J.; Warrell, G. R.; Irving, R.; Karpov, V. G.; Shvydka, Diana

    2016-07-01

    We have investigated the impact of strong (˜104 V/cm) electric fields on the development of Zn whiskers. The original samples, with considerable whisker infestation were cut from Zn-coated steel floors and then exposed to electric fields stresses for 10-20 hours at room temperature. We used various electric field sources, from charges accumulated in samples irradiated by: (1) the electron beam of a scanning electron microscope (SEM), (2) the electron beam of a medical linear accelerator, and (3) the ion beam of a linear accelerator; we also used (4) the electric field produced by a Van der Graaf generator. In all cases, the exposed samples exhibited a considerable (tens of percent) increase in whiskers concentration compared to the control sample. The acceleration factor defined as the ratio of the measured whisker growth rate over that in zero field, was estimated to approach several hundred. The statistics of lengths of e-beam induced whiskers was found to follow the log-normal distribution known previously for metal whiskers. The observed accelerated whisker growth is attributed to electrostatic effects. These results offer promise for establishing whisker-related accelerated life testing protocols.

  1. An electric stimulation system for electrokinetic particle manipulation in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lopez-de la Fuente, M S; Moncada-Hernandez, H; Perez-Gonzalez, V H; Lapizco-Encinas, B H; Martinez-Chapa, S O

    2013-03-01

    Microfluidic devices have grown significantly in the number of applications. Microfabrication techniques have evolved considerably; however, electric stimulation systems for microdevices have not advanced at the same pace. Electric stimulation of micro-fluidic devices is an important element in particle manipulation research. A flexible stimulation instrument is desired to perform configurable, repeatable, automated, and reliable experiments by allowing users to select the stimulation parameters. The instrument presented here is a configurable and programmable stimulation system for electrokinetic-driven microfluidic devices; it consists of a processor, a memory system, and a user interface to deliver several types of waveforms and stimulation patterns. It has been designed to be a flexible, highly configurable, low power instrument capable of delivering sine, triangle, and sawtooth waveforms with one single frequency or two superimposed frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 40 kHz, and an output voltage of up to 30 Vpp. A specific stimulation pattern can be delivered over a single time period or as a sequence of different signals for different time periods. This stimulation system can be applied as a research tool where manipulation of particles suspended in liquid media is involved, such as biology, medicine, environment, embryology, and genetics. This system has the potential to lead to new schemes for laboratory procedures by allowing application specific and user defined electric stimulation. The development of this device is a step towards portable and programmable instrumentation for electric stimulation on electrokinetic-based microfluidic devices, which are meant to be integrated with lab-on-a-chip devices.

  2. Visions on the future of medical devices in spinal cord stimulation: what medical device is needed?

    PubMed

    De Ridder, Dirk; Vanneste, Sven

    2016-01-01

    Recently burst stimulation and 10 kHz stimulation have been developed as novel stimulation designs. Both appear to be superior to classical tonic stimulation in the amount of responders and the amount of pain suppression and have as an extra advantage that they are paresthesia-free. This evolution is very important as it shifts the focus of research from better targeting by developing new lead configurations to better communication with the nervous system. It can be envisioned that this is only the start of a new trend in spinal cord, brain, and peripheral nerve stimulation and that more new stimulation designs will be developed in the near future such as pseudorandom burst stimulation, pleasure stimulation, noise stimulation and reconditioning stimulation. This evolution mandates a new approach in the development of internal pulse generators, and the most obvious approach is to develop an upgradable stimulator, on which new stimulation designs can be downloaded, analogous to the apps people download on their smartphones. This will create a shift from hardware driven products to software driven stimulators.

  3. Target coverage and selectivity in field steering brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Cubo, Ruben; Åstrom, Mattias; Medvedev, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment in Parkinson's Disease. The target area is defined based on the state and brain anatomy of the patient. The stimulation delivered via state-of-the-art DBS leads that are currently in clinical use is difficult to individualize to the patient particularities. Furthermore, the electric field generated by such a lead has a limited selectivity, resulting in stimulation of areas adjacent to the target and thus causing undesirable side effects. The goal of this study is, using actual clinical data, to compare in silico the stimulation performance of a symmetrical generic lead to a more versatile and adaptable one allowing, in particular, for asymmetric stimulation. The fraction of the volume of activated tissue in the target area and the fraction of the stimulation field that spreads beyond it are computed for a clinical data set of patients in order to quantify the lead performance. The obtained results suggest that using more versatile DBS leads might reduce the stimulation area beyond the target and thus lessen side effects for the same achieved therapeutical effect.

  4. Gastric Electrical Stimulation and Sacral Electrical Stimulation: A Long-Term Follow-Up Study of Dual-Device Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Anubhav; Francis, Sean Lamar; Deveneau, Nicolette Elizabeth; Jain, Shaily; Abrasley, Christopher; McNeese, Jason Trippe; Kothari, Shivangi T.; Lahr, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    Aims The objective of this study was to investigate sacral electrical stimulation (SES) and gastric electrical stimulation (GES) by comparing upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) symptoms and quality of life, before treatment and in the long term after treatment. We hypothesized that dual-device treatment would greatly improve upper and lower gastrointestinal and genitourinary symptoms, as well as quality of life. Methods Fifty-four patients who underwent dual-device treatment (GES and SES) were enrolled in this study. Patients who had surpassed 24 months since the second-device insertion were included. Patients were evaluated before and after both devices were implanted and given a symptom questionnaire regarding their upper GI, lower GI, and GU symptoms and their quality of life. Results With combined treatment, a statistically significant improvement was seen in upper GI, lower GI, and GU symptoms and quality of life. However, fecal incontinence and fecal urgency improvements did not reach statistical significance, likely due to the small sample size. Conclusion The implantation of two stimulators appears to be safe and effective to improve patients’ quality of life for those with upper GI symptoms, bowel problems, and bladder dysfunction. PMID:26280085

  5. Analysis of electric field stimulation of single cardiac muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tung, L; Borderies, J R

    1992-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of cardiac cells by imposed extracellular electric fields results in a transmembrane potential which is highly nonuniform, with one end of the cell depolarized and the other end hyperpolarized along the field direction. To date, the implications of the close proximity of oppositely polarized membranes on excitability have not been explored. In this work we compare the biophysical basis for field stimulation of cells at rest with that for intracellular current injection, using three Luo-Rudy type membrane patches coupled together as a lumped model to represent the cell membrane. Our model shows that cell excitation is a function of the temporal and spatial distribution of ionic currents and transmembrane potential. The extracellular and intracellular forms of stimulation were compared in greater detail for monophasic and symmetric biphasic rectangular pulses, with duration ranging from 0.5 to 10 ms. Strength-duration curves derived for field stimulation show that over a wide range of pulse durations, biphasic waveforms can recruit and activate membrane patches about as effectively as can monophasic waveforms having the same total pulse duration. We find that excitation with biphasic stimulation results from a synergistic, temporal summation of inward currents through the sodium channel in membrane patches at opposite ends of the cell. Furthermore, with both waveform types, a net inward current through the inwardly rectifying potassium channel contributes to initial membrane depolarization. In contrast, models of stimulation by intracellular current injection do not account for the nonuniformity of transmembrane potential and produce substantially different (even contradictory) results for the case of stimulation from rest. PMID:1420884

  6. Do we need to establish guidelines for patients with neuromodulation implantable devices, including spinal cord stimulators undergoing nonspinal surgeries?

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramsis F.; Tverdohleb, Tatiana; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation is currently approved to treat chronic intractable pain of the trunk and limbs. However, such implantable electronic devices are vulnerable to external electrical currents and magnetic fields. Within the hospitals and modern operating rooms (ORs), there is an abundance of electrical devices and other types of equipment that could interfere with such devices. Despite the increasing number of patients with neuromodulation implantable devices, there are no written guidelines available or consensus of cautions for such patients undergoing unrelated surgery. Case Descriptions: A 60-year-old female with a permanent St. Jude's spinal cord stimulator (SCS) presented for open total abdominal hysterectomy. Both the anesthesia and gynecology staffs were aware of the device presence, but were unaware of any precautions regarding intraoperative management. The device was found to be nonmagnetic resonance imaging compatible, and bipolar cautery was used instead of monopolar cautery. A 59-year-old female with a 9-year-old permanent Medtronic SCS, presented for right total hip arthroplasty. The device was switched off prior to entering the OR, bipolar cautery was used, and grounding pads were placed away from her battery site. In each case, the manufacturer's representative was contacted preoperative. Both surgeries proceeded uneventfully. Conclusions: The Food and Drug Administration safety information manual warns about the use of diathermy, concomitant implanted stimulation devices, lithotripsy, external defibrillation, radiation therapy, ultrasonic scanning, and high-output ultrasound, all of which can lead to permanent implant damage if not turned off prior to undertaking procedures. Lack of uniform guidelines makes intraoperative management, as well as remote anesthesia care of patients with previously implanted SCSs unsafe. PMID:26958424

  7. RF rectifiers for EM power harvesting in a Deep Brain Stimulating device.

    PubMed

    Hosain, Md Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah; Kaynak, Akif; Berk, Michael

    2015-03-01

    A passive deep brain stimulation (DBS) device can be equipped with a rectenna, consisting of an antenna and a rectifier, to harvest energy from electromagnetic fields for its operation. This paper presents optimization of radio frequency rectifier circuits for wireless energy harvesting in a passive head-mountable DBS device. The aim is to achieve a compact size, high conversion efficiency, and high output voltage rectifier. Four different rectifiers based on the Delon doubler, Greinacher voltage tripler, Delon voltage quadrupler, and 2-stage charge pumped architectures are designed, simulated, fabricated, and evaluated. The design and simulation are conducted using Agilent Genesys at operating frequency of 915 MHz. A dielectric substrate of FR-4 with thickness of 1.6 mm, and surface mount devices (SMD) components are used to fabricate the designed rectifiers. The performance of the fabricated rectifiers is evaluated using a 915 MHz radio frequency (RF) energy source. The maximum measured conversion efficiency of the Delon doubler, Greinacher tripler, Delon quadrupler, and 2-stage charge pumped rectifiers are 78, 75, 73, and 76 % at -5 dBm input power and for load resistances of 5-15 kΩ. The conversion efficiency of the rectifiers decreases significantly with the increase in the input power level. The Delon doubler rectifier provides the highest efficiency at both -5 and 5 dBm input power levels, whereas the Delon quadrupler rectifier gives the lowest efficiency for the same inputs. By considering both efficiency and DC output voltage, the charge pump rectifier outperforms the other three rectifiers. Accordingly, the optimised 2-stage charge pumped rectifier is used together with an antenna to harvest energy in our DBS device.

  8. MRI magnetic field stimulates rotational sensors of the brain.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Dale C; Marcelli, Vincenzo; Gillen, Joseph S; Carey, John P; Della Santina, Charles C; Zee, David S

    2011-10-11

    Vertigo in and around magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machines has been noted for years [1, 2]. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain these sensations [3, 4], yet without direct, objective measures, the cause is unknown. We found that all of our healthy human subjects developed a robust nystagmus while simply lying in the static magnetic field of an MRI machine. Patients lacking labyrinthine function did not. We use the pattern of eye movements as a measure of vestibular stimulation to show that the stimulation is static (continuous, proportional to static magnetic field strength, requiring neither head movement nor dynamic change in magnetic field strength) and directional (sensitive to magnetic field polarity and head orientation). Our calculations and geometric model suggest that magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS) derives from a Lorentz force resulting from interaction between the magnetic field and naturally occurring ionic currents in the labyrinthine endolymph fluid. This force pushes on the semicircular canal cupula, leading to nystagmus. We emphasize that the unique, dual role of endolymph in the delivery of both ionic current and fluid pressure, coupled with the cupula's function as a pressure sensor, makes magnetic-field-induced nystagmus and vertigo possible. Such effects could confound functional MRI studies of brain behavior, including resting-state brain activity.

  9. MRI Magnetic Field Stimulates Rotational Sensors of the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Dale C.; Marcelli, Vincenzo; Gillen, Joseph S.; Carey, John P.; Santina, Charles C. Della; Zee, David S.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Vertigo in and around MRI machines has been noted for years [1, 2]. Several mechanisms have been suggested to explain these sensations [3, 4], yet without direct, objective measures, the cause is unknown. We found that all healthy human subjects lying in the static magnetic field of an MRI machine develop a robust nystagmus. Patients lacking labyrinthine function do not. Here we use the pattern of eye movements as a measure of vestibular stimulation to show that the stimulation is static (continuous, proportional to static magnetic field strength, requiring neither head movement nor dynamic change in magnetic field strength) and directional (sensitive to magnetic field polarity and head orientation). Our calculations and geometric model suggest that magnetic vestibular stimulation derives from a Lorentz force due to interaction between the magnetic field and naturally-occurring ionic currents in the labyrinthine endolymph fluid. This force pushes on the semicircular canal cupula, leading to nystagmus. We emphasize that the unique, dual role of endolymph in the delivery of both ionic current and fluid pressure, coupled with the cupula’s function as a pressure sensor, makes magnetic field induced nystagmus and vertigo possible. Such effects could confound fMRI studies of brain behavior, including resting-state brain activity. PMID:21945276

  10. Geothermal well stimulation - program summary and the Beowawe field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Verity, R.V.

    1983-12-01

    Republic Geothermal, Inc. and its subcontractors have planned and executed laboratory studies and eight well stimulation field experiments under the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP). The program, begun in February 1979, has concentrated on extending petroleum industry stimulation technology for use by the geothermal industry. The most recent experiment was in a naturally fractured Chevron well at Beowawe and involved an acid stimulation of a damaged interval which yielded a 2.3-fold increase in injectivity. Overall results to date have shown that stimulation is viable where adequate reservoirs are penetrated by wells encountering formation damage or locally tight formations. However, wells in marginal naturally fractured reservoirs have not been saved by the types of well stimulation jobs performed thus far. A recent discovery is that many wells can possibly be made outstanding producers by widening and propping compliant natural fractures. Confirmation of this constitutes unfinished business of the GRWSP, adn offers one of the greatest potential opportunities for enhancing the economics of geothermal power production.

  11. Note: Automated optical focusing on encapsulated devices for scanning light stimulation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bitzer, L. A.; Benson, N. Schmechel, R.

    2014-08-15

    Recently, a scanning light stimulation system with an automated, adaptive focus correction during the measurement was introduced. Here, its application on encapsulated devices is discussed. This includes the changes an encapsulating optical medium introduces to the focusing process as well as to the subsequent light stimulation measurement. Further, the focusing method is modified to compensate for the influence of refraction and to maintain a minimum beam diameter on the sample surface.

  12. Determinants of the electric field during transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Paulus, Walter; Will, Susanne; Antunes, Andre; Thielscher, Axel

    2015-04-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) causes a complex spatial distribution of the electric current flow in the head which hampers the accurate localization of the stimulated brain areas. In this study we show how various anatomical features systematically shape the electric field distribution in the brain during tDCS. We constructed anatomically realistic finite element (FEM) models of two individual heads including conductivity anisotropy and different skull layers. We simulated a widely employed electrode montage to induce motor cortex plasticity and moved the stimulating electrode over the motor cortex in small steps to examine the resulting changes of the electric field distribution in the underlying cortex. We examined the effect of skull thickness and composition on the passing currents showing that thinner skull regions lead to higher electric field strengths. This effect is counteracted by a larger proportion of higher conducting spongy bone in thicker regions leading to a more homogenous current over the skull. Using a multiple regression model we could identify key factors that determine the field distribution to a significant extent, namely the thicknesses of the cerebrospinal fluid and the skull, the gyral depth and the distance to the anode and cathode. These factors account for up to 50% of the spatial variation of the electric field strength. Further, we demonstrate that individual anatomical factors can lead to stimulation "hotspots" which are partly resistant to electrode positioning. Our results give valuable novel insights in the biophysical foundation of tDCS and highlight the importance to account for individual anatomical factors when choosing an electrode montage.

  13. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouda, N. R.; Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M.

    2015-05-01

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/-20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG1) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG2) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  14. Methods of high current magnetic field generator for transcranial magnetic stimulation application

    SciTech Connect

    Bouda, N. R. Pritchard, J.; Weber, R. J.; Mina, M.

    2015-05-07

    This paper describes the design procedures and underlying concepts of a novel High Current Magnetic Field Generator (HCMFG) with adjustable pulse width for transcranial magnetic stimulation applications. This is achieved by utilizing two different switching devices, the MOSFET and insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT). Results indicate that currents as high as ±1200 A can be generated with inputs of +/−20 V. Special attention to tradeoffs between field generators utilizing IGBT circuits (HCMFG{sub 1}) and MOSFET circuits (HCMFG{sub 2}) was considered. The theory of operation, design, experimental results, and electronic setup are presented and analyzed.

  15. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  16. Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  17. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  18. Low Field Squid MRI Devices, Components and Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I. (Inventor); Eom, Byeong H. (Inventor); Hahn, Inseob (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Low field SQUID MRI devices, components and methods are disclosed. They include a portable low field (SQUID)-based MRI instrument and a portable low field SQUID-based MRI system to be operated under a bed where a subject is adapted to be located. Also disclosed is a method of distributing wires on an image encoding coil system adapted to be used with an NMR or MRI device for analyzing a sample or subject and a second order superconducting gradiometer adapted to be used with a low field SQUID-based MRI device as a sensing component for an MRI signal related to a subject or sample.

  19. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  20. Collision-induced stimulated photon echo in magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reshetov, V. A.

    2015-12-01

    The action of the longitudinal magnetic field on the collision-induced stimulated photon echo formed on the transition with the angular momentum change {{J}a}=0\\to {{J}b}=1 is studied theoretically. It is shown that this action depends essentially on the sign of the difference in the orientation Γb(1) and alignment Γb(2) relaxation rates of the excited level b. If Γb(2)>Γb(1) , then the echo intensity in a weak magnetic field increases with the increase in the magnetic field strength, while in the alternative case Γb(2)<Γb(1) it decreases up to zero value. The formulae enabling the determination of the magnitude of the difference Γb(1)-Γb(2) from the experimental study of the oscillations of the echo intensity with the increase in the magnetic field strength are obtained.

  1. Recent progress in nanostructured next-generation field emission devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Gaurav; Lahiri, Indranil

    2014-08-01

    Field emission has been known to mankind for more than a century, and extensive research in this field for the last 40-50 years has led to development of exciting applications such as electron sources, miniature x-ray devices, display materials, etc. In the last decade, large-area field emitters were projected as an important material to revolutionize healthcare and medical devices, and space research. With the advent of nanotechnology and advancements related to carbon nanotubes, field emitters are demonstrating highly enhanced performance and novel applications. Next-generation emitters need ultra-high emission current density, high brightness, excellent stability and reproducible performance. Novel design considerations and application of new materials can lead to achievement of these capabilities. This article presents an overview of recent developments in this field and their effects on improved performance of field emitters. These advancements are demonstrated to hold great potential for application in next-generation field emission devices.

  2. Crossed-field divertor for a plasma device

    DOEpatents

    Kerst, Donald W.; Strait, Edward J.

    1981-01-01

    A divertor for removal of unwanted materials from the interior of a magnetic plasma confinement device includes the division of the wall of the device into segments insulated from each other in order to apply an electric field having a component perpendicular to the confining magnetic field. The resulting crossed-field drift causes electrically charged particles to be removed from the outer part of the confinement chamber to a pumping chamber. This method moves the particles quickly past the saddle point in the poloidal magnetic field where they would otherwise tend to stall, and provides external control over the rate of removal by controlling the magnitude of the electric field.

  3. Improved selectivity from a wavelength addressable device for wireless stimulation of neural tissue

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Elif Ç.; Freedman, David S.; Gökkavas, Mutlu; Özbay, Ekmel; Sahin, Mesut; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2014-01-01

    Electrical neural stimulation with micro electrodes is a promising technique for restoring lost functions in the central nervous system as a result of injury or disease. One of the problems related to current neural stimulators is the tissue response due to the connecting wires and the presence of a rigid electrode inside soft neural tissue. We have developed a novel, optically activated, microscale photovoltaic neurostimulator based on a custom layered compound semiconductor heterostructure that is both wireless and has a comparatively small volume (<0.01 mm3). Optical activation provides a wireless means of energy transfer to the neurostimulator, eliminating wires and the associated complications. This neurostimulator was shown to evoke action potentials and a functional motor response in the rat spinal cord. In this work, we extend our design to include wavelength selectivity and thus allowing independent activation of devices. As a proof of concept, we fabricated two different microscale devices with different spectral responsivities in the near-infrared region. We assessed the improved addressability of individual devices via wavelength selectivity as compared to spatial selectivity alone through on-bench optical measurements of the devices in combination with an in vivo light intensity profile in the rat cortex obtained in a previous study. We show that wavelength selectivity improves the individual addressability of the floating stimulators, thus increasing the number of devices that can be implanted in close proximity to each other. PMID:24600390

  4. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering under electric field stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capitaine, Erwan; Ould Moussa, Nawel; Louot, Christophe; Lefort, Claire; Pagnoux, Dominique; Duclère, Jean-René; Kaneyasu, Junya F.; Kano, Hideaki; Duponchel, Ludovic; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    We introduce an experiment using electro-CARS, an electro-optical method based on the combination of ultrabroadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS) spectroscopy and electric field stimulation. We demonstrate that this method can effectively discriminate the resonant CARS signal from the nonresonant background owing to a phenomenon of molecular orientation in the sample medium. Such molecular orientation is intrinsically related to the induction of an electric dipole moment by the applied static electric field. Evidence of the electro-CARS effect is obtained with a solution of n -alkanes (CnH2 n +2 , 15 ≤n ≤40 ), for which an enhancement of the CARS signal-to-noise ratio is achieved in the case of CH2 and CH3 symmetric/asymmetric stretching vibrations. Additionally, an electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation experiment is performed in order to corroborate the orientational organization of molecules due to the electric field excitation. Finally, we use a simple mathematical approach to compare the vibrational information extracted from electro-CARS measurements with spontaneous Raman data and to highlight the impact of electric stimulation on the vibrational signal.

  5. Transcranial static magnetic field stimulation of the human motor cortex.

    PubMed

    Oliviero, Antonio; Mordillo-Mateos, Laura; Arias, Pablo; Panyavin, Ivan; Foffani, Guglielmo; Aguilar, Juan

    2011-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate in healthy humans the possibility of a non-invasive modulation of motor cortex excitability by the application of static magnetic fields through the scalp. Static magnetic fields were obtained by using cylindrical NdFeB magnets. We performed four sets of experiments. In Experiment 1, we recorded motor potentials evoked by single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) of the motor cortex before and after 10 min of transcranial static magnetic field stimulation (tSMS) in conscious subjects. We observed an average reduction of motor cortex excitability of up to 25%, as revealed by TMS, which lasted for several minutes after the end of tSMS, and was dose dependent (intensity of the magnetic field) but not polarity dependent. In Experiment 2, we confirmed the reduction of motor cortex excitability induced by tSMS using a double-blind sham-controlled design. In Experiment 3, we investigated the duration of tSMS that was necessary to modulate motor cortex excitability. We found that 10 min of tSMS (compared to 1 min and 5 min) were necessary to induce significant effects. In Experiment 4, we used transcranial electric stimulation (TES) to establish that the tSMS-induced reduction of motor cortex excitability was not due to corticospinal axon and/or spinal excitability, but specifically involved intracortical networks. These results suggest that tSMS using small static magnets may be a promising tool to modulate cerebral excitability in a non-invasive, painless, and reversible way.

  6. Electromagnetic field-induced stimulation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Kristupaitis, D; Dibirdik, I; Vassilev, A; Mahajan, S; Kurosaki, T; Chu, A; Tuel-Ahlgren, L; Tuong, D; Pond, D; Luben, R; Uckun, F M

    1998-05-15

    Here we present evidence that exposure of DT40 lymphoma B-cells to low energy electromagnetic fields (EMF) results in activation of phospholipase C-gamma 2 (PLC-gamma2), leading to increased inositol phospholipid turnover. PLC-gamma2 activation in EMF-stimulated cells is mediated by stimulation of the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), a member of the Src-related TEC family of protein tyrosine kinases, which acts downstream of LYN kinase and upstream of PLC-gamma2. B-cells rendered BTK-deficient by targeted disruption of the btk gene did not show enhanced PLC-gamma2 activation in response to EMF exposure. Introduction of the wild-type (but not a kinase domain mutant) human btk gene into BTK-deficient B-cells restored their EMF responsiveness. Thus, BTK exerts a pivotal and mandatory function in initiation of EMF-induced signaling cascades in B-cells.

  7. Barriers to investigator-initiated deep brain stimulation and device research

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Donald; Okun, Michael S.; Booth, Joan; Machado, Andre G.

    2014-01-01

    The success of device-based research in the clinical neurosciences has overshadowed a critical and emerging problem in the biomedical research environment in the United States. Neuroprosthetic devices, such as deep brain stimulation (DBS), have been shown in humans to be promising technologies for scientific exploration of neural pathways and as powerful treatments. Large device companies have, over the past several decades, funded and developed major research programs. However, both the structure of clinical trial funding and the current regulation of device research threaten investigator-initiated efforts in neurologic disorders. The current atmosphere dissuades clinical investigators from pursuing formal and prospective research with novel devices or novel indications. We review our experience in conducting a federally funded, investigator-initiated, device-based clinical trial that utilized DBS for thalamic pain syndrome. We also explore barriers that clinical investigators face in conducting device-based clinical trials, particularly in early-stage studies or small disease populations. We discuss 5 specific areas for potential reform and integration: (1) alternative pathways for device approval; (2) eliminating right of reference requirements; (3) combining federal grant awards with regulatory approval; (4) consolidation of oversight for human subjects research; and (5) private insurance coverage for clinical trials. Careful reformulation of regulatory policy and funding mechanisms is critical for expanding investigator-initiated device research, which has great potential to benefit science, industry, and, most importantly, patients. PMID:24670888

  8. An implantable device for neuropsychiatric rehabilitation by chronic deep brain stimulation in freely moving rats

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenguang; Zhang, Fuqiang; Jia, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Successful practice of clinical deep brain stimulation (DBS) calls for basic research on the mechanisms and explorations of new indications in animals. In the article, a new implantable, single-channel, low-power miniature device is proposed, which may transmit pulses chronically into the brain nucleus of freely moving rats. The DBS system consists of an implantable pulse generator (IPG), a bipolar electrode, and an external programmer. The IPG circuit module is assembled as a 20-mm diameter circular board and fixed on a rat’s skull together with an electrode and battery. The rigid electrode may make its fabrication and implantation more easy. The external programmer is designed for bidirectional communication with the IPG by a telecontrol transceiver and adjusts stimulation parameters. A biological validation was performed in which the effects of electrical stimulation in brain nucleus accumbens were detected. The programmed parameters were accurate, implant steady, and power sufficient to allow stimulation for more than 3 months. The larger area of the electrode tip provided a moderate current or charge density and minimized the damage from electrochemistry and pyroelectricity. The rats implanted with the device showed a reduction in morphine-induced conditioned place preference after high-frequency stimulation. In conclusion, the DBS device is based on the criteria of simple technology, minimal invasion, low cost, small in size, light-weight, and wireless controlled. This shows that our DBS device is appropriate and can be used for preclinical studies, indicating its potential utility in the therapy and rehabilitation of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28121810

  9. Inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock from a transcutaneous muscle stimulation device therapy.

    PubMed

    Siu, Chung-Wah; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lau, Chu-Pak

    2005-06-01

    Inappropriate shock from implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) may result from external electromagnetic interference (EMI), especially for unipolar ventricle sensing. Previous case reports and small in-vitro safety study suggested that endocardial bipolar lead system may be immune from EMI resulting from transcutaneous electrical neuromuscle stimulation (TENS) therapy. This report presents an unusual case of inappropriate discharge in a patient with ICD of endocardial bipolar lead system, receiving TENS from a commercially available device.

  10. Evaluation of unintended electrical stimulation from MR gradient fields.

    PubMed

    Bassen, Howard I; Angelone, Leonardo M

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of patients with active implants (e.g. cardiac pacemakers and neurostimulators) to magnetic gradient fields (kHz range) during magnetic resonance imaging presents safety issues, such as unintended stimulation. Magnetically induced electric fields generate currents along the implant's lead, especially high at the distal tip. Experimental evaluation of the induced electric field was previously conducted. This study aimed to perform the same evaluation by means of computational methods, using two commercially available software packages (SemcadX and COMSOL Multiphysics). Electric field values were analyzed 1-3 mm from the distal tip. The effect of the two-electrode experimental probe was evaluated. The results were compared with previously published experimental data with reasonable agreement at locations more than 2-3 mm from the distal tip of the lead. The results were affected by the computational mesh size, with up to one order of magnitude difference for SEMCAD (resolution of 0.1 mm) compared to COMSOL (resolution of 0.5 mm). The results were also affected by the dimensions of the two-electrode probe, suggesting careful selection of the probe dimensions during experimental studies.

  11. A high-voltage cardiac stimulator for field shocks of a whole heart in a bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashburn, David N.; Hinkson, Stephen J.; Woods, Marcella C.; Gilligan, Jonathan M.; Holcomb, Mark R.; Wikswo, John P.

    2007-10-01

    Defibrillators are a critical tool for treating heart disease; however, the mechanisms by which they halt fibrillation are still not fully understood and are the subject of ongoing research. Clinical defibrillators do not provide the precise control of shock timing, duration, and voltage or other features needed for detailed scientific inquiry, and there are few, if any, commercially available units designed for research applications. For this reason, we have developed a high-voltage, programmable, capacitive-discharge stimulator optimized to deliver defibrillation shocks with precise timing and voltage control to an isolated animal heart, either in air or in a bath. This stimulator is capable of delivering voltages of up to 500V and energies of nearly 100J with timing accuracy of a few microseconds and with rise and fall times of 5μs or less and is controlled only by two external timing pulses and a control computer that sets the stimulation parameters via a LABVIEW interface. Most importantly, the stimulator has circuits to protect the high-voltage circuitry and the operator from programming and input-output errors. This device has been tested and used successfully in field shock experiments on rabbit hearts as well as other protocols requiring high voltage.

  12. Intractable sacroiliac joint pain treated with peripheral nerve field stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabortty, Shushovan; Kumar, Sanjeev; Gupta, Deepak; Rudraraju, Sruthi

    2016-01-01

    As many as 62% low back pain patients can have sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain. There is limited (to poor) evidence in regards to long-term pain relief with therapeutic intra-articular injections and/or conventional (heat or pulsed) radiofrequency ablations (RFAs) for SIJ pain. We report our pain-clinic experience with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNFS) for two patients of intractable SIJ pain. They had reported absence of long-term pain relief (pain relief >50% for at least 2 weeks postinjection and at least 3 months post-RFA) with SIJ injections and SIJ RFAs. Two parallel permanent 8-contact subcutaneous stimulating leads were implanted under the skin overlying their painful SIJ. Adequate stimulation in the entire painful area was confirmed. For implantable pulse generator placement, a separate subcutaneous pocket was made in the upper buttock below the iliac crest level ipsilaterally. During the pain-clinic follow-up period, the patients had reduced their pain medications requirements by half with an additional report of more than 50% improvement in their functional status. The first patient passed away 2 years after the PNFS procedure due to medical causes unrelated to his chronic pain. The second patient has been comfortable with PNFS-induced analgesic regimen during her pain-clinic follow-up during last 5 years. In summary, PNFS can be an effective last resort option for SIJ pain wherein conventional interventional pain techniques have failed, and analgesic medication requirements are escalating or causing unwarranted side-effects. PMID:27625495

  13. Magnetic field inhibits isolated lymphocytes' proliferative response to mitogen stimulation.

    PubMed

    Roman, Adam; Zyss, Tomasz; Nalepa, Irena

    2005-04-01

    We aimed to find out how the exposure of isolated lymphocytes to a pulsed magnetic field (MF) affected their in vitro proliferative response to mitogenic stimulation. Cells were exposed to MF of various intensities (0.3, 0.6, and 1.2 T) at a constant frequency of 30 Hz, for a period of 60, 180, and 330 s. Then, the proliferative response of splenocytes was induced by optimal concentrations of concanavalin A (Con A; mitogenic toward T cells), bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; mitogenic toward B cells), or pokeweed mitogen (PWM; mitogenic toward both populations). We found that the exposure of lymphocytes to the MF profoundly inhibited their proliferative response to mitogens. The suppressive action of the MF on B and T cell proliferation was intensified when a cooperative response of those two lymphocyte populations was simultaneously induced by PWM. The inhibitory effect of MF depended on the exposure time and MF intensity. Prolonged exposure and/or a stronger intensity of the MF weakened its inhibitory influence on the response of lymphocyte to mitogenic stimulation. The data show that an exposure to MF may influence the activity of lymphocytes in their response to mitogenic stimuli.

  14. Flexible and extendible neural stimulation/recording device based on cooperative multi-chip CMOS LSI architecture.

    PubMed

    Tokuda, Takashi; Pan, Yi-Li; Uehara, Akihiro; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Ohta, Jun; Nunoshita, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    An LSI-based cooperative multi-chip neural stimulation/recording device is proposed and fabricated. The proposed multi-chip device consists of small (600 microm x 600 microm in the present design) intelligent neural stimulation/recording chips (unit chip). The unit chip has a neural stimulation/recording electrode array and individual control circuit. It can work with other unit chips cooperatively. One can configure any number of the unit chips as the multi-chip neural stimulation/recording device. Compared to conventional single-chip architecture, the proposed multi-chip architecture has advantages in thinness, mechanical strength and flexibility, and extendibility. That makes the multi-chip neural stimulation/ recording device more suitable for in vivo applications than conventional single-chip devices. Packaging technology for cooperative multi-chip device is also discussed. We developed a thin, flexible packaging technique for the multi-chip neural stimulation/recording device and LSI-compatible Pt/Au stacked biocompatible bump electrode.

  15. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research.

  16. Quantitative Study of Cell Invasion Process under Extracellular Stimulation of Cytokine in a Microfluidic Device.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Tseng, Hsueh-Peng; Lee, Chia-Yi; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-05-06

    Cell invasion is the first step of cancer metastasis that is the primary cause of death for cancer patients and defined as cell movement through extracellular matrix (ECM). Investigation of the correlation between cell invasive and extracellular stimulation is critical for the inhabitation of metastatic dissemination. Conventional cell invasion assay is based on Boyden chamber assay, which has a number of limitations. In this work, a microfluidic device incorporating with impedance measurement technique was developed for quantitative investigation of cell invasion process. The device consisted of 2 reservoirs connecting with a microchannel filled with hydrogel. Malignant cells invaded along the microchannel and impedance measurement was concurrently conducted by measuring across electrodes located at the bottom of the microchannel. Therefore, cell invasion process could be monitored in real-time and non-invasive manner. Also, cell invasion rate was then calculated to study the correlation between cell invasion and extracellular stimulation, i.e., IL-6 cytokine. Results showed that cell invasion rate was directly proportional to the IL-6 concentration. The microfluidic device provides a reliable and convenient platform for cell-based assays to facilitate more quantitative assessments in cancer research.

  17. Understanding the role of stimulation in reflexology: development and testing of a robotic device.

    PubMed

    Flynn, L L; Bush, T R; Sikorskii, A; Mukherjee, R; Wyatt, G

    2011-09-01

    Reflexology is a common choice of women with breast cancer as supportive care during treatment. It involves stimulation of specific locations of the feet called reflexes using a specialised walking motion with the thumb of the reflexologist. Reflexology has shown potential for the successful management of cancer and treatment-related symptoms and improvement in physical functioning; however to date, the mechanism of action for these improvements is unknown. One confounder to the study of reflexology is the 'human factor'. To study the effects of the stimulation of the reflexes independent of the 'human factor', there is a need for an alternative method for the delivery of reflexology. The objective of this work was to design and create a robotic reflexology device that would deliver a breast cancer-specific reflexology protocol to the feet of patients. A prototype robotic reflexology device was developed and tested for feasibility, safety and acceptability with breast cancer survivors (n= 13), and preliminary efficacy in symptom management and enhanced functional status with a sample of women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer (n= 13). Safety, feasibility and acceptability were established, and significant improvements from pre- to post-device-delivered reflexology were seen in symptom severity among women on chemotherapy.

  18. Digital field mapping for stimulating Secondary School students in the recognition of geological features and landforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Marco; Magagna, Alessandra; Ferrero, Elena; Perrone, Gianluigi

    2015-04-01

    Digital field mapping has certainly provided geoscientists with the opportunity to map and gather data in the field directly using digital tools and software rather than using paper maps, notebooks and analogue devices and then subsequently transferring the data to a digital format for subsequent analysis. But, the same opportunity has to be recognized for Geoscience education, as well as for stimulating and helping students in the recognition of landforms and interpretation of the geological and geomorphological components of a landscape. More, an early exposure to mapping during school and prior to university can optimise the ability to "read" and identify uncertainty in 3d models. During 2014, about 200 Secondary School students (aged 12-15) of the Piedmont region (NW Italy) participated in a research program involving the use of mobile devices (smartphone and tablet) in the field. Students, divided in groups, used the application Trimble Outdoors Navigators for tracking a geological trail in the Sangone Valley and for taking georeferenced pictures and notes. Back to school, students downloaded the digital data in a .kml file for the visualization on Google Earth. This allowed them: to compare the hand tracked trail on a paper map with the digital trail, and to discuss about the functioning and the precision of the tools; to overlap a digital/semitransparent version of the 2D paper map (a Regional Technical Map) used during the field trip on the 2.5D landscape of Google Earth, as to help them in the interpretation of conventional symbols such as contour lines; to perceive the landforms seen during the field trip as a part of a more complex Pleistocene glacial landscape; to understand the classical and innovative contributions from different geoscientific disciplines to the generation of a 3D structural geological model of the Rivoli-Avigliana Morainic Amphitheatre. In 2013 and 2014, some other pilot projects have been carried out in different areas of the

  19. Contactless remote induction of shear waves in soft tissues using a transcranial magnetic stimulation device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasland-Mongrain, Pol; Miller-Jolicoeur, Erika; Tang, An; Catheline, Stefan; Cloutier, Guy

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the first observation of shear waves induced remotely within soft tissues. It was performed through the combination of a transcranial magnetic stimulation device and a permanent magnet. A physical model based on Maxwell and Navier equations was developed. Experiments were performed on a cryogel phantom and a chicken breast sample. Using an ultrafast ultrasound scanner, shear waves of respective amplitudes of 5 and 0.5 μm were observed. Experimental and numerical results were in good agreement. This study constitutes the framework of an alternative shear wave elastography method.

  20. Note: Design of a novel rotating magnetic field device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godínez, F. A.; Chávez, O.; Zenit, R.

    2012-06-01

    A novel device to produce a rotating magnetic field was designed, constructed, and tested. The system consists of a Helmholtz coil pair which is mechanically coupled to a dc electric motor whose angular velocity is controlled. The coil pair generates a uniform magnetic field; the whole system is rotated maintaining the coils energized using brushes. The magnetic field strength is uniform (≈5.8 mT) for a workspace of about 100 mm along the rotation axis. The system remains free of undesirable high amplitude mechanical vibrations for rotation frequencies below 10 Hz. We verified the performance of the apparatus by conducting experiments with magnetic swimmers.

  1. The cell-stretcher: A novel device for the mechanical stimulation of cell populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seriani, S.; Del Favero, G.; Mahaffey, J.; Marko, D.; Gallina, P.; Long, C. S.; Mestroni, L.; Sbaizero, O.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation appears to be a critical modulator for many aspects of biology, both of living tissue and cells. The cell-stretcher, a novel device for the mechanical uniaxial stimulation of populations of cells, is described. The system is based on a variable stroke cam-lever-tappet mechanism which allows the delivery of cyclic stimuli with frequencies of up to 10 Hz and deformation between 1% and 20%. The kinematics is presented and a simulation of the dynamics of the system is shown, in order to compute the contact forces in the mechanism. The cells, following cultivation and preparation, are plated on an ad hoc polydimethylsiloxane membrane which is then loaded on the clamps of the cell-stretcher via force-adjustable magnetic couplings. In order to show the viability of the experimentation and biocompatibility of the cell-stretcher, a set of two in vitro tests were performed. Human epithelial carcinoma cell line A431 and Adult Mouse Ventricular Fibroblasts (AMVFs) from a dual reporter mouse were subject to 0.5 Hz, 24 h cyclic stretching at 15% strain, and to 48 h stimulation at 0.5 Hz and 15% strain, respectively. Visual analysis was performed on A431, showing definite morphological changes in the form of cellular extroflections in the direction of stimulation compared to an unstimulated control. A cytometric analysis was performed on the AMVF population. Results show a post-stimulation live-dead ratio deviance of less than 6% compared to control, which proves that the environment created by the cell-stretcher is suitable for in vitro experimentation.

  2. Nanomaterials and synergistic low-intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopedic implantable medical devices.

    PubMed

    Shirwaiker, Rohan A; Samberg, Meghan E; Cohen, Paul H; Wysk, Richard A; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A

    2013-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications because of their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilized to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopedic residual hardware devices (e.g., hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopedic implants is also discussed, the focus being on a low-intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The article concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these.

  3. Nanomaterials and synergistic low intensity direct current (LIDC) stimulation technology for orthopaedic implantable medical devices

    PubMed Central

    Samberg, Meghan E.; Cohen, Paul H.; Wysk, Richard A.; Monteiro-Riviere, Nancy A.

    2012-01-01

    Nanomaterials play a significant role in biomedical research and applications due to their unique biological, mechanical, and electrical properties. In recent years, they have been utilised to improve the functionality and reliability of a wide range of implantable medical devices ranging from well-established orthopaedic residual hardware devices (e.g. hip implants) that can repair defects in skeletal systems to emerging tissue engineering scaffolds that can repair or replace organ functions. This review summarizes the applications and efficacies of these nanomaterials that include synthetic or naturally occurring metals, polymers, ceramics, and composites in orthopaedic implants, the largest market segment of implantable medical devices. The importance of synergistic engineering techniques that can augment or enhance the performance of nanomaterial applications in orthopaedic implants is also discussed,, the focus being on a low intensity direct electric current (LIDC) stimulation technology to promote the long-term antibacterial efficacy of oligodynamic metal-based surfaces by ionization, while potentially accelerating tissue growth and osseointegration. While many nanomaterials have clearly demonstrated their ability to provide more effective implantable medical surfaces, further decisive investigations are necessary before they can translate into medically safe and commercially viable clinical applications. The paper concludes with a discussion about some of the critical impending issues with the application of nanomaterials-based technologies in implantable medical devices, and potential directions to address these. PMID:23335493

  4. The Safety of Using Body-Transmit MRI in Patients with Implanted Deep Brain Stimulation Devices

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, Joshua; Papadaki, Anastasia; White, Mark; Mancini, Laura; Yousry, Tarek; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Limousin, Patricia; Hariz, Marwan; Foltynie, Tom; Thornton, John

    2015-01-01

    Background Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established treatment for patients with movement disorders. Patients receiving chronic DBS provide a unique opportunity to explore the underlying mechanisms of DBS using functional MRI. It has been shown that the main safety concern with MRI in these patients is heating at the electrode tips – which can be minimised with strict adherence to a supervised acquisition protocol using a head-transmit/receive coil at 1.5T. MRI using the body-transmit coil with a multi-channel receive head coil has a number of potential advantages including an improved signal-to-noise ratio. Study outline We compared the safety of cranial MRI in an in vitro model of bilateral DBS using both head-transmit and body-transmit coils. We performed fibre-optic thermometry at a Medtronic ActivaPC device and Medtronic 3389 electrodes during turbo-spin echo (TSE) MRI using both coil arrangements at 1.5T and 3T, in addition to gradient-echo echo-planar fMRI exposure at 1.5T. Finally, we investigated the effect of transmit-coil choice on DBS stimulus delivery during MRI. Results Temperature increases were consistently largest at the electrode tips. Changing from head- to body-transmit coil significantly increased the electrode temperature elevation during TSE scans with scanner-reported head SAR 0.2W/kg from 0.45°C to 0.79°C (p<0.001) at 1.5T, and from 1.25°C to 1.44°C (p<0.001) at 3T. The position of the phantom relative to the body coil significantly impacted on electrode heating at 1.5T; however, the greatest heating observed in any position tested remained <1°C at this field strength. Conclusions We conclude that (1) with our specific hardware and SAR-limited protocol, body-transmit cranial MRI at 1.5T does not produce heating exceeding international guidelines, even in cases of poorly positioned patients, (2) cranial MRI at 3T can readily produce heating exceeding international guidelines, (3) patients with ActivaPC Medtronic systems are safe

  5. Electric Field Control of Ferromagnetism and Magnetic Devices Using Multiferroics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heron, John Thomas

    This dissertation presents a study of a heterostructure composed of room temperature magnetoelectric multiferroic BiFeO3 and ferromagnetic Co.90Fe.10, with specific interest in understanding the interfacial coupling mechanisms in this system and establishing the electric field control of a magnetization and spintronic devices. The field of spintronics has been plagued with the problem of a large energy dissipation as a consequence of the resistive losses that come during the writing of the magnetic state (i.e. reversing the magnetization direction). The primary aim of the work presented here is to investigate and understand a novel heterostructure and materials interface that can be demonstrated as a pathway to low energy spintronics. In this dissertation, I will address the specific aspects of multiferroicity, magnetoelectricity, and interface coupling that must be addressed in order to reverse a magnetization with an electric field. Furthermore, I will demonstrate the reversal of a magnetization with an electric field in single and multilayer magnetic devices. The primary advances made as a result of the work described herein are the use of epitaxial constraints to control the nanoscale domain structure of a multiferroic which is then correlated to the domain structure of the exchange coupled ferromagnet. Additionally, the magnetization direction of the ferromagnetic layer is controlled with only an applied electric field at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. Lastly, using this electric field control of ferromagnetism, the first demonstration of a magnetoelectric memory bit is presented.

  6. Influence of Biphasic Stimulation on Olfactory Ensheathing Cells for Neuroprosthetic Devices

    PubMed Central

    Hassarati, Rachelle T.; Foster, L. John R.; Green, Rylie A.

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) assisted regeneration of injured spinal cord has seen a rising interest in the use of these cells in tissue-engineered systems. Previously shown to support neural cell growth through glial scar tissue, OECs have the potential to assist neural network formation in living electrode systems to produce superior neuroprosthetic electrode surfaces. The following study sought to understand the influence of biphasic electrical stimulation (ES), inherent to bionic devices, on cell survival and function, with respect to conventional metallic and developmental conductive hydrogel (CH) coated electrodes. The CH utilized in this study was a biosynthetic hydrogel consisting of methacrylated poly(vinyl-alcohol) (PVA), heparin and gelatin through which poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was electropolymerised. OECs cultured on Pt and CH surfaces were subjected to biphasic ES. Image-based cytometry yielded little significant difference between the viability and cell cycle of OECs cultured on the stimulated and passive samples. The significantly lower voltages measured across the CH electrodes (147 ± 3 mV) compared to the Pt (317 ± 5 mV), had shown to influence a higher percentage of viable cells on CH (91–93%) compared to Pt (78–81%). To determine the functionality of these cells following electrical stimulation, OECs co-cultured with PC12 cells were found to support neural cell differentiation (an indirect measure of neurotrophic factor production) following ES. PMID:27757072

  7. Optimization of multifocal transcranial current stimulation for weighted cortical pattern targeting from realistic modeling of electric fields.

    PubMed

    Ruffini, Giulio; Fox, Michael D; Ripolles, Oscar; Miranda, Pedro Cavaleiro; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-04-01

    Recently, multifocal transcranial current stimulation (tCS) devices using several relatively small electrodes have been used to achieve more focal stimulation of specific cortical targets. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that many behavioral manifestations of neurological and psychiatric disease are not solely the result of abnormality in one isolated brain region but represent alterations in brain networks. In this paper we describe a method for optimizing the configuration of multifocal tCS for stimulation of brain networks, represented by spatially extended cortical targets. We show how, based on fMRI, PET, EEG or other data specifying a target map on the cortical surface for excitatory, inhibitory or neutral stimulation and a constraint on the maximal number of electrodes, a solution can be produced with the optimal currents and locations of the electrodes. The method described here relies on a fast calculation of multifocal tCS electric fields (including components normal and tangential to the cortical boundaries) using a five layer finite element model of a realistic head. Based on the hypothesis that the effects of current stimulation are to first order due to the interaction of electric fields with populations of elongated cortical neurons, it is argued that the optimization problem for tCS stimulation can be defined in terms of the component of the electric field normal to the cortical surface. Solutions are found using constrained least squares to optimize current intensities, while electrode number and their locations are selected using a genetic algorithm. For direct current tCS (tDCS) applications, we provide some examples of this technique using an available tCS system providing 8 small Ag/AgCl stimulation electrodes. We demonstrate the approach both for localized and spatially extended targets defined using rs-fcMRI and PET data, with clinical applications in stroke and depression. Finally, we extend these ideas to more general

  8. Optimization of multifocal transcranial current stimulation for weighted cortical pattern targeting from realistic modeling of electric fields

    PubMed Central

    Ruffini, Giulio; Fox, Michael D.; Ripolles, Oscar; Miranda, Pedro Cavaleiro; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Recently, multifocal transcranial current stimulation (tCS) devices using several relatively small electrodes have been used to achieve more focal stimulation of specific cortical targets. However, it is becoming increasingly recognized that many behavioral manifestations of neurological and psychiatric disease are not solely the result of abnormality in one isolated brain region but represent alterations in brain networks. In this paper we describe a method for optimizing the configuration of multifocal tCS for stimulation of brain networks, represented by spatially extended cortical targets. We show how, based on fMRI, PET, EEG or other data specifying a target map on the cortical surface for excitatory, inhibitory or neutral stimulation and a constraint of the maximal number of electrodes, a solution can be produced with the optimal currents and locations of the electrodes. The method described here relies on a fast calculation of multifocal tCS electric fields (including components normal and tangential to the cortical boundaries) using a five layer finite element model of a realistic head. Based on the hypothesis that the effects of current stimulation are to first order due to the interaction of electric fields with populations of elongated cortical neurons, it is argued that the optimization problem for tCS stimulation can be defined in terms of the component of the electric field normal to the cortical surface. Solutions are found using constrained least squares to optimize current intensities, while electrode number and their locations are selected using a genetic algorithm. For direct current tCS (tDCS) applications, we provide some examples of this technique using an available tCS system providing 8 small Ag/AgCl stimulation electrodes. We demonstrate the approach both for localized and spatially extended targets defined using rs-fcMRI and PET data, with clinical applications in stroke and depression. Finally, we extend these ideas to more general

  9. Receptive field characteristics under electrotactile stimulation of the fingertip.

    PubMed

    Warren, Jay P; Bobich, Lisa R; Santello, Marco; Sweeney, James D; Tillery, Stephen I Helms

    2008-08-01

    Skin on human fingertips has high concentrations of mechanoreceptors, which are used to provide fine resolution tactile representations of our environment. Here, we explore the ability to discriminate electrotactile stimulation at four sites on the fingertip. Electrical stimulation was delivered to arrays of electrodes centered on the index fingertip (volar aspect). Accuracy of discrimination was tested by examining electrode size, interelectrode spacing, and stimulation frequency as primary factors. Electrical stimulation was delivered at 2 mA with the pulse width modulated to be at (or above) perceptual threshold at 25 and 75 Hz and an average pulse width of 1.03 ms (+/- 0.70 ms standard deviation). Discrimination of the stimulated locations under this stimulation paradigm was significantly above chance level in all cases. Subjects' ability to discriminate stimulus location was not significantly influenced by electrode size or stimulation frequency when considered as separate factors. However, increased electrode spacing significantly increased subjects' ability to discriminate the location of the stimulated electrode. Further analysis revealed that errors were only significantly reduced along the medial-lateral direction with increasing interelectrode spacing. These results suggest that the electrotactile stimulus localization on the fingertip has some directional dependency, in addition to its dependency on interelectrode spacing. The neural mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are discussed in relation to electrical stimulus transduction characteristics of tactile mechanoreceptors.

  10. Process Orchestration With Modular Software Applications On Intelligent Field Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orfgen, Marius; Schmitt, Mathias

    2015-07-01

    The method developed by the DFKI-IFS for extending the functionality of intelligent field devices through the use of reloadable software applications (so-called Apps) is to be further augmented with a methodology and communication concept for process orchestration. The concept allows individual Apps from different manufacturers to decentrally share information. This way of communicating forms the basis for the dynamic orchestration of Apps to complete processes, in that it allows the actions of one App (e.g. detecting a component part with a sensor App) to trigger reactions in other Apps (e.g. triggering the processing of that component part). A holistic methodology and its implementation as a configuration tool allows one to model the information flow between Apps, as well as automatically introduce it into physical production hardware via available interfaces provided by the Field Device Middleware. Consequently, configuring industrial facilities is made simpler, resulting in shorter changeover and shutdown times.

  11. Acoustic and Cavitation Fields of Shock Wave Therapy Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Cleveland, Robin O.

    2006-05-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is considered a viable treatment modality for orthopedic ailments. Despite increasing clinical use, the mechanisms by which ESWT devices generate a therapeutic effect are not yet understood. The mechanistic differences in various devices and their efficacies might be dependent on their acoustic and cavitation outputs. We report acoustic and cavitation measurements of a number of different shock wave therapy devices. Two devices were electrohydraulic: one had a large reflector (HMT Ossatron) and the other was a hand-held source (HMT Evotron); the other device was a pneumatically driven device (EMS Swiss DolorClast Vet). Acoustic measurements were made using a fiber-optic probe hydrophone and a PVDF hydrophone. A dual passive cavitation detection system was used to monitor cavitation activity. Qualitative differences between these devices were also highlighted using a high-speed camera. We found that the Ossatron generated focused shock waves with a peak positive pressure around 40 MPa. The Evotron produced peak positive pressure around 20 MPa, however, its acoustic output appeared to be independent of the power setting of the device. The peak positive pressure from the DolorClast was about 5 MPa without a clear shock front. The DolorClast did not generate a focused acoustic field. Shadowgraph images show that the wave propagating from the DolorClast is planar and not focused in the vicinity of the hand-piece. All three devices produced measurable cavitation with a characteristic time (cavitation inception to bubble collapse) that varied between 95 and 209 μs for the Ossatron, between 59 and 283 μs for the Evotron, and between 195 and 431 μs for the DolorClast. The high-speed camera images show that the cavitation activity for the DolorClast is primarily restricted to the contact surface of the hand-piece. These data indicate that the devices studied here vary in acoustic and cavitation output, which may imply that the

  12. Electric Field Tunable Microwave and MM-wave Ferrite Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-30

    Electric Field Tunable Microwave and MM-wave Ferrite Devices (N00014-06-01-0167) Period of Performance: May 1, 2006-April 30, 2010 Principal...modes as a function of E. The coupling was strong and ranged from 1 to 30 MHz/(kV/cm). Ferrite - ferroelectric composites were used in microwave and...2005, focused on ME effects at microwave and millimeter wave frequencies in ferrite -ferroelectric composites. Studies were performed on basic

  13. Acoustic field of a ballistic shock wave therapy device.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Robin O; Chitnis, Parag V; McClure, Scott R

    2007-08-01

    Shock wave therapy (SWT) refers to the use of focused shock waves for treatment of musculoskeletal indications including plantar fascitis and dystrophic mineralization of tendons and joint capsules. Measurements were made of a SWT device that uses a ballistic source. The ballistic source consists of a handpiece within which compressed air (1-4 bar) is used to fire a projectile that strikes a metal applicator placed on the skin. The projectile generates stress waves in the applicator that transmit as pressure waves into tissue. The acoustic fields from two applicators were measured: one applicator was 15 mm in diameter and the surface slightly convex and the second was 12 mm in diameter the surface was concave. Measurements were made in a water tank and both applicators generated a similar pressure pulse consisting of a rectangular positive phase (4 micros duration and up to 8 MPa peak pressure) followed by a predominantly negative tail (duration of 20 micros and peak negative pressure of -6 MPa), with many oscillations. The rise times of the waveforms were around 1 micros and were shown to be too long for the pulses to be considered shock waves. Measurements of the field indicated that region of high pressure was restricted to the near-field (20-40 mm) of the source and was consistent with the Rayleigh distance. The measured acoustic field did not display focusing supported by calculations, which demonstrated that the radius of curvature of the concave surface was too large to effect a focusing gain. Other SWT devices use electrohydraulic, electromagnetic and piezoelectric sources that do result in focused shock waves. This difference in the acoustic fields means there is potentially a significant mechanistic difference between a ballistic source and other SWT devices.

  14. Field-Based Experiential Learning Using Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilley, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Technologies such as GPS and cellular triangulation allow location-specific content to be delivered by mobile devices, but no mechanism currently exists to associate content shared between locations in a way that guarantees the delivery of coherent and non-redundant information at every location. Thus, experiential learning via mobile devices must currently take place along a predefined path, as in the case of a self-guided tour. I developed a mobile-device-based system that allows a person to move through a space along a path of their choosing, while receiving information in a way that guarantees delivery of appropriate background and location-specific information without producing redundancy of content between locations. This is accomplished by coupling content to knowledge-concept tags that are noted as fulfilled when users take prescribed actions. Similarly, the presentation of the content is related to the fulfillment of these knowledge-concept tags through logic statements that control the presentation. Content delivery is triggered by mobile-device geolocation including GPS/cellular navigation, and sensing of low-power Bluetooth proximity beacons. Together, these features implement a process that guarantees a coherent, non-redundant educational experience throughout a space, regardless of a learner's chosen path. The app that runs on the mobile device works in tandem with a server-side database and file-serving system that can be configured through a web-based GUI, and so content creators can easily populate and configure content with the system. Once the database has been updated, the new content is immediately available to the mobile devices when they arrive at the location at which content is required. Such a system serves as a platform for the development of field-based geoscience educational experiences, in which students can organically learn about core concepts at particular locations while individually exploring a space.

  15. Modulating chemotaxis of lung cancer cells by using electric fields in a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Kao, Yu-Chiu; Hsieh, Meng-Hua; Liu, Chung-Chun; Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Liao, Wei-Yu; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Kuo, Po-Ling; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2014-03-01

    We employed direct-current electric fields (dcEFs) to modulate the chemotaxis of lung cancer cells in a microfluidic cell culture device that incorporates both stable concentration gradients and dcEFs. We found that the chemotaxis induced by a 0.5 μM/mm concentration gradient of epidermal growth factor can be nearly compensated by a 360 mV/mm dcEF. When the effect of chemical stimulation was balanced by the electrical drive, the cells migrated randomly, and the path lengths were largely reduced. We also demonstrated electrically modulated chemotaxis of two types of lung cancer cells with opposite directions of electrotaxis in this device.

  16. Magnetic field effect in organic films and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Bhoj Raj

    In this work, we focused on the magnetic field effect in organic films and devices, including organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells. We measured magnetic field effect (MFE) such as magnetoconductance (MC) and magneto-electroluminescence (MEL) in OLEDs based on several pi- conjugated polymers and small molecules for fields |B|<100 mT. We found that both MC(B) and MEL(B) responses in bipolar devices and MC(B) response in unipolar devices are composed of two B-regions: (i) an 'ultra-small' region at |B| < 1-2 mT, and (ii) a monotonic response region at |B| >˜2mT. Magnetic field effect (MFE) measured on three isotopes of Poly (dioctyloxy) phenylenevinylene (DOO-PPV) showed that both regular and ultra-small effects are isotope dependent. This indicates that MFE response in OLED is mainly due to the hyperfine interaction (HFI). We also performed spectroscopy of the MFE including magneto-photoinduced absorption (MPA) and magneto-photoluminescence (MPL) at steady state conditions in several systems. This includes pristine Poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyl-oxy)-1,4-phenylene-vinylene] (MEH-PPV) films, MEH-PPV films subjected to prolonged illumination, and MEH-PPV/[6,6]-Phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend, as well as annealed and pristine C60 thin films. For comparison, we also measured MC and MEL in organic diodes based on the same materials. By directly comparing the MPA and MPL responses in films to MC and MEL in organic diodes based on the same active layers, we are able to relate the MFE in organic diodes to the spin densities of the excitations formed in the device, regardless of whether they are formed by photon absorption or carrier injection from the electrodes. We also studied magneto-photocurrent (MPC) and power conversion efficiency (PCE) of a 'standard' Poly (3-hexylthiophene)/PCBM device at various Galvinoxyl radical wt%. We found that the MPC reduction with Galvinoxyl wt% follows the same trend as that of the

  17. Binocular device for displaying numerical information in field of view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, H. V. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An apparatus is described for superimposing numerical information on the field of view of binoculars. The invention has application in the flying of radio-controlled model airplanes. Information such as airspeed and angle of attack are sensed on a model airplane and transmitted back to earth where this information is changed into numerical form. Optical means are attached to the binoculars that a pilot is using to track the model air plane for displaying the numerical information in the field of view of the binoculars. The device includes means for focusing the numerical information at infinity whereby the user of the binoculars can see both the field of view and the numerical information without refocusing his eyes.

  18. Hazard zoning around electric substations of petrochemical industries by stimulation of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Monireh; Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Farhang Matin, Laleh; Khosroabadi, Hossein

    2015-05-01

    Electromagnetic fields in recent years have been discussed as one of the occupational hazards at workplaces. Hence, control and assessment of these physical factors is very important to protect and promote the health of employees. The present study was conducted to determine hazard zones based on assessment of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields at electric substations of a petrochemical complex in southern Iran, using the single-axis HI-3604 device. In measurement of electromagnetic fields by the single-axis HI-3604 device, the sensor screen should be oriented in a way to be perpendicular to the field lines. Therefore, in places where power lines are located in different directions, it is required to keep the device towards three axes of x, y, and z. For further precision, the measurements should be repeated along each of the three axes. In this research, magnetic field was measured, for the first time, in three axes of x, y, and z whose resultant value was considered as the value of magnetic field. Measurements were done based on IEEE std 644-1994. Further, the spatial changes of the magnetic field surrounding electric substations were stimulated using MATLAB software. The obtained results indicated that the maximum magnetic flux density was 49.90 μT recorded from boiler substation, while the minimum magnetic flux density of 0.02 μT was measured at the control room of the complex. As the stimulation results suggest, the spaces around incoming panels, transformers, and cables were recognized as hazardous zones of indoor electric substations. Considering the health effects of chronic exposure to magnetic fields, it would be possible to minimize exposure to these contaminants at workplaces by identification of risky zones and observation of protective considerations.

  19. Calculation of magnetic error fields in hybrid insertion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savoy, R.; Halbach, K.; Hassenzahl, W.; Hoyer, E.; Humphries, D.; Kincaid, B.

    1990-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory requires insertion devices with fields sufficiently accurate to take advantage of the small emittance of the ALS electron beam. To maintain the spectral performance of the synchrotron radiation and to limit steering effects on the electron beam these errors must be smaller than 0.25%. This paper develops a procedure for calculating the steering error due to misalignment of the easy axis of the permanent-magnet material. The procedure is based on a three-dimensional theory of the design of hybrid insertion devices developed by one of us. The acceptable tolerance for easy axis misalignment is found for a 5-cm-period undulator proposed for the ALS.

  20. Using silicon nanowire devices to detect adenosine triphosphate liberated from electrically stimulated HeLa cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, C C; Chen, Y-Z; Huang, Y-J; Sheu, J-T

    2011-01-15

    In this study, we used a biosensor chip featuring Abl tyrosine kinase-modified silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (SiNW-FETs) to detect adenosine triphosphate (ATP) liberated from HeLa cells that had been electrically stimulated. Cells that are cultured in high-ionic-strength media or buffer environments usually undermine the sensitivity and selectively of SiNW-FET-based sensors. Therefore, we first examined the performance of the biosensor chip incorporating the SiNW-FETs in both low- and high-ionic-strength buffer solutions. Next, we stimulated, using a sinusoidal wave (1.0 V, 50 Hz, 10 min), HeLa cells that had been cultured on a cell-culture chip featuring interdigitated electrodes. The extracellular ATP concentration increased by ca. 18.4-fold after electrical stimulation. Finally, we detected the presence of extracellular ATP after removing a small amount of buffer solution from the cell-cultured chip and introducing it into the biosensor chip.

  1. Fabrication of self-expandable NiTi thin film devices with micro-electrode array for bioelectric sensing, stimulation and ablation.

    PubMed

    Bechtold, Christoph; de Miranda, Rodrigo Lima; Chluba, Christoph; Quandt, Eckhard

    2016-12-01

    Self-expandable medical devices provide mechanical functionality at a specific location of the human body and are viable for minimal invasive procedures. Besides radiopaque markers and drug-eluting coatings, next generation self-expandable devices can be equipped with additional functionality, such as conductive and flexible electrodes, which enables chronic recording of bioelectrical signals, stimulating or ablating tissue. This promises new therapeutic options in various medical fields, among them in particular neuromodulation (e.g. deep brain stimulation), BioMEMS, radio frequency ablation, mapping or denervation. However, the fabrication of such multi-functional devices is challenging. For this study we have realized a 35 μm thick, superelastic NiTi thin film stent structure with six isolated electrodes on the outer circumference, each electrode connected to a contact pad at the end of the stent structure, using magnetron sputtering, UV lithography and wet chemical etching. Mechanical and electrical properties of the device during typical loading conditions, i.e. crimping, simulated pulsatile and electrochemical testing, were characterized and reveal promising results. For the fabrication of future multifunctional, minimal invasive medical devices, such as electroceuticals or other intelligent implants, NiTi thin film technology is therefore a versatile alternative to conventional fabrication routes.

  2. Design of a semi-implantable hearing device for direct acoustic cochlear stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Hans; Stieger, Christof; Perriard, Yves

    2011-02-01

    A new hearing therapy based on direct acoustic cochlear stimulation was developed for the treatment of severe to profound mixed hearing loss. The device efficacy was validated in an initial clinical trial with four patients. This semi-implantable investigational device consists of an externally worn audio processor, a percutaneous connector, and an implantable microactuator. The actuator is placed in the mastoid bone, right behind the external auditory canal. It generates vibrations that are directly coupled to the inner ear fluids and that, therefore, bypass the external and the middle ear. The system is able to provide an equivalent sound pressure level of 125 dB over the frequency range between 125 and 8000 Hz. The hermetically sealed actuator is designed to provide maximal output power by keeping its dimensions small enough to enable implantation. A network model is used to simulate the dynamic characteristics of the actuator to adjust its transfer function to the characteristics of the middle ear. The geometry of the different actuator components is optimized using finite-element modeling.

  3. System and method for evaluating wind flow fields using remote sensing devices

    DOEpatents

    Schroeder, John; Hirth, Brian; Guynes, Jerry

    2016-12-13

    The present invention provides a system and method for obtaining data to determine one or more characteristics of a wind field using a first remote sensing device and a second remote sensing device. Coordinated data is collected from the first and second remote sensing devices and analyzed to determine the one or more characteristics of the wind field. The first remote sensing device is positioned to have a portion of the wind field within a first scanning sector of the first remote sensing device. The second remote sensing device is positioned to have the portion of the wind field disposed within a second scanning sector of the second remote sensing device.

  4. Radiation hardening of MOS devices by boron. [for stabilizing gate threshold potential of field effect device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchenko, V. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for radiation hardening of MOS devices and specifically for stabilizing the gate threshold potential at room temperature of a radiation subjected MOS field-effect device with a semiconductor substrate, an insulating layer of oxide on the substrate, and a gate electrode disposed on the insulating layer. The boron is introduced within a layer of the oxide of about 100 A-300 A thickness immediately adjacent the semiconductor-insulator interface. The concentration of boron in the oxide layer is preferably maintained on the order of 10 to the 18th power atoms/cu cm. The technique serves to reduce and substantially annihilate radiation induced positive gate charge accumulations.

  5. In vitro stimulation with a strongly pulsed electromagnetic field on rat basophilic leukemia cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. W.; Shin, S. C.; Kim, S.; Chung, E. R.; Bang, J. H.; Cho, G. I.; Choi, S. D.; Park, Y. S.; Jang, T. S.; Yoo, Y. M.; Lee, S. S.; Hwang, D. G.

    2010-05-01

    In this study, the effects of pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation with a strong magnetic field on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL-2H3) cells were investigated to confirm the efficacy of the magnetic stimulator for biomedical applications. The maximum intensity of the magnetic field generated from the stimulation coil was 0.203 T, and the transition time was 126 μs. The oscillation time and frequency of the pulsed field were almost 0.1 ms and 8 kHz, respectively. The cell count as well as the mRNA expression and DNA sequence of the cytokine genes, such as the tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-4 (IL-4), of the stimulated RBL-2H3 cells were analyzed with a hemocytometer and via reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction to determine the physiological response under a strong pulse field. After 12 h stimulation, cell death was observed at an increasing scale with the increase in the stimulation time. On the other hand, the cells that were stimulated for 10 min almost doubled as the interval time between the stimulations was extended.

  6. Evaluation of EGFR and RTK Signaling in the Electrotaxis of Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells under Direct-Current Electric Field Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Hsieh-Fu; Huang, Ching-Wen; Chang, Hui-Fang; Chen, Jeremy J. W.; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Physiological electric field (EF) plays a pivotal role in tissue development and regeneration. In vitro, cells under direct-current electric field (dcEF) stimulation may demonstrate directional migration (electrotaxis) and long axis reorientation (electro-alignment). Although the biophysical models and biochemical signaling pathways behind cell electrotaxis have been investigated in numerous normal cells and cancer cells, the molecular signaling mechanisms in CL1 lung adenocarcinoma cells have not been identified. Two subclones of CL1 cells, the low invasive CL1-0 cells and the highly invasive CL 1-5 cells, were investigated in the present study. CL1-0 cells are non-electrotactic while the CL 1-5 cells are anodally electrotactic and have high expression level of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), in this study, we investigated the generally accepted hypothesis of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation in the two cell lines under dcEF stimulation. Erbitux, a therapeutic drug containing an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, was used to investigate the EGFR signaling in the electrotaxis of CL 1-5 cells. To investigate RTK phosphorylation and intracellular signaling in the CL1 cells, large amount of cellular proteins were collected in an airtight dcEF stimulation device, which has advantages of large culture area, uniform EF distribution, easy operation, easy cell collection, no contamination, and no medium evaporation. Commercial antibody arrays and Western blotting were used to study the phosphorylation profiles of major proteins in CL1 cells under dcEF stimulation. We found that electrotaxis of CL 1-5 cells is serum independent and EGFR independent. Moreover, the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein (rpS6) in dcEF-stimulated CL1 cells are different from that in EGF-stimulated cells. This result suggests that CL1 cells’ response to dcEF stimulation is not through EGFR-triggered pathways. The new large-scale dcEF stimulation device

  7. Evaluation of EGFR and RTK signaling in the electrotaxis of lung adenocarcinoma cells under direct-current electric field stimulation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsieh-Fu; Huang, Ching-Wen; Chang, Hui-Fang; Chen, Jeremy J W; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Cheng, Ji-Yen

    2013-01-01

    Physiological electric field (EF) plays a pivotal role in tissue development and regeneration. In vitro, cells under direct-current electric field (dcEF) stimulation may demonstrate directional migration (electrotaxis) and long axis reorientation (electro-alignment). Although the biophysical models and biochemical signaling pathways behind cell electrotaxis have been investigated in numerous normal cells and cancer cells, the molecular signaling mechanisms in CL1 lung adenocarcinoma cells have not been identified. Two subclones of CL1 cells, the low invasive CL1-0 cells and the highly invasive CL 1-5 cells, were investigated in the present study. CL1-0 cells are non-electrotactic while the CL 1-5 cells are anodally electrotactic and have high expression level of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), in this study, we investigated the generally accepted hypothesis of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation in the two cell lines under dcEF stimulation. Erbitux, a therapeutic drug containing an anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody, cetuximab, was used to investigate the EGFR signaling in the electrotaxis of CL 1-5 cells. To investigate RTK phosphorylation and intracellular signaling in the CL1 cells, large amount of cellular proteins were collected in an airtight dcEF stimulation device, which has advantages of large culture area, uniform EF distribution, easy operation, easy cell collection, no contamination, and no medium evaporation. Commercial antibody arrays and Western blotting were used to study the phosphorylation profiles of major proteins in CL1 cells under dcEF stimulation. We found that electrotaxis of CL 1-5 cells is serum independent and EGFR independent. Moreover, the phosphorylation of Akt and S6 ribosomal protein (rpS6) in dcEF-stimulated CL1 cells are different from that in EGF-stimulated cells. This result suggests that CL1 cells' response to dcEF stimulation is not through EGFR-triggered pathways. The new large-scale dcEF stimulation device developed

  8. Brain-computer interface controlled functional electrical stimulation device for foot drop due to stroke.

    PubMed

    Do, An H; Wang, Po T; King, Christine E; Schombs, Andrew; Cramer, Steven C; Nenadic, Zoran

    2012-01-01

    Gait impairment due to foot drop is a common outcome of stroke, and current physiotherapy provides only limited restoration of gait function. Gait function can also be aided by orthoses, but these devices may be cumbersome and their benefits disappear upon removal. Hence, new neuro-rehabilitative therapies are being sought to generate permanent improvements in motor function beyond those of conventional physiotherapies through positive neural plasticity processes. Here, the authors describe an electroencephalogram (EEG) based brain-computer interface (BCI) controlled functional electrical stimulation (FES) system that enabled a stroke subject with foot drop to re-establish foot dorsiflexion. To this end, a prediction model was generated from EEG data collected as the subject alternated between periods of idling and attempted foot dorsiflexion. This prediction model was then used to classify online EEG data into either "idling" or "dorsiflexion" states, and this information was subsequently used to control an FES device to elicit effective foot dorsiflexion. The performance of the system was assessed in online sessions, where the subject was prompted by a computer to alternate between periods of idling and dorsiflexion. The subject demonstrated purposeful operation of the BCI-FES system, with an average cross-correlation between instructional cues and BCI-FES response of 0.60 over 3 sessions. In addition, analysis of the prediction model indicated that non-classical brain areas were activated in the process, suggesting post-stroke cortical re-organization. In the future, these systems may be explored as a potential therapeutic tool that can help promote positive plasticity and neural repair in chronic stroke patients.

  9. Electromagnetic Field Modeling of Transcranial Electric and Magnetic Stimulation: Targeting, Individualization, and Safety of Convulsive and Subconvulsive Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Zhi-De

    neural stimulation strength and focality of ECT and MST. Across and within ECT studies, there is marked unexplained variability in seizure threshold and clinical outcomes. It is not known to what extent the age and sex effects on seizure threshold are mediated by interindividual variation in neural excitability and/or anatomy of the head. Addressing this question, we examine the effect on ECT and MST induced field characteristics of the variability in head diameter, scalp and skull thicknesses and conductivities, as well as brain volume, in a range of values that are representative of the patient population. Variations in the local tissue properties such as scalp and skull thickness and conductivity affect the existing ECT configurations more than MST. On the other hand, the existing MST coil configurations show greater sensitivity to head diameter variation compared to ECT. Due to the high focality of MST compared to ECT, the stimulated brain volume in MST is more sensitive to variation in tissue layer thicknesses. We further demonstrate how individualization of the stimulus pulse current amplitude, which is not presently done in ECT or MST, can be used as a means of compensating for interindividual anatomical variability, which could lead to better and more consistent clinical outcomes. Part III of the dissertation aims to systemically investigate, both computationally and experimentally, the safety of TMS and ECT in patients with a deep-brain stimulation system, and propose safety guidelines for the dual-device therapy. We showed that the induction of significant voltages in the subcutaneous leads in the scalp during TMS could result in unintended and potentially dangerous levels of electrical currents in the DBS electrode contacts. When applying ECT in patients with intracranial implants, we showed that there is an increase in the electric field strength in the brain due to conduction through the burr holes, especially when the burr holes are not fitted with

  10. Dual field effects in spinel ferrite field effect devices: electrostatic carrier doping and redox reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hidekazu

    2015-03-01

    Spinel ferrite is a good candidate as a tunable magnetic semiconductor with high TC. Here, we report the gate-induced conductance modulation of (Fe3-xZnx) O4 solid solution to demonstrate the dual contributions of volatile and non-volatile field effects arising from electronic carrier doping and redox reactions using field effect device structure with a ferroelectric Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 and an ionic liquid DEME-TFSI. In the Pb(Zr,Ti)O3/(Fe2.5Zn0.5) O4 FET, the gate voltage dependence of channel conductance on the (Fe,Zn)3O4 layer shows the typical hysteresis behavior reflecting the ferroelectric polarization, indicating the static carrier modulation . In contrast, in the DEME-TFSI/(Fe2.5Zn0.5) O4 FET, a large hysteresis observed in the drain current vs gate voltage characteristics is not accounted for solely by electrostatic doping, strongly suggesting the presence of chemical reactions. In more details, the characteristic hysteresis virtually disappears for the heavily Zn substituted system,(Fe2.2Zn0.8) O4 with less carrier concentration. These observations revealed the coexistence of two types of field effects in the Fe3-xZnxO4 devices, and the tuning of field-effect characteristics via composition engineering should be extremely useful for fabricating high-performance oxide field-effect devices.

  11. Electric Field Stimulation Enhances Healing of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritic Cartilage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0591 TITLE: Electric Field Stimulation Enhances Healing of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritic Cartilage PRINCIPAL...DATES COVERED 30 Sep 2014 – 29 Sep 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Electric Field Stimulation Enhances Healing of Post-Traumatic Osteoarthritic Cartilage...instability, among other traumatic affections of joints, and occupations or sports that subject joints to high levels of impact and torsional loading

  12. Stimulated oxidation of metals (laser, electric field, etc.): Comparative studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nánai, László; Füle, Miklós

    2014-11-01

    In this report we demonstrate the importance of metal oxides, e.g. thin films and nanostructures, in modern science and technology. The basic laws of oxide thickness on base of diffusion of specimens versus time in different circumstances (Cabrera-Mott and Wagner laws) under the influence of external fields, e.g. electromagnetic field, static electric and magnetic field, are demonstrated. We give experimental results for various metal oxide layers over a wide range of different metals. Theoretical explanations are provided as well for the most reliable circumstances.

  13. An application for delivering field results to mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanta, A.; Hloupis, G.; Vallianatos, F.; Rust, D.

    2009-04-01

    Mobile devices (MD) such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and Smartphones expand the ability of Internet communication between remote users. In particular these devices have the possibility to interact with data centres in order to request and receive information. For field surveys MDs used primarily for controlling instruments (in case of field measurements) or for entering data needed for later processing (e.g damage description after a natural hazard). It is not unusual in areas with high interest combined measurements took place. The results from these measurements usually stored in data servers and their publicity is driven mainly by web-based applications. Here we present a client / server application capable of displaying the results of several measurements for a specific area to a MD. More specific, we develop an application than can present to the screen of the MD the results of existing measurements according to the position of the user. The server side hosted at data centre and uses a relational data base (including the results), a SMS/MMS gateway and a receiver daemon application waiting for messages from MDs. The client side runs on MD and is a simple menu driven application which asks the user to enter the type of requested data and the geographical coordinates. In case of embedded GPS receiver, coordinates automatically derived from the receiver. Then a message is sent to server which responds with the results. In case of absence of Internet communication the application can switched to common Short/Multimedia Messaging Systems: the client request data using SMS and the server responds with MMS. We demonstrate the application using results from TEM, VES and HVSR measurements Acknowledgements Work of authors AK, GH and FV is partially supported by the EU-FP6-SSA in the frame of project "CYCLOPS: CYber-Infrastructure for CiviL protection Operative ProcedureS"

  14. Magnetic field characteristics of electric bed-heating devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B.W.; Davis, K.C.; Heimbigner, T.; Buschbom, R.L.; Lee, G.M.; Yost, M.G.

    1996-12-01

    Measurements of the flux density and spectra of magnetic fields (MFs) generated by several types of electric bed heaters (EBH) were made in order to characterize the MFs to which the fetus may be exposed in utero from the mother`s use of these devices. Data on MFs were gathered from more than 1,300 in-home and laboratory spot measurements. In-home measurements taken at seven different positions 10 cm from the EBHs determined that the mean flux density at the estimated position of the fetus relative to the device was 0.45 {micro}T (4.5 mG) for electric blankets and 0.20 {micro}T (2.0 mG) for electrically heated water beds. A rate-of-change (RC) metric applied to the nighttime segment of 24 h EMDEX-C personal-dosimeter measurements, which were taken next to the bed of volunteers, yielded an approximate fourfold to sixfold higher value for electric blanket users compared to water-bed heater users. These same data records yielded an approximate twofold difference for the same measurements when evaluated by the time-weighted-average (TWA) MF exposure metric. Performance of exposure meters was checked against standard fields generated in the laboratory, and studies of sources of variance in the in-home measurement protocols were carried out. Spectral measurements showed that the EBHs measured produced no appreciable high-frequency MFs. Data gathered during this work will be used in interpreting results from a component of the California Pregnancy Outcome Study, which evaluates the use of EBHs as a possible risk factor in miscarriage.

  15. Technical aspects of neurostimulation: Focus on equipment, electric field modeling, and stimulation protocols.

    PubMed

    Klooster, D C W; de Louw, A J A; Aldenkamp, A P; Besseling, R M H; Mestrom, R M C; Carrette, S; Zinger, S; Bergmans, J W M; Mess, W H; Vonck, K; Carrette, E; Breuer, L E M; Bernas, A; Tijhuis, A G; Boon, P

    2016-06-01

    Neuromodulation is a field of science, medicine, and bioengineering that encompasses implantable and non-implantable technologies for the purpose of improving quality of life and functioning of humans. Brain neuromodulation involves different neurostimulation techniques: transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), and deep brain stimulation (DBS), which are being used both to study their effects on cognitive brain functions and to treat neuropsychiatric disorders. The mechanisms of action of neurostimulation remain incompletely understood. Insight into the technical basis of neurostimulation might be a first step towards a more profound understanding of these mechanisms, which might lead to improved clinical outcome and therapeutic potential. This review provides an overview of the technical basis of neurostimulation focusing on the equipment, the present understanding of induced electric fields, and the stimulation protocols. The review is written from a technical perspective aimed at supporting the use of neurostimulation in clinical practice.

  16. Biphasic Electrical Field Stimulation Aids in Tissue Engineering of Multicell-Type Cardiac Organoids

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Loraine L.Y.; Iyer, Rohin K.; King, John-Paul

    2011-01-01

    The main objectives of current work were (1) to compare the effects of monophasic or biphasic electrical field stimulation on structure and function of engineered cardiac organoids based on enriched cardiomyocytes (CM) and (2) to determine if electrical field stimulation will enhance electrical excitability of cardiac organoids based on multiple cell types. Organoids resembling cardiac myofibers were cultivated in Matrigel-coated microchannels fabricated of poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate. We found that field stimulation using symmetric biphasic square pulses at 2.5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 1 ms (per pulse phase) was an improved stimulation protocol, as compared to no stimulation and stimulation using monophasic square pulses of identical total amplitude and duration (5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 2 ms). This was supported by the highest success rate for synchronous contractions, low excitation threshold, the highest cell density, and the highest expression of Connexin-43 in the biphasic group. Subsequently, enriched CM were seeded on the networks of (1) cardiac fibroblasts (FB), (2) D4T endothelial cells (EC), or (3) a mixture of FB and EC that were precultured for 2 days prior to the addition of enriched CM. Biphasic field stimulation was also effective at improving electrical excitability of these cardiac organoids by improving the three-dimensional organization of the cells, increasing cellular elongation and enhancing Connexin-43 presence. PMID:18783322

  17. Biphasic electrical field stimulation aids in tissue engineering of multicell-type cardiac organoids.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Loraine L Y; Iyer, Rohin K; King, John-Paul; Radisic, Milica

    2011-06-01

    The main objectives of current work were (1) to compare the effects of monophasic or biphasic electrical field stimulation on structure and function of engineered cardiac organoids based on enriched cardiomyocytes (CM) and (2) to determine if electrical field stimulation will enhance electrical excitability of cardiac organoids based on multiple cell types. Organoids resembling cardiac myofibers were cultivated in Matrigel-coated microchannels fabricated of poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate. We found that field stimulation using symmetric biphasic square pulses at 2.5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 1 ms (per pulse phase) was an improved stimulation protocol, as compared to no stimulation and stimulation using monophasic square pulses of identical total amplitude and duration (5 V/cm, 1 Hz, 2 ms). This was supported by the highest success rate for synchronous contractions, low excitation threshold, the highest cell density, and the highest expression of Connexin-43 in the biphasic group. Subsequently, enriched CM were seeded on the networks of (1) cardiac fibroblasts (FB), (2) D4T endothelial cells (EC), or (3) a mixture of FB and EC that were precultured for 2 days prior to the addition of enriched CM. Biphasic field stimulation was also effective at improving electrical excitability of these cardiac organoids by improving the three-dimensional organization of the cells, increasing cellular elongation and enhancing Connexin-43 presence.

  18. Tissue heterogeneity as a mechanism for localized neural stimulation by applied electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. C.; Correia, L.; Salvador, R.; Basser, P. J.

    2007-09-01

    We investigate the heterogeneity of electrical conductivity as a new mechanism to stimulate excitable tissues via applied electric fields. In particular, we show that stimulation of axons crossing internal boundaries can occur at boundaries where the electric conductivity of the volume conductor changes abruptly. The effectiveness of this and other stimulation mechanisms was compared by means of models and computer simulations in the context of transcranial magnetic stimulation. While, for a given stimulation intensity, the largest membrane depolarization occurred where an axon terminates or bends sharply in a high electric field region, a slightly smaller membrane depolarization, still sufficient to generate action potentials, also occurred at an internal boundary where the conductivity jumped from 0.143 S m-1 to 0.333 S m-1, simulating a white-matter-grey-matter interface. Tissue heterogeneity can also give rise to local electric field gradients that are considerably stronger and more focal than those impressed by the stimulation coil and that can affect the membrane potential, albeit to a lesser extent than the two mechanisms mentioned above. Tissue heterogeneity may play an important role in electric and magnetic 'far-field' stimulation.

  19. Mitigating stimulated scattering processes in gas-filled Hohlraums via external magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Tao; Zheng, Jian; Li, Zhichao; Ding, Yongkun; Yang, Dong; Hu, Guangyue; Zhao, Bin

    2015-09-15

    A simple model, based on energy and pressure equilibrium, is proposed to deal with the effect of external magnetic fields on the plasma parameters inside the laser path, which shows that the electron temperature can be significantly enhanced as the intensity of the external magnetic fields increases. With the combination of this model and a 1D three-wave coupling code, the effect of external magnetic fields on the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes is studied. The results indicate that a magnetic field with an intensity of tens of Tesla can decrease the reflectivities of stimulated scattering processes by several orders of magnitude.

  20. Relationship between neural activation and electric field distribution during deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Åström, Mattias; Diczfalusy, Elin; Martens, Hubert; Wårdell, Karin

    2015-02-01

    Models and simulations are commonly used to study deep brain stimulation (DBS). Simulated stimulation fields are often defined and visualized by electric field isolevels or volumes of tissue activated (VTA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between stimulation field strength as defined by the electric potential V, the electric field E, and the divergence of the electric field ∇(2) V, and neural activation. Axon cable models were developed and coupled to finite-element DBS models in three-dimensional (3-D). Field thresholds ( VT , ET, and ∇(2) VT ) were derived at the location of activation for various stimulation amplitudes (1 to 5 V), pulse widths (30 to 120 μs), and axon diameters (2.0 to 7.5 μm). Results showed that thresholds for VT and ∇(2) VT were highly dependent on the stimulation amplitude while ET were approximately independent of the amplitude for large axons. The activation field strength thresholds presented in this study may be used in future studies to approximate the VTA during model-based investigations of DBS without the need of computational axon models.

  1. Integrated device for optical stimulation and spatiotemporal electrical recording of neural activity in light-sensitized brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jiayi; Laiwalla, Farah; Kim, Jennifer A; Urabe, Hayato; Van Wagenen, Rick; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Connors, Barry W; Zhang, Feng; Deisseroth, Karl; Nurmikko, Arto V

    2010-01-01

    Neural stimulation with high spatial and temporal precision is desirable both for studying the real-time dynamics of neural networks and for prospective clinical treatment of neurological diseases. Optical stimulation of genetically targeted neurons expressing the light sensitive channel protein Channelrhodopsin (ChR2) has recently been reported as a means for millisecond temporal control of neuronal spiking activities with cell-type selectivity. This offers the prospect of enabling local delivery of optical stimulation and the simultaneous monitoring of the neural activity by electrophysiological means, both in the vicinity of and distant to the stimulation site. We report here a novel dual-modality hybrid device, which consists of a tapered coaxial optical waveguide (‘optrode’) integrated into a 100 element intra-cortical multi-electrode recording array. We first demonstrate the dual optical delivery and electrical recording capability of the single optrode in in vitro preparations of mouse retina, photo-stimulating the native retinal photoreceptors while recording light-responsive activities from ganglion cells. The dual-modality array device was then used in ChR2 transfected mouse brain slices. Specifically, epileptiform events were reliably optically triggered by the optrode and their spatiotemporal patterns were simultaneously recorded by the multi-electrode array. PMID:19721185

  2. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Sapp, Shawn; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-01-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this paper we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10–20 S/cm and loses 40 wt% after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) towards either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared to control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (± 3%) without an observable directional preference, compared to the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:23964001

  3. Electric field stimulation through a biodegradable polypyrrole-co-polycaprolactone substrate enhances neural cell growth.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hieu T; Sapp, Shawn; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K; Nguyen, Alvin; Coursen, Jeff; Luebben, Silvia; Chang, Emily; Ross, Robert; Schmidt, Christine E

    2014-08-01

    Nerve guidance conduits (NGCs) are FDA-approved devices used to bridge gaps across severed nerve cables and help direct axons sprouting from the proximal end toward the distal stump. In this article, we present the development of a novel electrically conductive, biodegradable NGC made from a polypyrrole-block-polycaprolactone (PPy-PCL) copolymer material laminated with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). The PPy-PCL has a bulk conductivity ranging 10-20 S/cm and loses 40 wt % after 7 months under physiologic conditions. Dorsal root ganglia (DRG) grown on flat PPy-PCL/PLGA material exposed to direct current electric fields (EF) of 100 mV/cm for 2 h increased axon growth by 13% (± 2%) toward either electrode of a 2-electrode setup, compared with control grown on identical substrates without EF exposure. Alternating current increased axon growth by 21% (±3%) without an observable directional preference, compared with the same control group. The results from this study demonstrate PLGA-coated PPy-PCL is a unique biodegradable material that can deliver substrate EF stimulation to improve axon growth for peripheral nerve repair.

  4. Use of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation Device in Early Osteoarthritis of the Knee.

    PubMed

    Cherian, Jeffrey J; Kapadia, Bhaveen H; Bhave, Anil; McElroy, Mark J; Cherian, Christopher; Harwin, Steven F; Mont, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Some have proposed the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) as an adjunct to the current standard of care in treatment of osteoarthritis knee pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of TENS on the following issues in patients who have early-stage osteoarthritis of the knee: (1) pain reduction; (2) subjective and (3) objective functional improvements; (4) quality-of-life (QOL) measure improvements; and (5) isokinetic strength. A prospective, randomized, and single-blinded trial was performed on 23 patients who were randomized to either novel TENS device or standard of care. Metrics analyzed included stair-climb test; timed-up-and-go test (TUGT); 2-minute walk test; 20 times, single leg 6-inch step test; five-repetition chair-rise test; active and passive range-of-motion (ROM) score; short form health survey-36 scores (SF-36) score; Knee Society Score (KSS); lower extremity functional scale (LEFS); visual analog scale (VAS); and isokinetic quadriceps and hamstring strength. In objective functional scores, TENS had significant improvements in TUGT and objective KSS when compared with the matching cohort. Subjective functional and QOL outcomes patients had a significant improvement of their LEFS and SF-36 physical component with the use of TENS brace. The TENS device significantly improved the quadriceps strength when compared with standard therapy. In evaluation for improvement within the TENS cohort, patients had a significant improvement at 3-month follow-up in the TUG test, timed stair-climb test, 20-times single leg, KSS, LEFS, and SF-36 physical component compared to their initial visit. In addition, within the TENS cohort, patients had a significant reduction in pain via VAS at their 3-month follow-up. In conclusion, the use of TENS for 3 months has shown encouraging results to improve pain, function, and QOL in patients with painful osteoarthritic knees, and could positively contribute as an adjunct to current

  5. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, M; Vaz, C A F; Raabe, J; Nolting, F

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg(0.66)Nb(0.33))O3-PbTiO3 and La(0.7)Sr(0.3)MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  6. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes

    SciTech Connect

    Buzzi, M.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Raabe, J.; Nolting, F.

    2015-08-15

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg{sub 0.66}Nb{sub 0.33})O{sub 3}-PbTiO{sub 3} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3}/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  7. Electric field stimulation setup for photoemission electron microscopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzzi, M.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Raabe, J.; Nolting, F.

    2015-08-01

    Manipulating magnetisation by the application of an electric field in magnetoelectric multiferroics represents a timely issue due to the potential applications in low power electronics and the novel physics involved. Thanks to its element sensitivity and high spatial resolution, X-ray photoemission electron microscopy is a uniquely suited technique for the investigation of magnetoelectric coupling in multiferroic materials. In this work, we present a setup that allows for the application of in situ electric and magnetic fields while the sample is analysed in the microscope. As an example of the performances of the setup, we present measurements on Ni/Pb(Mg0.66Nb0.33)O3-PbTiO3 and La0.7Sr0.3MnO3/PMN-PT artificial multiferroic nanostructures.

  8. A morphometric study of bone surfaces and skin reactions after stimulation with static magnetic fields in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Linder-Aronson, S.; Lindskog, S. )

    1991-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to measure any bone surface changes after stimulation with orthodontic magnets and, furthermore, to examine the soft tissue in immediate contact with the magnets. Both distal parts of the tibial hind legs in six groups of young rats were fitted with devices holding two orthodontic magnets in the experimental legs and similar devices without magnets in the control legs. The animals were killed after 2, 3, and 4 weeks. Morphometric evaluation showed significant increases in resorbing areas after 3 and 4 weeks. Similarly, a reduction was evident in the number of epithelial cells under the areas where the magnets had been applied. These findings indicate that the stimulation of bone resorption in the present study may have been caused by inhibition of the bone-lining osteoblasts. This proposition is supported by the apparent inhibitory effect of the magnetic fields on epithelial recycling that was seen as a reduced thickness of the epithelium under the magnets. Consequently, static magnetic fields should be used with care in orthodontic practice until a more complete understanding of their mechanism of action has been established.

  9. Stimulation of a ouabain-sensitive Rb+ uptake in human erthrocytes with an external electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Serpersu, E.H.; Tsong, T.Y.

    1983-01-01

    (Na, K)ATPase of the red blood cell (RBC) is known to be electrogenic. Activation of this pump hyperpolarizes the RBC membrane by several millivolts. By exposing erythrocytes in an isotonic suspension to an alternating electric field it is possible to modulate transmembrane potential (delta psi) of the RBC. We have found that this modulation stimulates uptake of Rb+, against a chemical concentration gradient, when the applied AC field exceeds 10 V/cm (or an induced delta psi of 6 mV). The voltage-stimulated Rb+ uptake is completely inhibited by ouabain. Thus, (Na, K)ATPase may be involved. The stimulated Rb+ uptake is unrelated to the thermal effect by several lines of evidence. First, this uptake is above levels in controlled samples maintained at an identical temperature. Second, this uptake shows an optimum voltage. The maximum stimulation obtained in our experiment (26 amol/RBC X hr) occurs at 20 V/cm, i.e., a delta psi of 12 mV. Above or below this field strength the uptake is reduced. Third, this uptake is AC frequency dependent. It peaks around 1 kHz and diminishes at 1 MHz. The effective range is between 0.1 kHz to 0.1 MHz. A thermal effect would not be frequency dependent. In contrast to the ATP-dependent pumping activity of the (Na, K)ATPase, no stimulated Na+ efflux is detectable with the AC field. Neither Rb+ efflux, nor Na+ influx is stimulated by the AC field. Rb+ uptake is also stimulated by the AC field in a RBC sample treated with vanadate. The meaning of these observations is discussed.

  10. Frac-and-pack stimulation: Application, design, and field experience

    SciTech Connect

    Roodhart, L.P.; Fokker, P.A.; Davies, D.R.; Shlyapobersky, J.; Wong, G.K.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the criteria for selecting wells to be frac-and-packed. The authors show how systematic study of the inflow performance can be used to assess the potential of frac-and-packed wells, to identify the controlling factors, and to optimize design parameters. They also show that fracture conductivity is often the key to successful treatment. This conductivity depends largely on proppant size; formation permeability damage around the created fracture has less effect. Appropriate allowance needs to be made for flow restrictions caused by the presence of the perforations, partial penetration, and non-Darcy effects. They describe the application of the overpressure-calibrated hydraulic fracture model in frac-and-pack treatment design, and discuss some operational considerations with reference to field examples. The full potential of this promising new completion method can be achieved only if the design is tailored to the individual well. This demands high-quality input data, which can be obtained only from a calibration test. This paper presents their strategy for frac-and-pack design, drawing on examples from field experience. They also point out several areas that the industry needs to address, such as the sizing of proppant in soft formations and the interaction between fracturing fluids and resin in resin-coated proppant.

  11. Field evaluations of hearing protection devices at surface mining environments

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    A study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of circumaural hearing protection devices and their predictability when they were being worn by mine employees performing normal work duties. The method employed relied on a physical measurement of the noise reduction of the hearing protectors by utilizing two FM-wireless transmitting and receiving systems. One system measured the outside hearing protector noise level, the second system measured the inside hearing protector noise level. The noise level data of both systems was transmitted back to the corresponding receivers and was recorded onto a two-channel tape recorder. Three methods of evaluating hearing protector performance were explored and compared to the Environmental Protection Agency, Noise Reduction Rating (EPA NRR) values. They were, (1) predicted National Institute for occupational Safety and Health`s (NIOSH) method No. 1 values, (2) field-calculated NIOSH No. 1 values, and (3) measured dBA reduction values, which was the arithmetic A-weighted differences between both microphone locations. The majority of the data was obtained on operators of mobile strip equipment, such as bulldozers, front-end-loaders, and overburden drills. A total of 107 individual tests were conducted using 11 different hearing protectors. The results indicate that the amount of protection, which can vary significantly, is related either to the spectrum shape of the noise, or the C-weighted minus the A-weighted (C-A) value. This is consistent with other researchers. The field measured noise reductions were equivalent to the EPA NRR values when the C-A values were negative or approaching zero. When the C-A values increased, the measured noise reductions significantly decreased.

  12. Magnetic field perturbation of neural recording and stimulating microelectrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Santiesteban, Francisco M.; Swanson, Scott D.; Noll, Douglas C.; Anderson, David J.

    2007-04-01

    To improve the overall temporal and spatial resolution of brain mapping techniques, in animal models, some attempts have been reported to join electrophysiological methods with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). However, little attention has been paid to the image artefacts produced by the microelectrodes that compromise the anatomical or functional information of those studies. This work presents a group of simulations and MR images that show the limitations of wire microelectrodes and the potential advantages of silicon technology, in terms of image quality, in MRI environments. Magnetic field perturbations are calculated using a Fourier-based method for platinum (Pt) and tungsten (W) microwires as well as two different silicon technologies. We conclude that image artefacts produced by microelectrodes are highly dependent not only on the magnetic susceptibility of the materials used but also on the size, shape and orientation of the electrodes with respect to the main magnetic field. In addition silicon microelectrodes present better MRI characteristics than metallic microelectrodes. However, metallization layers added to silicon materials can adversely affect the quality of MR images. Therefore only those silicon microelectrodes that minimize the amount of metallic material can be considered MR-compatible and therefore suitable for possible simultaneous fMRI and electrophysiological studies. High resolution gradient echo images acquired at 2 T (TR/TE = 100/15 ms, voxel size = 100 × 100 × 100 µm3) of platinum-iridium (Pt-Ir, 90%-10%) and tungsten microwires show a complete signal loss that covers a volume significantly larger than the actual volume occupied by the microelectrodes: roughly 400 times larger for Pt-Ir and 180 for W, at the tip of the microelectrodes. Similar MR images of a single-shank silicon microelectrode only produce a partial volume effect on the voxels occupied by the probe with less than 50% of signal loss.

  13. An investigation into the induced electric fields from transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadimani, Ravi; Lee, Erik; Duffy, Walter; Waris, Mohammed; Siddiqui, Waquar; Islam, Faisal; Rajamani, Mahesh; Nathan, Ryan; Jiles, David; David C Jiles Team; Walter Duffy Collaboration

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a promising tool for noninvasive brain stimulation that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of major depressive disorder. To stimulate the brain, TMS uses large, transient pulses of magnetic field to induce an electric field in the head. This transient magnetic field is large enough to cause the depolarization of cortical neurons and initiate a synaptic signal transmission. For this study, 50 unique head models were created from MRI images. Previous simulation studies have primarily used a single head model, and thus give a limited image of the induced electric field from TMS. This study uses finite element analysis simulations on 50 unique, heterogeneous head models to better investigate the relationship between TMS and the electric field induced in brain tissues. Results showed a significant variation in the strength of the induced electric field in the brain, which can be reasonably predicted by the distance from the TMS coil to the stimulated brain. Further, it was seen that some models had high electric field intensities in over five times as much brain volume as other models.

  14. Receptive-field changes induced by peripheral nerve stimulation in SI of adult cats.

    PubMed

    Recanzone, G H; Allard, T T; Jenkins, W M; Merzenich, M M

    1990-05-01

    1. Receptive fields (RFs) of neurons in the primary somatosensory (SI) cortex were defined before, during, and after electrical stimulation of myelinated fibers in the dorsal cutaneous branch of the ulnar nerve in adult pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized cats. 2. This stimulation resulted in an approximately threefold increase of SI multiunit RF sizes. Substantial changes were first recorded within 1-2 h of stimulation. RFs typically enlarged continuously over a several-hour stimulation period, then stabilized. 3. RF-area increases were observed within both the forepaw and hindpaw representational zones in the SI cortex contralateral to the stimulated forepaw nerve. RF sizes did not increase in the ipsilateral SI body surface representation or in sham-stimulation control animals. 4. Preliminary studies indicate that stimulation-induced changes can be halted and often reversed by the intravenous administration of the opiate antagonist naloxone. 5. These observations suggest a global naloxone-sensitive modulatory system that operates on large-diameter afferent inputs in the cat somatosensory system. The increases in RF size occur under nerve-stimulation conditions similar to those that result in the generation of widespread analgesia (Chung et al. 1984a,b; Gamble and Milne 1986; Toda and Ichioka 1978).

  15. Design and Application of a New Automated Fluidic Visceral Stimulation Device for Human fMRI Studies of Interoception

    PubMed Central

    Gassert, Roger; Wanek, Johann; Michels, Lars; Mehnert, Ulrich; Kollias, Spyros S.

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the brain centers that mediate the sensory-perceptual processing of visceral afferent signals arising from the body (i.e., interoception) is useful both for characterizing normal brain activity and for understanding clinical disorders related to abnormal processing of visceral sensation. Here, we report a novel closed-system, electrohydrostatically driven master–slave device that was designed and constructed for delivering controlled fluidic stimulations of visceral organs and inner cavities of the human body within the confines of a 3T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanner. The design concept and performance of the device in the MRI environment are described. In addition, the device was applied during a functional MRI (fMRI) investigation of visceral stimulation related to detrusor distention in two representative subjects to verify its feasibility in humans. System evaluation tests demonstrate that the device is MR-compatible with negligible impact on imaging quality [static signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) loss <2.5% and temporal SNR loss <3.5%], and has an accuracy of 99.68% for flow rate and 99.27% for volume delivery. A precise synchronization of the stimulus delivery with fMRI slice acquisition was achieved by programming the proposed device to detect the 5 V transistor–transistor logic (TTL) trigger signals generated by the MRI scanner. The fMRI data analysis using the general linear model analysis with the standard hemodynamic response function showed increased activations in the network of brain regions that included the insula, anterior and mid-cingulate and lateral prefrontal cortices, and thalamus in response to increased distension pressure on viscera. The translation from manually operated devices to an MR-compatible and MR-synchronized device under automatic control represents a useful innovation for clinical neuroimaging studies of human interoception. PMID:27551646

  16. A pragmatic analysis of the regulation of consumer transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) devices in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wexler, Anna

    2015-11-01

    Several recent articles have called for the regulation of consumer transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) devices, which provide low levels of electrical current to the brain. However, most of the discussion to-date has focused on ethical or normative considerations; there has been a notable absence of scholarship regarding the actual legal framework in the United States. This article aims to fill that gap by providing a pragmatic analysis of the consumer tDCS market and relevant laws and regulations. In the five main sections of this manuscript, I take into account (a) the history of the do-it-yourself tDCS movement and the subsequent emergence of direct-to-consumer devices; (b) the statutory language of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and how the definition of a medical device-which focuses on the intended use of the device rather than its mechanism of action-is of paramount importance for discussions of consumer tDCS device regulation; (c) how both the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and courts have understood the FDA's jurisdiction over medical devices in cases where the meaning of 'intended use' has been challenged; (d) an analysis of consumer tDCS regulatory enforcement action to-date; and (e) the multiple US authorities, other than the FDA, that can regulate consumer brain stimulation devices. Taken together, this paper demonstrates that rather than a 'regulatory gap,' there are multiple, distinct pathways by which consumer tDCS can be regulated in the United States.

  17. Cochlear excitation by the near-field component during stimulation through the partially occluded round window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weddell, Thomas D.; Yarin, Yury M.; Drexl, Markus; Russell, Ian J.; Elliott, Stephen J.; Lukashkin, Andrei N.

    2015-12-01

    The round window membrane (RW) provides pressure relief when the cochlea is excited by sound. While normal function of the RW is important for effective stimulation of the cochlea through the conventional oval window route, the cochlea can be stimulated successfully in non-conventional ways (e.g. through bone conduction, through the RW, and through perforations in the cochlea's apical turn). We report measurements of cochlear function from guinea pigs when the cochlea was stimulated at acoustic frequencies by movements of a miniature magnet which partially occluded the RW. Neural response latencies to acoustic and RW stimulation were similar and taken to indicate that both means of stimulation resulted in the generation of conventional travelling waves along the cochlear partition. It was concluded that the relatively high impedance of the ossicles, as seen from the cochlea, enabled the region of the RW not occluded by the magnet, to act as a pressure shunt during RW stimulation. We propose that travelling waves, similar to those due to acoustic far-field pressure changes, are driven by a jet-like, near-field component of a complex fluid-pressure field, which is generated by the magnetically vibrated RW.

  18. A programmable and configurable multi-port System-on-Chip for stimulating electrokinetically-driven microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Martha Salome; Gerstlauer, Andreas; Avila, Alfonso; Martinez-Chapa, Sergio O

    2011-01-01

    Recent research has demonstrated the use of microfluidic devices and electro-kinetics in areas such as medicine, genetics, embryology, epidemiology and pollution analysis, where manipulation of particles suspended in liquid media is required. Micro-fabrication technology has made it possible to increase system complexity and functionality by allowing integration of different processing and analysis stages in a single chip. However, fully integrated and autonomous microfluidic systems supporting ad-hoc stimulation have yet to be developed. This paper presents a flexible, configurable and programmable stimulator for electro-kinetically driven microfluidic devices. The stimulator is a dedicated System-on-Chip (SoC) architecture that generates sine, triangle, and sawtooth signals within a frequency range of 1 Hz to 20 MHz, capable of delivering single, dual, and superimposed waveforms, in a user defined test sequence for a selected time period. The system is designed to be integrated into complete, autonomous Lab-on-Chip, portable or implantable devices. As such, it is expected to help significantly advance current and future research on particle manipulation.

  19. High-Temperature Spintronic Devices and Circuits in Absence of Magnetic Field

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-23

    Spintronic Devices and Circuits in Absence of Magnetic Field 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N00014-09-1-0086 5b. GRANT NUMBER F021874 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT...operating at high temperatures and in the absence of an externally applied magnetic field. For electrical spin-based devices, our focus shifted to multi...ANSI Std. Z39.18 Adobe Professional 7.0 High Temperature Spintronic Devices and Circuits In Absence of Magnetic Field Principal Investigator Pallab

  20. Synaptic and Network Mechanisms of Sparse and Reliable Visual Cortical Activity during Nonclassical Receptive Field Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Bilal; Krause, Matthew R.; Duque, Alvaro; Yu, Yuguo; Touryan, Jonathan; Mazer, James A.; McCormick, David A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY During natural vision, the entire visual field is stimulated by images rich in spatiotemporal structure. Although many visual system studies restrict stimuli to the classical receptive field (CRF), it is known that costimulation of the CRF and the surrounding nonclassical receptive field (nCRF) increases neuronal response sparseness. The cellular and network mechanisms underlying increased response sparseness remain largely unexplored. Here we show that combined CRF + nCRF stimulation increases the sparseness, reliability, and precision of spiking and membrane potential responses in classical regular spiking (RSC) pyramidal neurons of cat primary visual cortex. Conversely, fast-spiking interneurons exhibit increased activity and decreased selectivity during CRF + nCRF stimulation. The increased sparseness and reliability of RSC neuron spiking is associated with increased inhibitory barrages and narrower visually evoked synaptic potentials. Our experimental observations were replicated with a simple computational model, suggesting that network interactions among neuronal subtypes ultimately sharpen recurrent excitation, producing specific and reliable visual responses. PMID:20152117

  1. Field Performance of a Newly Developed Upflow Filtration Device

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this research is to examine the removal capacities of a newly developed Upflow filtration device for treatment of stormwater. The device was developed by engineers at the University of Alabama through a Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grant from the U....

  2. New Acid Stimulation Treatment to Sustain Production - Los Angeles Downtown Oil Field

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Richard C.

    2003-03-10

    Hydrochloric acid stimulation was successfully used on several wells in the Los Angeles Downtown Field, in the past. The decline rates after stimulation were relatively high and generally within six months to a year, production rates have returned to their prestimulation rates. The wells in Los Angeles Downtown Field have strong scale producing tendencies and many wells are treated for scale control. Four wells were carefully selected that are representative of wells that had a tendency to form calcium carbonate scale and had shown substantial decline over the last few years.

  3. [Treatment of congenital facial paralysis with crossed innervation of facial nerve and electric field stimulation].

    PubMed

    Ysunza-Rivera, A; Iñigo-Muñoz, F; Drucker-Colín, R; Ortiz-Monasterio, F; Pesqueira, T

    1992-04-01

    Congenital facial palsy is a devastating deformity. At present time there are no reports of the early treatment of this disorder. The treatment may be to supply contralateral auto reinnervation to the affected muscles through a sural-facial nerve graft enhanced by electric field stimulation. The purpose of this paper is to report 5 cases of congenital facial palsy treated by a crossed sural-facial nerve graft, enhanced by electric field stimulation. One year after surgery, clinical and electrodiagnostic examinations indicate appropriate reinnervation activity in all the patients.

  4. Effect of the magnetic field on coexisting stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattering of an extraordinary mode

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Ashish Singh, Ram Kishor Sharma, R. P.

    2016-01-15

    This paper presents a model to study the interplay between the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) in the presence of background magnetic field. This formalism is applicable to laser produced plasma as well as to heating mechanism in toroidal system by an extraordinary electromagnetic wave. In the former case, the magnetic field is self-generated, while in the latter case (toroidal plasmas) magnetic field is applied externally. The behavior of one scattering process is explicitly dependent on the coexisting scattering process as well as on the magnetic field. Explicit expressions for the back-reflectivity of scattered beams (SRS and SBS) are presented. It has been demonstrated that due to the magnetic field and coexistence of the scattering processes (SRS and SBS) the back-reflectivity gets modified significantly. Results are also compared with the three wave interaction case (isolated SRS or SBS case)

  5. A pragmatic analysis of the regulation of consumer transcranial direct current stimulation (TDCS) devices in the United States

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Several recent articles have called for the regulation of consumer transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) devices, which provide low levels of electrical current to the brain. However, most of the discussion to-date has focused on ethical or normative considerations; there has been a notable absence of scholarship regarding the actual legal framework in the United States. This article aims to fill that gap by providing a pragmatic analysis of the consumer tDCS market and relevant laws and regulations. In the five main sections of this manuscript, I take into account (a) the history of the do-it-yourself tDCS movement and the subsequent emergence of direct-to-consumer devices; (b) the statutory language of the Federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and how the definition of a medical device—which focuses on the intended use of the device rather than its mechanism of action—is of paramount importance for discussions of consumer tDCS device regulation; (c) how both the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and courts have understood the FDA's jurisdiction over medical devices in cases where the meaning of ‘intended use’ has been challenged; (d) an analysis of consumer tDCS regulatory enforcement action to-date; and (e) the multiple US authorities, other than the FDA, that can regulate consumer brain stimulation devices. Taken together, this paper demonstrates that rather than a ‘regulatory gap,’ there are multiple, distinct pathways by which consumer tDCS can be regulated in the United States. PMID:27774217

  6. Predicting the effects of deep brain stimulation with diffusion tensor based electric field models.

    PubMed

    Butson, Christopher R; Cooper, Scott E; Henderson, Jaimie M; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2006-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for the treatment of movement disorders, and has shown promising results for the treatment of a wide range of other neurological disorders. However, little is known about the mechanism of action of DBS or the volume of brain tissue affected by stimulation. We have developed methods that use anatomical and diffusion tensor MRI (DTI) data to predict the volume of tissue activated (VTA) during DBS. We co-register the imaging data with detailed finite element models of the brain and stimulating electrode to enable anatomically and electrically accurate predictions of the spread of stimulation. One critical component of the model is the DTI tensor field that is used to represent the 3-dimensionally anisotropic and inhomogeneous tissue conductivity. With this system we are able to fuse structural and functional information to study a relevant clinical problem: DBS of the subthalamic nucleus for the treatment of Parkinsons disease (PD). Our results show that inclusion of the tensor field in our model caused significant differences in the size and shape of the VTA when compared to a homogeneous, isotropic tissue volume. The magnitude of these differences was proportional to the stimulation voltage. Our model predictions are validated by comparing spread of predicted activation to observed effects of oculomotor nerve stimulation in a PD patient. In turn, the 3D tissue electrical properties of the brain play an important role in regulating the spread of neural activation generated by DBS.

  7. Stimulation of well SN-12 in the Seltjarnarnes low-temperature field in SW-Iceland

    SciTech Connect

    Tulinius, H.; Axelsson, G.; Tomasson, J.

    1996-12-31

    Well SN-12 in the Seltjarnarnes low-temperature field in SW-Iceland was drilled to a depth of 2714 m in the fall of 1994. The well appeared to be almost non-productive at the end of drilling. A comprehensive ten day stimulation program was, therefore, initiated. The program involved, firstly, high-pressure wellhead injection and, secondly, high-pressure injection below a packer placed at 1412 m depth. After about twelve hours of wellhead stimulation the pressure dropped suddenly, indicating that the well had been stimulated. At the same time the water level response increased suddenly in two near-by monitoring wells. During the second stimulation phase (packer at 1412 m) the well appeared to be stimulated even further. The well eventually produced about 35 Us with a drawdown of roughly 60 m, and the stimulation had increased the yield of the well by a factor of nearly 60. Thus well SN-12, which appeared to be almost non-productive at the completion of drilling, had turned into a good production well. It is believed that during the stimulation some previously closed fractures, or interbed contacts, reopened connecting well SN-12 to the main fracture system of the geothermal reservoir.

  8. 75 FR 68200 - Medical Devices; Radiology Devices; Reclassification of Full-Field Digital Mammography System

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 892 Medical Devices; Radiology Devices... the Commissioner of Food and Drugs, 21 CFR part 892 is amended as follows: PART 892--RADIOLOGY...

  9. Device-based brain stimulation to augment fear extinction: implications for PTSD treatment and beyond.

    PubMed

    Marin, Marie-France; Camprodon, Joan A; Dougherty, Darin D; Milad, Mohammed R

    2014-04-01

    Conditioned fear acquisition and extinction paradigms have been widely used both in animals and humans to examine the neurobiology of emotional memory. Studies have also shown that patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) exhibit deficient extinction recall along with dysfunctional activation of the fear extinction network, including the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, amygdala, and hippocampus. A great deal of overlap exists between this fear extinction network and brain regions associated with symptom severity in PTSD. This suggests that the neural nodes of fear extinction could be targeted to reduce behavioral deficits that may subsequently translate into symptom improvement. In this article, we discuss potential applications of brain stimulation and neuromodulation methods, which, combined with a mechanistic understanding of the neurobiology of fear extinction, could be used to further our understanding of the pathophysiology of anxiety disorders and develop novel therapeutic tools. To this end, we discuss the following stimulation approaches: deep-brain stimulation, vagus nerve stimulation, transcranial direct current stimulation, and transcranial magnetic stimulation. We propose new translational research avenues that, from a systems neuroscience perspective, aim to expand our understanding of circuit dynamics and fear processing toward the practical development of clinical tools, to be used alone or in combination with behavioral therapies.

  10. Emulating Industrial Control System Field Devices Using Gumstix Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    servers are only basic simulations and offer a limited number of functions to interact with. The work is no longer maintained; however, a follow on...fingerprinting techniques specific to ICS devices. This research develops such a device that is able to be expanded upon and deployed to a live environment to...Sean Laughter , Ronald Williams, “Security Issues in SCADA networks”. Computers & Security, v 25, pp 498-506, num 7, 2006. [19] Krutz, R. L. (2006

  11. Effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration after spinal cord injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Tian, Da-Sheng; Jing, Jue-Hua; Qian, Jun; Chen, Lei; Zhu, Bin

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of oscillating electrical field stimulation on motor function recovery and myelin regeneration in rats with spinal cord injury. [Subjects and Methods] A rat model of spinal cord injury was constructed by using the Allen weight-drop method. These rats were randomly divided into normal, spinal cord injury, and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation groups. The experimental group received the intervention with oscillating electrical field stimulation, and the control group received the intervention with an electrical field stimulator without oscillating electrical field stimulation. Each group was then randomly divided into seven subgroups according to observation time (1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 weeks). Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan score and inclined plate test score evaluation, motor evoked potential detection, and histological observation were performed. [Results] In the first 2 weeks of oscillating electrical field stimulation, the oscillating electrical field stimulation and inclined plate test scores of spinal cord injury group and spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group were not significantly different. In the fourth week, the scores of the spinal cord injury group were significantly lower than those of the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group. The motor evoked potential incubation period in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group at the various time points was shorter than that in the spinal cord injury group. In the sixth week, the relative area of myelin in the spinal cord injury + oscillating electrical field stimulation group was evidently larger than that in the spinal cord injury group. [Conclusion] Oscillating electrical field stimulation could effectively improve spinal cord conduction function and promote motor function recovery in rats with spinal cord injury, as well as promote myelin

  12. [A 3D FEM model for calculation of electromagnetic fields in transmagnetic stimulation].

    PubMed

    Seilwinder, J; Kammer, T; Andrä, W; Bellemann, M E

    2002-01-01

    We developed a realistic finite elements method (FEM) model of the brain for the calculation of electromagnetic fields in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). A focal butterfly stimulation coil was X-rayed, parameterized, and modeled. The magnetic field components of the TMS coil were calculated and compared for validation to pointwise measurements of the magnetic fields with a Hall sensor. We found a mean deviation of 7.4% at an axial distance of 20 mm to the coil. A 3D brain model with the biological tissues of white and gray matter, bone, and cerebrospinal fluid was developed. At a current sweep of 1000 A in 120 microseconds, the maximum induced current density in gray matter was 177 mA/m2 and the strongest electric field gradient covered an area of 40 mm x 53 mm.

  13. Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect

    T. C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; D. Joyner; S. Borglin; E. Brodie; S. Hubbard; K. Williams; J. Peterson; J. Wan; T. Tokunaga; M. Firestone; P. E. Long; Resch, C.T.; Newcomer, D.; Koenigsberg, S.; Willet, A. C. T. Resch, and D. Newcomer , S. Koenigsberg and A. Willet Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr at Hanford 100H

    2005-04-20

    The overall objective of this paper is to carry out field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium-contaminated groundwater using lactate-stimulated bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at the Hanford 100H site.

  14. Measurements and models of electric fields in the in vivo human brain during transcranial electric stimulation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu; Liu, Anli A; Lafon, Belen; Friedman, Daniel; Dayan, Michael; Wang, Xiuyuan; Bikson, Marom; Doyle, Werner K; Devinsky, Orrin; Parra, Lucas C

    2017-02-07

    Transcranial electric stimulation aims to stimulate the brain by applying weak electrical currents at the scalp. However, the magnitude and spatial distribution of electric fields in the human brain are unknown. We measured electric potentials intracranially in ten epilepsy patients and estimate electric fields across the entire brain by leveraging calibrated current-flow models. When stimulating at 2 mA, cortical electric fields reach 0.4 V/m, the lower limit of effectiveness in animal studies. When individual whole-head anatomy is considered, the predicted electric field magnitudes correlate with the recorded values in cortical (r=0.89) and depth (r=0.84) electrodes. Accurate models require adjustment of tissue conductivity values reported in the literature, but accuracy is not improved when incorporating white matter anisotropy or different skull compartments. This is the first study to validate and calibrate current-flow models with in vivo intracranial recordings in humans, providing a solid foundation to target stimulation and interpret clinical trials.

  15. Measurements and models of electric fields in the in vivo human brain during transcranial electric stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu; Liu, Anli A; Lafon, Belen; Friedman, Daniel; Dayan, Michael; Wang, Xiuyuan; Bikson, Marom; Doyle, Werner K; Devinsky, Orrin; Parra, Lucas C

    2017-01-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation aims to stimulate the brain by applying weak electrical currents at the scalp. However, the magnitude and spatial distribution of electric fields in the human brain are unknown. We measured electric potentials intracranially in ten epilepsy patients and estimated electric fields across the entire brain by leveraging calibrated current-flow models. When stimulating at 2 mA, cortical electric fields reach 0.4 V/m, the lower limit of effectiveness in animal studies. When individual whole-head anatomy is considered, the predicted electric field magnitudes correlate with the recorded values in cortical (r = 0.89) and depth (r = 0.84) electrodes. Accurate models require adjustment of tissue conductivity values reported in the literature, but accuracy is not improved when incorporating white matter anisotropy or different skull compartments. This is the first study to validate and calibrate current-flow models with in vivo intracranial recordings in humans, providing a solid foundation to target stimulation and interpret clinical trials. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18834.001 PMID:28169833

  16. A Mechatronic Loading Device to Stimulate Bone Growth via a Human Knee.

    PubMed

    Prabhala, Sai Krishna; Chien, Stanley; Yokota, Hiroki; Anwar, Sohel

    2016-09-29

    This paper presents the design of an innovative device that applies dynamic mechanical load to human knee joints. Dynamic loading is employed by applying cyclic and periodic force on a target area. The repeated force loading was considered to be an effective modality for repair and rehabilitation of long bones that are subject to ailments like fractures, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, etc. The proposed device design builds on the knowledge gained in previous animal and mechanical studies. It employs a modified slider-crank linkage mechanism actuated by a brushless Direct Current (DC) motor and provides uniform and cyclic force. The functionality of the device was simulated in a software environment and the structural integrity was analyzed using a finite element method for the prototype construction. The device is controlled by a microcontroller that is programmed to provide the desired loading force at a predetermined frequency and for a specific duration. The device was successfully tested in various experiments for its usability and full functionality. The results reveal that the device works according to the requirements of force magnitude and operational frequency. This device is considered ready to be used for a clinical study to examine whether controlled knee-loading could be an effective regimen for treating the stated bone-related ailments.

  17. A Mechatronic Loading Device to Stimulate Bone Growth via a Human Knee

    PubMed Central

    Prabhala, Sai Krishna; Chien, Stanley; Yokota, Hiroki; Anwar, Sohel

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the design of an innovative device that applies dynamic mechanical load to human knee joints. Dynamic loading is employed by applying cyclic and periodic force on a target area. The repeated force loading was considered to be an effective modality for repair and rehabilitation of long bones that are subject to ailments like fractures, osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, etc. The proposed device design builds on the knowledge gained in previous animal and mechanical studies. It employs a modified slider-crank linkage mechanism actuated by a brushless Direct Current (DC) motor and provides uniform and cyclic force. The functionality of the device was simulated in a software environment and the structural integrity was analyzed using a finite element method for the prototype construction. The device is controlled by a microcontroller that is programmed to provide the desired loading force at a predetermined frequency and for a specific duration. The device was successfully tested in various experiments for its usability and full functionality. The results reveal that the device works according to the requirements of force magnitude and operational frequency. This device is considered ready to be used for a clinical study to examine whether controlled knee-loading could be an effective regimen for treating the stated bone-related ailments. PMID:27690057

  18. Storage of an electric field for photocurrent generation in ferroelectric-functionalized organic devices.

    PubMed

    Hu, Laigui; Dalgleish, Simon; Matsushita, Michio M; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi; Awaga, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Organic optoelectronic devices are usually driven by the electric field generated from an electrode potential difference or bias voltage. Although poled ferroelectric domains may produce oriented stray fields, few efforts have been made to utilize them for photocurrent generation in organic devices. Here we show that large net fields caused by incomplete screening during ferroelectric polarization, and which can be 'restored' by short voltage pulses, can facilitate exciton dissociation in organic semiconductors. The oriented fields, comparable with that produced by an electrode potential difference (1~10 MV m(-1)), here are found to be responsible for the photocurrent in our devices. A prototype for an organic photodetector driven by such stray fields is demonstrated. The photoresponsivity, without any optimization, can achieve ~0.1 mA W(-1). This study provides a different operation principle for the generation of photocurrent in organic optoelectronic devices. Furthermore, the polarity-tunable photoresponse may lead to new photoresponsive memory devices.

  19. Cerebellar and Spinal Direct Current Stimulation in Children: Computational Modeling of the Induced Electric Field

    PubMed Central

    Fiocchi, Serena; Ravazzani, Paolo; Priori, Alberto; Parazzini, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the specific application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum can modulate cerebellar activity. In parallel, transcutaneous spinal DC stimulation (tsDCS) was found to be able to modulate conduction along the spinal cord and spinal cord functions. Of particular interest is the possible use of these techniques in pediatric age, since many pathologies and injuries, which affect the cerebellar cortex as well as spinal cord circuits, are diffuse in adults as well as in children. Up to now, experimental studies of cerebellar and spinal DC stimulation on children are completely missing and therefore there is a lack of information about the safety of this technique as well as the appropriate dose to be used during the treatment. Therefore, the knowledge of electric quantities induced into the cerebellum and over the spinal cord during cerebellar tDCS and tsDCS, respectively, is required. This work attempts to address this issue by estimating through computational techniques, the electric field distributions induced in the target tissues during the two stimulation techniques applied to different models of children of various ages and gender. In detail, we used four voxel child models, aged between 5- and 8-years. Results revealed that, despite inter-individual differences, the cerebellum is the structure mainly involved by cerebellar tDCS, whereas the electric field generated by tsDCS can reach the spinal cord also in children. Moreover, it was found that there is a considerable spread toward the anterior area of the cerebellum and the brainstem region for cerebellar tDCS and in the spinal nerve for spinal direct current stimulation. Our study therefore predicts that the electric field spreads in complex patterns that strongly depend on individual anatomy, thus giving further insight into safety issues and informing data for pediatric investigations of these stimulation techniques. PMID:27799905

  20. Cerebellar and Spinal Direct Current Stimulation in Children: Computational Modeling of the Induced Electric Field.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Serena; Ravazzani, Paolo; Priori, Alberto; Parazzini, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the specific application of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) over the cerebellum can modulate cerebellar activity. In parallel, transcutaneous spinal DC stimulation (tsDCS) was found to be able to modulate conduction along the spinal cord and spinal cord functions. Of particular interest is the possible use of these techniques in pediatric age, since many pathologies and injuries, which affect the cerebellar cortex as well as spinal cord circuits, are diffuse in adults as well as in children. Up to now, experimental studies of cerebellar and spinal DC stimulation on children are completely missing and therefore there is a lack of information about the safety of this technique as well as the appropriate dose to be used during the treatment. Therefore, the knowledge of electric quantities induced into the cerebellum and over the spinal cord during cerebellar tDCS and tsDCS, respectively, is required. This work attempts to address this issue by estimating through computational techniques, the electric field distributions induced in the target tissues during the two stimulation techniques applied to different models of children of various ages and gender. In detail, we used four voxel child models, aged between 5- and 8-years. Results revealed that, despite inter-individual differences, the cerebellum is the structure mainly involved by cerebellar tDCS, whereas the electric field generated by tsDCS can reach the spinal cord also in children. Moreover, it was found that there is a considerable spread toward the anterior area of the cerebellum and the brainstem region for cerebellar tDCS and in the spinal nerve for spinal direct current stimulation. Our study therefore predicts that the electric field spreads in complex patterns that strongly depend on individual anatomy, thus giving further insight into safety issues and informing data for pediatric investigations of these stimulation techniques.

  1. Adverse events of gastric electrical stimulators recorded in the Manufacturer and User Device Experience (MAUDE) Registry.

    PubMed

    Bielefeldt, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The role of gastric electrical stimulation for patients with refractory symptoms of gastroparesis remains controversial. Open label studies suggest benefit while randomized controlled trials did not demonstrate differences between active and sham intervention. Using a voluntary reporting system of the Federal Drug Administration, we examined the type and frequency of adverse events.

  2. Field stimulation-induced tetrodotoxin-resistant vasorelaxation is mediated by sodium hypochlorite.

    PubMed

    Varma, Daya R; Xia, Zhicheng; Ozgoli, Mehran; Chemtob, Sylvain; Mulay, Shree

    2006-11-01

    This study was done to determine the mechanism of field stimulation-induced tetrodotoxin (TTX)- and NG- nitro-l-arginine (LNA)-resistant vasorelaxation. Field stimulation with platinum and carbon, but not with silver, electrodes (30 V, 30 HZ, 2-5 ms pulse width) as well as electrically stimulated salt (0.9% NaCl) solution (ESSS) or Krebs solution caused 100% relaxation of phenylephrine-contracted rat aortic strips, which was TTX and LNA resistant and endothelium independent. ESSS also relaxed other vascular preparations (rabbit aorta and renal artery, dog coronary artery, pig ductus arteriosus, and rat portal vein). The electric current generated hypochlorite (OCl-) and H2O2 from the salt solution; however, vasorelaxation was caused by NaOCl and not by H2O2. ESSS and NaOCl caused contraction failure of spontaneously beating right atria of rats and did not affect uterine contractions, vascular cAMP, cGMP, or the pH of the tissue bath. Field stimulation, ESSS, and NaOCl did not relax aortic preparations contracted by 32 mmol/L potassium and their vasorelaxant effects on phenylephrine-contracted rat aortic strips and rings were completely reversed by tetraethylammonium and partially by glibenclamide and iberiotoxin. We conclude that electric pulses generate the oxidant OCl- from the salt solution, which causes vasorelaxation by increasing K+ conductance.

  3. On the Role of Electric Field Orientation in Optimal Design of Transcranial Current Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Bikson, Marom; Datta, Abhishek; Richardson, Jessica; Fridriksson, Julius; Parra, Lucas C.

    2014-01-01

    Transcranial current stimulation (tCS) is a promising noninvasive technique to elicit neuromodulation by passing weak electrical currents through scalp electrodes. While significant effort has been devoted towards designing stimulation protocols which “steer” current to regions of interest, previous work has been almost exclusively focused on the magnitude of the electric field, while ignoring the effects of direction. This is despite previous in vitro studies demonstrating that the angle between the field orientation and the cell axis of symmetry has significant effects on the resulting membrane polarization presumably underlying therapeutic effects. To that end, here we examine the impact of the desired electric field orientation on the optimal placement of electrodes for a given target region. Based on high-resolution head models derived from magnetic resonance scans of patients enrolled in a clinical trial examining the use of tCS in rehabilitation after stroke, we derive and employ an optimization algorithm which computes the montage maximizing directed current flow at the target. The results reveal a strong dependence of the optimal montage on the desired orientation; moreover, the magnitude of the induced electric field at the target region varies widely with the preferred direction. This suggests that identifying the desired electric field orientation at the region of interest is a crucial step in the development of rational electrical stimulation paradigms. PMID:23367400

  4. Electric Field Model of Transcranial Electric Stimulation in Nonhuman Primates: Correspondence to Individual Motor Threshold

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Hee; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Laine, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To develop a pipeline for realistic head models of nonhuman primates (NHPs) for simulations of noninvasive brain stimulation, and use these models together with empirical threshold measurements to demonstrate that the models capture individual anatomical variability. Methods Based on structural MRI data, we created models of the electric field (E-field) induced by right unilateral (RUL) electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in four rhesus macaques. Individual motor threshold (MT) was measured with transcranial electric stimulation (TES) administered through the RUL electrodes in the same subjects. Results The interindividual anatomical differences resulted in 57% variation in median E-field strength in the brain at fixed stimulus current amplitude. Individualization of the stimulus current by MT reduced the E-field variation in the target motor area by 27%. There was significant correlation between the measured MT and the ratio of simulated electrode current and E-field strength (r2 = 0.95, p = 0.026). Exploratory analysis revealed significant correlations of this ratio with anatomical parameters including of the superior electrode-to-cortex distance, vertex-to-cortex distance, and brain volume (r2 > 0.96, p < 0.02). The neural activation threshold was estimated to be 0.45 ± 0.07 V/cm for 0.2 ms stimulus pulse width. Conclusion These results suggest that our individual-specific NHP E-field models appropriately capture individual anatomical variability relevant to the dosing of TES/ECT. These findings are exploratory due to the small number of subjects. Significance This work can contribute insight in NHP studies of ECT and other brain stimulation interventions, help link the results to clinical studies, and ultimately lead to more rational brain stimulation dosing paradigms. PMID:25910001

  5. Emerging Neural Stimulation Technologies for Bladder Dysfunctions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jee Woong; Kim, Daejeong; Yoo, Sangjin; Lee, Hyungsup; Lee, Gu-Haeng; Nam, Yoonkey

    2015-01-01

    In the neural engineering field, physiological dysfunctions are approached by identifying the target nerves and providing artificial stimulation to restore the function. Neural stimulation and recording technologies play a central role in this approach, and various engineering devices and stimulation techniques have become available to the medical community. For bladder control problems, electrical stimulation has been used as one of the treatments, while only a few emerging neurotechnologies have been used to tackle these problems. In this review, we introduce some recent developments in neural stimulation technologies including microelectrode array, closed-loop neural stimulation, optical stimulation, and ultrasound stimulation. PMID:25833475

  6. A shaping device for irregular electron fields for the Therac-20 accelerator.

    PubMed

    Muller-Runkel, R; Ovadia, J; Borger, F; Culbert, H; Rohowsky, B

    1985-01-01

    A device for shaping electron fields from a Therac-20 accelerator is described. The considerable advantage of continuously variable field sizes is enhanced when the shaping device is placed on the lower trimmer bars of the shorter set of electron trimmers, which remain fully adjustable. Cerrobend blocks of 1-cm thickness are sufficient for a 5% attenuation level with 20-MeV electrons and large field sizes.

  7. Adjunctive vagus nerve stimulation for treatment-resistant bipolar disorder: managing device failure or the end of battery life.

    PubMed

    Pardo, José V

    2016-03-07

    The vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) device is used not only to treat refractory seizure disorders but also mood disorders; the latter indication received CE Mark approval in 2001 and Food and Drug Administration approval in 2005. Original estimates for the end of battery life (EOBL) were approximately 6-10 years. Many neuropsychiatric patients have or will soon face EOBL. A patient with severe, life-threatening, treatment-resistant bipolar disorder underwent 9 years of stable remission following 20 months of adjunctive VNS. The device ceased operation at EOBL. Because of logistical issues, re-initiation of VNS was delayed over several months. The patient relapsed with depression, mania and mixed states, and regained remission 17 months after device replacement. This case dictates prudence in managing stable patients in remission with VNS. If the device malfunctions, urgent surgical replacement is warranted with subsequent rapid titration to previous parameters as tolerated. Several months' delay may trigger relapse and prove difficult to re-establish remission.

  8. Mean-square error due to gradiometer field measuring devices.

    PubMed

    Hatsell, C P

    1991-06-01

    Gradiometers use spatial common mode magnetic field rejection to reduce interference from distant sources. They also introduce distortion that can be severe, rendering experimental data difficult to interpret. Attempts to recover the measured magnetic field from the gradiometer output will be plagued by the nonexistence of a spatial function for deconvolution (except for first-order gradiometers), and by the high-pass nature of the spatial transform that emphasizes high spatial frequency noise. Goals of a design for a facility for measuring biomagnetic fields should be an effective shielded room and a field detector employing a first-order gradiometer.

  9. [Finite element analysis of temperature field of retina by electrical stimulation with microelectrode array].

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Qiao, Qingli; Gao, Weiping; Wu, Jun

    2014-12-01

    We studied the influence of electrode array parameters on temperature distribution to the retina during the use of retinal prosthesis in order to avoid thermal damage to retina caused by long-term electrical stimulation. Based on real epiretinal prosthesis, a three-dimensional model of electrical stimulation for retina with 4 X 4 microelectrode array had been established using the finite element software (COMSOL Multiphysics). The steady-state temperature field of electrical stimulation of the retina was calculated, and the effects of the electrode parameters such as the distance between the electrode contacts, the materials and area of the electrode contact on temperature field were considered. The maximum increase in the retina steady temperature was about 0. 004 degrees C with practical stimulation current. When the distance between the electrode contacts was changed from 130 microm to 520 microm, the temperature was reduced by about 0.006 microC. When the contact radius was doubled from 130 microm to 260 microm, the temperature decrease was about 0.005 degrees C. It was shown that there were little temperature changes in the retina with a 4 x 4 epiretinal microelectrode array, reflecting the safety of electrical stimulation. It was also shown that the maximum temperature in the retina decreased with increasing the distance between the electrode contacts, as well as increasing the area of electrode contact. However, the change of the maximum temperature was very small when the distance became larger than the diameter of electrode contact. There was no significant difference in the effects of temperature increase among the different electrode materials. Rational selection of the distance between the electrode contacts and their area in electrode design can reduce the temperature rise induced by electrical stimulation.

  10. Development and applications of tunable, narrow band lasers and stimulated Raman scattering devices for atmospheric lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkerson, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    The main thrust of the program was the study of stimulated Raman processes for application to atmospheric lidar measurements. This has involved the development of tunable lasers, the detailed study of stimulated Raman scattering, and the use of the Raman-shifted light for new measurements of molecular line strengths and line widths. The principal spectral region explored in this work was the visible and near-IR wavelengths between 500 nm and 1.5 microns. Recent alexandrite ring laser experiments are reported. The experiments involved diode injection-locking, Raman shifting, and frequency-doubling. The experiments succeeded in producing tunable light at 577 and 937 nm with line widths in the range 80-160 MHz.

  11. Field-Capable Biodetection Devices for Homeland Security Missions

    SciTech Connect

    Dougherty, G M; Clague, D S; Miles, R R

    2007-04-05

    Biodetection instrumentation that is capable of functioning effectively outside the controlled laboratory environment is critical for the detection of health threats, and is a crucial technology for Health Security. Experience in bringing technologies from the basic research laboratory to integrated fieldable instruments suggests lessons for the engineering of these systems. This overview will cover several classes of such devices, with examples from systems developed for homeland security missions by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Recent trends suggest that front-end sample processing is becoming a critical performance-determining factor for many classes of fieldable biodetection devices. This paper introduces some results of a recent study that was undertaken to assess the requirements and potential technologies for next-generation integrated sample processing.

  12. Vertical electric field stimulation of neural cells on porous amorphous carbon electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Shilpee; Sharma, Ashutosh; Basu, Bikramjit

    2014-03-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of amorphous macroporous carbon substrates as electrodes to stimulate neuronal cell proliferation in presence of external electric field. The electric field was applied perpendicular to carbon electrode, while growing mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells in vitro. The placement of the second electrode outside of the cell culture medium allows the investigation of cell response to electric field without the concurrent complexities of submerged electrodes such as potentially toxic electrode reactions, electro-kinetic flows and charge transfer (electrical current) in the cell medium. The macroporous carbon electrodes are uniquely characterized by a higher specific charge storage capacity (0.2 mC/cm2) and low impedance (3.3 k Ω at 1 kHz). When a uniform or a gradient electric field was applied perpendicular to the amorphous carbon substrate, it was found that the N2a cell viability and neurite length were higher at low electric field strengths (<= 2.5 V/cm) compared to that measured without an applied field (0 V/cm). Overall, the results of the present study unambiguously establish the uniform/gradient vertical electric field based culture protocol to stimulate neurite outgrowth and viability of nerve cells.

  13. Stimulation and release from neurons via a dual capillary collection device interfaced to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yi; Lee, Chang Young; Rubakhin, Stanislav S; Sweedler, Jonathan V

    2013-11-07

    Neuropeptides are cell to cell signaling molecules that modulate a wide range of physiological processes. Neuropeptide release has been studied in sample sizes ranging from single cells and neuronal clusters, to defined brain nuclei and large brain regions. We have developed and optimized cell stimulation and collection approaches for the efficient measurement of neuropeptide release from neuronal samples using a dual capillary system. The defining feature is a capillary that contains octadecyl-modified silica nanoparticles on its inner wall to capture and extract releasates. This collection capillary is inserted into another capillary used to deliver solutions that chemically stimulate the cells, with solution flowing up the inner capillary to facilitate peptide collection. The efficiency of peptide collection was evaluated using six peptide standards mixed in physiological saline. The extracted peptides eluted from these capillaries were characterized via matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) with low femtomole detection limits. Using the capillary collection system in small custom-fabricated culturing chambers, individual cultured neurons and neuronal clusters from the model animal Aplysia californica were stimulated with distinct neuronal secretagogues and the releasates were collected and characterized using MALDI-TOF MS.

  14. Clinical S-cone ERG recording with a commercial hand-held full-field stimulator.

    PubMed

    Marmor, Michael F; Cabael, Lorella; Shukla, Shefalee; Hwang, John C; Marcus, Mira

    2004-07-01

    Our purpose was to explore S-cone ERG protocols for a commercial full-field hand-held stimulator that contains colored LEDs, and to see whether the test would be useful as a part of routine ERG testing. S-cone responses were elicited by blue flashes over a longer-wavelength background. With the standard stimulator containing blue (461 nm), green (513 nm) and red (652 nm) LEDs, we were unable to obtain satisfactory responses. Reproducible S-cone ERGs were obtained with a stimulator that had been custom-fitted with shorter-wavelength blue (440 nm) LEDs for stimulation, and orange (590 nm) LEDs for background adaptation. S-cone responses took only a few minutes to record, and the typical waveform showed a slow peak at 45-50 ms with amplitude 3-9 microV, but ranging from 0 microV to more than 10 microV. Larger waves appeared in a patient with enhanced S-cone syndrome. S-cone responses could also be obtained with an alternating blue-orange flicker protocol. We added the S-cone response to our regular ERG protocol for a number of months. Although most normal subjects and patients showed recognizable S-cone responses with this stimulator, the amplitudes were small and there was too much variability to make the technique effective for routine clinical testing. In general, the S-cone responses followed the standard cone ERG responses in disease.

  15. Compression Stockings versus Neuromuscular Electrical Stimulation Devices in the Management of Occupational Leg Swelling.

    PubMed

    Wou, J; Williams, K J; Davies, A H

    2016-06-01

    Background Occupational edema is reported to occur in healthy individuals after working in a sitting or standing position for extensive periods of time. It can be associated with feelings of tiredness, heaviness of the legs, and pain. Three licensed medical devices were compared in their management of occupational edema. Subjects and Methods A total of 10 subjects were recruited from a clinical workspace. Right leg volume and great saphenous vein diameter was measured in the morning, and 6 hours later. On subsequent separate days, grade 2 graduated compression stockings (Active Compression Socks, Mediven, United Kingdom), geko (Firstkind Ltd, United Kingdom), and Revitive (Actegy Ltd, United Kingdom) were used bilaterally according to manufacturer's instructions. Results Leg volumes increased by median 41 mL (p < 0.05) with no intervention. Percentage increase in leg volume was found to be significantly reduced by stockings compared with control (-1.7%, p < 0.01), and were more effective than electrical devices. Changes in vein diameter poorly correlate with leg volume changes. Conclusion Occupational edema can occur over as little as 6 hours. All devices were well tolerated and reduced leg swelling. Stockings were the only device to significantly reduce leg swelling in this small trial.

  16. Divergent endometrial inflammatory cytokine expression at peri-implantation period and after the stimulation by copper intrauterine device.

    PubMed

    Chou, Chia-Hung; Chen, Shee-Uan; Shun, Chia-Tung; Tsao, Po-Nien; Yang, Yu-Shih; Yang, Jehn-Hsiahn

    2015-10-15

    Endometrial inflammation has contradictory effects. The one occurring at peri-implantation period is favourable for embryo implantation, whereas the other occurring after the stimulation by copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) prevents from embryo implantation. In this study, 8 week female ICR mice were used to investigate the endometrial inflammation, in which they were at proestrus stage (Group 1), at peri-implantation period (Group 2), and had a copper wire implanted into right uterine horn (Group 3). Cytokine array revealed that two cytokines were highly expressed in Group 2 and Group 3 as compared with Group 1, and seven cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), had selectively strong expression in Group 3. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated prominent TNF-α staining on the endometrium after Cu-IUD stimulation, and in vitro culture of human endometrial glandular cells with Cu induced TNF-α secretion. The increased TNF-α concentration enhanced in vitro THP-1 cells chemotaxis, and reduced embryo implantation rates. These results suggest that inflammatory cytokine profiles of endometrium are different between those at peri-implantation period and after Cu-IUD stimulation, and TNF-α is the one with selectively strong expression in the latter. It might account for the contradictory biological effects of endometrial inflammation.

  17. Divergent endometrial inflammatory cytokine expression at peri-implantation period and after the stimulation by copper intrauterine device

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Chia-Hung; Chen, Shee-Uan; Shun, Chia-Tung; Tsao, Po-Nien; Yang, Yu-Shih; Yang, Jehn-Hsiahn

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial inflammation has contradictory effects. The one occurring at peri-implantation period is favourable for embryo implantation, whereas the other occurring after the stimulation by copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD) prevents from embryo implantation. In this study, 8 week female ICR mice were used to investigate the endometrial inflammation, in which they were at proestrus stage (Group 1), at peri-implantation period (Group 2), and had a copper wire implanted into right uterine horn (Group 3). Cytokine array revealed that two cytokines were highly expressed in Group 2 and Group 3 as compared with Group 1, and seven cytokines, including tumour necrosis factor α (TNF-α), had selectively strong expression in Group 3. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated prominent TNF-α staining on the endometrium after Cu-IUD stimulation, and in vitro culture of human endometrial glandular cells with Cu induced TNF-α secretion. The increased TNF-α concentration enhanced in vitro THP-1 cells chemotaxis, and reduced embryo implantation rates. These results suggest that inflammatory cytokine profiles of endometrium are different between those at peri-implantation period and after Cu-IUD stimulation, and TNF-α is the one with selectively strong expression in the latter. It might account for the contradictory biological effects of endometrial inflammation. PMID:26469146

  18. Microfluidic Device for the Selective Chemical Stimulation of Neurons and Characterization of Peptide Release with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Neuropeptides are synthesized in and released from neurons and are involved in a wide range of physiological processes, including temperature homeostasis, learning, memory, and disease. When working with sparse neuronal networks, the ability to collect and characterize small sample volumes is important as neurons often release only a small proportion of their mass-limited content. Microfluidic systems are well suited for the study of neuropeptides. They offer the ability to control and manipulate the extracellular environment and small sample volumes, thereby reducing the dilution of peptides following release. We present an approach for the culture and stimulation of a neuronal network within a microfluidic device, subsequent collection of the released peptides, and their detection via mass spectrometry. The system employs microvalve-controlled stimulation channels to selectively stimulate a low-density neuronal culture, allowing us to determine the temporal onset of peptide release. Released peptides from the well-characterized, peptidergic bag cell neurons of Aplysia californica were collected and their temporal pattern of release was characterized with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. We show a robust difference in the timing of release for chemical solutions containing elevated K+ (7 ± 3 min), when compared to insulin (19 ± 7 min) (p < 0.000 01). PMID:23004687

  19. Electric-field enhanced performance in catalysis and solid-state devices involving gases

    DOEpatents

    Blackburn, Bryan M.; Wachsman, Eric D.; Van Assche, IV, Frederick Martin

    2015-05-19

    Electrode configurations for electric-field enhanced performance in catalysis and solid-state devices involving gases are provided. According to an embodiment, electric-field electrodes can be incorporated in devices such as gas sensors and fuel cells to shape an electric field provided with respect to sensing electrodes for the gas sensors and surfaces of the fuel cells. The shaped electric fields can alter surface dynamics, system thermodynamics, reaction kinetics, and adsorption/desorption processes. In one embodiment, ring-shaped electric-field electrodes can be provided around sensing electrodes of a planar gas sensor.

  20. Particle-Based Microfluidic Device for Providing High Magnetic Field Gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Adam Y. (Inventor); Wong, Tak S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A microfluidic device for manipulating particles in a fluid has a device body that defines a main channel therein, in which the main channel has an inlet and an outlet. The device body further defines a particulate diverting channel therein, the particulate diverting channel being in fluid connection with the main channel between the inlet and the outlet of the main channel and having a particulate outlet. The microfluidic device also has a plurality of microparticles arranged proximate or in the main channel between the inlet of the main channel and the fluid connection of the particulate diverting channel to the main channel. The plurality of microparticles each comprises a material in a composition thereof having a magnetic susceptibility suitable to cause concentration of magnetic field lines of an applied magnetic field while in operation. A microfluidic particle-manipulation system has a microfluidic particle-manipulation device and a magnet disposed proximate the microfluidic particle-manipulation device.

  1. Impact of the gyral geometry on the electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Thielscher, Axel; Opitz, Alexander; Windhoff, Mirko

    2011-01-01

    The spatial extent of the effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) on neural tissue is only coarsely understood. One key problem is the realistic calculation of the electric field induced in the brain, which proves difficult due to the complex gyral folding pattern that results in an inhomogeneous conductivity distribution within the skull. We used the finite element method (FEM) together with a high-resolution volume mesh of the human head to better characterize the field induced in cortical gray matter (GM). The volume mesh was constructed from T1-weighted structural magnetic resonance images to allow for an anatomically accurate modeling of the gyrification pattern. Five tissue types were taken into account, corresponding to skin, skull, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) including the ventricles as well as cortical gray and white matter. We characterized the effect of the current direction on the electric field distribution in GM. Importantly, the field strength in GM was increased by up to 51% when the induced currents were perpendicular to the local gyrus orientation. This effect was mainly restricted to the gyral crowns and lips, but did not extend into the sulcal walls. As a result, the focality of the fields induced in GM was increased. This enhancement effect might in part underlie the dependency of stimulation thresholds on coil orientation, as commonly observed in TMS motor cortex studies. In contrast to the clear-cut effects of the gyrification pattern on the induced field strength, current directions were predominantly influenced by the CSF-skull boundary.

  2. A study of the suitability of ferrite for use in low-field insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1995-02-01

    Most insertion devices built to date use rare-earth permanent-magnet materials, which have a high remanent field and are more expensive than many other permanent-magnet materials. Low-field insertion devices could use less-expensive, lower performance magnetic materials if they had suitable magnetic characteristics. These materials must be resistant to demagnetization during construction and operation of the insertion device, have uniform magnetization, possess low minor-axis magnetic moments, and have small minor field components on the surfaces. This paper describes an investigation to determine if ferrite possesses magnetic qualities suitable for insertion device applications. The type of ferrite investigated, MMPA Ceramic 8 from Stackpole Inc., was found to be acceptable for insertion device applications.

  3. Handheld deep ultraviolet emission device based on aluminum nitride quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field emitters.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Iwayama, Sho; Saito, Takao; Kawakami, Yasuyuki; Kubo, Fumio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2012-10-22

    We report the successful fabrication of a compact deep ultraviolet emission device via a marriage of AlGaN quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field electron emitters. The device demonstrated a 20-mW deep ultraviolet output power and an approximately 4% power efficiency. The performance of this device may lead toward the realization of an environmentally friendly, convenient and practical deep ultraviolet light source.

  4. An external portable device for adaptive deep brain stimulation (aDBS) clinical research in advanced Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Arlotti, Mattia; Rossi, Lorenzo; Rosa, Manuela; Marceglia, Sara; Priori, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    Compared to conventional deep brain stimulation (DBS) for patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD), the newer approach of adaptive DBS (aDBS), regulating stimulation on the basis of the patient's clinical state, promises to achieve better clinical outcomes, avoid adverse-effects and save time for tuning parameters. A remaining challenge before aDBS comes into practical use is to prove its feasibility and its effectiveness in larger groups of patients and in more ecological conditions. We developed an external portable aDBS system prototype designed for clinical testing in freely-moving PD patients with externalized DBS electrodes. From a single-channel bipolar artifact-free recording, it analyses local field potentials (LFPs), during ongoing DBS for tuning stimulation parameters, independent from the specific feedback algorithm implemented. We validated the aDBS system in vitro, by testing both its sensing and closed-loop stimulation capabilities, and then tested it in vivo, focusing on the sensing capabilities. By applying the aDBS system prototype in a patient with PD, we provided evidence that it can track levodopa and DBS-induced LFP spectral power changes among different patient's clinical states. Our system, intended for testing LFP-based feedback strategies for aDBS, should help understanding how and whether aDBS therapy works in PD and indicating future technical and clinical advances.

  5. Direct Nanoscale Sensing of the Internal Electric Field in Operating Semiconductor Devices Using Single Electron Spins.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Takayuki; Naruki, Wataru; Tahara, Kosuke; Makino, Toshiharu; Kato, Hiromitsu; Ogura, Masahiko; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Hatano, Mutsuko

    2017-02-28

    The electric field inside semiconductor devices is a key physical parameter that determines the properties of the devices. However, techniques based on scanning probe microscopy are limited to sensing at the surface only. Here, we demonstrate the direct sensing of the internal electric field in diamond power devices using single nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers. The NV center embedded inside the device acts as a nanoscale electric field sensor. We fabricated vertical diamond p-i-n diodes containing the single NV centers. By performing optically detected magnetic resonance measurements under reverse-biased conditions with an applied voltage of up to 150 V, we found a large splitting in the magnetic resonance frequencies. This indicated that the NV center senses the transverse electric field in the space-charge region formed in the i-layer. The experimentally obtained electric field values are in good agreement with those calculated by a device simulator. Furthermore, we demonstrate the sensing of the electric field in different directions by utilizing NV centers with different N-V axes. This direct and quantitative sensing method using an electron spin in a wide-band-gap material provides a way to monitor the electric field in operating semiconductor devices.

  6. Fast multigrid-based computation of the induced electric field for transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2012-12-07

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), the distribution of the induced electric field, and the affected brain areas, depends on the position of the stimulation coil and the individual geometry of the head and brain. The distribution of the induced electric field in realistic anatomies can be modelled using computational methods. However, existing computational methods for accurately determining the induced electric field in realistic anatomical models have suffered from long computation times, typically in the range of tens of minutes or longer. This paper presents a matrix-free implementation of the finite-element method with a geometric multigrid method that can potentially reduce the computation time to several seconds or less even when using an ordinary computer. The performance of the method is studied by computing the induced electric field in two anatomically realistic models. An idealized two-loop coil is used as the stimulating coil. Multiple computational grid resolutions ranging from 2 to 0.25 mm are used. The results show that, for macroscopic modelling of the electric field in an anatomically realistic model, computational grid resolutions of 1 mm or 2 mm appear to provide good numerical accuracy compared to higher resolutions. The multigrid iteration typically converges in less than ten iterations independent of the grid resolution. Even without parallelization, each iteration takes about 1.0 s or 0.1 s for the 1 and 2 mm resolutions, respectively. This suggests that calculating the electric field with sufficient accuracy in real time is feasible.

  7. Radio frequency energy harvesting from a feeding source in a passive deep brain stimulation device for murine preclinical research.

    PubMed

    Hosain, Md Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah J; Samad, Mst Fateha; Kale, Rajas P; Bennet, Kevin E; Manciu, Felicia S; Berk, Michael

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents the development of an energy harvesting circuit for use with a head-mountable deep brain stimulation (DBS) device. It consists of a circular planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) and a Schottky diode-based Cockcroft-Walton 4-voltage rectifier. The PIFA has the volume of π × 10(2) × 1.5 mm(3), resonance frequency of 915 MHz, and bandwidth of 16 MHz (909-925 MHz) at a return loss of -10 dB. The rectifier offers maximum efficiency of 78% for the input power of -5 dBm at a 5 kΩ load resistance. The developed rectenna operates efficiently at 915 MHz for the input power within -15 dBm to +5 dBm. For operating a DBS device, the DC voltage of 2 V is recorded from the rectenna terminal at a distance of 55 cm away from a 26.77 dBm transmitter in free space. An in-vitro test of the DBS device is presented.

  8. Maintaining ocular safety with light exposure, focusing on devices for optogenetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Boyuan; Vakulenko, Maksim; Min, Seok-Hong; Hauswirth, William W.; Nirenberg, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetics methods are rapidly being developed as therapeutic tools for treating neurological diseases, in particular, retinal degenerative diseases. A critical component of the development is testing the safety of the light stimulation used to activate the optogenetic proteins. While the stimulation needs to be sufficient to produce neural responses in the targeted retinal cell class, it also needs to be below photochemical and photothermal limits known to cause ocular damage. The maximal permissible exposure is determined by a variety of factors, including wavelength, exposure duration, visual angle, pupil size, pulse width, pulse pattern, and repetition frequency. In this paper, we develop utilities to systematically and efficiently assess the contributions of these parameters in relation to the limits, following directly from the 2014 American National Standards Institute (ANSI). We also provide an array of stimulus protocols that fall within the bounds of both safety and effectiveness. Additional verification of safety is provided with a case study in rats using one of these protocols. PMID:26882975

  9. Spectral distribution of local field potential responses to electrical stimulation of the retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Yan T.; Halupka, Kerry; Kameneva, Tatiana; Cloherty, Shaun L.; Grayden, David B.; Burkitt, Anthony N.; Meffin, Hamish; Shivdasani, Mohit N.

    2016-06-01

    Objective. Different frequency bands of the local field potential (LFP) have been shown to reflect neuronal activity occurring at varying cortical scales. As such, recordings of the LFP may offer a novel way to test the efficacy of neural prostheses and allow improvement of stimulation strategies via neural feedback. Here we use LFP measurements from visual cortex to characterize neural responses to electrical stimulation of the retina. We aim to show that the LFP is a viable signal that contains sufficient information to optimize the performance of sensory neural prostheses. Approach. Clinically relevant electrode arrays were implanted in the suprachoroidal space of one eye in four felines. LFPs were simultaneously recorded in response to stimulation of individual electrodes using penetrating microelectrode arrays from the visual cortex. The frequency response of each electrode was extracted using multi-taper spectral analysis and the uniqueness of the responses was determined via a linear decoder. Main results. We found that cortical LFPs are reliably modulated by electrical stimulation of the retina and that the responses are spatially localized. We further characterized the spectral distribution of responses, with maximum information being contained in the low and high gamma bands. Finally, we found that LFP responses are unique to a large range of stimulus parameters (∼40) with a maximum conveyable information rate of 6.1 bits. Significance. These results show that the LFP can be used to validate responses to electrical stimulation of the retina and we provide the first steps towards using these responses to provide more efficacious stimulation strategies.

  10. Stimulated Brillouin scattering in the field of a two-dimensionally localized pumping wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solikhov, D. K.; Dvinin, S. A.

    2016-06-01

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering of electromagnetic waves in the field of a two-dimensionally localized pump wave at arbitrary scattering angles in the regime of forward scattering is analyzed. Spatial variations in the amplitudes of interacting waves are studied for different values of the pump field and different dimensions of the pump wave localization region. The intensity of scattered radiation is determined as a function of the scattering angle and the dimensions of the pump wave localization region. It is shown that the intensity increases with increasing scattering angle.

  11. 12. NEAR FIELD HORN (TESTING DEVICE FOR EMIITER/ANTENNA ARRAY SYSTEM) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. NEAR FIELD HORN (TESTING DEVICE FOR EMIITER/ANTENNA ARRAY SYSTEM) AT FACE "A" - VIEW IS LOOKING SOUTH 20° EAST. - Cape Cod Air Station, Massachusetts Military Reservation, Sandwich, Barnstable County, MA

  12. Electric field depth–focality tradeoff in transcranial magnetic stimulation: simulation comparison of 50 coil designs

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-De; Lisanby, Sarah H.; Peterchev, Angel V.

    2012-01-01

    Background Various transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) coil designs are available or have been proposed. However, key coil characteristics such as electric field focality and attenuation in depth have not been adequately compared. Knowledge of the coil focality and depth characteristics can help TMS researchers and clinicians with coil selection and interpretation of TMS studies. Objective To quantify the electric field focality and depth of penetration of various TMS coils. Methods The electric field distributions induced by 50 TMS coils were simulated in a spherical human head model using the finite element method. For each coil design, we quantified the electric field penetration by the half-value depth, d1/2, and focality by the tangential spread, S1/2, defined as the half-value volume (V1/2) divided by the half-value depth, S1/2 = V1/2/d1/2. Results The 50 TMS coils exhibit a wide range of electric field focality and depth, but all followed a depth–focality tradeoff: coils with larger half-value depth cannot be as focal as more superficial coils. The ranges of achievable d1/2 are similar between coils producing circular and figure-8 electric field patterns, ranging 1.0–3.5 cm and 0.9–3.4 cm, respectively. However, figure-8 field coils are more focal, having S1/2 as low as 5 cm2 compared to 34 cm2 for circular field coils. Conclusions For any coil design, the ability to directly stimulate deeper brain structures is obtained at the expense of inducing wider electrical field spread. Novel coil designs should be benchmarked against comparison coils with consistent metrics such as d1/2 and S1/2. PMID:22483681

  13. PT-symmetric planar devices for field transformation and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valagiannopoulos, C. A.; Monticone, F.; Alù, A.

    2016-04-01

    The powerful tools of transformation optics (TO) allow an effective distortion of a region of space by carefully engineering the material inhomogeneity and anisotropy, and have been successfully applied in recent years to control electromagnetic fields in many different scenarios, e.g., to realize invisibility cloaks and planar lenses. For various field transformations, it is not necessary to use volumetric inhomogeneous materials, and suitably designed ultrathin metasurfaces with tailored spatial or spectral responses may be able to realize similar functionalities within smaller footprints and more robust mechanisms. Here, inspired by the concept of metamaterial TO lenses, we discuss field transformations enabled by parity-time (PT) symmetric metasurfaces, which can emulate negative refraction. We first analyze a simple realization based on homogeneous and local metasurfaces to achieve negative refraction and imaging, and we then extend our results to arbitrary PT-symmetric two-port networks to realize aberration-free planar imaging.

  14. Evaluation of the electric field in the brain during transcranial direct current stimulation: A sensitivity analysis.

    PubMed

    Santos, Laura; Martinho, Miguel; Salvador, Ricardo; Wenger, Cornelia; Fernandes, Sofia R; Ripolles, Oscar; Ruffini, Giulio; Miranda, Pedro C; Santos, Laura; Martinho, Miguel; Salvador, Ricardo; Wenger, Cornelia; Fernandes, Sofia R; Ripolles, Oscar; Ruffini, Giulio; Miranda, Pedro C; Santos, Laura; Martinho, Miguel; Wenger, Cornelia; Salvador, Ricardo; Ripolles, Oscar; Ruffini, Giulio; Fernandes, Sofia R; Miranda, Pedro C

    2016-08-01

    The use of computational modeling studies accounts currently for the best approach to predict the electric field (E-field) distribution in transcranial direct current stimulation. As with any model, the values attributed to the physical properties, namely the electrical conductivity of the tissues, affect the predicted E-field distribution. A wide range of values for the conductivity of most tissues is reported in the literature. In this work, we used the finite element method to compute the E-field induced in a realistic human head model for two electrode montages targeting the left dorso-lateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). A systematic analysis of the effect of different isotropic conductivity profiles on the E-field distribution was performed for the standard bipolar 7×5 cm(2) electrodes configuration and also for an optimized multielectrode montage. Average values of the E-field's magnitude, normal and tangential components were calculated in the target region in the left DLPFC. Results show that the field decreases with increasing scalp, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and grey matter (GM) conductivities, while the opposite is observed for the skull and white matter conductivities. The tissues whose conductivity most affects the E-field in the cortex are the scalp and the CSF, followed by the GM and the skull. Uncertainties in the conductivity of individual tissues may affect electric field values by up to about 80%.

  15. Device Comparison for Determining Field Soil Moisture Content

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    in operational construction activities . Soils ranged from fine-grained silts and clays to coarse-grained gravels and crushed limestone. This testing...Comparison of field data ....................................................................................................... 19 4 Data Analysis ... activity is most commonly and expediently conducted using a nuclear densometer or sand cone for density and a nuclear densometer or laboratory oven

  16. Short-term field stimulation mimics synaptic maturation of hippocampal synapses

    PubMed Central

    Bagley, Elena E; Westbrook, Gary L

    2012-01-01

    Many aspects of synaptic transmission are modified during development, reflecting not only the consequence of developmental programmes of gene expression, but also the effects of ongoing neural activity. We investigated the role of synaptic activity in the maturation of Schaffer collateral (SC)–CA1 synapses using sustained low frequency field stimulation of acute brain slices. Between postnatal days 4–6 and 14–16, mouse SC–CA1 synapses in naïve slices showed a developmental decrease in the probability of transmitter release (Pr) and an increase in the contribution of GluN2A (NR2A) subunits to the NMDA receptor-mediated excitatory postsynaptic current (EPSC). Surprisingly, these developmental changes could be mimicked by short term (4 h) in vitro synaptic activity in slices taken from postnatal days (PND) 4–6 mice. However, different activity levels were required to alter release probability compared to the NMDA receptor subunit composition. Spontaneous synaptic activity was sufficient to alter the NMDA receptor subunit composition, but sustained low-frequency field stimulation of the brain slice (0.1 Hz, 4 h) was necessary to reduce release probability, as assessed 1 h following the cessation of stimulation. The protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin blocked the effect of field stimulation on release probability. These results indicate that features of mature excitatory synapses can be rapidly induced in immature neurons. The activity dependence of the Pr and NMDA receptor subunit composition serves as a sensitive indicator of prior neural activity, and provides dual mechanisms for homeostatic control of excitatory synaptic efficacy. PMID:22351628

  17. Endogenous and exogenous electric fields as modifiers of brain activity: rational design of noninvasive brain stimulation with transcranial alternating current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Fröhlich, Flavio

    2014-03-01

    Synchronized neuronal activity in the cortex generates weak electric fields that are routinely measured in humans and animal models by electroencephalography and local field potential recordings. Traditionally, these endogenous electric fields have been considered to be an epiphenomenon of brain activity. Recent work has demonstrated that active cortical networks are surprisingly susceptible to weak perturbations of the membrane voltage of a large number of neurons by electric fields. Simultaneously, noninvasive brain stimulation with weak, exogenous electric fields (transcranial current stimulation, TCS) has undergone a renaissance due to the broad scope of its possible applications in modulating brain activity for cognitive enhancement and treatment of brain disorders. This review aims to interface the recent developments in the study of both endogenous and exogenous electric fields, with a particular focus on rhythmic stimulation for the modulation of cortical oscillations. The main goal is to provide a starting point for the use of rational design for the development of novel mechanism-based TCS therapeutics based on transcranial alternating current stimulation, for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses.

  18. Endogenous and exogenous electric fields as modifiers of brain activity: rational design of noninvasive brain stimulation with transcranial alternating current stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Fröhlich, Flavio

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized neuronal activity in the cortex generates weak electric fields that are routinely measured in humans and animal models by electroencephalography and local field potential recordings. Traditionally, these endogenous electric fields have been considered to be an epiphenomenon of brain activity. Recent work has demonstrated that active cortical networks are surprisingly susceptible to weak perturbations of the membrane voltage of a large number of neurons by electric fields. Simultaneously, noninvasive brain stimulation with weak, exogenous electric fields (transcranial current stimulation, TCS) has undergone a renaissance due to the broad scope of its possible applications in modulating brain activity for cognitive enhancement and treatment of brain disorders. This review aims to interface the recent developments in the study of both endogenous and exogenous electric fields, with a particular focus on rhythmic stimulation for the modulation of cortical oscillations. The main goal is to provide a starting point for the use of rational design for the development of novel mechanism-based TCS therapeutics based on transcranial alternating current stimulation, for the treatment of psychiatric illnesses. PMID:24733974

  19. Femoral perfusion after pulsed electromagnetic field stimulation in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis model.

    PubMed

    Ikegami, Akira; Ueshima, Keiichiro; Saito, Masazumi; Ikoma, Kazuya; Fujioka, Mikihiro; Hayashi, Shigeki; Ishida, Masashi; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Mazda, Osam; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2015-07-01

    This study was designed to evaluate femoral perfusion after pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) stimulation in a steroid-induced osteonecrosis rabbit model by dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). Steroid-induced osteonecrosis was produced by single intramuscular injection of methylprednisolone in 15 rabbits. Eight rabbits underwent PEMF stimulation (PEMF group) and seven did not (control group). DCE-MRI was performed before PEMF stimulation, immediately before steroid administration, and 1, 5, 10, and 14 days after steroid administration. Regions of interest were set in the bilateral proximal femora. Enhancement ratio (ER), initial slope (IS), and area under the curve (AUC) were analyzed. ER, IS, and AUC in the control group significantly decreased after steroid administration compared with before administration (P<0.05). In PEMF group, IS significantly decreased; however, ER and AUC showed no significant differences after steroid administration compared with before. ER and IS in PEMF group were higher than in control group until 10th day, and AUC was higher until 5th day after steroid administration (P<0.05). PEMF stimulation restrains the decrease in blood flow after steroid administration.

  20. Lorentz factor determination for local electric fields in semiconductor devices utilizing hyper-thin dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    McPherson, J. W.

    2015-11-28

    The local electric field (the field that distorts, polarizes, and weakens polar molecular bonds in dielectrics) has been investigated for hyper-thin dielectrics. Hyper-thin dielectrics are currently required for advanced semiconductor devices. In the work presented, it is shown that the common practice of using a Lorentz factor of L = 1/3, to describe the local electric field in a dielectric layer, remains valid for hyper-thin dielectrics. However, at the very edge of device structures, a rise in the macroscopic/Maxwell electric field E{sub diel} occurs and this causes a sharp rise in the effective Lorentz factor L{sub eff}. At capacitor and transistor edges, L{sub eff} is found to increase to a value 2/3 < L{sub eff} < 1. The increase in L{sub eff} results in a local electric field, at device edge, that is 50%–100% greater than in the bulk of the dielectric. This increase in local electric field serves to weaken polar bonds thus making them more susceptible to breakage by standard Boltzmann and/or current-driven processes. This has important time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) implications for all electronic devices utilizing polar materials, including GaN devices that suffer from device-edge TDDB.

  1. The Morphological and Molecular Changes of Brain Cells Exposed to Direct Current Electric Field Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Pelletier, Simon J.; Lagacé, Marie; St-Amour, Isabelle; Arsenault, Dany; Cisbani, Giulia; Chabrat, Audrey; Fecteau, Shirley; Lévesque, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background: The application of low-intensity direct current electric fields has been experimentally used in the clinic to treat a number of brain disorders, predominantly using transcranial direct current stimulation approaches. However, the cellular and molecular changes induced by such treatment remain largely unknown. Methods: Here, we tested various intensities of direct current electric fields (0, 25, 50, and 100V/m) in a well-controlled in vitro environment in order to investigate the responses of neurons, microglia, and astrocytes to this type of stimulation. This included morphological assessments of the cells, viability, as well as shape and fiber outgrowth relative to the orientation of the direct current electric field. We also undertook enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and western immunoblotting to identify which molecular pathways were affected by direct current electric fields. Results: In response to direct current electric field, neurons developed an elongated cell body shape with neurite outgrowth that was associated with a significant increase in growth associated protein-43. Fetal midbrain dopaminergic explants grown in a collagen gel matrix also showed a reorientation of their neurites towards the cathode. BV2 microglial cells adopted distinct morphological changes with an increase in cyclooxygenase-2 expression, but these were dependent on whether they had already been activated with lipopolysaccharide. Finally, astrocytes displayed elongated cell bodies with cellular filopodia that were oriented perpendicularly to the direct current electric field. Conclusion: We show that cells of the central nervous system can respond to direct current electric fields both in terms of their morphological shape and molecular expression of certain proteins, and this in turn can help us to begin understand the mechanisms underlying the clinical benefits of direct current electric field. PMID:25522422

  2. Simulation of RF-fields in a fusion device

    SciTech Connect

    De Witte, Dieter; Bogaert, Ignace; De Zutter, Daniel; Van Oost, Guido; Van Eester, Dirk

    2009-11-26

    In this paper the problem of scattering off a fusion plasma is approached from the point of view of integral equations. Using the volume equivalence principle an integral equation is derived which describes the electromagnetic fields in a plasma. The equation is discretized with MoM using conforming basis functions. This reduces the problem to solving a dense matrix equation. This can be done iteratively. Each iteration can be sped up using FFTs.

  3. Simulation and visualization of velocity fields in simple electrokinetic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahanti, Prasun; Taylor, Thomas; Cochran, Douglas; Keebaugh, Michael; Hayes, Mark A.

    2013-12-01

    Capillary electrophoresis and similar techniques which use an electrified contracting-flow interface (gradient elution moving boundary electrophoresis, electrophoretic exclusion, for examples) are widely used, but the detailed flow dynamics and local electric field effects within this zone have only recently been quantitatively investigated. The motivating force behind this work is establishing particle flow based visualization tools enabling advances for arbitrary interfacial designs beyond this traditional flow/electric field interface. These tools work with pre-computed 2-dimensional fundamental interacting fields which govern particle and(or) fluid flow and can now be obtained from various computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software packages. The particle-flow visualization calculations implemented in the tool and are built upon a solid foundation in fluid dynamics. The module developed in here provides a simulated video particle observation tool which generates a fast check for legitimacy. Further, estimating the accuracy and precision of full 2-D and 3-D simulation is notoriously difficult and a centerline estimation is used to quickly and easily quantitate behaviors in support of decision points. This tool and the recent quantitative assessment of particle behavior within the interfacial area have set the stage for new designs which can emphasize advantageous behaviors not offered by the traditional configuration.

  4. Electric field stimulation can increase protein synthesis in articular cartilage explants.

    PubMed

    MacGinitie, L A; Gluzband, Y A; Grodzinsky, A J

    1994-03-01

    It has been hypothesized that the electric fields associated with the dynamic loading of cartilage may affect its growth, remodeling, and biosynthesis. While the application of exogenous fields has been shown to modulate cartilage biosynthesis, it is not known what range of field magnitudes and frequencies can alter biosynthesis and how they relate to the magnitudes and frequencies of endogenous fields. Such information is necessary to understand and identify mechanisms by which fields may act on cartilage metabolism. In this study, incorporation of 35S-methionine was used as a marker for electric field-induced changes in chondrocyte protein synthesis in disks of cartilage from the femoropatellar groove of 1 to 2-week-old calves. The cartilage was stimulated sinusoidally at 1, 10, 100, 10(3), and 10(4) Hz with current densities of 10-30 mA/cm2. Incorporation was assessed in control disks maintained in the absence of applied current at 37, 41, and 43 degrees C. The possibility that applied currents would induce synthesis of the same stress proteins that are caused by heating or other mechanisms was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and examination of gel fluorographs. Total radiolabel incorporation in cartilage that had been stimulated relative to incorporation in the controls increased with current density magnitudes greater than 10 mA/cm2. The increase was greatest at 100 Hz and 1 kHz, and it depended on the position on the joint surface from which the cartilage samples were taken. Together, these results suggest that endogenous electric fields could affect cartilage biosynthesis. Stress proteins were not induced at any current density when the electrodes were electrically connected but chemically isolated from the media by agarose bridges. Stress proteins were observed for disks incubated at temperatures greater than 39 degrees C (no field) and when the stimulating platinum electrodes were in direct contact with the media

  5. The optical wing aligning device of the Langley Field tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norton, F H; Bacon, D L

    1921-01-01

    Described here is a convenient and accurate method of aligning the wing chord with the airflow. The device was developed to permit rapid and accurate alignment of airfoils and models with the airstream passing through the tunnel. It consists of three main parts: a projector, a reflector, and a target. The arrangement, which is shown in a figure, has proven satisfactory in operation. It is far better than the old method of sighting across a long batten, as the operator of a balance may see the target and correctly judge the accuracy of his alignment. Whereas the old method required two operators and several minutes time to align to within 1/10 degree, this method enables one operator to align a wing to within 1/100 of a degree in a few seconds. This method also has the advantage of being able to measure the angle of the wing while the tunnel is running. Thus, the true angle of incidence is shown.

  6. [Negative air ions generated by plants upon pulsed electric field stimulation applied to soil].

    PubMed

    Wu, Ren-ye; Deng, Chuan-yuan; Yang, Zhi-jian; Weng, Hai-yong; Zhu, Tie-jun-rong; Zheng, Jin-gui

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigated the capacity of plants (Schlumbergera truncata, Aloe vera var. chinensis, Chlorophytum comosum, Schlumbergera bridgesii, Gymnocalycium mihanovichii var. friedrichii, Aspidistra elatior, Cymbidium kanran, Echinocactus grusonii, Agave americana var. marginata, Asparagus setaceus) to generate negative air ions (NAI) under pulsed electric field stimulation. The results showed that single plant generated low amounts of NAI in natural condition. The capacity of C. comosum and G. mihanovichii var. friedrichii generated most NAI among the above ten species, with a daily average of 43 ion · cm(-3). The least one was A. americana var. marginata with the value of 19 ion · cm(-3). When proper pulsed electric field stimulation was applied to soil, the NAI of ten plant species were greatly improved. The effect of pulsed electric field u3 (average voltage over the pulse period was 2.0 x 10(4) V, pulse frequency was 1 Hz, and pulse duration was 50 ms) was the greatest. The mean NAI concentration of C. kanran was the highest 1454967 ion · cm(-3), which was 48498.9 times as much as that in natural condition. The lowest one was S. truncata with the value of 34567 ion · cm(-3), which was 843.1 times as much as that in natural condition. The capacity of the same plants to generate negative air ion varied extremely under different intensity pulsed electric fields.

  7. Spatiotemporal structure of intracranial electric fields induced by transcranial electric stimulation in humans and nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Alexander; Falchier, Arnaud; Yan, Chao-Gan; Yeagle, Erin M; Linn, Gary S; Megevand, Pierre; Thielscher, Axel; Deborah A, Ross; Milham, Michael P; Mehta, Ashesh D; Schroeder, Charles E

    2016-08-18

    Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) is an emerging technique, developed to non-invasively modulate brain function. However, the spatiotemporal distribution of the intracranial electric fields induced by TES remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how much current actually reaches the brain, and how it distributes across the brain. Lack of this basic information precludes a firm mechanistic understanding of TES effects. In this study we directly measure the spatial and temporal characteristics of the electric field generated by TES using stereotactic EEG (s-EEG) electrode arrays implanted in cebus monkeys and surgical epilepsy patients. We found a small frequency dependent decrease (10%) in magnitudes of TES induced potentials and negligible phase shifts over space. Electric field strengths were strongest in superficial brain regions with maximum values of about 0.5 mV/mm. Our results provide crucial information of the underlying biophysics in TES applications in humans and the optimization and design of TES stimulation protocols. In addition, our findings have broad implications concerning electric field propagation in non-invasive recording techniques such as EEG/MEG.

  8. Spatiotemporal structure of intracranial electric fields induced by transcranial electric stimulation in humans and nonhuman primates

    PubMed Central

    Opitz, Alexander; Falchier, Arnaud; Yan, Chao-Gan; Yeagle, Erin M.; Linn, Gary S.; Megevand, Pierre; Thielscher, Axel; Deborah A., Ross; Milham, Michael P.; Mehta, Ashesh D.; Schroeder, Charles E.

    2016-01-01

    Transcranial electric stimulation (TES) is an emerging technique, developed to non-invasively modulate brain function. However, the spatiotemporal distribution of the intracranial electric fields induced by TES remains poorly understood. In particular, it is unclear how much current actually reaches the brain, and how it distributes across the brain. Lack of this basic information precludes a firm mechanistic understanding of TES effects. In this study we directly measure the spatial and temporal characteristics of the electric field generated by TES using stereotactic EEG (s-EEG) electrode arrays implanted in cebus monkeys and surgical epilepsy patients. We found a small frequency dependent decrease (10%) in magnitudes of TES induced potentials and negligible phase shifts over space. Electric field strengths were strongest in superficial brain regions with maximum values of about 0.5 mV/mm. Our results provide crucial information of the underlying biophysics in TES applications in humans and the optimization and design of TES stimulation protocols. In addition, our findings have broad implications concerning electric field propagation in non-invasive recording techniques such as EEG/MEG. PMID:27535462

  9. Noise Studies on Injected-Beam Crossed-Field Devices.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-01

    In the gyrotron, where l magnetron injection guns are used, noise under crossed-field conditions is a limiting factor in the performance of the gun...charge I affected the behavior of the beam. Two factors which seemed to give rise to these effects appeared to be in the noise generated near the cathode...circuit I bars, or 0.270". The essential electrical properties of the meander circuit, the delay ratio (C/ vph ) and coupling impedance at the level of the

  10. Power and signal transmission protocol for a contactless subdural spinal cord stimulation device.

    PubMed

    Song, Suk-Heung; Gillies, George T; Howard, Matthew A; Kuhnley, Brian; Utz, Marcel

    2013-02-01

    Wireless signal transmission will play a critical role in developing reliable subdural spinal cord stimulation systems. We have developed an approach to inductively coupling signals across the epidural spacing between the pial and epidural surfaces. The major design constraints include tolerance of coil misalignments from spinal cord geometries in addition to reasonable power efficiencies within the expected range of movement. The design of the primary side as a driving circuit is simplified by several turns of commercial magnetic wire, whereas the implanted secondary side is implemented in a micro-planar spiral coil tuned to a resonant frequency of 1.6 MHz. We present the results of wireless inductive coupling experiments that demonstrate the ability to transmit and receive a frequency modulated 1.6 MHz carrier signal between primary and secondary coil antennae scaled to 10 mm. Power delivery is in the range of 400 mW at a link efficiency of 32 % for strong coupling (coil separations of 0.5 mm ) and in the range of 70 mW at 4 % efficiency for weak coupling (coil separations of 10 mm).

  11. Multicomponent seismic monitoring of the effective stimulated volume associated with hydraulic fracture stimulations in a shale reservoir, Pouce Coupe field, Alberta, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhoff, Christopher

    The Reservoir Characterization Project in conjunction with Talisman Energy Inc., have been investigating a time-lapse data set acquired during hydraulic fracture stimulations of two horizontal wells in the Montney Shale at Pouce Coupe Field, Alberta, Canada. Multicomponent seismic surveys and microseismic data were acquired in December 2008 and integrated in this study with multiscale, multidisciplinary reservoir characterization techniques, including geomechanics and production data, to monitor changes within the reservoir associated with the hydraulic fracture stimulations. The goal of this investigation was to study the feasibility of microseismic and time-lapse multicomponent seismic data for correlating hydraulic stimulation success to the enhanced permeability pathways created during the stimulation process. Three independently acquired microseismic monitoring surveys and the detected microseismic events were analyzed to infer the fracture length, height, azimuth, and asymmetry created by the hydraulic stimulation. Integrating the interpretation objectives with the multicomponent surface seismic processing sequence elevated the level of reservoir characterization that can be performed using the Pouce Coupe converted-wave seismic data. Shear-wave splitting as observed by the newly processed converted-wave data were sensitive to fracture induced anisotropy and therefore, provided a measurement of the dominant fracture orientation and fracture density difference within the Montney reservoir interval. Before hydraulic stimulations, the natural fracture conditions resulted in a measured shear-wave splitting magnitude of 2-3%, with Baseline anomalies matching the independently interpreted minimal offset faults only visible on the converted-wave seismic data. Multistage hydraulic fracture stimulations increased the magnitude of shear-wave splitting up to 8%, well above the background noise level of 1%. The natural fractures and faults acted as conduits or barriers

  12. Improved field localization in transcranial magnetic stimulation of the brain with the utilization of a conductive shield plate in the stimulator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Hun; Georghiou, George E; Won, Chulho

    2006-04-01

    In this paper, a carefully designed conductive shield plate is presented, which helps to improve localization of the electric field distribution induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation for neuron stimulation. The shield plate is introduced between a figure-of-eight coil and the head. In order to accurately predict the field distribution inside the brain and to examine the effects of the shield plate, a realistic head model is constructed from magnetic resonance image data with the help of image processing tools and the finite-element method in three dimensions is employed. Finally, to show the improvements obtained, the results are compared with two conventional coil designs. It is found that an incorporation of the shield plate into the coil, effectively improves the induced field localization by more than 50%, and prevents other parts of the brain from exposure to high pulsed magnetic fields.

  13. Analysis and design of nonlocal spin devices with electric-field-induced spin-transport acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takamura, Yota; Akushichi, Taiju; Shuto, Yusuke; Sugahara, Satoshi

    2015-05-01

    We apply electric-field-induced acceleration for spin transport to a four-terminal nonlocal device and theoretically analyze its Hanle-effect signals. The effect of the ferromagnetic contact widths of the spin injector and detector on the signals is carefully discussed. Although Hanle-effect signals are randomized owing to the effect of the contact widths, this can be excluded by selecting an appropriate electric field for acceleration of spin transport. Spin lifetime can be correctly extracted by nonlocal devices with electric-field acceleration even using the spin injector and detector with finite contact widths.

  14. Analysis and design of nonlocal spin devices with electric-field-induced spin-transport acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Takamura, Yota; Akushichi, Taiju; Shuto, Yusuke; Sugahara, Satoshi

    2015-05-07

    We apply electric-field-induced acceleration for spin transport to a four-terminal nonlocal device and theoretically analyze its Hanle-effect signals. The effect of the ferromagnetic contact widths of the spin injector and detector on the signals is carefully discussed. Although Hanle-effect signals are randomized owing to the effect of the contact widths, this can be excluded by selecting an appropriate electric field for acceleration of spin transport. Spin lifetime can be correctly extracted by nonlocal devices with electric-field acceleration even using the spin injector and detector with finite contact widths.

  15. Visualizing simulated electrical fields from electroencephalography and transcranial electric brain stimulation: a comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Eichelbaum, Sebastian; Dannhauer, Moritz; Hlawitschka, Mario; Brooks, Dana; Knösche, Thomas R; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2014-11-01

    Electrical activity of neuronal populations is a crucial aspect of brain activity. This activity is not measured directly but recorded as electrical potential changes using head surface electrodes (electroencephalogram - EEG). Head surface electrodes can also be deployed to inject electrical currents in order to modulate brain activity (transcranial electric stimulation techniques) for therapeutic and neuroscientific purposes. In electroencephalography and noninvasive electric brain stimulation, electrical fields mediate between electrical signal sources and regions of interest (ROI). These fields can be very complicated in structure, and are influenced in a complex way by the conductivity profile of the human head. Visualization techniques play a central role to grasp the nature of those fields because such techniques allow for an effective conveyance of complex data and enable quick qualitative and quantitative assessments. The examination of volume conduction effects of particular head model parameterizations (e.g., skull thickness and layering), of brain anomalies (e.g., holes in the skull, tumors), location and extent of active brain areas (e.g., high concentrations of current densities) and around current injecting electrodes can be investigated using visualization. Here, we evaluate a number of widely used visualization techniques, based on either the potential distribution or on the current-flow. In particular, we focus on the extractability of quantitative and qualitative information from the obtained images, their effective integration of anatomical context information, and their interaction. We present illustrative examples from clinically and neuroscientifically relevant cases and discuss the pros and cons of the various visualization techniques.

  16. Visualizing Simulated Electrical Fields from Electroencephalography and Transcranial Electric Brain Stimulation: A Comparative Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Eichelbaum, Sebastian; Dannhauer, Moritz; Hlawitschka, Mario; Brooks, Dana; Knösche, Thomas R.; Scheuermann, Gerik

    2014-01-01

    Electrical activity of neuronal populations is a crucial aspect of brain activity. This activity is not measured directly but recorded as electrical potential changes using head surface electrodes (electroencephalogram - EEG). Head surface electrodes can also be deployed to inject electrical currents in order to modulate brain activity (transcranial electric stimulation techniques) for therapeutic and neuroscientific purposes. In electroencephalography and noninvasive electric brain stimulation, electrical fields mediate between electrical signal sources and regions of interest (ROI). These fields can be very complicated in structure, and are influenced in a complex way by the conductivity profile of the human head. Visualization techniques play a central role to grasp the nature of those fields because such techniques allow for an effective conveyance of complex data and enable quick qualitative and quantitative assessments. The examination of volume conduction effects of particular head model parameterizations (e.g., skull thickness and layering), of brain anomalies (e.g., holes in the skull, tumors), location and extent of active brain areas (e.g., high concentrations of current densities) and around current injecting electrodes can be investigated using visualization. Here, we evaluate a number of widely used visualization techniques, based on either the potential distribution or on the current-flow. In particular, we focus on the extractability of quantitative and qualitative information from the obtained images, their effective integration of anatomical context information, and their interaction. We present illustrative examples from clinically and neuroscientifically relevant cases and discuss the pros and cons of the various visualization techniques. PMID:24821532

  17. Narrow and wide field amacrine cells fire action potentials in response to depolarization and light stimulation.

    PubMed

    Heflin, Stephanie J; Cook, Paul B

    2007-01-01

    Action potentials in amacrine cells are important for lateral propagation of signals across the inner retina, but it is unclear how many subclasses of amacrine cells contain voltage-gated sodium channels or can fire action potentials. This study investigated the ability of amacrine cells with narrow ( <200 microm) and wide (>200 microm) dendritic fields to fire action potentials in response to depolarizing current injections and light stimulation. The pattern of action potentials evoked by current injections revealed two distinct classes of amacrine cells; those that responded with a single action potential (single-spiking cells) and those that responded with repetitive action potentials (repetitive-spiking cells). Repetitive-spiking cells differed from single-spiking cells in several regards: Repetitive-spiking cells were more often wide field cells, while single-spiking cells were more often narrow field cells. Repetitive-spiking cells had larger action potential amplitudes, larger peak voltage-gated NaV currents lower action potential thresholds, and needed less current to induce action potentials. However, there was no difference in the input resistance, holding current or time constant of these two classes of cells. The intrinsic capacity to fire action potentials was mirrored in responses to light stimulation; single-spiking amacrine cells infrequently fired action potentials to light steps, while repetitive-spiking amacrine cells frequently fired numerous action potentials. These results indicate that there are two physiologically distinct classes of amacrine cells based on the intrinsic capacity to fire action potentials.

  18. Detection of a diabetic sural nerve from the magnetic field after electric stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayami, Takehito; Iramina, Keiji; Hyodo, Akira; Chen, Xian; Sunagawa, Kenji

    2009-04-01

    In this study, we proposed a new diagnostic technique for diabetic neuropathy using biomagnetic measurement. Peripheral neuropathy is one of the most common complications of diabetes. To examine the injury, the skin potential around the nerve is often measured after electric stimulation. However, measuring the magnetic field may reveal precise condition of the injury. To evaluate the effect of measuring the magnetic field, a simulation study was performed. A diabetic sural nerve was simulated as a bundle of myelinated nerve fibers. Each fiber was modeled as an electric cable of Ranvier's nodes. Anatomical data were used to determine the number of nerve fibers and distribution of nerve fiber diameters. The electric potential and the magnetic field on the skin after electric stimulation were computed to the boundary element method. Biphasic time courses were obtained as the electric potential and the magnetic flux density at measurement points. In diabetic nerves, the longer interpeak latency of the electric potential wave and the shorter interpeak latency of the magnetic flux wave were obtained. Measuring both the electric potential and the magnetic flux density seemed to provide a noninvasive and objective marker for diabetic neuropathy.

  19. Characterization of alpha 1-adrenoceptor subtypes in tension response of human prostate to electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Guh, J. H.; Chueh, S. C.; Ko, F. N.; Teng, C. M.

    1995-01-01

    1. The effects of various alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonists and nifedipine on tension responses of human prostate to electrical field stimulation were evaluated in this study. 2. Prazosin (3 x 10(-10) to 10(-8) M) and 5-methyl-urapidil (10(-9) to 3 x 10(-8) M) blocked concentration-dependently the tension responses to electrical field stimulation and completely abolished them in the maximal concentrations (10(-8) M and 3 x 10(-8) M, respectively); in contrast, chloroethylclonidine (CEC), in the maximal concentration of 100 microM, blocked these effects by only 50%. 3. The contractile responses of rat vas deferens and spleen to exogenously-applied alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonists were competitively inhibited by prazosin and 5-methyl-urapidil; in addition, the pA2 values were calculated and the relative potencies with reference to prazosin were obtained. The relative potency of 5-methyl-urapidil in human prostate (0.105) was close to that in rat vas deferens (0.257), which contains primarily putative alpha 1A-adrenoceptors. However, it was much more than that in rat spleen (0.011), which contains primarily putative alpha 1B-adrenoceptors. 4. Nifedipine (10(-8) to 10(-6) M) inhibited concentration-dependently the contractile responses to electrical field stimulation in human prostate; in addition, the inhibition percentages were similar to those to exogenously-applied noradrenaline in rat vas deferens. In contrast, CEC (10 microM), which almost flattened the concentration-response curve of the rat spleen to phenylephrine, only partially inhibited (by 33.1%) the nerve-mediated contraction of human prostate. 5. The involvement of prejunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors situated on the sympathetic nerve terminals of human prostate was also examined.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7647968

  20. Influence of heterogeneous and anisotropic tissue conductivity on electric field distribution in deep brain stimulation.

    PubMed

    Aström, Mattias; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Wårdell, Karin

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to quantify the influence of heterogeneous isotropic and heterogeneous anisotropic tissue on the spatial distribution of the electric field during deep brain stimulation (DBS). Three finite element tissue models were created of one patient treated with DBS. Tissue conductivity was modelled as (I) homogeneous isotropic, (II) heterogeneous isotropic based on MRI, and (III) heterogeneous anisotropic based on diffusion tensor MRI. Modelled DBS electrodes were positioned in the subthalamic area, the pallidum, and the internal capsule in each tissue model. Electric fields generated during DBS were simulated for each model and target-combination and visualized with isolevels at 0.20 (inner), and 0.05 V mm(-1) (outer). Statistical and vector analysis was used for evaluation of the distribution of the electric field. Heterogeneous isotropic tissue altered the spatial distribution of the electric field by up to 4% at inner, and up to 10% at outer isolevel. Heterogeneous anisotropic tissue influenced the distribution of the electric field by up to 18 and 15% at each isolevel, respectively. The influence of heterogeneous and anisotropic tissue on the electric field may be clinically relevant in anatomic regions that are functionally subdivided and surrounded by multiple fibres of passage.

  1. System Identification of Local Field Potentials under Deep Brain Stimulation in a Healthy Primate

    PubMed Central

    Pedoto, Gilda; Santaniello, Sabato; Montgomery, Erwin B.; Gale, John T.; Fiengo, Giovanni; Glielmo, Luigi; Sarma, Sridevi V.

    2013-01-01

    High frequency (HF) Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) in the Sub-Thalamic Nucleus (STN) is a clinically recognized therapy for the treatment of motor disorders in Parkinson Disease (PD). The underlying mechanisms of DBS and how it impacts neighboring nuclei, however, are not yet completely understood. Electrophysiological data has been collected in PD patients and primates to better understand the impact of DBS on STN and the entire Basal Ganglia (BG) motor circuit. We use single unit recordings from Globus Pallidus, both pars interna and externa segments (GPi and GPe) in the BG, in a normal primate before and after DBS to reconstruct Local Field Potentials (LFPs) in the region. We then use system identification techniques to understand how GPe LFP activity and the DBS signal applied to STN influence GPi LFP activity. Our models suggest that when no stimulation is applied, the GPe LFPs have an inhibitory effect on GPi LFPs with a 2-3 ms delay, as is the case for single unit neuronal activity. On the other hand, when DBS is ON the models suggest that stimulation has a dominant effect on GPi LFPs which mask the inhibitory effects of GPe. PMID:21096635

  2. Ultra-high magnetic resonance imaging (MRI): a potential examination for deep brain stimulation devices and the limitation study concerning MRI-related heating injury.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ying-Chuan; Li, Jun-Ju; Zhu, Guan-Yu; Shi, Lin; Yang, An-Chao; Jiang, Yin; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    Nowadays, the patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices are restricted to undertake 1.5T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) according to the guideline. Nevertheless, we conducted an experiment to test pathological change near the leads in different field-strength MRI. Twenty-four male New Zealand rabbits were assigned to Group 1 (G1, n = 6, 7.0T, DBS), Group 2 (G2, n = 6, 3.0T, DBS), Group 3 (G3, n = 6, 1.5T, DBS), and Group 4 (G4, n = 6, 1.5T, paracentesis). DBS leads were implanted in G1, G2 and G3, targeting left nucleus ventralis posterior thalami. Paracentesis was performed in G4. 24 h after MRI scan, all animals were killed for examining pathological alternation (at different distance from lead) via transmission electron microscopy. Our results suggest that the severity of tissue injury correlates with the distance to electrode instead of field strength of MRI. Up to now, the reason for the restriction of MRI indicated no significantly different pathological change.

  3. Vertical electric field stimulated neural cell functionality on porous amorphous carbon electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jain, Shilpee; Sharma, Ashutosh; Basu, Bikramjit

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of amorphous macroporous carbon substrates as electrodes to support neuronal cell proliferation and differentiation in electric field mediated culture conditions. The electric field was applied perpendicular to carbon substrate electrode, while growing mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells in vitro. The placement of the second electrode outside of the cell culture medium allows the investigation of cell response to electric field without the concurrent complexities of submerged electrodes such as potentially toxic electrode reactions, electro-kinetic flows and charge transfer (electrical current) in the cell medium. The macroporous carbon electrodes are uniquely characterized by a higher specific charge storage capacity (0.2 mC/cm(2)) and low impedance (3.3 kΩ at 1 kHz). The optimal window of electric field stimulation for better cell viability and neurite outgrowth is established. When a uniform or a gradient electric field was applied perpendicular to the amorphous carbon substrate, it was found that the N2a cell viability and neurite length were higher at low electric field strengths (≤ 2.5 V/cm) compared to that measured without an applied field (0 V/cm). While the cell viability was assessed by two complementary biochemical assays (MTT and LDH), the differentiation was studied by indirect immunostaining. Overall, the results of the present study unambiguously establish the uniform/gradient vertical electric field based culture protocol to either enhance or to restrict neurite outgrowth respectively at lower or higher field strengths, when neuroblastoma cells are cultured on porous glassy carbon electrodes having a desired combination of electrochemical properties.

  4. Brain activations evoked by tactile stimulation varies with the intensity and not with number of receptive fields stimulated: An fMRI study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez Garzón, Y. T.; Pasaye, E. H.; Barrios, F. A.

    2014-11-01

    Using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) it is possible to study the functional anatomy of primary cortices. Cortical representations in the primary somatosensory cortex have shown discrepancies between activations related to the same body region in some studies; these differences have been more pronounced for lower limb representations. The aim of this study was to observe the influence of the tactile stimulus intensity in somatosensory cortical responses using fMRI. Based in the sensitivity and pain threshold of each subject, we used Von Frey filaments for stimulate 12 control subject in three receptive fields on the right thigh. One filament near to sensitivity threshold (VFS), other close to pain threshold (VFP) and one intermediate filament between the two previous thresholds (VFI). The tactile stimulation with VFS produced no activation on SI, while that the contralateral SI was activated by stimulation with VFI in 5 subjects and with the stimulation of VFP in all subjects. Second level statistical analysis showed significant differences between SI activations related to the stimulation with VFP and VFI (VFP > VFI), in the comparison between the applied different intensities, a small cluster of activation was observed on SI for the unique possible contrast (VFP > VFI). The time course per trial for each subject was extracted and averaged to extract the activation in the contralateral SI and compared across the stimulus modalities, between the sites of field receptive stimulated and the intensities used. The time course of tactile stimulus responses revealed a consistent single peak of activity per cycle (30 s), approximately 12 s after the onset of the stimulus, with exception of the VFI stimulation,_which showed the peak at 10 s. Thus, our results indicate that the cortical representation of a tactile stimulus with fMRI is modulated for the intensity of the stimulus applied.

  5. Lightweight device to stimulate and monitor human vestibulo-ocular reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McStravick, M. Catherine (Inventor); Proctor, David R. (Inventor); Wood, Scott J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A helmet formed of a rigid shell is disclosed. The shell is lined with several air filled bladders to contact firmly the head of a user. The shell has a rigid chin bar supporting a bite bar connected fixedly to a mouthpiece bearing against the teeth and hard palate to firmly anchor the helmet without movement. The outer shell surface supports various air pumping bulbs and accelerometers. Separate left and right visor pivot on the side guided in a central tongue and groove track to move optical lens mounts into the user's field of vision. The chin bar is connected to the shell by a pair of releasable clasps. A safety lanyard connects to the clasps to quickly pull pins from the clasps to enable quick release in case of motion sickness.

  6. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo; Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao; Li, Jun

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  7. Factors involved in the relaxation of female pig urethra evoked by electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Werkström, V.; Persson, K.; Ny, L.; Bridgewater, M.; Brading, A. F.; Andersson, K. E.

    1995-01-01

    1. Non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) relaxations induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) were studied in pig isolated urethra. The mechanism for relaxation was characterized by measurement of cyclic nucleotides and by study of involvement of different subsets of voltage-operated calcium channels (VOCCs). 2. EFS evoked frequency-dependent and tetrodotoxin-sensitive relaxations in the presence of propranolol (1 microM), phentolamine (1 microM) and scopolamine (1 microM). At low frequencies (< 12 Hz), relaxations were rapid, whereas at high (> 12 Hz) frequencies distinct biphasic relaxations were evoked. The latter consisted of a rapidly developing first phase followed by a more long-lasting second phase. 3. Treatment with the NO-synthesis inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG; 0.3 mM) inhibited relaxations at low frequencies of stimulation. At high frequencies (> 12 Hz) only the first relaxation phase was affected. 4. Measurement of cyclic nucleotides in preparations subjected to continuous nerve-stimulation, revealed an increase in guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) levels from 1.3 +/- 0.3 to 3.0 +/- 0.4 pmol mg-1 protein (P < 0.01). In the presence of L-NOARG, there was a significant decrease in cyclic GMP content to control. However, there was no increase in cyclic GMP content in response to EFS. Levels of cyclic AMP remained unchanged following EFS. 5. Treatment with the N-type VOCC-inhibitor, omega-conotoxin GVIA (0.1 microM) reduced NO-dependent relaxations, the effect being most pronounced at low frequencies (1-4 Hz) of stimulation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8564225

  8. Electric field stimulation through a substrate influences Schwann cell and extracellular matrix structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hieu T.; Wei, Claudia; Chow, Jacqueline K.; Nguy, Lindsey; Nguyen, Hieu K.; Schmidt, Christine E.

    2013-08-01

    Objective. Electric field (EF) stimulation has been used to cue cell growth for tissue engineering applications. In this study, we explore the electrical parameters and extracellular mechanisms that elicit changes in cell behavior when stimulated through the substrate. Approach. Rat Schwann cell morphology was compared when exposed to EF through the media or a conductive indium tin oxide substrate. Ionic and structural effects were then analyzed on Matrigel and collagen I, respectively. Main results. When stimulating through media, cells had greater alignment perpendicular to the EF with higher current densities (106 mA cm-2 at 245 mV mm-1), and reached maximum alignment within 8 h. Stimulation through the substrate with EF (up to 110 mV mm-1) did not affect Schwann cell orientation, however the EF caused extracellular matrix (ECM) coatings on substrates to peel away, suggesting EF can physically change the ECM. Applying alternating current (ac) 2-1000 Hz signals through the media or substrate both caused cells to flatten and protrude many processes, without preferential alignment. Matrigel exposed to a substrate EF of 10 mV mm-1 for 2 h had a greater calcium concentration near the cathode, but quickly dissipated when the EF was removed. Schwann cells seeded 7 d after gels were exposed to substrate EF still aligned perpendicular to the EF direction. Microscopy of collagen I exposed to substrate EF shows alignment and bundling of fibrils. Significance. These findings demonstrate EF exposure can control Schwann cell alignment and morphology, change ECM bulk/surface architecture, and align ECM structures.

  9. Somatosensory Evoked Field in Response to Visuotactile Stimulation in 3- to 4-Year-Old Children

    PubMed Central

    Remijn, Gerard B.; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Shitamichi, Kiyomi; Ueno, Sanae; Yoshimura, Yuko; Nagao, Kikuko; Tsubokawa, Tsunehisa; Kojima, Haruyuki; Higashida, Haruhiro; Minabe, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    A child-customized magnetoencephalography system was used to investigate somatosensory evoked field (SEF) in 3- to 4-year-old children. Three stimulus conditions were used in which the children received tactile-only stimulation to their left index finger or visuotactile stimulation. In the two visuotactile conditions, the children received tactile stimulation to their finger while they watched a video of tactile stimulation applied either to someone else’s finger (the finger-touch condition) or to someone else’s toe (the toe-touch condition). The latencies and source strengths of equivalent current dipoles (ECDs) over contralateral (right) somatosensory cortex were analyzed. In the preschoolers who provided valid ECDs, the stimulus conditions induced an early-latency ECD occurring between 60 and 68 ms mainly with an anterior direction. We further identified a middle-latency ECD between 97 and 104 ms, which predominantly had a posterior direction. Finally, initial evidence was found for a late-latency ECD at about 139–151 ms again more often with an anterior direction. Differences were found in the source strengths of the middle-latency ECDs among the stimulus conditions. For the paired comparisons that could be formed, ECD source strength was more pronounced in the finger-touch condition than in the tactile-only and the toe-touch conditions. Although more research is necessary to expand the data set, this suggests that visual information modulated preschool SEF. The finding that ECD source strength was higher when seen and felt touch occurred to the same body part, as compared to a different body part, might further indicate that connectivity between visual and tactile information is indexed in preschool somatosensory cortical activity, already in a somatotopic way. PMID:24715860

  10. Tests of Oil Recovery Devices in Broken Ice Fields. Phase I.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    conducted with both devices in broken fresh water ice and salt water ice, with No. 2 diesel oil and a crude oil selected to closely match the...properties of Prudhoe Bay crude oil , at temperatures of +25F and +15F. These tests demonstrated that with minor hardware modifications and the proper...operating procedures, both devices will successfully recover crude oil and No. 2 diesel oil spilled in a broken ice field of moderate icepiece size.

  11. [Design and field calculation of coil array for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) based on genetic algorithm].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jicheng; Huang, Kama; Guo, Lanting; Zhang, Hong; Hu, Yayi

    2005-04-01

    It is the intent of this paper to locate the activation point in Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) efficiently. The schemes of coil array in torus shape is presented to get the electromagnetic field distribution with ideal focusing capability. Then an improved adaptive genetic algorithm (AGA) is applied to the optimization of both value and phase of the current infused in each coil. Based on the calculated results of the optimized current configurations, ideal focusing capability is drawn as contour lines and 3-D mesh charts of magnitude of both magnetic and electric field within the calculation area. It is shown that the coil array has good capability to establish focused shape of electromagnetic distribution. In addition, it is also demonstrated that the coil array has the capability to focus on two or more targets simultaneously.

  12. Localized stimulation of the human brain and spinal cord by a pair of opposing pulsed magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, S.; Matsuda, T.; Hiwaki, O.

    1990-05-01

    A method of localized stimulation of the human brain and spinal cord is proposed. The basic idea is to concentrate induced eddy currents locally in the vicinity of a target by a pair of opposing pulsed magnetic fields. A pair of coils are positioned outside the head in the opposite directions around a target. The eddy currents induced at the target are expected to flow together, which results in an increased current flow at the target. A figure-eight coil is designed, and the magnetic brain stimulation is carried out using ourselves as volunteers. The results show that the selective stimulation of the brain is realized with a 5-mm resolution. The functional mapping of the human motor cortex related to the hand, arm, and foot areas is obtained. It is also obtained that an optimum direction of stimulating currents for neural excitation exists in each functional area in the cortex. Magnetic stimulation of the spinal cord is carried out by the same method as used in the brain stimulation. Rabbits are used in the experiments. A figure-eight coil is positioned on the surface of the spine. Shifting the stimulating points on the spine, electromyographic (EMG) signals are recorded from limb muscles. The EMG signals are clearly responding to the stimulation at a segment which innervates limb muscles, whereas no EMG signals are obtained by stimulation of segments higher than the critical segment. It is also obtained that the amplitude of the EMG signals varies with the direction of stimulating currents.

  13. Strong Static Magnetic Fields Elicit Swimming Behaviors Consistent with Direct Vestibular Stimulation in Adult Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Tan, Grace X-J; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Zee, David S.; Carey, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Zebrafish (Danio rerio) offer advantages as model animals for studies of inner ear development, genetics and ototoxicity. However, traditional assessment of vestibular function in this species using the vestibulo-ocular reflex requires agar-immobilization of individual fish and specialized video, which are difficult and labor-intensive. We report that using a static magnetic field to directly stimulate the zebrafish labyrinth results in an efficient, quantitative behavioral assay in free-swimming fish. We recently observed that humans have sustained nystagmus in high strength magnetic fields, and we attributed this observation to magnetohydrodynamic forces acting on the labyrinths. Here, fish were individually introduced into the center of a vertical 11.7T magnetic field bore for 2-minute intervals, and their movements were tracked. To assess for heading preference relative to a magnetic field, fish were also placed in a horizontally oriented 4.7T magnet in infrared (IR) light. A sub-population was tested again in the magnet after gentamicin bath to ablate lateral line hair cell function. Free-swimming adult zebrafish exhibited markedly altered swimming behavior while in strong static magnetic fields, independent of vision or lateral line function. Two-thirds of fish showed increased swimming velocity or consistent looping/rolling behavior throughout exposure to a strong, vertically oriented magnetic field. Fish also demonstrated altered swimming behavior in a strong horizontally oriented field, demonstrating in most cases preferred swimming direction with respect to the field. These findings could be adapted for ‘high-throughput’ investigations of the effects of environmental manipulations as well as for changes that occur during development on vestibular function in zebrafish. PMID:24647586

  14. Static magnetic field stimulation over parietal cortex enhances somatosensory detection in humans.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-López, Carmen; Soto-León, Vanesa; Céspedes, Virginia; Profice, Paolo; Strange, Bryan A; Foffani, Guglielmo; Oliviero, Antonio

    2017-03-09

    The role of neuronal oscillations in human somatosensory perception is currently unclear. To address this, here we employ non-invasive brain stimulation to artificially modulate cortical network dynamics in the context of neurophysiological and behavioral recordings. We demonstrate that transcranial static magnetic stimulation (tSMS) over the somatosensory parietal cortex increases oscillatory power specifically in the alpha range, without significantly affecting bottom-up thalamo-cortical inputs indexed by the early cortical component of somatosensory evoked potentials. Critically, we next show that parietal tSMS enhances the detection of near-threshold somatosensory stimuli. Interestingly, this behavioral improvement reflects a decrease of habituation to somatosensation. Our data therefore provide causal evidence that somatosensory perception depends on parietal alpha activity. Artificially increasing alpha power by placing a powerful magnetic field over the parietal cortex overcomes the natural decline in detection probability of a repeated near-threshold sensory stimulus.SignificanceStatement Artificially increasing alpha power by placing a powerful magnetic field over the somatosensory cortex overcomes the natural decline in detection probability of a repeated near-threshold sensory stimulus.

  15. Evaluation of electric field distribution in electromagnetic stimulation of human femoral head.

    PubMed

    Su, Yukun; Souffrant, Robert; Kluess, Daniel; Ellenrieder, Martin; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; van Rienen, Ursula; Bader, Rainer

    2014-12-01

    Electromagnetic stimulation is a common therapy used to support bone healing in the case of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. In the present study, we investigated a bipolar induction screw system with an integrated coil. The aim was to analyse the influence of the screw parameters on the electric field distribution in the human femoral head. In addition, three kinds of design parameters (the shape of the screw tip, position of the screw in the femoral head, and size of the screw insulation) were varied. The electric field distribution in the bone was calculated using the finite element software Comsol Multiphysics. Moreover, a validation experiment was set up for an identical bone specimen with an implanted screw. The electric potential of points inside and on the surface of the bone were measured and compared to numerical data. The electric field distribution within the bone was clearly changed by the different implant parameters. Repositioning the screw by a maximum of 10 mm and changing the insulation length by a maximum of 4 mm resulted in electric field volume changes of 16% and 7%, respectively. By comparing the results of numerical simulation with the data of the validation experiment, on average, the electric potential difference of 19% and 24% occurred when the measuring points were at a depth of approximately 5 mm within the femoral bone and directly on the surface of the femoral bone, respectively. The results of the numerical simulations underline that the electro-stimulation treatment of bone in clinical applications can be influenced by the implant parameters.

  16. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Hamilton, Allister B.

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  17. Image dipoles approach to the local field enhancement in nanostructured Ag-Au hybrid devices.

    PubMed

    David, Christin; Richter, Marten; Knorr, Andreas; Weidinger, Inez M; Hildebrandt, Peter

    2010-01-14

    We have investigated the plasmonic enhancement in the radiation field at various nanostructured multilayer devices that may be applied in surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. We apply an image dipole method to describe the effect of surface morphology on the field enhancement in a quasistatic limit. In particular, we compare the performance of a nanostructured silver surface and a layered silver-gold hybrid device. It is found that localized surface plasmon states provide a high field enhancement in silver-gold hybrid devices, where symmetry breaking due to surface defects is a supporting factor. These results are compared to those obtained for multishell nanoparticles of spherical symmetry. Calculated enhancement factors are discussed on the background of recent experimental data.

  18. Activated T lymphocytes migrate toward the cathode of DC electric fields in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Wu, Dan; Romanuik, Sean F; Paul, Kausik; Thomson, Douglas J; Lin, Francis

    2011-04-07

    Immune cell migration is a fundamental process that enables immunosurveillance and immune responses. Understanding the mechanism of immune cell migration is not only of importance to the biology of cells, but also has high relevance to cell trafficking mediated physiological processes and diseases such as embryogenesis, wound healing, autoimmune diseases and cancers. In addition to the well-known chemical concentration gradient based guiding mechanism (i.e. chemotaxis), recent studies have shown that lymphocytes can respond to applied physiologically relevant direct current (DC) electric fields by migrating toward the cathode of the fields (i.e. electrotaxis) in both in vitro and in vivo settings. In the present study, we employed two microfluidic devices allowing controlled application of electric fields inside the microfluidic channel for quantitative studies of lymphocyte electrotaxis in vitro at the single cell level. The first device is fabricated by soft-lithography and the second device is made in glass with integrated on-chip electrodes. Using both devices, we for the first time showed that anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies activated human blood T cells migrate to the cathode of the applied DC electric field. This finding is consistent with previous electrotaxis studies on other lymphocyte subsets suggesting electrotaxis is a novel guiding mechanism for immune cell migration. Furthermore, the characteristics of electrotaxis and chemotaxis of activated T cells in PDMS microfluidic devices are compared.

  19. An inexpensive, charge-balanced rodent deep brain stimulation device: a step-by-step guide to its procurement and construction

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Samuel G.; Lipski, Witold J.; Grace, Anthony A.; Winter, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite there being a relatively large number of methods papers which detail specifically the development of stimulation devices, only a small number of reports involve the application of these devices in freely moving animals. To date multiple preclinical neural stimulators have been designed and described but have failed to make an impact on the methods employed by the majority of laboratories studying DBS. Thus, the overwhelming majority of DBS studies are still performed by tethering the subject to an external stimulator. We believe that the low adoption rate of previously described methods is a result of the complexity of replicating and implementing these methods. New Method Here were describe both the design and procurement of a simple and inexpensive stimulator designed to be compatible with commonly used, commercially available electrodes (Plastics 1). Results This system is initially programmable in frequency, pulsewidth and current amplitude, and delivers biphasic, charge-balanced output to two independent electrodes. Comparison with Existing Method(s) It is easy to implement requiring neither subcutaneous implantation or custom-made electrodes and has been optimized for either direct mounting to the head or for use with rodent jackets. Conclusions This device is inexpensive and universally accessible, facilitating high throughput, low cost, long-term rodent deep brain stimulation experiments. PMID:23954265

  20. [Development of a massage device based on microcontroller in the field of alimentary tract].

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Peng, Chenglin; He, Hongmei; Zhu, Jing

    2007-12-01

    In this artical is first reported a survey of the progress in research of MEMS technology. Then, the basic structure, features and the principles of a massage device based on microcontroller in the field of alimentary tract are introduced. Special emphasis is laid on the utilization of MSP430F123 microprocessor for producing a kind of period pulse to control the power of massage capsule. In general, the research and development of the massage device in the field of alimentary tract have active support and deep significance to therapy in the clinical and business settings as well as in the development of biomedical engineering and MEMS.

  1. Pulsed electromagnetic fields stimulation prevents steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rats

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) stimulation has been used successfully to treat nonunion fractures and femoral head osteonecrosis, but relatively little is known about its effects on preventing steroid-induced osteonecrosis. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of PEMF stimulation on the prevention of steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rats and explore the underlying mechanisms. Methods Seventy-two male adult Wistar rats were divided into three groups and treated as follows. (1) PEMF stimulation group (PEMF group, n = 24): intravenously injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10 μg/kg) on day 0 and intramuscularly injected with methylprednisolone acetate (MPSL, 20 mg/kg) on days 1, 2 and 3, then subjected to PEMF stimulation 4 h per day for 1 to 8 weeks. (2) Methylprednisolone-treated group (MPSL group, n = 24): injected the same dose of LPS and MPSL as the PEMF group but without exposure to PEMF. (3) Control group (PS group, n = 24): injected 0.9% saline in the same mode at the same time points. The incidence of osteonecrosis, serum lipid levels and the mRNA and protein expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) in the proximal femur were measured 1, 2, 4 and 8 weeks after the last MPSL (or saline) injection. Results The incidence of osteonecrosis in the PEMF group (29%) was significantly lower than that observed in the MPSL group (75%), while no osteonecrosis was observed in the PS group. The serum lipid levels were significantly lower in the PEMF and PS groups than in the MPSL group. Compared with the MPSL and PS groups, the mRNA expression of TGF-β1 increased, reaching a peak 1 week after PEMF treatment, and remained high for 4 weeks, then declined at 8 weeks, whereas the protein expression of TGF-β1 increased, reaching a peak at 2 weeks after PEMF treatment, and remained high for 8 weeks. Conclusions PEMF stimulation can prevent steroid-induced osteonecrosis in rats, and the underlying mechanisms involve decreased

  2. Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity in the Long-Latency Stretch Reflex Following Paired Stimulation from a Wearable Electronic Device.

    PubMed

    Foysal, K M Riashad; de Carvalho, Felipe; Baker, Stuart N

    2016-10-19

    The long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) in human elbow muscles probably depends on multiple pathways; one possible contributor is the reticulospinal tract. Here we attempted to induce plastic changes in the LLSR by pairing noninvasive stimuli that are known to activate reticulospinal pathways, at timings predicted to cause spike timing-dependent plasticity in the brainstem. In healthy human subjects, reflex responses in flexor muscles were recorded following extension perturbations at the elbow. Subjects were then fitted with a portable device that delivered auditory click stimuli through an earpiece, and electrical stimuli around motor threshold to the biceps muscle via surface electrodes. We tested the following four paradigms: biceps stimulus 10 ms before click (Bi-10ms-C); click 25 ms before biceps (C-25ms-Bi); click alone (C only); and biceps alone (Bi only). The average stimulus rate was 0.67 Hz. Subjects left the laboratory wearing the device and performed normal daily activities. Approximately 7 h later, they returned, and stretch reflexes were remeasured. The LLSR was significantly enhanced in the biceps muscle (on average by 49%) after the Bi-10ms-C paradigm, but was suppressed for C-25ms-Bi (by 31%); it was unchanged for Bi only and C only. No paradigm induced LLSR changes in the unstimulated brachioradialis muscle. Although we cannot exclude contributions from spinal or cortical pathways, our results are consistent with spike timing-dependent plasticity in reticulospinal circuits, specific to the stimulated muscle. This is the first demonstration that the LLSR can be modified via paired-pulse methods, and may open up new possibilities in motor systems neuroscience and rehabilitation.

  3. The influence of sulcus width on simulated electric fields induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, A M; Rampersad, S M; Lucka, F; Lanfer, B; Lew, S; Aydin, Ü; Wolters, C H; Stegeman, D F; Oostendorp, T F

    2013-01-01

    Volume conduction models can help in acquiring knowledge about the distribution of the electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). One aspect of a detailed model is an accurate description of the cortical surface geometry. Since its estimation is difficult, it is important to know how accurate the geometry has to be represented. Previous studies only looked at the differences caused by neglecting the complete boundary between the CSF and GM (Thielscher et al. 2011; Bijsterbosch et al. 2012), or by resizing the whole brain (Wagner et al. 2008). However, due to the high conductive properties of the CSF, it can be expected that alterations in sulcus width can already have a significant effect on the distribution of the electric field. To answer this question, the sulcus width of a highly realistic head model, based on T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images (MRI), was altered systematically. This study shows that alterations in the sulcus width do not cause large differences in the majority of the electric field values. However, considerable overestimation of sulcus width produces an overestimation of the calculated field strength, also at locations distant from the target location. PMID:23787706

  4. The influence of sulcus width on simulated electric fields induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, A. M.; Rampersad, S. M.; Lucka, F.; Lanfer, B.; Lew, S.; Aydin, Ü.; Wolters, C. H.; Stegeman, D. F.; Oostendorp, T. F.

    2013-07-01

    Volume conduction models can help in acquiring knowledge about the distribution of the electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation. One aspect of a detailed model is an accurate description of the cortical surface geometry. Since its estimation is difficult, it is important to know how accurate the geometry has to be represented. Previous studies only looked at the differences caused by neglecting the complete boundary between cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and grey matter (Thielscher et al 2011 NeuroImage 54 234-43, Bijsterbosch et al 2012 Med. Biol. Eng. Comput. 50 671-81), or by resizing the whole brain (Wagner et al 2008 Exp. Brain Res. 186 539-50). However, due to the high conductive properties of the CSF, it can be expected that alterations in sulcus width can already have a significant effect on the distribution of the electric field. To answer this question, the sulcus width of a highly realistic head model, based on T1-, T2- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance images, was altered systematically. This study shows that alterations in the sulcus width do not cause large differences in the majority of the electric field values. However, considerable overestimation of sulcus width produces an overestimation of the calculated field strength, also at locations distant from the target location.

  5. Interactive effects of surface topography and pulsatile electrical field stimulation on orientation and elongation of fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Heidi Au, Hoi Ting; Cheng, Irene; Chowdhury, Mohammad Fahad; Radisic, Milica

    2007-01-01

    In contractile tissues such as myocardium, functional properties are directly related to the cellular orientation and elongation. Thus, tissue engineering of functional cardiac patches critically depends on our understanding of the interaction between multiple guidance cues such as topographical, adhesive or electrical. The main objective of this study was to determine the interactive effects of contact guidance and electrical field stimulation on elongation and orientation of fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes, major cell populations of the myocardium. Polyvinyl surfaces were abraded using lapping paper with grain size 1 to 80μm, resulting in V-shaped abrasions with the average abrasion peak-to-peak width in the range from 3 to 13μm, and the average depth in the range from 140nm to 700nm (AFM). The surfaces with abrasions 13μm wide and 700nm deep, exhibited the strongest effect on neonatal rat cardiomyocyte elongation and orientation as well as statistically significant effect on orientation of fibroblasts, thus they were utilized for electrical field stimulation. Electrical field stimulation was performed using a regime of relevance for heart tissue in vivo as well as for cardiac tissue engineering. Stimulation (square pulses, 1ms duration, 1Hz, 2.3V/cm or 4.6V/cm) was initiated 24hr after cell seeding and maintained for additional 72hr. The cover slips were positioned between the carbon rod electrodes so that the abrasions were either parallel or perpendicular to the field lines. Non-abraded surfaces were utilized as controls. Field stimulation did not affect cell viability (live/dead staining). The presence of a well developed contractile apparatus in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes (staining for cardiac Troponin I and actin filaments) was identified in the groups cultivated on abraded surfaces in the presence of field stimulation. Overall we observed that i) fibroblast and cardiomyocyte elongation on non-abraded surfaces was significantly enhanced by electrical

  6. Friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal insulations: field evaluation of prototype test devices

    SciTech Connect

    Rossiter, W.J.; Roberts, W.E.; Mathey, R.G.

    1989-03-01

    The report describes results of the third and final phase of a study conducted for the General Services Administration (GSA) to develop a field-test method to measure the friability of spray-applied fireproofing and thermal-insulation materials. Field tests were conducted on 17 fibrous and 2 cementitious spray-applied materials to assess surface and bulk compression/shear, indentation, abrasion, and impact properties. The tests were performed using prototype devices developed in an earlier phase of the study. As expected, the field specimens displayed varying response to dislodgment or indentation in the tests. The field tests confirmed that the goal of the study had been achieved.

  7. Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity in the Long-Latency Stretch Reflex Following Paired Stimulation from a Wearable Electronic Device

    PubMed Central

    Foysal, K. M. Riashad; de Carvalho, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    The long-latency stretch reflex (LLSR) in human elbow muscles probably depends on multiple pathways; one possible contributor is the reticulospinal tract. Here we attempted to induce plastic changes in the LLSR by pairing noninvasive stimuli that are known to activate reticulospinal pathways, at timings predicted to cause spike timing-dependent plasticity in the brainstem. In healthy human subjects, reflex responses in flexor muscles were recorded following extension perturbations at the elbow. Subjects were then fitted with a portable device that delivered auditory click stimuli through an earpiece, and electrical stimuli around motor threshold to the biceps muscle via surface electrodes. We tested the following four paradigms: biceps stimulus 10 ms before click (Bi-10ms-C); click 25 ms before biceps (C-25ms-Bi); click alone (C only); and biceps alone (Bi only). The average stimulus rate was 0.67 Hz. Subjects left the laboratory wearing the device and performed normal daily activities. Approximately 7 h later, they returned, and stretch reflexes were remeasured. The LLSR was significantly enhanced in the biceps muscle (on average by 49%) after the Bi-10ms-C paradigm, but was suppressed for C-25ms-Bi (by 31%); it was unchanged for Bi only and C only. No paradigm induced LLSR changes in the unstimulated brachioradialis muscle. Although we cannot exclude contributions from spinal or cortical pathways, our results are consistent with spike timing-dependent plasticity in reticulospinal circuits, specific to the stimulated muscle. This is the first demonstration that the LLSR can be modified via paired-pulse methods, and may open up new possibilities in motor systems neuroscience and rehabilitation. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT This report is the first demonstration that the long-latency stretch reflex can be modified by repeated, precisely timed pairing of stimuli known to activate brainstem pathways. Furthermore, pairing was achieved with a portable electronic device

  8. Thermal management in MoS2 based integrated device using near-field radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jiebin; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-09-01

    Recently, wafer-scale growth of monolayer MoS2 films with spatial homogeneity is realized on SiO2 substrate. Together with the latest reported high mobility, MoS2 based integrated electronic devices are expected to be fabricated in the near future. Owing to the low lattice thermal conductivity in monolayer MoS2, and the increased transistor density accompanied with the increased power density, heat dissipation will become a crucial issue for these integrated devices. In this letter, using the formalism of fluctuation electrodynamics, we explored the near-field radiative heat transfer from a monolayer MoS2 to graphene. We demonstrate that in resonance, the maximum heat transfer via near-field radiation between MoS2 and graphene can be ten times higher than the in-plane lattice thermal conduction for MoS2 sheet. Therefore, an efficient thermal management strategy for MoS2 integrated device is proposed: Graphene sheet is brought into close proximity, 10-20 nm from MoS2 device; heat energy transfer from MoS2 to graphene via near-field radiation; this amount of heat energy then be conducted to contact due to ultra-high lattice thermal conductivity of graphene. Our work sheds light for developing cooling strategy for nano devices constructing with low thermal conductivity materials.

  9. Thermal management in MoS{sub 2} based integrated device using near-field radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Peng, Jiebin; Zhang, Gang; Li, Baowen

    2015-09-28

    Recently, wafer-scale growth of monolayer MoS{sub 2} films with spatial homogeneity is realized on SiO{sub 2} substrate. Together with the latest reported high mobility, MoS{sub 2} based integrated electronic devices are expected to be fabricated in the near future. Owing to the low lattice thermal conductivity in monolayer MoS{sub 2}, and the increased transistor density accompanied with the increased power density, heat dissipation will become a crucial issue for these integrated devices. In this letter, using the formalism of fluctuation electrodynamics, we explored the near-field radiative heat transfer from a monolayer MoS{sub 2} to graphene. We demonstrate that in resonance, the maximum heat transfer via near-field radiation between MoS{sub 2} and graphene can be ten times higher than the in-plane lattice thermal conduction for MoS{sub 2} sheet. Therefore, an efficient thermal management strategy for MoS{sub 2} integrated device is proposed: Graphene sheet is brought into close proximity, 10–20 nm from MoS{sub 2} device; heat energy transfer from MoS{sub 2} to graphene via near-field radiation; this amount of heat energy then be conducted to contact due to ultra-high lattice thermal conductivity of graphene. Our work sheds light for developing cooling strategy for nano devices constructing with low thermal conductivity materials.

  10. Cartilage repair with osteochondral autografts in sheep: effect of biophysical stimulation with pulsed electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Benazzo, Franco; Cadossi, Matteo; Cavani, Francesco; Fini, Milena; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Setti, Stefania; Cadossi, Ruggero; Giardino, Roberto

    2008-05-01

    The effect of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMFs) on the integration of osteochondral autografts was evaluated in sheep. After osteochondral grafts were performed, the animals were treated with PEMFs for 6 h/day or sham-treated. Six animals were sacrificed at 1 month. Fourteen animals were treated for 2 months and sacrificed at 6 months. At 1 month, the osteogenic activity at the transplant-host subchondral bone interface was increased in PEMF-treated animals compared to controls. Articular cartilage was healthy in controls and stimulated animals. At 6 months, complete resorption was observed in four control grafts only. Cyst-like resorption areas were more frequent within the graft of sham-treated animals versus PEMF-treated. The average volume of the cysts was not significantly different between the two groups; nevertheless, analysis of the variance of the volumes demonstrated a significant difference. The histological score showed no significant differences between controls and stimulated animals, but the percentage of surface covered by fibrous tissue was higher in the control group than in the stimulated one. Interleukin-1 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha concentration in the synovial fluid was significantly lower, and transforming growth factor-beta1 was significantly higher, in PEMF-treated animals compared to controls. One month after osteochondral graft implantation, we observed larger bone formation in PEMF-treated grafts which favors early graft stabilization. In the long term, PEMF exposure limited the bone resorption in subchondral bone; furthermore, the cytokine profile in the synovial fluid was indicative of a more favorable articular environment for the graft.

  11. A new high performance field reversed configuration operating regime in the C-2 device

    SciTech Connect

    Tuszewski, M.; Smirnov, A.; Thompson, M. C.; Barnes, D.; Binderbauer, M. W.; Brown, R.; Bui, D. Q.; Clary, R.; Conroy, K. D.; Deng, B. H.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Garate, E.; Glass, F. J.; Gota, H.; Guo, H.Y.; Gupta, D.; Gupta, S.; Kinley, J. S.; Knapp, K.; and others

    2012-05-15

    Large field reversed configurations (FRCs) are produced in the C-2 device by combining dynamic formation and merging processes. The good confinement of these FRCs must be further improved to achieve sustainment with neutral beam (NB) injection and pellet fuelling. A plasma gun is installed at one end of the C-2 device to attempt electric field control of the FRC edge layer. The gun inward radial electric field counters the usual FRC spin-up and mitigates the n = 2 rotational instability without applying quadrupole magnetic fields. Better plasma centering is also obtained, presumably from line-tying to the gun electrodes. The combined effects of the plasma gun and of neutral beam injection lead to the high performance FRC operating regime, with FRC lifetimes up to 3 ms and with FRC confinement times improved by factors 2 to 4.

  12. A low-power bidirectional telemetry device with a near-field charging feature for a cardiac microstimulator.

    PubMed

    Shuenn-Yuh Lee; Chih-Jen Cheng; Ming-Chun Liang

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, wireless telemetry using the near-field coupling technique with round-wire coils for an implanted cardiac microstimulator is presented. The proposed system possesses an external powering amplifier and an internal bidirectional microstimulator. The energy of the microstimulator is provided by a rectifier that can efficiently charge a rechargeable device. A fully integrated regulator and a charge pump circuit are included to generate a stable, low-voltage, and high-potential supply voltage, respectively. A miniature digital processor includes a phase-shift-keying (PSK) demodulator to decode the transmission data and a self-protective system controller to operate the entire system. To acquire the cardiac signal, a low-voltage and low-power monitoring analog front end (MAFE) performs immediate threshold detection and data conversion. In addition, the pacing circuit, which consists of a pulse generator (PG) and its digital-to-analog (D/A) controller, is responsible for stimulating heart tissue. The chip was fabricated by Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company (TSMC) with 0.35-μm complementary metal-oxide semiconductor technology to perform the monitoring and pacing functions with inductively powered communication. Using a model with lead and heart tissue on measurement, a -5-V pulse at a stimulating frequency of 60 beats per minute (bpm) is delivered while only consuming 31.5 μW of power.

  13. Flow-Field Measurement of Device-Induced Embedded Streamwise Vortex on a Flat Plate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yao, Chung-Sheng; Lin, John C.; Allan, Brian G.

    2002-01-01

    Detailed flow-field measurements were performed downstream of a single vortex generator (VG) using an advanced Stereo Digital Particle Image Velocimetry system. Thc passive flow-control devices examined consisted of a low-profile VG with a device height, h, approximately equal to 20 percent of the boundary-layer thickness, sigma, and a conventional VG with h is approximately sigma. Flow-field data were taken at twelve cross-flow planes downstream of the VG to document and quantify the evolution of embedded streamwise vortex. The effects of device angle of attack on vortex development downstream were compared between the low-profile VG and the conventional VG. Key parameters including vorticity, circulation, trajectory, and half-life radius - describing concentration, strength, path, and size, respectively--of the device-induced streamwise vortex were extracted from the flow-field data. The magnitude of maximum vorticity increases as angle of attack increases for the low-profile VG, but the trend is reversed for the conventional VG, probably due to flow stalling around the larger device at higher angles of attack. Peak vorticity and circulation for the low-profile VG decays exponentially and inversely proportional to the distance downstream from the device. The device-height normalized vortex trajectories for the low-profile VG, especially in the lateral direction, follow the general trends of the conventional VG. The experimental database was used to validate the predictive capability of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). CFD accurately predicts the vortex circulation and path; however, improvements are needed for predicting the vorticity strength and vortex size.

  14. Fiber - Optic Devices as Temperature Sensors for Temperature Measurements in AC Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rablau, Corneliu; Lafrance, Joseph; Sala, Anca

    2007-10-01

    We report on the investigation of several fiber-optic devices as potential sensors for temperature measurements in AC magnetic fields. Common temperature sensors, such as thermocouples, thermistors or diodes, will create random and/or systematic errors when placed in a magnetic field. A DC magnetic field is susceptible to create a systematic offset to the measurement, while in an AC magnetic field of variable frequency random errors which cannot be corrected for can also be introduced. Fiber-Bragg-gratings and thin film filters have an inherent temperature dependence. Detrimental for their primary applications, the same dependence allows one to use such devices as temperature sensors. In an AC magnetic field, they present the advantage of being immune to electromagnetic interference. Moreover, for fiber-Bragg-gratings, the shape factor and small mass of the bare-fiber device make it convenient for temperature measurements on small samples. We studied several thin-film filters and fiber-Bragg-gratings and compared their temperature measurement capabilities in AC magnetic fields of 0 to 150 Gauss, 0 to 20 KHz to the results provided by off-the-shelf thermocouples and thermistor-based temperature measurement systems.

  15. Field evaluation of four spatial repellent devices against Arkansas rice-land mosquitoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four commercially available spatial repellent devices were tested in a rice land habitat near Stuttgart, Arkansas after semi-field level assessments had been made at the Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, ARS, USDA in Gainesville, FL. OFF! Clip-On® (a.i. metofluthrin, S.C....

  16. The Use of Sound-Field Amplification Devices in Different Types of Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Wayne J.; Marinac, Julie; Pitty, Kathryn; Burrows, Carolyn

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine if sound-field amplification (SFA) devices affected student performance in 3 different types of classrooms. Method: The classroom performance of 147 children (77 males, 70 females, ages 8;2 [years;months] plus or minus 5 months) was measured at the beginning and end of the second semester of…

  17. Lessons from Learner Experiences in a Field-Based Inquiry in Geography Using Mobile Devices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chew-Hung; Chatterjea, Kalyani; Goh, Dion Hoe-Lian; Theng, Yin Leng; Lim, Ee-Peng; Sun, Aixin; Razikin, Khasfariyati; Kim, Thi Nhu Quynh; Nguyen, Quang Minh

    2012-01-01

    Geographical inquiry involves collecting, using and making sense of the data to investigate some geographical phenomena. With the increasing number of mobile devices equipped with Internet access capabilities, there is a wide scope for using it in field inquiry where learning can take place in the form of social interactions between team members…

  18. Generating Electric Fields in PDMS Microfluidic Devices with Salt Water Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Sciambi, Adam; Abate, Adam R.

    2014-01-01

    Droplet merging and sorting in microfluidic devices usually rely on electric fields generated by solid metal electrodes. We show that simpler and more reliable salt water electrodes, despite their lower conductivity, can perform the same droplet manipulations at the same voltages. PMID:24671446

  19. Neurogenesis in the subventricular zone following transcranial magnetic field stimulation and nigrostriatal lesions.

    PubMed

    Arias-Carrión, O; Verdugo-Díaz, L; Feria-Velasco, A; Millán-Aldaco, D; Gutiérrez, A A; Hernández-Cruz, A; Drucker-Colín, R

    2004-10-01

    Neurogenesis continues at least in two regions of the mammalian adult brain, the subventricular zone (SVZ) and the subgranular zone in hippocampal dentate gyrus. Neurogenesis in these regions is subjected to physiological regulation and can be modified by pharmacological and pathological events. Here we report the induction of neurogenesis in the SVZ and the differentiation after nigrostriatal pathway lesion along with transcranial magnetic field stimulation (TMFS) in adult rats. Significant numbers of proliferating cells demonstrated by bromodeoxyuridine-positive reaction colocalized with the neuronal marker NeuN were detected bilaterally in the SVZ, and several of these cells also expressed tyrosine hydroxylase. Transplanted chromaffin cells into lesioned animals also induced bilateral appearance of subependymal cells. These results show for the first time that unilateral lesion, transplant, and/or TMFS induce neurogenesis in the SVZ of rats and also that TMFS prevents the motor alterations induced by the lesion.

  20. 3D modeling of the total electric field induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation using the boundary element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas, F. S.; Lancaster, J. L.; Fox, P. T.

    2009-06-01

    Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) delivers highly localized brain stimulations via non-invasive externally applied magnetic fields. This non-invasive, painless technique provides researchers and clinicians with a unique tool capable of stimulating both the central and peripheral nervous systems. However, a complete analysis of the macroscopic electric fields produced by TMS has not yet been performed. In this paper, we addressed the importance of the secondary E-field created by surface charge accumulation during TMS using the boundary element method (BEM). 3D models were developed using simple head geometries in order to test the model and compare it with measured values. The effects of tissue geometry, size and conductivity were also investigated. Finally, a realistically shaped head model was used to assess the effect of multiple surfaces on the total E-field. Secondary E-fields have the greatest impact at areas in close proximity to each tissue layer. Throughout the head, the secondary E-field magnitudes typically range from 20% to 35% of the primary E-field's magnitude. The direction of the secondary E-field was generally in opposition to the primary E-field; however, for some locations, this was not the case (i.e. going from high to low conductivity tissues). These findings show that realistically shaped head geometries are important for accurate modeling of the total E-field.

  1. Bias field tailored plasmonic nano-electrode for high-power terahertz photonic devices

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Il-Min; Shin, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Eui Su; Kim, Namje; Lee, Won-Hui; Ko, Hyunsung; Han, Sang-Pil; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Photoconductive antennas with nano-structured electrodes and which show significantly improved performances have been proposed to satisfy the demand for compact and efficient terahertz (THz) sources. Plasmonic field enhancement was previously considered the dominant mechanism accounting for the improvements in the underlying physics. However, we discovered that the role of plasmonic field enhancement is limited and near-field distribution of bias field should be considered as well. In this paper, we clearly show that the locally enhanced bias field due to the size effect is much more important than the plasmonic enhanced absorption in the nano-structured electrodes for the THz emitters. Consequently, an improved nano-electrode design is presented by tailoring bias field distribution and plasmonic enhancement. Our findings will pave the way for new perspectives in the design and analysis of plasmonic nano-structures for more efficient THz photonic devices. PMID:26347288

  2. Bias field tailored plasmonic nano-electrode for high-power terahertz photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Moon, Kiwon; Lee, Il-Min; Shin, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Eui Su; Kim, Namje; Lee, Won-Hui; Ko, Hyunsung; Han, Sang-Pil; Park, Kyung Hyun

    2015-09-08

    Photoconductive antennas with nano-structured electrodes and which show significantly improved performances have been proposed to satisfy the demand for compact and efficient terahertz (THz) sources. Plasmonic field enhancement was previously considered the dominant mechanism accounting for the improvements in the underlying physics. However, we discovered that the role of plasmonic field enhancement is limited and near-field distribution of bias field should be considered as well. In this paper, we clearly show that the locally enhanced bias field due to the size effect is much more important than the plasmonic enhanced absorption in the nano-structured electrodes for the THz emitters. Consequently, an improved nano-electrode design is presented by tailoring bias field distribution and plasmonic enhancement. Our findings will pave the way for new perspectives in the design and analysis of plasmonic nano-structures for more efficient THz photonic devices.

  3. Microwave Study of Field-Effect Devices Based on Graphene/Aluminum Nitride/Graphene Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adabi, Mohammad; Lischner, Johannes; Hanham, Stephen M.; Mihai, Andrei P.; Shaforost, Olena; Wang, Rui; Hao, Ling; Petrov, Peter K.; Klein, Norbert

    2017-03-01

    Metallic gate electrodes are often employed to control the conductivity of graphene based field effect devices. The lack of transparency of such electrodes in many optical applications is a key limiting factor. We demonstrate a working concept of a double layer graphene field effect device that utilizes a thin film of sputtered aluminum nitride as dielectric gate material. For this system, we show that the graphene resistance can be modified by a voltage between the two graphene layers. We study how a second gate voltage applied to the silicon back gate modifies the measured microwave transport data at around 8.7 GHz. As confirmed by numerical simulations based on the Boltzmann equation, this system resembles a parallel circuit of two graphene layers with different intrinsic doping levels. The obtained experimental results indicate that the graphene-aluminum nitride-graphene device concept presents a promising technology platform for terahertz- to- optical devices as well as radio-frequency acoustic devices where piezoelectricity in aluminum nitride can also be exploited.

  4. Theoretical Analyses of Oxide-Bypassed Superjunction Power Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Liang, Yung C.; Samudra, Ganesh S.

    2005-02-01

    The performance merit of silicon unipolar power devices is best described by a trade-off relationship between specific on-state resistance (Ron,sp) and breakdown voltage (Vbr), which leads to the establishment of an ideal unipolar limit on device performance. Recently, engineering the electric field in the device drift region to break this unipolar silicon limit for superior performance has become an important research topic. The superjunction (SJ) structure achieves this by paralleling precisely matched higher doping alternate p--n layers to replace the typically low doping drift region. Alternatively, for fabrication simplicity in an oxide-bypassed (OB) structure, an oxide layer of predetermined thickness together with a polycontact is used to replace the p-column of the SJ structure to modulate the electric field. The further improved gradient OB (GOB) structure with slanted oxide sidewalls delivers a performance similar to ideal SJ devices. In this paper, detailed theoretical analyses in closed-form equations on OB and GOB devices are made for the first time to model the performance in various operating regions. The theoretical analyses were also carefully verified through two-dimensional numerical simulations.

  5. Microwave Study of Field-Effect Devices Based on Graphene/Aluminum Nitride/Graphene Structures

    PubMed Central

    Adabi, Mohammad; Lischner, Johannes; Hanham, Stephen M.; Mihai, Andrei P.; Shaforost, Olena; Wang, Rui; Hao, Ling; Petrov, Peter K.; Klein, Norbert

    2017-01-01

    Metallic gate electrodes are often employed to control the conductivity of graphene based field effect devices. The lack of transparency of such electrodes in many optical applications is a key limiting factor. We demonstrate a working concept of a double layer graphene field effect device that utilizes a thin film of sputtered aluminum nitride as dielectric gate material. For this system, we show that the graphene resistance can be modified by a voltage between the two graphene layers. We study how a second gate voltage applied to the silicon back gate modifies the measured microwave transport data at around 8.7 GHz. As confirmed by numerical simulations based on the Boltzmann equation, this system resembles a parallel circuit of two graphene layers with different intrinsic doping levels. The obtained experimental results indicate that the graphene-aluminum nitride-graphene device concept presents a promising technology platform for terahertz- to- optical devices as well as radio-frequency acoustic devices where piezoelectricity in aluminum nitride can also be exploited. PMID:28276517

  6. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  7. Characterization of X-ray fields at the center for devices and radiological health

    SciTech Connect

    Cerra, F.

    1993-12-31

    This talk summarizes the process undertaken by the Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) for establishing reference x-ray fields in its accredited calibration laboratory. The main considerations and their effects on the calibration parameters are discussed. The characterization of fields may be broken down into two parts: (1) the initial setup of the calibration beam spectra and (2) the ongoing measurements and controls which ensure consistency of the reference fields. The methods employed by CDRH for both these stages and underlying considerations are presented. Uncertainties associated with the various parameters are discussed. Finally, the laboratory`s performance, as evidenced by ongoing measurement quality assurance results, is reported.

  8. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue.

    PubMed

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites ("virtual electrodes") in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  9. Controlling activation site density by low-energy far-field stimulation in cardiac tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörning, Marcel; Takagi, Seiji; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-06-01

    Tachycardia and fibrillation are potentially fatal arrhythmias associated with the formation of rotating spiral waves in the heart. Presently, the termination of these types of arrhythmia is achieved by use of antitachycardia pacing or cardioversion. However, these techniques have serious drawbacks, in that they either have limited application or produce undesirable side effects. Low-energy far-field stimulation has recently been proposed as a superior therapy. This proposed therapeutic method would exploit the phenomenon in which the application of low-energy far-field shocks induces a large number of activation sites (“virtual electrodes”) in tissue. It has been found that the formation of such sites can lead to the termination of undesired states in the heart and the restoration of normal beating. In this study we investigate a particular aspect of this method. Here we seek to determine how the activation site density depends on the applied electric field through in vitro experiments carried out on neonatal rat cardiac tissue cultures. The results indicate that the activation site density increases exponentially as a function of the intracellular conductivity and the level of cell isotropy. Additionally, we report numerical results obtained from bidomain simulations of the Beeler-Reuter model that are quantitatively consistent with our experimental results. Also, we derive an intuitive analytical framework that describes the activation site density and provides useful information for determining the ratio of longitudinal to transverse conductivity in a cardiac tissue culture. The results obtained here should be useful in the development of an actual therapeutic method based on low-energy far-field pacing. In addition, they provide a deeper understanding of the intrinsic properties of cardiac cells.

  10. Interactive Near-Field Illumination for Photorealistic Augmented Reality with Varying Materials on Mobile Devices.

    PubMed

    Rohmer, Kai; Buschel, Wolfgang; Dachselt, Raimund; Grosch, Thorsten

    2015-12-01

    At present, photorealistic augmentation is not yet possible since the computational power of mobile devices is insufficient. Even streaming solutions from stationary PCs cause a latency that affects user interactions considerably. Therefore, we introduce a differential rendering method that allows for a consistent illumination of the inserted virtual objects on mobile devices, avoiding delays. The computation effort is shared between a stationary PC and the mobile devices to make use of the capacities available on both sides. The method is designed such that only a minimum amount of data has to be transferred asynchronously between the participants. This allows for an interactive illumination of virtual objects with a consistent appearance under both temporally and spatially varying real illumination conditions. To describe the complex near-field illumination in an indoor scenario, HDR video cameras are used to capture the illumination from multiple directions. In this way, sources of illumination can be considered that are not directly visible to the mobile device because of occlusions and the limited field of view. While our method focuses on Lambertian materials, we also provide some initial approaches to approximate non-diffuse virtual objects and thereby allow for a wider field of application at nearly the same cost.

  11. FreshAiR and Field Studies—Augmenting Geological Reality with Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Paor, D. G.; Crompton, H.; Dunleavy, M.

    2014-12-01

    During the last decade, mobile devices have fomented a revolution in geological mapping. Present Clinton set the stage for this revolution in the year 2000 when he ordered a cessation to Selective Availability, making reliable GPS available for civilian use. Geologists began using personal digital assistants and ruggedized tablet PCs for geolocation and data recording and the pace of change accelerated with the development of mobile apps such as Google Maps, digital notebooks, and digital compass-clinometers. Despite these changes in map-making technologies, most students continue to learn geology in the field the old-fashioned way, by following a field trip leader as a group and trying to hear and understand lecturettes at the outcrop. In this presentation, we demonstrate the potential of a new Augment Reality (AR) mobile app called "FreshAiR" to change fundamentally the way content-knowledge and learning objectives are delivered to students in the field. FreshAiR, which was developed by co-author and ODU alumnus M.D., triggers content delivery to mobile devices based on proximity. Students holding their mobile devices to the horizon see trigger points superimposed on the field of view of the device's built-in camera. When they walk towards the trigger, information about the location pops up. This can include text, images, movies, and quiz questions (multiple choice and fill-in-the-blank). Students can use the app to reinforce the field trip leader's presentations or they can visit outcrops individuals at different times. This creates the possibility for asynchronous field class, a concept that has profound implications for distance education in the geosciences.

  12. Electrical Impact of SiC Structural Crystal Defects on High Electric Field Devices (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neudeck, Philip G.

    1999-01-01

    As illustrated by the invited paper at this conference and other works, SiC wafers and epilayers contain a variety of crystallographic imperfections, including micropipes, closed-core screw dislocations, grain boundaries, basal plane dislocations, heteropolytypic inclusions, and surfaces that are often damaged and contain atomically rough features like step bunching and growth pits or hillocks. Present understanding of the operational impact of various crystal imperfections on SiC electrical devices is reviewed, with an emphasis placed on high-field SiC power devices and circuits.

  13. Multiple trim magnets, or magic fingers,'' for insertion device field integral correction

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Marks, S.; Pipersky, P.; Schlueter, R. )

    1995-02-01

    Multiple trim magnets (MTMs), also known as magic fingers,'' are an arrangement of magnets for reducing integrated magnetic-field errors in insertion devices. The idea is to use transverse arrays of permanent magnets, hence the name multiple trim magnets,'' above and below the midplane, to correct both normal and skew longitudinal magnetic-field integral errors in a device. MTMs are typically installed at the ends of an ID. Adjustments are made by changing either the size, position, or orientation of each trim magnet. Application of the MTMs to the ALS undulators reduced both the normal and skew longitudinal field integral errors, over the entire 20 mm[times]60 mm good field region,'' of the beam aperture by as much as an order of magnitude. The requirements included corrections of field and gradients outside the multipole convergence radius. Additionally, these trim magnet arrays provided correction of the linear component of the integrated field gradients for particles with trajectories not parallel to the nominal beam axis. The MTM concept, design, construction, tests that demonstrated feasibility, and magnetic-field integral reduction of ALS undulators are presented.

  14. How external magnetic fields alter the parameter dependence of reflectivity in stimulated Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Tableman, A.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.

    2016-10-01

    We show the parameter dependence of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) reflectivity over a range of electron temperatures and densities, laser intensities, and external magnetic field (B0) amplitudes and orientations in particle-in-cell simulations with kλD = 0.2 - 0.4 for the backscatter plasma wave. B0 can modify kinetic SRS by altering the phasespace dynamics of trapped particles. We show how B0 (both in amplitude and in orientation relative to the incident laser wavevector) affects the onset intensity and threshold values for reflectivity. Without an external field, and for constant kλD , lower electron densities have lower reflectivities, since SRS saturates at amplitudes for which the detuning rate due to the nonlinear frequency shift is on the order of the growth rate. Lower reflectivities are also seen for shorter speckle lengths in multi-speckle ensembles. The sensitivity of SRS reflectivity to B0 depends on the underlying kinetic physics, though we comment on generalities and the parameter regimes for which B0 eliminates kinetic SRS reflectivity. Supported under Grant DE-NA0001833; simulations were carried out on the Dawson2 cluster, Edison, Mira, and BlueWaters.

  15. Vagus Nerve Stimulation

    MedlinePlus

    Vagus nerve stimulation Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Vagus nerve stimulation is a procedure that involves implantation of a device that stimulates the vagus nerve with electrical impulses. There's one vagus nerve on ...

  16. Loss of contractile activity of endothelin-1 induced by electrical field stimulation-generated free radicals.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, N; Kasuya, Y; Yamada, G; Hama, H; Masaki, T; Goto, K

    1994-09-01

    1. Electrical field stimulation (EFS; 10 V, 10 Hz, 2 ms) of porcine coronary artery strips precontracted with 10 nM endothelin-1 (ET-1) for 5 min caused a biphasic response, consisting of a slight contraction during EFS and a marked and irreversible relaxation just after EFS. This irreversible relaxation after EFS has never been investigated. In the present study, we have investigated the mechanism of the relaxation after EFS. 2. The EFS-induced response was not affected by the presence or absence of endothelium and was insensitive to 10 microM tetrodotoxin (TTX). 3. In the presence of free radical scavengers (40 u ml-1 superoxide dismutase (SOD), 1200 u ml-1 catalase or 80 mM D-mannitol), the relaxation after EFS was significantly inhibited. Moreover, relaxation after EFS was not observed in porcine coronary artery strips precontracted with 20 mM KCl. 4. In a cascade experiment, EFS of Krebs-Ringer solution containing 10 nM ET-1 induced marked suppression of the contractile activity of ET-1 in porcine coronary artery strips, which was in accord with the observed decrease in release of immunoreactive ET-1 (ir-ET-1). This effect of EFS was significantly inhibited by each of the free radical scavengers, 3 mM vitamin C, 40 u ml-1 SOD, 1200 u ml-1 catalase and 80 mM D-mannitol. 5. The exchange of 95% O2/5% CO2 gas for 95% N2/5% CO2 gas significantly inhibited the EFS-induced decrease in release of ir-ET-1. 6. Neither superoxide anions generated by xanthine (10 JM) plus xanthine oxidase (0.1 micro ml-1) nor hydrogen peroxide (10 microM) exogenously added to Krebs-Ringer solution containing 10 nM ET-1 affected the level of ir-ET-1.7. Generation of hydroxyl radicals was detected in the EFS-applied Krebs-Ringer solution. The EFS-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals was dependent on the period of stimulation and 02-bubbling, and significant generation of hydroxyl radicals was detectable with stimulation of over 5 min.Moreover, hydroxyl radicals generated in 50 mM Na

  17. Field line and Particle orbit Analysis in the Periphery of the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Yutaka; Oikawa, Shun-ichi; Watanabe, Tsuguhiro

    2002-07-01

    Magnetic field lines and particle orbits were analyzed in the periphery of the Large Helical Device (LHD), which is called the chaotic field line region in this paper. The widths of the chaotic field line region were numerically identified for the standard LHD configuration with the magnetic axis position Rax = 3.75 m and for an improved confinement configuration with Rax = 3.6 m. It was found that the reflected particles include of what we have named chaotic particles and non-chaotic particles. Most of the reflected particles are mirror-confined with strong adiabaticity in the chaotic field line region. The remaining reflected particles, named type-A and type-B particles, are harmful to confinement. We found by detailed analysis of the vacuum magnetic field in the LHD that there exist loss canals that are the open intersections of |\\mbi{B}| = const. and \\mbi{B} \\cdot \

  18. Optically stimulated luminescence dating of aeolian sand in the otindag dune field and holocene climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, Y.L.; Lu, H.Y.; Mason, J.; Miao, X.D.; Swinehart, J.; Goble, R.

    2008-01-01

    The dune system in Otindag sand field of northern China is sensitive to climate change, where effective moisture and related vegetation cover play a controlling role for dune activity and stability. Therefore, aeolian deposits may be an archive of past environmental changes, possibly at the millennial scale, but previous studies on this topic have rarely been reported. In this study, thirty-five optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) ages of ten representative sand-paleosol profiles in Otindag sand field are obtained, and these ages provide a relatively complete and well-dated chronology for wet and dry variations in Holocene. The results indicate that widespread dune mobilization occurred from 9.9 to 8.2 ka, suggesting a dry early Holocene climate. The dunes were mainly stabilized between 8.0 and 2.7 ka, implying a relatively wet climate, although there were short-term penetrations of dune activity during this wet period. After ???2.3 ka, the region became dry again, as inferred from widespread dune activity. The "8.2 ka" cold event and the Little Ice Age climatic deterioration are detected on the basis of the dune records and OSL ages. During the Medieval Warm Period and the Sui-Tang Warm Period (570-770 AD), climate in Otindag sand field was relatively humid and the vegetation was denser, and the sand dunes were stabilized again. These aeolian records may indicate climate changes at millennial time scale during Holocene, and these climatic changes may be the teleconnection to the climate changes elsewhere in the world. ?? Science in China Press and Springer-Verlag GmbH 2008.

  19. Enhanced Field Emission Studies on Niobium Surfaces Relevant to High Field Superconducting Radio-Frequency Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tong

    2002-09-18

    Enhanced field emission (EFE) presents the main impediment to higher acceleration gradients in superconducting niobium (Nb) radiofrequency cavities for particle accelerators. The strength, number and sources of EFE sites strongly depend on surface preparation and handling. The main objective of this thesis project is to systematically investigate the sources of EFE from Nb, to evaluate the best available surface preparation techniques with respect to resulting field emission, and to establish an optimized process to minimize or eliminate EFE. To achieve these goals, a scanning field emission microscope (SFEM) was designed and built as an extension to an existing commercial scanning electron microscope (SEM). In the SFEM chamber of ultra high vacuum, a sample is moved laterally in a raster pattern under a high voltage anode tip for EFE detection and localization. The sample is then transferred under vacuum to the SEM chamber equipped with an energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometer for individual emitting site characterization. Compared to other systems built for similar purposes, this apparatus has low cost and maintenance, high operational flexibility, considerably bigger scan area, as well as reliable performance. EFE sources from planar Nb have been studied after various surface preparation, including chemical etching and electropolishing, combined with ultrasonic or high-pressure water rinse. Emitters have been identified, analyzed and the preparation process has been examined and improved based on EFE results. As a result, field-emission-free or near field-emission-free surfaces at ~140 MV/m have been consistently achieved with the above techniques. Characterization on the remaining emitters leads to the conclusion that no evidence of intrinsic emitters, i.e., no fundamental electric field limit induced by EFE, has been observed up to ~140 MV/m. Chemically etched and electropolished Nb are compared and no significant difference is observed up to ~140 MV/m. To

  20. Phase-field modeling of fracture propagation under hydraulic stimulation in pre-fractured rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khisamitov, Ildar; Mohseni, Seyed Ali; Meschke, Guenther

    2016-04-01

    The presentation presents the numerical analysis of hydraulic fracturing within Griffith theory of brittle damage. The phase-field method [1] is employed to model brittle fracture propagation driven by pressurized fluids within fully saturated porous rocks. The phase-field equation is coupled with the Biot-theory using the effective stress concept. The porous rock is assumed as fully saturated with incompressible fluid and deforms within elasticity theory. The hydraulic fracturing propagates under mode I crack opening in quasi-static regime with slow fluid flow in porous matrix and fracture. The phase-field approach for the modelling of brittle fracture [2] coincides with the maximum energy release rate criterion in fracture mechanics theory. The phase-field equation is approximated over entire the domain and introduces new degree of freedom (damage variable). Crack surface is represented by a smooth regularized damage distribution over the fractured area. The presented numerical investigations are characterized by different scenarios of hydraulic stimulation and the interaction of a new fracture emanating from the bore hole with pre-existing cracks. The scenarios include predefined fractures with different oriented to specific angle and spatial distribution over the entire domain. The undamaged rock matrix is modeled as an isotropic elastic material with initial porosity and isotropic matrix permeability. The flow within the undamaged region is governed by Darcy's law while the fluid flow in fractures is approximated by cubic law with the crack opening computed from the displacement solution and the damage variable distribution [3]. Initial fractures are modeled by an initial distribution of the damage variable and by special zero-thickness interface finite elements. Adaptive algorithms in conjunction with appropriately chosen refinement criteria are utilized to reduce the computational costs. References [1] M.J. Borden "A phase-field description of dynamic

  1. Promoting foot-leg movements in children with multiple disabilities through the use of support devices and technology for regulating contingent stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Scalini, Lorenza; Castagnaro, Francesca; Di Bari, Mauro

    2007-12-01

    The present study assessed the possibility of promoting pre-ambulatory foot-leg movements in children with multiple disabilities by motivating their action through contingent stimulation combined with a support device. Two children aged 10 and 8 years participated. Microswitch technology (i.e., pressure sensors under the shoes or optic sensors at the front-inner side of the shoes) served for detecting the foot-leg movements and providing contingent stimulation on their occurrence. Sensor activation produced 5 s of stimulation during intervention. Data showed that both children had significant increases in foot-leg movements during the intervention phases. Implications of the data in terms of skill acquisition and further intervention prospects are discussed.

  2. D-zero rototrack: first stage of D-zero 2 Tesla solenoid field mapping device

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Korienek, J.; Krider, J.; Lindenmeyer, C.; Miksa, D.; Miksa, R.

    1997-09-01

    A simple and portable field mapping device was developed at Fermilab and successfully used to test the D0 2 Tesla solenoid at Toshiba Works in Japan. A description of the mechanical structure, electric driving and control system, and software of the field mapping device is given. Four Hall probe elements of Group3 Digital Gaussmeters are mounted on the radial extension arm of a carriage, which is mounted on a central rotating beam. The system gives two dimensional motions (axial and rotational) to the Hall probes. To make the system compact and portable, we used a laptop computer with PCMCIA cards. For the control system we used commercially available software LabVIEW and Motion Toolbox, and for the data analysis we used Microsoft Excel.

  3. Co-stimulation of HaCaT keratinization with mechanical stress and air-exposure using a novel 3D culture device

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Moon Hee; Jung, Sang-Myung; Shin, Hwa Sung

    2016-01-01

    Artificial skin or skin equivalents have been used for clinical purpose to skin graft and as substitutes for animal experiments. The culture of cell lines such as HaCaT has the potential to produce large amounts of artificial skin at a low cost. However, there is a limit to keratinization due to the restriction of differentiation in HaCaT. In this study, a culture device that mimics the in vivo keratinization mechanism, co-stimulated by air-exposure and mechanical stimulation, was developed to construct skin equivalents. The device can reconstruct the epidermal morphology, including the cornified layer, similar to its formation in vivo. Under the condition, epidermis was differentiated in the spinous and granular layers. Formation of the stratum corneum is consistent with the mRNA and protein expressions of differentiation markers. The device is the first of its kind to combine air-exposure with mechanical stress to co-stimulate keratinization, which can facilitate the economically viable production of HaCaT-based artificial skin substitutes. PMID:27670754

  4. Analysis of field usage failure rate data for plastic encapsulated solid state devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Survey and questionnaire techniques were used to gather data from users and manufacturers on the failure rates in the field of plastic encapsulated semiconductors. It was found that such solid state devices are being successfully used by commercial companies which impose certain screening and qualification procedures. The reliability of these semiconductors is now adequate to support their consideration in NASA systems, particularly in low cost systems. The cost of performing necessary screening for NASA applications was assessed.

  5. Fabrication and Electrical Characterization of Correlated Oxide Field Effect Switching Devices for High Speed Electronics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-19

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0381 Fabrication and Electrical Characterization of Correlated Oxide Field Effect Switching Devices for High Speed Electronics ...high speed electronics 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0189 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Shriram Ramanathan 5d... electronic properties of thin film correlated oxides was investigated via electrical transport measurements and electronic structure studies

  6. High electric field effects on gigahertz dielectric properties of water measured with microwave microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Song, Chunrong; Wang, Pingshan

    2010-05-01

    Silicon microstrip line devices with 260 nm planar microfluidic channels are fabricated and used to investigate water dielectric saturation effects. Microwave scattering parameter measurements are conducted from 1 to 16 GHz under different uniform dc electric fields. When the applied dc field is increased to approximately 1 MV/cm, the measured transmission coefficient S(21) is increased up to 18 dB, which indicates a large change in water dielectric properties. Extracted water permittivity (epsilon=epsilon'+jepsilon") shows that epsilon' and epsilon" are changed up to 70% and 50%, respectively.

  7. A Field-Based Cleaning Protocol for Sampling Devices Used in Life-Detection Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eigenbrode, Jennifer; Benning, Liane G.; Maule, Jake; Wainwright, Norm; Steele, Andrew; Amundsen, Hans E. F.

    2009-06-01

    Analytical approaches to extant and extinct life detection involve molecular detection often at trace levels. Thus, removal of biological materials and other organic molecules from the surfaces of devices used for sampling is essential for ascertaining meaningful results. Organic decontamination to levels consistent with null values on life-detection instruments is particularly challenging at remote field locations where Mars analog field investigations are carried out. Here, we present a seven-step, multi-reagent decontamination method that can be applied to sampling devices while in the field. In situ lipopolysaccharide detection via low-level endotoxin assays and molecular detection via gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used to test the effectiveness of the decontamination protocol for sampling of glacial ice with a coring device and for sampling of sediments with a rover scoop during deployment at Arctic Mars-analog sites in Svalbard, Norway. Our results indicate that the protocols and detection technique sufficiently remove and detect low levels of molecular constituents necessary for life-detection tests.

  8. Graphene based spin-FET devices: Spin current manipulation through spatially modulated Rashba Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza Diniz, Ginetom; Vernek, Edson; Macedo de Souza, Fabricio

    We have calculated the spin dependent conductance in a two-terminal device made of zigzag graphene nanoribbon in the presence of a spatially modulated Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC). The modulated Rashba SOC can be achieved by using local gates that generate strong localized electric fields perpendicular to the plane underneath. We have used the equilibrium surface Green's function technique in real space using tight-binding approximation in order to calculate the electronic transport. We demonstrate that by an appropriate architecture of the gate width, and tuning the strength and direction of the electric field in the gates is possible to effectively control the spin-charge current flow along the device. In addition, we also discuss the effect of uniaxial strain in the spin-resolved conductance profiles, which demonstrates to be an additional tool as an on-off electronic current flow switch. Our results suggest suitable application of graphene-based nanostructures in the spintronic field, using spatially modulated Rashba SOC, and uniaxial strains to effectively manipulate the spin-polarized current in nanoelectronic devices. Supported by CAPES, CNPq and FAPEMIG.

  9. On the fringing-field effect in liquid-crystal beam-steering devices.

    PubMed

    Apter, Boris; Efron, Uzi; Bahat-Treidel, Eldad

    2004-01-01

    A detailed simulation of the fringing-field effect in liquid-crystal (LC)-based blazed-grating structures has been carried out. These studies are aimed at clarifying the relationship between the width of the fringing-field-broadened phase profile of the blazed grating and the LC cell thickness. This fringing-field broadening of the blazed grating's phase profile is shown to affect mostly the 2pi phase-step zone (fly-back zone) of the blazed grating. The results of the simulations carried out on the blazed-grating structure indicate two main effects of the fringing field: (1) reduction in the attainable diffraction efficiency and (2) limitation of the maximum deflection angle of the device. Both effects are shown to be directly linked to the broadening of the fly-back zone, which is shown to be proportional to the LC cell thickness.

  10. Field-induced activation of metal oxide semiconductor for low temperature flexible transparent electronic device applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pudasaini, Pushpa Raj; Noh, Joo Hyon; Wong, Anthony; Haglund, Amada; Ward, Thomas Zac; Mandrus, David; Rack, Philip

    Amorphous metal-oxide semiconductors have been extensively studied as an active channel material in thin film transistors due to their high carrier mobility, and excellent large-area uniformity. Here, we report the athermal activation of amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide semiconductor channels by an electric field-induced oxygen migration via gating through an ionic liquid. Using field-induced activation, a transparent flexible thin film transistor is demonstrated on a polyamide substrate with transistor characteristics having a current ON-OFF ratio exceeding 108, and saturation field effect mobility of 8.32 cm2/(V.s) without a post-deposition thermal treatment. This study demonstrates the potential of field-induced activation as an athermal alternative to traditional post-deposition thermal annealing for metal oxide electronic devices suitable for transparent and flexible polymer substrates. Materials Science and Technology Division, ORBL, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  11. Frontal eye field involvement in sustaining visual attention: evidence from transcranial magnetic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Esterman, Michael; Liu, Guanyu; Okabe, Hidefusa; Reagan, Andrew; Thai, Michelle; DeGutis, Joe

    2015-05-01

    The frontal eye field (FEF), particularly the right FEF, is broadly implicated in top-down control of transient acts of attention, but less is known about its involvement in sustained attention. Although neuroimaging studies of sustained attention tasks commonly find FEF activation, it is unclear how this region contributes to moment-to-moment fluctuations in sustained performance. We sought to determine if the FEF plays a critical role in sustained attention, and if that role differs between periods of worse performance (out-of-the-zone) and periods of better performance (in-the-zone). We used offline 1 Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to temporarily attenuate either right or left FEF excitability while participants performed a go/no-go sustained attention task (the gradual onset continuous performance task). The results demonstrate that following TMS to the right FEF, sustained attention during in-the-zone periods significantly worsened both in terms of lower accuracy and increased reaction time variability. In contrast, applying TMS to the left FEF did not significantly affect accuracy or variability. These results demonstrate that the right FEF plays a crucial role in supporting optimal sustained attention.

  12. Pulsed electric field stimulates plant secondary metabolism in suspension cultures of Taxus chinensis.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hong; Huang, Lin-Ling; Chen, Shu-De; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2004-12-20

    The effects of pulsed electric field (PEF) on growth and secondary metabolite production by plant cell culture were investigated by using suspension cultures of Taxus chinensis as a model system. Cultured cells in different growth phases were exposed to a PEF (50 Hz, 10 V/m) for various periods of time. A significant increase in intracellular accumulation of taxuyunnanine C (Tc), a bioactive secondary metabolite, was observed by exposing the cells in the early exponential growth phase to a 30-min PEF. The Tc content (i.e., the specific production based on dry cell weight) was increased by 30% after exposure to PEF, without loss of biomass, compared with the control. The combination of PEF treatment and sucrose feeding proved useful for improving secondary metabolite formation. Production levels of reactive oxygen species, extracellular Tc, and phenolics were all increased, whereas cell capacitance was decreased with PEF treatment. The results show that PEF induced a defense response of plant cells and may have altered the cell/membrane's dielectric properties. PEF, an external stimulus or stress, is proposed as a promising new abiotic elicitor for stimulating secondary metabolite biosynthesis in plant cell cultures.

  13. Responses of the Smooth Muscle Membrane of Guinea Pig Jejunum Elicited by Field Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Hidaka, T.; Kuriyama, H.

    1969-01-01

    Field stimulation of the jejunum elicited successively an action potential of spike form, a slow excitatory depolarization, a slow inhibitory hyperpolarization, and a postinhibitory depolarization as a rebound excitation. The slow depolarization often triggered the spike. The inhibitory potential showed lower threshold than did the excitatory potential. Both the excitatory potentials were abolished by atropine and tetrodotoxin. Effective membrane resistance measured by the intracellular polarizing method was reduced during the peak of the excitatory potential, but the degree of reduction was smaller than that evoked by iontophoretic application of acetylcholine. Conditioning hyperpolarization of the muscle membrane modified the amplitude of the excitatory potential. The estimated reversal potential level for the excitatory potenialt was about 0 mv. No changes could be observed in the amplitude of the inhibitory potential when hyperpolarization was induced with intracellularly applied current. Low [K]o and [Ca]o blocked the generation of the excitatory potential but the amplitude of the inhibitory potential was enhanced in low [K]o. Low [Ca]o and high [Mg]o had no effect on the inhibitory potential. PMID:5778319

  14. Modifying the Kinetic Behavior of Stimulated Raman Scattering with External Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winjum, B. J.; Tableman, A.; Tsung, F. S.; Mori, W. B.

    2015-11-01

    We show the effect of an external magnetic field (B0) on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in the kinetic regime using particle-in-cell simulations. 1D simulations (with three velocity components for particle motion) are sufficient to show that orienting B0 perpendicular to the laser propagation direction can reduce SRS reflectivity. We show the effect of B0 on trapped particle motion and on local heating. In 2D simulations of single- and multi-speckled laser beams, trapped particles can be restricted to, or freed from, speckles and local bursts of SRS activity by B0. B0 collinear with the laser propagation direction acts to align trapped particles with the daughter electron plasma wave (EPW) in SRS, which can both limit collective speckle interactions and make 2D SRS more 1D-like. On the other hand, B0 perpendicular to the laser propagation direction acts to deflect trapped particles transversely across the daughter EPW and to dynamically change the population of particles that are resonant with the EPW, disrupting the nonlinear wave-particle effects on EPWs. This acts to decrease SRS reflectivity. Hot electron motion is restricted for either orientation, but to different effect with regard to local heating, SRS recurrence, and speckle interactivity. Supported by DOE, Grant No. DE-NA0001833.

  15. MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCE ON NGF-STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS: EFFECT OF PAINT FUMES

    EPA Science Inventory

    MAGNETIC FIELD INFLUENCE ON NGF-STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH IN PC-12 CELLS: EFFECT OF PAINT FUMES. C. F. Blackman1, D. E. House2*, S. G. Benane3*, A. Ubeda4, M.A. TrilIo4. 1 National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, EPA,
    Research Triangle Park, North Caro...

  16. Origin and Properties of Striatal Local Field Potential Responses to Cortical Stimulation: Temporal Regulation by Fast Inhibitory Connections

    PubMed Central

    Galiñanes, Gregorio L.; Braz, Barbara Y.; Murer, Mario Gustavo

    2011-01-01

    Evoked striatal field potentials are seldom used to study corticostriatal communication in vivo because little is known about their origin and significance. Here we show that striatal field responses evoked by stimulating the prelimbic cortex in mice are reduced by more than 90% after infusing the AMPA receptor antagonist CNQX close to the recording electrode. Moreover, the amplitude of local field responses and dPSPs recorded in striatal medium spiny neurons increase in parallel with increasing stimulating current intensity. Finally, the evoked striatal fields show several of the basic known properties of corticostriatal transmission, including paired pulse facilitation and topographical organization. As a case study, we characterized the effect of local GABAA receptor blockade on striatal field and multiunitary action potential responses to prelimbic cortex stimulation. Striatal activity was recorded through a 24 channel silicon probe at about 600 µm from a microdialysis probe. Intrastriatal administration of the GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline increased by 65±7% the duration of the evoked field responses. Moreover, the associated action potential responses were markedly enhanced during bicuculline infusion. Bicuculline enhancement took place at all the striatal sites that showed a response to cortical stimulation before drug infusion, but sites showing no field response before bicuculline remained unresponsive during GABAA receptor blockade. Thus, the data demonstrate that fast inhibitory connections exert a marked temporal regulation of input-output transformations within spatially delimited striatal networks responding to a cortical input. Overall, we propose that evoked striatal fields may be a useful tool to study corticostriatal synaptic connectivity in relation to behavior. PMID:22163020

  17. Improvement of device isolation using field implantation for GaN MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying; Wang, Qingpeng; Zhang, Fuzhe; Li, Liuan; Shinkai, Satoko; Wang, Dejun; Ao, Jin-Ping

    2016-03-01

    Gallium nitride (GaN) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with boron field implantation isolation and mesa isolation were fabricated and characterized. The process of boron field implantation was altered and subsequently conducted after performing high-temperature ohmic annealing and gate oxide thermal treatment. Implanted regions with high resistivity were achieved. The circular MOSFET fabricated in the implanted region showed an extremely low current of 6.5 × 10-12 A under a gate voltage value up to 10 V, thus demonstrating that the parasitic MOSFET in the isolation region was eliminated by boron field implantation. The off-state drain current of the rectangular MOSFET with boron field implantation was 5.5 × 10-11 A, which was only one order of magnitude higher than the 6.6 × 10-12 A of the circular device. By contrast, the rectangular MOSFET with mesa isolation presented an off-state drain current of 3.2 × 10-9 A. The field isolation for GaN MOSFETs was achieved by using boron field implantation. The implantation did not reduce the field-effect mobility. The isolation structure of both mesa and implantation did not influence the subthreshold swing, whereas the isolation structure of only the implantation increased the subthreshold swing. The breakdown voltage of the implanted region with 5 μm spacing was up to 901.5 V.

  18. FLiT: a field line trace code for magnetic confinement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocente, P.; Lorenzini, R.; Terranova, D.; Zanca, P.

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a field line tracing code (FLiT) developed to study particle and energy transport as well as other phenomena related to magnetic topology in reversed-field pinch (RFP) and tokamak experiments. The code computes magnetic field lines in toroidal geometry using curvilinear coordinates (r, ϑ, ϕ) and calculates the intersections of these field lines with specified planes. The code also computes the magnetic and thermal diffusivity due to stochastic magnetic field in the collisionless limit. Compared to Hamiltonian codes, there are no constraints on the magnetic field functional formulation, which allows the integration of whichever magnetic field is required. The code uses the magnetic field computed by solving the zeroth-order axisymmetric equilibrium and the Newcomb equation for the first-order helical perturbation matching the edge magnetic field measurements in toroidal geometry. Two algorithms are developed to integrate the field lines: one is a dedicated implementation of a first-order semi-implicit volume-preserving integration method, and the other is based on the Adams–Moulton predictor–corrector method. As expected, the volume-preserving algorithm is accurate in conserving divergence, but slow because the low integration order requires small amplitude steps. The second algorithm proves to be quite fast and it is able to integrate the field lines in many partially and fully stochastic configurations accurately. The code has already been used to study the core and edge magnetic topology of the RFX-mod device in both the reversed-field pinch and tokamak magnetic configurations.

  19. Magnetic field effect in non-magnetic organic semiconductor thin film devices and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermer, Omer

    Organic pi-conjugated materials have been used to manufacture devices such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells and field-effect transistors. Recently there has been growing interest in spin and magnetic field effects in these materials. In this thesis, I report on the discovery and experimental characterization of a large and intriguing magnetoresistance effect, which we dubbed organic magnetoresistance (OMAR), in various pi-conjugated polymer and small molecular OLEDs. OMAR may find application in magnetic field sensors in OLED interactive displays (patent pending). We discovered OMAR originally in devices made from the pi-conjugated polymer polyfluorene. We found ≈ 10% magnetoresistance at 10 mT fields at room temperature. The effect is independent of the field direction, and is only weakly temperature dependent. We show that OMAR is a bulk effect related to the majority carrier transport. Studying polymer films with different amount of disorder we found that low disorder/large mobility is not a necessary prerequisite for large OMAR response. We also studied a possible interrelation between spin-orbit coupling and the OMAR effect in platinum-containing polymers. We found that spin-orbit coupling has apparently little effect on OMAR. A large OMAR effect was also observed in devices made from the prototypical small molecule, Alq3 that is similar in size to that in the polyfluorene devices. Our study shows that the basic properties are equivalent to polymer devices. To the best of our knowledge, OMAR is not adequately described by any of the magnetoresistance mechanisms known to date. A future explanation for this effect may lead to a breakthrough in the scientific understanding of organic semiconductors. In a largely unrelated effort, we also modelled spin-dependent exciton formation in OLEDs. Our work leads to the following picture of exciton formation: Since the triplet exciton states lie lower in energy than singlets, more phonons must

  20. Rhythmic auditory stimulation using a portable smart device: short-term effects on gait in chronic hemiplegic stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Byung-Woo; Lee, Hwi-Young; Song, Won-Kyung

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The effects of various rhythmic auditory stimulation tempos on stroke gait pattern changes when training patients with a smartphone-based rhythmic auditory stimulation application were investigated. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen patients with chronic stroke were included. Cadence during comfortable walking was measured (baseline). After the baseline findings were recorded, rhythmic auditory stimulation with five different tempos (i.e., −10%, −5%, 0%, +5%, and +10% change from baseline) was randomly applied. Finally, comfortable walking without rhythmic auditory stimulation was initiated to evaluate gait pattern changes. [Results] As the tempo increased, the spatiotemporal gait parameters of the stroke patients changed significantly. Gait speed, cadence, and gait cycle duration showed the greatest improvement in the +10% rhythmic auditory stimulation condition compared to baseline. After gait training with rhythmic auditory stimulation, gait speed, cadence, stride length, gait cycle duration, and step length of the affected and unaffected sides improved significantly compared to baseline. [Conclusion] Significant changes in the gait pattern of stroke patients were noted for various tempos after training with rhythmic auditory stimulation. These findings could be used to customize rehabilitative gait training for patients who experience stroke with hemiplegia. PMID:27313366

  1. Patient-Specific Electric Field Simulations and Acceleration Measurements for Objective Analysis of Intraoperative Stimulation Tests in the Thalamus.

    PubMed

    Hemm, Simone; Pison, Daniela; Alonso, Fabiola; Shah, Ashesh; Coste, Jérôme; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Wårdell, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) the fundamental mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Simulation of electric entities has previously been proposed for chronic DBS combined with subjective symptom evaluations, but not for intraoperative stimulation tests. The present paper introduces a method for an objective exploitation of intraoperative stimulation test data to identify the optimal implant position of the chronic DBS lead by relating the electric field (EF) simulations to the patient-specific anatomy and the clinical effects quantified by accelerometry. To illustrate the feasibility of this approach, it was applied to five patients with essential tremor bilaterally implanted in the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM). The VIM and its neighborhood structures were preoperatively outlined in 3D on white matter attenuated inversion recovery MR images. Quantitative intraoperative clinical assessments were performed using accelerometry. EF simulations (n = 272) for intraoperative stimulation test data performed along two trajectories per side were set-up using the finite element method for 143 stimulation test positions. The resulting EF isosurface of 0.2 V/mm was superimposed to the outlined anatomical structures. The percentage of volume of each structure's overlap was calculated and related to the corresponding clinical improvement. The proposed concept has been successfully applied to the five patients. For higher clinical improvements, not only the VIM but as well other neighboring structures were covered by the EF isosurfaces. The percentage of the volumes of the VIM, of the nucleus intermediate lateral of the thalamus and the prelemniscal radiations within the prerubral field of Forel increased for clinical improvements higher than 50% compared to improvements lower than 50%. The presented new concept allows a detailed and objective analysis of a high amount of intraoperative data to identify the optimal stimulation target. First

  2. Field Experiment to Stimulate Microbial Urease Activity in Groundwater for in situ Calcite Precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Y.; Taylor, J. L.; Tyler, T. L.; Banta, A. B.; Reysenbach, A. L.; Delwiche, M. E.; McLing, T. L.; Colwell, F. S.; Smith, R. W.

    2003-12-01

    Groundwater contamination by radionuclides and metals from past weapons processing activities is a significant problem for the United States Department of Energy. Removal of these pollutants from the subsurface can be prohibitively expensive and result in worker exposure, and therefore in situ containment and stabilization is an attractive remediation alternative. One potential approach for the immobilization of certain radionuclides and metals (e.g., 90Sr, 60Co, Pb, Cd) is to induce geochemical conditions that promote co-precipitation in calcite. Many aquifers in the arid western US are calcite-saturated, and calcite precipitated under an engineered remediation scheme in such aquifers should remain stable even after return to ambient conditions. We have proposed that an effective way to promote calcite precipitation is to utilize native microorganisms that hydrolyze urea. Urea hydrolysis results in carbonate and ammonium production, and an increase in pH. The increased carbonate alkalinity favors calcite precipitation, and the ammonium serves the additional role of promoting desorption of sorbed metal ions from the aquifer matrix by ion exchange. The desorbed metals are then accessible to co-precipitation in calcite, which can be a longer-term immobilization mechanism than sorption. The ability to hydrolyze urea is common among environmental microorganisms, and we have shown in the laboratory that microbial urea hydrolysis can be linked to calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of the trace metal strontium. As a next step in the development of our remediation approach, we aimed to demonstrate that we can stimulate the native microbial community to express urease in the field. In 2002 we conducted a preliminary field trial of our approach, using a well in the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer in Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA. A dilute molasses solution (0.00075%) was injected to promote overall biological growth, and then urea (50 mM) was added to the aquifer

  3. Effective electric fields along realistic DTI-based neural trajectories for modelling the stimulation mechanisms of TMS.

    PubMed

    De Geeter, N; Crevecoeur, G; Leemans, A; Dupré, L

    2015-01-21

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an applied alternating magnetic field induces an electric field in the brain that can interact with the neural system. It is generally assumed that this induced electric field is the crucial effect exciting a certain region of the brain. More specifically, it is the component of this field parallel to the neuron's local orientation, the so-called effective electric field, that can initiate neuronal stimulation. Deeper insights on the stimulation mechanisms can be acquired through extensive TMS modelling. Most models study simple representations of neurons with assumed geometries, whereas we embed realistic neural trajectories computed using tractography based on diffusion tensor images. This way of modelling ensures a more accurate spatial distribution of the effective electric field that is in addition patient and case specific. The case study of this paper focuses on the single pulse stimulation of the left primary motor cortex with a standard figure-of-eight coil. Including realistic neural geometry in the model demonstrates the strong and localized variations of the effective electric field between the tracts themselves and along them due to the interplay of factors such as the tract's position and orientation in relation to the TMS coil, the neural trajectory and its course along the white and grey matter interface. Furthermore, the influence of changes in the coil orientation is studied. Investigating the impact of tissue anisotropy confirms that its contribution is not negligible. Moreover, assuming isotropic tissues lead to errors of the same size as rotating or tilting the coil with 10 degrees. In contrast, the model proves to be less sensitive towards the not well-known tissue conductivity values.

  4. Effective electric fields along realistic DTI-based neural trajectories for modelling the stimulation mechanisms of TMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Geeter, N.; Crevecoeur, G.; Leemans, A.; Dupré, L.

    2015-01-01

    In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an applied alternating magnetic field induces an electric field in the brain that can interact with the neural system. It is generally assumed that this induced electric field is the crucial effect exciting a certain region of the brain. More specifically, it is the component of this field parallel to the neuron’s local orientation, the so-called effective electric field, that can initiate neuronal stimulation. Deeper insights on the stimulation mechanisms can be acquired through extensive TMS modelling. Most models study simple representations of neurons with assumed geometries, whereas we embed realistic neural trajectories computed using tractography based on diffusion tensor images. This way of modelling ensures a more accurate spatial distribution of the effective electric field that is in addition patient and case specific. The case study of this paper focuses on the single pulse stimulation of the left primary motor cortex with a standard figure-of-eight coil. Including realistic neural geometry in the model demonstrates the strong and localized variations of the effective electric field between the tracts themselves and along them due to the interplay of factors such as the tract’s position and orientation in relation to the TMS coil, the neural trajectory and its course along the white and grey matter interface. Furthermore, the influence of changes in the coil orientation is studied. Investigating the impact of tissue anisotropy confirms that its contribution is not negligible. Moreover, assuming isotropic tissues lead to errors of the same size as rotating or tilting the coil with 10 degrees. In contrast, the model proves to be less sensitive towards the not well-known tissue conductivity values.

  5. Spatial heterogeneity of transmembrane potential responses of single guinea-pig cardiac cells during electric field stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Vinod; Tung, Leslie

    2002-01-01

    Changes in transmembrane voltage (Vm) of cardiac cells during electric field stimulation have a complex spatial- and time-dependent behaviour that differs significantly from electrical stimulation of space-clamped membranes by current pulses. A multisite optical mapping system was used to obtain 17 or 25 μm resolution maps of Vm along the long axis of guinea-pig ventricular cells (n = 57) stained with voltage-sensitive dye (di-8-ANEPPS) and stimulated longitudinally with uniform electric field (2, 5 or 10 ms, 3–62 V cm−1) pulses (n = 201). The initial polarizations of Vm responses (Vmr) varied linearly along the cell length and reversed symmetrically upon field reversal. The remainder of the Vm responses had parallel time courses among the recording sites, revealing a common time-varying signal component (Vms). Vms was depolarizing for pulses during rest and hyperpolarizing for pulses during the early plateau phase. Vms varied in amplitude and time course with increasing pulse amplitude. Four types of plateau response were observed, with transition points between the different responses occurring when the maximum polarization at the ends of the cell reached values estimated as 60, 110 and 220 mV. Among the cells that had a polarization change of > 200 mV at their ends (for fields > 45 V cm−1), some (n = 17/25) had non-parallel time courses among Vm recordings of the various sites. This implied development of an intracellular field (Ei) that was found to increase exponentially with time (τ = 7.2 ± 3.2 ms). Theoretical considerations suggest that Vms represents the intracellular potential (φi) as well as the average polarization of the cell, and that Vmr is the manifestation of the extracellular potential gradient resulting from the field stimulus. For cells undergoing field stimulation, φi acts as the cellular physiological state variable and substitutes for Vm, which is the customary variable for space-clamped membranes. PMID:12122146

  6. Field Safety Notes in Product Problems of Medical Devices for Use in Pulmonology.

    PubMed

    Hannig, Jürgen; Siekmeier, Rüdiger

    2015-01-01

    The current European system for medical devices is governed by three EC directives: the Medical Device Directive 93/42/EEC, the In-Vitro Diagnostic Directive 98/79/EC and the Active Implantable Medical Device Directive 90/385/EEC and regulates marketing and post-market surveillance of medical devices in the European Economic Area. In cases of incidents and field safety corrective actions (FSCA) manufacturers have to inform the responsible Competent Authority, which is the Federal Institute for Drugs and Medical Devices (BfArM) and the public by field safety notices (FSN). In this study we analyzed FSN of medical devices exclusively serving for diagnostics or treatment in pulmonology (e.g. nebulizers, oxygen concentrators, pulse oximeters, lung function analyzers, and non-active devices for treatment). FSCA and FSN publicized by BfArM in 2005-2013 were analyzed in respect to the MEDDEV 2.12-1 rev 8. In total 41 FSCA were publicized for the included products. German and English FSN were found in 36/35 cases, respectively. FSN were clearly characterized as FSN in 22/20 cases and declaration of the type of action was found in 27/26 cases, respectively. Product names were provided in all cases. Lot numbers or other information for product characterization were available in 7/8 and 26/24 cases, respectively. Detailed information regarding FSCA and product malfunction were found in 27/33 and 36/35 cases, respectively. Information on product related risks with previous use of the affected product was provided in 24/23 cases. In 34/34 cases manufacturers provided information to mitigate product related risks. Requests to pass FSN to persons needing awareness were found in 10/14 cases. Contact data were provided in 30/30 cases. Confirmation that the Competent Authority was informed was found in 12/14 cases and in 19/18 cases a customer confirmation was included. The obtained data suggest that there is an increasing annual number of FSCA and most FSN fulfill the criteria of

  7. Using GIS for planning field trips: In-situ assessment of Geopoints for field trips with mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, Sarah; Kisser, Thomas; Ditter, Raimund

    2016-04-01

    Up to now no application is existing for collecting data via mobile devices using a geographical information system referring to the evaluation of Geopoints. Classified in different geographical topics a Geopark can be rated for suitability of Geopoints for field trips. The systematically acquisition of the suitability of Geopoints is necessary, especially when doing field trips with lower grade students who see a physical-geographic phenomenon for the first time. For this reason, the development of such an application is an invention for easy handling evaluations of Geopoints on the basis of commonly valid criteria like esthetic attraction, interestingness, and pithiness (Streifinger 2010). Collecting data provides the opportunity of receiving information of particularly suitable Geopoints out of the sight from students, tourists and others. One solution for collecting data in a simple and intuitive form is Survey123 for ArcGIS (http://survey123.esri.com/#/). You can create surveys using an ArcGIS Online organizational account and download your own survey or surveys "that may have been shared with you" (https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/survey-123-for-arcgis/id993015031?mt=8) on your mobile device. "Once a form is downloaded, you will be able to start collecting data."(https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/survey-123-for-arcgis/id993015031?mt=8) Free of cost and use while disconnected the application can easily be used via mobile device on field trips. On a 3-day field trip which is held three times per year in the Geopark Bergstraße-Odenwald Survey123 is being used to evaluate the suitability of different Geopoints for different topics (geology, soils, vegetation, climate). With every field trip about 25 students take part in the survey and evaluate each Geopoint at the route. So, over the time, the docents know exactly which Geopoints suites perfect for teaching geology for example, and why it suites that good. The field trip is organized in an innovative way. Before

  8. Electro-active device using radial electric field piezo-diaphragm for sonic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Robert G. (Inventor); Fox, Robert L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An electro-active transducer for sonic applications includes a ferroelectric material sandwiched by first and second electrode patterns to form a piezo-diaphragm coupled to a mounting frame. When the device is used as a sonic actuator, the first and second electrode patterns are configured to introduce an electric field into the ferroelectric material when voltage is applied to the electrode patterns. When the device is used as a sonic sensor, the first and second electrode patterns are configured to introduce an electric field into the ferroelectric material when the ferroelectric material experiences deflection in a direction substantially perpendicular thereto. In each case, the electrode patterns are designed to cause the electric field to: i) originate at a region of the ferroelectric material between the first and second electrode patterns, and ii) extend radially outward from the region of the ferroelectric material (at which the electric field originates) and substantially parallel to the plane of the ferroelectric material. The mounting frame perimetrically surrounds the peizo-diaphragm and enables attachment of the piezo-diaphragm to a housing.

  9. Micro-PIT/V --- Simultaneous temperature and velocity fields in microfluidic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pottebaum, Tait

    2008-11-01

    The use of encapsulated thermochromic liquid crystals (TLC) for the simultaneous measurement of temperature and velocity fields in microfluidic devices has been demonstrated. Implementation of TLC thermometry at the micro-scale is significantly different than at the macro-scale due to the constraints on imaging and illumination configurations and the proximity of the measurements to interfaces and surfaces from which light will scatter. Unlike in micro-PIV, wavelength filtering (such as with fluorescent particles) cannot be used to remove undesired reflections, because the temperature information is carried by the particle color. Therefore, circular polarization filtering is used, exploiting the circular dichroism of TLC. Micro-PIT/V will enable new investigations into the physics of microfluidic devices involving temperature gradients, such as thermocapillary actuated devices and many ``lab-on-a-chip'' applications involving temperature sensitive chemical and biological processes. In addition, the design of operational devices can be improved by applying micro-PIT/V to the characterization of prototypes.

  10. Air core poloidal magnetic field system for a toroidal plasma producing device

    DOEpatents

    Marcus, Frederick B.

    1978-01-01

    A poloidal magnetics system for a plasma producing device of toroidal configuration is provided that reduces both the total volt-seconds requirement and the magnitude of the field change at the toroidal field coils. The system utilizes an air core transformer wound between the toroidal field (TF) coils and the major axis outside the TF coils. Electric current in the primary windings of this transformer is distributed and the magnetic flux returned by air core windings wrapped outside the toroidal field coils. A shield winding that is closely coupled to the plasma carries a current equal and opposite to the plasma current. This winding provides the shielding function and in addition serves in a fashion similar to a driven conducting shell to provide the equilibrium vertical field for the plasma. The shield winding is in series with a power supply and a decoupling coil located outside the TF coil at the primary winding locations. The present invention requires much less energy than the usual air core transformer and is capable of substantially shielding the toroidal field coils from poloidal field flux.

  11. Self-modulated field electron emitter: Gated device of integrated Si tip-on-nano-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhijun; Huang, Yifeng; Pan, Zhangxu; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Chen, Jun; Xu, Ningsheng

    2016-12-01

    We report the featured gated field electron emission devices of Si nano-tips with individually integrated Si nano-channels and the interpretation of the related physics. A rational procedure was developed to fabricate the uniform integrated devices. The electrical and thermal conduction tests demonstrated that the Si nano-channel can limit both the current and heat flows. The integrated devices showed the specialties of self-enhancement and self-regulation. The heat resistance results in the heat accumulation at the tip-apex, inducing the thermally enhanced field electron emission. The self-regulated effect of the electrical resistance is benefit for impeding the current overloading and prevents the emitters from a catastrophic breakdown. The nano-channel-integrated Si nano-tip array exhibited emission current density up to 24.9 mA/cm2 at a gate voltage of 94 V, much higher than that of the Si nano-tip array without an integrated nano-channel.

  12. Electrochemical fields within 3D reconstructed microstructures of mixed ionic and electronic conducting devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yanxiang; Chen, Yu; Lin, Ye; Yan, Mufu; Harris, William M.; Chiu, Wilson K. S.; Ni, Meng; Chen, Fanglin

    2016-11-01

    The performance and stability of the mixed ionic and electronic conducting (MIEC) membrane devices, such as solid oxide cells (SOCs) and oxygen separation membranes (OSMs) interplay tightly with the transport properties and the three-dimensional (3D) microstructure of the membrane. However, development of the MIEC devices is hindered by the limited knowledge about the distribution of electrochemical fields within the 3D local microstructures, especially at surface and interface. In this work, a generic model conforming to local thermodynamic equilibrium is developed to calculate the electrochemical fields, such as electric potential and oxygen chemical potential, within the 3D microstructure of the MIEC membrane. Stability of the MIEC membrane is evaluated by the distribution of oxygen partial pressure. The cell-level performance such as polarization resistance and voltage vs. current curve can be further calculated. Case studies are performed to demonstrate the capability of the framework by using X-ray computed tomography reconstructed 3D microstructures of a SOC and an OSM. The calculation method demonstrates high computational efficiency for large size 3D tomographic microstructures, and permits parallel calculation. The framework can serve as a powerful tool for correlating the transport properties and the 3D microstructure to the performance and the stability of MIEC devices.

  13. A field-deployable device for the rapid detection of cyanide poisoning in whole blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehringer, Hans; Tong, Winnie; Chung, Roy; Boss, Gerry; O'Farrell, Brendan

    2012-06-01

    Feasibility of a field-deployable device for the rapid and early diagnosis of cyanide poisoning in whole blood using the spectral shift of the vitamin B12 precursor cobinamide upon binding with cyanide as an indicator is being assessed. Cyanide is an extremely potent and rapid acting poison with as little as 50 mg fatal to humans. Cyanide poisoning has been recognized as a threat from smoke inhalation and potentially through weapons of mass destruction. Currently, no portable rapid tests for the detection of cyanide in whole blood are available. Cobinamide has an extremely high affinity for cyanide and captures hemoglobin associated cyanide from red blood cells. Upon binding of cyanide, cobinamide undergoes a spectral shift that can be measured with a spectrophotometer. We have combined the unique cyanide-binding properties of cobinamide with blood separation technology, sample transport and a detection system, and are developing a rapid, field deployable, disposable device which will deliver an intuitive result to a first responder, allowing for rapid response to exposure events. Feasibility of the cobinamide-Cyanide chemistry in a rapid test using a whole blood sample from a finger-stick has been demonstrated with an assay time from sample collection to a valid result of under 5 minutes. Data showing the efficacy of the diagnostic method and initial device design concepts will be shown.

  14. Prototype of haptic device for sole of foot using magnetic field sensitive elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, T.; Masuda, Y.; Sugiyama, M.; Mitsumata, T.; Ohori, S.

    2013-02-01

    Walking is one of the most popular activities and a healthy aerobic exercise for the elderly. However, if they have physical and / or cognitive disabilities, sometimes it is challenging to go somewhere they don't know well. The final goal of this study is to develop a virtual reality walking system that allows users to walk in virtual worlds fabricated with computer graphics. We focus on a haptic device that can perform various plantar pressures on users' soles of feet as an additional sense in the virtual reality walking. In this study, we discuss a use of a magnetic field sensitive elastomer (MSE) as a working material for the haptic interface on the sole. The first prototype with MSE was developed and evaluated in this work. According to the measurement of planter pressures, it was found that this device can perform different pressures on the sole of a light-weight user by applying magnetic field on the MSE. The result also implied necessities of the improvement of the magnetic circuit and the basic structure of the mechanism of the device.

  15. Exposure to an Extremely-Low-Frequency Magnetic Field Stimulates Adrenal Steroidogenesis via Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase Activity in a Mouse Adrenal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Kawata, Shiyori; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Kadoriku, Fumiya; Kitamura, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) are generated by power lines and household electrical devices. In the last several decades, some evidence has shown an association between ELF-MF exposure and depression and/or anxiety in epidemiological and animal studies. The mechanism underlying ELF-MF-induced depression is considered to involve adrenal steroidogenesis, which is triggered by ELF-MF exposure. However, how ELF-MFs stimulate adrenal steroidogenesis is controversial. In the current study, we investigated the effect of ELF-MF exposure on the mouse adrenal cortex-derived Y-1 cell line and the human adrenal cortex-derived H295R cell line to clarify whether the ELF-MF stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis directly. ELF-MF exposure was found to significantly stimulate adrenal steroidogenesis (p < 0.01–0.05) and the expression of adrenal steroid synthetic enzymes (p < 0.05) in Y-1 cells, but the effect was weak in H295R cells. Y-1 cells exposed to an ELF-MF showed significant decreases in phosphodiesterase activity (p < 0.05) and intracellular Ca2+ concentration (p < 0.01) and significant increases in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentration (p < 0.001–0.05) and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation (p < 0.05). The increase in cAMP was not inhibited by treatment with NF449, an inhibitor of the Gs alpha subunit of G protein. Our results suggest that ELF-MF exposure stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis via an increase in intracellular cAMP caused by the inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity in Y-1 cells. The same mechanism may trigger the increase in adrenal steroid secretion in mice observed in our previous study. PMID:27100201

  16. Palinpinon I geothermal field production well PN-32d: Review of acid stimulation treatment. Export trade information

    SciTech Connect

    1994-05-19

    The study, conducted by the Mesquite Group, Inc., was funded by the U.S. Trade and Development Agency on behalf of the Philippine National Oil Company-Energy Development Corporation. The report is a review of an Acid Stimulation Treatment done on a production well in the Palinpinon I Geothermal Field. The report gives a detailed description of the key elements of the program as well as the end results. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) Introduction; (2) Key Elements of Stimulation; (3) Results; (4) Recommendations for Future Acid Treatments.

  17. [Finite element analysis of electric field of extracellular stimulation of optic nerve with a spiral cuff electrode].

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Qiao, Qingli; Luo, Fang

    2012-10-01

    In order to study the underlying electrode-nerve functional mechanism, optimize the electrode design and guide the prosthesis application, we applied finite element method to analyze the spatial distribution of electric field generated by optic nerve electrical stimulation with spiral cuff electrode. A macroscopic cylindrical model of optic nerve was elaborated, taking into account of electrode contact configurations and possible variations of the thickness of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). By building an appropriate mesh on this model and under some boundary conditions, the finite element method was applied to compute the 3D electric field generated by the electrode with finite element software COMSOL Multiphysics. The stimulation results indicated that, under the same conditions of stimulation, the longitudinal tripolar electrode structure could generate larger current density than that of biopolar electrode structure (located in the opposite of nerve trunk). However biopolar electrode structure requirs less leads, and is more easily implanted. By means of parametric sweep, the results suggest that, with the increase of the CSF thickness and a higher conductivity of CSF than those of other tissues, the distribution of electric field generated by electrodes is extended but scattered, and the diffuse current distribution makes nerve stimulation less effective.

  18. Integrated nanoplasmonic waveguides for magnetic, nonlinear, and strong-field devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederberg, Shawn; Firby, Curtis J.; Greig, Shawn R.; Elezzabi, Abdulhakem Y.

    2017-01-01

    As modern complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry rapidly approaches fundamental speed and bandwidth limitations, optical platforms have become promising candidates to circumvent these limits and facilitate massive increases in computational power. To compete with high density CMOS circuitry, optical technology within the plasmonic regime is desirable, because of the sub-diffraction limited confinement of electromagnetic energy, large optical bandwidth, and ultrafast processing capabilities. As such, nanoplasmonic waveguides act as nanoscale conduits for optical signals, thereby forming the backbone of such a platform. In recent years, significant research interest has developed to uncover the fundamental physics governing phenomena occurring within nanoplasmonic waveguides, and to implement unique optical devices. In doing so, a wide variety of material properties have been exploited. CMOS-compatible materials facilitate passive plasmonic routing devices for directing the confined radiation. Magnetic materials facilitate time-reversal symmetry breaking, aiding in the development of nonreciprocal isolators or modulators. Additionally, strong confinement and enhancement of electric fields within such waveguides require the use of materials with high nonlinear coefficients to achieve increased nonlinear optical phenomenon in a nanoscale footprint. Furthermore, this enhancement and confinement of the fields facilitate the study of strong-field effects within the solid-state environment of the waveguide. Here, we review current state-of-the-art physics and applications of nanoplasmonic waveguides pertaining to passive, magnetoplasmonic, nonlinear, and strong-field devices. Such components are essential elements in integrated optical circuitry, and each fulfill specific roles in truly developing a chip-scale plasmonic computing architecture.

  19. Integrated nanoplasmonic waveguides for magnetic, nonlinear, and strong-field devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sederberg, Shawn; Firby, Curtis J.; Greig, Shawn R.; Elezzabi, Abdulhakem Y.

    2016-11-01

    As modern complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) circuitry rapidly approaches fundamental speed and bandwidth limitations, optical platforms have become promising candidates to circumvent these limits and facilitate massive increases in computational power. To compete with high density CMOS circuitry, optical technology within the plasmonic regime is desirable, because of the sub-diffraction limited confinement of electromagnetic energy, large optical bandwidth, and ultrafast processing capabilities. As such, nanoplasmonic waveguides act as nanoscale conduits for optical signals, thereby forming the backbone of such a platform. In recent years, significant research interest has developed to uncover the fundamental physics governing phenomena occurring within nanoplasmonic waveguides, and to implement unique optical devices. In doing so, a wide variety of material properties have been exploited. CMOS-compatible materials facilitate passive plasmonic routing devices for directing the confined radiation. Magnetic materials facilitate time-reversal symmetry breaking, aiding in the development of nonreciprocal isolators or modulators. Additionally, strong confinement and enhancement of electric fields within such waveguides require the use of materials with high nonlinear coefficients to achieve increased nonlinear optical phenomenon in a nanoscale footprint. Furthermore, this enhancement and confinement of the fields facilitate the study of strong-field effects within the solid-state environment of the waveguide. Here, we review current state-of-the-art physics and applications of nanoplasmonic waveguides pertaining to passive, magnetoplasmonic, nonlinear, and strong-field devices. Such components are essential elements in integrated optical circuitry, and each fulfill specific roles in truly developing a chip-scale plasmonic computing architecture.

  20. Imaging of Active Microwave Devices at Cryogenic Temperatures using Scanning Near-Field Microwave Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanawalla, Ashfaq S.; Dutta, S. K.; Vlahacos, C. P.; Steinhauer, D. E.; Feenstra, B. J.; Anlage, Steven M.; Wellstood, F. C.

    1998-03-01

    The ability to image electric fields in operating microwave devices is interesting both from the fundamental point of view and for diagnostic purposes. To that end we have constructed a scanning near-field microwave microscope which uses an open-ended coaxial probe and operates at cryogenic temperatures.(For related publications see: C. P. Vlahacos, R. C. Black, S. M. Anlage, A. Amar and F. C. Wellstood, Appl. Phys. Lett. 69), 3274 (1996) and S. M. Anlage, C. P. Vlahacos, Sudeep Dutta and F. C. Wellstood, IEEE Trans. Appl. Supercond. 7, 3686 (1997). Using this system we have imaged electric fields generated by both normal metal and superconducting microstrip resonators at temperatures ranging from 77 K to 300 K. We will present images and discuss our results including observations of clear standing wave patterns at the fundamental resonant frequency and an increased quality factor of the resonators at low temperatures.

  1. Passive magnetic field cancellation device by multiple high-Tc superconducting coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, C.; Zou, S.; Han, Z.; Qu, T.-M.

    2010-04-01

    A passive magnetic field cancellation device (PMFCD) is designed. The PMFCD could automatically cancel the field as an active cancellation system did; however it requires no power sources and feedback systems. The capability of the PMFCD is based on the principle that a closed loop can resist flux variation and keep the flux constant inside. The closed loop in the PMFCD is formed by connecting two pairs of high temperature superconductor Helmholtz coils with different radii in series. More important thing is that the ratio of the radius and the turn number between the coils has to satisfy a number of conditions, with which 100% cancellation can be reached. Theoretical methods to obtain the turn number ratio and radius ratio are the major part of the paper. Numerical simulation was followed, aiming to evaluate field distribution under a cancellation state and correct the theoretical values.

  2. Far-field dispersal modeling for fuel-air-explosive devices

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, M.W.

    1990-05-01

    A computer model for simulating the explosive dispersal of a fuel agent in the far-field regime is described and is applied to a wide variety of initial conditions to judge their effect upon the resulting fuel/air cloud. This work was directed toward modeling the dispersal process associated with Fuel-Air-Explosives devices. The far-field dispersal regime is taken to be that time after the initial burster charge detonation in which the shock forces no longer dominate the flow field and initial canister and fuel mass breakup has occurred. The model was applied to a low vapor pressure fuel, a high vapor pressure fuel and a solid fuel. A strong dependence of the final cloud characteristics upon the initial droplet size distribution was demonstrated. The predicted fuel-air clouds were highly non-uniform in concentration. 18 refs., 86 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Theoretical analysis of the local field potential in deep brain stimulation applications.

    PubMed

    Lempka, Scott F; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a common therapy for treating movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), and provides a unique opportunity to study the neural activity of various subcortical structures in human patients. Local field potential (LFP) recordings are often performed with either intraoperative microelectrodes or DBS leads and reflect oscillatory activity within nuclei of the basal ganglia. These LFP recordings have numerous clinical implications and might someday be used to optimize DBS outcomes in closed-loop systems. However, the origin of the recorded LFP is poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to theoretically analyze LFP recordings within the context of clinical DBS applications. This goal was achieved with a detailed recording model of beta oscillations (∼20 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus. The recording model consisted of finite element models of intraoperative microelectrodes and DBS macroelectrodes implanted in the brain along with multi-compartment cable models of STN projection neurons. Model analysis permitted systematic investigation into a number of variables that can affect the composition of the recorded LFP (e.g. electrode size, electrode impedance, recording configuration, and filtering effects of the brain, electrode-electrolyte interface, and recording electronics). The results of the study suggest that the spatial reach of the LFP can extend several millimeters. Model analysis also showed that variables such as electrode geometry and recording configuration can have a significant effect on LFP amplitude and spatial reach, while the effects of other variables, such as electrode impedance, are often negligible. The results of this study provide insight into the origin of the LFP and identify variables that need to be considered when analyzing LFP recordings in clinical DBS applications.

  4. Dynamic stimulation evokes spatially focused receptive fields in bat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Susanne; Schuller, Gerd; Firzlaff, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Bats can orient and hunt for prey in complete darkness using echolocation. Due to the pulse-like character of call emission they receive a stroboscopic view of their environment. During target approach, bats adjust their emitted echolocation calls to the specific requirements of the dynamically changing environmental and behavioral context. In addition to changes of the spectro-temporal call features, the spatial focusing of the beam of the sonar emissions onto the target is a conspicuous feature during target tracking. The neural processes underlying the complex sensory-motor interactions during target tracking are not well understood. In this study, we used a two-tone-pulse paradigm with 81 combinations of inter-aural intensity differences and six inter-pulse intervals in a passive hearing task to tackle the question of how transient changes in the azimuthal position of successive sounds are encoded by neurons in the auditory cortex of the bat Phyllostomus discolor. In a population of cortical neurons (11%, 24 of 217), spatial receptive fields were focused to a small region of frontal azimuthal positions during dynamic stimulation with tone-pulse pairs at short inter-pulse intervals. The response of these neurons might be important for the behaviorally observed locking of the sonar beam onto a selected target during the later stages of target tracking. Most interestingly, the majority of these neurons (88%, 21 of 24) were located in the posterior dorsal part of the auditory cortex. This cortical subfield might thus be specifically involved in the analysis of dynamic acoustic scenes.

  5. Theoretical Analysis of the Local Field Potential in Deep Brain Stimulation Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lempka, Scott F.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a common therapy for treating movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), and provides a unique opportunity to study the neural activity of various subcortical structures in human patients. Local field potential (LFP) recordings are often performed with either intraoperative microelectrodes or DBS leads and reflect oscillatory activity within nuclei of the basal ganglia. These LFP recordings have numerous clinical implications and might someday be used to optimize DBS outcomes in closed-loop systems. However, the origin of the recorded LFP is poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to theoretically analyze LFP recordings within the context of clinical DBS applications. This goal was achieved with a detailed recording model of beta oscillations (∼20 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus. The recording model consisted of finite element models of intraoperative microelectrodes and DBS macroelectrodes implanted in the brain along with multi-compartment cable models of STN projection neurons. Model analysis permitted systematic investigation into a number of variables that can affect the composition of the recorded LFP (e.g. electrode size, electrode impedance, recording configuration, and filtering effects of the brain, electrode-electrolyte interface, and recording electronics). The results of the study suggest that the spatial reach of the LFP can extend several millimeters. Model analysis also showed that variables such as electrode geometry and recording configuration can have a significant effect on LFP amplitude and spatial reach, while the effects of other variables, such as electrode impedance, are often negligible. The results of this study provide insight into the origin of the LFP and identify variables that need to be considered when analyzing LFP recordings in clinical DBS applications. PMID:23555799

  6. Effect of electron-beam irradiation on graphene field effect devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childres, Isaac; Jauregui, Luis A.; Foxe, Michael; Tian, Jifa; Jalilian, Romaneh; Jovanovic, Igor; Chen, Yong P.

    2010-10-01

    Electron beam exposure is a commonly used tool for fabricating and imaging graphene-based devices. Here, we present a study of the effects of electron-beam irradiation on the electronic transport properties of graphene and the operation of graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs). Exposure to a 30 keV electron-beam caused negative shifts in the charge-neutral point (CNP) of the GFET, interpreted as due to n-doping in the graphene from the interaction of the energetic electron beam with the substrate. The shift in the CNP is substantially reduced for suspended graphene devices. The electron beam is seen to also decrease the carrier mobilities and minimum conductivity, indicating defects created in the graphene. The findings are valuable for understanding the effects of radiation damage on graphene and for the development of radiation-hard graphene-based electronics.

  7. Field-directed assembly of nanowires: identifying directors, disruptors and indices to maximize the device yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sam, Mahshid; Moghimian, Nima; Bhiladvala, Rustom B.

    2015-12-01

    Individually-addressable nano-electro-mechanical (NEMS) devices have been used to demonstrate sensitive mass detection to the single-proton level, as well as neutral-particle mass spectrometry. The cost of individually securing or patterning such devices is proportional to their number or the chip area covered. This limits statistical support for new research, as well as paths to the commercial availability of extraordinarily sensitive instruments. Field-directed assembly of synthesized nanowires addresses this problem and shows potential for low-cost, large-area coverage with NEMS devices. For positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) as the main assembly director, the space of field, geometric and material parameters is large, with combinations that can serve either as directors or disruptors for directed assembly. We seek parameter values to obtain the best yield, by introducing a rational framework to reduce trial-and-error. We show that sorting the disruptors by severity and eliminating those weakly coupled to the director, allows reduction of the parameter space. The remaining disruptors are then represented compactly by dimensionless parameters. In the example protocol chosen, a single dimensionless parameter, the yield index, allows minimization of disruptors by the choice of frequency. Following this, the voltage may be selected to maximize the yield. Using this framework, we obtained 94% pre-clamped and 88% post-clamped yield over 57000 nanowire sites. Organizing the parameter space using a director-disruptor framework, with economy introduced by non-dimensional parameters, provides a path to controllably decrease the effort and cost of manufacturing nanoscale devices. This should help in the commercialization of individually addressable nanodevices.Individually-addressable nano-electro-mechanical (NEMS) devices have been used to demonstrate sensitive mass detection to the single-proton level, as well as neutral-particle mass spectrometry. The cost of

  8. Microscopic magnetic stimulation of neural tissue

    PubMed Central

    Bonmassar, Giorgio; Lee, Seung Woo; Freeman, Daniel K.; Polasek, Miloslav; Fried, Shelley I.; Gale, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Electrical stimulation is currently used to treat a wide range of cardiovascular, sensory and neurological diseases. Despite its success, there are significant limitations to its application, including incompatibility with magnetic resonance imaging, limited control of electric fields and decreased performance associated with tissue inflammation. Magnetic stimulation overcomes these limitations but existing devices (that is, transcranial magnetic stimulation) are large, reducing their translation to chronic applications. In addition, existing devices are not effective for deeper, sub-cortical targets. Here we demonstrate that sub-millimeter coils can activate neuronal tissue. Interestingly, the results of both modelling and physiological experiments suggest that different spatial orientations of the coils relative to the neuronal tissue can be used to generate specific neural responses. These results raise the possibility that micro-magnetic stimulation coils, small enough to be implanted within the brain parenchyma, may prove to be an effective alternative to existing stimulation devices. PMID:22735449

  9. Electric-field-driven Phenomena for Manipulating Particles in Micro-Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khusid, Boris; Acrivos, Andreas

    2004-01-01

    Compared to other available methods, ac dielectrophoresis is particularly well-suited for the manipulation of minute particles in micro- and nano-fluidics. The essential advantage of this technique is that an ac field at a sufficiently high frequency suppresses unwanted electric effects in a liquid. To date very little has been achieved towards understanding the micro-scale field-and shear driven behavior of a suspension in that, the concepts currently favored for the design and operation of dielectrophoretic micro-devices adopt the approach used for macro-scale electric filters. This strategy considers the trend of the field-induced particle motions by computing the spatial distribution of the field strength over a channel as if it were filled only with a liquid and then evaluating the direction of the dielectrophoretic force, exerted on a single particle placed in the liquid. However, the exposure of suspended particles to a field generates not only the dielectrophoretic force acting on each of these particles, but also the dipolar interactions of the particles due to their polarization. Furthermore, the field-driven motion of the particles is accompanied by their hydrodynamic interactions. We present the results of our experimental and theoretical studies which indicate that, under certain conditions, these long-range electrical and hydrodynamic interparticle interactions drastically affect the suspension behavior in a micro-channel due to its small dimensions.

  10. Anisotropic heat diffusion on stochastic magnetic field in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic topology is a key issue in fusion plasma researches. An example is the Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP) to control the transport and MHD activities in tokamak and stellarator experiments. However, the physics how the RMP affects the transport and MHD is not clear. One reason is a role of the magnetic topology is unclear. That problem is connecting to the identification of the magnetic topology in the experiment. In the experiment, the finite temperature gradient is observed on the stochastic field where is stochastized by the theoretical prediction. In a classical theory, the electron temperature gradient should be zero on the stochastic magnetic field. We need to study the stochastic magnetic field can keep the finite temperature gradient or not. In this study, we study the anisotropic heat diffusion equation to simulate the heat transport on the stochastic magnetic field. Changing a ratio of κ∥ and κ⊥, the distribution of the temperature on the stochastic magnetic field is obtained. Hudson et al. pointed out the KAM surface is a barrier to keep the finite temperature. We simulate those results in realistic magnetic field of the Large Helical Device.

  11. Field emission device driven by self-powered contact-electrification: Simulation and experimental analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Xiangyu E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn; Jiang, Tao; Sun, Zhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei E-mail: ouyangwei@phy.ecnu.edu.cn

    2015-09-14

    A self-powered field emission device (FED) driven by a single-electrode tribo-electric nanogenerator (TENG) is demonstrated. The mechanical motion works as both a power supply to drive the FED and a control unit to regulate the amount of emitted electrons. By using the Fowler-Nordheim equation and Kirchhoff laws, a theoretical model of this self-powered FED is proposed, and accordingly the real-time output characteristics of the device are systematically investigated. It is found that the motion distance of the TENG controls switch-on of the FED and determines the charge amount for emission, while the motion velocity regulates the amplitude of emission current. The minimum contact area for the TENG to generate field emission is about 9 cm{sup 2}, which can be improved by optimizing FED structure and the tribo-materials of TENG. The demonstrated concept of this self-powered FED as well as the proposed physical analysis can serve as guidance for further applications of FED in such fields of self-powered electronics and soft electronics.

  12. Acoustic field characterization of the Duolith: Measurements and modeling of a clinical shock wave therapy device

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Camilo; Chen, Hong; Matula, Thomas J.; Karzova, Maria; Khokhlova, Vera A.

    2013-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) uses acoustic pulses to treat certain musculoskeletal disorders. In this paper the acoustic field of a clinical portable ESWT device (Duolith SD1) was characterized. Field mapping was performed in water for two different standoffs of the electromagnetic head (15 or 30 mm) using a fiber optic probe hydrophone. Peak positive pressures at the focus ranged from 2 to 45 MPa, while peak negative pressures ranged from −2 to −11 MPa. Pulse rise times ranged from 8 to 500 ns; shock formation did not occur for any machine settings. The maximum standard deviation in peak pressure at the focus was 1.2%, indicating that the Duolith SD1 generates stable pulses. The results compare qualitatively, but not quantitatively with manufacturer specifications. Simulations were carried out for the short standoff by matching a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetzov equation to the measured field at a plane near the source, and then propagating the wave outward. The results of modeling agree well with experimental data. The model was used to analyze the spatial structure of the peak pressures. Predictions from the model suggest that a true shock wave could be obtained in water if the initial pressure output of the device were doubled. PMID:23927207

  13. Evaluation method for in situ electric field in standardized human brain for different transcranial magnetic stimulation coils.

    PubMed

    Iwahashi, Masahiro; Gomez-Tames, Jose; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2017-03-21

    This study proposes a method to evaluate the electric field induced in the brain by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to realize focal stimulation in the target area considering the inter-subject difference of the brain anatomy. The TMS is a non-invasive technique used for treatment/diagnosis, and it works by inducing an electric field in a specific area of the brain via a coil-induced magnetic field. Recent studies that report on the electric field distribution in the brain induced by TMS coils have been limited to simplified human brain models or a small number of detailed human brain models. Until now, no method has been developed that appropriately evaluates the coil performance for a group of subjects. In this study, we first compare the magnetic field and the magnetic vector potential distributions to determine if they can be used as predictors of the TMS focality derived from the electric field distribution. Next, the hotspots of the electric field on the brain surface of ten subjects using six coils are compared. Further, decisive physical factors affecting the focality of the induced electric field by different coils are discussed by registering the computed electric field in a standard brain space for the first time, so as to evaluate coil characteristics for a large population of subjects. The computational results suggest that the induced electric field in the target area cannot be generalized without considering the morphological variability of the human brain. Moreover, there was no remarkable difference between the various coils, although focality could be improved to a certain extent by modifying the coil design (e.g., coil radius). Finally, the focality estimated by the electric field was more correlated with the magnetic vector potential than the magnetic field in a homogeneous sphere.

  14. Evaluation method for in situ electric field in standardized human brain for different transcranial magnetic stimulation coils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwahashi, Masahiro; Gomez-Tames, Jose; Laakso, Ilkka; Hirata, Akimasa

    2017-03-01

    This study proposes a method to evaluate the electric field induced in the brain by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to realize focal stimulation in the target area considering the inter-subject difference of the brain anatomy. The TMS is a non-invasive technique used for treatment/diagnosis, and it works by inducing an electric field in a specific area of the brain via a coil-induced magnetic field. Recent studies that report on the electric field distribution in the brain induced by TMS coils have been limited to simplified human brain models or a small number of detailed human brain models. Until now, no method has been developed that appropriately evaluates the coil performance for a group of subjects. In this study, we first compare the magnetic field and the magnetic vector potential distributions to determine if they can be used as predictors of the TMS focality derived from the electric field distribution. Next, the hotspots of the electric field on the brain surface of ten subjects using six coils are compared. Further, decisive physical factors affecting the focality of the induced electric field by different coils are discussed by registering the computed electric field in a standard brain space for the first time, so as to evaluate coil characteristics for a large population of subjects. The computational results suggest that the induced electric field in the target area cannot be generalized without considering the morphological variability of the human brain. Moreover, there was no remarkable difference between the various coils, although focality could be improved to a certain extent by modifying the coil design (e.g., coil radius). Finally, the focality estimated by the electric field was more correlated with the magnetic vector potential than the magnetic field in a homogeneous sphere.

  15. Incorporating Geoscience, Field Data Collection Workflows into Software Developed for Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, D. A.; Mookerjee, M.; Matsa, S.

    2014-12-01

    Modern geological sciences depend heavily on investigating the natural world in situ, i.e., within "the field," as well as managing data collections in the light of evolving advances in technology and cyberinfrastructure. To accelerate the rate of scientific discovery, we need to expedite data collection and management in such a way so as to not interfere with the typical geoscience, field workflow. To this end, we suggest replacing traditional analog methods of data collection, such as the standard field notebook and compass, with primary digital data collection applications. While some field data collecting apps exist for both the iOS and android operating systems, they do not communicate with each other in an organized data collection effort. We propose the development of a mobile app that coordinates the collection of GPS, photographic, and orientation data, along with field observations. Additionally, this application should be able to pair with other devices in order to incorporate other sensor data. In this way, the app can generate a single file that includes all field data elements and can be synced to the appropriate database with ease and efficiency. We present here a prototype application that attempts to illustrate how digital collection can be integrated into a "typical" geoscience, field workflow. The purpose of our app is to get field scientists to think about specific requirements for the development of a unified field data collection application. One fundamental step in the development of such an app is the community-based, decision-making process of adopting certain data/metadata standards and conventions. In August of 2014, on a four-day field trip to Yosemite National Park and Owens Valley, we engaged a group of field-based geologists and computer/cognitive scientists to start building a community consensus on these cyberinfrastructure-related issues. Discussing the unique problems of field data recording, conventions, storage, representation

  16. Modifying the Genetic Regulation of Bone and Cartilage Cells and Associated Tissue by EMF Stimulation Fields and Uses Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); Shackelford, Linda C. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An apparatus and method to modify the genetic regulation of mammalian tissue, bone, or any combination. The method may be comprised of the steps of tuning at least one predetermined profile associated with at least one time-varying stimulation field thereby resulting in at least one tuned time-varying stimulation field comprised of at least one tuned predetermined profile, wherein said at least one tuned predetermined profile is comprised of a plurality of tuned predetermined figures of merit and is controllable through at least one of said plurality of tuned predetermined figures of merit, wherein said plurality of predetermined tuned figures of merit is comprised of a tuned B-Field magnitude, tuned rising slew rate, tuned rise time, tuned falling slew rate, tuned fall time, tuned frequency, tuned wavelength, and tuned duty cycle; and exposing mammalian chondrocytes, osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts, nucleus pulposus, associated tissue, or any combination to said at least one tuned time-varying stimulation field comprised of said at least one tuned predetermined profile for a predetermined tuned exposure time or plurality of tuned exposure time sequences.

  17. Combination of Static Magnetic Fields and Peripheral Nerve Stimulation Can Alter Focal Cortical Excitability

    PubMed Central

    Nojima, Ippei; Koganemaru, Satoko; Mima, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    For clinical application of transcranial static magnetic stimulation (tSMS), it is important to achieve a focal target cortical stimulation. Previous study suggested that the associative stimulation combining non-invasive stimulation of the motor cortex (M1) and the peripheral nerve stimulation (PNS) may be useful to produce cortical excitability change. To test this hypothesis, we measured the M1 excitability and intracortical circuits by using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) before and after the tSMS of short duration (5 min) combined with PNS. Thirty-three normal volunteers were participated; tSMS+PNS (n = 11), sham+PNS (n = 11), and tSMS alone (n = 11). We found the transient suppression of the motor-evoked potential (MEP) of the right abductor pollicis brevis (APB) muscle, but not of the abductor digiti minimi (ADM) muscle, when combining tSMS with PNS over median nerve at the wrist. The lack of suppressive effect on APB in tSMS alone with short duration is in accord with the previous observation. In addition, the tendency of transient enhancement of the short-latency intracortical inhibition was observed immediately after intervention in the tSMS±PNS group. These findings show that the combination of tSMS and PNS can induce the cortical excitability change in target cortical motor area and potentiate the suppression effect. PMID:27932966

  18. Gap-gate field effect gas sensing device for chemical image generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filippini, D.; Lundström, I.; Uchida, H.

    2004-04-01

    A field effect chemically sensitive device, specially suited for the generation of scanning light pulse technique chemical images, is demonstrated. The present approach provides a complete separation between the required electrical biasing and chemical sensing functions inherently coupled in all previous systems. The concept is demonstrated by sensing hydrogen with insensitive biasing electrodes, composing a so-called gap gate, combined with discontinuous palladium clusters usually unsuitable for sensing in conventional arrangements. A simple one-dimensional model is used to explain the observed behavior.

  19. Note: Device for obtaining volumetric, three-component velocity fields inside cylindrical cavities.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, G; Núñez, J; Hernández, G N; Hernández-Cruz, G; Ramos, E

    2015-11-01

    We describe a device designed and built to obtain the three-component, steady state velocity field in the whole volume occupied by a fluid in motion contained in a cavity with cylindrical walls. The prototype comprises a two-camera stereoscopic particle image velocimetry system mounted on a platform that rotates around the volume under analysis and a slip ring arrangement that transmits data from the rotating sensors to the data storage elements. Sample observations are presented for natural convection in a cylindrical container but other flows can be analyzed.

  20. Note: Device for obtaining volumetric, three-component velocity fields inside cylindrical cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, G.; Núñez, J.; Hernández, G. N.; Hernández-Cruz, G.; Ramos, E.

    2015-11-01

    We describe a device designed and built to obtain the three-component, steady state velocity field in the whole volume occupied by a fluid in motion contained in a cavity with cylindrical walls. The prototype comprises a two-camera stereoscopic particle image velocimetry system mounted on a platform that rotates around the volume under analysis and a slip ring arrangement that transmits data from the rotating sensors to the data storage elements. Sample observations are presented for natural convection in a cylindrical container but other flows can be analyzed.

  1. The enhancement of neuronal cells wound healing with non-contact electric field stimulation by graphene electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sohee; Heo, Chaejeong; Lee, Si Young; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Minah

    2013-05-01

    Electrical stimulation affects cellular behaviors including division, migration and wound healing [1-3]. Cellular injury often occurs due to the imbalance of the endogenous electric field [3]. In order to recover from the injury, wound healing process requires various cellular changes such as regeneration, migration, and the enhancement of cytoskeletal proteins and growth factors. In previous reports, a weak non-contact electric field stimulation (nEFS) accelerates the cell migration as well as cell-to-cell coupling between neuronal cell junction which are accompanied by increasing of cytoskeletal proteins [4, 5]. In this paper, we further investigated the wound healing effect of the nEFS in the neuronal cells (SHSY5Y cells) with live cell optical imaging. Cells were cultured over the optically transparent graphenen EF stimulator. Cellular behavioral changes upon nEFS were recorded with live optical imaging during stimulation of 120 minutes. The ability of wound healing was significantly enhanced with the nEFS. In particular, nEFS significantly shorten the duration of wound healing process. Moreover, after treating cells with cytochalasin D, a block polymerization of the actin filaments, the nEFS significantly enhanced wound healing process of cytochalasin D treated neural cells as compared to the control neural cells. This study suggests that nEFS may provide an effective way to control neural cells repairing process from cellular injury. Further mechanism study about the effect of nEFS on the wound healing may shed new light on cellular behavior.

  2. Highly Effective Conductance Modulation in Planar Silicene Field Effect Devices Due to Buckling.

    PubMed

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Hossain, Faruque M; Mohammed, Mahmood A; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2015-10-06

    Silicene is an exciting two-dimensional material that shares many of graphene's electronic properties, but differs in its structural buckling. This buckling allows opening a bandgap in silicene through the application of a perpendicular electric field. Here we show that this buckling also enables highly effective modulation of silicene's conductance by means of an in-plane electric field applied through silicene side gates, which can be realized concurrently within the same silicene monolayer. We illustrate this by using silicene to implement Self-Switching Diodes (SSDs), which are two-dimensional field effect nanorectifiers realized within a single silicene monolayer. Our quantum simulation results show that the atomically-thin silicene SSDs, with sub-10 nm dimensions, achieve a current rectification ratio that exceeds 200, without the need for doping, representing a 30 fold enhancement over graphene SSDs. We attribute this enhancement to a bandgap opening due to the in-plane electric field, as a consequence of silicene's buckling. Our results suggest that silicene is a promising material for the realization of planar field effect devices.

  3. Highly Effective Conductance Modulation in Planar Silicene Field Effect Devices Due to Buckling

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dirini, Feras; Hossain, Faruque M.; Mohammed, Mahmood A.; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai; Skafidas, Efstratios

    2015-01-01

    Silicene is an exciting two-dimensional material that shares many of graphene’s electronic properties, but differs in its structural buckling. This buckling allows opening a bandgap in silicene through the application of a perpendicular electric field. Here we show that this buckling also enables highly effective modulation of silicene’s conductance by means of an in-plane electric field applied through silicene side gates, which can be realized concurrently within the same silicene monolayer. We illustrate this by using silicene to implement Self-Switching Diodes (SSDs), which are two-dimensional field effect nanorectifiers realized within a single silicene monolayer. Our quantum simulation results show that the atomically-thin silicene SSDs, with sub-10 nm dimensions, achieve a current rectification ratio that exceeds 200, without the need for doping, representing a 30 fold enhancement over graphene SSDs. We attribute this enhancement to a bandgap opening due to the in-plane electric field, as a consequence of silicene’s buckling. Our results suggest that silicene is a promising material for the realization of planar field effect devices. PMID:26441200

  4. Measurements of Turbulent Flow Field in Separate Flow Nozzles with Enhanced Mixing Devices - Test Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2002-01-01

    As part of the Advanced Subsonic Technology Program, a series of experiments was conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center on the effect of mixing enhancement devices on the aeroacoustic performance of separate flow nozzles. Initial acoustic evaluations of the devices showed that they reduced jet noise significantly, while creating very little thrust loss. The explanation for the improvement required that turbulence measurements, namely single point mean and RMS statistics and two-point spatial correlations, be made to determine the change in the turbulence caused by the mixing enhancement devices that lead to the noise reduction. These measurements were made in the summer of 2000 in a test program called Separate Nozzle Flow Test 2000 (SFNT2K) supported by the Aeropropulsion Research Program at NASA Glenn Research Center. Given the hot high-speed flows representative of a contemporary bypass ratio 5 turbofan engine, unsteady flow field measurements required the use of an optical measurement method. To achieve the spatial correlations, the Particle Image Velocimetry technique was employed, acquiring high-density velocity maps of the flows from which the required statistics could be derived. This was the first successful use of this technique for such flows, and shows the utility of this technique for future experimental programs. The extensive statistics obtained were likewise unique and give great insight into the turbulence which produces noise and how the turbulence can be modified to reduce jet noise.

  5. Therapeutic effects of whole-body devices applying pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF): a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Hug, Kerstin; Röösli, Martin

    2012-02-01

    Pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) delivered by whole-body mats are promoted in many countries for a wide range of therapeutic applications and for enhanced well-being. However, neither the therapeutic efficacy nor the potential health hazards caused by these mats have been systematically evaluated. We conducted a systematic review of trials investigating the therapeutic effects of low-frequency PEMF devices. We were interested in all health outcomes addressed so far in randomized, sham-controlled, double-blind trials. In total, 11 trials were identified. They were focused on osteoarthritis of the knee (3 trials) or the cervical spine (1), fibromyalgia (1), pain perception (2), skin ulcer healing (1), multiple sclerosis-related fatigue (2), or heart rate variability and well-being (1). The sample sizes of the trials ranged from 12 to 71 individuals. The observation period lasted 12 weeks at maximum, and the applied magnetic flux densities ranged from 3.4 to 200 µT. In some trials sporadic positive effects on health were observed. However, independent confirmation of such singular findings was lacking. We conclude that the scientific evidence for therapeutic effects of whole-body PEMF devices is insufficient. Acute adverse effects have not been reported. However, adverse effects occurring after long-term application have not been studied so far. In summary, the therapeutic use of low-frequency whole-body PEMF devices cannot be recommended without more scientific evidence from high-quality, double-blind trials.

  6. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system

    SciTech Connect

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  7. A cryogen-free ultralow-field superconducting quantum interference device magnetic resonance imaging system.

    PubMed

    Eom, Byeong Ho; Penanen, Konstantin; Hahn, Inseob

    2014-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at microtesla fields using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detection has previously been demonstrated, and advantages have been noted. Although the ultralow-field SQUID MRI technique would not need the heavy superconducting magnet of conventional MRI systems, liquid helium required to cool the low-temperature detector still places a significant burden on its operation. We have built a prototype cryocooler-based SQUID MRI system that does not require a cryogen. The SQUID detector and the superconducting gradiometer were cooled down to 3.7 K and 4.3 K, respectively. We describe the prototype design, characterization, a phantom image, and areas of further improvements needed to bring the imaging performance to parity with conventional MRI systems.

  8. Unconventional Impacts from Unconventional Hydropower Devices: The Environmental Effects of Noise, Electromagnetic Fields, and other Stressors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevelhimer, M.; Cada, G. F.

    2011-12-01

    Conventional dam-based hydropower production produces a variety of environmental stressors that have been debated and confronted for decades. In-current hydrokinetic devices present some of the same or analogous stressors (e.g., changes in sediment transport and deposition, interference with animal movements and migrations, and strike by rotor blades) and some potentially new stressors (e.g., noise during operation, emission of electromagnetic fields [EMF], and toxicity of paints, lubricants, and antifouling coatings). The types of hydrokinetic devices being proposed and tested are varied, as are the locations where they could be deployed, i.e., coastal, estuarine, and big rivers. Differences in hydrology, device type, and the affected aquatic community (marine, estuarine, and riverine) will likely result in a different suite of environmental concerns for each project. Studies are underway at the U.S. Department of Energy's national laboratories to characterize the level of exposure to these stressors and to measure environmental response where possible. In this presentation we present results of studies on EMF, noise, and benthic habitat alteration relevant to hydrokinetic device operation in large rivers. In laboratory studies we tested the behavioral response of a variety of fish and invertebrate organisms to exposure to DC and AC EMF. Our findings suggest that lake sturgeon may be susceptible to EMF like that emitted from underwater cables, but most other species tested are not. Based on recordings of various underwater noise sources, we will show how the spectral density of noises created by hydrokinetic devices compares to that from other anthropogenic sources and natural sources. We will also report the results of hydroacoustic surveys that show how sediments are redistributed behind pilings like those that could be used for mounting hydrokinetic devices. The potential effects of these stressors will be discussed in the context of possible fish population

  9. Enhancement of nuclear magnetic resonance in microtesla magnetic field with prepolarization field detected with high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hong-Chang; Liao, Shu-Hsien; Horng, Herng-Er; Kuo, Shing-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Hsien; Yang, S. Y.

    2006-06-01

    We applied prepolarization field and high-Tc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detector to enhance nuclear magnetic resonance signal in a microtesla magnetic field. The minimum measuring magnetic field is 8.9μT at which the proton resonance frequency is 380Hz. The specificity instrumentation and the difficulty of using a high-Tc SQUID with prepolarization field were investigated. We applied gradient field to perform one-dimensional proton imaging in a microtesla magnetic field. Additionally, low field high-Tc SQUID-based NMR systems are promising in biomagnetic research due to its use, for example, in imaging with hyperpolarized noble gas.

  10. Investigating the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy.

    PubMed

    Pirbodaghi, Tohid; Vigolo, Daniele; Akbari, Samin; deMello, Andrew

    2015-05-07

    The widespread application of microfluidic devices in the biological and chemical sciences requires the implementation of complex designs and geometries, which in turn leads to atypical fluid dynamic phenomena. Accordingly, a complete understanding of fluid dynamics in such systems is key in the facile engineering of novel and efficient analytical tools. Herein, we present an accurate approach for studying the fluid dynamics of rapid processes within microfluidic devices using bright-field microscopy with white light illumination and a standard high-speed camera. Specifically, we combine Ghost Particle Velocimetry and the detection of moving objects in automated video surveillance to track submicron size tracing particles via cross correlation between the speckle patterns of successive images. The efficacy of the presented technique is demonstrated by measuring the flow field over a square pillar (80 μm × 80 μm) in a 200 μm wide microchannel at high volumetric flow rates. Experimental results are in excellent agreement with those obtained via computational fluid dynamics simulations. The method is subsequently used to study the dynamics of droplet generation at a flow focusing microfluidic geometry. A unique feature of the presented technique is the ability to perform velocimetry analysis of high-speed phenomena, which is not possible using micron-resolution particle image velocimetry (μPIV) approaches based on confocal or fluorescence microscopy.

  11. AC electric field for rapid assembly of nanostructured polyaniline onto microsized gap for sensor devices.

    PubMed

    La Ferrara, Vera; Rametta, Gabriella; De Maria, Antonella

    2015-07-01

    Interconnected network of nanostructured polyaniline (PANI) is giving strong potential for enhancing device performances than bulk PANI counterparts. For nanostructured device processing, the main challenge is to get prototypes on large area by requiring precision, low cost and high rate assembly. Among processes meeting these requests, the alternate current electric fields are often used for nanostructure assembling. For the first time, we show the assembly of nanostructured PANI onto large electrode gaps (30-60 μm width) by applying alternate current electric fields, at low frequencies, to PANI particles dispersed in acetonitrile (ACN). An important advantage is the short assembly time, limited to 5-10 s, although electrode gaps are microsized. That encouraging result is due to a combination of forces, such as dielectrophoresis (DEP), induced-charge electrokinetic (ICEK) flow and alternate current electroosmotic (ACEO) flow, which speed up the assembly process when low frequencies and large electrode gaps are used. The main achievement of the present study is the development of ammonia sensors created by direct assembling of nanostructured PANI onto electrodes. Sensors exhibit high sensitivity to low gas concentrations as well as excellent reversibility at room temperature, even after storage in air.

  12. Locked modes in two reversed-field pinch devices of different size and shell system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malmberg, J.-A.; Brunsell, P. R.; Yagi, Y.; Koguchi, H.

    2000-10-01

    The behavior of locked modes in two reversed-field pinch devices, the Toroidal Pinch Experiment (TPE-RX) [Y. Yagi et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, 2552 (1999)] and Extrap T2 [J. R. Drake et al., in Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1996, Montreal (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1996), Vol. 2, p. 193] is analyzed and compared. The main characteristics of the locked mode are qualitatively similar. The toroidal distribution of the mode locking shows that field errors play a role in both devices. The probability of phase locking is found to increase with increasing magnetic fluctuation levels in both machines. Furthermore, the probability of phase locking increases with plasma current in TPE-RX despite the fact that the magnetic fluctuation levels decrease. A comparison with computations using a theoretical model estimating the critical mode amplitude for locking [R. Fitzpatrick et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 3878 (1999)] shows a good correlation with experimental results in TPE-RX. In Extrap T2, the magnetic fluctuations scale weakly with both plasma current and electron densities. This is also reflected in the weak scaling of the magnetic fluctuation levels with the Lundquist number (˜S-0.06). In TPE-RX, the corresponding scaling is ˜S-0.18.

  13. Screening for diabetic retinopathy using new mydriasis-free, full-field flicker ERG recording device

    PubMed Central

    Fukuo, Motonobu; Kondo, Mineo; Hirose, Akira; Fukushima, Harumi; Ikesugi, Kengo; Sugimoto, Masahiko; Kato, Kumiko; Uchigata, Yasuko; Kitano, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of blindness among working-age adults. Therefore, it is important to detect DR accurately during mass screening. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a small, hand-held, mydriasis-free, full-field flicker electroretinographic (ERGs) device called RETeval can be used to screen for DR. To accomplish this, we recorded full-field flicker ERGs with this device from 48 normal eyes and 118 eyes with different severities of DR in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). This system delivered a constant flash retinal luminance by adjusting the flash luminance that compensated for changes in the pupil size. Our results showed that there were significant correlations between the severity of DR and the implicit times (P < 0.001; r = 0.55) and the amplitudes (P = 0.001; r = −0.29). When the implicit time was used for the index, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.84 for the detection of DR, and was 0.89 for the detection of DR requiring ophthalmic treatments. These results suggest that the implicit times of the flicker ERGs recorded by the small, mydryasis-free ERG system can be used as an adjunctive tool to screen for DR. PMID:27824158

  14. Stimulation of 450, 650 and 850-nm optical emissions from custom designed silicon LED devices by utilizing carrier energy and carrier momentum engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyman, L. W.; Polleux, J.-L.; Xu, K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical emission probabilities from silicon were analyzed by appropriate modelling, taking the silicon energy band structure, available carrier energy spread, and available carrier momentum spreads that can be realized with typical device design and operating conditions as available in current silicon technologies. The analyses showed that creation of micron-dimensioned conduction channels as made possible by using a RF bipolar fabrication process, appropriate doping and variations in the channel utilizing Boron, Phosphorous and Germanium doping, and using reversed biased junctions to energize specifically electrons, appropriately controlling carrier energy and carrier density, and control over carrier momentum through appropriate impurity scattering technology; particularly, 280nm, 650nm and 850nm emissions can be stimulated. Particularly, using p+nn and p+np+ device designs with appropriate control over carrier energy, carrier type balancing and implementing enhanced impurity scattering in some device regions, show the greatest potential to enhance these emissions. First iteration empirically conducted device realizations results show interesting peaking features and nonuniform high intensity behaviors. Particularly, it was succeeded to increase the emissions at 650nm with about two orders of magnitude. Internal electrical- to- optical conversion efficiencies of up to 10-4 and intensity emissions of up to 200 nW μm2 are derived, with further prospects to increase emissions further. The attained results compare extremely favorable, and in some cases exceeds, results as published by Venter et al, Kuindersma et al and Du Plessis et al using related technologies.

  15. Proton spectral editing in the inhomogeneous radiofrequency field of a surface coil using modified stimulated echoes.

    PubMed

    Lahrech, H; Briguet, A

    1990-11-01

    It is shown that the modified stimulated echo sequence, [theta](+/- x +/- y)-t1-[theta](+ x)-t2/2-[2 theta](+ x)-t2/2- [theta](+ x)-t1-Acq(+/- x +/- y), denoted as MSTE[2 theta]x according to the exciter phase of the 2 theta pulse, is able to perform proton spectral editing without difference spectra. On the other hand, this sequence appears to be suitable for spatial localization. Sensitivity and spatial selectivity of MSTE and conventional stimulated echo sequence (STE) are briefly compared. MSTE is applied to editing lactate in the rat brain using the locally restricted excitation of a surface coil.

  16. Field Investigations of Lactate-Stimulated Bioreduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) at Hanford 100H

    SciTech Connect

    T.C. Hazen; B. Faybishenko; J. Wan; T.Tokunaga; S. Hubbard; M. Conrad; S. Borglin; D. Joyner; S. Koenigsberg; A. Willet

    2004-03-17

    The objective of this report is to perform field investigations to assess the potential for immobilizing and detoxifying chromium contaminated soils and groundwater using bioremediation at Site 100H at Hanford. Specific goals are: (1) Designing a field test to measure the effect of lactate biostimulation on microbial community activity, redox gradients, transport limitations, and other reducing agents in comparison with our previous NABIR laboratory work. (2) Establishing the rates and conditions that may cause are oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) following biostimulation. (3) Providing design criteria for full-scale deployment on in situ Cr(VI) bioreduction via lactate stimulation for use at DOE sites.

  17. Patient-Specific Electric Field Simulations and Acceleration Measurements for Objective Analysis of Intraoperative Stimulation Tests in the Thalamus

    PubMed Central

    Hemm, Simone; Pison, Daniela; Alonso, Fabiola; Shah, Ashesh; Coste, Jérôme; Lemaire, Jean-Jacques; Wårdell, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Despite an increasing use of deep brain stimulation (DBS) the fundamental mechanisms of action remain largely unknown. Simulation of electric entities has previously been proposed for chronic DBS combined with subjective symptom evaluations, but not for intraoperative stimulation tests. The present paper introduces a method for an objective exploitation of intraoperative stimulation test data to identify the optimal implant position of the chronic DBS lead by relating the electric field (EF) simulations to the patient-specific anatomy and the clinical effects quantified by accelerometry. To illustrate the feasibility of this approach, it was applied to five patients with essential tremor bilaterally implanted in the ventral intermediate nucleus (VIM). The VIM and its neighborhood structures were preoperatively outlined in 3D on white matter attenuated inversion recovery MR images. Quantitative intraoperative clinical assessments were performed using accelerometry. EF simulations (n = 272) for intraoperative stimulation test data performed along two trajectories per side were set-up using the finite element method for 143 stimulation test positions. The resulting EF isosurface of 0.2 V/mm was superimposed to the outlined anatomical structures. The percentage of volume of each structure’s overlap was calculated and related to the corresponding clinical improvement. The proposed concept has been successfully applied to the five patients. For higher clinical improvements, not only the VIM but as well other neighboring structures were covered by the EF isosurfaces. The percentage of the volumes of the VIM, of the nucleus intermediate lateral of the thalamus and the prelemniscal radiations within the prerubral field of Forel increased for clinical improvements higher than 50% compared to improvements lower than 50%. The presented new concept allows a detailed and objective analysis of a high amount of intraoperative data to identify the optimal stimulation target

  18. Mechanical Stimulation (Pulsed Electromagnetic Fields "PEMF" and Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy "ESWT") and Tendon Regeneration: A Possible Alternative.

    PubMed

    Rosso, Federica; Bonasia, Davide E; Marmotti, Antonio; Cottino, Umberto; Rossi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    The pathogenesis of tendon degeneration and tendinopathy is still partially unclear. However, an active role of metalloproteinases (MMP), growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and a crucial role of inflammatory elements and cytokines was demonstrated. Mechanical stimulation may play a role in regulation of inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that both pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine such as interleukin (IL-6 and IL-10). Moreover, ESWT increases the expression of growth factors, such as transforming growth factor β(TGF-β), (VEGF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1), as well as the synthesis of collagen I fibers. These pre-clinical results, in association with several clinical studies, suggest a potential effectiveness of ESWT for tendinopathy treatment. Recently PEMF gained popularity as adjuvant for fracture healing and bone regeneration. Similarly to ESWT, the mechanical stimulation obtained using PEMFs may play a role for treatment of tendinopathy and for tendon regeneration, increasing in vitro TGF-β production, as well as scleraxis and collagen I gene expression. In this manuscript the rational of mechanical stimulations and the clinical studies on the efficacy of extracorporeal shock wave (ESW) and PEMF will be discussed. However, no clear evidence of a clinical value of ESW and PEMF has been found in literature with regards to the treatment of tendinopathy in human, so further clinical trials are needed to confirm the promising hypotheses concerning the effectiveness of ESWT and PEMF mechanical stimulation.

  19. Templating Biomineralization: Surface Directed Protein Self-assembly and External Magnetic Field Stimulation of Osteoblasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ba, Xiaolan

    Biomineralization is a wide-spread phenomenon in the biological systems, which is the process of mineral formation by organisms through interaction between its organic contents and the inorganic minerals. The process is essential in a broad spectrum of biological phenomena ranging from bone and tooth formation to pathological mineralization under hypoxic conditions or cancerous formations. In this thesis I studied biomineralization at the earliest stages in order to obtain a better understanding of the fundamental principals involved. This knowledge is essential if we want to engineer devices which will increase bone regeneration or prevent unwanted mineral deposits. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins play an essential role during biomineralization in bone and engineered tissues. In this dissertation, I present an approach to mimic the ECM in vitro to probe the interactions of these proteins with calcium phosphate mineral and with each other. Early stage of mineralization is investigated by mechanical properties of the protein fibers using Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM) and Shear Modulation Force Microscopy (SMFM). The development of mineral crystals on the protein matrices is also characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Grazing Incidence X-ray Diffraction (GIXRD). The results demonstrate complementary actions of the two ECM proteins to collect cations and template calcium phosphate mineral, respectively. Magnets have been clinically used as an "induction source" in various bone or orthodontic treatments. However, the mechanism and effects of magnetic fields remain unclear. In this dissertation, I also undertake the present investigation to study the effects of 150 mT static magnetic fields (SMF) on ECM development and cell biomineralization using MC3T3-E1 osteobalst-like cells. Early stage of biomineralization is characterized by SPM, SMFM and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CSLM). Late stage of

  20. Simulating the hydraulic stimulation of multiple fractures in an anisotropic stress field applying the discrete element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeeb, Conny; Frühwirt, Thomas; Konietzky, Heinz

    2015-04-01

    Key to a successful exploitation of deep geothermal reservoirs in a petrothermal environment is the hydraulic stimulation of the host rock to increase permeability. The presented research investigates the fracture propagation and interaction during hydraulic stimulation of multiple fractures in a highly anisotropic stress field. The presented work was conducted within the framework of the OPTIRISS project, which is a cooperation of industry partners and universities in Thuringia and Saxony (Federal States of Germany) and was funded by the European Fond for Regional Development. One objective was the design optimization of the subsurface geothermal heat exchanger (SGHE) by means of numerical simulations. The presented simulations were conducted applying 3DEC (Itasca™), a software tool based on the discrete element method. The simulation results indicate that the main direction of fracture propagation is towards lower stresses and thus towards the biosphere. Therefore, barriers might be necessary to limit fracture propagation to the designated geological formation. Moreover, the hydraulic stimulation significantly alters the stresses in the vicinity of newly created fractures. Especially the change of the minimum stress component affects the hydraulic stimulation of subsequent fractures, which are deflected away from the previously stimulated fractures. This fracture deflection can render it impossible to connect all fractures with a second borehole for the later production. The results of continuative simulations indicate that a fracture deflection cannot be avoided completely. Therefore, the stage alignment was modified to minimize fracture deflection by varying (1) the pauses between stages, (2) the spacing's between adjacent stages, and (3) the angle between stimulation borehole and minimum stress component. An optimum SGHE design, which implies that all stimulated fractures are connected to the production borehole, can be achieved by aligning the stimulation

  1. Extracellular Ca(2+) entry and mobilization of inositol trisphosphate-dependent Ca(2+) stores modulate histamine and electrical field stimulation induced contractions of the guinea-pig prostate.

    PubMed

    Lam, Michelle; Kerr, Karen; Ventura, Sabatino; Exintaris, Betty

    2011-09-01

    This investigation aimed to examine the source of Ca(2+) mobilization that leads to the contractile response to either exogenously added histamine (1 μM-1mM) or electrical field stimulation (10Hz, 0.5ms, 60V). Removal of extracellular Ca(2+) by removal of Ca(2+) from the bathing medium reduced histamine (1mM) induced responses by 34% and responses induced by electrical field stimulation by 94%. Similarly, blockade of L-type Ca(2+) channels by nifedipine (1 μM) reduced histamine (1mM) induced responses by 43% and responses induced by electrical field stimulation by 77%. Application of cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) (10 μM) to inhibit Ca(2+) reuptake to the sarcoplasmic reticulum enhanced both histamine-induced and electrical field stimulation induced responses to a small degree, while the addition of the inosotol triphosphate (IP(3)) receptor antagonist, 2-aminophenoxyethane borane (2-APB) (100 μM) inhibited histamine induced responses by 70% and electrical field stimulation induced responses by 57%. Ryanodine (1 μM) did not affect contractile responses to either histamine or electrical field stimulation, either in the absence or presence of 2-APB (100 μM). During both histamine and electrical field stimulation induced contractions, prostate smooth muscle generates IP(3) receptor mediated Ca(2+) release in conjunction with Ca(2+) entry from the extracellular environment. Ryanodine receptors on the other hand, appear not to play a role in this physiological mechanism.

  2. Switching dynamics of thin film ferroelectric devices - a massively parallel phase field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, Md. Khalid

    In this thesis, we investigate the switching dynamics in thin film ferroelectrics. Ferroelectric materials are of inherent interest for low power and multi-functional devices. However, possible device applications of these materials have been limited due to the poorly understood electromagnetic and mechanical response at the nanoscale in arbitrary device structures. The difficulty in understanding switching dynamics mainly arises from the presence of features at multiple length scales and the nonlinearity associated with the strongly coupled states. For example, in a ferroelectric material, the domain walls are of nm size whereas the domain pattern forms at micron scale. The switching is determined by coupled chemical, electrostatic, mechanical and thermal interactions. Thus computational understanding of switching dynamics in thin film ferroelectrics and a direct comparison with experiment poses a significant numerical challenge. We have developed a phase field model that describes the physics of polarization dynamics at the microscopic scale. A number of efficient numerical methods have been applied for achieving massive parallelization of all the calculation steps. Conformally mapped elements, node wise assembly and prevention of dynamic loading minimized the communication between processors and increased the parallelization efficiency. With these improvements, we have reached the experimental scale - a significant step forward compared to the state of the art thin film ferroelectric switching dynamics models. Using this model, we elucidated the switching dynamics on multiple surfaces of the multiferroic material BFO. We also calculated the switching energy of scaled BFO islands. Finally, we studied the interaction of domain wall propagation with misfit dislocations in the thin film. We believe that the model will be useful in understanding the switching dynamics in many different experimental setups incorporating thin film ferroelectrics.

  3. Magnetoneurographic registration of propagating magnetic fields in the lumbar spine after stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Anita; van Leeuwen, Peter; Hoormann, Jörg; Grönemeyer, Dietrich

    2006-06-01

    Stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve has been associated with different somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) recorded along the spine and thorax. The aim of this study was to register and describe the magnetic fields corresponding to different components of spinal SEP after stimulation of tibial nerves. In nine healthy subjects, right and left posterior tibial nerves were transcutaneously electrostimulated at the ankles. Neuromagnetic fields were registered over a circular 800 cm2 area of the lumbosacral spine using a 61-channel biomagnetometer. Magnetic field maps were constructed and examined visually for dipolar patterns. Equivalent current dipoles (ECD) were calculated for each somatosensory evoked field (SEF) using a least-squares fit in a spherical model. In seven subjects dipolar SEF were detected over the lower back at two separate latencies and locations and propagating ECD could be localized. Both the first and second components found agreed anatomically and functionally with respect to propagation in the underlying nerve fibers. It was possible to record and identify SEF which correspond to the SEP described in the literature. Dipole localization based on an equivalent current dipole model allowed a basic evaluation of the plausibility of the measurements with respect to the processes being examined.

  4. [On the mechanisms of stimulation and inhibition during germination of wheat seeds in extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Aksenov, S I; Grunina, T Iu; Goriachev, S N

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown that the effects of stimulation of germination of wheat seeds by electromagnetic field depend on the degree of membrane tension during imbibition of seeds in sucrose solutions. This provides further confirmation of the influence of electromagnetic fields on the release of proteins from the bound state on the membranes. The prolonged treatment with electromagnetic fields during the imbibition of seeds leads not only to the inhibition of germination of sprouts but also to a decrease in their germinability, which can be as strong as twofold for seeds with the initial low germinability. This is related to the desynchronization of germination processes, caused by the stimulation of the release of proteins and inhibition of another stage during the cell division, the assembly of complex structures. It is noted that the activation of the release of proteins and inhibition of their binding by the action of electromagnetic fields must elevate the cell excitability. The presumably, the excitability of cells determines the effects of magnetic storms and high solar activity on the physiological state of organisms.

  5. Stereo vision-based depth of field rendering on a mobile device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiaosong; Yu, Zhan; Rasmussen, Christopher; Yu, Jingyi

    2014-03-01

    The depth of field (DoF) effect is a useful tool in photography and cinematography because of its aesthetic value. However, capturing and displaying dynamic DoF effect were until recently a quality unique to expensive and bulky movie cameras. A computational approach to generate realistic DoF effects for mobile devices such as tablets is proposed. We first calibrate the rear-facing stereo cameras and rectify the stereo image pairs through FCam API, then generate a low-res disparity map using graph cuts stereo matching and subsequently upsample it via joint bilateral upsampling. Next, we generate a synthetic light field by warping the raw color image to nearby viewpoints, according to the corresponding values in the upsampled high-resolution disparity map. Finally, we render dynamic DoF effect on the tablet screen with light field rendering. The user can easily capture and generate desired DoF effects with arbitrary aperture sizes or focal depths using the tablet only, with no additional hardware or software required. The system has been examined in a variety of environments with satisfactory results, according to the subjective evaluation tests.

  6. ANALYSIS OF THE STRUCTURE OF MAGNETIC FIELDS THAT INDUCED INHIBITION OF STIMULATED NEURITE OUTGROWTH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The important experiments showing nonlinear amplitude dependences of the neurite outgrowth in pheochromocytoma nerve cells due to ELF magnetic field exposure had been carried out in a nonuniform ac magnetic field. The nonuniformity entailed larger than expected variances in magne...

  7. Measurement of impulse peak insertion loss for four hearing protection devices in field conditions

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, William J.; Flamme, Gregory A.; Meinke, Deanna K.; Sondergaard, Jacob; Finan, Donald S.; Lankford, James E.; Khan, Amir; Vernon, Julia; Stewart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective In 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed an impulse noise reduction rating (NRR) for hearing protection devices based upon the impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) methods in the ANSI S12.42-2010 standard. This study tests the ANSI S12.42 methods with a range of hearing protection devices measured in field conditions. Design The method utilizes an acoustic test fixture and three ranges for impulse levels: 130–134, 148–152, and 166–170 dB peak SPL. For this study, four different models of hearing protectors were tested: Bilsom 707 Impact II electronic earmuff, E·A·R Pod Express, E·A·R Combat Arms version 4, and the Etymotic Research, Inc. Electronic BlastPLG™ EB1. Study sample Five samples of each protector were fitted on the fixture or inserted in the fixture's ear canal five times for each impulse level. Impulses were generated by a 0.223 caliber rifle. Results The average IPILs increased with peak pressure and ranged between 20 and 38 dB. For some protectors, significant differences were observed across protector examples of the same model, and across insertions. Conclusions The EPA's proposed methods provide consistent and reproducible results. The proposed impulse NRR rating should utilize the minimum and maximum protection percentiles as determined by the ANSI S12.42-2010 methods. PMID:22176308

  8. Electrical properties of single CuO nanowires for device fabrication: Diodes and field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Florica, Camelia; Costas, Andreea; Boni, Andra Georgia; Negrea, Raluca; Preda, Nicoleta E-mail: encu@infim.ro; Pintilie, Lucian; Enculescu, Ionut E-mail: encu@infim.ro; Ion, Lucian

    2015-06-01

    High aspect ratio CuO nanowires are synthesized by a simple and scalable method, thermal oxidation in air. The structural, morphological, optical, and electrical properties of the semiconducting nanowires were studied. Au-Ti/CuO nanowire and Pt/CuO nanowire electrical contacts were investigated. A dominant Schottky mechanism was evidenced in the Au-Ti/CuO nanowire junction and an ohmic behavior was observed for the Pt/CuO nanowire junction. The Pt/CuO nanowire/Pt structure allows the measurements of the intrinsic transport properties of the single CuO nanowires. It was found that an activation mechanism describes the behavior at higher temperatures, while a nearest neighbor hopping transport mechanism is characteristic at low temperatures. This was also confirmed by four-probe resistivity measurements on the single CuO nanowires. By changing the metal/semiconductor interface, devices such as Schottky diodes and field effect transistors based on single CuO p-type nanowire semiconductor channel are obtained. These devices are suitable for being used in various electronic circuits where their size related properties can be exploited.

  9. Incipient Fault Detection and Isolation of Field Devices in Nuclear Power Systems Using Principal Component Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaistha, Nitin; Upadhyaya, Belle R.

    2001-11-15

    An integrated method for the detection and isolation of incipient faults in common field devices, such as sensors and actuators, using plant operational data is presented. The approach is based on the premise that data for normal operation lie on a surface and abnormal situations lead to deviations from the surface in a particular way. Statistically significant deviations from the surface result in the detection of faults, and the characteristic directions of deviations are used for isolation of one or more faults from the set of typical faults. Principal component analysis (PCA), a multivariate data-driven technique, is used to capture the relationships in the data and fit a hyperplane to the data. The fault direction for each of the scenarios is obtained using the singular value decomposition on the state and control function prediction errors, and fault isolation is then accomplished from projections on the fault directions. This approach is demonstrated for a simulated pressurized water reactor steam generator system and for a laboratory process control system under single device fault conditions. Enhanced fault isolation capability is also illustrated by incorporating realistic nonlinear terms in the PCA data matrix.

  10. Gate Tunable Relativistic Mass and Berry's phase in Topological Insulator Nanoribbon Field Effect Devices

    PubMed Central

    Jauregui, Luis A.; Pettes, Michael T.; Rokhinson, Leonid P.; Shi, Li; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-01-01

    Transport due to spin-helical massless Dirac fermion surface state is of paramount importance to realize various new physical phenomena in topological insulators, ranging from quantum anomalous Hall effect to Majorana fermions. However, one of the most important hallmarks of topological surface states, the Dirac linear band dispersion, has been difficult to reveal directly in transport measurements. Here we report experiments on Bi2Te3 nanoribbon ambipolar field effect devices on high-κ SrTiO3 substrates, where we achieve a gate-tuned bulk metal-insulator transition and the topological transport regime with substantial surface state conduction. In this regime, we report two unambiguous transport evidences for gate-tunable Dirac fermions through π Berry's phase in Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations and effective mass proportional to the Fermi momentum, indicating linear energy-momentum dispersion. We also measure a gate-tunable weak anti-localization (WAL) with 2 coherent conduction channels (indicating 2 decoupled surfaces) near the charge neutrality point, and a transition to weak localization (indicating a collapse of the Berry's phase) when the Fermi energy approaches the bulk conduction band. The gate-tunable Dirac fermion topological surface states pave the way towards a variety of topological electronic devices. PMID:25677703

  11. A Full electric-field tuning of thermoelectric power in a dual-gated Bi-layer graphene device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wei-Li; Wang, Chang-Ran; Lu, Wen-Sen; Hao, Lei; Lee, Ting-Kuo; Lin, Feng; Cheng, I.-Chun; Chen, Jiang-Zhang

    2012-02-01

    By using high quality microcrystals of hexagonal boron nitride as top gate dielectric, we fabricated dual-gated bilayer graphene devices. We demonstrate a full electric field tuning of thermoelectric power resulting from the opening of a band-gap by applying a perpendicular electric field on bilayer graphene. We uncover a large enhancement in thermoelectric power at low temperature. At 15 K, the thermoelectric power can be amplified by more than four-fold attaining a value of ˜ 50μV/K at a displacement field of 0.8 V/nm. Our result may open up a new possibility in thermoelectric application using graphene-based device.

  12. Abdominal wall Type-I complex regional pain syndrome treated effectively with peripheral nerve field stimulation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linqiu; Chou, Henry; Holder, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Chronic abdominal wall pain is a well-documented complication of abdominal surgery. However, abdominal wall complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a rare medical condition. We present a case of abdominal wall CRPS and its treatment with peripheral nerve field stimulation (PNfS). A 34-year-old female presented with right periumbilical pain for 2 years. She developed burning, sharp and stabbing pain with allodynia (extremely sensitive to wind and light touch) and erythema or pallor 2 weeks after an exploratory appendectomy. The extensive evaluation ruled out the underlining pathology. After she failed conservative therapies, she underwent a 7-day trial of thoracic spinal cord stimulation (SCS) and abdominal wall PNfS. Thoracic SCS failed to provide pain relief; however, PNfS provided significant relief (>90%) of burning sensation. It has now been 5 years since the PNfS was implanted and she continues to demonstrate substantial pain relief. PMID:28044002

  13. Cooldown performance of an inner vertical field coil for the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Takahata, K.; Mito, T.; Satow, T.

    1996-07-01

    A single cooldown test of an Inner Vertical (IV) field coil for the Large Helical Device (LHD) was started on February 1 of 1995, and the superconducting transition of the coil was confirmed on February 23. The coil is a forced-flow type using a cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor and weighing about 16 tons. The total cooldown time was about 250 hours, not including suspended time. Pressure drop characteristics were measured during the cooldown, and the same results were obtained as the R and D coil previously tested. The cooldown time could be reduced by indirect cooling using stainless steel sleeves with cooling pipes. The indirect cooling is effective for the CIC conductor which has no subchannel because otherwise an adequate mass flow cannot be obtained due to a high pressure drop in the high temperature region. The temperature distribution in the vertical direction was also examined during the indirect cooling.

  14. A titanium hydride gun for plasma injection into the T2-reversed field pinch device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voronin, A. V.; Hellblom, K. G.

    1999-02-01

    A study of a plasma gun (modified Bostic type) with titanium hydride electrodes has been carried out. The total number of released hydrogen atoms was in the range 1016-1018 and the maximum plasma flow velocity was 2.5×105 m s-1. The ion density near the gun edge reached 1.8×1020 m-3 and the electron temperature was around 40 eV as estimated from probe measurements. No species other than hydrogen or titanium were seen in the plasma line radiation. The plasma injector was successfully used for gas pre-ionization in the Extrap T2 reversed-field pinch device (ohmic heating toroidal experiment (OHTE)).

  15. Use of a hard mask for formation of gate and dielectric via nanofilament field emission devices

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Contolini, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a nanofilament field emission device in which a via in a dielectric layer is self-aligned to gate metal via structure located on top of the dielectric layer. By the use of a hard mask layer located on top of the gate metal layer, inert to the etch chemistry for the gate metal layer, and in which a via is formed by the pattern from etched nuclear tracks in a trackable material, a via is formed by the hard mask will eliminate any erosion of the gate metal layer during the dielectric via etch. Also, the hard mask layer will protect the gate metal layer while the gate structure is etched back from the edge of the dielectric via, if such is desired. This method provides more tolerance for the electroplating of a nanofilament in the dielectric via and sharpening of the nanofilament.

  16. Thermal effects and space-charge limited transition in crossed-field devices

    SciTech Connect

    Marini, Samuel; Rizzato, Felipe B.; Pakter, Renato

    2014-08-15

    A fully kinetic model for the electron flow in a crossed field device is derived and used to determine the system stationary states. It is found that for low injection temperatures, there is a simultaneous presence of distinct stationary solutions and an abrupt transition between accelerating and space-charge limited regimes. On the other hand, for high injection temperatures, there is only a single stationary solution branch and the change between the regimes becomes continuous. For intermediate temperatures, it is then identified a critical point that separates the abrupt and continuous behaviors. It is also investigated how intrinsic space-charge oscillations may drive stationary states unstable in certain parameter regimes. The results are verified with N-particle self-consistent simulations.

  17. Improvement of Electrostatic Discharge Protection by Introducing a Spindt-Type Silicon Field Emission Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Liann-Be; Ferng, Yi-Cherng; Liao, Jhong-Wei; Lin, Ching-Chi

    2012-04-01

    In this paper, an original Spindt-type silicon field emission device (FED) with electrostatic discharge (ESD) regulation capability is proposed. The fabricated FED characteristics, including process parameters, capacitance-voltage (C-V), current-voltage (I-V), and frequency response, are investigated. To verify its capability of ESD protection, we replace the metal oxide varistor (MOV) in a state-of-the-art protection configuration with the fabricated FED under the application conditions of system-level ESD tests. The measured results show that the proposed ESD protection circuit composed of a prestage gas arrestor, an intermediate resistor, and an introduced FED can suppress an injected ESD pulse voltage of 6000 to 3193 V, a reduction of 46.8%, whereas suppression is to 5606 V, a reduction of 6.57%, when using only a gas arrestor.

  18. Velocity Vector Field Visualization of Flow in Liquid Acquisition Device Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McQuillen, John B.; Chao, David F.; Hall, Nancy R.; Zhang, Nengli

    2012-01-01

    A capillary flow liquid acquisition device (LAD) for cryogenic propellants has been developed and tested in NASA Glenn Research Center to meet the requirements of transferring cryogenic liquid propellants from storage tanks to an engine in reduced gravity environments. The prototypical mesh screen channel LAD was fabricated with a mesh screen, covering a rectangular flow channel with a cylindrical outlet tube, and was tested with liquid oxygen (LOX). In order to better understand the performance in various gravity environments and orientations at different liquid submersion depths of the screen channel LAD, a series of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of LOX flow through the LAD screen channel was undertaken. The resulting velocity vector field visualization for the flow in the channel has been used to reveal the gravity effects on the flow in the screen channel.

  19. Simulation of the electric field distribution in the electrode system of a device forming a high-voltage gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markushin, M. A.; Kolpakov, V. A.; Krichevskii, S. V.; Kolpakov, A. I.

    2015-03-01

    We propose a model of the electric field distribution in the electrode system of a gas-discharge device. The possibility of application the method of conformal mapping of a function of a complex variable for describing analytically the form of the distribution of equipotential lines of the field in the region of the circular orifice in the anode of the gas discharge device is demonstrated. The method for obtaining a system of parametric equations for determining the equipotential lines and field lines is described. We obtain the theoretical maps of the electric field distribution, which make it possible to determine their relation with the electrophysical parameters of the electrode system of the device.

  20. Field Evidence for Co-Metabolism of Trichloroethene Stimulated by Addition of Electron Donor to Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    Conrad, Mark E.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Radtke, Corey W.; Bill, Markus; Delwiche, Mark E.; Lee, M. Hope; Swift, Dana L.; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2010-05-17

    For more than 10 years, electron donor has been injected into the Snake River aquifer beneath the Test Area North site of the Idaho National Laboratory for the purpose of stimulating microbial reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater. This has resulted in significant TCE removal from the source area of the contaminant plume and elevated dissolved CH4 in the groundwater extending 250 m from the injection well. The delta13C of the CH4 increases from 56o/oo in the source area to -13 o/oo with distance from the injection well, whereas the delta13C of dissolved inorganic carbon decreases from 8 o/oo to -13 o/oo, indicating a shift from methanogenesis to methane oxidation. This change in microbial activity along the plume axis is confirmed by PhyloChip microarray analyses of 16S rRNA genes obtained from groundwater microbial communities, which indicate decreasing abundances of reductive dechlorinating microorganisms (e.g., Dehalococcoides ethenogenes) and increasing CH4-oxidizing microorganisms capable of aerobic co-metabolism of TCE (e.g., Methylosinus trichosporium). Incubation experiments with 13C-labeled TCE introduced into microcosms containing basalt and groundwater from the aquifer confirm that TCE co-metabolism is possible. The results of these studies indicate that electron donor amendment designed to stimulate reductive dechlorination of TCE may also stimulate co-metabolism of TCE.

  1. Low-noise nano superconducting quantum interference device operating in Tesla magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Tobias; Nagel, Joachim; Wölbing, Roman; Kemmler, Matthias; Kleiner, Reinhold; Koelle, Dieter

    2013-01-22

    Superconductivity in the cuprate YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7) (YBCO) persists up to huge magnetic fields (B) up to several tens of Teslas, and sensitive direct current (dc) superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) can be realized in epitaxially grown YBCO films by using grain boundary Josephson junctions (GBJs). Here we present the realization of high-quality YBCO nanoSQUIDs, patterned by focused ion beam milling. We demonstrate low-noise performance of such a SQUID up to B = 1 T applied parallel to the plane of the SQUID loop at the temperature T = 4.2 K. The GBJs are shunted by a thin Au layer to provide nonhysteretic current voltage characteristics, and the SQUID incorporates a 90 nm wide constriction which is used for on-chip modulation of the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop. The white flux noise of the device increases only slightly from 1.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz)(1/2) at B = 0 to 2.3 μΦ(0)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. Assuming that a point-like magnetic particle with magnetization in the plane of the SQUID loop is placed directly on top of the constriction and taking into account the geometry of the SQUID, we calculate a spin sensitivity S(μ)(1/2) = 62 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at B = 0 and 110 μ(B)/(Hz))(1/2) at 1 T. The demonstration of low noise of such a SQUID in Tesla fields is a decisive step toward utilizing the full potential of ultrasensitive nanoSQUIDs for direct measurements of magnetic hysteresis curves of magnetic nanoparticles and molecular magnets.

  2. A novel field generator for magnetic stimulation in cell culture experiments.

    PubMed

    Vogt, G; Schrefl, A; Mitteregger, R; Falkenhagen, D

    1997-06-01

    A novel field generator specially designed to examine the influence of low frequency magnetic fields on specific cell material was constructed and characterized. The exposure unit described in this paper consists of a controller unit and three sets of coils. The field generator permits a precious definition of the revelant signal parameters and allows the superposition of alternating current (AC) and direct current (DC) magnetic fields. Critical system parameters were monitored continuously. The three sets of coils, each arranged in the Helmholtz Configuration were characterized. After data processing and visualization the results showed a constant and homogeneous field within the experimental area. The special coil design also allows their use in an incubator.

  3. A multi-channel device for high-density target-selective stimulation and long-term monitoring of cells and subcellular features in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyewon; Kim, Shin Ae; Coakley, Sean; Mugno, Paula; Hammarlund, Marc; Hilliard, Massimo A; Lu, Hang

    2014-12-07

    Selective cell ablation can be used to identify neuronal functions in multicellular model organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans. The optogenetic tool KillerRed facilitates selective ablation by enabling light-activated damage of cell or subcellular components in a temporally and spatially precise manner. However, the use of KillerRed requires stimulating (5 min-1 h), culturing (~24 h) and imaging (often repeatedly) a large number of individual animals. Current manual manipulation methods are limited by their time-consuming, labor-intensive nature, and their usage of anesthetics. To facilitate large-scale selective ablation, culturing, and repetitive imaging, we developed a densely-packed multi-channel device and used it to perform high-throughput neuronal ablation on KillerRed-expressing animals. The ability to load worms in identical locations with high loading efficiency allows us to ablate selected neurons in multiple worms simultaneously. Our device also enables continuous observation of animals for 24 h following KillerRed activation, and allows the animals to be recovered for behavioural assays. We expect this multi-channel device to facilitate a broad range of long-term imaging and selective illumination experiments in neuroscience.

  4. Development of a Compact Rectenna for Wireless Powering of a Head-Mountable Deep Brain Stimulation Device.

    PubMed

    Hosain, M D Kamal; Kouzani, Abbas Z; Tye, Susannah J; Abulseoud, Osama A; Amiet, Andrew; Galehdar, Amir; Kaynak, Akif; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Design of a rectangular spiral planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) at 915 MHz for wireless power transmission applications is proposed. The antenna and rectifying circuitry form a rectenna, which can produce dc power from a distant radio frequency energy transmitter. The generated dc power is used to operate a low-power deep brain stimulation pulse generator. The proposed antenna has the dimensions of 10 mm [Formula: see text]12.5 mm [Formula: see text]1.5 mm and resonance frequency of 915 MHz with a measured bandwidth of 15 MHz at return loss of [Formula: see text]. A dielectric substrate of FR-4 of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] with thickness of 1.5 mm is used for both antenna and rectifier circuit simulation and fabrication because of its availability and low cost. An L-section impedance matching circuit is used between the PIFA and voltage doubler rectifier. The impedance matching circuit also works as a low-pass filter for elimination of higher order harmonics. Maximum dc voltage at the rectenna output is 7.5 V in free space and this rectenna can drive a deep brain stimulation pulse generator at a distance of 30 cm from a radio frequency energy transmitter, which transmits power of 26.77 dBm.

  5. Electric field mediated non-volatile tuning magnetism in CoPt/PMN-PT heterostructure for magnetoelectric memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Y. T.; Li, J.; Peng, X. L.; Wang, X. Q.; Wang, D. H.; Cao, Q. Q.; Du, Y. W.

    2016-02-01

    We report a power efficient non-volatile magnetoelectric memory in the CoPt/(011)PMN-PT heterostructure. Two reversible and stable electric field induced coercivity states (i.e., high-HC or low-HC) are obtained due to the strain mediated converse magnetoelectric effect. The reading process of the different coercive field information written by electric fields is demonstrated by using a magnetoresistance read head. This result shows good prospects in the application of novel multiferroic devices.

  6. Full-field vibration measurements of the violin using digital stroboscopic holographic interferometry and electromagnetic stimulation of the strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keersmaekers, Lissa; Keustermans, William; De Greef, Daniël; Dirckx, Joris J. J.

    2016-06-01

    We developed a setup in which the strings of the violin are driven electromagnetically, and the resulting vibration of the instrument is measured with digital stroboscopic holography. A 250mW single mode green laser beam is chopped using an acousto-optic modulator, generating illumination pulses of 2% of the vibration period. The phase of the illumination pulse is controlled by a programmable function generator so that digital holograms can be recorded on a number of subsequent time positions within the vibration phase. From these recordings, the out of plane motion as a function of time is reconstructed in full field. We show results of full-field vibration amplitude and vibration phase maps, and time resolved full-field deformations of the violin back plane. Time resolved measurements show in detail how the deformation of the violin plane changes as a function of time at different frequencies. We found very different behavior under acoustic stimulation of the instrument and when using electromagnetic stimulation of a string. The aim of the work it to gather data which can be used in power flow calculations to study how the energy of the strings is conducted to the body of the violin and eventually is radiated as sound.

  7. The Effect of Variation in Permittivity of Different Tissues on Induced Electric Field in the Brain during Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadimani, Ravi; Porzig, Konstantin; Crowther, Lawrence; Brauer, Hartmut; Toepfer, Hannes; Jiles, David; Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University Team; Department of Advanced Electromagnetics, Ilmenau University of Technology Team

    2013-03-01

    Estimation of electric field in the brain during Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS) requires knowledge of the electric property of brain tissue. Grey and white matters have unusually high relative permittivities of ~ 106 at low frequencies. However, relative permittivity of cerebrospinal fluid is ~ 102. With such a variation it is necessary to consider the effect of boundaries. A model consisting of 2 hemispheres was used in the model with the properties of one hemisphere kept constant at σ1 = 0.1Sm-1 and ɛr 1 = 10 while the properties of the second hemisphere were changed kept at σ2 = 0.1Sm-1 to 2Sm-1 and ɛr 2 = 102 to 105. A 70 mm diameter double coil was used as the source of the magnetic field. The amplitude of the current in the coil was 5488 A at a frequency of 2.9 kHz. The results show that the electric field, E induced during magnetic stimulation is independent of the relative permittivity, ɛr and varies with the conductivity. Thus the variation in E, calculated with homogeneous and heterogeneous head models was due to variation in conductivity of the tissues and not due to variation in permittivities.

  8. Evaluation of local and integral magnitudes in metal sheets inductive levitation device by FEM electromagnetic field modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Fireteanu, V.; Craiu, O.; Curiac, R.

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents a numerical computation of a device for the horizontal casting of the inductive levitated metallic sheets. Local and integral magnitudes of electromagnetic field values are computed by means of FEM, using the FLUX-2D software and the dedicated program LEVITA. The influences of the supply frequency, magnetic saturation, and device configuration on the levitation force, induced power and transverse variation of the levitation force density are studied. Some experimental proof of the calculated magnitudes is also presented.

  9. Fluence-Field Modulated X-ray CT using Multiple Aperture Devices

    PubMed Central

    Stayman, J. Webster; Mathews, Aswin; Zbijewski, Wojciech; Gang, Grace; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey; Kawamoto, Satomi; Blevis, Ira; Levinson, Reuven

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel strategy for fluence field modulation (FFM) in x-ray CT using multiple aperture devices (MADs). MAD filters permit FFM by blocking or transmitting the x-ray beam on a fine (0.1–1 mm) scale. The filters have a number of potential advantages over other beam modulation strategies including the potential for a highly compact design, modest actuation speed and acceleration requirements, and spectrally neutral filtration due to their essentially binary action. In this work, we present the underlying MAD filtration concept including a design process to achieve a specific class of FFM patterns. A set of MAD filters is fabricated using a tungsten laser sintering process and integrated into an x-ray CT test bench. A characterization of the MAD filters is conducted and compared to traditional attenuating bowtie filters and the ability to flatten the fluence profile for a 32 cm acrylic phantom is demonstrated. MAD-filtered tomographic data was acquired on the CT test bench and reconstructed without artifacts associated with the MAD filter. These initial studies suggest that MAD-based FFM is appropriate for integration in clinical CT system to create patient-specific fluence field profile and reduce radiation exposures. PMID:27110052

  10. Nanosecond Pulsed Electric Field Stimulation of Reactive Oxygen Species in Human Pancreatic Cancer Cells is Ca2+-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Nuccitelli, Richard; Lui, Kaying; Kreis, Mark; Athos, Brian; Nuccitelli, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    The cellular response to 100 ns pulsed electric fields (nsPEF) exposure includes the formation of transient nanopores in the plasma membrane and organelle membranes, an immediate increase in intracellular Ca2+, an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS), DNA fragmentation and caspase activation. 100 ns, 30 kV/cm nsPEF stimulates an increase in ROS proportional to the pulse number. This increase is inhibited by the anti-oxidant, Trolox, as well as the presence of Ca2+ chelators in the intracellular and extracellular media. This suggests that the nsPEF-triggered Ca2+ increase is required for ROS generation. PMID:23680664

  11. Effect of focused ultrasound stimulation at different ultrasonic power levels on the local field potential power spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yi; Lu, Cheng-Biao; Li, Xiao-Li

    2015-08-01

    Local field potential (LFP) signals of the rat hippocampus were recorded under noninvasive focused ultrasound stimulation (FUS) with different ultrasonic powers. The LFP mean absolute power was calculated with the Welch algorithm at the delta, theta, alpha, beta, and gamma frequency bands. The experimental results demonstrate that the LFP mean absolute power at different frequency bands increases as the ultrasound power increases. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61273063), China Postdoctoral Science Foundation (Grant No. 2013M540215), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hebei Province, China (Grant No. F2014203161).

  12. Development and clinical translation of OTIS: a wide-field OCT imaging device for ex-vivo tissue characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munro, Elizabeth A.; Rempel, David; Danner, Christine; Atchia, Yaaseen; Valic, Michael S.; Berkeley, Andrew; Davoudi, Bahar; Magnin, Paul A.; Akens, Margarete; Done, Susan J.; Kulkarni, Supriya; Leong, Wey-Liang; Wilson, Brian C.

    2016-03-01

    We have developed an automated, wide-field optical coherence tomography (OCT)-based imaging device (OTISTM Perimeter Medical Imaging) for peri-operative, ex-vivo tissue imaging. This device features automated image acquisition, enabling rapid capture of high-resolution (15 μm) OCT images from samples up to 10 cm in diameter. We report on the iterative progression of device development from phantom and pre-clinical (tumor xenograft) models through to initial clinical results. We discuss the challenges associated with proving a novel imaging technology against the clinical "gold standard" of conventional post-operative pathology.

  13. The optimal conditions for the correlation of object pulse temporary form with the stimulated photon echo response in the presence of external spatial inhomogeneous electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garnaeva, G. I.; Nefediev, L. A.; Hakimzyanova, E. I.; Nefedieva, K. L.

    2014-08-01

    The influence of external spatially inhomogeneous electric fields on the reproducibility of the information and effectiveness of stimulated photon echo responses locking at different encoding information in the object laser pulses are investigated.

  14. Enlargement of the receptive field size to low intensity mechanical stimulation in the rat spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, R; Kontinen, V K; Matthews, E; Williams, E; Dickenson, A H

    2000-06-01

    One characteristic of plasticity after peripheral tissue or nerve damage is receptive field reorganization, and enlargement of receptive field size has been suggested to occur in certain models of neuropathic pain. The aim of the present study was to explore whether enlargement of neuronal receptive fields could contribute to the mechanical allodynia found on the ipsilateral paw in the spinal nerve ligation model of neuropathy. After ligation of L(5)-L(6) spinal nerves, all rats developed behavioral signs of mechanical allodynia, while the sham-operated control group displayed no such changes. The characteristics of the evoked responses of the neurones recorded in the dorsal horn of the rats were similar between the spinal nerve ligation, the sham operated control group, and the nonoperated control group, except for spontaneous activity, which was significantly increased in the spinal nerve ligation group. The mean size of the receptive field on the ipsilateral hindpaw, mapped using low-intensity stimulation with 9-g von Frey hair, was significantly increased in the spinal nerve ligation group, as compared to the sham-operated group. No significant difference was seen with 15- or 75-g von Frey hairs. The distribution of the receptive fields over the plantar surface of the paw was similar between the study groups. The enlargement of receptive field for non-noxious touch could be an indication of central sensitization in this model.

  15. Calculated spinal cord electric fields and current densities for possible neurite regrowth from quasi-DC electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Greenebaum, Ben

    2015-12-01

    The prime goal of this work was to model essentially steady (DC) fields from electrodes, implanted in several ways, which have been suggested as possible means to encourage nerve fiber regrowth in spinal cord injuries. A simplified model of the human spinal cord in the lumbar region and the SEMCAD-X computer program were used to calculate electric field and current density patterns from electrodes outside vertebrae and those inserted extradurally within the spinal canal. DC electric fields guide nerve growth in developing organisms and in vitro. They also have been shown to encourage healing of injured peripheral nerves, and application of a longitudinal field has been used in attempts to bridge spinal cord injuries. When calculated results are scaled to the experimental level used in the literature, all modeled electrodes produced fields in the spinal cord below fields needed in the literature for stimulation of spinal as well as peripheral nerve growth in vitro, in dogs, and in a published clinical human trial. The highly-conducting cerebrospinal fluid appeared to provide effective shielding; there was also a very high degree of polarization at electrodes.

  16. The signaling of amitriptyline-induced inhibitory effect on electrical field stimulation response in colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zaw, Tin Sandar; Khin, Phyu Phyu; Sohn, Uy Dong

    2016-09-01

    Amitriptyline, a well-known antidepressant, exerts inhibitory effect on electrically stimulated rat colon smooth muscle contraction. In this study, we investigated the signaling pathway of amitriptyline-induced inhibitory effect. Changes in isometric force of colon muscle were recorded on polygraph, and data were analyzed by measuring the inhibitory extent induced by amitriptyline. Firstly, muscles were contracted by stimulation with electric field stimulation (EFS), and then, amitriptyline was added cumulatively to determine its influence effect on EFS. Amitriptyline significantly inhibited EFS-induced contraction dose dependently. Then, the mechanism of inhibitory effect of amitriptyline was evaluated by pretreating with various antagonists such as L-NAME, methylene blue, atropine, 5-HT receptors blockers, guanethidine, prazosin, guanabenz, isoprenaline, Y27632 (Rho-kinase inhibitor), ML9 (myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor), U73122 (PLC inhibitor), and chelerythrine (PKC inhibitor). Then, Ca(2+) channel blocker (nifedipine) and K(+)channel blockers, tetraethylammonium (TEA), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), and glybenclamide, were used to determine the involvement of ion channels. L-NAME, guanabenz, 5HT4 receptor blocker, ML9, and Y27632 enhanced the effect of amitriptyline. Meanwhile, methylene blue, atropine, guanethidine, prazosin, methylsergide, ondansetron, U73122, and chelerythrine blocked its effect. It was also shown that nifedipine enhanced but TEA and glybenclamide blocked amitriptyline-induced inhibitory effect on EFS. Our results indicated that amitriptyline may exert inhibitory effect in response to EFS by inhibiting muscarinic receptors and then PLC-mediated PKC pathway leading to opening of ATP-sensitive potassium channel.

  17. Changes in NGF/c-Fos colocalization in specific limbic structures of juvenile and aged rats after open field stimulation.

    PubMed

    Badowska-Szalewska, E; Klejbor, I; Cecot, T; Domaradzka-Pytel, B; Ludkiewicz, B; Moryś, J

    2009-08-01

    Changes in NGF release during stressful events have been associated with the activation of neurons expressing NGF receptors. This study examined the influence of acute stress-induced stimulation on NGF/c-Fos colocalization in the following limbic regions: the paraventricular (PV) nucleus of the hypothalamus, medial (MeA) nucleus of the amygdala, and CA3 hippocampus. Juvenile (P21) and aged rats (P360) were exposed to a 15-minute acute open field (OF) test. Double immunofluorescence staining, used to detect NGF-ir and c-Fos-ir cells, revealed a higher percentage of NGF/c-Fos-ir neurons in the P21 control group than in the P360 control group. Under OF acute stimulation, a statistically significant (p < 0.05) increase of NGF/c-Fos level in CA3 of juvenile animals and in PV and CA3 of the aged rats was observed. These observations indicate that the investigated structures in both age groups show a different response to acute OF stimulation. Acute OF affects the levels of NGF/c-Fos more significantly in aged rats.

  18. Intense-field-stimulated multiphoton transitions in a two-level system

    SciTech Connect

    Milman, Perola; Zagury, Nicim

    2011-11-15

    We study the interaction of an intense classical field with a two-level system coupled to a bosonic quantized field. We focus on the regime where the classical field and the two-level system characteristic frequencies are the same, while the quantized mode is set off resonance with both. We show that a parameter governing the dynamics of the system is the ratio between the classical field's intensity and the quantized mode detuning. Depending on this parameter, multiple excitations can be created in the quantized mode in a single cycle of the two-level system. Examples of physical setups allowing for the application of the presented ideas are superconducting circuits in strip-line resonators, laser cooled trapped ions, and neutral atoms coupled to the quantized field of a cavity. We focus on the latter in order to show that, with realistic experimental parameters, it is possible to generate up to four photons in a single Rabi cycle.

  19. 3D printing of soft lithography mold for rapid production of polydimethylsiloxane-based microfluidic devices for cell stimulation with concentration gradients.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Mashimo, Yasumasa; Koyama, Yoshie; Fockenberg, Christopher; Nakashima, Miyuki; Nakajima, Minako; Li, Junjun; Chen, Yong

    2015-04-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is advantageous over conventional technologies for the fabrication of sophisticated structures such as 3D micro-channels for future applications in tissue engineering and drug screening. We aimed to apply this technology to cell-based assays using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the most commonly used material for fabrication of micro-channels used for cell culture experiments. Useful properties of PDMS include biocompatibility, gas permeability and transparency. We developed a simple and robust protocol to generate PDMS-based devices using a soft lithography mold produced by 3D printing. 3D chemical gradients were then generated to stimulate cells confined to a micro-channel. We demonstrate that concentration gradients of growth factors, important regulators of cell/tissue functions in vivo, influence the survival and growth of human embryonic stem cells. Thus, this approach for generation of 3D concentration gradients could have strong implications for tissue engineering and drug screening.

  20. Paper analytical devices for fast field screening of beta lactam antibiotics and anti-tuberculosis pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Abigail A.; Reiser, Hannah; Barstis, Toni; Benvenuti, Michael; Ghosh, Debarati; Hunckler, Michael; Joy, Brittney; Koenig, Leah; Raddell, Kellie; Lieberman, Marya

    2013-01-01

    Reports of low quality pharmaceuticals have been on the rise in the last decade with the greatest prevalence of substandard medicines in developing countries, where lapses in manufacturing quality control or breaches in the supply chain allow substandard medicines to reach the marketplace. Here, we describe inexpensive test cards for fast field screening of pharmaceutical dosage forms containing beta lactam antibiotics or combinations of the four first-line antituberculosis (TB) drugs. The devices detect the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) ampicillin, amoxicillin, rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide, and also screen for substitute pharmaceuticals such as acetaminophen and chloroquine that may be found in counterfeit pharmaceuticals. The tests can detect binders and fillers like chalk, talc, and starch not revealed by traditional chromatographic methods. These paper devices contain twelve lanes, separated by hydrophobic barriers, with different reagents deposited in the lanes. The user rubs some of the solid pharmaceutical across the lanes and dips the edge of the paper into water. As water climbs up the lanes by capillary action, it triggers a library of different chemical tests and a timer to indicate when the tests are completed. The reactions in each lane generate colors to form a “color bar code” which can be analyzed visually by comparison to standard outcomes. While quantification of the APIs is poor compared to conventional analytical methods, the sensitivity and selectivity for the analytes is high enough to pick out suspicious formulations containing no API or a substitute API, as well as formulations containing APIs that have been “cut” with inactive ingredients. PMID:23725012

  1. Development of rotating magnetic field coil system in the HIST spherical torus device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, T.; Kikuchi, Y.; Yamada, S.; Hashimoto, S.; Nishioka, T.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2007-11-01

    Coaxial Helicity Injection (CHI) is one of most attractive methods to achieve non-inductive current drive in spherical torus devices. The current drive mechanism of CHI relies on MHD relaxation process of rotating kink behavior [1], so that there is a possibility to control the CHI by using an externally applied rotating magnetic field (RMF). We have recently started to develop a RMF coil system in the HIST spherical torus device. Eight coils are located above and below the midplane at four toroidal locations so that the RMF is resonant with n = 1 rotating kink mode driven by the CHI. In addition, the RMF coil set is installed inside a flux conserver of 5 mm thickness (cut-off frequency ˜ 170 Hz) so that the RMF penetrates into the plasma. The coil winding is made of 20 turns of enameled copper circular wires (1.5 mm^2 conductor cross section), covered with a thin stainless steal case of 0.5 mm thickness (cut-off frequency ˜ 710 kHz). The RMF system is driven by an IGBT inverter power supply (nominal current: 1 kA, nominal voltage: 1 kV) with an operating frequency band from 10 kHz to 30 kHz. The estimated amplitude of RMF neglecting effects of image current at the flux conserver is a few tens Gauss at around the magnetic axis. A preliminary experimental result will be shown in the conference. [1] M. Nagata, et al., Physics of Plasmas 10, 2932 (2003).

  2. Paper analytical devices for fast field screening of beta lactam antibiotics and antituberculosis pharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Abigail A; Reiser, Hannah; Barstis, Toni; Benvenuti, Michael; Ghosh, Debarati; Hunckler, Michael; Joy, Brittney; Koenig, Leah; Raddell, Kellie; Lieberman, Marya

    2013-07-02

    Reports of low-quality pharmaceuticals have been on the rise in the past decade, with the greatest prevalence of substandard medicines in developing countries, where lapses in manufacturing quality control or breaches in the supply chain allow substandard medicines to reach the marketplace. Here, we describe inexpensive test cards for fast field screening of pharmaceutical dosage forms containing beta lactam antibiotics or combinations of the four first-line antituberculosis (TB) drugs. The devices detect the active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) ampicillin, amoxicillin, rifampicin, isoniazid, ethambutol, and pyrazinamide and also screen for substitute pharmaceuticals, such as acetaminophen and chloroquine that may be found in counterfeit pharmaceuticals. The tests can detect binders and fillers such as chalk, talc, and starch not revealed by traditional chromatographic methods. These paper devices contain 12 lanes, separated by hydrophobic barriers, with different reagents deposited in the lanes. The user rubs some of the solid pharmaceutical across the lanes and dips the edge of the paper into water. As water climbs up the lanes by capillary action, it triggers a library of different chemical tests and a timer to indicate when the tests are completed. The reactions in each lane generate colors to form a "color bar code" which can be analyzed visually by comparison with standard outcomes. Although quantification of the APIs is poor compared with conventional analytical methods, the sensitivity and selectivity for the analytes is high enough to pick out suspicious formulations containing no API or a substitute API as well as formulations containing APIs that have been "cut" with inactive ingredients.

  3. Effect of the number of pins and inter-pin distance on somatosensory evoked magnetic fields following mechanical tactile stimulation.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideaki; Sugawara, Kazuhiro; Yamashiro, Koya; Sato, Daisuke; Suzuki, Makoto; Kirimoto, Hikari; Tamaki, Hiroyuki; Murakami, Hiroatsu; Kameyama, Shigeki

    2013-10-16

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) recordings were collected to investigate the effect of the number of mechanical pins and inter-pin distance on somatosensory evoked magnetic fields (SEFs) following mechanical stimulation (MS). We used a 306-ch whole-head MEG system. SEFs were elicited through tactile stimuli with 1-, 2-, 3-, 4- and 8-pins using healthy participants. Tactile stimuli were applied to the tip of the right index finger. SEF following electrical stimulation of the index finger was recorded in order to compare the activity in the primary somatosensory cortex (S1) following MS. Prominent SEFs were recorded from the contralateral hemisphere approximately 54 ms (P50m) and 125 ms (P100m) after MS regardless of the number of pins. Equivalent current dipoles were located in the S1. The source activities for P50m and P100m significantly increased in tandem with the number of pins for MS. However, the increased ratios for the source activities according to the increase in the number of pins were significantly smaller than that induced by electrical stimulation, and when the number of the pins doubled from 1-pin to 2-pins, from 2-pins to 4-pins, and from 4-pins to 8-pins, S1 activities increased by only 130%. Additionally, source activities significantly increased when the inter-pin distance increased from 2.4 to 7.2 mm. The number of stimulated receptors was considered to have increased with an increase in the inter-pin distance as well as an increase in the number of pins. These findings clarified the effect of the number of pins and inter-pin distance for MS on SEFs.

  4. Development of a Compact Rectenna for Wireless Powering of a Head-Mountable Deep Brain Stimulation Device

    PubMed Central

    Kouzani, Abbas Z.; Tye, Susannah J.; Abulseoud, Osama A.; Amiet, Andrew; Galehdar, Amir; Kaynak, Akif; Berk, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Design of a rectangular spiral planar inverted-F antenna (PIFA) at 915 MHz for wireless power transmission applications is proposed. The antenna and rectifying circuitry form a rectenna, which can produce dc power from a distant radio frequency energy transmitter. The generated dc power is used to operate a low-power deep brain stimulation pulse generator. The proposed antenna has the dimensions of 10 mm \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\times\\,$ \\end{document}12.5 mm \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\times\\,$ \\end{document}1.5 mm and resonance frequency of 915 MHz with a measured bandwidth of 15 MHz at return loss of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}${-}{\\rm 10}~{\\rm dB}$ \\end{document}. A dielectric substrate of FR-4 of \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\varepsilon _{r}=4.8$ \\end{document} and \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{upgreek} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} }{}$\\delta=0.015$ \\end{document} with thickness of 1.5 mm is used for both antenna and rectifier

  5. Situated Learning in the Mobile Age: Mobile Devices on a Field Trip to the Sea

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeiffer, Vanessa D. I.; Gemballa, Sven; Jarodzka, Halszka; Scheiter, Katharina; Gerjets, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This study focuses on learning about fish biodiversity via mobile devices in a situated learning scenario. Mobile devices do not only facilitate relating the presented information to the real world in a direct way; they also allow the provision of dynamic representations on demand. This study asks whether mobile devices are suited to support…

  6. Theoretical model of DC electric field formation in the ionosphere stimulated by seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, V. M.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Yaschenko, A. K.

    2005-09-01

    Seismic activity is accompanied by emanation of soil gases into the atmosphere. These gases transfer positive and negative charged aerosols. Atmospheric convection of charged aerosols forms external electric current, which works as a source of perturbation in the atmosphere ionosphere electric circuit. It is shown that DC electric field generated in the ionosphere by this current reaches up to 10 mV/m, while the long-term vertical electric field disturbances near the Earth's surface do not exceed 100 V/m. Such a limitation of the near-ground field is caused by the formation of potential barrier for charged particles at the Earth's surface in a process of their transport from soil to atmosphere. This paper presents the method for calculation of the electric field in the atmosphere and the ionosphere generated by given distribution of external electric current in the atmosphere.

  7. The effect of inter-electrode distance on the electric field distribution during transcutaneous lumbar spinal cord direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Rui; Fernandes, Sofia R; Salvador, Ricardo; Wenger, Cornelia; de Carvalho, Mamede A; Miranda, Pedro C; Bastos, Rui; Fernandes, Sofia R; Salvador, Ricardo; Wenger, Cornelia; de Carvalho, Mamede A; Miranda, Pedro C; Miranda, Pedro C; Bastos, Rui; Wenger, Cornelia; Salvador, Ricardo; de Carvalho, Mamede A; Fernandes, Sofia R

    2016-08-01

    Previous studies have indicated potential neuromodulation of the spinal circuitry by transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS), such as changes in motor unit recruitment, shortening of the peripheral silent period and interference with supraspinal input to lower motor neurons. All of these effects were dependent on the polarity of the electrodes. The present study investigates how the distance between the electrodes during tsDCS influences the electric field's (E-field) spatial distribution in the lumbar and sacral spinal cord (SC). The electrodes were placed longitudinally along the SC, with the target electrode over the lumbar spine, and the return electrode above the former, considering four different distances (4, 8, 12 and 16 cm from the target). A fifth configuration was also tested with the return electrode over the right deltoid muscle. Peak values of the E-field's magnitude are found in the lumbo-sacral region of the SC for all tested configurations. Increasing the distance between the electrodes results in a wider spread of the E-field magnitude distribution along the SC, with larger maximum peak values and a smoother variation. The fifth configuration does not present the highest maximum values when compared to the other configurations. The results indicate that the choice of the return electrode position relative to the target can influence the distribution and the range of values of the E-field magnitude in the SC. Possible clinical significance of the observed effects will be discussed.

  8. Patient-specific models of deep brain stimulation: Influence of field model complexity on neural activation predictions

    PubMed Central

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Butson, Christopher R.; Lempka, Scott F.; Cooper, Scott E.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2010-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become the surgical therapy of choice for medically intractable Parkinson’s disease. However, quantitative understanding of the interaction between the electric field generated by DBS and the underlying neural tissue is limited. Recently, computational models of varying levels of complexity have been used to study the neural response to DBS. The goal of this study was to evaluate the quantitative impact of incrementally incorporating increasing levels of complexity into computer models of STN DBS. Our analysis focused on the direct activation of experimentally measureable fiber pathways within the internal capsule (IC). Our model system was customized to an STN DBS patient and stimulation thresholds for activation of IC axons were calculated with electric field models that ranged from an electrostatic, homogenous, isotropic model to one that explicitly incorporated the voltage-drop and capacitance of the electrode-electrolyte interface, tissue encapsulation of the electrode, and diffusion-tensor based 3D tissue anisotropy and inhomogeneity. The model predictions were compared to experimental IC activation defined from electromyographic (EMG) recordings from eight different muscle groups in the contralateral arm and leg of the STN DBS patient. Coupled evaluation of the model and experimental data showed that the most realistic predictions of axonal thresholds were achieved with the most detailed model. Furthermore, the more simplistic neurostimulation models substantially overestimated the spatial extent of neural activation. PMID:20607090

  9. Electric field estimation of deep transcranial magnetic stimulation clinically used for the treatment of neuropsychiatric disorders in anatomical head models.

    PubMed

    Parazzini, Marta; Fiocchi, Serena; Chiaramello, Emma; Roth, Yiftach; Zangen, Abraham; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2017-02-21

    Literature studies showed the ability to treat neuropsychiatric disorders using H1 coil, developed for the deep Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (dTMS). Despite the positive results of the clinical studies, the electric field (E) distributions inside the brain induced by this coil when it is positioned on the scalp according to the clinical studies themselves are not yet precisely estimated. This study aims to characterize the E distributions due to the H1 coil in the brain of two realistic human models by computational electromagnetic techniques and to compare them with the ones due to the figure-of-8 coil, traditionally used in TMS and positioned as such to simulate the clinical experiments. Despite inter-individual differences, our results show that the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex is the region preferentially stimulated by both H1 and figure-of-8 coil when they are placed in the position on the scalp according to the clinical studies, with a more broad and non-focal distribution in the case of H1 coil. Moreover, the H1 coil spreads more than the figure-of-8 coil both in the prefrontal cortex and medial prefrontal cortex and towards some deeper brain structures and it is characterized by a higher penetration depth in the frontal lobe. This work highlights the importance of the knowledge of the electric field distribution in the brain tissues to interpret the outcomes of the experimental studies and to optimize the treatments.

  10. Patient-specific models of deep brain stimulation: influence of field model complexity on neural activation predictions.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Ashutosh; Butson, Christopher R; Lempka, Scott F; Cooper, Scott E; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2010-04-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become the surgical therapy of choice for medically intractable Parkinson's disease. However, quantitative understanding of the interaction between the electric field generated by DBS and the underlying neural tissue is limited. Recently, computational models of varying levels of complexity have been used to study the neural response to DBS. The goal of this study was to evaluate the quantitative impact of incrementally incorporating increasing levels of complexity into computer models of STN DBS. Our analysis focused on the direct activation of experimentally measureable fiber pathways within the internal capsule (IC). Our model system was customized to an STN DBS patient and stimulation thresholds for activation of IC axons were calculated with electric field models that ranged from an electrostatic, homogenous, isotropic model to one that explicitly incorporated the voltage-drop and capacitance of the electrode-electrolyte interface, tissue encapsulation of the electrode, and diffusion-tensor based 3D tissue anisotropy and inhomogeneity. The model predictions were compared to experimental IC activation defined from electromyographic (EMG) recordings from eight different muscle groups in the contralateral arm and leg of the STN DBS patient. Coupled evaluation of the model and experimental data showed that the most realistic predictions of axonal thresholds were achieved with the most detailed model. Furthermore, the more simplistic neurostimulation models substantially overestimated the spatial extent of neural activation.

  11. Hydraulic Stimulation of Fracture Permeability in Volcanic and Metasedimentary Rocks at the Desert Peak Geothermal Field, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, S.; Davatzes, N. C.; Zemach, E.; Stacey, R.; Drakos, P. S.; Lutz, S.; Rose, P. E.; Majer, E.; Robertson-Tait, A.

    2011-12-01

    An integrated study of fluid flow, fracturing, stress and rock mechanical properties is being conducted to develop the geomechanical framework for creating an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) through hydraulic stimulation. This stimulation is being carried out in the relatively impermeable well 27-15 located on the margins of the Desert Peak Geothermal Field, in silicified rhyolite tuffs and metamorphosed mudstones at depths of ~0.9 to 1.1 km and ambient temperatures of ~180 to 195° C. Extensive drilling-induced tensile fractures seen in image logs from well 27-15 indicate that the direction of the minimum horizontal principal stress, Shmin, is 114±17°. This orientation is consistent with normal faulting on ESE- and WNW-dipping normal faults also seen in these image logs. A hydraulic fracturing stress test conducted at 931 m indicates that the magnitude of Shmin is 13.8 MPa, which is ~0.61 of the calculated vertical stress, Sv. Coulomb failure calculations using these stresses and friction coefficients measured on core indicate that shear failure should be induced on pre-existing fractures once fluid pressures are increased ~2.5 MPa or more above the ambient formation fluid pressure. The resulting activation of faults well-oriented for shear failure should generate a zone of enhanced permeability propagating to the SSW, in the direction of nearby geothermal injection and production wells, and to the NNE, into an unexploited part of the field. Stimulation of well 27-15 began in August 2010, and is being monitored by flow-rate/pressure recording, a local seismic network, periodic temperature-pressure-flowmeter logging, tracer tests and pressure transient analyses. An initial phase of shear stimulation was carried out over 110 days at low pressures (< Shmin) and low injection rates (< 380 l/min), employing stepwise increases in pressure to induce shear failure along pre-existing natural fractures. This phase increased injectivity by one order of magnitude

  12. Using the Hephaistos orthotic device to study countermeasure effectiveness of neuromuscular electrical stimulation and dietary lupin protein supplementation, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Schopen, Kathrin; Albracht, Kirsten; Gerlach, Darius A.; Frings-Meuthen, Petra; Maffiuletti, Nicola A.; Bloch, Wilhelm; Rittweger, Jörn

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The present study investigated whether neuromuscular electrical stimulation for 20 min twice a day with an electrode placed over the soleus muscle and nutritional supplementation with 19 g of protein rich lupin seeds can reduce the loss in volume and strength of the human calf musculature during long term unloading by wearing an orthotic unloading device. Methods Thirteen healthy male subjects (age of 26.4 ± 3.7 years) wore a Hephaistos orthosis one leg for 60 days during all habitual activities. The leg side was randomly chosen for every subject. Six subjects only wore the orthosis as control group, and 7 subjects additionally received the countermeasure consisting of neuromuscular electrical stimulation of the soleus and lateral gastrocnemius muscles and lupin protein supplementation. Twenty-eight days before and on the penultimate day of the intervention cross-sectional images of the calf muscles were taken by magnetic resonance imaging (controls n = 5), and maximum voluntary torque (controls n = 6) of foot plantar flexion was estimated under isometric (extended knee, 90° knee flexion) and isokinetic conditions (extended knee), respectively. Results After 58 days of wearing the orthosis the percentage loss of volume in the entire triceps surae muscle of the control subjects (-11.9 ± 4.4%, mean ± standard deviation) was reduced by the countermeasure (-3.5 ± 7.2%, p = 0.032). Wearing the orthosis generally reduced plantar flexion torques values, however, only when testing isometric contraction at 90° knee ankle the countermeasure effected a significantly lower percentage decrease of torque (-9.7 ± 7.2%, mean ± SD) in comparison with controls (-22.3 ± 11.2%, p = 0.032). Conclusion Unloading of calf musculature by an orthotic device resulted in the expected loss of muscle volume and maximum of plantar flexion torque. Neuromuscular electrical muscle stimulation and lupin protein supplementation could significantly reduce the process of atrophy. Trial

  13. Notes from the Field: Mycobacterium chimaera Contamination of Heater-Cooler Devices Used in Cardiac Surgery - United States.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Kiran M; Lawsin, Adrian; Hasan, Nabeeh A; Strong, Michael; Halpin, Alison L; Rodger, Rachael R; Moulton-Meissner, Heather; Crist, Matthew B; Schwartz, Suzanne; Marders, Julia; Daley, Charles L; Salfinger, Max; Perz, Joseph F

    2016-10-14

    In the spring of 2015, investigators in Switzerland reported a cluster of six patients with invasive infection with Mycobacterium chimaera, a species of nontuberculous mycobacterium ubiquitous in soil and water. The infected patients had undergone open-heart surgery that used contaminated heater-cooler devices during extracorporeal circulation (1). In July 2015, a Pennsylvania hospital also identified a cluster of invasive nontuberculous mycobacterial infections among open-heart surgery patients. Similar to the Swiss report, a field investigation by the Pennsylvania Department of Health, with assistance from CDC, used both epidemiologic and laboratory evidence to identify an association between invasive Mycobacterium avium complex, including M. chimaera, infections and exposure to contaminated Stöckert 3T heater-cooler devices, all manufactured by LivaNova PLC (formerly Sorin Group Deutschland GmbH) (2). M. chimaera was described as a distinct species of M. avium complex in 2004 (3). The results of the field investigation prompted notification of approximately 1,300 potentially exposed patients.* Although heater-cooler devices are used to regulate patients' blood temperature during cardiopulmonary bypass through water circuits that are closed, these reports suggest that aerosolized M. chimaera from the devices resulted in the invasive infections (1,2). The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and CDC have issued alerts regarding the need to follow updated manufacturer's instructions for use of the devices, evaluate the devices for contamination, remain vigilant for new infections, and continue to monitor reports from the United States and overseas (2).

  14. Growth stimulation of biological cells and tissue by electromagnetic fields and uses thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides systems for growing two or three dimensional mammalian cells within a culture medium facilitated by an electromagnetic field, and preferably, a time varying electromagnetic field. The cells and culture medium are contained within a fixed or rotating culture vessel, and the electromagnetic field is emitted from at least one electrode. In one embodiment, the electrode is spaced from the vessel. The invention further provides methods to promote neural tissue regeneration by means of culturing the neural cells in the claimed system. In one embodiment, neuronal cells are grown within longitudinally extending tissue strands extending axially along and within electrodes comprising electrically conductive channels or guides through which a time varying electrical current is conducted, the conductive channels being positioned within a culture medium.

  15. Growth Stimulation of Biological Cells and Tissue by Electromagnetic Fields and Uses Thereof

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides systems for growing two or three dimensional mammalian cells within a culture medium facilitated by an electromagnetic field, and preferably, a time varying electromagnetic field. The cells, and culture medium are contained within a fixed or rotating culture vessel, and the electromagnetic field is emitted from at least one electrode. In one embodiment, the electrode is spaced from the vessel. The invention further provides methods to promote neural tissue regeneration by means of culturing the neural cells in the claimed system. In one embodiment, neuronal cells are grown within longitudinally extending tissue strands extending axially along and within electrodes comprising electrically conductive channels or guides through which a time varying electrical current is conducted, the conductive channels being positioned within a culture medium.

  16. Active control of near-field coupling in conductively coupled microelectromechanical system metamaterial devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitchappa, Prakash; Manjappa, Manukumara; Ho, Chong Pei; Qian, You; Singh, Ranjan; Singh, Navab; Lee, Chengkuo

    2016-03-01

    We experimentally report a structurally reconfigurable metamaterial for active switching of near-field coupling in conductively coupled, orthogonally twisted split ring resonators (SRRs) operating in the terahertz spectral region. Out-of-plane reconfigurable microcantilevers integrated into the dark SRR geometry are used to provide active frequency tuning of dark SRR resonance. The geometrical parameters of individual SRRs are designed to have identical inductive-capacitive resonant frequency. This allows for the excitation of classical analogue of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) due to the strong conductive coupling between the SRRs. When the microcantilevers are curved up, the resonant frequency of dark SRR blue-shifts and the EIT peak is completely modulated while the SRRs are still conductively connected. EIT modulation contrast of ˜50% is experimentally achieved with actively switchable group delay of ˜2.5 ps. Electrical control, miniaturized size, and readily integrable fabrication process of the proposed structurally reconfigurable metamaterial make it an ideal candidate for the realization of various terahertz communication devices such as electrically controllable terahertz delay lines, buffers, and tunable data-rate channels.

  17. Model-based analysis of a dielectrophoretic microfluidic device for field-flow fractionation.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Bobby; Alazzam, Anas; Abutayeh, Mohammad; Stiharu, Ion

    2016-08-01

    We present the development of a dynamic model for predicting the trajectory of microparticles in microfluidic devices, employing dielectrophoresis, for Hyperlayer field-flow fractionation. The electrode configuration is such that multiple finite-sized electrodes are located on the top and bottom walls of the microchannel; the electrodes on the walls are aligned with each other. The electric potential inside the microchannel is described using the Laplace equation while the microparticles' trajectory is described using equations based on Newton's second law. All equations are solved using finite difference method. The equations of motion account for forces including inertia, buoyancy, drag, gravity, virtual mass, and dielectrophoresis. The model is used for parametric study; the geometric parameters analyzed include microparticle radius, microchannel depth, and electrode/spacing lengths while volumetric flow rate and actuation voltage are the two operating parameters considered in the study. The trajectory of microparticles is composed of transient and steady state phases; the trajectory is influenced by all parameters. Microparticle radius and volumetric flow rate, above the threshold, do not influence the steady state levitation height; microparticle levitation is not possible below the threshold of the volumetric flow rate. Microchannel depth, electrode/spacing lengths, and actuation voltage influence the steady-state levitation height.

  18. Community-Based Trial of Peripheral Prism Visual Field Expansion Device for Hemianopia

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Alex R.; Keeney, Karen; Peli, Eli

    2007-01-01

    Background Peripheral prism glasses, a novel visual field expansion device for hemianopia, showed promise in early, small-sample evaluations. Objective To determine functionality of the glasses for general mobility in a larger-scale, community-based, multi-center study with longer-term follow up. Methods Forty-three participants with homonymous hemianopia were fitted with temporary press-on™ Fresnel (40 prism diopter) peripheral prism segments. Follow up questionnaires, evaluating functional benefits for mobility, were administered in-office at week 6. Participants who continued wearing the prisms were interviewed again by telephone after 12 months (median). Primary outcome measures included: clinical success (a clinical decision to continue wear) and 5-point ratings of prism-helpfulness for obstacle avoidance when walking. Results Thirty-two participants (74%) continued prism-wear at week 6, and 20 (47%) were still wearing prisms after 12 months (8 hours per day ) rating the prism glasses as “very helpful” for obstacle avoidance and reporting significant benefits for obstacle avoidance in a variety of mobility situations. Success rates varied among clinic groups (27% to 81%), with higher rates at the clinics that fitted more patients. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the functional utility of peripheral prism glasses as a general mobility aid for hemianopic patients. PMID:18474776

  19. Device Model for Organic Semiconductor Light-Emitting Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Darryl; Ruden, P. Paul

    2007-03-01

    Recent experiments demonstrate ambipolar channel conduction and light generation in polymer field effect transistors (FETs).^1,2 In the ambipolar mode of operation, the gate potential lies between those of the source and drain contacts, hence electrons are injected from one of these contacts and holes from the other. The carriers recombine in channel regions where both types of carriers are present, and the location of the resulting light emission is controlled by the voltages applied to the terminals. We describe a device model for ambipolar organic FETs based on the gradual channel approximation. Trapping of injected carriers in localized states within the polymer energy gap is shown to be important. A non-linear differential equation for the channel potential is derived and solved numerically. Carrier density and recombination profiles are determined. The calculations are in good agreement with experimental data^1,2. 1) J.S. Swensen, C. Soci, and A.J. Heeger, Appl. Phys. Lett. 87, 253511 (2005). 2) J. Zaumseil, R.H. Friend, and H. Sirringhaus, Nature Materials 5, 69 (2006).

  20. RF Power and Magnetic Field Modulation Experiments with Simple Mirror Geometry in the Central Cell of Hanbit Device

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.G.; Bak, J.G.; Jhang, H.G.; Kim, S.S.

    2005-01-15

    The radio frequency (RF) stabilization effects to investigate the characteristics of the interchange instability by RF power and magnetic field modulation experiments were performed near {omega}/{omega}{sub i} {approx} = 1 and with low beta ({approx} 0.1%) plasmas in the central cell of the Hanbit mirror device. Temporal behaviors of the interchange mode were measured and analyzed when the interchange mode was triggered by sudden changes of the RF power and magnetic field intensity.

  1. Portable low-cost devices for videotaping, editing, and displaying field-sequential stereoscopic motion pictures and video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starks, Michael R.

    1990-09-01

    A variety of low cost devices for capturing, editing and displaying field sequential 60 cycle stereoscopic video have recently been marketed by 3D TV Corp. and others. When properly used, they give very high quality images with most consumer and professional equipment. Our stereoscopic multiplexers for creating and editing field sequential video in NTSC or component(SVHS, Betacain, RGB) and Home 3D Theater system employing LCD eyeglasses have made 3D movies and television available to a large audience.

  2. Field-effect and frequency dependent transport in semiconductor-enriched single-wall carbon nanotube network device.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manu; Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Wang, Wei; Sun, Ya-Ping; Menon, Reghu

    2009-11-01

    The electrical and optical response of a field-effect device comprising a network of semiconductor-enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes, gated with sodium chloride solution is investigated. Field-effect is demonstrated in a device that uses facile fabrication techniques along with a small-ion as the gate electrolyte-and this is accomplished as a result of the semiconductor enhancement of the tubes. The optical transparency and electrical resistance of the device are modulated with gate voltage. A time-response study of the modulation of optical transparency and electrical resistance upon application of gate voltage suggests the percolative charge transport in the network. Also the ac response in the network is investigated as a function of frequency and temperature down to 5 K. An empirical relation between onset frequency and temperature is determined.

  3. Co thickness dependence of structural and magnetic properties in spin quantum cross devices utilizing stray magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiju, H. Kasa, H.; Mori, S.; Misawa, T.; Abe, T.; Nishii, J.; Komine, T.

    2015-05-07

    We investigate the Co thickness dependence of the structural and magnetic properties of Co thin-film electrodes sandwiched between borate glasses in spin quantum cross (SQC) devices that utilize stray magnetic fields. We also calculate the Co thickness dependence of the stray field between the two edges of Co thin-film electrodes in SQC devices using micromagnetic simulation. The surface roughness of Co thin films with a thickness of less than 20 nm on borate glasses is shown to be as small as 0.18 nm, at the same scanning scale as the Co film thickness, and the squareness of the hysteresis loop is shown to be as large as 0.96–1.0. As a result of the establishment of polishing techniques for Co thin-film electrodes sandwiched between borate glasses, we successfully demonstrate the formation of smooth Co edges and the generation of stray magnetic fields from Co edges. Theoretical calculation reveals that a strong stray field beyond 6 kOe is generated when the Co thickness is greater than 10 nm at a junction gap distance of 5 nm. From these experimental and calculation results, it can be concluded that SQC devices with a Co thickness of 10–20 nm can be expected to function as spin-filter devices.

  4. High-intensity static magnetic field exposure devices for in vitro experiments on biopharmaceutical plant factories in aerospace environments.

    PubMed

    Lopresto, Vanni; Merla, Caterina; Pinto, Rosanna; Benvenuto, Eugenio

    2015-08-01

    Three high-intensity static magnetic field (SMF) exposure devices have been designed and realized for application to in vitro experimental research on hairy root cultures, supposed to grow in extreme environments- as those of space aircrafts- for producing biopharmaceutical molecules. The devices allow the exposure at two different levels of induction magnetic (B) field (250 mT and 500 mT) plus sham for blind exposure. The exposure levels can be considered representative of possible B-fields experienced within the habitat of a spacecraft in presence of active magnetic shielding systems. Each device can house a single 85-mm diameter Petri dish. Numerical simulations have been performed to accurately evaluate the B-field distribution in the biological target. Numerical results have been confirmed by measured data, proving that designed setups allows exposure to SMFs with a homogeneity better than 90%. The exposure devices will be employed for experiments scheduled within BIOxTREME research project, funded by the Italian Space Agency (ASI).

  5. An Adjustable Gas-Mixing Device to Increase Feasibility of In Vitro Culture of Plasmodium falciparum Parasites in the Field

    PubMed Central

    Volkman, Sarah K.; Ahouidi, Ambroise D.; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wirth, Dyann F.

    2014-01-01

    A challenge to conducting high-impact and reproducible studies of the mechanisms of P. falciparum drug resistance, invasion, virulence, and immunity is the lack of robust and sustainable in vitro culture in the field. While the technology exists and is routinely utilized in developed countries, various factors–from cost, to supply, to quality–make it hard to implement in malaria endemic countries. Here, we design and rigorously evaluate an adjustable gas-mixing device for the in vitro culture of P. falciparum parasites in the field to circumvent this challenge. The device accurately replicates the gas concentrations needed to culture laboratory isolates, short-term adapted field isolates, cryopreserved previously non-adapted isolates, as well as to adapt ex vivo isolates to in vitro culture in the field. We also show an advantage over existing alternatives both in cost and in supply. Furthermore, the adjustable nature of the device makes it an ideal tool for many applications in which varied gas concentrations could be critical to culture success. This adjustable gas-mixing device will dramatically improve the feasibility of in vitro culture of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in malaria endemic countries given its numerous advantages. PMID:24603696

  6. An adjustable gas-mixing device to increase feasibility of in vitro culture of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in the field.

    PubMed

    Bei, Amy K; Patel, Saurabh D; Volkman, Sarah K; Ahouidi, Ambroise D; Ndiaye, Daouda; Mboup, Souleymane; Wirth, Dyann F

    2014-01-01

    A challenge to conducting high-impact and reproducible studies of the mechanisms of P. falciparum drug resistance, invasion, virulence, and immunity is the lack of robust and sustainable in vitro culture in the field. While the technology exists and is routinely utilized in developed countries, various factors-from cost, to supply, to quality-make it hard to implement in malaria endemic countries. Here, we design and rigorously evaluate an adjustable gas-mixing device for the in vitro culture of P. falciparum parasites in the field to circumvent this challenge. The device accurately replicates the gas concentrations needed to culture laboratory isolates, short-term adapted field isolates, cryopreserved previously non-adapted isolates, as well as to adapt ex vivo isolates to in vitro culture in the field. We also show an advantage over existing alternatives both in cost and in supply. Furthermore, the adjustable nature of the device makes it an ideal tool for many applications in which varied gas concentrations could be critical to culture success. This adjustable gas-mixing device will dramatically improve the feasibility of in vitro culture of Plasmodium falciparum parasites in malaria endemic countries given its numerous advantages.

  7. The Development and Study of Molecular Electronic Switches and their Field-Effect Transistor (FET) Device Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-27

    fabrication of nanostructures can serve as building blocks for molecular switching devices, organic light - emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic, field...a class of highly thermostable n-type semiconductors and have been used as building blocks for organic light - emitting diodes , light - harvesting...electrochromatic materials, light - emitting diodes (LEDs), and photovoltaic and solar cells applications. This project will secure funding to establish

  8. Effect of the application of an electric field on the performance of a two-phase loop device: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creatini, F.; Di Marco, P.; Filippeschi, S.; Fioriti, D.; Mameli, M.

    2015-11-01

    In the last decade, the continuous development of electronics has pointed out the need for a change in mind with regard to thermal management. In the present scenario, Pulsating Heat Pipes (PHPs) are novel promising two-phase passive heat transport devices that seem to meet all present and future thermal requirements. Nevertheless, PHPs governing phenomena are quite unique and not completely understood. In particular, single closed loop PHPs manifest several drawbacks, mostly related to the reduction of device thermal performance and reliability, i.e. the occurrence of multiple operational quasi-steady states. The present research work proposes the application of an electric field as a technique to promote the circulation of the working fluid in a preferential direction and stabilize the device operation. The tested single closed loop PHP is made of a copper tube with an inner tube diameter equal to 2.00 mm and filled with pure ethanol (60% filling ratio). The electric field is generated by a couple of wire-shaped electrodes powered with DC voltage up to 20 kV and laid parallel to the longitudinal axis of the glass tube constituting the adiabatic section. Although the electric field intensity in the working fluid region is weakened both by the polarization phenomenon of the working fluid and by the interposition of the glass tube, the experimental results highlight the influence of the electric field on the device thermal performance and encourage the continuation of the research in this direction.

  9. In-situ stress and fracture characterization for planning of a hydraulic stimulation in the Desert Peak Geothermal Field, NV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hickman, S.; Davatzes, N. C.

    2009-12-01

    A suite of geophysical logs and a hydraulic fracturing stress measurement were conducted in well 27-15 in the Desert Peak Geothermal Field, Nevada, to constrain the state of stress and the geometry and relative permeability of natural fractures in preparation for development of an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) through hydraulic stimulation. Advanced Logic Technologies Borehole Televiewer (BHTV) and Schlumberger Formation MicroScanner (FMS) image logs reveal extensive drilling-induced tensile fractures, showing that the current minimum horizontal principal stress, Shmin, in the vicinity of well 27-15 is oriented 114 ± 17°. This orientation is consistent with down-dip extensional slip on a set of ESE and WNW dipping normal faults mapped at the surface. Similarly, all formations imaged in the BHTV and FMS logs include significant sub-populations of fractures that are well oriented for normal faulting given this direction of Shmin. Although the bulk permeability of the well is quite low, temperature and spinner flowmeter surveys reveal several minor flowing fractures. Some of these relatively permeable fractures are well oriented for normal faulting, in addition to fluid flow that is preferentially developed at low-angle formation boundaries. A hydraulic fracturing stress measurement conducted at the top of the intended stimulation interval (931 m) indicates that the magnitude of Shmin is 13.8 MPa, which is 0.609 of the calculated vertical (overburden) stress at this depth. Given the current water table depth (122 m below ground level), this Shmin magnitude is somewhat higher than expected for frictional failure on optimally oriented normal faults given typical laboratory measurements of sliding friction (Byerlee’s Law). Coulomb failure calculations assuming cohesionless pre-existing fractures with coefficients of friction of 0.6 or higher (consistent with Byerlee’s Law and with tests on representative core samples from nearby wells) indicate that shear

  10. Source mechanism characterization and integrated interpretation of microseismic data monitoring two hydraulic stimulations in pouce coupe field, Alberta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindholm, Garrison J.

    The study of the Pouce Coupe Field is a joint effort between the Reservoir Characterization Project (RCP) and Talisman Energy Inc. My study focuses on the hydraulic stimulation of two horizontal wells within the Montney Formation located in north-western Alberta. The Montney is an example of a modern-day tight, engineering-driven play in which recent advances in drilling of horizontal wells and hydraulic fracturing have made shale gas exploitation economical. The wells were completed in December 2008 and were part of a science driven project in which a multitude of data were collected including multicomponent seismic, microseismic, and production logs. Since this time, a number of studies have been performed by students at Colorado School of Mines to better understand the effects the completions have had on the reservoir. This thesis utilizes the microseismic data that were recorded during the stimulation of the two horizontal wells in order to understand the origin of the microseismic events themselves. The data are then used to understand and correlate to the well production. To gain insight into the source of the microseismic events, amplitude ratios of recorded seismic modes (P, Sh and Sv) for the microseismic events are studied. By fitting trends of simple end member source mechanisms (strike-slip, dip-slip, and tensile) to groups of amplitude ratio data, the events are found to be of strike-slip nature. By comparing the focal mechanisms to other independent natural fracture determination techniques (shear-wave splitting analysis, FMI log), it is shown that the source of recorded microseismic events is likely to be a portion of the shear slip along existing weak planes (fractures) within a reservoir. The technique described in this work is one that is occasionally but increasingly used but offers the opportunity to draw further information from microseismic data using results that are already part of a typical processing workflow. The microseismic events are

  11. Exposure to Static Magnetic Field Stimulates Quorum Sensing Circuit in Luminescent Vibrio Strains of the Harveyi Clade

    PubMed Central

    Talà, Adelfia; Delle Side, Domenico; Buccolieri, Giovanni; Tredici, Salvatore Maurizio; Velardi, Luciano; Paladini, Fabio; De Stefano, Mario; Nassisi, Vincenzo; Alifano, Pietro

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the evidence of electron-dense magnetic inclusions with polyhedral shape in the cytoplasm of Harveyi clade Vibrio strain PS1, a bioluminescent bacterium living in symbiosis with marine organisms, led us to investigate the behavior of this bacterium under exposure to static magnetic fields ranging between 20 and 2000 Gauss. When compared to sham-exposed, the light emission of magnetic field-exposed bacteria growing on solid medium at 18°C ±0.1°C was increased up to two-fold as a function of dose and growth phase. Stimulation of bioluminescence by magnetic field was more pronounced during the post-exponential growth and stationary phase, and was lost when bacteria were grown in the presence of the iron chelator deferoxamine, which caused disassembly of the magnetic inclusions suggesting their involvement in magnetic response. As in luminescent Vibrio spp. bioluminescence is regulated by quorum sensing, possible effects of magnetic field exposure on quorum sensing were investigated. Measurement of mRNA levels by reverse transcriptase real time-PCR demonstrated that luxR regulatory gene and luxCDABE operon coding for luciferase and fatty acid reductase complex were significantly up-regulated in magnetic field-exposed bacteria. In contrast, genes coding for a type III secretion system, whose expression was negatively affected by LuxR, were down-regulated. Up-regulation of luxR paralleled with down-regulation of small RNAs that mediate destabilization of luxR mRNA in quorum sensing signaling pathways. The results of experiments with the well-studied Vibrio campbellii strain BB120 (originally classified as Vibrio harveyi) and derivative mutants unable to synthesize autoinducers suggest that the effects of magnetic fields on quorum sensing may be mediated by AI-2, the interspecies quorum sensing signal molecule. PMID:24960170

  12. Roles of electric field and fiber structure in cardiac electric stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Knisley, S B; Trayanova, N; Aguel, F

    1999-01-01

    This study investigated roles of the variation of extracellular voltage gradient (VG) over space and cardiac fibers in production of transmembrane voltage changes (DeltaV(m)) during shocks. Eleven isolated rabbit hearts were arterially perfused with solution containing V(m)-sensitive fluorescent dye (di-4-ANEPPS). The epicardium received shocks from symmetrical or asymmetrical electrodes to produce nominally uniform or nonuniform VGs. Extracellular electric field and DeltaV(m) produced by shocks in the absolute refractory period were measured with electrodes and a laser scanner and were simulated with a bidomain computer model that incorporated the anterior left ventricular epicardial fiber field. Measurements and simulations showed that fibers distorted extracellular voltages and influenced the DeltaV(m). For both uniform and nonuniform shocks, DeltaV(m) depended primarily on second spatial derivatives of extracellular voltages, whereas the VGs played a smaller role. Thus, 1) fiber structure influences the extracellular electric field and the distribution of DeltaV(m); 2) the DeltaV(m) depend on second spatial derivatives of extracellular voltage. PMID:10465752

  13. Program to stimulate graduate training in the field of aeroacoustics. [cross correlation of flow fields of a jet-blown flap with far fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, R. S.

    1975-01-01

    An experiment is reported to cross correlate the output of hot film probes located at various points in the flow field of a jet-blown flap with the output of microphones in the acoustic far field. Fluid dynamic measurements of the flow fields of the test configuration are reported.

  14. Impact of magnetic topology on radial electric field profile in the scrape-off layer of the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.; Ida, K.; Kamiya, K.; Yoshinuma, M.; Tsuchiya, H.; Kobayashi, M.; Kawamura, G.; Ohdachi, S.; Sakakibara, S.; Watanabe, K. Y.; Hudson, S.; Feng, Y.; Yamada, I.; Yasuhara, R.; Tanaka, K.; Akiyama, T.; Morisaki, T.; The LHD Experiment Group

    2016-09-01

    The radial electric field in the plasma edge is studied in the Large Helical Device (LHD) experiments. When magnetic field lines become stochastic or open at the plasma edge and connected to the vessel, electrons are lost faster than ions along these field lines. Then, a positive electric field appears in the plasma edge. The radial electric field profile can be used to detect the effective plasma boundary. Magnetic topology is an important issue in stellarator and tokamak research because the 3D boundary has the important role of controlling MHD edge stability with respect to ELMs, and plasma detachment. Since the stochastic magnetic field layer can be controlled in the LHD by changing the preset vacuum magnetic axis, this device is a good platform to study the properties of the radial electric field that appear with the different stochastic layer width. Two magnetic configurations with different widths of the stochastic layer as simulated in vacuum are studied for low-β discharges. It has been found that a positive electric field appeared outside of the last closed flux surface. In fact the positions of the positive electric field are found in the boundary between of the stochastic layer and the scrape-off layer. To understand where is the boundary of the stochastic layer and the scrape-off layer, the magnetic field lines are analyzed statistically. The variance of the magnetic field lines in the stochastic layer is increased outwards for both configurations. However, the skewness, which means the asymmetry of the distribution of the magnetic field line, increases for only one configuration. If the skewness is large, the connection length becomes effectively short. Since that is consistent with the experimental observation, the radial electric field can be considered as an index of the magnetic topology.

  15. Formation of Stimulated Photon Echo in Three-Level Systems and Recovery of Phase Memory by External Spatially Inhomogeneous Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefediev, L. A.; Nizamova, E. I.

    2014-09-01

    The formation of stimulated photon echo is studied in three-level systems in the presence of external inhomogeneous electric fields. The ratio of the gradients of external spatially inhomogeneous electric fields required to recover the phase memory of the system is calculated. This ratio is found to correlate with the nonequidistance parameter of the spectrum of the system.

  16. Effect of magnetic field topology on quasi-stationary equilibrium, fluctuations, and flows in a simple toroidal device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Umesh; Thatipamula, Shekar G.; Ganesh, R.; Saxena, Y. C.; Raju, D.

    2016-10-01

    In a simple toroidal device, the plasma profiles and properties depend on toroidal magnetic field topology. For example, the toroidal connection length crucially controls the adiabatic or non-adiabatic nature of electron dynamics, which in turn governs the nature of instabilities, fluctuations, and transport, the latter of which governs the plasma mean profiles. We present the results of extensive experiments in a simple toroidal device obtained by controlling the mean parallel connection length L ¯ c , by application of external vertical component of magnetic field Bv, where B v ≤ 2 % of toroidal magnetic field BT. Interestingly, for nearly closed field lines, which are characterized by large values of L ¯ c , it is found that flute like coherent modes are observed to be dominant and is accompanied by large poloidal flows. For small values of L ¯ c , the mean density on the high field side is seen to increase and the net poloidal flow reduces while a turbulent broad band in fluctuation spectrum is observed. Upon a gradual variation of L ¯ c from large to small values, continuous changes in mean plasma potential and density profiles, fluctuation, and poloidal flows demonstrate that in a simple toroidal device there exists a strong relationship between Lc, flows, and fluctuations. The net flow measured is found independent of the direction of Bv, but an asymmetry in the magnitude of the flow is found. The observed imbalance between the mean flow, fluctuation driven flow, and net flow is also discussed.

  17. FIELD SCREENING FOR HALOGENATED VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS: THE NEW X-WAND HVOC SCREENING DEVICE

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Susan S. Sorini; Joseph F. Rovani Jr

    2006-03-01

    Western Research Institute (WRI) has developed new methodology and a test kit to screen soil or water samples for halogenated volatile organic compounds (HVOCs) in the field. The technology has been designated the X-Wand{trademark} screening tool. The new device uses a heated diode sensor that is commonly used to detect leaks of refrigerants from air conditioners, freezers, and refrigerators. This sensor is selective to halogens. It does not respond to volatile aromatic hydrocarbons, such as those in gasoline, and it is not affected by high humidity. In the current work, the heated diode leak detectors were modified further to provide units with rapid response and enhanced sensitivity. The limit of detection for trichloroethylene TCE in air is 0.1 mg/m{sup 3} (S/N = 2). The response to other HVOCS relative to TCE is similar. Variability between sensors and changes in a particular sensor over time can be compensated for by normalizing sensor readings to a maximum sensor reading at 1,000 mg/m{sup 3} TCE. The soil TCE screening method was expanded to include application to water samples. Assuming complete vaporization, the detection limit for TCE in soil is about 1 ug/kg (ppb) for a 25-g sample in an 8-oz jar. The detection limit for TCE in water is about 1 ug/L (ppb) for a 25-mL sample in an 8-oz jar. This is comparable to quantitation limits of EPA GC/MS laboratory methods. A draft ASTM method for screening TCE contaminated soils using a heated diode sensor was successfully submitted for concurrent main committee and subcommittee balloting in ASTM Committee D 34 on Waste Management. The method was approved as ASTM D 7203-05, Standard Test Method for Screening Trichloroethylene (TCE)-Contaminated Soil Using a Heated Diode Sensor.

  18. Multitarget, quantitative nanoplasmonic electrical field-enhanced resonating device (NE2RD) for diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Inci, Fatih; Filippini, Chiara; Baday, Murat; Ozen, Mehmet Ozgun; Calamak, Semih; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Wang, ShuQi; Hanhauser, Emily; Hobbs, Kristen S; Juillard, Franceline; Kuang, Ping Ping; Vetter, Michael L; Carocci, Margot; Yamamoto, Hidemi S; Takagi, Yuko; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Akin, Demir; Wesemann, Duane R; Singhal, Amit; Yang, Priscilla L; Nibert, Max L; Fichorova, Raina N; Lau, Daryl T-Y; Henrich, Timothy J; Kaye, Kenneth M; Schachter, Steven C; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Steinmetz, Lars M; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Davis, Ronald W; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-08-11

    Recent advances in biosensing technologies present great potential for medical diagnostics, thus improving clinical decisions. However, creating a label-free general sensing platform capable of detecting multiple biotargets in various clinical specimens over a wide dynamic range, without lengthy sample-processing steps, remains a considerable challenge. In practice, these barriers prevent broad applications in clinics and at patients' homes. Here, we demonstrate the nanoplasmonic electrical field-enhanced resonating device (NE(2)RD), which addresses all these impediments on a single platform. The NE(2)RD employs an immunodetection assay to capture biotargets, and precisely measures spectral color changes by their wavelength and extinction intensity shifts in nanoparticles without prior sample labeling or preprocessing. We present through multiple examples, a label-free, quantitative, portable, multitarget platform by rapidly detecting various protein biomarkers, drugs, protein allergens, bacteria, eukaryotic cells, and distinct viruses. The linear dynamic range of NE(2)RD is five orders of magnitude broader than ELISA, with a sensitivity down to 400 fg/mL This range and sensitivity are achieved by self-assembling gold nanoparticles to generate hot spots on a 3D-oriented substrate for ultrasensitive measurements. We demonstrate that this precise platform handles multiple clinical samples such as whole blood, serum, and saliva without sample preprocessing under diverse conditions of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. The NE(2)RD's broad dynamic range, detection limit, and portability integrated with a disposable fluidic chip have broad applications, potentially enabling the transition toward precision medicine at the point-of-care or primary care settings and at patients' homes.

  19. Multitarget, quantitative nanoplasmonic electrical field-enhanced resonating device (NE2RD) for diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Inci, Fatih; Filippini, Chiara; Ozen, Mehmet Ozgun; Calamak, Semih; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Wang, ShuQi; Hanhauser, Emily; Hobbs, Kristen S.; Juillard, Franceline; Kuang, Ping Ping; Vetter, Michael L.; Carocci, Margot; Yamamoto, Hidemi S.; Takagi, Yuko; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Akin, Demir; Wesemann, Duane R.; Singhal, Amit; Yang, Priscilla L.; Nibert, Max L.; Fichorova, Raina N.; Lau, Daryl T.-Y.; Henrich, Timothy J.; Kaye, Kenneth M.; Schachter, Steven C.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Steinmetz, Lars M.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Davis, Ronald W.; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in biosensing technologies present great potential for medical diagnostics, thus improving clinical decisions. However, creating a label-free general sensing platform capable of detecting multiple biotargets in various clinical specimens over a wide dynamic range, without lengthy sample-processing steps, remains a considerable challenge. In practice, these barriers prevent broad applications in clinics and at patients’ homes. Here, we demonstrate the nanoplasmonic electrical field-enhanced resonating device (NE2RD), which addresses all these impediments on a single platform. The NE2RD employs an immunodetection assay to capture biotargets, and precisely measures spectral color changes by their wavelength and extinction intensity shifts in nanoparticles without prior sample labeling or preprocessing. We present through multiple examples, a label-free, quantitative, portable, multitarget platform by rapidly detecting various protein biomarkers, drugs, protein allergens, bacteria, eukaryotic cells, and distinct viruses. The linear dynamic range of NE2RD is five orders of magnitude broader than ELISA, with a sensitivity down to 400 fg/mL This range and sensitivity are achieved by self-assembling gold nanoparticles to generate hot spots on a 3D-oriented substrate for ultrasensitive measurements. We demonstrate that this precise platform handles multiple clinical samples such as whole blood, serum, and saliva without sample preprocessing under diverse conditions of temperature, pH, and ionic strength. The NE2RD’s broad dynamic range, detection limit, and portability integrated with a disposable fluidic chip have broad applications, potentially enabling the transition toward precision medicine at the point-of-care or primary care settings and at patients’ homes. PMID:26195743

  20. Bringing Magnetic Field Data in Real-Time for Researchers on Mobile Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolf, V. G.; Hampton, D. L.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetometer data from eight remote stations across Alaska have been collected continuously since the early 1980's by the Geophysical Institute Magnetometer Array (GIMA). These three-axis fluxgate magnetometers, with <1 nT precision, provide data at 1 Hz, which are used to determine the currents associated with auroral activity in the Alaska polar regions. A primary function of the GIMA is to supply magnetic field deflection data in real time to researchers so they can determine when to launch a sub-orbital sounding rocket from the Poker Flat Research Range into the proper auroral conditions. The aurora is a key coupling mechanism between the Earth's magnetosphere and ionosphere, and the magnetometers are used to remotely sense the ionospheric currents associated with aurora. The web-based interface to display the real-time magnetometer data has been upgraded to be fully functional on a wide range of platforms, from desktops to mobile devices. The incoming data stream from each station is recorded in a database and used to populate the real time graphical display. Improvements in data management increased the sampling rate from 5 seconds to 1 second for the display. The displays are highly configurable to allow researchers the flexibility to interpret the magnetic signature they need to make a successful launch decision. The use of Django and Java script technology enabled the system to be structured for rapid expansion when new stations come online and input streams are improved. Data are also available for download within 24 hours of collection. The existence of real-time data has been and will continue to be critical for successful rocket launches.

  1. Intermittent 20-HZ-photic stimulation leads to a uniform reduction of alpha-global field power in healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Rau, R; Raschka, C; Koch, H J

    2001-01-01

    19-channel-EEGs were recorded from scalp surface of 30 healthy subjects (16m, 14f, mean age: 34 ys, SD: 11.7 ys) at rest and under IPS (Intermittent Photic Stimulation) at rates of 5, 10 and 20 Hertz (Hz). Digitalized data underwent spectral analysis with fast fourier transfomation (FFT) yielding the basis for the computation of global field power (GFP). For quantification GFP values in the frequency ranges of 5, 10 and 20 Hz at rest were divided by the corresponding data gained under IPS. While ratios from PDE data showed no stable parameter due to high interindividual variability, ratios of alpha-power turned out to be uniform in all subjects: IPS at 20 Hz always led to a suppression of alpha-power. Dividing alpha-GFP at rest by alpha-GFP under 20-Hz IPS thus resulted in a ratio < 1. We conclude that ratios from GFP data are a stable diagnostic paradigma.

  2. Clinical Outcome and Characterization of Local Field Potentials in Holmes Tremor Treated with Pallidal Deep Brain Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez-Zamora, Adolfo; Kaszuba, Brian C.; Gee, Lucy; Prusik, Julia; Danisi, Fabio; Shin, Damian; Pilitsis, Julie G

    2016-01-01

    Background Holmes tremor (HT) is an irregular, low-frequency rest tremor associated with prominent action and postural tremors. Currently, the most effective stereotactic target and neurophysiologic characterization of HT, specifically local field potentials (LFPs) are uncertain. We present the outcome, intraoperative neurophysiologic analysis with characterization of LFPs in a patient managed with left globus pallidus interna deep brain stimulation (Gpi DBS). Case Report A 24-year-old male underwent left Gpi DBS for medically refractory HT. LFPs demonstrated highest powers in the delta range in Gpi. At the 6-month follow-up, a 90% reduction in tremor was observed. Discussion Pallidal DBS should be considered as an alternative target for management of refractory HT. LFP demonstrated neuronal activity associated with higher power in the delta region, similarly seen in patients with generalized dystonia. PMID:27441097

  3. A stimulated Raman scattering imager using high-speed lateral electric field modulator and lock-in pixels amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mars, Kamel; Guseul, Beak; Han, Sang Man; Takasawa, Taishi; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Kawahito, Shoji

    2014-03-01

    A high speed Lateral Electric Field Modulator (LEFM) and lock-in pixels amplifiers for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS)imager is presented. Since the generated signal from the SRS process is very small compared to the offset signal, a technique suitable for extracting and amplifying the SRS signal is needed. The offset can be canceled by tuning the phase delay between the demodulated pixel output signal and the sampling clock. The small SRS signal in large offset is amplified by the differential integration. The proposed technique has been investigated with an implementation of 64x8 pixels array using a pinned photodiode LEFM an lock-in pixels amplifiers. Very small signal can be extracted from large offset signal. A ratio of the detected small SRS to offset signal of less 10-5 is achieved.

  4. Magnetic Field-Induced T Cell Receptor Clustering by Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Activation and Stimulates Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron–dextran nanoparticles functionalized with T cell activating proteins have been used to study T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. However, nanoparticle triggering of membrane receptors is poorly understood and may be sensitive to physiologically regulated changes in TCR clustering that occur after T cell activation. Nano-aAPC bound 2-fold more TCR on activated T cells, which have clustered TCR, than on naive T cells, resulting in a lower threshold for activation. To enhance T cell activation, a magnetic field was used to drive aggregation of paramagnetic nano-aAPC, resulting in a doubling of TCR cluster size and increased T cell expansion in vitro and after adoptive transfer in vivo. T cells activated by nano-aAPC in a magnetic field inhibited growth of B16 melanoma, showing that this novel approach, using magnetic field-enhanced nano-aAPC stimulation, can generate large numbers of activated antigen-specific T cells and has clinically relevant applications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:24564881

  5. Investigation on optical and acoustic fields of stimulated Brillouin scattering in As2S3 suspended-core optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qiang; Gao, Weiqing; Li, Xue; Ni, Chenquan; Chen, Xiangcai; Chen, Li; Zhang, Wei; Hu, Jigang; Chen, Xiangdong; Yuan, Zijun

    2016-10-01

    The optical and acoustic fields of stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) effect in the As2S3 chalcogenide suspended-core microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) are investigated by the finite-element method (FEM). The optical and acoustic fundamental modes at 1550 nm are analyzed with the core diameters of the MOFs varying from 1.0 to 6.0 μm. For each case, the holes of the MOFs are filled with different materials such as trichlormethane (CHCL3), alcohol and water. When the core diameter is 6.0 μm, the maximum peak intensity of the optical fundamental mode is in the case with air holes, while the minimum value is in the case filled with CHCL3. The ratio of difference is 0.66%. The minimum peak intensity of the acoustic fundamental mode is in the case with air holes, while the maximum value is in the case filled with water. The ratio of difference is 0.13%. The same rule occurs in the fiber cores of 4.5, 3.0 and 2.0 μm, where the decreases of 0.97%, 1.48%, 1.94% for optical field and the increases of 0.24%, 0.34%, 0.74% for acoustic field are obtained, respectively. When the core diameter is 1.0 μm, ratios of difference for optical and acoustic fields are much higher than those in the cases of 2.0-6.0 μm, which are 3.55% and 29.13%, respectively. The overlap factors between optical and acoustic fields are calculated, which are changed with the core diameter and the filled material in holes. Our results will be helpful to strengthen or suppress the SBS effect in practical applications.

  6. Estimating dose to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator outside the treatment fields using a skin QED diode, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters.

    PubMed

    Chan, Maria F; Song, Yulin; Dauer, Lawrence T; Li, Jingdong; Huang, David; Burman, Chandra

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative sensitivity of skin QED diodes, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) (microStar™ DOT, Landauer), and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of distance from a photon beam field edge when applied to measure dose at out-of-field points. These detectors have been used to estimate radiation dose to patients' implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) located outside the treatment field. The ICDs have a thin outer case made of 0.4- to 0.6-mm-thick titanium (∼2.4-mm tissue equivalent). A 5-mm bolus, being the equivalent depth of the devices under the patient's skin, was placed over the ICDs. Response per unit absorbed dose-to-water was measured for each of the dosimeters with and without bolus on the beam central axis (CAX) and at a distance up to 20 cm from the CAX. Doses were measured with an ionization chamber at various depths for 6- and 15-MV x-rays on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator. Relative sensitivity of the detectors was determined as the ratio of the sensitivity at each off-axis distance to that at the CAX. The detector sensitivity as a function of the distance from the field edge changed by ± 3% (1-11%) for LiF TLD-700, decreased by 10% (5-21%) for OSLD, and increased by 16% (11-19%) for the skin QED diode (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at the equivalent depth of 5 mm for 6- or 15-MV photon energies. Our results showed that the use of bolus with proper thickness (i.e., ∼d(max) of the photon energy) on the top of the ICD would reduce the scattered dose to a lower level. Dosimeters should be calibrated out-of-field and preferably with bolus equal in thickness to the depth of interest. This can be readily performed in clinic.

  7. Estimating dose to implantable cardioverter-defibrillator outside the treatment fields using a skin QED diode, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters, and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Maria F.; Song, Yulin; Dauer, Lawrence T.; Li Jingdong; Huang, David; Burman, Chandra

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the relative sensitivity of skin QED diodes, optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters (OSLDs) (microStar Trade-Mark-Sign DOT, Landauer), and LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) as a function of distance from a photon beam field edge when applied to measure dose at out-of-field points. These detectors have been used to estimate radiation dose to patients' implantable cardioverter-defibrillators (ICDs) located outside the treatment field. The ICDs have a thin outer case made of 0.4- to 0.6-mm-thick titanium ({approx}2.4-mm tissue equivalent). A 5-mm bolus, being the equivalent depth of the devices under the patient's skin, was placed over the ICDs. Response per unit absorbed dose-to-water was measured for each of the dosimeters with and without bolus on the beam central axis (CAX) and at a distance up to 20 cm from the CAX. Doses were measured with an ionization chamber at various depths for 6- and 15-MV x-rays on a Varian Clinac-iX linear accelerator. Relative sensitivity of the detectors was determined as the ratio of the sensitivity at each off-axis distance to that at the CAX. The detector sensitivity as a function of the distance from the field edge changed by {+-} 3% (1-11%) for LiF TLD-700, decreased by 10% (5-21%) for OSLD, and increased by 16% (11-19%) for the skin QED diode (Sun Nuclear Corp.) at the equivalent depth of 5 mm for 6- or 15-MV photon energies. Our results showed that the use of bolus with proper thickness (i.e., {approx}d{sub max} of the photon energy) on the top of the ICD would reduce the scattered dose to a lower level. Dosimeters should be calibrated out-of-field and preferably with bolus equal in thickness to the depth of interest. This can be readily performed in clinic.

  8. Formation of optical fields of stimulated Raman scattering with a resolution beyond the Abbe diffraction limit by spherical microlens cavities with whispering gallery modes: Near-field approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouravlev, M. V.

    2012-04-01

    We consider a significant lowering of the threshold of stimulated Raman scattering in solid fused silica spherical microlenses cavities that is caused by an increase in the integral overlap factor of whispering gallery modes. The structure of focal regions of a microlens is shown to have the shape of honeycombs, forming a photonic crystal or a photonic nanojet. We show that, at comparatively small numerical apertures NA = 0.7-0.8, which correspond to hemispherical microlenses, a spherical microlens cavity exhibits the possibility of focusing laser radiation beyond the Abbe diffraction limit. This enables the possibility of wide practical applications of microspheres as a focusing element the resolving power of which exceeds the Abbe diffraction limit in the near field. The whispering-gallery-mode spherical microlens cavity makes it possible to perform laser generation with a duration of a coherent pulse in the subfemtosecond range and to form a subwavelength focal region of the near field. This ensures the possibility of detecting single molecules of a substance in the subwavelength range in the near field and can be used to increase the sensitivity of intracavity spectroscopy methods and as microlasers for excitation of molecules in metal molecular nanoswitches and semiconductor heterostructures. From an array of microlens cavities, metamaterials with a negative refractive index can be formed.

  9. Low voltage electrically stimulated lab-on-a-chip device followed by red-green-blue analysis: a simple and efficient design for complicated matrices.

    PubMed

    Seidi, Shahram; Rezazadeh, Maryam; Yamini, Yadollah; Zamani, Niki; Esmaili, Sara

    2014-11-07

    In the present work, a simple and portable analysis device was designed for the first time for the determination of lead ions as the model analyte. The basis of the lead analysis is its extraction and pre-concentration in an acceptor droplet via the application of an electrical field. The acceptor droplet is a KI solution and therefore, the formation of a yellow precipitation of PbI2 was a sign of the presence of lead ion in the solution. Following this, digital picture of the final acceptor droplet was analyzed by investigating its Red-Green-Blue (RGB) components. The results show that the RGB intensities of the acceptor phase are proportionate to the lead concentration in the sample solution. Also, a 9.0 V battery was used to apply the electrical field, and other effective parameters, such as the type of organic liquid membrane, pH of the sample solution, and the extraction time, were considered to obtain the optimal conditions. The model analyte was determined by extracting it from a 100 μL sample solution across a thin layer of 1-octanol, immobilized in the pores of a polypropylene membrane sheet, and into the acceptor droplet via applying a 9.0 V electrical potential for 20 min. The device is capable of determining lead ions down to 20.0 ng mL(-1), with admissible repeatability and reproducibility (the intra- and inter-assay precision ranged between 3.8-7.0% and 9.8-11.9%, respectively). Also, we calculated error% for the model analyte in the range of -8.5 to +4.5, which suggests that the chip offers acceptable accuracy for the analysis of lead ions. The linearity was studied in the range of 50.0-1500 ng mL(-1), with a correlation coefficient of 0.9994. Finally, the designed device was used for the analysis of lead in real samples.

  10. 21 CFR 874.1820 - Surgical nerve stimulator/locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1820 Surgical nerve stimulator/locator. (a) Identification. A surgical nerve stimulator/locator is a device that is intended...

  11. 21 CFR 874.1820 - Surgical nerve stimulator/locator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 874.1820 Surgical nerve stimulator/locator. (a) Identification. A surgical nerve stimulator/locator is a device that is intended...

  12. The Application of Intensive Longitudinal Methods to Investigate Change: Stimulating the Field of Applied Family Research.

    PubMed

    Bamberger, Katharine T

    2016-03-01

    The use of intensive longitudinal methods (ILM)-rapid in situ assessment at micro timescales-can be overlaid on RCTs and other study designs in applied family research. Particularly, when done as part of a multiple timescale design-in bursts over macro timescales-ILM can advance the study of the mechanisms and effects of family interventions and processes of family change. ILM confers measurement benefits in accurately assessing momentary and variable experiences and captures fine-grained dynamic pictures of time-ordered processes. Thus, ILM allows opportunities to investigate new research questions about intervention effects on within-subject (i.e., within-person, within-family) variability (i.e., dynamic constructs) and about the time-ordered change process that interventions induce in families and family members beginning with the first intervention session. This paper discusses the need and rationale for applying ILM to family intervention evaluation, new research questions that can be addressed with ILM, example research using ILM in the related fields of basic family research and the evaluation of individual-based interventions. Finally, the paper touches on practical challenges and considerations associated with ILM and points readers to resources for the application of ILM.

  13. External stimulation by nanosecond pulsed electric fields to enhance cellular uptake of nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Samantha; Beier, Hope T.; Ibey, Bennett L.; Nash, Kelly

    2015-03-01

    As an increasing number of studies use gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for potential medicinal, biosensing and therapeutic applications, the synthesis and use of readily functional, bio-compatible nanoparticles is receiving much interest. For these efforts, the particles are often taken up by the cells to allow for optimum sensing or therapeutic measures. This process typically requires incubation of the particles with the cells for an extended period. In an attempt to shorten and control this incubation, we investigated whether nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) exposure of cells will cause a controlled uptake of the particles. NsPEF are known to induce the formation of nanopores in the plasma membrane, so we hypothesized that by controlling the number, amplitude or duration of the nsPEF exposure, we could control the size of the nanopores, and thus control the particle uptake. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO-K1) cells were incubated sub-10 nm AuNPs with and without exposure to 600-ns electrical pulses. Contrary to our hypothesis, the nsPEF exposure was found to actually decrease the particle uptake in the exposed cells. This result suggests that the nsPEF exposure may be affecting the endocytotic pathway and processes due to membrane disruption.

  14. Correlation between cell migration and reactive oxygen species under electric field stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shang-Ying; Hou, Hsien-San; Sun, Yung-Shin; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Lo, Kai-Yin

    2015-09-01

    Cell migration is an essential process involved in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Electric fields (EFs) are one of the many physical and chemical factors known to affect cell migration, a phenomenon termed electrotaxis or galvanotaxis. In this paper, a microfluidics chip was developed to study the migration of cells under different electrical and chemical stimuli. This chip is capable of providing four different strengths of EFs in combination with two different chemicals via one simple set of agar salt bridges and Ag/AgCl electrodes. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded inside this chip to study their migration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to different EF strengths and the presence of β-lapachone. We found that both the EF and β-lapachone level increased the cell migration rate and the production of ROS in an EF-strength-dependent manner. A strong linear correlation between the cell migration rate and the amount of intracellular ROS suggests that ROS are an intermediate product by which EF and β-lapachone enhance cell migration. Moreover, an anti-oxidant, α-tocopherol, was found to quench the production of ROS, resulting in a decrease in the migration rate.

  15. The Application of Intensive Longitudinal Methods to Investigate Change: Stimulating the Field of Applied Family Research

    PubMed Central

    Bamberger, Katharine T.

    2015-01-01

    The use of intensive longitudinal methods (ILM)—rapid in situ assessment at micro timescales—can be overlaid on RCTs and other study designs in applied family research. Especially when done as part of a multiple timescale design—in bursts over macro timescales, ILM can advance the study of the mechanisms and effects of family interventions and processes of family change. ILM confers measurement benefits in accurately assessing momentary and variable experiences and captures fine-grained dynamic pictures of time-ordered processes. Thus, ILM allows opportunities to investigate new research questions about intervention effects on within-subject (i.e., within-person, within-family) variability (i.e., dynamic constructs) and about the time-ordered change process that interventions induce in families and family members beginning with the first intervention session. This paper discusses the need and rationale for applying ILM to intervention evaluation, new research questions that can be addressed with ILM, example research using ILM in the related fields of basic family research and the evaluation of individual-based (rather than family-based) interventions. Finally, the paper touches on practical challenges and considerations associated with ILM and points readers to resources for the application of ILM. PMID:26541560

  16. Correlation between cell migration and reactive oxygen species under electric field stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Shang-Ying; Hou, Hsien-San; Sun, Yung-Shin; Cheng, Ji-Yen; Lo, Kai-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Cell migration is an essential process involved in the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Electric fields (EFs) are one of the many physical and chemical factors known to affect cell migration, a phenomenon termed electrotaxis or galvanotaxis. In this paper, a microfluidics chip was developed to study the migration of cells under different electrical and chemical stimuli. This chip is capable of providing four different strengths of EFs in combination with two different chemicals via one simple set of agar salt bridges and Ag/AgCl electrodes. NIH 3T3 fibroblasts were seeded inside this chip to study their migration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in response to different EF strengths and the presence of β-lapachone. We found that both the EF and β-lapachone level increased the cell migration rate and the production of ROS in an EF-strength-dependent manner. A strong linear correlation between the cell migration rate and the amount of intracellular ROS suggests that ROS are an intermediate product by which EF and β-lapachone enhance cell migration. Moreover, an anti-oxidant, α-tocopherol, was found to quench the production of ROS, resulting in a decrease in the migration rate. PMID:26487906

  17. Does social approval stimulate prosocial behavior? Evidence from a field experiment in the residential electricity market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoeli, Erez

    At least since Veblen (1899), economists have proposed that people do good because they desire "social approval" and want to look good in front of others. Evidence from the laboratory supports this claim, but is difficult to generalize due to the unrealistic degree of scrutiny in a laboratory environment. I administer a field experiment to test the potency of social approval in a realistic and policy relevant setting. In the experiment I solicit 7893 customers of a large electric utility for a program that helps prevent blackouts. I vary whether their decision to participate in the program is revealed to their neighbors. Customers whose decision is revealed are 1.5% more likely to sign up than those whose decision is anonymous when their decision is framed as a contribution to a public good. Social approval increases participation more than offering subjects a $25 incentive, and its effect is large relative to the mean sign-up rate of 4.1%. I explore whether social approval contributes to crowding out and conditionally cooperative behavior, but the evidence is inconclusive.

  18. Soft X-ray stimulated bremsstrahlung in traveling longitudinal electric wake-fields of two-beam pill-box cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Chen, K. W.; Wilhelm, H. E.

    The amplification of laser light in a free electron laser (FEL) due to stimulated bremsstrahlung in a traveling longitudinal undulating electric field is derived. It is shown that this FEL provides sufficient gain to be used as a coherent radiation source down to the soft X-ray regime. It is suggested that, among other possibilities, the wake-field produced in a two-beam elliptical or annular pill-box cavity is suitable for the required traveling longitudinal undulating electric field.

  19. The Nano-Memory Devices of a Single Wall and Peapod Structural Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Kang, K. T.; Park, K. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. G.; Fischer, J. E.; Johnson, A. T.

    2003-08-01

    The rediscovery and the memory application of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) give a new method in nanoelectronics applications. At first we will report the memory effects of a SWNT, and attempt to use this property in a memory device. To use a SWNT field effect transistor (FET) as a charge-storage memory device, the device operates by injecting electrons from the nanotube channel of a TubeFET into charge traps on the surface of the SiO2 gate dielectric, thus shifting the threshold voltage. This memory can be written and erased many times, and has a hold time of hundreds of seconds at room temperature. At second we have attempted to make a Peapod tubeFET. It is the structure that a C60 was contained within the tube and separated from it by a graphitic Van der Waals gap. I-V property of the Peapod shows semiconducting property.

  20. Field Error Analysis and a Correction Scheme for the KSTAR device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, K.-I.; Lee, D. K.; Jhang, Hogun; Lee, G.-S.; Kwon, K. H.

    2000-10-01

    Non-axisymmetric error fields can lead to tokamak plasma performance degradation and ultimately premature plasma disruption, if some error field components are larger than threshold values. The major sources of the field error include the unavoidable winding irregularities of the poloidal field coils during manufacturing, poloidal field and toroidal field coils misalignments during installation, stray fields from bus and lead wires between coils and power supplies, and welded joints of the vacuum vessel. Numerical simulation results are presented for Fourier harmonics of the error field obtained on the (m,n) = (2,1) resonant flux surface with a coil current set for the reference equilibrium configuration. Field error contributions are considered separately for all major error sources. An error correction scheme designed to reduce key components of the total net error field is also discussed in relation to the field error correction coils inside the vacuum vessel.

  1. Assessment of physiotherapists' occupational exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from shortwave and microwave diathermy devices: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Ghulam Sarwar; Farrow, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed studies reporting the strength of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) in physiotherapists' occupational environment. Studies from academic journals published from January 1990 to June 2010 were identified in nine online bibliographic databases. EMF strength was compared with occupational exposure limits (OELs) recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). In the reviewed studies, EMFs were measured at different distances (range 0.2 m to 6 m) from the console of diathermy devices, electrodes, and cables. For continuous shortwave diathermy (CSWD) (27.12 megahertz, MHz), measurements of EMFs at < 1 m, 1 m, 1.1-1.5 m, and 2 m reported the maximum E field strength as 8197%, 1639%, 295%, and 69%, respectively, and the maximum H field strength as 6250%, 681%, 213%, and 56%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limits for E and H fields for occupational exposure. For pulsed shortwave diathermy (PSWD) (27.12 MHz), EMF measurements at < 1 m, 1 m, and, 1.1-1.5 m showed the maximum E field intensity as 1639%, 175%, and 32%, and the maximum H field strength as 1175%, 968%, and 28%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limits for E and H fields for occupational exposure. For microwave diathermy (MWD) (2.45 gigahertz, GHz), the maximum power density measured at < 1 m, 1 m, 1.1-1.5 m, and 2 m was 200%, <30%, 0.76%, and 0.82%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limit for occupational exposure. RF EMF emissions measured from continuous and pulsed electrotherapeutic diathermy devices may well be higher than OELs at specific distances, i.e., at 1 m, which is currently designated to be a safe distance for physiotherapists. The minimum safe distance for physiotherapists should be revised to at least 2 m for CSWD and 1.5 m for PSWD. The reviewed studies did not provide evidence of exceeding the ICNIRP's reference levels for occupational exposure at 1 m from MWD devices.

  2. Stimulation of nodulation in field peas (Pisum sativum) by low concentrations of ammonium in hydroponic culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waterer, J. G.; Vessey, J. K.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Raper CD, J. r. (Principal Investigator)

    1992-01-01

    Although the inhibitory effects of high concentrations of mineral N (> 1.0 mM) on nodule development and function have often been studied, the effects of low, static concentrations of NH4+ (< 1.0 mM) on nodulation are unknown. In the present experiments we examine the effects of static concentrations of NH4+ at 0, 0.1 and 0.5 mM in flowing, hydroponic culture on nodule establishment and nitrogenase activity in field peas [Pisum sativum L. cv. Express (Svalof AB)] for the initial 28 days after planting (DAP). Peas grown in the presence of low concentrations of NH4+ had significantly greater nodule numbers (up to 4-fold) than plants grown without NH4+. Nodule dry weight per plant was significantly higher at 14, 21 and 28 DAP in plants grown in the presence of NH4+, but individual nodule mass was lower than in plants grown without NH4+. The nodulation pattern of the plants supplied with NH4+ was similar to that often reported for supernodulating mutants, however the plants did not express other growth habits associated with supernodulation. Estimates of N2 fixation indicate that the plus-NH4+ peas fixed as much or more N2 than the plants supplied with minus-NH4+ nutrient solution. There were no significant differences in nodule numbers, nodule mass or NH4+ uptake between the plants grown at the two concentrations of NH4+. Nodulation appeared to autoregulate by 14 DAP in the minus-NH4+ treatment. Plant growth and N accumulation in the minus-NH4+ plants lagged behind those of the plus-NH4+ treatments prior to N2 fixation becoming well established in the final week of the experiment. The plus-NH4+ treatments appeared not to elicit autoregulation and plants continued to initiate nodules throughout the experiment.

  3. Biochar Decelerates Soil Organic Nitrogen Cycling but Stimulates Soil Nitrification in a Temperate Arable Field Trial

    PubMed Central

    Prommer, Judith; Wanek, Wolfgang; Hofhansl, Florian; Trojan, Daniela; Offre, Pierre; Urich, Tim; Schleper, Christa; Sassmann, Stefan; Kitzler, Barbara; Soja, Gerhard; Hood-Nowotny, Rebecca Clare

    2014-01-01

    Biochar production and subsequent soil incorporation could provide carbon farming solutions to global climate change and escalating food demand. There is evidence that biochar amendment causes fundamental changes in soil nutrient cycles, often resulting in marked increases in crop production, particularly in acidic and in infertile soils with low soil organic matter contents, although comparable outcomes in temperate soils are variable. We offer insight into the mechanisms underlying these findings by focusing attention on the soil nitrogen (N) cycle, specifically on hitherto unmeasured processes of organic N cycling in arable soils. We here investigated the impacts of biochar addition on soil organic and inorganic N pools and on gross transformation rates of both pools in a biochar field trial on arable land (Chernozem) in Traismauer, Lower Austria. We found that biochar increased total soil organic carbon but decreased the extractable organic C pool and soil nitrate. While gross rates of organic N transformation processes were reduced by 50–80%, gross N mineralization of organic N was not affected. In contrast, biochar promoted soil ammonia-oxidizer populations (bacterial and archaeal nitrifiers) and accelerated gross nitrification rates more than two-fold. Our findings indicate a de-coupling of the soil organic and inorganic N cycles, with a build-up of organic N, and deceleration of inorganic N release from this pool. The results therefore suggest that addition of inorganic fertilizer-N in combination with biochar could compensate for the reduction in organic N mineralization, with plants and microbes drawing on fertilizer-N for growth, in turn fuelling the belowground build-up of organic N. We conclude that combined addition of biochar with fertilizer-N may increase soil organic N in turn enhancing soil carbon sequestration and thereby could play a fundamental role in future soil management strategies. PMID:24497947

  4. Investigation of ac-magnetic field stimulated nanoelectroporation of magneto-electric nano-drug-carrier inside CNS cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Ajeet; Nikkhah-Moshaie, Roozbeh; Sinha, Raju; Bhardwaj, Vinay; Atluri, Venkata; Jayant, Rahul Dev; Yndart, Adriana; Kateb, Babak; Pala, Nezih; Nair, Madhavan

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we demonstrate cell uptake of magneto-electric nanoparticles (MENPs) through nanoelectroporation (NEP) using alternating current (ac)-magnetic field stimulation. Uptake of MENPs was confirmed using focused-ion-beam assisted transmission electron microscopy (FIB-TEM) and validated by a numerical simulation model. The NEP was performed in microglial (MG) brain cells, which are highly sensitive for neuro-viral infection and were selected as target for nano-neuro-therapeutics. When the ac-magnetic field optimized (60 Oe at 1 kHz), MENPs were taken up by MG cells without affecting cell health (viability > 92%). FIB-TEM analysis of porated MG cells confirmed the non-agglomerated distribution of MENPs inside the cell and no loss of their elemental and crystalline characteristics. The presented NEP method can be adopted as a part of future nanotherapeutics and nanoneurosurgery strategies where a high uptake of a nanomedicine is required for effective and timely treatment of brain diseases. PMID:28374799

  5. Fast computation of Fresnel diffraction field of a three-dimensional object for a pixelated optical device.

    PubMed

    Esmer, G Bora

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, a fast algorithm is proposed for accurate calculation of the scalar optical diffraction on a pixelated optical device used in the reconstruction process from a three-dimensional object that is formed by scattered sample points over the space. In computer-generated holography, fast and accurate calculation of the diffraction field is an important and a challenging problem. Therefore, several fast algorithms can be found in the literature. The accuracy of the calculations can be determined by the signal processing techniques and the numerical methods used in the calculation of diffraction fields. Furthermore, the quality of reconstructed objects can be affected by the properties of optical devices employed in the reconstruction process. For instance, the pixelated structure of those devices has a significant effect on the reconstruction process. Therefore, the pixelated structure of the display device has to be taken into account. Furthermore, fast calculation of the diffraction pattern can be a bottleneck in dynamic holographic content generation. As a solution to the problems, we propose a fast and accurate algorithm based on a precomputed one-dimensional kernel and scaling of that kernel for the computation of the diffraction pattern for a pixelated display.

  6. Near-field measurement of ZnS:Mn nanocrystal and bulk thin-film electroluminescent devices.

    PubMed

    Grmela, L; Macku, R; Tomanek, P

    2008-02-01

    A near-field study of the electro-optical phenomena and aging characteristics of nanostructured and bulk ZnS:Mn alternating-current thin-film electro-optical devices is presented. ZnS:Mn nanocrystals embedded in the glass matrices as well as ZnS:Mn thin-film phosphors contain four different concentrations of Mn (from 0.05 to 1.0 mol%). The activator impurity in the phosphor influences the spectral properties and, to a large extent, the temporal properties of optical emission and an aging process of the devices. Therefore, a local photoluminescence and electroluminescence investigation using a scanning near-field optical microscope technique is provided and the aging characteristics of ZnS:Mn nanocrystal structure also presented.

  7. Comparison of confinement in resistive-shell reversed-field pinch devices with two different magnetic shell penetration times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravestijn, R. M.; Drake, J. R.; Hedqvist, A.; Rachlew, E.

    2004-01-01

    A loop voltage is required to sustain the reversed-field pinch (RFP) equilibrium. The configuration is characterized by redistribution of magnetic helicity but with the condition that the total helicity is maintained constant. The magnetic field shell penetration time, tgrs, has a critical role in the stability and performance of the RFP. Confinement in the EXTRAP device has been studied with two values of tgrs, first (EXTRAP-T2) with tgrs of the order of the typical relaxation cycle timescale and then (EXTRAP-T2R) with tgrs much longer than the relaxation cycle timescale, but still much shorter than the pulse length. Plasma parameters show significant improvements in confinement in EXTRAP-T2R. The typical loop voltage required to sustain comparable electron poloidal beta values is a factor of 3 lower in the EXTRAP-T2R device. The improvement is attributed to reduced magnetic turbulence.

  8. Platelet-rich plasma stimulated by pulse electric fields: Platelet activation, procoagulant markers, growth factor release and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, A L; Torres, A S; Caiafa, A; Morton, C A; Berny-Lang, M A; Gerrits, A J; Carmichael, S L; Neculaes, V B; Michelson, A D

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic use of activated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been explored for wound healing, hemostasis and antimicrobial wound applications. Pulse electric field (PEF) stimulation may provide more consistent platelet activation and avoid complications associated with the addition of bovine thrombin, the current state of the art ex vivo activator of therapeutic PRP. The aim of this study was to compare the ability of PEF, bovine thrombin and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) to activate human PRP, release growth factors and induce cell proliferation in vitro. Human PRP was prepared in the Harvest SmartPreP2 System and treated with vehicle, PEF, bovine thrombin, TRAP or Triton X-100. Platelet activation and procoagulant markers and microparticle generation were measured by flow cytometry. Released growth factors were measured by ELISA. The releasates were tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation of human epithelial cells in culture. PEF produced more platelet-derived microparticles, P-selectin-positive particles and procoagulant annexin V-positive particles than bovine thrombin or TRAP. These differences were associated with higher levels of released epidermal growth factor after PEF than after bovine thrombin or TRAP but similar levels of platelet-derived, vascular-endothelial, and basic fibroblast growth factors, and platelet factor 4. Supernatant from PEF-treated platelets significantly increased cell proliferation compared to plasma. In conclusion, PEF treatment of fresh PRP results in generation of microparticles, exposure of prothrombotic platelet surfaces, differential release of growth factors compared to bovine thrombin and TRAP and significant cell proliferation. These results, together with PEF's inherent advantages, suggest that PEF may be a superior alternative to bovine thrombin activation of PRP for therapeutic applications.

  9. Effects of epithelium removal on relaxation of airway smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide and electrical field stimulation.

    PubMed Central

    Farmer, S. G.; Togo, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. We have studied the effect of epithelium removal on relaxation of guinea-pig isolated tracheal smooth muscle induced by vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) or stimulation of non-adrenergic, non-cholinergic (NANC) inhibitory nerves. Also examined were the effects of inhibitors of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE). 2. Epithelium removal produced a 3.6 +/- 0.4 fold leftward shift in the VIP concentration-response curve. The supersensitivity to VIP, following epithelium removal was abolished by phosphoramidon or thiorphan (NEP inhibitors), but unaffected by captopril (an ACE inhibitor). In intact trachea, the NEP inhibitors produced leftward shifts in the VIP curves similar to those produced by epithelium removal. 3. In contrast to responses to exogenous VIP, neurogenic NANC inhibitory responses to electrical field stimulation were affected neither by epithelial denudation nor by the peptidase inhibitors. 4. As in previous studies, epithelium removal increased tracheal sensitivity to isoprenaline. This was not altered by pretreatment with a cocktail of peptidase inhibitors. Thus, the effect of the NEP inhibitors on responses to VIP appears to be relatively specific. 5. These data indicate that exogenous VIP is a substrate for airway NEP, since inhibition of the enzyme potentiates the peptide. This is further evidence that the airway epithelium provides a source for the metabolism of mediators. 6. In guinea-pig trachea the NEP responsible for cleaving VIP may be located largely in the epithelial layer, since NEP inhibition was without effect on sensitivity to VIP in epithelium-denuded preparations. If VIP is a NANC inhibitory neurotransmitter in this tissue its degradation endogenously does not appear to involve epithelial NEP. PMID:2196967

  10. The effect of tissue anisotropy on the radial and tangential components of the electric field in transcranial direct current stimulation.

    PubMed

    Metwally, Mohamed K; Han, Seung Moo; Kim, Tae-Seong

    2015-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is considered to be a promising technique for noninvasive brain stimulation and brain disease therapy. Recent studies have investigated the distribution of the electric field (EF) magnitude over gyri and sulci and the effect of tissue homogeneity with isotropic electrical conductivities. However, it is well known that the skull and white matter (WM) are highly anisotropic electrically, requiring investigations of their anisotropic effects on the magnitude and the directional components of the induced EF due to the high dependency between neuromodulation and the EF direction. In this study, we investigated the effects of the skull and WM anisotropy on the radial and tangential components of the EF via gyri-specific high-resolution finite element head models. For tDCS, three configurations were investigated: the conventional rectangular pad electrode, a 4(cathodes) +1(anode) ring configuration, and a bilateral configuration. The results showed that the skull anisotropy has a crucial influence on the distribution of the radial EF component. The affected cortical regions by the radial EF were reduced about 22 % when considering the skull anisotropy in comparison with the regions with the skull isotropy. On the other hand, the WM anisotropy strongly alters the EF directionality, especially within the sulci. The electric current tends to flow radially to the cortical surface with the WM anisotropy. This effect increases the affected cortical areas by the radial EF component within the sulcal regions. Our results suggest that one must examine the distribution of the EF components in tDCS, not just the magnitude of the EF alone.

  11. Bismuth ferrite based thin films, nanofibers, and field effect transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera-Beltran, Rut

    In this research an attempt has been made to explore bismuth ferrite thin films with low leakage current and nanofibers with high photoconductivity. Thin films were deposited with pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. An attempt has been made to develop thin films under different deposition parameters with following target compositions: i) 0.6BiFeO3-0.4(Bi0.5 K0.5)TiO3 (BFO-BKT) and ii) bi-layered 0.88Bi 0.5Na0.5TiO3-0.08Bi0.5K0.5TiO 3-0.04BaTiO3/BiFeO3 (BNT-BKT-BT/BFO). BFO-BKT thin film shows suppressed leakage current by about four orders of magnitude which in turn improve the ferroelectric and dielectric properties of the films. The optimum remnant polarization is 19 muC.cm-2 at the oxygen partial pressure of 300 mtorr. The BNT-BKT-BT/BFO bi-layered thin films exhibited ferroelectric behavior as: Pr = 22.0 muC.cm-2, Ec = 100 kV.cm-1 and epsilonr = 140. The leakage current of bi-layered thin films have been reduced two orders of magnitude compare to un-doped bismuth ferrite. Bismuth ferrite nanofibers were developed by electrospinning technique and its electronic properties such as photoconductivity and field effect transistor performance were investigated extensively. Nanofibers were deposited by electrospinning of sol-gel solution on SiO2/Si substrate at driving voltage of 10 kV followed by heat treatment at 550 °C for 2 hours. The composition analysis through energy dispersive detector and electron energy loss spectroscopy revealed the heterogeneous nature of the composition with Bi rich and Fe deficient regions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results confirmed the combination of Fe3+ and Fe2+ valence state in the fibers. The photoresponse result is almost hundred times higher for a fiber of 40 nm diameter compared to a fiber with 100 nm diameter. This effect is described by a size dependent surface recombination mechanism. A single and multiple BFO nanofibers field effect transistors devices were fabricated and characterized. Bismuth ferrite FET behaves

  12. Optimum conditions for correlation of the temporal shape of an object pulse with a stimulated photon echo response in inhomogeneous external electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nefediev, L. A.; Khakimzyanova, E. I.; Garnaeva, G. I.

    2013-12-01

    We have studied the information locking effect and the effect of correlation of the shape of an object laser pulse with the shape of a stimulated photon echo response in the presence of external spatially inhomogeneous electric fields. We have shown that, for the transition 3H4-3P0 in a LaF3:Pr3+ crystal, one can observe the effect of the correlation of the shape of an object laser pulse with the shape of a stimulated photon echo response and, depe