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Sample records for field strength dependence

  1. Dependence of Brownian and Néel relaxation times on magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Deissler, Robert J. Wu, Yong; Martens, Michael A.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: In magnetic particle imaging (MPI) and magnetic particle spectroscopy (MPS) the relaxation time of the magnetization in response to externally applied magnetic fields is determined by the Brownian and Néel relaxation mechanisms. Here the authors investigate the dependence of the relaxation times on the magnetic field strength and the implications for MPI and MPS. Methods: The Fokker–Planck equation with Brownian relaxation and the Fokker–Planck equation with Néel relaxation are solved numerically for a time-varying externally applied magnetic field, including a step-function, a sinusoidally varying, and a linearly ramped magnetic field. For magnetic fields that are applied as a step function, an eigenvalue approach is used to directly calculate both the Brownian and Néel relaxation times for a range of magnetic field strengths. For Néel relaxation, the eigenvalue calculations are compared to Brown's high-barrier approximation formula. Results: The relaxation times due to the Brownian or Néel mechanisms depend on the magnitude of the applied magnetic field. In particular, the Néel relaxation time is sensitive to the magnetic field strength, and varies by many orders of magnitude for nanoparticle properties and magnetic field strengths relevant for MPI and MPS. Therefore, the well-known zero-field relaxation times underestimate the actual relaxation times and, in particular, can underestimate the Néel relaxation time by many orders of magnitude. When only Néel relaxation is present—if the particles are embedded in a solid for instance—the authors found that there can be a strong magnetization response to a sinusoidal driving field, even if the period is much less than the zero-field relaxation time. For a ferrofluid in which both Brownian and Néel relaxation are present, only one relaxation mechanism may dominate depending on the magnetic field strength, the driving frequency (or ramp time), and the phase of the magnetization relative to the

  2. Field strength and dose dependence of contrast enhancement by gadolinium-based MR contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Rinck, P A; Muller, R N

    1999-01-01

    The relaxivities r1 and r2 of magnetic resonance contrast agents and the T1 relaxation time values of tissues are strongly field dependent. We present quantitative data and simulations of different gadolinium-based extracellular fluid contrast agents and the modulation of their contrast enhancement by the magnetic field to be able to answer the following questions: How are the dose and field dependences of their contrast enhancement? Is there an interrelationship between dose and field dependence? Should one increase or decrease doses at specific fields? Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion data were acquired for the following contrast agents: gadopentetate dimeglumine, gadoterate meglumine, gadodiamide injection, and gadoteridol injection, as well as for several normal and pathological human tissue samples. The magnetic field range stretched from 0.0002 to 4.7 T, including the entire clinical imaging range. The data acquired were then fitted with the appropriate theoretical models. The combination of the diamagnetic relaxation rates (R1 = 1/T1 and R2 = 1/T2) of tissues with the respective paramagnetic contributions of the contrast agents allowed the prediction of image contrast at any magnetic field. The results revealed a nearly identical field and dose-dependent increase of contrast enhancement induced by these contrast agents within a certain dose range. The target tissue concentration (TTC) was an important though nonlinear factor for enhancement. The currently recommended dose of 0.1 mmol/kg body weight seems to be a compromise close to the lower limits of diagnostically sufficient contrast enhancement for clinical imaging at all field strengths. At low field contrast enhancement might be insufficient. Adjustment of dose or concentration, or a new class of contrast agents with optimized relaxivity, would be a valuable contribution to a better diagnostic yield of contrast enhancement at all fields.

  3. Magnetic-field-induced dose effects in MR-guided radiotherapy systems: dependence on the magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Raaijmakers, A J E; Raaymakers, B W; Lagendijk, J J W

    2008-02-21

    Several institutes are currently working on the development of a radiotherapy treatment system with online MR imaging (MRI) modality. The main difference between their designs is the magnetic field strength of the MRI system. While we have chosen a 1.5 Tesla (T) magnetic field strength, the Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton will be using a 0.2 T MRI scanner and the company Viewray aims to use 0.3 T. The magnetic field strength will affect the severity of magnetic field dose effects, such as the electron return effect (ERE): considerable dose increase at tissue air boundaries due to returning electrons. This paper has investigated how the ERE dose increase depends on the magnetic field strength. Therefore, four situations where the ERE occurs have been simulated: ERE at the distal side of the beam, the lateral ERE, ERE in cylindrical air cavities and ERE in the lungs. The magnetic field comparison values were 0.2, 0.75, 1.5 and 3 T. Results show that, in general, magnetic field dose effects are reduced at lower magnetic field strengths. At the distal side, the ERE dose increase is largest for B = 0.75 T and depends on the irradiation field size for B = 0.2 T. The lateral ERE is strongest for B = 3 T but shows no effect for B = 0.2 T. Around cylindrical air cavities, dose inhomogeneities disappear if the radius of the cavity becomes small relative to the in-air radius of the secondary electron trajectories. At larger cavities (r > 1 cm), dose inhomogeneities exist for all magnetic field strengths. In water-lung-water phantoms, the ERE dose increase takes place at the water-lung transition and the dose decreases at the lung-water transition, but these effects are minimal for B = 0.2 T. These results will contribute to evaluating the trade-off between magnetic field dose effects and image quality of MR-guided radiotherapy systems.

  4. An investigation on the field strength and loading rate dependences of the hysteretic dynamics of magnetorheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Chen, Zhangwei; Wang, Linxiang

    2015-02-01

    This paper is an extended study on the model of the hysteretic dynamics of magnetorheological dampers based on a phenomenological phase transition theory (Wang and Kamath in Smart Mater. Struct. 15(6):1725-1733, 2006). It is demonstrated that, by appropriately choosing model parameters, the frequency dependence of the hysteretic dynamics can be captured very well by the model based on phase transition theory. Whilst by introducing an appropriate rescaling coefficient to account for the strength of the magnetized particle chains with various magnetic field strengths, the field strength dependence of the hysteretic dynamics can also be captured very well by the same differential equation with the same set of model parameters. There are in total eight model parameters introduced for capturing the hysteretic dynamics, including its dependence on the loading rate and field strength.

  5. Dependence of streamer density on electric field strength on positive electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koki, Nakamura; Takahumi, Okuyama; Wang, Douyan; Takao, N.; Hidenori, Akiyama; Kumamoto University Collaboration

    2015-09-01

    Pulsed streamer discharge plasma, a type of non-thermal plasma, is known as generation method of reactive radicals and ozone and treatment of exhausted gas. From our previous research, the distance between electrodes has been considered a very important parameter for applications using pulsed streamer discharge. However, how the distance between electrodes affects the pulsed discharge hasn't been clarified. In this research, the propagation process of pulsed streamer discharge in a wire-plate electrode was observed using an ICCD camera for 4 electrodes having different distance between electrodes. The distance between electrodes was changeable at 45 mm, 40 mm, 35 mm, and 30 mm. The results show that, when the distance between electrodes was shortened, applied voltage with a pulse duration of 100 ns decreased from 80 to 60.3 kV. Conversely, discharge current increased from 149 to 190 A. Streamer head velocity became faster. On the other hand, Streamer head density at onset time of streamer head propagation didn't change. This is considered due to the electric field strength of streamer head at that time, in result, it was about 14 kV/mm under each distance between electrodes.

  6. The dependence of potential well formation on the magnetic field strength and electron injection current in a polywell device

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, S. Gummersall, D.; Carr, M.; Khachan, J.

    2014-09-15

    A capacitive probe has been used to measure the plasma potential in a polywell device in order to observe the dependence of potential well formation on magnetic field strength, electron injection current, and polywell voltage bias. The effectiveness of the capacitive probe in a high energy electron plasma was determined by measuring the plasma potential of a planar diode with an axial magnetic field. The capacitive probe was translated along the axis of one of the field coils of the polywell, and the spatial profile of the potential well was measured. The confinement time of electrons in the polywell was estimated with a simple analytical model which used the experimentally observed potential well depths, as well as a simulation of the electron trajectories using particle orbit theory.

  7. How the Strength and Thickness of Field-aligned Currents Depend on Solar Wind and Ionospheric Parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J.; Wing, S.

    2012-12-01

    Recently, Wing et al. [2011] examined the dependence of field-aligned currents, peak electron energy, and electron energy flux on solar wind parameters. We provide an analytical analysis of how velocity shear layers couple to the ionosphere via field-aligned currents. In the model, we use the Knight relation to express the field-aligned current in terms of the potential drop between the magnetosphere and ionosphere and solve for the ionospheric potential using current continuity. We obtain an analytic expression for the dependence of the current, the current maximum, and the current thickness on the magnetosheath velocity, magnetopause shear layer thickness, magnetospheric density and temperature, and ionospheric conductivity. We compare the analytical results for the current profiles using the magnetic field instruments on board the DMSP satellites. Estimates for FAC strength and thickness allow us to constrain the model to estimate the thickness of the magnetopause velocity shear layer, which is consistent with in situ observations and kinetic simulations. Finally, we discuss how the presence of waves could affect the field-aligned currents. Wing, S., S. Ohtani, J. R. Johnson, M. Echim, P. T. Newell, T. Higuchi, G. Ueno, and G. R. Wilson (2011), Solar wind driving of dayside field-aligned currents, J. Geophys. Res., 116, A08208, doi:10.1029/2011JA016579.

  8. Systematic study of low-lying E1 strength using the time-dependent mean field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Ebata, S.; Nakatsukasa, T.; Inakura, T.

    2012-11-12

    We carry out systematic investigation of electric dipole (E1) mode from light to heavy nuclei, using a new time-dependent mean field theory: the Canonical-basis Time-Dependent Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (Cb-TDHFB) theory. The Cb-TDHFB in the three-dimensional coordinate space representation can deal with pairing correlation and any kind of deformation in the timedependent framework. We report the neutron-number dependence of the low-energy E1 mode for light (A > 40) and heavy isotopes (A < 100) around N= 82.

  9. The Dependence of the Strength and Thickness of Field-Aligned Currents on Solar Wind and Ionospheric Parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Jay R.; Wing, Simon

    2014-08-01

    Sheared plasma flows at the low-latitude boundary layer correlate well with early afternoon auroral arcs and eld-aligned currents [Sonnerup, 1980; Lundin and Evans, 1985]. We present a simple analytic model that relates solar wind and ionospheric parameters to the strength and thickness of field-aligned currents in a region of sheared velocity, such as the low latitude boundary layer. We compare the predictions of the model with DMSP observations and nd remarkably good scaling of the currents with solar wind and ionospheric parameters. The sheared boundary layer thickness is inferred to be around 3000km consistent with observational studies. The analytic model provides a simple way to organize data and to infer boundary layer structures from ionospheric data.

  10. Dependences of Q-branch integrated intensity of linear-molecule pendular spectra on electric-field strength and rotational temperature and its potential applications

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Min; Wang, Hailing; Wang, Qin; Yin, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the pendular-state spectra of cold linear molecules, and investigated the dependences of “Q-branch” integrated intensity of pendular spectra on both electric-field strength and molecular rotation-temperature. A new multi-peak structure in the “Q-branch” spectrum is appearing when the Stark interaction strength ω = μE/B equal to or larger than the critical value. Our study shows that the above results can be used not only to measure the electric-field vector and its spatial distribution in some electrostatic devices, such as the Stark decelerator, Stark velocity filter and electrostatic trap and so on, but also to survey the orientation degree of cold linear molecules in a strong electrostatic field. PMID:27231057

  11. Magnetic Field Strengths in Photodissociation Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balser, Dana S.; Anish Roshi, D.; Jeyakumar, S.; Bania, T. M.; Montet, Benjamin T.; Shitanishi, J. A.

    2016-01-01

    We measure carbon radio recombination line (RRL) emission at 5.3 {{GHz}} toward four H ii regions with the Green Bank Telescope to determine the magnetic field strength in the photodissociation region (PDR) that surrounds the ionized gas. Roshi suggests that the non-thermal line widths of carbon RRLs from PDRs are predominantly due to magneto-hydrodynamic waves, thus allowing the magnetic field strength to be derived. We model the PDR with a simple geometry and perform the non-LTE radiative transfer of the carbon RRL emission to solve for the PDR physical properties. Using the PDR mass density from these models and the carbon RRL non-thermal line width we estimate total magnetic field strengths of B∼ 100{--}300 μ {{G}} in W3 and NGC 6334A. Our results for W49 and NGC 6334D are less well constrained with total magnetic field strengths between B∼ 200{--}1000 μ {{G}}. H i and OH Zeeman measurements of the line of sight magnetic field strength ({B}{{los}}), taken from the literature, are between a factor of ∼ 0.5{--}1 of the lower bound of our carbon RRL magnetic field strength estimates. Since | {B}{{los}}| ≤slant B, our results are consistent with the magnetic origin of the non-thermal component of carbon RRL widths.

  12. Strength of field compacted clayey embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Lovell, C. W.

    1982-02-01

    The shearing behavior of a plastic Indiana clay (St. Croix) was studied for both laboratory and field compaction. This interim report deals with the field compacted phase. The strength tests were performed by unconsolidated undrained (UU) and saturated consolidated undrained (CIU) triaxials. These were run at various confining pressures to approximate the end of construction and long term conditions at several embankment depths.

  13. 47 CFR 24.236 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength limits. 24.236 Section 24.236... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.236 Field strength limits. The predicted or measured median field strength at... to a higher field strength....

  14. 47 CFR 24.236 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength limits. 24.236 Section 24.236... SERVICES Broadband PCS § 24.236 Field strength limits. The predicted or measured median field strength at... to a higher field strength....

  15. Critical electric field strengths of onion tissues treated by pulsed electric fields.

    PubMed

    Asavasanti, Suvaluk; Ersus, Seda; Ristenpart, William; Stroeve, Pieter; Barrett, Diane M

    2010-09-01

    The impact of pulsed electric fields (PEF) on cellular integrity and texture of Ranchero and Sabroso onions (Allium cepa L.) was investigated. Electrical properties, ion leakage rate, texture, and amount of enzymatically formed pyruvate were measured before and after PEF treatment for a range of applied field strengths and number of pulses. Critical electric field strengths or thresholds (E(c)) necessary to initiate membrane rupture were different because dissimilar properties were measured. Measurement of electrical characteristics was the most sensitive method and was used to detect the early stage of plasma membrane breakdown, while pyruvate formation by the enzyme alliinase was used to identify tonoplast membrane breakdown. Our results for 100-μs pulses indicate that breakdown of the plasma membrane occurs above E(c)= 67 V/cm for 10 pulses, but breakdown of the tonoplast membrane is above either E(c)= 200 V/cm for 10 pulses or 133 V/cm for 100 pulses. This disparity in field strength suggests there may be 2 critical electrical field strengths: a lower field strength for plasma membrane breakdown and a higher field strength for tonoplast membrane breakdown. Both critical electric field strengths depended on the number of pulses applied. Application of a single pulse at an electric field up to 333 V/cm had no observable effect on any measured properties, while significant differences were observed for n≥10. The minimum electric field strength required to cause a measurable property change decreased with the number of pulses. The results also suggest that PEF treatment may be more efficient if a higher electric field strength is applied for a fewer pulses.

  16. Measurements of magnetic field strength on T Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, Eike W.; Lehmann, Holger; Emerson, James P.; Staude, Jürgen

    1999-01-01

    We have investigated the magnetic field strength of one weak-line and four classical T Tauri stars. The magnetic field strength is derived from the differential change of the equivalent width of photospheric Fe I lines in the presence of a magnetic field, calculated using a full radiative transfer code. The method was successfully tested by applying it to a non-magnetic solar-type star, and to VY Ari which is believed to have a strong magnetic field. For two of the classical T Tauri stars, we find a product of magnetic field strength and filling factor B * f = (2.35+/- 0.15) kG for T Tau, and B * f = (1.1+/- 0.2) kG for LkCa 15. For the classical T Tauri star UX Tau A and the weak-line T Tauri star LkCa 16 the detection is only marginal, indicating magnetic field strengths of the order of 1 kG and possibly of more than 2 kG, respectively. No field could be detected for the classical T Tauri star GW Ori. For the two classical T Tauri stars for which we have detected a field, we find the filling factors to be larger than ~ 0.5, which indicates that the magnetic field covers most of the photosphere. We also show that ignoring a magnetic field can, depending on the lines used, result in errors in effective temperature and underestimates of veiling. Based on observations made with the William Herschel Telescope operated on the island of La Palma by the Royal Greenwich Observatory in the Spanish Observatorio de los Roque de los Muchachos of the Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias

  17. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  18. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  19. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  20. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  1. 47 CFR 73.311 - Field strength contours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Field strength contours. 73.311 Section 73.311... Broadcast Stations § 73.311 Field strength contours. (a) Applications for FM broadcast authorizations must show the field strength contours required by FCC Form 301 or FCC Form 340, as appropriate. (b)...

  2. 47 CFR 90.689 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.689 Section 90.689...-824/851-869 Mhz Band § 90.689 Field strength limits. (a) For purposes of implementing §§ 90.689... or measured field strength at any location on the border of the EA-based service area for...

  3. 47 CFR 90.689 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.689 Section 90.689...-824/851-869 Mhz Band § 90.689 Field strength limits. (a) For purposes of implementing §§ 90.689... or measured field strength at any location on the border of the EA-based service area for...

  4. 47 CFR 73.683 - Field strength contours and presumptive determination of field strength at individual locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... definitions of satellite carrier, subscriber, and local market contained in 47 CFR 76.66(a) apply to this... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength contours and presumptive... Stations § 73.683 Field strength contours and presumptive determination of field strength at...

  5. Pulsar Emission Geometry and Accelerating Field Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCesar, Megan E.; Harding, Alice K.; Miller, M. Coleman; Kalapotharakos, Constantinos; Parent, Damien

    2012-01-01

    The high-quality Fermi LAT observations of gamma-ray pulsars have opened a new window to understanding the generation mechanisms of high-energy emission from these systems, The high statistics allow for careful modeling of the light curve features as well as for phase resolved spectral modeling. We modeled the LAT light curves of the Vela and CTA I pulsars with simulated high-energy light curves generated from geometrical representations of the outer gap and slot gap emission models. within the vacuum retarded dipole and force-free fields. A Markov Chain Monte Carlo maximum likelihood method was used to explore the phase space of the magnetic inclination angle, viewing angle. maximum emission radius, and gap width. We also used the measured spectral cutoff energies to estimate the accelerating parallel electric field dependence on radius. under the assumptions that the high-energy emission is dominated by curvature radiation and the geometry (radius of emission and minimum radius of curvature of the magnetic field lines) is determined by the best fitting light curves for each model. We find that light curves from the vacuum field more closely match the observed light curves and multiwavelength constraints, and that the calculated parallel electric field can place additional constraints on the emission geometry

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging: effects of magnetic field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, L.E.; Arakawa, M.; Hoenninger, J.; McCarten, B.; Watts, J.; Kaufman, L.

    1984-04-01

    Magnetic resonance images of the head, abdomen, and pelvis of normal adult men were obtained using varying magnetic field strength, and measurements of T1 and T2 relaxations and of signal-to-noise (SN) ratios were determined. For any one spin echo sequence, gray/white matter contrast decreases and muscle/fat contrast increases with field. SN levels rise rapidly up to 3.0 kgauss and then change more slowly, actually dropping for muscle. The optimum field for magnetic resonance imaging depends on tissue type, body part, and imaging sequence, so that it does not have a unique value. Magnetic resonance systems that operate in the 3.0-5.0 kgauss range achieve most or all of the gains that can be achieved by higher magnetic fields.

  7. Effects of magnetic field strength in the discharge channel on the performance of a multi-cusped field thruster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Peng; Liu, Hui; Gao, Yuanyuan; Yu, Daren

    2016-09-01

    The performance characteristics of a Multi-cusped Field Thruster depending on the magnetic field strength in the discharge channel were investigated. Four thrusters with different outer diameters of the magnet rings were designed to change the magnetic field strength in the discharge channel. It is found that increasing the magnetic field strength could restrain the radial cross-field electron current and decrease the radial width of main ionization region, which gives rise to the reduction of propellant utilization and thruster performance. The test results in different anode voltage conditions indicate that both the thrust and anode efficiency are higher for the weaker magnetic field in the discharge channel.

  8. 47 CFR 90.771 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.771 Section 90.771... Policies Governing the Licensing and Use of Phase II Ea, Regional and Nationwide Systems § 90.771 Field... transmit frequencies, of EA and Regional licensees may not exceed a predicted 38 dBu field strength...

  9. 47 CFR 90.771 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.771 Section 90.771... Policies Governing the Licensing and Use of Phase II Ea, Regional and Nationwide Systems § 90.771 Field... transmit frequencies, of EA and Regional licensees may not exceed a predicted 38 dBu field strength...

  10. PERMANENT MAGNET DESIGNS WITH LARGE VARIATIONS IN FIELD STRENGTH.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA,R.

    2004-01-21

    The use of permanent magnets has been investigated as an option for electron cooling ring for the proposed luminosity upgrade of RHIC. Several methods have been developed that allow a large variation in field strength. These design concepts were verified with computer simulations using finite element codes. It will be shown that the field uniformity is maintained while the field strength is mechanically adjusted.

  11. Identifying Individual Excellence: The Dependable Strengths Articulation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boivin-Brown, Allen; Haldane, Jean; Forster, Jerald

    This paper was written to describe the essential tasks of a process known as Dependable Strengths Articulation (DSA) and how career development practitioners can acquire the skills to use the process. DSA, when combined with practices known as Job Magnet, helps participants identify their individual excellence and then use this knowledge to…

  12. Initial Intervention Outcomes of the Dependable Strengths Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMurrer, James E., Jr.

    Dependable Strengths Articulation Process (DSAP) is a self-development process designed to facilitate positive self-constructions and improved personal functioning. This study examined the effectiveness of DSAP interventions. Participants (N=30) were college graduates who had expressed a desire to improve their educational and career planning and…

  13. 47 CFR 18.305 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Field strength limits. 18.305 Section 18.305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.305 Field strength limits. (a) ISM equipment operating on a frequency specified in §...

  14. 47 CFR 18.305 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Field strength limits. 18.305 Section 18.305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL INDUSTRIAL, SCIENTIFIC, AND MEDICAL EQUIPMENT Technical Standards § 18.305 Field strength limits. (a) ISM equipment operating on a frequency specified in §...

  15. Spontaneous Radiation Emission from Short, High Field Strength Insertion Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Geoffrey Krafft

    2005-09-15

    Since the earliest papers on undulaters were published, it has been known how to calculate the spontaneous emission spectrum from ''short'' undulaters when the magnetic field strength parameter is small compared to unity, or in ''single'' frequency sinusoidal undulaters where the magnetic field strength parameter is comparable to or larger than unity, but where the magnetic field amplitude is constant throughout the undulater. Fewer general results have been obtained in the case where the insertion device is both short, i.e., the magnetic field strength parameter changes appreciably throughout the insertion device, and the magnetic field strength is high enough that ponderomotive effects, radiation retardation, and harmonic generation are important physical phenomena. In this paper a general method is presented for calculating the radiation spectrum for short, high-field insertion devices. It is used to calculate the emission from some insertion device designs of recent interest.

  16. SIZE DEPENDENCE OF FLEXURAL STRENGTH AND FATIGUE STRENGTH OF PAVEMENT CONCRETE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimoto, Toru; Sato, Ryoichi

    The size effect on flexural fatigue strength of concrete was experime ntally investigated. For this purpose, specimens of two sizes were prepared: 150mm x 150mm x 530mm (span=450mm) and 200mm x 450mm x 1800mm (span=1350mm). The stress levels were set at 70%, 80% and 90% of the compressive strength. Experimental results showed that the number of loading cycles at failure increased with the enlargement of specimens. Based on a fracture mechanics approach, with a stress level of 70%, this dependence of flexural fatigue strength on size was explained by the difference in the stress distributions in the sections of small and large sized specimens. A te nsion softening stress region was formed in the section of the small specimen, whereas elastic stress was produced over the full section in the large specimen.

  17. 47 CFR 73.184 - Groundwave field strength graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the CFR, nor will they be included in the Commission's automated rules system. For information on... versus distance used to plot Graphs 1 to 20 are available in tabular form. For information on obtaining... strength at 1 kilometer. This is accomplished by plotting the measured field strengths on transparent...

  18. 47 CFR 73.184 - Groundwave field strength graphs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... the CFR, nor will they be included in the Commission's automated rules system. For information on... versus distance used to plot Graphs 1 to 20 are available in tabular form. For information on obtaining... strength at 1 kilometer. This is accomplished by plotting the measured field strengths on transparent...

  19. Physical processes at high field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Measurements of the radiation produced by the high field interaction with the rare gases have revealed the presence of both copious harmonic production and fluorescence. The highest harmonic observed was the seventeenth (14.6 rm) in Ne, the shortest wavelength ever produced by that means. Strong fluorescence was seen in Ar, Kr, and Xe with the shortest wavelengths observed being below 10 nm. Furthermore, radiation from inner-shell excited configurations in Xe, specifically the 4d/sup 9/5s5p ..-->.. 4d/sup 10/5s manifold at approx. 17.7 nm, was detected. The behaviors of the rare gases with respect to multiquantum ionization, harmonic production, and fluorescence were found to be correlated so that the materials fell into two groups, He and Ne in one and Ar, Kr, and Xe in the other. These experimental findings, in alliance with other studies on inner-shell decay processes, give evidence for a role of atomic correlations in a direct nonlinear process of inner-shell excitation. It is expected that an understanding of these high-field processes will enable the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 59 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Electrostatic precipitator having apparatus for sensing electrostatic field strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Perryman, J.W.

    1984-03-27

    An electrostatic precipitator (10) of the type having a casing (12) defining a precipitation chamber (6) wherein a plurality of discharge electrode frames (32) are disposed alternately between a plurality of collecting electrode plates (20). Paired probe devices (50) are mounted on the collecting electrode plates for sensing the strength of the electrostatic field generated by at least one discharge electrode wire (36) at at least one location on each of the collecting electrode plates (20) disposed adjacent thereto. The electrostatic field strength sensed by the paired probe devices are compared with each other to provide an indication of the degree of imbalance, if any, existing between the sensed electrostatic fields experienced by the bounding electrode plates. The existence of an imbalance and the strength of the electrostatic fields on the bounding collecting electrode plates and the degree of any such imbalance provide an indication of whether or not the discharge electrode frame is properly positioned within the assembly of collecting electrode plates.

  1. Brownian motion of electrons in time-dependent magnetic fields.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iverson, G. J.; Williams, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    The behavior of a weakly ionized plasma in slowly varying time-dependent magnetic fields is studied through an extension of Williamson's stochastic theory. In particular, attention is focused on the properties of electron diffusion in the plane perpendicular to the direction of the magnetic field, when the field strength is large. It is shown that, in the strong field limit, the classical 1/B-squared dependence of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient is obtained for two models in which the field B(t) is monotonic in t and for two models in which B(t) possesses at least one turning point.

  2. Technique for Predicting the RF Field Strength Inside an Enclosure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallett, M.; Reddell, J.

    1998-01-01

    This Memorandum presents a simple analytical technique for predicting the RF electric field strength inside an enclosed volume in which radio frequency radiation occurs. The technique was developed to predict the radio frequency (RF) field strength within a launch vehicle's fairing from payloads launched with their telemetry transmitters radiating and to the impact of the radiation on the vehicle and payload. The RF field strength is shown to be a function of the surface materials and surface areas. The method accounts for RF energy losses within exposed surfaces, through RF windows, and within multiple layers of dielectric materials which may cover the surfaces. This Memorandum includes the rigorous derivation of all equations and presents examples and data to support the validity of the technique.

  3. Estimate of Coronal Magnetic Field Strength Using Plasmoid Acceleration Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, G.; Lee, K.; Jang, M.

    2010-12-01

    A method of estimating the lower bound of coronal magnetic field strength in the neighborhood of an ejecting plasmoid is presented. Based on the assumption that the plasma ejecta is within a magnetic island, an analytical expression for the force acting on the ejecta is derived. A rather simple calculation shows that the vertical force acting on a cylinder-like volume, whose lateral surface is a flux surface and whose magnetic axis is parallel to the horizontal, is just the difference in total pressure (magnetic pressure plus plasma pressure) below and above the volume. The method is applied to a limb coronal mass ejection event, and a lower bound of the magnetic field strength just below the CME core is estimated. The method is expected to provide useful information on the strength of reconnecting magnetic field if applied to X-ray plasma ejecta.

  4. 47 CFR 90.671 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.671 Section 90.671 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... coordinate their frequency usage with so-channel adjacent MTA licensees and all other affected parties....

  5. 47 CFR 90.671 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength limits. 90.671 Section 90.671 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... coordinate their frequency usage with so-channel adjacent MTA licensees and all other affected parties....

  6. AC Magnetic Field Frequency Dependence of Magnetoacoustic Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkung, M.; Wincheski, B.; Fulton, J. P.; DeNale, R.

    1992-01-01

    Our recent study has proved a strong correlation between the low-frequency AC applied magnetic field amplitude dependence of the asymmetry of the magnetoacoustic emission (MAE) burst and the strength of the domain wall-defect interaction in iron-base ferromagnets. For the present study the AC magnetic field frequency dependence of the asymmetry has been investigated in the range of 1 to 200 Hz. When represented by the third moment of the rectified acoustic emission pulses, the asymmetry becomes a bell-shaped function of frequency with its center located around 25 Hz. This experiment has been performed with low carbon, high yield stress steel specimens of three different levels of domain wall-defect interaction strength. The results show that the increase in the interaction strength causes a vertical down shift of the asymmetry in the entire frequency range investigated.

  7. Sunspot rotation. II. Effects of varying the field strength and twist of an emerging flux tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturrock, Z.; Hood, A. W.

    2016-09-01

    Context. Observations of flux emergence indicate that rotational velocities may develop within sunspots. However, the dependence of this rotation on sub-photospheric field strength and twist remains largely unknown. Aims: We investigate the effects of varying the initial field strength and twist of an emerging sub-photospheric magnetic flux tube on the rotation of the sunspots at the photosphere. Methods: We consider a simple model of a stratified domain with a sub-photospheric interior layer and three overlying atmospheric layers. A twisted arched flux tube is inserted in the interior and is allowed to rise into the atmosphere. To achieve this, the magnetohydrodynamic equations are solved using the Lagrangian-remap code, Lare3d. We perform a parameter study by independently varying the sub-photospheric magnetic field strength and twist. Results: Altering the initial magnetic field strength and twist of the flux tube significantly affects the tube's evolution and the rotational motions that develop at the photosphere. The rotation angle, vorticity, and current show a direct dependence on the initial field strength. We find that an increase in field strength increases the angle through which the fieldlines rotate, the length of the fieldlines extending into the atmosphere, and the magnetic energy transported to the atmosphere. This also affects the amount of residual twist in the interior. The length of the fieldlines is crucial as we predict the twist per unit length equilibrates to a lower value on longer fieldlines. No such direct dependence is found when we modify the twist of the magnetic field owing to the complex effect this has on the tension force acting on the tube. However, there is still a clear ordering in quantities such as the rotation angle, helicity, and free energy with higher initial twist cases being related to sunspots that rotate more rapidly, transporting more helicity and magnetic energy to the atmosphere.

  8. EFFECTS OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND ORIENTATION ON MOLECULAR CLOUD FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Heitsch, Fabian; Hartmann, Lee W.; Stone, James M.

    2009-04-10

    We present a set of numerical simulations addressing the effects of magnetic field strength and orientation on the flow-driven formation of molecular clouds. Fields perpendicular to the flows sweeping up the cloud can efficiently prevent the formation of massive clouds but permit the buildup of cold, diffuse filaments. Fields aligned with the flows lead to substantial clouds, whose degree of fragmentation and turbulence strongly depends on the background field strength. Adding a random field component leads to a 'selection effect' for molecular cloud formation: high column densities are only reached at locations where the field component perpendicular to the flows is vanishing. Searching for signatures of colliding flows should focus on the diffuse, warm gas, since the cold gas phase making up the cloud will have lost the information about the original flow direction because the magnetic fields redistribute the kinetic energy of the inflows.

  9. Metamaterial magnetoinductive lens performance as a function of field strength.

    PubMed

    Algarín, José M; Freire, Manuel J; Breuer, Felix; Behr, Volker C

    2014-10-01

    Metamaterials are artificial composites that exhibit exotic electromagnetic properties, as the ability of metamaterial slabs to behave like lenses with sub-wavelength resolution for the electric or the magnetic field. In previous works, the authors investigated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications of metamaterial slabs that behave like lenses for the radiofrequency magnetic field. In particular, the authors investigated the ability of MRI metamaterial lenses to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of surface coils, and to localize the field of view (FOV) of the coils, which is of interest for parallel MRI (pMRI) applications. A metamaterial lens placed between a surface coil and the tissue enhances the sensitivity of the coil. Although the metamaterial lens introduces losses which add to the losses of the tissue, the enhancement of the sensitivity can compensate these additional losses and the SNR of the coil is increased. In a previous work, an optimization procedure was followed to find a metamaterial structure with minimum losses that will maximize the SNR. This structure was termed magnetoinductive (MI) lens by the authors. The properties of surface coils in the presence of MI lenses were investigated in previous works at the proton frequency of 1.5 T systems. The different frequency dependence of the losses in both the MI lenses and the tissue encouraged us to investigate the performance of MI lenses at different frequencies. Thus, in the present work, the SNR and the pMRI ability of MI lenses are investigated as a function of field strength. A numerical analysis is carried out with an algorithm developed by the authors to predict the SNR behavior of a surface coil loaded with a MI lens at the proton frequencies of 0.5 T, 1.5 T and 3 T systems. The results show that, at 0.5 T, there is a gain in the SNR for short distances, but the SNR is highly degraded at deeper distances. However, at 1.5 T and 3T, the MI lenses provide a gain in the SNR up to a

  10. Relationship between field strength and arousal response in mice exposed to 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, R.S.; Duffy, P.H.; Sacher, G.A.; Ehret, C.F.

    1983-01-01

    White-footed mice, Peromyscus leucopus, were exposed to 60-Hz electric fields to study the relationship between field strength and three measures of the transient arousal response previously reported to occur with exposures at 100 kV/m. Five groups of 12 mice each were given a series of four 1-h exposures, separated by an hour, with each group exposed at one of the following field strengths: 75, 50, 35, 25, and 10 kV/m; 8 additional mice were sham-exposed with no voltage applied to the field generator. All mice were experimentally naive before the start of the experiment, and all exposures occurred during the inactive (lights-on) phase of the circadian cycle. The first exposure produced immediate increases in arousal measures, but subsequent exposures had no significant effect on any measure. These arousal responses were defined by significant increases of gross motor activity, carbon dioxide production, and oxygen consumption, and were frequently recorded with field strengths of 50 kV/m or higher. Significant arousal responses rarely occurred with exposures at lower field strengths. Responses of mice exposed at 75 and 50 kV/m were similar to previously described transient arousal responses in mice exposed to 100-kV/m electric fields. Less than half of the mice in each of the field strength groups below 50 kV/m showed arousal response based on Z (standard) scores, but the arousals of the mice that did respond were similar to those of mice exposed at higher field strengths. Polynomial regression was used to calculate the field strength producing the greatest increases for each of the arousal measures. The results show that the amplitude of the transient arousal response is related to the strength of the electric field, but different measures of arousal may have different relationships to field strength.

  11. 47 CFR 73.683 - Field strength contours and presumptive determination of field strength at individual locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... at distances beyond about 48.3 kilometers (30 miles). Theory would indicate that the field strengths..., 445 12th St., SW., Reference Information Center, Room CY-A257, Washington, DC, or at the FCC's Office..., subscriber, and local market contained in 47 CFR 76.66(a) apply to this paragraph (f)....

  12. 47 CFR 73.683 - Field strength contours and presumptive determination of field strength at individual locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... at distances beyond about 48.3 kilometers (30 miles). Theory would indicate that the field strengths..., 445 12th St., SW., Reference Information Center, Room CY-A257, Washington, DC, or at the FCC's Office..., subscriber, and local market contained in 47 CFR 76.66(a) apply to this paragraph (f)....

  13. Momentum dependence of local fields in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrio, C.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1992-02-01

    We report measurements of microscopic local fields in four polycrystalline solids obtained in two different manners. In N2, the local field shows a striking increase with momentum out to our maximum measured value of 1.1 Å-1, while in O2 the local field increases at low momentum and reaches a maximum at 0.75 Å-1. In Ar, the dielectric constant, which is directly related to the local-field strength, shows a sharp increase but reaches a maximum and begins to decrease at high momentum. In Kr, the dielectric constant shows only a small increase before reaching a maximum. For the cubic cases, we find reasonable agreement with point-dipole calculations. These results suggest that in many cubic materials, the local-field strength near the Brillouin-zone boundary may be up to a factor of 4 stronger than the Clausius-Mossotti value at the zone center.

  14. Rate dependent of strength in metallic glasses at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y W; Bian, X L; Wu, S W; Hussain, I; Jia, Y D; Yi, J; Wang, G

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the strength at the macroscale and the elastic deformation as well as shear cracking behavior at the microscale of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated. The temperatures of 298 K and 77 K as well as the strain rate ranging from 10(-6) s(-1) to 10(-2) s(-1) are applied to the BMGs, in which the mechanical responses of the BMGs are profiled through the compression tests. The yield strength is associated with the activation of the elementary deformation unit, which is insensitive to the strain rate. The maximum compressive strength is linked to the crack propagation during shear fracture process, which is influenced by the strain rate. The cryogenic temperature of 77 K significantly improves the yield strength and the maximum compressive strength of the BMGs. PMID:27270688

  15. Rate dependent of strength in metallic glasses at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y. W.; Bian, X. L.; Wu, S. W.; Hussain, I.; Jia, Y. D.; Yi, J.; Wang, G.

    2016-01-01

    The correlation between the strength at the macroscale and the elastic deformation as well as shear cracking behavior at the microscale of bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) is investigated. The temperatures of 298 K and 77 K as well as the strain rate ranging from 10−6 s−1 to 10−2 s−1 are applied to the BMGs, in which the mechanical responses of the BMGs are profiled through the compression tests. The yield strength is associated with the activation of the elementary deformation unit, which is insensitive to the strain rate. The maximum compressive strength is linked to the crack propagation during shear fracture process, which is influenced by the strain rate. The cryogenic temperature of 77 K significantly improves the yield strength and the maximum compressive strength of the BMGs. PMID:27270688

  16. The Field Dependence/Field Independence of Information Professional Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kerry A.; White, Marilyn Domas

    1981-01-01

    Data gathered from a sample of 179 students at the College of Library and Information Science, University of Maryland, supported hypotheses relating field dependence/field independence to functional and institutional preferences and to undergraduate majors. (RBF)

  17. Alcoholism, Field Dependency and Organic Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafferty, Patricia; Kahn, Marvin W.

    Although research has suggested that field dependency is a relatively stable characteristic of alcoholics, the results have been confounded by the use of different measures and different time intervals. To investigate the degree of organic brain impairment and its association with measured field dependency amongst alcoholics, 41 male alcoholics,…

  18. Controlling flow direction in nanochannels by electric field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiang; Zhao, Tianshou; Li, Zhigang

    2015-08-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to study the flow behavior of CsF solutions in nanochannels under external electric fields E . It is found that the channel surface energy greatly affects the flow behavior. In channels of high surface energy, water molecules, on average, move in the same direction as that of the electric field regardless of the strength of E . In low surface energy channels, however, water transports in the opposite direction to the electric field at weak E and the flow direction is changed when E becomes sufficiently large. The direction change of water flow is attributed to the coupled effects of different water-ion interactions, inhomogeneous water viscosity, and ion distribution changes caused by the electric field. The flow direction change observed in this work may be employed for flow control in complex micro- or nanofluidic systems.

  19. Dielectronic recombination as a function of electric field strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reisenfeld, Daniel B.

    1992-01-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) is the dominant recombination mechanism at coronal temperatures and densities. We present a procedure for calculating DR rate coefficients as a function of electric field strength and apply this method to carbon ions. We focus on the competing effects of enhancement by plasma microfields and rate decrease through collisional excitation and ionization. We find that, in the case of C(3+), a significant rate enhancement results, leading to a reinterpretation of C IV emission-line intensities in the sun and late-type stars. We further consider how macroscopic electric fields, in particular motional electric fields, can affect DR rate coefficients, demonstrating dramatic rate increases for a number of the carbon ions.

  20. 47 CFR 18.305 - Field strength limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...Any 2515 300300 Ultrasonic Below 490 kHz Below 500500 or more 2,400/F(kHz)2,400/F(kHz)× SQRT(power/500) 300 3300 490 to 1,600 kHzAbove 1,600 kHz AnyAny 24,000/F(kHz)15 3030 Induction cooking ranges Below 90 kHzOn or above 90 kHz AnyAny 1,500300 430 430 1 Field strength may not exceed 10 μV/m at 1600...

  1. Paleomagnetic field strength over the last million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, L. B.; Johnson, C. L.; Constable, C. G.

    2012-04-01

    Absolute paleomagnetic intensity data derived from thermally magnetized lavas and archeological objects provide information about past geomagnetic field behavior, but the average field strength, its variability, and the expected statistical distribution of these observations remain uncertain despite growing data sets. We present statistical characterizations of the 0-1 Ma field strength, in terms of virtual axial dipole moment (VADM), using data from the PINT, MagIC, and Geomagia50 databases. Uneven temporal sampling and large age uncertainties in the available data produce biased estimates for the mean field and its statistical distribution. We describe and apply bootstrap resampling techniques to correct for these effects. The influence of material type is assessed using independent data compilations to compare Holocene data from lava flows, Submarine Basaltic Glass (SBG), and archeological objects. The comparison to SBG is inconclusive because of dating issues, but paleointensity estimates from lavas are on average about 10% higher than for archeological materials and show greater dispersion. A further interesting basis for comparison is provided by PADM2M, a continuous model of temporal variations in axial dipole moment principally derived from relative paleointensity time series, but calibrated by incorporating absolute measurements. On average, absolute VADMs are higher than the axial dipole moment estimated in PADM2M, with greater spread in the VADM distribution. Both VADM and PADM2M distribution estimates from lavas show more structure than might be expected: neither has a smooth, unimodal distribution despite the large numbers of data used in the estimation. Simulations from a stochastic model based on the geomagnetic field spectrum demonstrate that long period intensity variations can have a strong impact on the observed distributions and could plausibly explain apparent bimodality.

  2. Symmetry-, time-, and temperature-dependent strength of carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrica, Traian; Hua, Ming; Yakobson, Boris I.

    2006-01-01

    Although the strength of carbon nanotubes has been of great interest, their ideal value has remained elusive both experimentally and theoretically. Here, we present a comprehensive analysis of underlying atomic mechanisms and evaluate the yield strain for arbitrary nanotubes at realistic conditions. For this purpose, we combine detailed quantum mechanical computations of failure nucleation and transition-state barriers with the probabilistic approach of the rate theory. The numerical results are then summarized in a concise set of equations for the breaking strain. We reveal a competition between two alternative routes of brittle bond breaking and plastic relaxation, determine the domains of their dominance, and map the nanotube strength as a function of chiral symmetry, tensile test time, and temperature. PMID:16581906

  3. Dependence of tablet brittleness on tensile strength and porosity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xingchu; Chang, Shao-Yu; Osei-Yeboah, Frederick; Paul, Shubhajit; Perumalla, Sathyanarayana Reddy; Shi, Limin; Sun, Wei-Jhe; Zhou, Qun; Sun, Changquan Calvin

    2015-09-30

    An analysis of data collected from 25 sets of diverse pharmaceutical powders has identified that an exponential growth function satisfactorily describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tablet porosity while a power law function well describes the relationship between tablet brittleness and tensile strength. These equations have the potential to facilitate better characterization of tablet mechanical properties and to guide the design and optimization of pharmaceutical tablet products. PMID:26226338

  4. Effect of static magnetic field on experimental dermal wound strength

    PubMed Central

    Ekici, Yahya; Aydogan, Cem; Balcik, Cenk; Haberal, Nihan; Kirnap, Mahir; Moray, Gokhan; Haberal, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Context: An animal model. Aim: We sought to evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields on cutaneous wound healing. Materials and Methods: Male Wistar rats were used. Wounds were created on the backs of all rats. Forty of these animals (M group) had NeFeB magnets placed in contact with the incisions, either parallel (Pa) and perpendicular (Pr) to the incision. The other 40 animals (sham [S] group) had nonmagnetized NeFeB bars placed in the same directions as the implanted animals. Half of the animals in each group were killed and assessed for healing on postoperative day 7 and the other half on postoperative day 14. The following assessments were done: gross healing, mechanical strength, and histopathology. Statistical Analysis Used: Intergroup differences were compared by using the Mann-Whitney U or t test. Values for P less than 0.05 were accepted as significant. Results and Conclusions: There were no differences between the magnetic and sham animals with respect to gross healing parameters. The mechanical strength was different between groups. On postoperative day 14, the MPr14 had significantly higher scores than the other groups. When static, high-power, magnetic fields are placed perpendicular to the wound, increased wound healing occurs in the skin of the experimental model. PMID:23162219

  5. On the Collective Magnetic Field Strength and Vector Structure of Dark Umbral Cores Measured by the Hinode Spectropolarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, T. A.

    2014-05-01

    We study 7530 sunspot umbrae and pores measured by the Hinode Spectropolarimeter (SP) between November 2006 and November 2012. We primarily seek confirmation of the long term secular decrease in the mean magnetic field strength of sunspot umbrae found by Penn and Livingston ( IAU Symp. 273, 126, 2011) between 1998 and 2011. The excellent SP photometric properties and full vector magnetic field determinations from full-Stokes Milne-Eddington inversions are used to address the interrelated properties of the magnetic field strength and brightness temperature for all umbral cores. We find non-linear relationships between magnetic field strength and umbral temperature (and continuum contrast), as well as between umbral radius and magnetic field strength. Using disambiguated vector data, we find that the azimuths measured in the umbral cores reflect an organization weakly influenced by Joy's law. The large selection of umbrae displays a log-normal size spectrum similar to earlier solar cycles. Influenced by the amplitude of the solar cycle and the non-linear relationship between umbral size and core magnetic field strength, the distribution of core magnetic field strengths, fit most effectively with a skew-normal distribution, shows a weak solar cycle dependence. Yet, the mean magnetic field strength does not show a significant long term trend.

  6. Field-dependence/field-independence and labeling of facial affect.

    PubMed

    Pellegreno, D; Stickle, F

    1979-04-01

    56 high school students were administered the Group Embedded Figures Test and the Pictures of Facial Affect. A low Pearson product-moment correlation of .02 was obtained between the measures. Data indicated that field-dependent and field-independent individuals were not signficantly different in their skills of labeling pictures of facial affect.

  7. Spin resonance strength of a localized rf magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2006-07-01

    Spin-resonance strength produced by a localized rf field has been a focus of recent publications [V. S. Morozov , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 7, 024002 (2004).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.7.024002; M. A. Leonova (to be published).; T. Roser, in Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering, edited by A. W. Chao and M. Tigner (World Scientific, Singapore, 1999), p. 151.; M. Bai, W. W. MacKay, and T. Roser, Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 099001 (2005).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.099001; V. S. Morozov , Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 8, 099002 (2005).PRABFM1098-440210.1103/PhysRevSTAB.8.099002]. This paper discusses the debated factor of 2, and provides a formula to calculate the component enhanced by the induced betatron motion.

  8. Rate Dependent Deformation and Strength Analysis of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1999-01-01

    A research program is being undertaken to develop rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composite materials. In previous work in this program, strain-rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations used to analyze polymers have been implemented into a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics method. In the current work, modifications to the micromechanics model have been implemented to improve the calculation of the effective inelastic strain. Additionally, modifications to the polymer constitutive model are discussed in which pressure dependence is incorporated into the equations in order to improve the calculation of constituent and composite shear stresses. The Hashin failure criterion is implemented into the analysis method to allow for the calculation of ply level failure stresses. The deformation response and failure stresses for two representative uniaxial polymer matrix composites, IM7/977-2 and AS4-PEEK, are predicted for varying strain rates and fiber orientations. The predicted results compare favorably to experimentally obtained values.

  9. Friction behavior of magnetorheological fluids with different material types and magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Chul-Hee

    2016-01-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) fluid is a type of a smart material that can control its mechanical properties under a magnetic field. Iron particles in MR fluid form chain structures in the direction of an applied magnetic field, which is known as MR effect, resulting in variation of stiffness, shear modulus, damping and tribological characteristics of MR fluid. As MR effect depends on the density of particles in the fluid or the strength of a magnetic field, the experiments are conducted to evaluate the friction property under reciprocating motion by changing the types of MR fluid and the strength of a magnetic field. The material of aluminum, brass, and steel are chosen for specimen as they are the most common material in mechanical applications. The surfaces of specimen are also observed by optical microscope before and after experiments to compare the surfaces with test conditions. The comparing results show that the friction coefficient increases as the strength of a magnetic field increases in regardless of types of MR fluid or the material. Also the density of particle in MR fluid affects the friction characteristic. The results from this research can be used to improve the performance of mechanical applications using MR fluid.

  10. Instructional Media, Attitude Change and Field Dependence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloock, Terryl R.; And Others

    The effectiveness of two media types (sound film and still slides with audiotape) in changing student attitudes, and their impact on students varying in field dependency levels was examined. Subjects, 82 college students scoring at the high and low extremes of the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT), were randomly assigned to either a (1) multi-cue…

  11. Field dependence in the institutionalized elderly.

    PubMed

    Mosley, J; Guyot, G

    1987-01-01

    The institutional-inducement hypothesis of field dependence regression in the elderly was assessed by administering the Children's Embedded Figures Test (CEFT) to a group of elderly upon admission to a nursing home and to a group of community-living elderly. Both groups were retested four months later. The institutionalized group exhibited significantly lower CEFT scores on initial testing than the community-living group. In addition, the CEFT scores for the institutionalized group declined significantly from pretest to posttest. The results suggested that greater field dependence in the institutionalized elderly may be due to pre-institutional dependence regression that continues after institutionalization. Additional measures of mental status and activity levels were also lower in the institutionalized group upon admission supporting a pre-institutional generalized regression effect.

  12. Delayed Ego Strength Development in Opioid Dependent Adolescents and Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Abramoff, Benjamin A; Lange, Hannah L H; Matson, Steven C; Cottrill, Casey B; Bridge, Jeffrey A; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Bonny, Andrea E

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate ego strengths, in the context of Erikson's framework, among adolescents and young adults diagnosed with opioid dependence as compared to non-drug using youth. Methods. Opioid dependent (n = 51) and non-drug using control (n = 31) youth completed the self-administered Psychosocial Inventory of Ego Strengths (PIES). The PIES assesses development in the framework of Erikson's ego strength stages. Multivariate linear regression modeling assessed the independent association of the primary covariate (opioid dependent versus control) as well as potential confounding variables (e.g., psychiatric comorbidities, intelligence) with total PIES score. Results. Mean total PIES score was significantly lower in opioid dependent youth (231.65 ± 30.39 opioid dependent versus 270.67 ± 30.06 control; p < 0.01). Evaluation of the PIES subscores found significant (p < 0.05) delays in all ego strength areas (hope, will, purpose, competence, fidelity, love, care, and wisdom). When adjusting for potential confounders, opioid dependence remained a significant (p < 0.001) independent predictor of total PIES score. Conclusion. Adolescents with opioid dependence demonstrated significant delays in ego strength development. A treatment approach acknowledging this delay may be needed in the counseling and treatment of adolescents with opioid dependence.

  13. Delayed Ego Strength Development in Opioid Dependent Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Abramoff, Benjamin A.; Lange, Hannah L. H.; Matson, Steven C.; Cottrill, Casey B.; Bridge, Jeffrey A.; Abdel-Rasoul, Mahmoud; Bonny, Andrea E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate ego strengths, in the context of Erikson's framework, among adolescents and young adults diagnosed with opioid dependence as compared to non-drug using youth. Methods. Opioid dependent (n = 51) and non-drug using control (n = 31) youth completed the self-administered Psychosocial Inventory of Ego Strengths (PIES). The PIES assesses development in the framework of Erikson's ego strength stages. Multivariate linear regression modeling assessed the independent association of the primary covariate (opioid dependent versus control) as well as potential confounding variables (e.g., psychiatric comorbidities, intelligence) with total PIES score. Results. Mean total PIES score was significantly lower in opioid dependent youth (231.65 ± 30.39 opioid dependent versus 270.67 ± 30.06 control; p < 0.01). Evaluation of the PIES subscores found significant (p < 0.05) delays in all ego strength areas (hope, will, purpose, competence, fidelity, love, care, and wisdom). When adjusting for potential confounders, opioid dependence remained a significant (p < 0.001) independent predictor of total PIES score. Conclusion. Adolescents with opioid dependence demonstrated significant delays in ego strength development. A treatment approach acknowledging this delay may be needed in the counseling and treatment of adolescents with opioid dependence. PMID:26664819

  14. Heating liquid dielectrics by time dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalife, A.; Pathak, U.; Richert, R.

    2011-10-01

    Steady state and time-resolved dielectric relaxation experiments are performed at high fields on viscous glycerol and the effects of energy absorption from the electric field are studied. Time resolution is obtained by a sinusoidal field whose amplitude is switched from a low to a high level and by recording voltage and current traces with an oscilloscope during this transition. Based on their distinct time and frequency dependences, three sources of modifying the dynamics and dielectric loss via an increase in the effective temperature can be distinguished: electrode temperature, real sample temperature, and configurational temperatures of the modes that absorbed the energy. Isothermal conditions that are desired for focusing on the configurational temperature changes (as in dielectric hole burning and related techniques) are maintained only for very thin samples and for moderate power levels. For high frequencies, say ν > 1 MHz, changes of the real temperature will exceed the effects of configurational temperatures in the case of macroscopic samples. Regarding microwave chemistry, heating via cell phone use, and related situations in which materials are subject to fields involving frequencies beyond the MHz regime, we conclude that changes in the configurational (or fictive) temperatures remain negligible compared with the increase of the real temperature. This simplifies the assessment of how time dependent electric fields modify the properties of materials.

  15. Carboxylated magnetic nanoparticles as MRI contrast agents: Relaxation measurements at different field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jedlovszky-Hajdú, Angéla; Tombácz, Etelka; Bányai, István; Babos, Magor; Palkó, András

    2012-09-01

    At the moment the biomedical applications of magnetic fluids are the subject of intensive scientific interest. In the present work, magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized and stabilized in aqueous medium with different carboxylic compounds (citric acid (CA), polyacrylic acid (PAA), and sodium oleate (NaOA)), in order to prepare well stabilized magnetic fluids (MFs). The magnetic nanoparticles can be used in the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as contrast agents. Magnetic resonance relaxation measurements of the above MFs were performed at different field strengths (i.e., 0.47, 1.5 and 9.4 T) to reveal the field strength dependence of their magnetic responses, and to compare them with that of ferucarbotran, a well-known superparamagnetic contrast agent. The measurements showed characteristic differences between the tested magnetic fluids stabilized by carboxylic compounds and ferucarbotran. It is worthy of note that our magnetic fluids have the highest r2 relaxivities at the field strength of 1.5 T, where the most of the MRI works in worldwide.

  16. Field dependence-independence of basketball referees.

    PubMed

    Tabernero, B; Márquez, S

    1999-06-01

    This study examined the field dependence-independence of basketball referees. A total of 205 subjects (nonathletes, athletes active in individual or team sports, and referees) completed the Group Embedded Figures Test. Analysis indicated no significant differences among referees due to age, group, or number of years officiating. Statistically significant lower scores were obtained by team-sport players and referees than by nonathletes. Mean scores of team-sport players and referees did not differ significantly.

  17. Harmonic generation at high field strengths - Frequency shifts and saturation phenomena. [optical mixing technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stappaerts, E. A.

    1975-01-01

    Optical harmonic generation and mixing in the gas phase has been proposed as a technique for the generation of coherent radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray spectral region. At the high field strengths required by these processes the interaction between atoms and the electromagnetic field shows intensity-dependent resonances. In this paper we modify harmonic generation theory to include the effect of these frequency shifts. Closed-form expressions for generated dipole moment, absorption probability, and coherence length are presented. The most important consequences of frequency shifts on resonantly enhanced processes are that the pump laser must be tuned away from the small-field resonance frequency, that the conversion efficiency may saturate, and that the dispersion of the medium may change sign. As an example, the generation of 198-A radiation by a five-photon mixing process in Li(+) is considered.

  18. Scale-dependent measurements of meteorite strength: Implications for asteroid fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Asphaug, Erik; Garvie, Laurence A. J.; Rai, Ashwin; Johnston, Joel; Borkowski, Luke; Datta, Siddhant; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Morris, Melissa A.

    2016-10-01

    Measuring the strengths of asteroidal materials is important for developing mitigation strategies for potential Earth impactors and for understanding properties of in situ materials on asteroids during human and robotic exploration. Studies of asteroid disruption and fragmentation have typically used the strengths determined from terrestrial analog materials, although questions have been raised regarding the suitability of these materials. The few published measurements of meteorite strength are typically significantly greater than those estimated from the stratospheric breakup of meter-sized meteoroids. Given the paucity of relevant strength data, the scale-varying strength properties of meteoritic and asteroidal materials are poorly constrained. Based on our uniaxial failure studies of centimeter-sized cubes of a carbonaceous and ordinary chondrite, we develop the first Weibull failure distribution analysis of meteorites. This Weibull distribution projected to meter scales, overlaps the strengths determined from asteroidal airbursts and can be used to predict properties of to the 100 m scale. In addition, our analysis shows that meter-scale boulders on asteroids are significantly weaker than small pieces of meteorites, while large meteorites surviving on Earth are selected by attrition. Further, the common use of terrestrial analog materials to predict scale-dependent strength properties significantly overestimates the strength of meter-sized asteroidal materials and therefore is unlikely well suited for the modeling of asteroid disruption and fragmentation. Given the strength scale-dependence determined for carbonaceous and ordinary chondrite meteorites, our results suggest that boulders of similar composition on asteroids will have compressive strengths significantly less than typical terrestrial rocks.

  19. Postoperative irradiation impairs or enhances wound strength depending on time of administration

    SciTech Connect

    Vegesna, V.; McBride, W.H.; Withers, H.R.

    1995-08-01

    Irradiation can complicate surgical wound healing, yet little is known of the importance of the time between surgery and irradiation on this process. This study investigated the impact of post-operative irradiation on gain in wound tensile strength in a murine skin model. Irradiation on the same day as wounding or to 2-day-old wounds reduced wound tensile strength. In contrast, postoperative irradiation delivered at 7, 9 and 14 days transiently enhanced wound tensile strength, as measure d 3 but not 4 or 5 weeks later. This effect was independent of the inclusion (hemi-body) or exclusion (skin alone) of the hematopoietic system in the field of irradiation. Radiation-enhanced wound tensile strength was greater and occurred earlier after higher radiation doses. Even though the effect of irradiation in enhancing wound tensile strength is transitory, it could be important in assisting early wound healing. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Direct observation of momentum-dependent local-field effects in solid nitrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarrio, C.; Schnatterly, S. E.

    1991-02-01

    We have measured the momentum dependence of the 1Πg<--X 1Σ+g transition in cubic solid nitrogen. We have evaluated the oscillator strength of the transition and compared it to the markedly different strength found in analogous measurements on the gas, and conclude that local-field effects present in the solid are responsible for the differences found. This is the first momentum-dependent measurement of local fields in a solid. The local-field enhancement factor increases by about a factor of 3 over the momentum range covered, and is consistent with a simple model calculation for small momenta.

  1. Discrete states of synaptic strength in a stochastic model of spike-timing-dependent plasticity.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Terry

    2010-01-01

    A stochastic model of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) postulates that single synapses presented with a single spike pair exhibit all-or-none quantal jumps in synaptic strength. The amplitudes of the jumps are independent of spiking timing, but their probabilities do depend on spiking timing. By making the amplitudes of both upward and downward transitions equal, synapses then occupy only a discrete set of states of synaptic strength. We explore the impact of a finite, discrete set of strength states on our model, finding three principal results. First, a finite set of strength states limits the capacity of a single synapse to express the standard, exponential STDP curve. We derive the expression for the expected change in synaptic strength in response to a standard, experimental spike pair protocol, finding a deviation from exponential behavior. We fit our prediction to recent data from single dendritic spine heads, finding results that are somewhat better than exponential fits. Second, we show that the fixed-point dynamics of our model regulate the upward and downward transition probabilities so that these are on average equal, leading to a uniform distribution of synaptic strength states. However, third, under long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) protocols, these probabilities are unequal, skewing the distribution away from uniformity. If the number of states of strength is at least of order 10, then we find that three effective states of synaptic strength appear, consistent with some experimental data on ternary-strength synapses. On this view, LTP and LTD protocols may therefore be saturating protocols.

  2. Yield strength dependence on strain rate of molybdenum-alloy nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Loya, P. E.; Peng, C.; Zhang, P.; Zhang, J.; Lou, J.; Xia, Y. Z.; Bei, H.; George, E. P.; Gao, Y. F.

    2014-06-23

    The yield strength dependence on strain rate was studied for molybdenum-alloy nanofibers with varying initial dislocation density at three different pre-strain levels. In-situ tensile experiments at three displacement rates were carried out in a scanning electron microscope. Yield strength and its scatter decreased as a function of the pre-strain level for different displacement rates. A statistical model was used to analyze the results, and a negative strain rate dependence was inferred from the yield experiments. This finding suggests the need for theoretical investigations since classical models such as dynamic strain aging may have limitations at such nanoscales.

  3. Scale-Dependent Measurements of Meteorite Strength and Fragmentation: Tamdakht (H5) and Allende (CV3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, Desireé; Asphaug, Erik; Garvie, Laurence; Morris, Melissa; Rai, Ashwin; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2015-11-01

    Meteorites are pieces of natural space debris, which have survived ejection from their parent bodies and passage through the Earth’s atmosphere. As such, they provide a unique opportunity to study the fundamental physical and mechanical properties of early Solar System materials. But to date, few direct studies of physical properties have been conducted on meteoritic materials, in contrast to extensive chemical and isotopic analyses. It is important to determine these properties as they are related to disruption and fragmentation of bolides and asteroids, and activities related to sample return and hazardous asteroid mitigation. Here we present results from an ongoing suite of scale-dependent studies of meteorite strength and fragmentation. The meteorites studied are Tamdakht (H5), an ordinary chondrite that exhibits a heterogeneous structure criss-crossed with shock veins and centimeter-sized regions of white and light grey, and the carbonaceous chondrite Allende (CV3), which suitable pieces are light grey with abundant chondrules and CAIs. Uniaxial compression tests are performed on meteorite cubes ranging from 0.5 to 4 centimeters using an Instron 5985 frame with a 250 kN load cell and compression fixtures with 145mm diameter radial platens. All tests are conducted at room temperature and in displacement control with a displacement rate of 0.25 mm per minute to ensure quasi-static conditions. A three-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) system that enables noncontact measurement of displacement and strain fields is also used. Analysis of the strength and failure process of the two meteorite types is conducted and compared to terrestrial materials.

  4. Scale-Dependent Measurements of Meteorite Strength and Fragmentation: Tamdakht (H5) and Allende (CV3).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotto-Figueroa, D.; Asphaug, E. I.; Garvie, L. A. J.; Morris, M. A.; Rai, A.; Chattopadhyay, A.; Johnston, J.; Borkowski, L.

    2015-12-01

    Meteorites are pieces of natural space debris, which have survived ejection from their parent bodies and passage through the Earth's atmosphere. As such, they provide a unique opportunity to study the fundamental physical and mechanical properties of early Solar System materials. But to date, few direct studies of physical properties have been conducted on meteoritic materials, in contrast to extensive chemical and isotopic analyses. It is important to determine these properties as they are related to disruption and fragmentation of bolides and asteroids, and activities related to sample return and hazardous asteroid mitigation. Here we present results from an ongoing suite of scale-dependent studies of meteorite strength and fragmentation. The meteorites studied are Tamdakht (H5), an ordinary chondrite that exhibits a heterogeneous structure criss-crossed with shock veins and centimeter-sized regions of white and light grey, and the carbonaceous chondrite Allende (CV3), which suitable pieces are light grey with abundant chondrules and CAIs. Uniaxial compression tests are performed on meteorite cubes ranging from 0.5 to 4 centimeters using an Instron 5985 frame with a 250 kN load cell and compression fixtures with 145mm diameter radial platens. All tests are conducted at room temperature and in displacement control with a displacement rate of 0.25 mm per minute to ensure quasi-static conditions. A three-dimensional digital image correlation (DIC) system that enables noncontact measurement of displacement and strain fields is also used. Analysis of the strength and failure process of the two meteorite types is conducted and compared to terrestrial materials.

  5. 47 CFR 27.804 - Field strength limits at WMTS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Field strength limits at WMTS facility. 27.804 Section 27.804 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.804 Field strength limits at WMTS facility....

  6. 47 CFR 27.804 - Field strength limits at WMTS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Field strength limits at WMTS facility. 27.804 Section 27.804 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.804 Field strength limits at WMTS facility....

  7. 47 CFR 27.804 - Field strength limits at WMTS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Field strength limits at WMTS facility. 27.804 Section 27.804 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.804 Field strength limits at WMTS facility....

  8. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  9. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  10. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  11. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  12. 47 CFR 73.61 - AM directional antenna field strength measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false AM directional antenna field strength... RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES AM Broadcast Stations § 73.61 AM directional antenna field strength measurements. (a) Each AM station using a directional antenna with monitoring point...

  13. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation. 2.1053 Section 2.1053 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Certification § 2.1053 Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation....

  14. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation. 2.1053 Section 2.1053 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Certification § 2.1053 Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation....

  15. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation. 2.1053 Section 2.1053 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Certification § 2.1053 Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation....

  16. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation. 2.1053 Section 2.1053 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL... Procedures Certification § 2.1053 Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation....

  17. 47 CFR 27.804 - Field strength limits at WMTS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Field strength limits at WMTS facility. 27.804 Section 27.804 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.804 Field strength limits at WMTS facility....

  18. 47 CFR 27.804 - Field strength limits at WMTS facility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Field strength limits at WMTS facility. 27.804 Section 27.804 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.804 Field strength limits at WMTS facility....

  19. Optical Field-Strength Polarization of Two-Mode Single-Photon States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linares, J.; Nistal, M. C.; Barral, D.; Moreno, V.

    2010-01-01

    We present a quantum analysis of two-mode single-photon states based on the probability distributions of the optical field strength (or position quadrature) in order to describe their quantum polarization characteristics, where polarization is understood as a significative confinement of the optical field-strength values on determined regions of…

  20. Field dependent magnetic anisotropy of Fe1-xZnx thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Damon A.; McClure, A.; Kuster, C. M.; Rugheimer, P.; Idzerda, Y. U.

    2013-05-01

    Using longitudinal magneto-optical Kerr effect in combination with a variable strength rotating magnetic field, called the Rotational Magneto-Optic Kerr Effect (ROTMOKE) method, we show that the magnetic anisotropy for thin Fe82Zn18 single crystal films, grown on MgO(001) substrates, depends linearly on the strength of the applied magnetic field at low fields but is constant (saturates) at fields greater than 350 Oe. The torque moment curves generated using ROTMOKE are well fit with a model that accounts for the uniaxial and cubic anisotropy with the addition of a cubic anisotropy that depends linearly on the applied magnetic field. The field dependent term is evidence of a large effect on the effective magnetic anisotropy in Fe1-xZnx thin films by the magnetostriction.

  1. Field dependent magnetic anisotropy of Ga0.2Fe0.8 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resnick, Damon A.; McClure, A.; Kuster, C. M.; Rugheimer, P.; Idzerda, Y. U.

    2011-04-01

    Using longitudinal MOKE in combination with a variable strength rotating magnetic field, called the rotational MOKE (ROTMOKE) method, we show that the magnetic anisotropy for a Ga0.2Fe0.8 single crystal film with a thickness of 17 nm, grown on GaAs (001) with a thick ZnSe buffer layer, depends linearly on the strength of the applied magnetic field. The torque moment curves generated using ROTMOKE are well fit with a model that accounts for the uniaxial, cubic, or fourfold anisotropy, as well as additional terms with a linear dependence on the applied magnetic field. The uniaxial and cubic anisotropy fields, taken from both the hard and the easy axis scans, are seen to remain field independent. The field dependent terms are evidence of a large affect of the magnetostriction and its contribution to the effective magnetic anisotropy in GaxFe1-x thin films.

  2. Radial transport of large-scale magnetic fields in accretion disks. I. Steady solutions and an upper limit on the vertical field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Okuzumi, Satoshi; Takeuchi, Taku; Muto, Takayuki

    2014-04-20

    Large-scale magnetic fields are key ingredients of magnetically driven disk accretion. We study how large-scale poloidal fields evolve in accretion disks, with the primary aim of quantifying the viability of magnetic accretion mechanisms in protoplanetary disks. We employ a kinematic mean-field model for poloidal field transport and focus on steady states where inward advection of a field balances with outward diffusion due to effective resistivities. We analytically derive the steady-state radial distribution of poloidal fields in highly conducting accretion disks. The analytic solution reveals an upper limit on the strength of large-scale vertical fields attainable in steady states. Any excess poloidal field will diffuse away within a finite time, and we demonstrate this with time-dependent numerical calculations of the mean-field equations. We apply this upper limit to large-scale vertical fields threading protoplanetary disks. We find that the maximum attainable strength is about 0.1 G at 1 AU, and about 1 mG at 10 AU from the central star. When combined with recent magnetic accretion models, the maximum field strength translates into the maximum steady-state accretion rate of ∼10{sup –7} M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, in agreement with observations. We also find that the maximum field strength is ∼1 kG at the surface of the central star provided that the disk extends down to the stellar surface. This implies that any excess stellar poloidal field of strength ≳ kG can be transported to the surrounding disk. This might in part resolve the magnetic flux problem in star formation.

  3. Ionic strength dependent vesicle adsorption and phase behavior of anionic phospholipids on a gold substrate.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Sumit Kumar; Seneca, Senne; Ethirajan, Anitha; Neupane, Shova; Renner, Frank Uwe; Losada-Pérez, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    The authors report on the effect of ionic strength on the formation of supported vesicle layers of anionic phospholipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-glycerol (DMPG) and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS) onto gold. Using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring the authors show that vesicle adsorption is mainly governed by NaCl concentration, reflecting the importance of electrostatic interactions in anionic lipids, as compared to zwitterionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. At low ionic strength, low or no adsorption is observed as a result of vesicle-vesicle electrostatic repulsion. At medium ionic strength, the negative charges of DMPG and DMPS are screened resulting in larger adsorption and a highly dissipative intact vesicle layer. In addition, DMPS exhibits a peculiar behavior at high ionic strength that depends on the temperature of the process. PMID:26746165

  4. Ionic strength dependent vesicle adsorption and phase behavior of anionic phospholipids on a gold substrate.

    PubMed

    Pramanik, Sumit Kumar; Seneca, Senne; Ethirajan, Anitha; Neupane, Shova; Renner, Frank Uwe; Losada-Pérez, Patricia

    2016-03-08

    The authors report on the effect of ionic strength on the formation of supported vesicle layers of anionic phospholipids 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-glycerol (DMPG) and dimyristoylphosphatidylserine (DMPS) onto gold. Using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring the authors show that vesicle adsorption is mainly governed by NaCl concentration, reflecting the importance of electrostatic interactions in anionic lipids, as compared to zwitterionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. At low ionic strength, low or no adsorption is observed as a result of vesicle-vesicle electrostatic repulsion. At medium ionic strength, the negative charges of DMPG and DMPS are screened resulting in larger adsorption and a highly dissipative intact vesicle layer. In addition, DMPS exhibits a peculiar behavior at high ionic strength that depends on the temperature of the process.

  5. Ionic strength-dependent changes in tentacular ion exchangers with variable ligand density. I. Structural properties.

    PubMed

    Bhambure, Rahul; Gillespie, Christopher M; Phillips, Michael; Graalfs, Heiner; Lenhoff, Abraham M

    2016-09-01

    The ligand density critically affects the performance of ion-exchange resins in such measures as the adsorption capacity and transport characteristics. However, for tentacular and other polymer-modified exchangers, the mechanistic basis of the effect of ligand density on performance is not yet fully understood. In this study we map the ionic strength-dependent structural changes in tentacular cation exchangers with variable ligand densities as the basis for subsequent investigation of effects on functional properties. Inverse size-exclusion chromatography (ISEC), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) were used to assess the effect of ionic strength on the pore size and intraparticle architecture of resin variants with different ligand densities. Comparison of ISEC and cryo-SEM results shows a considerable reduction in average pore size with increasing ligand density; these methods also confirm an increase of average pore size at higher ionic strengths. SAXS analysis of ionic strength-dependent conformational changes in the grafted polyelectrolyte layer shows a characteristic ionomer peak at values of the scattering vector q (0.1-0.2Å(-1)) that depend on the ligand density and the ionic strength of the solution. This peak attribution reflects nanoscale changes in the structure of the grafted polyelectrolyte chains that can in turn be responsible for observed pore-size changes in the resins. Finally, salt breakthrough experiments confirm a stronger Donnan exclusion effect on pore accessibility for small ions in the high ligand density variant. PMID:27544749

  6. New Evidence For Proton Cyclotron Resonance In a Magnetar Strength Field From SGR 1806-20

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parke, William; Ibrahim, Alaa I.; Swank, Jean H.

    2002-01-01

    A great deal of evidence has recently been gathered in favor of the picture that Soft Gamma Repeaters and Anomalous X-Ray Pulsars are powered by ultra-strong magnetic fields (B greater than 10(exp 14) G; i.e. magnetars). Nevertheless, present determination of the magnetic field in such magnetar candidates has been indirect and model dependent. A key prediction concerning magnetars is the detection of ion cyclotron resonance features, which would offer a decisive diagnostic of the field strength. Here we present the detection of a 5 keV absorption feature in a variety of bursts from the Soft Gamma Repeater SGR 1806-20, confirming our initial discovery and establishing the presence of the feature in the source's burst spectra. The line feature is well explained as proton cyclotron resonance in an ultra-strong magnetic field, offering a direct measurement of SGR 1806-20's magnetic field (B approx. 10(exp 15) G) and a clear evidence of a magnetar. Together with the source's spin-down rate, the feature also provides the first measurement of the gravitational redshift, mass and radius of a magnetar.

  7. Yang-Mills field theory in an axial field-strength gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyburski, Lawrence

    1984-02-01

    We introduce what we call an axial field-strength gauge as an alternative to the conventional Coulomb gauge in the Yang-Mills field theory. This new gauge does not share the pathologies that were shown to exist in the Coulomb gauge by Gribov and Mandelstam. We apply this new gauge to the calculation, in two special cases, of the energy possessed by sources J1,20 interacting in the presence of a background field produced by a source J30, which is assumed to be of order g-1, in the limit g goes to zero, where g is the coupling constant. In the case in which the charge density J30 consists of two infinite uniform parallel plates bearing charge densities equal in magnitude but opposite in sign, we find that the potential energy possessed by two point particles bearing charge densities J1,20 grows linearly in proportion to the distance between them at large distances when the two particles are separated along a line parallel to the background field. This is a confining potential.

  8. Dose dependence of strength after low-temperature irradiation in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Li, Meimei; Farrell, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    This study intends to review and characterize the low-temperature (< 200 oC) irradiation hardening behaviors in metallic materials and to propose new interpretations on the dose dependence of strength, particularly in the pre-hardening and saturation regimes. The analysis results of yield stress-dose curves indicate that four dose-dependence regimes exist: the pre-hardening, main hardening, saturation, and embrittlement regimes. The semi-log plots of yield stress versus dose data revealed that the pre-hardening regime displaying zero-hardening or softening was common at least for the alloys with low dose data available. It was observed that the dose range of the pre-hardening regime increased with the strength of material, which indicates that slower initiation in irradiation hardening is expected when strength is higher. For the majority of the metallic materials analyzed, it was reconfirmed that the exponent of the power-law hardening function was evaluated to be about 0.5 in the main hardening regime and about 0.1 in the saturation regime. In these positive hardening regimes the low strength pure metals such as Fe, Ta, Cu, and Zr displayed lower hardening exponents. The minimum dose to the saturation of irradiation hardening was in the range of 0.003 0.08 dpa, depending on the category of materials. It was also reaffirmed that there exists a strong relationship between the saturation in irradiation hardening and the occurrence of plastic instability at yield.

  9. Time-Dependent Behavior of High-Strength Kevlar and Vectran Webbing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, William R.

    2014-01-01

    High-strength Kevlar and Vectran webbings are currently being used by both NASA and industry as the primary load-bearing structure in inflatable space habitation modules. The time-dependent behavior of high-strength webbing architectures is a vital area of research that is providing critical material data to guide a more robust design process for this class of structures. This paper details the results of a series of time-dependent tests on 1-inch wide webbing including an initial set of comparative tests between specimens that underwent realtime and accelerated creep at 65 and 70% of their ultimate tensile strength. Variability in the ultimate tensile strength of the webbings is investigated and compared with variability in the creep life response. Additional testing studied the effects of load and displacement rate, specimen length and the time-dependent effects of preconditioning the webbings. The creep test facilities, instrumentation and test procedures are also detailed. The accelerated creep tests display consistently longer times to failure than their real-time counterparts; however, several factors were identified that may contribute to the observed disparity. Test setup and instrumentation, grip type, loading scheme, thermal environment and accelerated test postprocessing along with material variability are among these factors. Their effects are discussed and future work is detailed for the exploration and elimination of some of these factors in order to achieve a higher fidelity comparison.

  10. Dose Dependence of Strength After Low-Temperature Irradiation in Metallic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, Thak Sang; Li, Meimei; Farrell, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    This study intends to review and characterize the low-temperature (<473 K [200 °C]) irradiation-hardening behaviors in metallic materials and to propose new interpretations on the dose dependence of strength, particularly in the prehardening and saturation regimes. The analysis of results of yield stress-dose curves indicate that four dose-dependence regimes exist: the prehardening, main hardening, saturation, and embrittlement regimes. The semilog plots of yield stress vs dose data revealed that the prehardening regime displaying zero hardening or softening was common at least for the alloys with low-dose data available. It was observed that the dose range of the prehardening regime increased with the strength of material, which indicates that slower initiation in irradiation hardening is expected when strength is higher. For the majority of the metallic materials analyzed, it was reconfirmed that the exponent of the power-law hardening function was evaluated to be about 0.5 in the main hardening regime and about 0.1 in the saturation regime. In these positive hardening regimes, the low strength pure metals such as Fe, Ta, Cu, and Zr displayed lower hardening exponents. The minimum dose to the saturation of irradiation hardening was in the range of 0.003 to 0.08 dpa, depending on the category of materials. It was also reaffirmed that there exists a strong relationship between the saturation in irradiation hardening and the occurrence of plastic instability at yield.

  11. Comparisons of 76Hz transverse and radial magnetic field strength components received in Connecticut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, P. R.

    1986-03-01

    Since June 1970, we have made extremely low frequency (ELF) measurements of the transverse horizontal magnetic field strength, H sub phi, received in Connecticut. Occasionally, we also have measured either the vertical electric field strength, E sub v, or the radial horizontal magnetic field strength, H sub rho. The AN/BSR-1 ELF receivers are located at the Naval Underwater Systems Center (NUSC), at New London, CT. The transmission source for these farfield (1.6-Mm range) measurements is the U.S. Navy's ELF Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF), located in the Chequamegon National Forest in north-central Wisconsin. The results of 136 days of radial magnetic field measurements taken from November 1977 through June 1984 are discussed in this report. The main result is that during disturbed propagation conditions, the radial and transverse magnetic field strength daily plots (versus GMT) are usually dissimilar (in both amplitude and relative phase).

  12. STRENGTH PROPERTIES OF POLED PZT SUBJECTED TO BIAXIAL FLEXURAL LOADING IN HIGH ELECTRIC FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2010-01-01

    Failure of poled PZT has been experimentally studied using ball-on-ring (BoR) biaxial flexure strength tests with an electric field concurrently applied. The as-received and aged PZTs were tested in high electric fields of -3 to 4 times the coercive field. Both the sign and the magnitude of electric field had a significant effect on the strength of poled PZT. A surface flaw type with a depth of around 18 m was identified as the strength limiter and responsible for the failure of the tested PZT. With a value of 0.76 MPa m1/2 in the open circle condition, the fracture toughness of the poled PZT was affected by an applied electric field just as the strength was affected. These results and observations have the potential to serve probabilistic reliability analysis and design optimization of multilayer PZT piezo actuators.

  13. Dependence of levitation force on frequency of an oscillating magnetic levitation field in a bulk YBCO superconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Hamilton; Pate, Stephen; Goedecke, George

    2013-02-01

    The dependence of the magnetic field strength required for levitation of a melt textured, single domain YBCO superconductor disk on the frequency of the current generating the levitating magnetic field has been investigated. The magnetic field strength is found to be independent of frequency between 10 and 300 Hz. This required field strength is found to be in good experimental and theoretical agreement with the field strength required to levitate the same superconductor with a non-oscillating magnetic field. Hysteretic losses within the superconductor predicted by Bean’s critical-state model were also calculated. The measured data rules out any significant Bean’s model effects on the required levitation field strength within the measured frequency range.

  14. Temperature-dependent residual shear strength characteristics of smectite-rich landslide soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibasaki, Tatsuya; Matsuura, Sumio; Okamoto, Takashi

    2015-04-01

    On gentle clayey slopes in weathered argillaceous rock areas, there exist many landslides which repeatedly reactivate with slow movement. The slip surface soils of these landslides are sometimes composed dominantly of swelling clay mineral (smectite) which is well known to show extremely low residual friction angle. From field data monitored at landslide sites in Japan, it has become clear that some landslides with relatively shallow slip surface begin to move and become active in late autumn or early winter every year. In such cases, the triggering mechanisms of landslides have not been understood well enough, because landslide initiation and movement are not always clearly linked with rises in pore water pressures (ground water levels). In this study, we focus on the influence of seasonal variation in ground temperature on slope stability and have investigated the effect of temperature on the shear strength of slip surface soils. Undisturbed soil samples were collected by boring from the Busuno landslide in Japan. We performed box shear experiments on undisturbed slip surface soils at low temperature ranges (approximately 5-25 °C). XRD analysis revealed that these soils contain high fraction of smectite. Slickensided slip surface within test specimen was coincided with the shearing plane of the shear box and shear displacement was applied precisely along the localized slip surface. Experiments were performed under slow shearing rate condition (0.005mm/min) and the results showed that shear strength decreased with decreasing temperature. Temperature effect was rather significant on frictional angle than on cohesion. Ring shear experiments were also performed on normally-consolidated remoulded samples. Under residual strength condition, temperature-change experiments (cooling-event tests) ranging approximately from 5 to 25 °C were performed on smectite-rich landslide soils and commercial bentonites. As well as the results by box shear test, shear weakening

  15. Dynamical mass generation in QED with magnetic fields: Arbitrary field strength and coupling constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Eduardo; Ayala, Alejandro; Bashir, Adnan; Raya, Alfredo

    2008-05-01

    We study the dynamical generation of masses for fundamental fermions in quenched quantum electrodynamics, in the presence of magnetics fields of arbitrary strength, by solving the Schwinger-Dyson equation for the fermion self-energy in the rainbow approximation. We employ the Ritus eigenfunction formalism which provides a neat solution to the technical problem of summing over all Landau levels. It is well known that magnetic fields catalyze the generation of fermion mass m for arbitrarily small values of electromagnetic coupling α. For intense fields it is also well known that m∝eB. Our approach allows us to span all regimes of parameters α and eB. We find that m∝eB provided α is small. However, when α increases beyond the critical value αc which marks the onslaught of dynamical fermion masses in vacuum, we find m∝Λ, the cutoff required to regularize the ultraviolet divergences. Our method permits us to verify the results available in literature for the limiting cases of eB and α. We also point out the relevance of our work for possible physical applications.

  16. Magnetic diode for measurement of magnetic-field strength

    SciTech Connect

    Fedotov, S.I.; Zalkind, V.M.

    1988-02-01

    The accuracy of fabrication and assembly of the elements of the magnetic systems of thermonuclear installations of the stellarator type is checked by study of the topography of the confining magnetic field and is determined by the space resolution and accuracy of the measuring apparatus. A magnetometer with a galvanomagnetic sensor is described that is used to adjust the magnetic system of the Uragan-3 stellarator. The magnetometer measure magnetic-field induction in the range of 6 x 10/sup -7/-10/sup -2/ T with high space resolution.

  17. Temperature Dependence of Sound Velocity in High-Strength Fiber-Reinforced Plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Ryuji; Yoneyama, Keiichi; Ogasawara, Futoshi; Ueno, Masashi; Okuda, Yuichi; Yamanaka, Atsuhiko

    2003-08-01

    Longitudinal sound velocity in unidirectional hybrid composites or high-strength fiber-reinforced plastics (FRPs) was measured along the fiber axis over a wide temperature range (from 77 K to 420 K). We investigated two kinds of high-strength crystalline polymer fibers, polyethylene (Dyneema) and polybenzobisoxazole (Zylon), which are known to have negative thermal expansion coefficients and high thermal conductivities along the fiber axis. Both FRPs had very high sound velocities of about 9000 m/s at low temperatures and their temperature dependences were very strong. Sound velocity monotonically decreased with increasing temperature. The temperature dependence of sound velocity was much stronger in Dyneema-FRP than in Zylon-FRP.

  18. MF radio field strength measurements in desert terrain near Yuma, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckscher, J. L.; Kalakowsky, C. B.; Whidden, R. W.; Tichovolsky, E. J.

    1980-12-01

    The field strength of the commercial radio broadcast station KBLU was measured at several hundred locations in the desert southeast of Yuma, Arizona, to study MF ground-wave propagation over the desert valleys and mountain ridges. Field strengths below the surface of the desert floor were measured in specially drilled holes to observe the penetration of MF into the desert soil. Idealized propagation path models are shown to produce effects similar to the observations.

  19. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowther, L. J.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Jiles, D. C.

    2012-04-01

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  20. Developments in deep brain stimulation using time dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Crowther, L.J.; Nlebedim, I.C.; Jiles, D.C.

    2012-03-07

    The effect of head model complexity upon the strength of field in different brain regions for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has been investigated. Experimental measurements were used to verify the validity of magnetic field calculations and induced electric field calculations for three 3D human head models of varying complexity. Results show the inability for simplified head models to accurately determine the site of high fields that lead to neuronal stimulation and highlight the necessity for realistic head modeling for TMS applications.

  1. PUTTING CORONAL SEISMOLOGY ESTIMATES OF THE MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH TO THE TEST

    SciTech Connect

    De Moortel, I.; Pascoe, D. J.

    2009-07-10

    The magnetic field strength inside a model coronal loop is 'estimated' using coronal seismology, to examine the reliability of magnetic field strengths derived from observed, transverse coronal loop oscillations. Three-dimensional numerical simulations of the interaction of an external pressure pulse with a coronal loop (modeled as a three-dimensional density enhancement inside a two-dimensional magnetic arcade) are analyzed and the 'observed' properties of the excited transverse loop oscillations are used to derive the value of the local magnetic field strength, following the method of Nakariakov and Ofman. Due to the (unexpected) change in periodicity, the magnetic field derived from our 'observed' oscillation is substantially different from the actual (input) magnetic field value (approximately 50%). Coronal seismology can derive useful information about the local magnetic field, but the combined effect of the loop curvature, the density ratio, and aspect ratio of the loop appears to be more important than previously expected.

  2. POSSIBLE CONSTRAINTS ON EXOPLANET MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTHS FROM PLANET-STAR INTERACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Caleb A.

    2010-10-20

    A small percentage of normal stars harbor giant planets that orbit within a few tenths of an astronomical unit. At such distances, the potential exists for significant tidal and magnetic field interaction resulting in energy dissipation that may manifest as changes within the stellar corona. We examine the X-ray emission of stars hosting planets and find a positive correlation between X-ray luminosity and the projected mass of the most closely orbiting exoplanets. We investigate possible systematics and observational biases that could mimic or confuse this correlation but find no strong evidence for any, especially for planets more massive than {approx}0.1 M{sub J} . Luminosities and upper limits are consistent with the interpretation that there is a lower floor to stellar X-ray emission dependent on close-in planetary mass. Under the hypothesis that this is a consequence of planet-star magnetic field interaction, and energy dissipation, we estimate a possible field strength increase of a factor of {approx}8 between planets of 1 and 10 M{sub J} . Intriguingly, this is consistent with recent geodynamo scaling law predictions. The high-energy photon emission of planet-star systems may therefore provide unique access to the detailed magnetic, and hence geodynamic, properties of exoplanets.

  3. Study on technology of high-frequency pulsed magnetic field strength measurement.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Mei; Liu, Zhi-Peng; Yin, Tao

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency transient weak magnetic field is always involved in researches about biomedical engineering field while common magnetic-field sensors cannot work properly at frequencies as high as MHz. To measure the value of MHz-level weak pulsed magnetic-field strength accurately, this paper designs a measurement and calibration method for pulsed magnetic-field. In this paper, a device made of Nonferromagnetic material was independently designed and applied to pulsed magnetic field measurement. It held an accurately relative position between the magnetic field generating coil and the detecting coil. By applying a sinusoidal pulse to the generator, collecting the induced electromotive force of the detector, the final magnetic field strength was worked out through algorithms written in Matlab according to Faraday's Law. Experiments were carried out for measurement and calibration. Experiments showed that, under good stability and consistency, accurate measurement of magnetic-field strength of a sinepulse magnetic-field can be achieved, with frequency at 0.5, 1, 1.5 MHz and strength level at micro-Tesla. Calibration results carried out a measuring relative error about 2.5%.

  4. Tidal dissipation and the strength of the Earth's internal magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Buffett, Bruce A

    2010-12-16

    Magnetic fields at the Earth's surface represent only a fraction of the field inside the core. The strength and structure of the internal field are poorly known, yet the details are important for our understanding of the geodynamo. Here I obtain an indirect estimate for the field strength from measurements of tidal dissipation. Tidally driven flow in the Earth's liquid core develops internal shear layers, which distort the internal magnetic field and generate electric currents. Ohmic losses damp the tidal motions and produce detectable signatures in the Earth's nutations. Previously reported evidence of anomalous dissipation in nutations can be explained with a core-averaged field of 2.5 mT, eliminating the need for high fluid viscosity or a stronger magnetic field at the inner-core boundary. Estimates for the internal field constrain the power required for the geodynamo.

  5. Size dependence of yield strength simulated by a dislocation-density function dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, P. S. S.; Leung, H. S.; Cheng, B.; Ngan, A. H. W.

    2015-04-01

    The size dependence of the strength of nano- and micron-sized crystals is studied using a new simulation approach in which the dynamics of the density functions of dislocations are modeled. Since any quantity of dislocations can be represented by a density, this approach can handle large systems containing large quantities of dislocations, which may handicap discrete dislocation dynamics schemes due to the excessive computation time involved. For this reason, pillar sizes spanning a large range, from the sub-micron to micron regimes, can be simulated. The simulation results reveal the power-law relationship between strength and specimen size up to a certain size, beyond which the strength varies much more slowly with size. For specimens smaller than ∼4000b, their strength is found to be controlled by the dislocation depletion condition, in which the total dislocation density remains almost constant throughout the loading process. In specimens larger than ∼4000b, the initial dislocation distribution is of critical importance since the presence of dislocation entanglements is found to obstruct deformation in the neighboring regions within a distance of ∼2000b. This length scale suggests that the effects of dense dislocation clusters are greater in intermediate-sized specimens (e.g. 4000b and 8000b) than in larger specimens (e.g. 16 000b), according to the weakest-link concept.

  6. Frictional strength and velocity-dependence of serpentine gouges under hydrothermal conditions and their seismogeological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ma, S.; Lockner, D.; Moore, D.; Summers, R.; Byerlee, J.

    1997-01-01

    The velocity - dependence of frictional strength of serpentine gouges has been measured at constant normal stress of 110 MPa, pore pressure of 10 MPa, temperature 25, 100 and 200??C , and at sliding rate ranging from 0. 001 to 10??m/s. At 25??C, the coefficient of friction of chrysotile gouge is very low (?????0. 2-0. 25), while lizardite and antigorite gouge are much stronger, with ?????0. 39 and 0. 45, respectively. The frictional strengths of chrysotile and antigorite gouges change little with a temperature increase to 200??C, whereas the strength of lizardite gouge increases substantially with increasing temperature. At 25??C, all three gouges show a transition from weak velocity weakening at high slip rates to velocity strengthening at low slip rates. With increasing temperature, the velocity dependence of each gouge shifts towards more positive values, especially at high slip rates. Based on this study and previous results, we suggest that the presence of serpentine in the fault zone may contribute to the occurrence of stable creep rather than earthquakes, but this effect may be limited to shallow depths. Although chrysotile is one of the weakest rock - forming minerals, it is still too strong to explain the weakness of the San Andreas fault deduced from heat flow data.

  7. Splice Site Strength-Dependent Activity and Genetic Buffering by Poly-G Runs

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xinshu; Wang, Zefeng; Jang, Minyoung; Nutiu, Razvan; Wang, Eric T.; Burge, Christopher B.

    2009-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is regulated through combinatorial activity of RNA motifs including splice sites and splicing regulatory elements (SREs). Here, we show that the activity of the G-run class of SREs is ∼4-fold higher when adjacent to intermediate strength 5'ss relative to weak 5'ss, and ∼1.3-fold higher relative to strong 5'ss. This dependence on 5'ss strength was observed in splicing reporters and in global microarray and mRNA-Seq analyses of splicing changes following RNAi against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) H, which crosslinked to G-runs adjacent to many regulated exons. An exon’s responsiveness to changes in hnRNP H levels therefore depends in a complex way on G-run abundance and 5'ss strength, and other splicing factors may function similarly. This pattern of activity enables G-runs and hnRNP H to buffer the effects of 5'ss mutations, augmenting the frequency of 5'ss polymorphism and the evolution of new splicing patterns. PMID:19749754

  8. Temperature dependence of elastic and strength properties of T300/5208 graphite-epoxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milkovich, S. M.; Herakovich, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental results are presented for the elastic and strength properties of T300/5208 graphite-epoxy at room temperature, 116K (-250 F), and 394K (+250 F). Results are presented for unidirectional 0, 90, and 45 degree laminates, and + or - 30, + or - 45, and + or - 60 degree angle-ply laminates. The stress-strain behavior of the 0 and 90 degree laminates is essentially linear for all three temperatures and that the stress-strain behavior of all other laminates is linear at 116K. A second-order curve provides the best fit for the temperature is linear at 116K. A second-order curve provides the best fit for the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus of all laminates and for the principal shear modulus. Poisson's ratio appears to vary linearly with temperature. all moduli decrease with increasing temperature except for E (sub 1) which exhibits a small increase. The strength temperature dependence is also quadratic for all laminates except the 0 degree - laminate which exhibits linear temperature dependence. In many cases the temperature dependence of properties is nearly linear.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Field Strength Effects on Diffusion Measures and Brain Connectivity Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Liang; Mueller, Bryon A.; Jahanshad, Neda; Jin, Yan; Lenglet, Christophe; Yacoub, Essa; Sapiro, Guillermo; Ugurbil, Kamil; Harel, Noam; Toga, Arthur W.; Lim, Kelvin O.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The quest to map brain connectivity is being pursued worldwide using diffusion imaging, among other techniques. Even so, we know little about how brain connectivity measures depend on the magnetic field strength of the scanner. To investigate this, we scanned 10 healthy subjects at 7 and 3 tesla—using 128-gradient high-angular resolution diffusion imaging. For each subject and scan, whole-brain tractography was used to estimate connectivity between 113 cortical and subcortical regions. We examined how scanner field strength affects (i) the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the non-diffusion-sensitized reference images (b0); (ii) diffusion tensor imaging (DTI)-derived fractional anisotropy (FA), mean, radial, and axial diffusivity (MD/RD/AD), in atlas-defined regions; (iii) whole-brain tractography; (iv) the 113×113 brain connectivity maps; and (v) five commonly used network topology measures. We also assessed effects of the multi-channel reconstruction methods (sum-of-squares, SOS, at 7T; adaptive recombine, AC, at 3T). At 7T with SOS, the b0 images had 18.3% higher SNR than with 3T-AC. FA was similar for most regions of interest (ROIs) derived from an online DTI atlas (ICBM81), but higher at 7T in the cerebral peduncle and internal capsule. MD, AD, and RD were lower at 7T for most ROIs. The apparent fiber density between some subcortical regions was greater at 7T-SOS than 3T-AC, with a consistent connection pattern overall. Suggesting the need for caution, the recovered brain network was apparently more efficient at 7T, which cannot be biologically true as the same subjects were assessed. Care is needed when comparing network measures across studies, and when interpreting apparently discrepant findings. PMID:23205551

  10. Reliability Stress-Strength Models for Dependent Observations with Applications in Clinical Trials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kushary, Debashis; Kulkarni, Pandurang M.

    1995-01-01

    We consider the applications of stress-strength models in studies involving clinical trials. When studying the effects and side effects of certain procedures (treatments), it is often the case that observations are correlated due to subject effect, repeated measurements and observing many characteristics simultaneously. We develop maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) and uniform minimum variance unbiased estimator (UMVUE) of the reliability which in clinical trial studies could be considered as the chances of increased side effects due to a particular procedure compared to another. The results developed apply to both univariate and multivariate situations. Also, for the univariate situations we develop simple to use lower confidence bounds for the reliability. Further, we consider the cases when both stress and strength constitute time dependent processes. We define the future reliability and obtain methods of constructing lower confidence bounds for this reliability. Finally, we conduct simulation studies to evaluate all the procedures developed and also to compare the MLE and the UMVUE.

  11. 47 CFR 73.151 - Field strength measurements to establish performance of directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... coordinates determined with a Global Positioning System receiver. (iii) Clear photographs taken with the field... verified either by field strength measurement or by computer modeling and sampling system verification. (a... antenna systems (e.g., two towers) in the 1605-1705 kHz band, the measurements to support pattern...

  12. 47 CFR 73.151 - Field strength measurements to establish performance of directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... coordinates determined with a Global Positioning System receiver. (iii) Clear photographs taken with the field... verified either by field strength measurement or by computer modeling and sampling system verification. (a... antenna systems (e.g., two towers) in the 1605-1705 kHz band, the measurements to support pattern...

  13. 47 CFR 73.151 - Field strength measurements to establish performance of directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... coordinates determined with a Global Positioning System receiver. (iii) Clear photographs taken with the field... verified either by field strength measurement or by computer modeling and sampling system verification. (a... antenna systems (e.g., two towers) in the 1605-1705 kHz band, the measurements to support pattern...

  14. 47 CFR 73.151 - Field strength measurements to establish performance of directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... coordinates determined with a Global Positioning System receiver. (iii) Clear photographs taken with the field... verified either by field strength measurement or by computer modeling and sampling system verification. (a... antenna systems (e.g., two towers) in the 1605-1705 kHz band, the measurements to support pattern...

  15. Field-dependent Brownian relaxation dynamics of a superparamagnetic clustered-particle suspension.

    PubMed

    Trisnanto, S B; Kitamoto, Y

    2014-09-01

    The distinguishable Brownian relaxation dynamics of a clustered-particle system of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle suspension compared to that of a dispersed-particle system has been experimentally investigated through characterization of the frequency and field strength dependences of complex magnetic susceptibility. We confirmed that the application of low sinusoidal magnetic field strength enables cluster rotation instead of individual particle rotations. Furthermore, we found that the cluster rotation was altered to individual particle rotations in higher field strength, resulting in a shorter Brownian relaxation time, which suggests a change in the hydrodynamic volume. This evolutional relaxation behavior was associated with a change in the fitting parameter which satisfies the empirical model of relaxation and further represents the significance of interparticle interactions in defining the nonlinearity of the magnetization response.

  16. Interaction of radio-frequency, high-strength electric fields with harmful insects.

    PubMed

    Ponomaryova, Iryna A; Niño de Rivera y Oyarzabal, Luis; Ruíz Sánchez, Eduardo

    2009-01-01

    The objective of the research reported here is to investigate the influence of radio-frequency electric fields of high strength on insect mortality. The experiments were accomplished at the frequencies 47.5, 900 and 2,450 MHz for the pulse modulated radiation treatment and the continuous wave RF radiation. Two types of systems, which are the coaxial irradiation chamber and the irradiation chamber with plane capacitor are presented in this work. The experiments in the coaxial type radiation chamber on granary weevil (Sitophilus granarius L.) at voltages U = 5.5-10.5 kV frequency 47.5 MHz, electric field intensity 180-350 kV/m and exposures 5-60 seconds give 40-90% of insect mortality that mainly depends on voltage increase. The experiments in the irradiation chamber with plane capacitor are presented for the pulse modulated regime at a frequency of 47.5 MHz and field intensities 350-2000 kV/m. 100% of insect mortality is reached at the exposures of 1-30 seconds, at field intensity of 2000 kV/m. The RF radiation of granary weevil (Sitophilus granarius L.) in the coaxial irradiation chamber in stationary mode reaches 100% insect mortality at major exposure times for the frequencies 900 and 2,450 MHz. Stationary generator mode also permits 21-97% fungi (Cladosporium cladosporioides, Aspergillus candidus) control at voltage U = 10.5 kV frequencies 900 and 2,450 MHz and exposures of 120-180 seconds. Further investigation is needed for microscopic fungi control to understand the fungi reproduction mechanism during the RF-radiation treatment for Aspergillus fumigatus.

  17. Characterization of Strength of Intact Brittle Rock Considering Confinement-Dependent Failure Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Peter K.; Kim, Bo-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    unconfined compression tests (UCS) alone, the confined strength may be underestimated by as much as 50 % (on average). If triaxial data with a limited confinement range (e.g., σ3 ≪ 0.5 UCS due to cell pressure limitations) are used, the confined strength may be overestimated. Therefore, the application of standard data fitting procedures, without consideration of confinement-dependent failure mechanisms, may lead to erroneous intact rock strength parameters when applied to brittle rocks, and consequently, by extrapolation, to correspondingly erroneous rock mass strength parameters. It follows that the strength characteristics of massive rock differ significantly in the direct vicinity of excavation from that which is remote with higher confinement. Therefore, it is recommended to adopt a differentiated approach to obtain intact rock strength parameters for engineering problems at lower confinement (near excavation; e.g., excavation stability assessment or support design), and at elevated confinement (typically, when the confinement exceeds about 10 % of the UCS) as might be encountered in wide pillar cores.

  18. Self-healing slip pulses in dynamic rupture models due to velocity-dependent strength

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Beeler, N.M.; Tullis, T.E.

    1996-01-01

    Seismological observations of short slip duration on faults (short rise time on seismograms) during earthquakes are not consistent with conventional crack models of dynamic rupture and fault slip. In these models, the leading edge of rupture stops only when a strong region is encountered, and slip at an interior point ceases only when waves from the stopped edge of slip propagate back to that point. In contrast, some seismological evidence suggests that the duration of slip is too short for waves to propagate from the nearest edge of the ruptured surface, perhaps even if the distance used is an asperity size instead of the entire rupture dimension. What controls slip duration, if not dimensions of the fault or of asperities? In this study, dynamic earthquake rupture and slip are represented by a propagating shear crack. For all propagating shear cracks, slip velocity is highest near the rupture front, and at a small distance behind the rupture front, the slip velocity decreases. As pointed out by Heaton (1990), if the crack obeys a negative slip-rate-dependent strength relation, the lower slip velocity behind the rupture front will lead to strengthening that further reduces the velocity, and under certain circumstances, healing of slip can occur. The boundary element method of Hamano (1974) is used in a program adapted from Andrews (1985) for numerical simulations of mode II rupture with two different velocity-dependent strength functions. For the first function, after a slip-weakening displacement, the crack follows an exponential velocity-weakening relation. The characteristic velocity V0 of the exponential determines the magnitude of the velocity-dependence at dynamic velocities. The velocity-dependence at high velocity is essentially zero when V0 is small and the resulting slip velocity distribution is similar to slip weakening. If V0 is larger, rupture propagation initially resembles slip-weakening, but spontaneous healing occurs behind the rupture front. The

  19. Atomic-level Pseudo-degeneracy of Atomic Levels Giving Transitions Induced by Magnetic Fields, of Importance for Determining the Field Strengths in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenxian; Yang, Yang; Tu, Bingsheng; Xiao, Jun; Grumer, Jon; Brage, Tomas; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming

    2016-08-01

    We present a measured value for the degree of pseudo-degeneracy between two fine-structure levels in Fe9+ from line intensity ratios involving a transition induced by an external magnetic field. The extracted fine-structure energy difference between the 3{p}43d{}4{D}5/2 and {}4{D}7/2 levels, where the latter is the upper state for the magnetic-field induced line, is needed in our recently proposed method to measure magnetic-field strengths in the solar corona. The intensity of the 3{p}43d{}4{D}7/2\\to 3{p}5{}2{P}3/2 line at 257.262 Å is sensitive to the magnetic field external to the ion. This sensitivity is in turn strongly dependent on the energy separation in the pseudo-degeneracy through the mixing induced by the external magnetic field. Our measurement, which uses an Electron Beam Ion Trap with a known magnetic-field strength, indicates that this energy difference is 3.5 cm‑1. The high abundance of Fe9+ and the sensitivity of the line’s transition probability to field strengths below 0.1 T opens up the possibility of diagnosing coronal magnetic fields. We propose a new method to measure the magnetic field in the solar corona, from similar intensity ratios in Fe9+. In addition, the proposed method to use the line ratio of the blended line 3{p}43d{}4{D}7/{2,5/2}\\to 3{p}5{}2{P}3/2 with another line from Fe x as the density diagnostic should evaluate the effect of the magnetic-field-induced transition line.

  20. Atomic-level Pseudo-degeneracy of Atomic Levels Giving Transitions Induced by Magnetic Fields, of Importance for Determining the Field Strengths in the Solar Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenxian; Yang, Yang; Tu, Bingsheng; Xiao, Jun; Grumer, Jon; Brage, Tomas; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming

    2016-08-01

    We present a measured value for the degree of pseudo-degeneracy between two fine-structure levels in Fe9+ from line intensity ratios involving a transition induced by an external magnetic field. The extracted fine-structure energy difference between the 3{p}43d{}4{D}5/2 and {}4{D}7/2 levels, where the latter is the upper state for the magnetic-field induced line, is needed in our recently proposed method to measure magnetic-field strengths in the solar corona. The intensity of the 3{p}43d{}4{D}7/2\\to 3{p}5{}2{P}3/2 line at 257.262 Å is sensitive to the magnetic field external to the ion. This sensitivity is in turn strongly dependent on the energy separation in the pseudo-degeneracy through the mixing induced by the external magnetic field. Our measurement, which uses an Electron Beam Ion Trap with a known magnetic-field strength, indicates that this energy difference is 3.5 cm-1. The high abundance of Fe9+ and the sensitivity of the line’s transition probability to field strengths below 0.1 T opens up the possibility of diagnosing coronal magnetic fields. We propose a new method to measure the magnetic field in the solar corona, from similar intensity ratios in Fe9+. In addition, the proposed method to use the line ratio of the blended line 3{p}43d{}4{D}7/{2,5/2}\\to 3{p}5{}2{P}3/2 with another line from Fe x as the density diagnostic should evaluate the effect of the magnetic-field-induced transition line.

  1. S-nitrosylation-dependent proteasomal degradation restrains Cdk5 activity to regulate hippocampal synaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Peng; Fu, Wing-Yu; Fu, Amy K. Y.; Ip, Nancy Y.

    2015-01-01

    Precise regulation of synaptic strength requires coordinated activity and functions of synaptic proteins, which is controlled by a variety of post-translational modification. Here we report that S-nitrosylation of p35, the activator of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), by nitric oxide (NO) is important for the regulation of excitatory synaptic strength. While blockade of NO signalling results in structural and functional synaptic deficits as indicated by reduced mature dendritic spine density and surface expression of glutamate receptor subunits, phosphorylation of numerous synaptic substrates of Cdk5 and its activity are aberrantly upregulated following reduced NO production. The results show that the NO-induced reduction in Cdk5 activity is mediated by S-nitrosylation of p35, resulting in its ubiquitination and degradation by the E3 ligase PJA2. Silencing p35 protein in hippocampal neurons partially rescues the NO blockade-induced synaptic deficits. These findings collectively demonstrate that p35 S-nitrosylation by NO signalling is critical for regulating hippocampal synaptic strength. PMID:26503494

  2. Temperature-Dependent Thermal Conductivity of High Strength Lightweight Raw Perlite Aggregate Concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandiroglu, Ahmet

    2010-06-01

    Twenty-four types of high strength lightweight concrete have been designed with raw perlite aggregate (PA) from the Erzincan Mollaköy region as new low-temperature insulation material. The effects of the water/cement ratio, the amount of raw PA, and the temperature on high strength lightweight raw perlite aggregate concrete (HSLWPAC) have been investigated. Three empirical equations were derived to correlate the thermal conductivity of HSLWPAC as a function of PA percentage and temperature depending on the water/cement ratio. Experimentally observed thermal conductivities of concrete samples were predicted 92 % of the time for each set of concrete matrices within 97 % accuracy and over the range from 1.457 W · m-1 · K-1 to 1.777 W · m-1 · K-1. The experimental investigation revealed that the usage of raw PA from the Erzincan Mollaköy region in concrete production reduces the concrete unit mass, increases the concrete strength, and furthermore, the thermal conductivity of the concrete has been improved. The proposed empirical correlations of thermal conductivity were considered to be applicable within the range of temperatures 203.15 K ≤ T ≤ 303.15 K in the form of λ = a( PAP b ) + c( T d ).

  3. The Dependence of Carbohydrate-Aromatic Interaction Strengths on the Structure of the Carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Che-Hsiung; Park, Sangho; Mortenson, David E; Foley, B Lachele; Wang, Xiaocong; Woods, Robert J; Case, David A; Powers, Evan T; Wong, Chi-Huey; Dyson, H Jane; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-06-22

    Interactions between proteins and carbohydrates are ubiquitous in biology. Therefore, understanding the factors that determine their affinity and selectivity are correspondingly important. Herein, we have determined the relative strengths of intramolecular interactions between a series of monosaccharides and an aromatic ring close to the glycosylation site in an N-glycoprotein host. We employed the enhanced aromatic sequon, a structural motif found in the reverse turns of some N-glycoproteins, to facilitate face-to-face monosaccharide-aromatic interactions. A protein host was used because the dependence of the folding energetics on the identity of the monosaccharide can be accurately measured to assess the strength of the carbohydrate-aromatic interaction. Our data demonstrate that the carbohydrate-aromatic interaction strengths are moderately affected by changes in the stereochemistry and identity of the substituents on the pyranose rings of the sugars. Galactose seems to make the weakest and allose the strongest sugar-aromatic interactions, with glucose, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) and mannose in between. The NMR solution structures of several of the monosaccharide-containing N-glycoproteins were solved to further understand the origins of the similarities and differences between the monosaccharide-aromatic interaction energies. Peracetylation of the monosaccharides substantially increases the strength of the sugar-aromatic interaction in the context of our N-glycoprotein host. Finally, we discuss our results in light of recent literature regarding the contribution of electrostatics to CH-π interactions and speculate on what our observations imply about the absolute conservation of GlcNAc as the monosaccharide through which N-linked glycans are attached to glycoproteins in eukaryotes. PMID:27249581

  4. Ionic strength dependence of localized contact formation between membranes: nonlinear theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Coakley, W T; Gallez, D; de Souza, E R; Gauci, H

    1999-08-01

    Erythrocyte membrane surface or suspending phase properties can be experimentally modified to give either spatially periodic local contacts or continuous contact along the seams of interacting membranes. Here, for cells suspended in a solution of the uncharged polysaccharide dextran, the average lateral separation between localized contacts in spatially periodic seams at eight ionic strengths, decreasing from 0.15 to 0.065, increased from 0.65 to 3.4 micrometers. The interacting membranes and intermembrane aqueous layer were modeled as a fluid film, submitted to a disjoining pressure, responding to a displacement perturbation either through wave growth resulting in spatially periodic contacts or in perturbation decay, to give a plane continuous film. Measured changes of lateral contact separations with ionic strength change were quantitatively consistent with analytical predictions of linear theory for an instability mechanism dependent on the membrane bending modulus. Introduction of a nonlinear approach established the consequences of the changing interaction potential experienced by different parts of the membrane as the disturbance grew. Numerical solutions of the full nonlinear governing equations correctly identified the ionic strength at which the bifurcation from continuous seam to a stationary periodic contact pattern occurred and showed a decrease in lateral contact and wave crest separation with increasing ionic strength. The nonlinear approach has the potential to recognize the role of nonspecific interactions in initiating the localized approach of membranes, and then incorporate the contribution of specific molecular interactions, of too short a range to influence the beginning of perturbation growth. This new approach can be applied to other biological processes such as neural cell adhesion, phagocytosis, and the acrosome reaction.

  5. Strength of evidence for density dependence in abundance time series of 1198 species.

    PubMed

    Brook, Barry W; Bradshaw, Corey J A

    2006-06-01

    Population limitation is a fundamental tenet of ecology, but the relative roles of exogenous and endogenous mechanisms remain unquantified for most species. Here we used multi-model inference (MMI), a form of model averaging, based on information theory (Akaike's Information Criterion) to evaluate the relative strength of evidence for density-dependent and density-independent population dynamical models in long-term abundance time series of 1198 species. We also compared the MMI results to more classic methods for detecting density dependence: Neyman-Pearson hypothesis-testing and best-model selection using the Bayesian Information Criterion or cross-validation. Using MMI on our large database, we show that density dependence is a pervasive feature of population dynamics (median MMI support for density dependence = 74.7-92.2%), and that this holds across widely different taxa. The weight of evidence for density dependence varied among species but increased consistently, with the number of generations monitored. Best-model selection methods yielded similar results to MMI (a density-dependent model was favored in 66.2-93.9% of species time series), while the hypothesis-testing methods detected density dependence less frequently (32.6-49.8%). There were no obvious differences in the prevalence of density dependence across major taxonomic groups under any of the statistical methods used. These results underscore the value of using multiple modes of analysis to quantify the relative empirical support for a set of working hypotheses that encompass a range of realistic population dynamical behaviors.

  6. Registration of weak ULF/ELF oscillations of the surface electric field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldyrev, A. I.; Vyazilov, A. E.; Ivanov, V. N.; Kemaev, R. V.; Korovin, V. Ya.; Melyashinskii, A. V.; Pamukhin, K. V.; Panov, V. N.; Shvyrev, Yu. N.

    2016-07-01

    Measurements of the atmospheric electric field strength made by an electrostatic fluxmeter with a unique threshold sensitivity for such devices (6 × 10-2-10-3 V m-1 Hz-1/2 in the 10-3-25 Hz frequency range) and wide dynamic (120 dB) and spectral (0-25 Hz) ranges, are presented. The device parameters make it possible to observe the electric component of global electromagnetic Schumann resonances and long-period fluctuations in the atmospheric electric field strength.

  7. Optical field-strength generalized polarization of non-stationary quantum states in waveguiding photonic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barral, David; Liñares, Jesús; Nistal, María C.

    2013-07-01

    A quantum analysis of the generalized polarization properties of multimode non-stationary states based on their optical field-strength probability distributions is presented. The quantum generalized polarization is understood as a significant confinement of the probability distribution along certain regions of a multidimensional optical field-strength space. The analysis is addressed to quantum states generated in multimode linear and nonlinear waveguiding (integrated) photonic devices, such as multimode waveguiding directional couplers and waveguiding parametric amplifiers, whose modes fulfill a spatial modal orthogonality. In particular, the generalized polarization degree of coherent, squeezed and Schrödinger's cat states is analyzed.

  8. Field Dependence as a Factor in Second Language Communicative Production.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Janice; Prior, Suzanne; Artuso, Mariangela

    2000-01-01

    Investigates the hypothesis that a more field-dependent cognitive style may be adaptive for certain components of second language proficiency. Native English speakers or students of English as a Second Language (ESL) completed measures of language proficiency and field dependence-independence (FDI). Native English speakers performed better than…

  9. Lower-extremity strength ratios of professional soccer players according to field position.

    PubMed

    Ruas, Cassio V; Minozzo, Felipe; Pinto, Matheus D; Brown, Lee E; Pinto, Ronei S

    2015-05-01

    Previous investigators have proposed that knee strength, hamstrings to quadriceps, and side-to-side asymmetries may vary according to soccer field positions. However, different results have been found in these variables, and a generalization of this topic could lead to data misinterpretation by coaches and soccer clubs. Thus, the aim of this study was to measure knee strength and asymmetry in soccer players across different field positions. One hundred and two male professional soccer players performed maximal concentric and eccentric isokinetic knee actions on the preferred and nonpreferred legs at a velocity of 60° · s. Players were divided into their field positions for analysis: goalkeepers, side backs, central backs, central defender midfielders, central attacking midfielders, and forwards. Results demonstrated that only goalkeepers (GK) differed from most other field positions on players' characteristics, and concentric peak torque across muscles. Although all players presented functional ratios of the preferred (0.79 ± 0.14) and nonpreferred (0.75 ± 0.13) legs below accepted normative values, there were no differences between positions for conventional or functional strength ratios or side-to-side asymmetry. The same comparisons were made only between field players, without inclusion of the GK, and no differences were found between positions. Therefore, the hamstrings to quadriceps and side-to-side asymmetries found here may reflect knee strength functional balance required for soccer skills performance and game demands across field positions. These results also suggest that isokinetic strength profiles should be considered differently in GK compared with other field positions due to their specific physiological and training characteristics.

  10. Periodic coupling strength-dependent multiple coherence resonance by time delay in Newman-Watts neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanan; Gong, Yubing; Xu, Bo

    2013-12-01

    Recently, multiple coherence resonance induced by time delay has been observed in neuronal networks with constant coupling strength. In this paper, by employing Newman-Watts Hodgkin-Huxley neuron networks with time-periodic coupling strength, we study how the temporal coherence of spiking behavior and coherence resonance by time delay change when the frequency of periodic coupling strength is varied. It is found that delay induced coherence resonance is dependent on periodic coupling strength and increases when the frequency of periodic coupling strength increases. Periodic coupling strength can also induce multiple coherence resonance, and the coherence resonance occurs when the frequency of periodic coupling strength is approximately multiple of the spiking frequency. These results show that for periodic coupling strength time delay can more frequently optimize the temporal coherence of spiking activity, and periodic coupling strength can repetitively optimize the temporal coherence of spiking activity as well. Frequency locking may be the mechanism for multiple coherence resonance induced by periodic coupling strength. These findings imply that periodic coupling strength is more efficient for enhancing the temporal coherence of spiking activity of neuronal networks, and thus it could play a more important role in improving the time precision of information processing and transmission in neural networks.

  11. Perspectives and limitations of parallel MR imaging at high field strengths.

    PubMed

    Heidemann, Robin M; Seiberlich, Nicole; Griswold, Mark A; Wohlfarth, Katrin; Krueger, Gunnar; Jakob, Peter M

    2006-05-01

    In medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) imaging, it is standard practice to use MR scanners with a field strength of 1.5 Tesla. Recently, an ongoing trend towards higher field strengths can be observed, with a new potential clinical standard of 3.0 Tesla. High-field MR imaging, with its intrinsic higher signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), can enable new applications for MRI in medical diagnosis, or can serve to improve existing methods. The use of high field MRI is not without its limitations, however. Besides SNR, other unwanted effects increase with a higher field strength. Without correction, these high field problems can cause a serious loss in image quality. An elegant way to address these problems is the use of parallel imaging. In many clinical applications, parallel MRI (pMRI) is part of the standard protocol, as pMRI can enhance virtually every MRI application without necessarily affecting the contrast behavior of the underlying imaging sequence. In addition to the speed advantages offered by pMRI, the capability of parallel imaging to reduce significant high field-specific problems, thereby improving image quality, will be of major importance.

  12. Semiclassical circular strings in AdS{sub 5} and 'long' gauge field strength operators

    SciTech Connect

    Park, I.Y.; Tirziu, A.; Tseytlin, A.A.

    2005-06-15

    We consider circular strings rotating with equal spins S{sub 1}=S{sub 2}=S in two orthogonal planes in AdS{sub 5} and suggest that they may be dual to long gauge-theory operators built out of self-dual components of gauge field strength. As was found in hep-th/0404187, the one-loop anomalous dimensions of the such gauge-theory operators are described by an antiferromagnetic XXX{sub 1} spin chain and scale linearly with length L>>1. We find that in the case of rigid rotating string both the classical energy E{sub 0} and the 1-loop string correction E{sub 1} depend linearly on the spin S (within the stability region of the solution). This supports the identification of the rigid rotating string with the gauge-theory operator corresponding to the maximal-spin (ferromagnetic) state of the XXX{sub 1} spin chain. The energy of more general rotating and pulsating strings also happens to scale linearly with both the spin and the oscillation number. Such solutions should be dual to other lower-spin states of the spin chain, with the antiferromagnetic ground state presumably corresponding to the string pulsating in two planes with no rotation.

  13. Temporal changes in the strength of density-dependent mortality and growth in intertidal barnacles.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Stuart R; Murua, Jefferson; Burrows, Michael T

    2008-05-01

    1. In demographically open marine systems, the extent to which density-dependent processes in the benthic adult phase are required for population persistence is unclear. At one extreme, represented by the recruitment limitation hypothesis, larval supply may be insufficient for the total population size to reach a carrying capacity and density-independent mortality predominates. At the opposite extreme, populations are saturated and density-dependent mortality is sufficiently strong to reshape patterns established at settlement. 2. We examined temporal variation in the way density-independent and density-dependent mortality interact in a typical sessile marine benthic invertebrate, the acorn barnacle Semibalanus balanoides (L.), over a 2-year period. 3. Recruitment was manipulated at two high recruitment sites in north Wales, UK to produce recruit densities covering the range naturally found in this species. Following manipulation, fixed quadrats were monitored using digital photography and temporal changes in mortality and growth rate were examined. 4. Over a 2-year period there was a clear, spatially consistent, over-compensatory relationship between the density of recruits and adult abundance indicating strong density-dependent mortality. The strength of density dependence intensified with increasing recruitment. 5. Density-dependent mortality did not operate consistently over the study period. It only operated in the early part of the benthic phase, but the pattern of adult abundance generated was maintained throughout the whole 2-year period. Thus, early life-history processes dictated adult population abundance and dynamics. 6. Examination of the natural recruitment regime in the area of study indicated that both positive and negative effects of recruitment will occur over scales varying from kilometres to metres.

  14. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  15. On the size, structure, and strength of the small-scale solar magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, H. E.; Schoolman, S. A.; Title, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    High-resolution magnetograms place an upper limit of 0.33 arcsec on the smallest magnetic-field structures. These magnetograms show that the active-region field is organized into roughly cellular patterns 2-3 arcsec in diameter and that the field structures occur in the centers of 'abnormal' granules. Comparison of these data and other magnetograms with high signal-to-noise ratio indicates that there exists another component of the field that is diffuse on the scale of an arc second and has a maximum strength of less than 500 gauss.

  16. 47 CFR 73.151 - Field strength measurements to establish performance of directional antennas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... verified either by field strength measurement or by computer modeling and sampling system verification. (a... specifically identified by the Commission. (c) Computer modeling and sample system verification of modeled... element of the directional array shall be modeled by use of a method of moments computer program,...

  17. 47 CFR 5.87 - Frequencies for field strength surveys or equipment demonstrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Frequencies for field strength surveys or equipment demonstrations. 5.87 Section 5.87 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EXPERIMENTAL RADIO SERVICE (OTHER THAN BROADCAST) Applications and Licenses § 5.87 Frequencies for...

  18. Strength of the Archean geomagnetic field and effectiveness of magnetic shielding from the young active Sun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.

    2008-05-01

    The strength of Earth's early magnetic field is important for understanding the evolution of the core, surface environment, atmosphere and life. Paleointensity analyses of single silicate crystals indicate that the strength of the geomagnetic field 3.2 billion years ago was within 50% of the modern value (Tarduno et al., 2007), but for even earlier times it is unknown. Two ideas have been offered: (1) the geomagnetic field started shortly after core formation, and the subsequent field strength has been within a factor of 2-3 of the modern value since its initiation; (2) the field was at null values ~3.9 billion years ago and commenced thereafter. The latter scenario relies on a hypothesis to explain the amount and isotopic composition of nitrogen found in soils of the Moon; this lunar nitrogen may have been derived from Earth's atmosphere via the solar wind (Ozima et al., 2005) in the absence of geomagnetic field that would otherwise shield atmospheric erosion. The possibility of a delayed dynamo onset (Labrosse et al., 2007) will be discussed, as will our efforts to address the presence/absence of the geomagnetic field between 3.2 and 3.9 billion years ago using the terrestrial rock record. The available constraints on ancient magnetic shielding will be reviewed in light of the radiation and particle flux associated with the active young Sun. (References: Labrosse et al., A crystallizing dense magma ocean at the base of the Earth's mantle, Nature, 450, 866-868, 2007; Ozima, M., et al., Terrestrial nitrogen and noble gases in lunar soils, Nature, 436, 655-659, 2005; Tarduno, J.A. et al., Geomagnetic field strength 3.2 billion years ago recorded by single silicate crystals, Nature, 446, 657-660, 2007.)

  19. Effect of magnetic field strength on the alignment of α''-Fe16N2 nanoparticle films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartikowati, Christina W.; Suhendi, Asep; Zulhijah, Rizka; Ogi, Takashi; Iwaki, Toru; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2016-01-01

    Aligning the magnetic orientation is one strategy to improve the magnetic performance of magnetic materials. In this study, well-dispersed single-domain core-shell α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) were aligned by vertically applying magnetic fields with various strengths to a Si wafer substrate followed by fixation with resin. X-ray diffraction indicated that the alignment of the easy c-axis of the α''-Fe16N2 crystal and the magnetic orientation of the NPs depended upon the applied magnetic field. Magnetic analysis demonstrated that increasing the magnetic field strength resulted in hysteresis loops approaching a rectangular form, implying a higher magnetic coercivity, remanence, and maximum energy product. The same tendency was also observed when a horizontal magnetic field was applied. The fixation of the easy c-axis alignment of each nanoparticle caused by Brownian rotation under the magnetic field, instead of Néel rotation, was the reason for the enhancement in the magnetic performance. These results on the alignment of the magnetic orientation of α''-Fe16N2 NPs suggest the practical application of high-performance permanent bulk magnets from well-dispersed single-domain α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 NPs.

  20. Effect of magnetic field strength on the alignment of α''-Fe16N2 nanoparticle films.

    PubMed

    Kartikowati, Christina W; Suhendi, Asep; Zulhijah, Rizka; Ogi, Takashi; Iwaki, Toru; Okuyama, Kikuo

    2016-02-01

    Aligning the magnetic orientation is one strategy to improve the magnetic performance of magnetic materials. In this study, well-dispersed single-domain core-shell α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 nanoparticles (NPs) were aligned by vertically applying magnetic fields with various strengths to a Si wafer substrate followed by fixation with resin. X-ray diffraction indicated that the alignment of the easy c-axis of the α''-Fe16N2 crystal and the magnetic orientation of the NPs depended upon the applied magnetic field. Magnetic analysis demonstrated that increasing the magnetic field strength resulted in hysteresis loops approaching a rectangular form, implying a higher magnetic coercivity, remanence, and maximum energy product. The same tendency was also observed when a horizontal magnetic field was applied. The fixation of the easy c-axis alignment of each nanoparticle caused by Brownian rotation under the magnetic field, instead of Néel rotation, was the reason for the enhancement in the magnetic performance. These results on the alignment of the magnetic orientation of α''-Fe16N2 NPs suggest the practical application of high-performance permanent bulk magnets from well-dispersed single-domain α''-Fe16N2/Al2O3 NPs.

  1. Shear-rate-dependent strength control on the dynamics of rainfall-triggered landslides, Tokushima Prefecture, Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, G.; Suemine, A.; Schulz, W.H.

    2010-01-01

    A typhoon (Typhoon No. 10) attacked Shikoku Island and the Tyugoku area of Japan in 2004. This typhoon produced a new daily precipitation record of 1317 mm on Shikoku Island and triggered hundreds of landslides in Tokushima Prefecture. One catastrophic landslide was triggered in the Shiraishi area of Kisawa village, and destroyed more than 10 houses while also leaving an unstable block high on the slope. The unstable block kept moving after the event, showing accelerating and decelerating movement during and after rainfall and reaching a displacement of several meters before countermeasures were put into place. To examine the mechanism for this landsliding characteristic, samples (weathered serpentinite) were taken from the field, and their shear behaviours examined using ring shear tests. The test results revealed that the residual shear strength of the samples is positively dependent on the shear rate, which may provide an explanation for the continuous acceleratingdecelerating process of the landsliding. The roughness of the shear surface and the microstructure of the shear zone were measured and observed by laser microscope and SEM techniques in an attempt to clarify the mechanism of shear rate effect on the residual shear strength. Copyright ?? 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Field dependence-independence of male and female Spanish athletes.

    PubMed

    Caño, J E; Márquez, S

    1995-06-01

    We examined the field dependence-independence of Spanish athletes, 293 men and women (aged 18 to 23 years) active in individual and team sports, and nonathletes. Subjects were tested on the Group Embedded Figures Test. Analysis indicated that men active in team sports were more field-dependent than those non-involved in sports, and that team-sport women exhibited a higher field-dependence than individual-sport athletes or nonathletes of both sexes. Our data reflect a significant interaction between type of sport and sex. PMID:7478872

  3. Constraints on magnetic field strength in the remnant SN 1006 from its non-thermal images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruk, O.; Kuzyo, T.; Bocchino, F.

    2012-01-01

    Images of SN 1006 have a number of important properties. For instance, the bright limbs coincide spatially in various bands, they have different brightnesses, and the contrast of brightness varies from radio to gamma rays. The reasons for such properties and the role of the magnetic field strength are discussed. Simple, almost model-independent methods and analytical approximations for the derivation of the strength of the magnetic field from the comparison of radio, X-ray and TeV images of the supernova remnant are presented. The methods require the TeV image to be well resolved and accurate, at least to the level of the radio and X-ray maps, so that reasonable constraints can be placed on the magnetic field. If we apply the methods to the present HESS data, they limit the strength of the magnetic field in the limbs of SN 1006 to values lower than a few hundred micro-gauss. If applied to the Fermi-LAT band, the model predicts the same position and same ratio of the surface brightness for GeV photons as for the radio band. We conclude that future TeV and GeV high-resolution data may prove to be very informative about the magnetic field of SN 1006.

  4. Grout stability and strength requirements for field scale injection of fluidized bed combustion ash grout

    SciTech Connect

    Ziemkiewicz, P.F.; Black, C.; Gray, D.D.; Siriwardane, H.J.; Hamric, R.

    1998-12-31

    This paper presents the results of a study involving a field scale injection of a grout made of Fluidized Bed Combustion Ash to control acid mine drainage and subsidence at an abandoned room and pillar coal mine. The grout mix was developed from results obtained from several laboratory scale experiments conducted to investigate flow characteristics and strength of the grout. Based on the rheological properties of the candidate grout mixes it was determined that admixtures were needed to stabilize the grout for optimum flow characteristics. Strength requirements for the grout were determined from site specific geologic information and expected stress levels. One thousand cubic yards of the candidate grout were pumped into an inactive panel of an active room and pillar coal mine to investigate the field performance of the grout. The field study showed that a grout made of Fluidized Bed Combustion ash can be successfully pumped to backfill the mine void.

  5. Polarizable model of water with field-dependent polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranyai, András; Kiss, Péter T.

    2011-12-01

    The polarizable charge-on-spring model of water with three Gaussian charges developed by the present authors [A. Baranyai and P. T. Kiss, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144109 (2010), 10.1063/1.3490660] was studied. We introduced an analytic function for the polarizability in terms of the local electric field. Following theoretical suggestions, the polarizability decreases from its experimental gas-phase value, in our approach, toward a high-field threshold. Using this modified polarizability, we reparameterized the model by calculating its dielectric constant and obtained good estimates of density and internal energy for ambient water, hexagonal ice, and water cluster properties. Mimicked by the new model, we studied liquid water under the impact of homogeneous static electric field in the rage of 0-2.5 V/Å. Both the density and the average dipole moment increase with the strength of the electric field. However, the internal energy shows a minimum at ˜0.35 V/Å. At this field strength, the model starts ordering into a crystal structure. At higher fields the liquid forms a crystalline structure which is a special version of cubic ice.

  6. Effect of low transverse magnetic field on the confinement strength in a quasi-1D wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Thomas, K. J.; Smith, L. W.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Jones, G. A. C.; Griffiths, J.; Pepper, M.

    2013-12-04

    Transport measurements in a quasi-one dimensional (1D) quantum wire are reported in the presence of low transverse magnetic field. Differential conductance shows weak quantised plateaus when the 2D electrons are squeezed electrostatically. Application of a small transverse magnetic field (0.2T) enhances the overall degree of quantisation due to the formation of magneto-electric subbands. The results show the role of magnetic field to fine tune the confinement strength in low density wires when interaction gives rise to double row formation.

  7. A new estimate of average dipole field strength for the last five million years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromwell, G.; Tauxe, L.; Halldorsson, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth's ancient magnetic field can be approximated by a geocentric axial dipole (GAD) where the average field intensity is twice as strong at the poles than at the equator. The present day geomagnetic field, and some global paleointensity datasets, support the GAD hypothesis with a virtual axial dipole moment (VADM) of about 80 ZAm2. Significant departures from GAD for 0-5 Ma are found in Antarctica and Iceland where paleointensity experiments on massive flows (Antarctica) (1) and volcanic glasses (Iceland) produce average VADM estimates of 41.4 ZAm2 and 59.5 ZAm2, respectively. These combined intensities are much closer to a lower estimate for long-term dipole field strength, 50 ZAm2 (2), and some other estimates of average VADM based on paleointensities strictly from volcanic glasses. Proposed explanations for the observed non-GAD behavior, from otherwise high-quality paleointensity results, include incomplete temporal sampling, effects from the tangent cylinder, and hemispheric asymmetry. Differences in estimates of average magnetic field strength likely arise from inconsistent selection protocols and experiment methodologies. We address these possible biases and estimate the average dipole field strength for the last five million years by compiling measurement level data of IZZI-modified paleointensity experiments from lava flows around the globe (including new results from Iceland and the HSDP-2 Hawaii drill core). We use the Thellier Gui paleointensity interpreter (3) in order to apply objective criteria to all specimens, ensuring consistency between sites. Specimen level selection criteria are determined from a recent paleointensity investigation of modern Hawaiian lava flows where the expected magnetic field strength was accurately recovered when following certain selection parameters. Our new estimate of average dipole field strength for the last five million years incorporates multiple paleointensity studies on lava flows with diverse global and

  8. Field thermal infrared emissivity dependence on soil moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emissivity dependence on soil water content has been already reported and modeled under controlled conditions at the laboratory. This study completes and extends that previous work by providing emissivity measurements under field conditions without elimination of impurities, local heterogeneities or...

  9. Heliocentric distance dependence of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.

    1978-01-01

    Numerous spacecraft measurements bearing on the heliocentric distance dependencies of both large- and small-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) are assembled and compared. These data tend to indicate that the average of the radial field component varies as the inverse square of distance. However, the azimuthal component is rather strongly a function of time, being influenced by both the time-dependent solar wind speed and the evolution of the source field at the sun. Thus, unless the solar wind speed dependence is taken into account, individual sets of measurements by a single spacecraft give an azimuthal component gradient which is steeper than the inverse distance dependence predicted from the Parker spiral model. A least squares fit to the composite (five spacecraft) solar rotation average data set gives a result close to the inverse distance dependence. Preliminary Helios results suggest general consistency with the spiral model.

  10. Reproduction, growth, and development of rats during chronic exposure to multiple field strengths of 60-Hz electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Rommereim, D.N.; Rommereim, R.L.; Sikov, M.R.; Buschbom, R.L.; Anderson, L.E. )

    1990-04-01

    A study with multiple exposure groups and large group sizes was performed to establish whether exposure to 60-Hz electric fields would result in reproductive and developmental toxicity. A response model was developed from previous results and tested in groups of rats exposed to electric fields at various field strengths. Female rats were mated, and sperm-positive animals randomly distributed among four groups: sham-exposed or exposed to 10, 65, or 130 kV/m, 60-Hz vertical electric fields. Animals were exposed for 19 hr/day throughout the experiment. During gestation, exposure to the higher field strengths resulted in slightly depressed weight gains of dams. Offspring were born in the field and remained with their dams through the suckling period. Numbers of pups per litter and pup mortality did not differ among the exposure groups. Dams exposed at 65 kV/m lost slightly more weight through the lactation period than the control group. Male pups exposed to higher field strengths gained slightly less weight from 4 to 21 days of age than did sham-exposed animals. At weaning, two F1 females per litter (randomly selected) continued on the same exposure regimen were mated at 11 weeks of age to unexposed males, and euthanized at 20 days of gestation. Uterine contents were evaluated, and all live fetuses were weighed and examined for external, visceral, and skeletal malformations. Fertility and gestational weight gain of F1 females were not affected by exposure, nor was prenatal viability or fetal body weight. No significant increase in the incidence of litters with malformations was observed. Although no developmental toxicity was detected, exposures produced physical changes in the dams, evidenced as a rust-colored deposit on the muzzle and ears (chromodacryorrhea) that increased in incidence and severity at 65 and 130 kV/m.

  11. Strain-rate dependence of ramp-wave evolution and strength in tantalum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. Matthew D.; Foiles, Stephen M.; Lim, Hojun; Brown, Justin L.

    2016-08-01

    We have conducted molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of quasi-isentropic ramp-wave compression to very high pressures over a range of strain rates from 1011 down to 108 1/s. Using scaling methods, we collapse wave profiles from various strain rates to a master profile curve, which shows deviations when material response is strain-rate dependent. Thus, we can show with precision where, and how, strain-rate dependence affects the ramp wave. We find that strain rate affects the stress-strain material response most dramatically at strains below 20%, and that above 30% strain the material response is largely independent of strain rate. We show good overall agreement with experimental stress-strain curves up to approximately 30% strain, above which simulated response is somewhat too stiff. We postulate that this could be due to our interatomic potential or to differences in grain structure and/or size between simulation and experiment. Strength is directly measured from per-atom stress tensor and shows significantly enhanced elastic response at the highest strain rates. This enhanced elastic response is less pronounced at higher pressures and at lower strain rates.

  12. Consistency restrictions on maximal electric-field strength in quantum field theory.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, S P; Gitman, D M

    2008-09-26

    Quantum field theory with an external background can be considered as a consistent model only if backreaction is relatively small with respect to the background. To find the corresponding consistency restrictions on an external electric field and its duration in QED and QCD, we analyze the mean-energy density of quantized fields for an arbitrary constant electric field E, acting during a large but finite time T. Using the corresponding asymptotics with respect to the dimensionless parameter eET2, one can see that the leading contributions to the energy are due to the creation of particles by the electric field. Assuming that these contributions are small in comparison with the energy density of the electric background, we establish the above-mentioned restrictions, which determine, in fact, the time scales from above of depletion of an electric field due to the backreaction.

  13. Field-dependence of AC susceptibility in titanomagnetites

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, M.; Moskowitz, B.; Rosenbaum, J.; Kissel, Catherie

    1998-01-01

    AC susceptibility measurements as a function of field amplitude Hac and of frequency show a strong field dependence for a set of synthetic titanomagnetites (Fe3-xTixO4) and for certain basalts from the SOH-1 Hawaiian drill hole and from Iceland. In-phase susceptibility is constant below fields of about 10-100 A/m, and then increases by as much as a factor of two as Hsc is increased to 2000 A/m. Both the initial field-independent susceptibilities and field-dependence of susceptibility are systematically related to composition: initial susceptibility is 3 SI for a single-crystal sphere of TMO (x = 0) and decreases with increasing titanium content; field-dependence is nearly zero for TM0 and increases systematically to a maximum near TM60 (x = 0.6). This field dependence can in some cases be mistaken for frequency dependence, and leaf to incorrect interpretations of magnetic grain size and composition when titanomagnetite is present.

  14. Spatial offset of test field elements from surround elements affects the strength of motion aftereffects.

    PubMed

    Harris, John; Sullivan, Daniel; Oakley, Madeleine

    2008-01-01

    Static movement aftereffects (MAEs) were measured after adaptation to vertical square-wave luminance gratings drifting horizontally within a central window in a surrounding stationary vertical grating. The relationship between the stationary test grating and the surround was manipulated by varying the alignment of the stationary stripes in the window and those in the surround, and the type of outline separating the window and the surround [no outline, black outline (invisible on black stripes), and red outline (visible throughout its length)]. Offsetting the stripes in the window significantly increased both the duration and ratings of the strength of MAEs. Manipulating the outline had no significant effect on either measure of MAE strength. In a second experiment, in which the stationary test fields alone were presented, participants judged how segregated the test field appeared from its surround. In contrast to the MAE measures, outline as well as offset contributed to judged segregation. In a third experiment, in which test-stripe offset was systematically manipulated, segregation ratings rose with offset. However, MAE strength was greater at medium than at either small or large (180 degrees phase shift) offsets. The effects of these manipulations on the MAE are interpreted in terms of a spatial mechanism which integrates motion signals along collinear contours of the test field and surround, and so causes a reduction of motion contrast at the edges of the test field. PMID:18773724

  15. Using coronal seismology to estimate the magnetic field strength in a realistic coronal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, F.; Peter, H.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: Coronal seismology is used extensively to estimate properties of the corona, e.g. the coronal magnetic field strength is derived from oscillations observed in coronal loops. We present a three-dimensional coronal simulation, including a realistic energy balance in which we observe oscillations of a loop in synthesised coronal emission. We use these results to test the inversions based on coronal seismology. Methods: From the simulation of the corona above an active region, we synthesise extreme ultraviolet emission from the model corona. From this, we derive maps of line intensity and Doppler shift providing synthetic data in the same format as obtained from observations. We fit the (Doppler) oscillation of the loop in the same fashion as done for observations to derive the oscillation period and damping time. Results: The loop oscillation seen in our model is similar to imaging and spectroscopic observations of the Sun. The velocity disturbance of the kink oscillation shows an oscillation period of 52.5 s and a damping time of 125 s, which are both consistent with the ranges of periods and damping times found in observations. Using standard coronal seismology techniques, we find an average magnetic field strength of Bkink = 79 G for our loop in the simulation, while in the loop the field strength drops from roughly 300 G at the coronal base to 50 G at the apex. Using the data from our simulation, we can infer what the average magnetic field derived from coronal seismology actually means. It is close to the magnetic field strength in a constant cross-section flux tube, which would give the same wave travel time through the loop. Conclusions: Our model produced a realistic looking loop-dominated corona, and provides realistic information on the oscillation properties that can be used to calibrate and better understand the result from coronal seismology. A movie associated with Fig. 1 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. The ionic strength dependence of lead (II) carbonate complexation in perchlorate media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Easley, Regina A.; Byrne, Robert H.

    2011-10-01

    Lead speciation in many aqueous geochemical systems is dominated by carbonate complexation. However, direct observations of Pb complexation by carbonate ions are few in number. This work represents the first investigation of the equilibrium Pb+CO32-⇌PbCO30 over a range of ionic strength. Through spectrophotometric observations of PbCO30 formation at 25 °C in NaHCO 3-NaClO 4 solutions, PbCO30 formation constants of the form COβ1=[PbCO30]/[Pb][CO32-] were determined between 0.001 and 5.0 molal ionic strength. Formation constant results were well represented by the equation: logCO3β1=(6.789±0.022)-{4.088·I0.5}/{1+1.5I0.5}+(0.244±0.012)I . This result, combined with previous critical assessments of formation constants for the equilibrium PbCO30+CO32-⇌Pb(CO)22-, was used to estimate the ionic strength dependence for the equilibrium Pb+2CO32-⇌Pb(CO)22-: logCO3β2=(10.41±0.18)-{4.088·I0.5}/{1+1.5I0.5}-(0.31±0.33)I where COβ2=[Pb(CO)22-]/[Pb][CO32-]2. The carbonate complexation constants produced in this study, combined with previous complexation constants for formation of Pb chloride and hydroxide species, were used to predict formation constants for mixed-ligand species Pb(CO)Cl, Pb(OH)Cl, and Pb(CO)OH. Formation constant estimates for the system Pb-HCO3-Cl-H were then used to assess Pb speciation in seawater. In the absence of complexation by organics, approximately 1.9% of the total lead in surface seawater ( S = 35, t = 25 °C, pH ˜8.2 (free H concentration scale)) is present as free hydrated Pb. Carbonate complexes, PbCO30 and Pb(CO)Cl, are predominant forms of Pb in seawater at high pH, and lead chloride complexes are predominant species at low pH. For pH >7.7 the sum concentration of PbCO30, Pb(CO)Cl, PbOH, and Pb(OH)Cl in seawater exceeds the sum concentration of Pb, PbCl, PbCl20, and PbCl3-.

  17. Field Dependence and Vocational Choice of Interior Design Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Diane M.; And Others

    One hundred ninety-three interior design college students were administered the Group Embedded Figures Test, a measure of field dependence, in order to evaluate two of Witkin's hypotheses regarding career choice. The career-differentiation hypothesis predicted that students electing to major in interior design would be field independent because…

  18. In situ rock strength and far field stress in the Nankai accretionary complex: Integration of downhole data from multiple wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, K. A.; Saffer, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    Knowing the magnitude of tectonic stress and rock strength at seismically active margins is important towards understanding fault strength and failure mechanics, yet both are difficult to measure in situ. Recent work at subduction margins, including Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Nankai Trough Subduction Zone Experiment (NanTroSEIZE) drillsites, uses the width of compressional wellbore breakouts (BO), which depends on far field stress conditions, rock strength, and borehole annular pressure (APRS), to estimate the magnitude of horizontal principal stresses (SHmax and Shmin); estimates are problematic due to uncertainty in rock strength (unconfined compressive strength/UCS- for which direct measurements are scarce) and rheology that govern stress distribution at the wellbore. We conduct a novel case study at IODP Site C0002, where a hole was drilled twice with different boundary conditions, providing an opportunity to define in situ stress and strength from field data. Site C0002 is the main deep riser borehole for NanTroSEIZE, located near the seaward edge of the Kumano Basin above the seismogenic plate boundary, ~30 km from the trench. Several boreholes were drilled at the site. During IODP Expedition 314 in 2007, Hole C0002A was drilled with a suite of logging while drilling (LWD) tools to 1401 mbsf in a riserless mode. Hole C0002F, ~70 m away, was drilled to 862 mbsf in riserless mode during Exp. 326 in 2010 and deepened to 2005 mbsf in a riser mode during Expedition 338 in 2012-2013. Increased APRS achieved by riser drilling stabilizes the borehole and suppresses BO, consistent with resistivity imaging data from Exp. 314 that document well-developed, continuous BO throughout the borehole, and data from Expedition 338 indicating few BO. We use a semi-Newtonian approach to solve for stress and UCS consistent with the observed BO width and measured APRS in the two holes over the interval from 862-2005 mbsf. Effective SHmax ranges from ~10-30 MPa and

  19. Polarization dependent switching of asymmetric nanorings with a circular field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Nihar R.; Tuominen, Mark T.; Aidala, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally investigated the switching from onion to vortex states in asymmetric cobalt nanorings by an applied circular field. An in-plane field is applied along the symmetric or asymmetric axis of the ring to establish domain walls (DWs) with symmetric or asymmetric polarization. A circular field is then applied to switch from the onion state to the vortex state, moving the DWs in the process. The asymmetry of the ring leads to different switching fields depending on the location of the DWs and direction of applied field. For polarization along the asymmetric axis, the field required to move the DWs to the narrow side of the ring is smaller than the field required to move the DWs to the larger side of the ring. For polarization along the symmetric axis, establishing one DW in the narrow side and one on the wide side, the field required to switch to the vortex state is an intermediate value.

  20. Rieger-type Periodicity during Solar Cycles 14–24: Estimation of Dynamo Magnetic Field Strength in the Solar Interior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurgenashvili, Eka; Zaqarashvili, Teimuraz V.; Kukhianidze, Vasil; Oliver, Ramon; Ballester, Jose Luis; Ramishvili, Giorgi; Shergelashvili, Bidzina; Hanslmeier, Arnold; Poedts, Stefaan

    2016-07-01

    Solar activity undergoes a variation over timescales of several months known as Rieger-type periodicity, which usually occurs near maxima of sunspot cycles. An early analysis showed that the periodicity appears only in some cycles and is absent in other cycles. But the appearance/absence during different cycles has not been explained. We performed a wavelet analysis of sunspot data from the Greenwich Royal Observatory and the Royal Observatory of Belgium during cycles 14–24. We found that the Rieger-type periods occur in all cycles, but they are cycle dependent: shorter periods occur during stronger cycles. Our analysis revealed a periodicity of 185–195 days during the weak cycles 14–15 and 24 and a periodicity of 155–165 days during the stronger cycles 16–23. We derived the dispersion relation of the spherical harmonics of the magnetic Rossby waves in the presence of differential rotation and a toroidal magnetic field in the dynamo layer near the base of the convection zone. This showed that the harmonics of fast Rossby waves with m = 1 and n = 4, where m (n) indicates the toroidal (poloidal) wavenumbers, perfectly fit with the observed periodicity. The variation of the toroidal field strength from weaker to stronger cycles may lead to the different periods found in those cycles, which explains the observed enigmatic feature of the Rieger-type periodicity. Finally, we used the observed periodicity to estimate the dynamo field strength during cycles 14–24. Our estimations suggest a field strength of ˜40 kG for the stronger cycles and ˜20 kG for the weaker cycles.

  1. Development and testing of passive tracking markers for different field strengths and tracking speeds.

    PubMed

    Peeters, J M; Seppenwoolde, J-H; Bartels, L W; Bakker, C J G

    2006-03-21

    Susceptibility markers for passive tracking need to be small in order to maintain the shape and mechanical properties of the endovascular device. Nevertheless, they also must have a high magnetic moment to induce an adequate artefact at a variety of scan techniques, tracking speeds and, preferably, field strengths. Paramagnetic markers do not satisfy all of these requirements. Ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials were therefore investigated with a vibrating sample magnetometer and compared with the strongly paramagnetic dysprosium oxide. Results indicated that the magnetic behaviour of stainless steel type AISI 410 corresponds the best with ideal marker properties. Markers with different magnetic moments were constructed and tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The appearance of the corresponding artefacts was field strength independent above magnetic saturation of 1.5 T. Generally, the contrast-to-noise ratio decreased at increasing tracking speed and decreasing magnetic moment. Device depiction was most consistent at a frame rate of 20 frames per second. PMID:16510948

  2. NOTE: Development and testing of passive tracking markers for different field strengths and tracking speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peeters, J. M.; Seppenwoolde, J.-H.; Bartels, L. W.; Bakker, C. J. G.

    2006-03-01

    Susceptibility markers for passive tracking need to be small in order to maintain the shape and mechanical properties of the endovascular device. Nevertheless, they also must have a high magnetic moment to induce an adequate artefact at a variety of scan techniques, tracking speeds and, preferably, field strengths. Paramagnetic markers do not satisfy all of these requirements. Ferro- and ferrimagnetic materials were therefore investigated with a vibrating sample magnetometer and compared with the strongly paramagnetic dysprosium oxide. Results indicated that the magnetic behaviour of stainless steel type AISI 410 corresponds the best with ideal marker properties. Markers with different magnetic moments were constructed and tested in in vitro and in vivo experiments. The appearance of the corresponding artefacts was field strength independent above magnetic saturation of 1.5 T. Generally, the contrast-to-noise ratio decreased at increasing tracking speed and decreasing magnetic moment. Device depiction was most consistent at a frame rate of 20 frames per second.

  3. Field strength prediction for mobile radio with the aid of a topographic data bank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. W.

    Okumura's classical study (1968) and numerous measurements in Germany are used to develop a field strength prediction method for mobile radio. A topographic data bank is developed that contains information on the altitude above sea level and the environmental clutter for areas of 100 x 150 sq m. The work is restricted to quasi-smooth terrain, and special attention is paid to the influence of environmental clutter and the range of field strength fluctuations. The prediction errors are indicated and values for the local probabilities are listed for two different kinds of built-up areas, forests and open terrain. Some discrepancies between measured values and the predicted values of the Okumura model are also explained.

  4. Electromagnetic field strength prediction in an urban environment: A useful tool for the planning of LMSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandooren, G. A. J.; Herben, M. H. A. J.; Brussaard, G.; Sforza, M.; Poiaresbaptista, J. P. V.

    1993-01-01

    A model for the prediction of the electromagnetic field strength in an urban environment is presented. The ray model, that is based on the Uniform Theory of Diffraction (UTD), includes effects of the non-perfect conductivity of the obstacles and their surface roughness. The urban environment is transformed into a list of standardized obstacles that have various shapes and material properties. The model is capable of accurately predicting the field strength in the urban environment by calculating different types of wave contributions such as reflected, edge and corner diffracted waves, and combinations thereof. Also, antenna weight functions are introduced to simulate the spatial filtering by the mobile antenna. Communication channel parameters such as signal fading, time delay profiles, Doppler shifts and delay-Doppler spectra can be derived from the ray-tracing procedure using post-processing routines. The model has been tested against results from scaled measurements at 50 GHz and proves to be accurate.

  5. Optical field-strength generalized polarization of multimode single photon states in integrated directional couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liñares, Jesús; Barral, David; Nistal, María C.; Moreno, Vicente

    2011-05-01

    A quantum analysis of the generalized polarization properties of multimode single photon states is presented. It is based on the optical field-strength probability distributions in such a way that generalized polarization is understood as a significant confinement of the probability distribution along certain regions of the multidimensional optical field-strength space. The analysis is addressed to multimode integrated waveguiding devices, such as N × N integrated directional couplers, whose modes fulfil a spatial modal orthogonality relationship. For that purpose a definition of the quantum generalized polarization degree in a N-dimensional space, based on the concept of distance to an unpolarized N-dimensional Gaussian distribution, is proposed. The generalized polarization degree of pure and mixture multimode single photon states and also of some multi-photon states such as coherent and chaotic ones, is evaluated and analyzed.

  6. EFFECTS OF ELECTRIC FIELD ON THE BIAXIAL STRENGTH OF POLED PZT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2008-01-01

    The mechanical integrity of piezoelectric ceramics plays a crucial role in the performance and design of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) piezo stack actuators especially as PZT actuators become physically larger and are sought to operate under harsher conditions. The reliable design of such systems demands additional consideration of a number of issues that include electro-mechanical coupling as well as strength-size scaling. This study addresses some of those issues through the use of ball-on-ring (BoR) equibiaxial flexure strength tests of two PZT piezo ceramics. The BoR biaxial flexure tests were conducted with two PZT materials under different electric fields. Fracture surfaces and failure initiations were analyzed using optical and scanning electronic microscopy. The effects of electric fields on the two-parameter Weibull distribution are discussed. These results will serve as input data for future probabilistic reliability analysis of multilayer PZT piezo actuators.

  7. Field dependent emission rates in radiation damaged GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R. M.; Myers, S. M.; Wampler, W. R.; Lang, D. V.; Seager, C. H.; Campbell, J. M.

    2014-07-07

    We have measured the temperature and field dependence of emission rates from five traps in electron damaged GaAs. Four of the traps have previously been identified as radiation defects. One of the traps, seen in higher doped diodes, has not been previously identified. We have fit the data to a multiphonon emission theory that allows recombination in GaAs to be characterized over a broad range of temperature and electric field. These results demonstrate an efficient method to calculate field-dependent emission rates in GaAs.

  8. Magnetic field dependent polarizability and electric field dependent diamagnetic susceptibility of a donor in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthukrishnaveni, M.; Srinivasan, N.

    2016-09-01

    The polarizability and diamagnetic susceptibility values of a shallow donor in Si are computed. These values are obtained for the cases bar{E}allel bar{B} and bar{E} bot bar{B}. The anisotropy introduced by these perturbations are properly taken care of in the expressions derived for polarizability and magnetic susceptibility. Our results show that the numerical value of the contribution from electric field to diamagnetic susceptibility is several orders smaller than that of the magnetic field effect. Polarizability values are obtained in a magnetic field by two different methods. The polarizability values decrease as the intensity of magnetic field increases. Using the Clausius-Mossotti relation, the anisotropic values of the refractive indices for different magnetic fields are estimated.

  9. Dependency of Shear Strength on Test Rate in SiC/BSAS Ceramic Matrix Composite at Elevated Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    2003-01-01

    Both interlaminar and in-plane shear strengths of a unidirectional Hi-Nicalon(TM) fiber-reinforced barium strontium aluminosilicate (SiC/BSAS) composite were determined at 1100 C in air as a function of test rate using double notch shear test specimens. The composite exhibited a significant effect of test rate on shear strength, regardless of orientation which was either in interlaminar or in in-plane direction, resulting in an appreciable shear-strength degradation of about 50 percent as test rate decreased from 3.3 10(exp -1) mm/s to 3.3 10(exp -5) mm/s. The rate dependency of composite's shear strength was very similar to that of ultimate tensile strength at 1100 C observed in a similar composite (2-D SiC/BSAS) in which tensile strength decreased by about 60 percent when test rate varied from the highest (5 MPa/s) to the lowest (0.005 MPa/s). A phenomenological, power-law slow crack growth formulation was proposed and formulated to account for the rate dependency of shear strength of the composite.

  10. H:Q Ratios and Bilateral Leg Strength in College Field and Court Sports Players

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Roy T.H.; Smith, Andrew W.; Wong, Del P.

    2012-01-01

    One of the key components in sports injury prevention is the identification of imbalances in leg muscle strength. However, different leg muscle characteristics may occur in large playing area (field) sports and small playing area (court) sports, which should be considered in regular injury prevention assessment. This study examined the isokinetic hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and bilateral leg strength balance in 40 male college (age: 23.4 ± 2.5 yrs) team sport players (field sport = 23, soccer players; court sport = 17, volleyball and basketball players). Five repetitions of maximal knee concentric flexion and concentric extension were performed on an isokinetic dynamometer at two speeds (slow: 60°·s−1 and fast: 300°·s−1) with 3 minutes rest between tests. Both legs were measured in counterbalanced order with the dominant leg being determined as the leg used to kick a ball. The highest concentric peak torque values (Nm) of the hamstrings and quadriceps of each leg were analyzed after body mass normalization (Nm·kg−1). Court sport players showed significantly weaker dominant leg hamstrings muscles at both contraction speeds (P < 0.05). The H:Q ratio was significantly larger in field players in their dominant leg at 60°·s−1 (P < 0.001), and their non-dominant leg at 300°·s−1 (P < 0.001) respectively. Sport-specific leg muscle strength was evident in college players from field and court sports. These results suggest the need for different muscle strength training and rehabilitation protocols for college players according to the musculature requirements in their respective sports. PMID:23487043

  11. H:q ratios and bilateral leg strength in college field and court sports players.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Roy T H; Smith, Andrew W; Wong, Del P

    2012-06-01

    One of the key components in sports injury prevention is the identification of imbalances in leg muscle strength. However, different leg muscle characteristics may occur in large playing area (field) sports and small playing area (court) sports, which should be considered in regular injury prevention assessment. This study examined the isokinetic hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and bilateral leg strength balance in 40 male college (age: 23.4 ± 2.5 yrs) team sport players (field sport = 23, soccer players; court sport = 17, volleyball and basketball players). Five repetitions of maximal knee concentric flexion and concentric extension were performed on an isokinetic dynamometer at two speeds (slow: 60°·s(-1) and fast: 300°·s(-1)) with 3 minutes rest between tests. Both legs were measured in counterbalanced order with the dominant leg being determined as the leg used to kick a ball. The highest concentric peak torque values (Nm) of the hamstrings and quadriceps of each leg were analyzed after body mass normalization (Nm·kg(-1)). Court sport players showed significantly weaker dominant leg hamstrings muscles at both contraction speeds (P < 0.05). The H:Q ratio was significantly larger in field players in their dominant leg at 60°·s(-1) (P < 0.001), and their non-dominant leg at 300°·s(-1) (P < 0.001) respectively. Sport-specific leg muscle strength was evident in college players from field and court sports. These results suggest the need for different muscle strength training and rehabilitation protocols for college players according to the musculature requirements in their respective sports. PMID:23487043

  12. Magnetic field strength influence on the reactive magnetron sputter deposition of Ta2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerweger, R.; Holec, D.; Paulitsch, J.; Rachbauer, R.; Polcik, P.; Mayrhofer, P. H.

    2013-08-01

    Reactive magnetron sputtering enables the deposition of various thin films to be used for protective as well as optical and electronic applications. However, progressing target erosion during sputtering results in increased magnetic field strengths at the target surface. Consequently, the glow discharge, the target poisoning, and hence the morphology, crystal structure and stoichiometry of the prepared thin films are influenced. Therefore, these effects were investigated by varying the cathode current Im between 0.50 and 1.00 A, the magnetic field strength B between 45 and 90 mT, and the O2/(Ar + O2) flow rate ratio Γ between 0% and 100%. With increasing oxygen flow ratio a substoichiometric TaOx oxide forms at the metallic Ta target surface which further transfers to a non-conductive tantalum pentoxide Ta2O5, impeding a stable dc glow discharge. These two transition zones (from Ta to TaOx and from TaOx to Ta2O5) shift to higher oxygen flow rates for increasing target currents. In contrast, increasing the magnetic field strength (e.g., due to sputter erosion) mainly shifts the TaOx to Ta2O5 transition to lower oxygen flow rates while marginally influencing the Ta to TaOx transition. To allow for a stable dc glow discharge (and to suppress the formation of non-conductive Ta2O5 at the target) even at Γ = 100% either a high target current (Im ⩾ 1 A) or a low magnetic field strength (B ⩽ 60 mT) is necessary. These conditions are required to prepare stoichiometric and fully crystalline Ta2O5 films.

  13. H:q ratios and bilateral leg strength in college field and court sports players.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Roy T H; Smith, Andrew W; Wong, Del P

    2012-06-01

    One of the key components in sports injury prevention is the identification of imbalances in leg muscle strength. However, different leg muscle characteristics may occur in large playing area (field) sports and small playing area (court) sports, which should be considered in regular injury prevention assessment. This study examined the isokinetic hamstrings-to-quadriceps (H:Q) ratio and bilateral leg strength balance in 40 male college (age: 23.4 ± 2.5 yrs) team sport players (field sport = 23, soccer players; court sport = 17, volleyball and basketball players). Five repetitions of maximal knee concentric flexion and concentric extension were performed on an isokinetic dynamometer at two speeds (slow: 60°·s(-1) and fast: 300°·s(-1)) with 3 minutes rest between tests. Both legs were measured in counterbalanced order with the dominant leg being determined as the leg used to kick a ball. The highest concentric peak torque values (Nm) of the hamstrings and quadriceps of each leg were analyzed after body mass normalization (Nm·kg(-1)). Court sport players showed significantly weaker dominant leg hamstrings muscles at both contraction speeds (P < 0.05). The H:Q ratio was significantly larger in field players in their dominant leg at 60°·s(-1) (P < 0.001), and their non-dominant leg at 300°·s(-1) (P < 0.001) respectively. Sport-specific leg muscle strength was evident in college players from field and court sports. These results suggest the need for different muscle strength training and rehabilitation protocols for college players according to the musculature requirements in their respective sports.

  14. Isotopic dependences of the dielectric strength of gases: new observations, classification, and possible origins

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L.G.; Rodrigo, H.; Marode, E.; Bastien, F.

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we report: (1) the finding that the CH/sub 4//CD/sub 4/ nonuniform field behavior is polarity dependent (i.e., the V/sub s/ of CD/sub 4/ is lower than the V/sub s/ of CH/sub 4/ for negative polarity which is just the opposite of that observed for positive polarity); (2) discuss the origins of the observed isotope effects and predict new isotopic dependences of V/sub s/; and (3) report results on the V/sub s/ of H/sub 2/S and D/sub 2/S for negative polarity which confirm their predicted isotopic behavior.

  15. Optical field-strength polarization of two-mode single-photon states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liñares, J.; Nistal, M. C.; Barral, D.; Moreno, V.

    2010-09-01

    We present a quantum analysis of two-mode single-photon states based on the probability distributions of the optical field strength (or position quadrature) in order to describe their quantum polarization characteristics, where polarization is understood as a significative confinement of the optical field-strength values on determined regions of the two-mode optical field-strength plane. We will show that the mentioned probability distributions along with the values of quantum Stokes parameters allow us to characterize the polarization of a two-mode single-photon state, in an analogous way to the classical case, and to distinguish conceptually between mixture and partially polarized quantum states; in this way, we propose a simple definition of the quantum polarization degree based on the recent concept of distance measure to an unpolarized distribution, which gives rise to a depolarization degree equivalent to an overlapping between the probability distribution of the quantum state and a non-polarized two-mode Gaussian distribution. The work is particularly intended to university physics teachers and graduate students as well as to physicists and specialists concerned with the issue of optical polarization.

  16. Resolution Improvements in in Vivo1H NMR Spectra with Increased Magnetic Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruetter, Rolf; Weisdorf, Sally A.; Rajanayagan, Vasantham; Terpstra, Melissa; Merkle, Hellmut; Truwit, Charles L.; Garwood, Michael; Nyberg, Scott L.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-11-01

    The measurement of cerebral metabolites using highly homologous localization techniques and similar shimming methods was performed in the human brain at 1.5 and 4 T as well as in the dog and rat brain at 9.4 T. In rat brain, improved resolution was achieved by shimming all first- and second-order shim coils using a fully adiabatic FASTMAP sequence. The spectra showed a clear improvement in spectral resolution for all metabolite resonances with increased field strength. Changes in cerebral glutamine content were clearly observed at 4 T compared to 1.5 T in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. At 9.4 T, glutamine H4 at 2.46 ppm was fully resolved from glutamate H4 at 2.37 ppm, as was the potential resonance from γ-amino-butyric acid at 2.30 ppm and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate at 2.05 ppm. Singlet linewidths were found to be as low as 6 Hz (0.015 ppm) at 9.4 T, indicating a substantial decrease in ppm linewidth with field strength. Furthermore, the methylene peak of creatine was partially resolved from phosphocreatine, indicating a close to 1:1 relationship in gray matter. We conclude that increasing the magnetic field strength increases spectral resolution also for1H NMR, which can lead to more than linear sensitivity gains.

  17. Nonmonotonic field-dependent magnetic permeability of a paramagnetic ferrofluid emulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Alexey O.; Kuznetsova, Olga B.

    2012-04-01

    The ferrofluid emulsion, made of kerosene-based ferrofluid droplets suspended in nonmiscible aviation oil, demonstrates experimentally the nonmonotonic dependence of the effective magnetic permeability as a function of the uniform static magnetic field. In weak fields the emulsion permeability rapidly grows; it reaches its maximum at fields on the order of 1 kA/m; after that, it decays to zero. The theoretical explanation of the effect, as we show here, could be based on the following idea: In a weak magnetic field the growth of the induced droplet magnetic moment is faster than the linear one due to the droplet elongation accompanied by the reduction of the demagnetizing field. Further increase of the external magnetic field strength cannot lead to a significant decrease of the demagnetizing field, as the droplets are already highly elongated. On the other hand, the magnetic susceptibility of the ferrofluid reduces with the field strength. Thus, the effective magnetic permeability of the ferrofluid suspension starts decreasing. The developed theoretical model describes well the experimental observations.

  18. Nonmonotonic field-dependent magnetic permeability of a paramagnetic ferrofluid emulsion.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Alexey O; Kuznetsova, Olga B

    2012-04-01

    The ferrofluid emulsion, made of kerosene-based ferrofluid droplets suspended in nonmiscible aviation oil, demonstrates experimentally the nonmonotonic dependence of the effective magnetic permeability as a function of the uniform static magnetic field. In weak fields the emulsion permeability rapidly grows; it reaches its maximum at fields on the order of 1 kA/m; after that, it decays to zero. The theoretical explanation of the effect, as we show here, could be based on the following idea: In a weak magnetic field the growth of the induced droplet magnetic moment is faster than the linear one due to the droplet elongation accompanied by the reduction of the demagnetizing field. Further increase of the external magnetic field strength cannot lead to a significant decrease of the demagnetizing field, as the droplets are already highly elongated. On the other hand, the magnetic susceptibility of the ferrofluid reduces with the field strength. Thus, the effective magnetic permeability of the ferrofluid suspension starts decreasing. The developed theoretical model describes well the experimental observations. PMID:22680473

  19. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate. PMID:25940850

  20. An experimental study on the effects of temperature and magnetic field strength on the magnetorheological fluid stability and MR effect.

    PubMed

    Rabbani, Yahya; Ashtiani, Mahshid; Hashemabadi, Seyed Hassan

    2015-06-14

    In this study, the stability and rheological properties of a suspension of carbonyl iron microparticles (CIMs) in silicone oil were investigated within a temperature range of 10 to 85 °C. The effect of adding two hydrophobic (stearic and palmitic) acids on the stability and magnetorheological effect of a suspension of CIMs in silicone oil was studied. According to the results, for preparing a stable and efficient magnetorheological (MR) fluid, additives should be utilized. Therefore, 3 wt% of stearic acid was added to the MR fluid which led to an enhancement of the fluid stability over 92% at 25 °C. By investigating shear stress variation due to the changes in the shear rate for acid-based MR fluids, the maximum yield stress was obtained by fitting the Bingham plastic rheological model at high shear rates. Based on the existing correlations of yield stress and either temperature or magnetic field strength, a new model was fitted to the experimental data to monitor the simultaneous effect of magnetic field strength and temperature on the maximum yield stress. The results demonstrated that as the magnetic field intensified or the temperature decreased, the maximum yield stress increased dramatically. In addition, when the MR fluid reached its magnetic saturation, the viscosity of fluid depended only on the shear rate.

  1. Quantitative determination of electric field strengths within dynamically operated devices using EBIC analysis in the SEM.

    PubMed

    Pugatschow, Anton; Heiderhoff, Ralf; Balk, Ludwig J

    2008-01-01

    Although electron beam-induced current (EBIC) technique was invented in the seventies, it is still a powerful technique for failure analysis and reliability investigations of modern materials and devices. Time-resolved and stroboscopic microanalyses using sampling Fourier components decomposed by modulated charge carrier excitation are introduced. Quantitative determination of electric field strengths within dynamically operated devices in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) will be demonstrated. This technique allows investigations of diffusion and drift processes and of variations of electric field distributions inside active devices.

  2. Field dependent spin transport of anisotropic Heisenberg chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezania, H.

    2016-04-01

    We have addressed the static spin conductivity and spin Drude weight of one-dimensional spin-1/2 anisotropic antiferromagnetic Heisenberg chain in the finite magnetic field. We have investigated the behavior of transport properties by means of excitation spectrum in terms of a hard core bosonic representation. The effect of in-plane anisotropy on the spin transport properties has also been studied via the bosonic model by Green's function approach. This anisotropy is considered for exchange constants that couple spin components perpendicular to magnetic field direction. We have found the temperature dependence of the spin conductivity and spin Drude weight in the gapped field induced spin-polarized phase for various magnetic field and anisotropy parameters. Furthermore we have studied the magnetic field dependence of static spin conductivity and Drude weight for various anisotropy parameters. Our results show the regular part of spin conductivity vanishes in isotropic case however Drude weight has a finite non-zero value and the system exhibits ballistic transport properties. We also find the peak in the static spin conductivity factor moves to higher temperature upon increasing the magnetic field at fixed anisotropy. The static spin conductivity is found to be monotonically decreasing with magnetic field due to increase of energy gap in the excitation spectrum. Furthermore we have studied the temperature dependence of spin Drude weight for different magnetic field and various anisotropy parameters.

  3. Tailoring magnetostriction sign of ferromagnetic composite by increasing magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gou, Junming; Liu, Xiaolian; Wu, Kaiyun; Wang, Yue; Hu, Shanshan; Zhao, Hui; Xiao, Andong; Ma, Tianyu; Yan, Mi

    2016-08-01

    The unitary deformation of single-phase ferromagnets by a magnetic field, i.e., either positive or negative linear magnetostriction, allows only monotonous control. Here we report a proof-of-principle ferromagnetic composite Fe73Ga27, for which the magnetostriction sign changes from positive to negative by increasing the magnetic field strength. Based on the transformation from body-centered-cubic (BCC) to face-centered-cubic (FCC) phases in this binary system, Fe73Ga27 composite is prepared by aging the BCC averaged precursor for 3 days at 803 K. Magnetic measurements indicate that the BCC phase exhibits smaller magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant than the FCC phase. The offset effect between BCC and FCC phases produces positive net magnetostriction at low magnetic fields but negative net magnetostriction at high magnetic fields. By tuning the field strength, such composites can mediate compressive and tensile strains to other functional materials, e.g., piezoelectric material or optic-fibers, which is beneficial to design multifunctional devices.

  4. BIPOLAR JETS LAUNCHED FROM MAGNETICALLY DIFFUSIVE ACCRETION DISKS. I. EJECTION EFFICIENCY VERSUS FIELD STRENGTH AND DIFFUSIVITY

    SciTech Connect

    Sheikhnezami, Somayeh; Fendt, Christian; Porth, Oliver; Vaidya, Bhargav; Ghanbari, Jamshid E-mail: fendt@mpia.de

    2012-09-20

    We investigate the launching of jets and outflows from magnetically diffusive accretion disks. Using the PLUTO code, we solve the time-dependent resistive magnetohydrodynamic equations taking into account the disk and jet evolution simultaneously. The main question we address is which kind of disks launch jets and which kind of disks do not? In particular, we study how the magnitude and distribution of the (turbulent) magnetic diffusivity affect mass loading and jet acceleration. We apply a turbulent magnetic diffusivity based on {alpha}-prescription, but also investigate examples where the scale height of diffusivity is larger than that of the disk gas pressure. We further investigate how the ejection efficiency is governed by the magnetic field strength. Our simulations last for up to 5000 dynamical timescales corresponding to 900 orbital periods of the inner disk. As a general result, we observe a continuous and robust outflow launched from the inner part of the disk, expanding into a collimated jet of superfast-magnetosonic speed. For long timescales, the disk's internal dynamics change, as due to outflow ejection and disk accretion the disk mass decreases. For magnetocentrifugally driven jets, we find that for (1) less diffusive disks, (2) a stronger magnetic field, (3) a low poloidal diffusivity, or (4) a lower numerical diffusivity (resolution), the mass loading of the outflow is increased-resulting in more powerful jets with high-mass flux. For weak magnetization, the (weak) outflow is driven by the magnetic pressure gradient. We consider in detail the advection and diffusion of magnetic flux within the disk and we find that the disk and outflow magnetization may substantially change in time. This may have severe impact on the launching and formation process-an initially highly magnetized disk may evolve into a disk of weak magnetization which cannot drive strong outflows. We further investigate the jet asymptotic velocity and the jet rotational velocity in

  5. Magnetic field dependence of spatial frequency encoding NMR as probed on an oligosaccharide.

    PubMed

    Pitoux, D; Hu, Z; Plainchont, B; Merlet, D; Farjon, J; Bonnaffé, D; Giraud, N

    2015-10-01

    The magnetic field dependence of spatial frequency encoding NMR techniques is addressed through a detailed analysis of (1)H NMR spectra acquired under spatial frequency encoding on an oligomeric saccharide sample. In particular, the influence of the strength of the static magnetic field on spectral and spatial resolutions that are key features of this method is investigated. For this purpose, we report the acquisition of correlation experiments implementing broadband homodecoupling or J-edited spin evolutions, and we discuss the resolution enhancements that are provided by these techniques at two different magnetic fields. We show that performing these experiments at higher field improves the performance of high resolution NMR techniques based on a spatial frequency encoding. The significant resolution enhancements observed on the correlation spectra acquired at very high field make them valuable analytical tools that are suitable for the assignment of (1)H chemical shifts and scalar couplings in molecules with highly crowded spectrum such as carbohydrates.

  6. Electric field dependence of reactivity of state-selected and oriented methylhalides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulthuis, J.; Milan, J. B.; Janssen, M. H. M.; Stolte, S.

    1991-06-01

    , i.e., weak field and strong field, particularly because the Stark curves reveal the presence and the precise position of avoided crossings. Dependent on the field strength used for state selection and focusing, these crossings may, in principle, have a marked effect on the orientation obtained, given that the final orientation field at the reaction site remains the same. In addition, knowledge of the detailed Stark curves suggests a novel and feasible way to reverse the orientation of the molecules without interference with the detection system, which may be particularly useful if ionic products are formed.

  7. CORRELATIONS OF PLASMA DENSITY AND MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN THE HELIOSHEATH

    SciTech Connect

    Gutynska, O.; Safrankova, J.; Nemecek, Z.; Richardson, J. D.

    2010-10-20

    The crossing of the termination shock (TS) by Voyager 2 in 2007 at 84 AU allows a comparison of fluctuations in different heliosheath regions. The Letter concentrates on MHD waves that exhibit a significant correlation between the magnetic field strength and plasma density. The correlations between both quantities were computed on 2 hr time intervals in the frequency range of 1 x 10{sup -4} to 4 x 10{sup -3} Hz. We separate the data into two regions with different magnetic field behavior; the post-TS region with many crossings of the current sheet and the unipolar region where the magnetic field direction remains nearly constant. We find that typical correlation coefficients in these regions are about 0.55-0.65, larger than in Earth's magnetosheath. The largest correlations occur when the spectrum of magnetic field fluctuations is dominated by low frequencies.

  8. The shape dependency of two-dimensional magnetic field dependence of a Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Norimichi; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Abe, Susumu; Kawai, Sho; Nishi, Yohei; Masuda, Koji

    2008-04-01

    Modulation characteristics of a Josephson current are usually measured by applying the external magnetic field parallel to the junction plane from one direction, and uniformity in tunnel barrier is discussed. So far, we have measured two-dimensional magnetic field dependence of a square Josephson junction by independently scanning the magnetic field (Hx,Hy) parallel to the junction plane from two directions. We can get a lot of information about spatial critical current distribution in a Josephson junction by observing the magnetic field dependence of a Josephson junction in two dimensions. This time, we have fabricated the different-shaped Josephson junctions and investigated the shape dependency of two-dimensional magnetic field dependence of a Josephson junction. We observed the Ic-(Hx,Hy) characteristics of triangular, hexagonal, and circular Josephson junctions quite different from the Ic-(Hx,Hy), characteristics of a square Josephson junction. Furthermore, we simulated two-dimensional magnetic field dependence of a Josephson junction by calculating the superconducting current density distribution in each magnetic field. The simulation results agreed well with experimental results.

  9. Effect of excitation field strength on magnetic Barkhausen noise profile in case carburized EN 36 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaow, M. M.; Shaw, B. A.

    2015-03-01

    The sensitivity of magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) profile to changes in the excitation field strength has been investigated in case carburized EN36 steel. In general, the 0.5 mm case depth EN 36 steel specimen induces a double peak profile indicative of inhomogeneity through the detected depth in the magnetized landscape. Various excitation field amplitudes have been applied to the electromagnet to generate various excitation fields on the specimen surface. Excitation field at the lowest level induced an MBN emission of two peaks of equivalent heights at low current value. The first peak occurs at lower field than the second peak in each half magnetization cycle. As the excitation field increases, the height of both peaks increased but the second peak, at higher field, increases in a higher rate than that of the first peak at lower field. Beyond certain magnetizing voltage, both peaks heights began to saturate and no further increase in the MBN intensity has been noticed. The results are discussed on the basis of the available theories on MBN.

  10. Prostate MR imaging at high-field strength: evolution or revolution?

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Hartman, Robert P; Lyonnet, Denis

    2006-02-01

    As 3 T MR scanners become more available, body imaging at high field strength is becoming the subject of intensive research. However, little has been published on prostate imaging at 3 T. Will high-field imaging dramatically increase our ability to depict and stage prostate cancer? This paper will address this question by reviewing the advantages and drawbacks of body imaging at 3 T and the current limitations of prostate imaging at 1.5 T, and by detailing the preliminary results of prostate 3 T MRI. Even if slight adjustments of imaging protocols are necessary for taking into account the changes in T1 and T2 relaxation times at 3 T, tissue contrast in T2-weighted (T2w) imaging seems similar at 1.5 T and 3 T. Therefore, significant improvement in cancer depiction in T2w imaging is not expected. However, increased spatial resolution due to increased signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) may improve the detection of minimal capsular invasion. Higher field strength should provide increased spectral and spatial resolution for spectroscopic imaging, but new pulse sequences will have to be designed for overcoming field inhomogeneities and citrate J-modulation issues. Finally, dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI is the method of imaging that is the most likely to benefit from the increased SNR, with a significantly better trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution.

  11. Influence of static magnetic field strength on the temperature resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle thermometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jing; Dieckhoff, Jan; Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank

    2016-10-01

    This paper investigates the influence of dc magnetic field strength on the resolution of a magnetic nanoparticle (MNP) thermometer, which employs the fundamental f0 and 2f0 harmonics of the MNP magnetization induced by ac and superimposed dc magnetic fields. In ac and parallel dc magnetic fields, the strength of dc magnetic field modulates the harmonics of the MNP magnetization, which affects their temperature sensitivities and measurement signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). A temperature-adjustable fluxgate-based magnetic particle spectrometer was used to measure the spectra of the MNP magnetization at different temperatures. To determine the temperature, the amplitudes of the measured f0 and 2f0 harmonics were modeled based on the static Langevin function. AC susceptibility measurements on a MNP sample demonstrate the applicability of the static Langevin function for the description of the MNP magnetization spectra at a low frequency ac magnetic field without taking into account the MNP dynamics. Our simulations and experiments show that with increasing dc magnetic field from 0.2 mT to 2.0 mT, both the amplitude of the 2f0 harmonic and the temperature sensitivity of the amplitude ratio of the 2f0 to f0 harmonics increase by a factor of about 10 in an ac magnetic field with a frequency of 70 Hz and an amplitude of 1 mT. Concomitantly, the SNR of the 2f0 harmonic significantly increases by about 20 dB. Consequently, the temperature resolution of the MNP thermometer is improved from 1.97 K to 0.26 K.

  12. Low-field one-dimensional and direction-dependent relaxation imaging of bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rössler, Erik; Mattea, Carlos; Mollova, Ayret; Stapf, Siegfried

    2011-12-01

    The structure of articular cartilage is separated into three layers of differently oriented collagen fibers, which is accompanied by a gradient of increasing glycosaminoglycan (GAG) and decreasing water concentration from the top layer towards the bone interface. The combined effect of these structural variations results in a change of the longitudinal and transverse relaxation times as a function of the distance from the cartilage surface. In this paper, this dependence is investigated at a magnetic field strength of 0.27 T with a one-dimensional depth resolution of 50 μm on bovine hip and stifle joint articular cartilage. By employing this method, advantage is taken of the increasing contrast of the longitudinal relaxation rate found at lower magnetic field strengths. Furthermore, evidence for an orientational dependence of relaxation times with respect to an axis normal to the surface plane is given, an observation that has recently been reported using high-field MRI and that was explained by preferential orientations of collagen bundles in each of the three cartilage zones. In order to quantify the extent of a further contrast mechanism and to estimate spatially dependent glycosaminoglycan concentrations, the data are supplemented by proton relaxation times that were acquired in bovine articular cartilage that was soaked in a 0.8 mM aqueous Gd ++ solution.

  13. Evaluating the strength of salt bridges: a comparison of current biomolecular force fields.

    PubMed

    Debiec, Karl T; Gronenborn, Angela M; Chong, Lillian T

    2014-06-19

    Recent advances in computer hardware and software have made rigorous evaluation of current biomolecular force fields using microsecond-scale simulations possible. Force fields differ in their treatment of electrostatic interactions, including the formation of salt bridges in proteins. Here we conducted an extensive evaluation of salt bridge interactions in the latest AMBER, CHARMM, and OPLS force fields, using microsecond-scale molecular dynamics simulations of amino acid analogues in explicit solvent. We focused on salt bridges between three different pairs of oppositely charged amino acids: Arg/Asp, Lys/Asp, and His(+)/Asp. Our results reveal considerable variability in the predicted KA values of the salt bridges for these force fields, as well as differences from experimental data: almost all of the force fields overestimate the strengths of the salt bridges. When amino acids are represented by side-chain analogues, the AMBER ff03 force field overestimates the KA values the least, while for complete amino acids, the AMBER ff13α force field yields the lowest KA value, most likely caused by an altered balance of side-chain/side-chain and side-chain/backbone contacts. These findings confirm the notion that the implicit incorporation of solvent polarization improves the accuracy of modeling salt bridge interactions.

  14. Wave function for time-dependent harmonically confined electrons in a time-dependent electric field.

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Qi; Pan, Xiao-Yin; Sahni, Viraht

    2013-09-21

    The many-body wave function of a system of interacting particles confined by a time-dependent harmonic potential and perturbed by a time-dependent spatially homogeneous electric field is derived via the Feynman path-integral method. The wave function is comprised of a phase factor times the solution to the unperturbed time-dependent Schrödinger equation with the latter being translated by a time-dependent value that satisfies the classical driven equation of motion. The wave function reduces to that of the Harmonic Potential Theorem wave function for the case of the time-independent harmonic confining potential. PMID:24070284

  15. Light field reconstruction robust to signal dependent noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Kun; Bian, Liheng; Suo, Jinli; Dai, Qionghai

    2014-11-01

    Capturing four dimensional light field data sequentially using a coded aperture camera is an effective approach but suffers from low signal noise ratio. Although multiplexing can help raise the acquisition quality, noise is still a big issue especially for fast acquisition. To address this problem, this paper proposes a noise robust light field reconstruction method. Firstly, scene dependent noise model is studied and incorporated into the light field reconstruction framework. Then, we derive an optimization algorithm for the final reconstruction. We build a prototype by hacking an off-the-shelf camera for data capturing and prove the concept. The effectiveness of this method is validated with experiments on the real captured data.

  16. Layer-dependent modulation of tungsten disulfide photoluminescence by lateral electric fields.

    PubMed

    He, Zhengyu; Sheng, Yuewen; Rong, Youmin; Lee, Gun-Do; Li, Ju; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-03-24

    Large single-crystal domains of WS2 are grown by chemical vapor deposition, and their photoluminescent properties under a lateral electric field are studied. We demonstrate that monolayer and bilayer WS2 have opposite responses to lateral electric fields, with WS2 photoluminescence (PL) substantially reduced in monolayer and increased in bilayers with increasing lateral electric field strength. Temperature-dependent PL measurements are also undertaken and show behavior distinctly different than that of the lateral electric field effects, ruling out heating as the cause of the PL changes. The PL variation in both monolayer and bilayer WS2 is attributed to the transfer of photoexcited electrons from one conduction band extremum to another, modifying the resultant recombination pathways. This effect is observed in 2D transition metal dichalcogenides due to their large exciton binding energy and small energy difference between the two conduction band extrema.

  17. Magnetic-field-dependent plasma composition of a pulsed aluminum arc in an oxygen ambient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Jochen M.; Anders, André; Yushkov, George Yu.

    2001-01-01

    A variety of plasma-based deposition techniques utilize magnetic fields to affect the degree of ionization as well as for focusing and guiding of plasma beams. Here we use time-of-flight charge-to-mass spectrometry to describe the effect of a magnetic field on the plasma composition of a pulsed Al plasma stream in an ambient containing intentionally introduced oxygen as well as for high vacuum conditions typical residual gas. The plasma composition evolution was found to be strongly dependent on the magnetic field strength and can be understood by invoking two electron impact ionization routes: ionization of the intentionally introduced gas as well as ionization of the residual gas. These results are characteristic of plasma-based techniques where magnetic fields are employed in a high-vacuum ambient. In effect, the impurity incorporation during reactive thin-film growth pertains to the present findings.

  18. Heliomagnetic latitude dependence of the heliospheric magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, M. E.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.; Murphy, N.

    1996-07-01

    ICE and IMP-8 magnetic field data from 1984-1988 have been analyzed in a magnetic coordinate system defined by the orientation of the solar magnetic dipole. The heliomagnetic latitude dependence of the radial component of the magnetic field (Br) has then been investigated in a wide range of magnetic latitudes above and below the heliospheric current sheet (HCS). Br reverses sign abruptly across the current sheet, consistent with the solar magnetic field models of Pneuman and Kopp [1971] and Wolfson [1985] but inconsistent with the source surface models [Hoeksema, 1986]. No evidence is found for an asymmetry in the magnetic field suggested by earlier studies of interplanetary magnetic field data [Luhmann, 1987, Burton, 1990]. A slight (~.03 nT per degree) latitude gradient has been found which is consistent with the MHD model of Pneuman and Kopp and the recent model of Zhao and Hoeksema [1995].

  19. Geomagnetic field strength 3.2 billion years ago recorded by single silicate crystals.

    PubMed

    Tarduno, John A; Cottrell, Rory D; Watkeys, Michael K; Bauch, Dorothy

    2007-04-01

    The strength of the Earth's early geomagnetic field is of importance for understanding the evolution of the Earth's deep interior, surface environment and atmosphere. Palaeomagnetic and palaeointensity data from rocks formed near the boundary of the Proterozoic and Archaean eons, some 2.5 Gyr ago, show many hallmarks of the more recent geomagnetic field. Reversals are recorded, palaeosecular variation data indicate a dipole-dominated morphology and available palaeointensity values are similar to those from younger rocks. The picture before 2.8 Gyr ago is much less clear. Rocks of the Archaean Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) are among the best-preserved, but even they have experienced low-grade metamorphism. The variable acquisition of later magnetizations by these rocks is therefore expected, precluding use of conventional palaeointensity methods. Silicate crystals from igneous rocks, however, can contain minute magnetic inclusions capable of preserving Archaean-age magnetizations. Here we use a CO2 laser heating approach and direct-current SQUID magnetometer measurements to obtain palaeodirections and intensities from single silicate crystals that host magnetite inclusions. We find 3.2-Gyr-old field strengths that are within 50 per cent of the present-day value, indicating that a viable magnetosphere sheltered the early Earth's atmosphere from solar wind erosion. PMID:17410173

  20. Geomagnetic field strength 3.2 billion years ago recorded by single silicate crystals.

    PubMed

    Tarduno, John A; Cottrell, Rory D; Watkeys, Michael K; Bauch, Dorothy

    2007-04-01

    The strength of the Earth's early geomagnetic field is of importance for understanding the evolution of the Earth's deep interior, surface environment and atmosphere. Palaeomagnetic and palaeointensity data from rocks formed near the boundary of the Proterozoic and Archaean eons, some 2.5 Gyr ago, show many hallmarks of the more recent geomagnetic field. Reversals are recorded, palaeosecular variation data indicate a dipole-dominated morphology and available palaeointensity values are similar to those from younger rocks. The picture before 2.8 Gyr ago is much less clear. Rocks of the Archaean Kaapvaal craton (South Africa) are among the best-preserved, but even they have experienced low-grade metamorphism. The variable acquisition of later magnetizations by these rocks is therefore expected, precluding use of conventional palaeointensity methods. Silicate crystals from igneous rocks, however, can contain minute magnetic inclusions capable of preserving Archaean-age magnetizations. Here we use a CO2 laser heating approach and direct-current SQUID magnetometer measurements to obtain palaeodirections and intensities from single silicate crystals that host magnetite inclusions. We find 3.2-Gyr-old field strengths that are within 50 per cent of the present-day value, indicating that a viable magnetosphere sheltered the early Earth's atmosphere from solar wind erosion.

  1. Electric-field dependence of photocarrier generation efficiency of organic photoconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Umeda, Minoru

    2015-03-07

    The electric-field dependence of photocarrier generation efficiency has been investigated in several different types of organic photoconductor for electrophotography to elucidate the controlling factors of light-to-electrical energy conversion. The rate-determining step in generating photocarriers has been considered to be the charge transfer between two neighboring molecules. Overall photocarrier generation efficiency has been determined using the charge transfer velocity at the rate-determining step as a function of electric-field-dependent activation energy, which is influenced by the symmetry factor α and the energy gap ΔE. The formula used successfully fits the experimental data for different types of organic photoconductor over a wide field strengths range. From the fitting results of high-sensitivity photoconductors, the zero-field activation energy is small and the reactant lifetime is long. In addition, ΔE is zero, which implies that the hole-electron interaction in the reactant is negligible at the rate-determining step. In contrast, for low-sensitivity photoconductors, the zero-field activation energy is large and the reactant lifetime is short; however, ΔE < 0 and α > 0.5, which suggest that the hole-electron interaction is not negligible. Consequently, the proposed formula well explains the electric-field dependence of photocarrier generation efficiency on the basis of its controlling factors.

  2. The Field Dependence-Independence Construct: Some, One, or None.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Marcia C.; Kyllonen, Patrick

    The field dependency/independency construct (FDI) was measured using tests of perception of the upright such as the Rod and Frame Test (RFT) and tests of cognitive restructuring such as the Hidden Figures Test (HFT); relationships between cognitive restructing and perception of the upright were investigated. High school seniors received 34 tests…

  3. The Field Dependence-Independence Construct: Some, One or None.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linn, Marcia C.; Kyllonen, Patrick

    1981-01-01

    The relationship between cognitive restructuring and perception of the upright (tests of which may be used to measure field dependence-independence [FDI]) was investigated. Data analysis of 34 tests administered to high school seniors, including 12 measures of FDI, resulted in five dimensions, including two associated with FDI. (Author/AEF)

  4. Field Dependence-Independence and Learning from Instructional Text.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Merton E.; Thompson, Marcia E.

    The relationship between field dependence-independence (FDI) and the ability to read and comprehend printed text was examined in this study. The effect of the structure of instructional text on the learning process of individuals at various points on the continuum of FDI was also studied. The following hypotheses were developed: (1) there would be…

  5. A Practical Assessment of Field Dependence/Independence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donlon, Thomas F.

    This report summarizes research and development activity leading to the development of a new test of field-dependence/independence which was carried out with two related projects sponsored by the Graduate Record Examinations Board between September, 1974 and September, 1976. This new test is a group measure, which is machine scorable. In the first…

  6. Field dependent elastic anomaly in uniaxial tungsten bronze relaxors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aftabuzzaman, Md; Dec, Jan; Kleemann, Wolfgang; Kojima, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    The electric field effects on the elastic properties of uniaxial Ca x Ba1- x Nb2O6 (x = 0.30, CBN30) single crystals were investigated using broadband Brillouin scattering spectroscopy as functions of temperature and electric field. Remarkable thermal hysteresis was observed between zero field heating and zero field cooling processes. A stretching index β = 2.05 indicates the stretched critical slowing down of polar nanoregions (PNRs). The effect of electric field along [001] direction was clearly observed. Under 1.0 kV/cm field, the alignment of nanodomains and enhancement of the long-range ferroelectric order were observed in the ferroelectric phase. In the field dependent measurement, a mixed state consisting of macrodomains induced by the electric field and nanodomains caused by the random fields was observed at 3.0 kV/cm. The mixed state persists up to 13 kV/cm because of the incomplete switching of the nanodomains to the macrodomains state. A very strong memory effect was also observed.

  7. Intracranial surgery with a compact, low-field-strength magnetic resonance imager.

    PubMed

    Schulder, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging (iMRI) has been a reality for more than a decade. As technology has begun to mature, the focus on practicality and user-friendliness has sharpened. In addition, the need for well-designed and well-executed outcome studies remains so that expensive new instruments such as iMRI can be justified. We present our experience with the PoleStar system, a compact, low-field-strength iMRI designed to make intraoperative imaging a routine component of intracranial neurosurgery. The advantages and limitations of this approach are discussed in the context of different clinical applications. PMID:19148034

  8. Determining the neutron star surface magnetic field strength of two Z sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Guoqiang; Huang, Chunping; Wang, Yanan

    2013-02-01

    From the extreme position of disk motion, we infer the neutron star (NS) surface magnetic field strength (B 0) of Z-source GX 17+2 and Cyg X-2. The inferred B 0 of GX 17+2 and Cyg X-2 are ~(1-5)×108 G and ~(1-3)×108 G, respectively, which are not inferior to that of millisecond X-ray pulsars or atoll sources. It is likely that the NS magnetic axis of Z sources is parallel to the axis of rotation, which could result in the lack of pulsations in these sources.

  9. Limits on the Strength of the Vestan Magnetic Field Using Dawn's GRaND Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villarreal, Michaela; Russell, Christopher; Prettyman, Tom; Yamashita, Naoyuki

    2015-04-01

    The well known HED meteorites have long been thought to have originated from Vesta and this interpretation was confirmed by Dawn's visit to Vesta in 2012. Fu et al. (2012) analyzed the HED meteorite Allan Hills ALHA81001 in particular and determined that the remanent magnetization of the meteorite likely formed in the presence of crustal fields about 12 microteslas. The Dawn spacecraft was not equipped with a magnetometer to confirm these results. However, the photomultiplier tube associated with the Bismuth Germanate (BGO) scintillator that is part of Dawn's Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) instrument is known to be sensitive to strong magnetic fields. The gain of the photomultiplier tube varies with both the magnitude and direction of the present magnetic field. Due to the arrangement of the photomultiplier tube, it is most sensitive along one axis. Fortunately, the defined axes of the photomultiplier tube are well aligned with the coordinate system defined for the spacecraft. Using position data, we can monitor how the output of the photomultiplier tube changes as the sensitive axis varies in position with respect to the surface. Here we attempt to use the variation of the gain of the photomultiplier tube as Dawn orbits Vesta as a proxy for any crustal fields that may be present. The photomultiplier tube is sensitive to field strengths greater than 0.5 mT, allowing us to put constraints on the Vestan crustal fields.

  10. Alignments of Dark Matter Halos with Large-scale Tidal Fields: Mass and Redshift Dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sijie; Wang, Huiyuan; Mo, H. J.; Shi, Jingjing

    2016-07-01

    Large-scale tidal fields estimated directly from the distribution of dark matter halos are used to investigate how halo shapes and spin vectors are aligned with the cosmic web. The major, intermediate, and minor axes of halos are aligned with the corresponding tidal axes, and halo spin axes tend to be parallel with the intermediate axes and perpendicular to the major axes of the tidal field. The strengths of these alignments generally increase with halo mass and redshift, but the dependence is only on the peak height, ν \\equiv {δ }{{c}}/σ ({M}{{h}},z). The scaling relations of the alignment strengths with the value of ν indicate that the alignment strengths remain roughly constant when the structures within which the halos reside are still in a quasi-linear regime, but decreases as nonlinear evolution becomes more important. We also calculate the alignments in projection so that our results can be compared directly with observations. Finally, we investigate the alignments of tidal tensors on large scales, and use the results to understand alignments of halo pairs separated at various distances. Our results suggest that the coherent structure of the tidal field is the underlying reason for the alignments of halos and galaxies seen in numerical simulations and in observations.

  11. Control over Janus micromotors by the strength of a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraban, Larysa; Makarov, Denys; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Leiderer, Paul; Erbe, Artur

    2013-01-01

    For transportation of molecules or biological cells using artificial motors, the control over their motion, i.e. direction and speed of transfer, is important. Here, we demonstrate that modification of the velocity and orientation of a magnetic Janus particle can be efficiently controlled by tuning the strength of an applied homogeneous magnetic field. Interestingly, by keeping the same orientation of the magnetic field but changing its magnitude not only the velocity of capped particles can be altered but even their direction of motion can be reversed. We put forth a simple qualitative model, which allows us to explain this intriguing observation.For transportation of molecules or biological cells using artificial motors, the control over their motion, i.e. direction and speed of transfer, is important. Here, we demonstrate that modification of the velocity and orientation of a magnetic Janus particle can be efficiently controlled by tuning the strength of an applied homogeneous magnetic field. Interestingly, by keeping the same orientation of the magnetic field but changing its magnitude not only the velocity of capped particles can be altered but even their direction of motion can be reversed. We put forth a simple qualitative model, which allows us to explain this intriguing observation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Videos (1-3) describe the behavior of the magnetic Janus micromotors at different magnetic fields applied. The magnetic field is always applied along the positive direction of the y-axis. All the movies are recorded at the same frame rate of 21 images per second. Experiments were performed at 30 wt% of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution. Video 1 shows the motion of the Janus micromotors when a small magnetic field is applied (B = 0.2 mT). The particle is propelled in the direction ``opposite to the cap'' with a velocity of about 6 μm s-1. Video 2 displays the motion of the same Janus bead when an intermediately strong

  12. Ionic strength dependence of the oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 in sodium chloride particles

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Hashim M.; Iedema, Martin J.; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Cowin, James P.

    2014-06-20

    The reaction of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of deliquesced (>75% RH) sodium particles was studied by utilizing a crossflow-mini reactor. The reaction kinetics was followed by observing chloride depletion in particles by computer-controlled scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, namely SEM/EDX. The reactions take place in concentrated mixed salt brine aerosols, for which no complete kinetic equilibrium data previously existed. We measured the Henry’s law solubility of H2O2 to close that gap. We also calculated the reaction rate as the particle transforms continuously from concentrated NaCl brine to eventually a mixed NaHSO4 plus H2SO4 brine solution. The reaction rate of the SO2 oxidation by H2O2 was found to be influenced by the change in ionic strength as the particle undergoes compositional transformation, following closely the dependence of the third order rate constant on ionic strength as predicted rates using previously established rate equations. This is the first study that has measured the ionic strength dependence of sulfate formation (in non-aqueous media) from oxidation of mixed salt brine aerosols in the presence of H2O2. It also gives the first report of the Henry’s law constant of H2O2 dependence on ionic strength.

  13. Ionic strength dependence of the oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 in sodium chloride particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, H. M.; Iedema, M.; Yu, X.-Y.; Cowin, J. P.

    2014-06-01

    The reaction of sulfur dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in the presence of deliquesced (>75% RH) sodium chloride (brine) particles was studied by utilizing a cross flow mini-reactor. The reaction kinetics were followed by observing chloride depletion in particles by computer-controlled scanning electron microscope with energy dispersive X-ray analysis, namely CCSEM/EDX. The reactions take place in concentrated mixed salt brine aerosols, for which no complete kinetic equilibrium data previously existed. We measured the Henry's law solubility of H2O2 in brine solutions to close that gap. We also calculated the reaction rate as the particle transforms continuously from concentrated NaCl brine to, eventually, a mixed NaHSO4 plus H2SO4 brine solution. The reaction rate of the SO2 oxidation by H2O2 was found to be influenced by the change in ionic strength as the particle undergoes compositional transformation, following closely the dependence of the third order rate constant on ionic strength as predicted using established rate equations. This is the first study that has measured the ionic strength dependence of sulfate formation (in non-aqueous media) from oxidation of mixed salt brine aerosols in the presence of H2O2. It also gives the first report of the dependence of the Henry's law constant of H2O2 on ionic strength.

  14. The magnetic field dependence of cross-effect dynamic nuclear polarization under magic angle spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Mance, Deni; Baldus, Marc; Gast, Peter; Huber, Martina; Ivanov, Konstantin L.

    2015-06-21

    We develop a theoretical description of Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (DNP) in solids under Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) to describe the magnetic field dependence of the DNP effect. The treatment is based on an efficient scheme for numerical solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation, which explicitly takes into account the variation of magnetic interactions during the sample spinning. The dependence of the cross-effect MAS-DNP on various parameters, such as the hyperfine interaction, electron-electron dipolar interaction, microwave field strength, and electron spin relaxation rates, is analyzed. Electron spin relaxation rates are determined by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements, and calculations are compared to experimental data. Our results suggest that the observed nuclear magnetic resonance signal enhancements provided by MAS-DNP can be explained by discriminating between “bulk” and “core” nuclei and by taking into account the slow DNP build-up rate for the bulk nuclei.

  15. Magnetic field dependence of critical currents in superconducting polycrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Kugel, K.I.; Lisovskaya, T.Y. ); Mints, R.G. )

    1992-02-10

    The authors study the dependence of critical current j{sub c} on magnetic field H in superconducting polycrystals which are considered as system of superconducting crystallites (isotropic or anisotropic) with Josephson contacts between them. Isotropy or anisotropy of contacts depends on the orientation of their crystallographic axes relatively to edges of contact planes. In this paper it is shown that for a system of randomly oriented isotropic contacts, the dependence j{sub c}(H) in a relatively wide field range has the asymptotic form j{sub c} {approximately} (InH)/H{sup 2}. This differs drastically from j{sub c}(H) for single contacts. Anisotropy effects due to large differences in London penetration depth {lambda} values corresponding to external magnetic field directed along different axes are analyzed in detail. It is shown that for uniaxal crystals with {lambda}{sub 1} = {lambda}{sub 2} {lt} {lambda}{sub 3}, this anisotropy leads to the relation j{sub c} {approximately} {radical}{lambda}{sub 3}/{lambda}{sub 1} for chaotic orientation of crystallites. The form of j{sub c}(H) curves for two different orientations of the magnetic field relatively to the transport current through the sample is found.

  16. Frequency-dependent force fields for QMMM calculations.

    PubMed

    Harczuk, Ignat; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans

    2015-03-28

    We outline the construction of frequency-dependent polarizable force fields. The force fields are derived from analytic response theory for different frequencies using a generalization of the LoProp algorithm giving a decomposition of a molecular dynamical polarizability to localized atomic dynamical polarizabilities. These force fields can enter in a variety of applications - we focus on two such applications in this work: firstly, they can be incorporated in a physical, straightforward, way for current existing methods that use polarizable embeddings, and we can show, for the first time, the effect of the frequency dispersion within the classical environment of a quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QMMM) method. Our methodology is here evaluated for some test cases comprising water clusters and organic residues. Secondly, together with a modified Silberstein-Applequist procedure for interacting inducible point-dipoles, these frequency-dependent polarizable force fields can be used for a classical determination of frequency-dependent cluster polarizabilities. We evaluate this methodology by comparing with the corresponding results obtained from quantum mechanics or QMMM where the absolute mean [small alpha, Greek, macron] is determined with respect to the size of the QM and MM parts of the total system.

  17. Frequency-dependent force fields for QMMM calculations.

    PubMed

    Harczuk, Ignat; Vahtras, Olav; Ågren, Hans

    2015-03-28

    We outline the construction of frequency-dependent polarizable force fields. The force fields are derived from analytic response theory for different frequencies using a generalization of the LoProp algorithm giving a decomposition of a molecular dynamical polarizability to localized atomic dynamical polarizabilities. These force fields can enter in a variety of applications - we focus on two such applications in this work: firstly, they can be incorporated in a physical, straightforward, way for current existing methods that use polarizable embeddings, and we can show, for the first time, the effect of the frequency dispersion within the classical environment of a quantum mechanics-molecular mechanics (QMMM) method. Our methodology is here evaluated for some test cases comprising water clusters and organic residues. Secondly, together with a modified Silberstein-Applequist procedure for interacting inducible point-dipoles, these frequency-dependent polarizable force fields can be used for a classical determination of frequency-dependent cluster polarizabilities. We evaluate this methodology by comparing with the corresponding results obtained from quantum mechanics or QMMM where the absolute mean [small alpha, Greek, macron] is determined with respect to the size of the QM and MM parts of the total system. PMID:25714984

  18. Temperature- and field-dependent characterization of a conductor on round core cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, C.; van der Laan, D. C.; Bagrets, N.; Bayer, C. M.; Weiss, K.-P.; Lange, C.

    2015-06-01

    The conductor on round core (CORC) cable is one of the major high temperature superconductor cable concepts combining scalability, flexibility, mechanical strength, ease of fabrication and high current density; making it a possible candidate as conductor for large, high field magnets. To simulate the boundary conditions of such magnets as well as the temperature dependence of CORC cables a 1.16 m long sample consisting of 15, 4 mm wide SuperPower REBCO tapes was characterized using the ‘FBI’ (force—field—current) superconductor test facility of the Institute for Technical Physics of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. In a five step investigation, the CORC cable’s performance was determined at different transverse mechanical loads, magnetic background fields and temperatures as well as its response to swift current changes. In the first step, the sample’s 77 K, self-field current was measured in a liquid nitrogen bath. In the second step, the temperature dependence was measured at self-field condition and compared with extrapolated single tape data. In the third step, the magnetic background field was repeatedly cycled while measuring the current carrying capabilities to determine the impact of transverse Lorentz forces on the CORC cable sample’s performance. In the fourth step, the sample’s current carrying capabilities were measured at different background fields (2-12 T) and surface temperatures (4.2-51.5 K). Through finite element method simulations, the surface temperatures are converted into average sample temperatures and the gained field- and temperature dependence is compared with extrapolated single tape data. In the fifth step, the response of the CORC cable sample to rapid current changes (8.3 kA s-1) was observed with a fast data acquisition system. During these tests, the sample performance remains constant, no degradation is observed. The sample’s measured current carrying capabilities correlate to those of single tapes assuming

  19. New paleointensity results from rapidly cooled Icelandic lavas: Implications for Arctic geomagnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromwell, G.; Tauxe, L.; Halldórsson, S. A.

    2015-05-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is assumed to be a geocentric axial dipole (GAD) when averaged over sufficient time (105-106 years). Recent investigations of global paleosecular variation and time-averaged field behavior on million year timescales generally support a predominantly dipole field in the Northern Hemisphere, but unique field structures at high southern latitudes suggest the presence of a substantial ḡ20 quadrupolar component. Average paleointensity results from Antarctica are approximately half the value predicted by a GAD field; this behavior has not been sufficiently investigated because there is a paucity of absolute paleointensity data from the high latitudes of the Arctic and Antarctic, so no adequate comparisons have been made between the two regions. We collected glassy volcanic material from 129 subaerial and subglacial volcanic units in Iceland in order to provide a suitable intensity data set at high northern latitudes. Forty-four sites met our very strict specimen and site level selection criteria. Four Holocene sites have a median intensity value of 55.8 ± 15.6μT (virtual axial dipole moment = 78.1 ± 22.0 ZAm2), consistent with the present-day field. Thirty-seven sites are between 11 ka and 3.35 Ma with a median intensity of 33.1 ± 8.3 μT (47.0 ± 11.6 ZAm2). This median intensity is indistinguishable from some long-term global field strength estimates. Reevaluation of existing high-latitude data suggests a general agreement with our Iceland results, but there are still too few Antarctic sites to adequately compare Arctic and Antarctic field behaviors.

  20. CORONAL SEISMOLOGY USING EIT WAVES: ESTIMATION OF THE CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH IN THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect

    West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N.; Dolla, L.; Rodriguez, L.

    2011-04-01

    Coronal EIT waves have been observed for many years. The nature of EIT waves is still contentious, however, there is strong evidence that some of them might be fast magnetosonic waves, or at least have a fast magnetosonic wave component. The fast magnetosonic wave speed is formed from two components; the Alfven speed (magnetic) and the sound speed (thermal). By making measurements of the wave speed, coronal density and temperature it is possible to calculate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength through coronal seismology. In this paper, we investigate an EIT wave observed on 2009 February 13 by the SECCHI/EUVI instruments on board the STEREO satellites. The wave epicenter was observed at disk center in the STEREO B (Behind) satellite. At this time, the STEREO satellites were separated by approximately 90 deg., and as a consequence the STEREO A (Ahead) satellite observed the wave on the solar limb. These observations allowed us to make accurate speed measurements of the wave. The background coronal density was derived through Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer observations of the quiet Sun and the temperature was estimated through the narrow temperature response in the EUVI bandpasses. The density, temperature, and speed measurements allowed us to estimate the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field strength to be approximately 0.7 {+-} 0.7 G.

  1. Variation of radio field strength and radio horizon distance over three stations in Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adediji, A. T.; Ismail, Mahamod; Mandeep, J. S.

    2014-03-01

    In this work, we present seasonal results of radio field strength and radio horizon distance derived from the computation of surface refractivity through in-situ measurement of temperature, relative humidity and pressure across three stations (Akure, Minna and Enugu) in Nigeria. The measurements of the tropospheric parameters were made using a Davis Wireless Weather Station (Integrated Sensor Suite, ISS) installed on the ground surface at each of the stations. The study utilized data for two years of measurement (January 2008-December 2009). Results show that the values of surface refractivity were low during the dry season months and high during the wet season months. The lowest values of 323, 313 and 281 N-units were observed in February for Akure, Enugu and Minna respectively, while maximum values of 372, 375 and 365 N-units were observed in September, October and August for the respective locations. Also, the average value of field strength variability was found to be 6.67, 5.62 and 7.48 for Akure, Enugu and Minna respectively.

  2. Field strength variations of LF radio waves prior to earthquakes in central Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bella, F.; Biagi, P. F.; Caputo, M.; Cozzi, E.; Della Monica, G.; Ermini, A.; Plastino, W.; Sgrigna, V.

    The electric field strength of the LF radio broadcasting RMC (Principality of Monaco) which operates at 216 kHz has been recorded since January 1991 by two receivers in central Italy. During the monitoring period we observed two evident attenuations of the field strength in one receiver, with durations of 6-10 days. The geomagnetic and ionospheric observations carried out in the same time interval do not seem able to explain the attenuation of the radio signal. An analysis of the seismic activity occurring in the area between transmitter and receiver has revealed that some days after the attenuations the energy released by earthquakes reaches a maximum. The observed attenuation might therefore be precursors of earthquakes. We also checked meteorological conditions and found that advections of warm air occurred during both the two anomalous periods. It seems possible that these conditions can help the action of preseismic effects in generating irregularities in the vertical gradient of the tropospheric radio refractivity able to produce defocusing of LF radiobroadcast propagation.

  3. Examining the Magnetic Field Strength and the Horizontal and Vertical Motions in an Emerging Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Yu-Che

    2016-03-01

    Earlier observational studies have used the time evolution of emerging magnetic flux regions at the photosphere to infer their subsurface structures, assuming that the flux structure does not change significantly over the near-surface layer. In this study, we test the validity of this assumption by comparing the horizontal and vertical motions of an emerging active region. The two motions would be correlated if the emerging structure is rigid. The selected active region (AR) NOAA 11645 is not embedded in detectable preexisting magnetic field. The observed horizontal motion is quantified by the separation of the two AR polarities and the width of the region. The vertical motion is derived from the magnetic buoyancy theory. Our results show that the separation of the polarities is fastest at the beginning with a velocity of {≈ }4 Mm hr^{-1} and decreases to ≤ 1 Mm hr^{-1} after the main growing phase of flux emergence. The derived thick flux-tube buoyant velocity is between 1 and 3 Mm hr^{-1}, while the thin flux-tube approximation results in an unreasonably high buoyant velocity, consistent with the expectation that the approximation is inappropriate at the surface layer. The observed horizontal motion is not found to directly correlate with either the magnetic field strength or the derived buoyant velocities. However, the percentage of the horizontally oriented fields and the temporal derivatives of the field strength and the buoyant velocity show some positive correlations with the separation velocity. The results of this study imply that the assumption that the emerging active region is the cross section of a rising flux tube whose structure can be considered rigid as it rises through the near-surface layer should be taken with caution.

  4. Reproduction, growth, and development of rats during exposure to electric fields at multiple strengths

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, L.E. )

    1991-11-01

    A study with multiple exposure groups and large group sizes was performed to establish whether exposure to 60-Hz electric fields would result in reproductive and development toxicity. Female rats were mated, and sperm-positive animals randomly distributed among four groups: sham-exposed, or exposed to 10, 65, or 130 kV/m, 60-Hz vertical electric fields. During gestation, exposure to the higher field strengths resulted in slightly depressed weight gains of dams. Numbers ofpups per litter and pup mortality did not differ among the exposure groups. Dams exposed at 65 kV/m lost slightly more weight through the lactation period than the control group. Male pups exposed to high field strengths gained slightly less weight from 4 to 21 days of age than did sham exposed animals. At weaning, two F{sub 1} females per litter continued on the same exposure regimen, were mated at 11 weeks of age to unexposed males, and sacrificed at 20 days of gestation. Fertility and gestational weight gain of F{sub 1} females were not affected by exposure, nor was prenatal viability or fetal body weight. No significant increase in the incidence of litters with malformations was observed. Although no developmental toxicity was detected, exposures produced physical changes in the dams, evidenced as a rust-colored deposit on the muzzle and ears (chromodacryorrhea) that increased in incidence and severity at 65 and 130 kV/m. Incidence of chromodacryorrhea was not significantly different between sham-exposed rats and those exposed at 10 kV/m. 29 refs., 10 figs., 7 tabs.

  5. Mineralogic reservoirs for high-field strength elements in deeply subducted continental sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, R. P.; Shimizu, N.; Irifune, T.; Nishiyama, N.

    2013-12-01

    For more than 40 years now, mantle geochemists have interpreted the isotopic signature of ocean-island basalts (OIB) in terms of deeply recycled crustal lithologies, including terrigeneous sediments, being transported via subduction into the source region for mantle plumes, which reside in the transition zone (MTZ) and/or lower mantle. As such, continent-derived sediments in particular represent domains of extreme isotopic and trace-element heterogeneity relative to the deep primitive mantle (PM). In an effort to understand the extent to which the original geochemical signature of deeply subducted continental material is preserved, and to determine which mineral phases act as reservoirs for transporting key trace-elements (e.g., large-ion lithophile elements, LILE; high-field strength elements, HFSE) into the deep mantle, we have conducted a series of phase-equilibria multi-anvil experiments on natural terrigeneous sediments at pressures appropriate to the base of the MTZ and uppermost lower mantle. The starting materials for these experiments contain modest amounts of water, and a small carbonate component, and their major- and trace-element composition are a close approximation to that of average 'global subducting sediment' (i.e., GLOSS; Plank and Langmuir, 1998). Experiments were conducted over the pressure range ~15-23 GPa, and temperatures between ~1200-1800°C. Below ~22 GPa, the high-pressure phase assemblage consists of K-hollandite, majoritic garnet, stishovite, and depending on temperature, either a hydrous alumino-silicate (e.g., phase-EGG or δ-AlOOH), or kyanite or corundum. Stable accessory minerals at these conditions include rutile, and zircon, where much of the whole-rock complement of HFSE resides, and occasionally monazite. At higher pressure (>23 GPa), the breakdown of garnet produces a Fe-Al-Mg perovskite phase, which is exceptionally rich in TiO2 (up to 9 wt%), and the aforementioned accessory phases are no longer stable. The full phase

  6. Stereotype Strength and Attentional Bias: Preference for Confirming versus Disconfirming Information Depends on Processing Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Thomas J.; Sherman, Jeffrey W.; Conrey, Frederica R.; Stroessner, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the relationships among stereotype strength, processing capacity, and the allocation of attention to stereotype-consistent versus stereotype-inconsistent information describing a target person. The results of both experiments showed that, with full capacity, greater stereotype strength was associated with increased attention toward stereotype-consistent versus stereotype-inconsistent information. However, when capacity was diminished, greater stereotype strength was associated with increased attention toward inconsistent versus consistent information. Thus, strong stereotypes may act as self-confirming filters when processing capacity is plentiful, but as efficient information gathering devices that maximize the acquisition of novel (disconfirming) information when capacity is depleted. Implications for models of stereotyping and stereotype change are discussed. PMID:20161043

  7. Shear Strength of Conductive Adhesive Joints on Rigid and Flexible Substrates Depending on Adhesive Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirman, Martin; Steiner, Frantisek

    2016-05-01

    This article deals with the impact of electrically conductive adhesive quantity on the shear strength of joints glued by adhesives "EPO-TEKⓇ H20S" and "MG8331S" on three types of substrates (FR-4, MELINEXⓇST504, DuPont™ PyraluxⓇAC). These joints were made by gluing chip resistors 1206, 0805 and 0603, with two curing profiles for each adhesive. Different thicknesses of stencil and reductions in the size of the hole in stencils were used for this experiment. These differences have an effect on the quantity of conductive adhesives which must be used on the samples. Samples were measured after the curing process by using a shear strength test applied by the device LabTest 3.030. This article presents the effects of different curing profiles, various types of substrates, and different quantities of adhesives on the mechanical strength of the joint.

  8. Dose-dependent changes in the synaptic strength on dopamine neurons and locomotor activity after cocaine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Wanat, M.J.; Bonci, A.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in synaptic strength on ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine neurons are thought to play a critical role in the development of addiction-related behaviors. However, it is unknown how a single injection of cocaine at different doses affects locomotor activity, behavioral sensitization, and glutamatergic synaptic strength on VTA dopamine neurons in mice. We observed that behavioral sensitization to a challenge cocaine injection scaled with the dose of cocaine received one day prior. Interestingly, the locomotor activity after the initial exposure to different doses of cocaine corresponded to the changes in glutamatergic strength on VTA dopamine neurons. These results in mice suggest that a single exposure to cocaine dose-dependently affects excitatory synapses on VTA dopamine neurons, and that this acute synaptic alteration is directly associated with the locomotor responses to cocaine and not to behavioral sensitization. PMID:18655120

  9. Is the general conclusion justified that higher applicable field strength results in shorter analysis time with organic solvents in CE?

    PubMed

    Téllez, Adolfo; Kenndler, Ernst

    2009-11-01

    In this paper, a widespread opinion in CE with organic solvents for the background electrolyte is critically questioned, namely that in general a shorter analysis time can be achieved due to the higher field strength applicable compared with aqueous electrolyte systems. This view, common in the literature, is based on the supposition that the conductance in organic solvents is lower than in water. Indeed in many organic solvents with higher viscosity than water lower ion mobility is observed, and higher fields can be applied in these cases. However, in this paper the problem is sharper defined and treated two-fold: (i) in all solvents conditions are such that either the same electric power is generated, or (ii) the same temperature increase is taken into account. It was shown that for the same electric power the field strength in the organic solvent can be changed to a less extent than the ionic mobility changes. As a result, the migration velocity of the analytes is lower and the analysis time is longer in most organic solvents compared with water; acetonitrile (MeCN) is an exception (in this solvent the mobilities are higher than in water). The more stringent treatment of the problem takes an equal temperature increase due to Joule heating into account rather than equal electric power. The temperature increase in the capillary depends on the thermal conductivity of the solvent, which is only about one-third of that of water for organic liquids. The consequence is that in none of the organic solvent systems a shorter analysis time can be achieved compared with water (given that the experimental conditions are comparable, e.g. zero EOF). The theoretical predictions were confirmed by measurements with water, methanol, propylenecarbonate, and MeCN as solvents.

  10. Monte Carlo characterization of skin doses in 6 MV transverse field MRI-linac systems: Effect of field size, surface orientation, magnetic field strength, and exit bolus

    SciTech Connect

    Oborn, B. M.; Metcalfe, P. E.; Butson, M. J.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: The main focus of this work is to continue investigations into the Monte Carlo predicted skin doses seen in MRI-guided radiotherapy. In particular, the authors aim to characterize the 70 {mu}m skin doses over a larger range of magnetic field strength and x-ray field size than in the current literature. The effect of surface orientation on both the entry and exit sides is also studied. Finally, the use of exit bolus is also investigated for minimizing the negative effects of the electron return effect (ERE) on the exit skin dose. Methods: High resolution GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulations of a water phantom exposed to a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian 2100C) have been performed. Transverse magnetic fields of strengths between 0 and 3 T have been applied to a 30x30x20 cm{sup 3} phantom. This phantom is also altered to have variable entry and exit surfaces with respect to the beam central axis and they range from -75 deg. to +75 deg. The exit bolus simulated is a 1 cm thick (water equivalent) slab located on the beam exit side. Results: On the entry side, significant skin doses at the beam central axis are reported for large positive surface angles and strong magnetic fields. However, over the entry surface angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg., the entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose, regardless of magnetic field strength and field size. On the exit side, moderate to high central axis skin dose increases are expected except at large positive surface angles. For exit bolus of 1 cm thickness, the central axis exit skin dose becomes an almost consistent value regardless of magnetic field strength or exit surface angle. This is due to the almost complete absorption of the ERE electrons by the bolus. Conclusions: There is an ideal entry angle range of -30 deg. to -60 deg. where entry skin dose is comparable to or less than the zero magnetic field skin dose. Other than this, the entry skin dose increases are significant, especially at

  11. Field dependence and the effect of REM deprivation on thirst.

    PubMed

    Koulack, D; De Koninck, J; Oczkowski, G

    1978-04-01

    Recently a number of studies have concerned the possible function of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and the mastery of stress. The present study was designed to explore the possibility that REM sleep might play a function in reducing the potency of a stressful physiological stimulus, thirst, as well as the possibility that such a function might be specific to individuals falling at different points along the field-dependence dimension. While there was no difference between REM deprivation and non-REM awakening nights in subsequent morning thirst, there was a significant interaction between field dependence and night on morning thirst measures for 10 college students. These results are discussed in light of previous work on stylistic differences in dreaming and their possible role in adaptation to stress. PMID:208050

  12. Temperature Dependence of Internal Deformation Field in Zeolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Wonsuk; Song, Sanghoon; Jeong, Nak Cheon; Pham, Tung; Harder, Ross; Xiong, Gang; Yoon, Kyung Byung; Robinson, Ian K.; Kim, Hyunjung

    2011-03-01

    We studied temperature dependent internal deformation field distributions in zeolite microcrystals using coherent x-ray diffraction. We measured the coherent x-ray diffraction patterns around (200) and (020) Bragg peaks of the crystals. The three-dimensional real space images were obtained by phasing and inverting the oversampled diffraction patterns using the phase retrieval algorithm combined with error reduction and hybrid input-output method. The internal deformation fields show unusual temperature dependent behaviors which might be originated from the synthesis and calcination process. This work was supported by National Research Foundation of Korea (Nos. 2010-0000112 and R15-2008-006-01001-0), Seoul Research and Business Development Program (10816), and Sogang University Research Grant (2010).

  13. Effect of various electric field strengths and current durations on stunning and spinal injuries of Atlantic herring.

    PubMed

    Nordgreen, Andreas Hoel; Slinde, Erik; Møller, Dag; Roth, Bjorn

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of electric field strength and current duration on wild-caught Atlantic herring Clupea harengus stunned with sinusoidal 50-Hz AC in seawater. The fish were exposed to electric field strengths ranging from 16 to 142 V/m and current durations from 1 to 12 s. We recorded the elapsed times between the point at which each fish became unconscious and the points at which it resumed normal behavioral functions. We also investigated injuries such as broken spinal columns and hematomas after the fish were filleted. The threshold electric field strength required to stun all of the fish to unconsciousness was 33 V/m for 1 s. The duration of the unconscious condition increased as both electric field strength and current duration increased. Of a total of 260 Atlantic herring, 60% had broken spinal columns. The proportion of fish with fractured spines was independent of field strength and duration, but the number of fractures per fish increased with field strength. We conclude that electrical stunning would promote the welfare of Atlantic herring that are landed alive but negatively affect fillet quality owing to hematomas associated with the fractures.

  14. Cognitive Learning Style: A Review of the Field Dependent-Field Independent Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pithers, R. T.

    2002-01-01

    Cumulative research evidence on field dependence-field independence suggests that matching teacher and learner cognitive styles has limits, but can be used to identify varied teaching methods. Both learners and teachers should develop a flexible approach to cognitive style attitudes and behavior. (Contains 41 references.) (SK)

  15. Learning by Employing Educational Multimedia in Field-Dependent and Field-Independent Cognitive Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karamaerouz, Mohamad Javad; Abdi, Ali; Laei, Soosan

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive learning styles are relatively fixed procedures using which individuals receive, process and organize information. This paper aims to examine academic achievement in English for both field dependence and field independence learning styles using educational multimedia. The sample of the study consisted of 40 second-grade female students…

  16. Time dependent strength and stiffness of PCC bottom ash-bentonite mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Vaddu, P.

    2004-07-01

    Utilization of bottom ash from burning of pulverized coal in construction-related applications has received some attention within the last decade. Its use in geotechnical engineering applications is still very limited. However within the last few years several studies have been completed to evaluate strength, stiffiness, and durability properties of pulverized coal combustion (PCC) bottom ash mixed with various admixtures. Studies have shown that the physical properties of bottom ash obtained from burning of pulverized coal are similar to that of natural sand with particle sizes ranging from fine gravel to fine sand and low percentages of silt and clay sized particles. However unlike sand, chemical composition of bottom ash results in change of strength and stiffiness characteristics of the bottom ash-admixture mixtures with time. In this study, change in strength and stiffness characteristics of Illinois PCC bottom ash and bentonite mixtures with time are evaluated. A series of unconfined compression tests on bottom ash-bentonite mixtures at various curing ages was performed in the laboratory. Results presented show that strength and stiffness of bottom ash-bentonite mixtures changed significantly with time.

  17. Dependence of Dynamic Tensile Strength of Longyou Sandstone on Heat-Treatment Temperature and Loading Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Wei; Xu, Ying; Wang, Wei; Kanopolous, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    As a material for famous historical underground rock caverns, Longyou sandstone (LS) may fail under the combination of high loading rate and high temperature. The thermal damage induced by various heat-treatment temperatures (150, 250, 350, 450, 600 and 850 °C) is first characterized by X-ray Micro-computed tomography (CT) method. The damage variable derived from the average CT value for heat-treated LS specimen and reference specimen without heat treatment was used to quantify the thermal damage. The dynamic tensile strengths of these LS samples under different dynamic loading rates (ranging from 24 to 540 GPa/s) were then obtained using the split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) system. The dynamic tensile strength of LS increases with the loading rate at a given heat-treatment temperature, and the tensile strength at the same loading rate decreases with the heat-treatment temperature except for 450 °C. Based on the experimental data, an empirical equation was established to relate the dynamic tensile strength of LS to the loading rate and the heat-treatment temperature.

  18. Time-dependent strength degradation of a siliconized silicon carbide determined by dynamic fatigue

    SciTech Connect

    Breder, K.

    1995-10-01

    Both fast-fracture strength and strength as a function of stressing rate at room temperature, 1,100, and 1,400 C were measured for a siliconized SiC. The fast-fracture strength increased slightly from 386 MPa at room temperature to 424 MPa at 1,100 C and then dropped to 308 MPa at 1,400 C. The Weibull moduli at room temperature and 1,100 were 10.8 and 7.8, respectively, whereas, at 1,400 C, the Weibull modulus was 2.8. The very low Weibull modulus at 1,400 C was due to the existence of two exclusive flaw populations with very different characteristic strengths. The data were reanalyzed using two exclusive flaw populations. The ceramic showed no slow crack growth (SCG), as measured by dynamic fatigue at 1,100 C, but, at 1,400 C, an SCG parameter, n, of 15.5 was measured. Fractography showed SCG zones consisting of cracks grown out from silicon-rich areas. Time-to-failure predictions at given levels of failure probabilities were performed.

  19. Time-Dependent Stress Rupture Strength Degradation of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Composites at Intermediate Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Roy M.

    2016-01-01

    The stress rupture strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites with a boron nitride fiber coating decreases with time within the intermediate temperature range of 700 to 950 degree Celsius. Various theories have been proposed to explain the cause of the time-dependent stress rupture strength. The objective of this paper is to investigate the relative significance of the various theories for the time-dependent strength of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon carbide composites. This is achieved through the development of a numerically based progressive failure analysis routine and through the application of the routine to simulate the composite stress rupture tests. The progressive failure routine is a time-marching routine with an iterative loop between a probability of fiber survival equation and a force equilibrium equation within each time step. Failure of the composite is assumed to initiate near a matrix crack and the progression of fiber failures occurs by global load sharing. The probability of survival equation is derived from consideration of the strength of ceramic fibers with randomly occurring and slow growing flaws as well as the mechanical interaction between the fibers and matrix near a matrix crack. The force equilibrium equation follows from the global load sharing presumption. The results of progressive failure analyses of the composite tests suggest that the relationship between time and stress-rupture strength is attributed almost entirely to the slow flaw growth within the fibers. Although other mechanisms may be present, they appear to have only a minor influence on the observed time-dependent behavior.

  20. Effective charge on acetylcholinesterase active sites determined from the ionic strength dependence of association rate constants with cationic ligands.

    PubMed

    Nolte, H J; Rosenberry, T L; Neumann, E

    1980-08-01

    The reaction of the specific fluorescent cationic ligand N-methylacridinium with the active site of 11S acetylcholinesterase from electric eel was monitored by temperature-jump relaxation kinetics at a variety of ionic strengths. The ionic strength dependence of the bimolecular association rate constant is analyzed with a Brønsted-Debye-Hückel expression and leads to estimates of the association rate constant at zero ionic strength of K120 = 1.1 X 10(10) M-1 S-1 at 25 degrees C and the net charge number of the enzyme active site of ZE = -6.3. The ionic strength dependence of the second-order hydrolysis rate constant kcat/Kapp for acetylthiocholine under steady-state conditions is also very pronounced and indicates a value of ZE = -9. Thus, a large effective negative charge on the enzyme active site appears to be a general characteristic of its interaction with cationic ligands. The ionic strength dependence of Kcat/Kapp is identical with that of sodium chloride, sodium phosphate, and sodium citrate, thus ruling out any possibility that the phenomena arise from a specific, partially competitive binding of Na+ to the enzyme active site. Substitution of the calculated electrostatic parameters into theoretical equations indicates that the most significant effect of these ZE values is a 2-3 order of magnitude reduction in the rate constant for dissociation of the initial ligand-enzyme encounter complex; this decrease renders the bimolecular reaction diffusion controlled. The high value of k120 and the space requirements of six to nine charged groups suggest that regions of the enzyme surface area larger than the catalytic sites themselves are effective in trapping cationic ligands.

  1. Magnetic Field Strength in an Intermediate-velocity Ionized Filament in the First Galactic Quadrant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stil, J. M.; Hryhoriw, A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the magnetic field in an intermediate-velocity filament for which the Hα intensity in the WHAM survey correlates with excess Faraday rotation of extragalactic radio sources over the length of the filament from b ≈ 20° to b ≈ 55°. The density-weighted mean magnetic field is 2.8 +/- 0.8 μ {{G}}, derived from rotation measures and an empirical relation between Hα emission measure and dispersion measure from Berkhuijsen et al. In view of the uncertainties in the derived magnetic field strength, we propose an alternative use of the available data, rotation measure, and emission measure, to derive a lower limit to the Alfvén speed, weighted by electron density {n}e3/2. We find lower limits to the Alfvén speed that are comparable to or larger than the sound speed in a {10}4 {{K}} plasma, and conclude that the magnetic field is dynamically important. We discuss the role of intermediate-velocity gas as a locus of Faraday rotation in the interstellar medium, and propose that this lower limit to the Alfvén speed may also be applicable to Faraday rotation by galaxy clusters.

  2. Seeing the forest before the trees depends on individual field-dependency characteristics.

    PubMed

    Poirel, Nicolas; Pineau, Arlette; Jobard, Gael; Mellet, Emmanuel

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have demonstrated that the well-known global precedence effect, characterized by a visual bias toward global information, is highly dependent on stimulus characteristics (Kimchi, 1992). Despite the extensive global-local literature, few studies have investigated how interindividual characteristics could affect the global precedence effect. In this framework, we studied the relationship between global-local visual biases and the Group Embedded Figure Test (GEFT), a standardized measure of field dependency. Data from 34 participants were consistent with the idea that an individual's bias toward the global level is linearly related to his or her degree of field dependence. Given the important role that global-local visual skills play during visuospatial tasks, these results have important implications for future research in this area.

  3. Surface Magnetic Field Strengths: New Tests of Magnetoconvective Models of M Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, James; Mullan, D. J.

    2014-05-01

    Precision modeling of M dwarfs has become worthwhile in recent years due to the increasingly precise values of masses and radii which can be obtained from eclipsing binary studies. In a recent paper, Torres has identified four prime M dwarf pairs with the most precise empirical determinations of masses and radii. The measured radii are consistently larger than standard stellar models predict by several percent. These four systems potentially provide the most challenging tests of precision evolutionary models of cool dwarfs at the present time. We have previously modeled M dwarfs in the context of a criterion due to Gough & Tayler in which magnetic fields inhibit the onset of convection according to a physics-based prescription. In the present paper, we apply our magnetoconvective approach to the four prime systems in the Torres list. Going a step beyond what we have already modeled in CM Dra (one of the four Torres systems), we note that new constraints on magnetoconvective models of M dwarfs are now available from empirical estimates of magnetic field strengths on the surfaces of these stars. In the present paper, we consider how well our magnetoconvective models succeed when confronted with this new test of surface magnetic field strengths. Among the systems listed by Torres, we find that plausible magnetic models work well for CM Dra, YY Gem, and CU Cnc. (The fourth system in Torres's list does not yet have enough information to warrant magnetic modeling.) Our magnetoconvection models of CM Dra, YY Gem, and CU Cnc yield predictions of the magnetic fluxes on the stellar surface which are consistent with the observed correlation between magnetic flux and X-ray luminosity.

  4. Surface magnetic field strengths: New tests of magnetoconvective models of M dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    MacDonald, James; Mullan, D. J. E-mail: mullan@udel.edu

    2014-05-20

    Precision modeling of M dwarfs has become worthwhile in recent years due to the increasingly precise values of masses and radii which can be obtained from eclipsing binary studies. In a recent paper, Torres has identified four prime M dwarf pairs with the most precise empirical determinations of masses and radii. The measured radii are consistently larger than standard stellar models predict by several percent. These four systems potentially provide the most challenging tests of precision evolutionary models of cool dwarfs at the present time. We have previously modeled M dwarfs in the context of a criterion due to Gough and Tayler in which magnetic fields inhibit the onset of convection according to a physics-based prescription. In the present paper, we apply our magnetoconvective approach to the four prime systems in the Torres list. Going a step beyond what we have already modeled in CM Dra (one of the four Torres systems), we note that new constraints on magnetoconvective models of M dwarfs are now available from empirical estimates of magnetic field strengths on the surfaces of these stars. In the present paper, we consider how well our magnetoconvective models succeed when confronted with this new test of surface magnetic field strengths. Among the systems listed by Torres, we find that plausible magnetic models work well for CM Dra, YY Gem, and CU Cnc. (The fourth system in Torres's list does not yet have enough information to warrant magnetic modeling.) Our magnetoconvection models of CM Dra, YY Gem, and CU Cnc yield predictions of the magnetic fluxes on the stellar surface which are consistent with the observed correlation between magnetic flux and X-ray luminosity.

  5. Observation of Field-Emission Dependence on Stored Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Jiahang; Antipov, Sergey P.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell S.; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Liu, Wanming; Power, John; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Dan; Wang, Faya; Whiteford, Charles E.; Wisniewski, Eric; Xiao, Liling

    2015-12-01

    Field emission from a solid metal surface has been continuously studied for a century over macroscopic to atomic scales. It is general knowledge that, other than the surface properties, the emitted current is governed solely by the applied electric field. A pin cathode has been used to study the dependence of field emission on stored energy in an L -band rf gun. The stored energy was changed by adjusting the axial position (distance between the cathode base and the gun back surface) of the cathode while the applied electric field on the cathode tip is kept constant. A very strong correlation of the field-emission current with the stored energy has been observed. While eliminating all possible interfering sources, an enhancement of the current by a factor of 5 was obtained as the stored energy was increased by a factor of 3. It implies that under certain circumstances a localized field emission may be significantly altered by the global parameters in a system.

  6. Observation of Field-Emission Dependence on Stored Energy.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jiahang; Antipov, Sergey P; Baryshev, Sergey V; Chen, Huaibi; Conde, Manoel; Doran, Darrell S; Gai, Wei; Jing, Chunguang; Liu, Wanming; Power, John; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shi, Jiaru; Wang, Dan; Wang, Faya; Whiteford, Charles E; Wisniewski, Eric; Xiao, Liling

    2015-12-31

    Field emission from a solid metal surface has been continuously studied for a century over macroscopic to atomic scales. It is general knowledge that, other than the surface properties, the emitted current is governed solely by the applied electric field. A pin cathode has been used to study the dependence of field emission on stored energy in an L-band rf gun. The stored energy was changed by adjusting the axial position (distance between the cathode base and the gun back surface) of the cathode while the applied electric field on the cathode tip is kept constant. A very strong correlation of the field-emission current with the stored energy has been observed. While eliminating all possible interfering sources, an enhancement of the current by a factor of 5 was obtained as the stored energy was increased by a factor of 3. It implies that under certain circumstances a localized field emission may be significantly altered by the global parameters in a system. PMID:26764996

  7. Laboratory measurements of ice tensile strength dependence on density and concentration of silicate and polymer impurities at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litwin, K. L.; Beyeler, J. D.; Polito, P. J.; Zygielbaum, B. R.; Sklar, L. S.; Collins, G. C.

    2009-12-01

    The tensile strength of ice bedrock on Titan should strongly influence the effectiveness of the erosional processes responsible for carving the extensive fluvial drainage networks and other surface features visible in images returned by the Cassini and Huygens probes. Recent measurements of the effect of temperature on the tensile strength of low-porosity, polycrystalline ice, without impurities, suggest that ice bedrock at the Titan surface temperature of 93 K may be as much as five times stronger than ice at terrestrial surface temperatures. However, ice bedrock on Titan and other outer solar system bodies may have significant porosity, and impurities such silicates or polymers are possible in such ices. In this laboratory investigation we are exploring the dependence of tensile strength on the density and concentration of impurities, for polycrystalline ice across a wide range of temperatures. We use the Brazilian tensile splitting test to measure strength, and control temperature with dry ice and liquid nitrogen. The 50 mm diameter ice cores are made from a log-normally distributed seed crystal mixture with a median size of 1.4 mm. To control ice density and porosity we vary the packing density of the seed grains in core molds and vary the degree of saturation of the matrix with added near-freezing distilled water. We also vary ice density by blending in a similarly-sized mixture of angular fragments of two types of impurities, a fine-grained volcanic rock and a polyethylene polymer. Because both types of impurities have greater tensile strength than ice at Earth surface temperatures, we expect higher concentrations of impurities to correlate with increased strength for ice-rock and ice-polymer mixtures. However, at the ultra-cold temperatures of the outer planets, we expect significant divergence in the temperature dependence of ice tensile strength for the various mixtures and resulting densities. These measurements will help constrain the range of possible

  8. On the strength of oceanic fracture zones and their influence on the intraplate stress field

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, E.A.; Solomon, S.C. )

    1992-10-01

    We use the locations and source mechanisms of oceanic intraplate earthquakes to test the hypothesis that the strength of oceanic fracture zones is less than that of normal oceanic lithosphere. The 77 earthquakes selected for the study have well-determined focal mechanisms and epicenters in regions where fracture zones are well mapped. We have search for dependence of faulting style, fault orientation, or principal stress direction on the distance from the nearest fracture zone. If fracture zones were generally weaker than the surrounding lithosphere, one of the principal horizontal stresses would be oriented nearly perpendicular to the fracture zone; we find no evidence that principal stresses near fracture zones are oriented preferentially in this manner. There is a slight tendency for earthquakes to occur near fracture zones, and patterns of fault orientation and sense of slip support the view that differential cooling and horizontal contraction on fracture zones may contribute seismogenic stress. 56 refs.

  9. Diurnal Rhythm of Muscular Strength Depends on Temporal Specificity of Self-Resistance Training.

    PubMed

    Zbidi, Sana; Zinoubi, Badrane; Vandewalle, Henry; Driss, Tarak

    2016-03-01

    The study investigated the effect of the time-of-day at which maximal isometric voluntary co-contraction (MIVCC) training is conducted on the adaptation and diurnal variation of maximal and explosive force production. Twenty active men underwent a 6-week (3 times per week) MIVCC training of the right elbow joint. The participants were randomly assigned to a morning training group (MTG, 07:00-08:00 hours) and evening training group (ETG, 17:00-18:00 hours). The maximal voluntary force (MVF) and maximal rate of force development (MRFD) during isometric elbow flexion (MVFF and MRFD(F)) and extension (MVF(E) and MRFD(E)) were recorded before (T0) and after (T1) training in the morning and evening. At T0, MVF and MRFD were higher in the evening compared with those in the morning for the MTG and ETG (p ≤ 0.05). At T1, MVFF and MVFE increased in the morning and evening for both groups (p < 0.001). The MRFD(F) and MRFD(E) increased only if training and test session were scheduled at the same time. The relative increase of MVF was greater at the specific time of training for the MTG (12 and 17.6% in MVF(F) and MVF(E), respectively) and ETG (9.8 and 13.4% in MVF(F) and MVF(E), respectively). The diurnal variations in MVF and MRF(D) during flexion and extension disappeared in the MTG and persisted in the ETG. Maximal isometric voluntary co-contraction training enhanced muscle strength whatever the time-of-day at which the training was scheduled without alteration of explosive force. In contrast, to optimize the muscle strength, our results suggested that morning training may be accompanied by the greatest muscle strength gain and blunted muscle strength variation observed between the morning and evening.

  10. Field dependent transport properties in InAs nanowire field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Dayeh, Shadi A; Susac, Darija; Kavanagh, Karen L; Yu, Edward T; Wang, Deli

    2008-10-01

    We present detailed studies of the field dependent transport properties of InAs nanowire field-effect transistors. Transconductance dependence on both vertical and lateral fields is discussed. Velocity-field plots are constructed from a large set of output and transfer curves that show negative differential conductance behavior and marked mobility degradation at high injection fields. Two dimensional electrothermal simulations at current densities similar to those measured in the InAs NWFET devices indicate that a significant temperature rise occurs in the channel due to enhanced phonon scattering that leads to the observed mobility degradation. Scanning transmission electron microscopy measurements on devices operated at high current densities reveal arsenic vaporization and crystal deformation in the subject nanowires.

  11. Extended gyrokinetic field theory for time-dependent magnetic confinement fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, H.; Watanabe, T.-H.; Nunami, M.

    2014-01-15

    A gyrokinetic system of equations for turbulent toroidal plasmas in time-dependent axisymmetric background magnetic fields is derived from the variational principle. Besides governing equations for gyrocenter distribution functions and turbulent electromagnetic fields, the conditions which self-consistently determine the background magnetic fields varying on a transport time scale are obtained by using the Lagrangian, which includes the constraint on the background fields. Conservation laws for energy and toroidal angular momentum of the whole system in the time-dependent background magnetic fields are naturally derived by applying Noether's theorem. It is shown that the ensemble-averaged transport equations of particles, energy, and toroidal momentum given in the present work agree with the results from the conventional recursive formulation with the WKB representation except that collisional effects are disregarded here.

  12. Dynamical features and electric field strengths of double layers driven by currents. [in auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, N.; Thiemann, H.; Schunk, R. W.

    1985-01-01

    In recent years, a number of papers have been concerned with 'ion-acoustic' double layers. In the present investigation, results from numerical simulations are presented to show that the shapes and forms of current-driven double layers evolve dynamically with the fluctuations in the current through the plasma. It is shown that double layers with a potential dip can form even without the excitation of ion-acoustic modes. Double layers in two-and one-half-dimensional simulations are discussed, taking into account the simulation technique, the spatial and temporal features of plasma, and the dynamical behavior of the parallel potential distribution. Attention is also given to double layers in one-dimensional simulations, and electrical field strengths predicted by two-and one-half-dimensional simulations.

  13. Sensitivity Reach of the Neutron EDM Experiment: The Electric Field Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Hennings-Yeomans, R.; Cooper, M.; Currie, S. A.; Makela, M. F.; Ramsey, J. C.; Tajima, S.; Womack, T. L.; Long, J. C.; Stanislaus, S.

    2010-08-04

    The search for an electric dipole moment of the neutron tests physics beyond the Standard Model such as new sources of CP-violation and Supersymmetry. The nEDM experiment aims to improve the sensitivity on the current limit of the electric dipole moment of the neutron to <10{sup -27} e{center_dot}cm. The experiment will use a flux of Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCNs) produced and stored in a bath of superfluid He-II. A change in precession frequency is expected for a non-zero EDM when an electric field is applied parallel and antiparallel to a magnetic field across the neutron storage cell. A dominant parameter in terms of reducing the statistical uncertainty of this measurement is the strength of the applied electric field. An experiment to measure if superfluid He-II can sustain up to 50 kV/cm for a volume and electrode spacings comparable to the nEDM experiment has been constructed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It consists in a large-area parallel plate capacitor immersed in a 200 liter central volume inside a suitable cryostat that in turn is connected to a dilution refrigerator unit. A description of test runs and the status of the experiment is presented.

  14. A low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator.

    PubMed

    Secoli, Riccardo; Robinson, Matthew; Brugnoli, Michele; Rodriguez y Baena, Ferdinando

    2015-03-01

    To perform minimally invasive surgical interventions with the aid of robotic systems within a magnetic resonance imaging scanner offers significant advantages compared to conventional surgery. However, despite the numerous exciting potential applications of this technology, the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging-compatible robotics has been hampered by safety, reliability and cost concerns: the robots should not be attracted by the strong magnetic field of the scanner and should operate reliably in the field without causing distortion to the scan data. Development of non-conventional sensors and/or actuators is thus required to meet these strict operational and safety requirements. These demands commonly result in expensive actuators, which mean that cost effectiveness remains a major challenge for such robotic systems. This work presents a low-cost, high-field-strength magnetic resonance imaging-compatible actuator: a pneumatic stepper motor which is controllable in open loop or closed loop, along with a rotary encoder, both fully manufactured in plastic, which are shown to perform reliably via a set of in vitro trials while generating negligible artifacts when imaged within a standard clinical scanner. PMID:25833997

  15. The auditory evoked sustained field: origin and frequency dependence.

    PubMed

    Pantev, C; Eulitz, C; Elbert, T; Hoke, M

    1994-01-01

    A sound lasting for several seconds is known to elicit a baseline shift in electrical and magnetic records. We have studied the dependence of the magnetic field distribution of this "per-stimulatory" sustained field (SF) on tone frequency. Tone bursts of 2 sec duration and 60 dB nHL intensity were presented to 11 subjects at varying interstimulus intervals between 5 and 7 sec. The carrier frequencies of 250, 1000 and 4000 Hz varied randomly from trial to trial. The field distributions obtained are consistent with the view that the auditory evoked sustained field activity originates in the supratemporal cortex. Differences in the locations of equivalent current dipoles of the SF from those of the M100 wave of the slow auditory evoked field are consistent across subjects. The SF source locations corresponding to stimulus frequencies over an extended frequency range are arranged in a tonotopic manner and support the idea that the sources of the M100 and the SF are current dipole sheets located on the superior surface of the primary auditory cortex. PMID:7509276

  16. Impact of field strength and iron oxide nanoparticle concentration on the linearity and diagnostic accuracy of off-resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Christian T; Dai, Guangping; Novikov, Mikhail; Rosenzweig, Anthony; Weissleder, Ralph; Rosen, Bruce R; Sosnovik, David E

    2008-06-01

    Off-resonance imaging (ORI) techniques are being increasingly used to image iron oxide imaging agents such as monocrystalline iron oxide nanoparticles (MION). However, the diagnostic accuracy, linearity, and field dependence of ORI have not been fully characterized. In this study, the sensitivity, specificity, and linearity of ORI were thus examined as a function of both MION concentration and magnetic field strength (4.7 and 14 T). MION phantoms with and without an air interface as well as MION uptake in a mouse model of healing myocardial infarction were imaged. MION-induced resonance shifts were shown to increase linearly with MION concentration. In contrast, the ORI signal/sensitivity was highly non-linear, initially increasing with MION concentration until T2 became comparable to the TE and decreasing thereafter. The specificity of ORI to distinguish MION-induced resonance shifts from on-resonance water was found to decrease with increasing field because of the increased on-resonance water linewidths (15 Hz at 4.7 T versus 45 Hz at 14 T). Large resonance shifts ( approximately 300 Hz) were observed at air interfaces at 4.7 T, both in vitro and in vivo, and led to poor ORI specificity for MION concentrations less than 150 microg Fe/mL. The in vivo ORI sensitivity was sufficient to detect the accumulation of MION in macrophages infiltrating healing myocardial infarcts, but the specificity was limited by non-specific areas of positive contrast at the air/tissue interfaces of the thoracic wall and the descending aorta. Improved specificity and linearity can, however, be expected at lower fields where decreased on-resonance water linewidths, reduced air-induced resonance shifts, and longer T2 relaxation times are observed. The optimal performance of ORI will thus likely be seen at low fields, with moderate MION concentrations and with sequences containing very short TEs.

  17. Volcanic sanidinites: an example for the mobilization of high field strength elements (HFSE) in magmatic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aßbichler, Donjá; Heuss-Aßbichler, Soraya; Müller, Dirk; Kunzmann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In earth science the mobility of high field strength elements (HFSE) is generally discussed in context of hydrothermal processes. Recent investigations mainly address processes in (late) magmatic-, metamorphic- and submarine hydrothermal systems. They have all in common that H2O is main solvent. The transport of HFSE is suggested to be favored by volatiles, like boron, fluorine, phosphate and sulfate (Jiang et al., 2005). In this study processes in magmatic system are investigated. Sanidinites are rare rocks of igneous origin and are found as volcanic ejecta of explosive volcanoes. They consist mainly of sanidine and minerals of the sodalite group. The very porous fabric of these rocks is an indication of their aggregation from a gaseous magmatic phase. The large sanidine crystals (up to several centimeters) are mostly interlocking, creating large cavities between some crystals. In these pores Zr crystallizes as oxide (baddeleyite, ZrO2) or silicate (zircon, ZrSiO4). The euhedral shape of these minerals is a further indication of their formation out of the gas phase. Furthermore, bubbles in glass observed in some samples are evidence for gas-rich reaction conditions during the formation of the sanidinites. The formation of sanidinites is suggested to be an example for solvothermal processes in natural systems. Solvothermal processes imply the solvation, transport and recrystallization of elements in a gas phase. Results obtained from whole rock analysis from sanidinites from Laacher See (Germany) show a positive correlation between LOI, sulfate, Cl, and Na with the HFSE like Zr. Na-rich conditions seem to ameliorate the solvothermal transport of Zr. All these features point to the formation of sanidinites in the upper part of a magma chamber, where fluid consisting of SO3 and Cl compounds in addition to H2O, CO2 and HFSE (high field strength elements) like Zr accumulate.

  18. FR II radio galaxies at low frequencies - I. Morphology, magnetic field strength and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harwood, Jeremy J.; Croston, Judith H.; Intema, Huib T.; Stewart, Adam J.; Ineson, Judith; Hardcastle, Martin J.; Godfrey, Leith; Best, Philip; Brienza, Marisa; Heesen, Volker; Mahony, Elizabeth K.; Morganti, Raffaella; Murgia, Matteo; Orrú, Emanuela; Röttgering, Huub; Shulevski, Aleksandar; Wise, Michael W.

    2016-06-01

    Due to their steep spectra, low-frequency observations of Fanaroff-Riley type II (FR II) radio galaxies potentially provide key insights in to the morphology, energetics and spectrum of these powerful radio sources. However, limitations imposed by the previous generation of radio interferometers at metre wavelengths have meant that this region of parameter space remains largely unexplored. In this paper, the first in a series examining FR IIs at low frequencies, we use LOFAR (LOw Frequency ARray) observations between 50 and 160 MHz, along with complementary archival radio and X-ray data, to explore the properties of two FR II sources, 3C 452 and 3C 223. We find that the morphology of 3C 452 is that of a standard FR II rather than of a double-double radio galaxy as had previously been suggested, with no remnant emission being observed beyond the active lobes. We find that the low-frequency integrated spectra of both sources are much steeper than expected based on traditional assumptions and, using synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting, show that the total energy content of the lobes is greater than previous estimates by a factor of around 5 for 3C 452 and 2 for 3C 223. We go on to discuss possible causes of these steeper-than-expected spectra and provide revised estimates of the internal pressures and magnetic field strengths for the intrinsically steep case. We find that the ratio between the equipartition magnetic field strengths and those derived through synchrotron/inverse-Compton model fitting remains consistent with previous findings and show that the observed departure from equipartition may in some cases provide a solution to the spectral versus dynamical age disparity.

  19. Relationships between field-based measures of strength and power and golf club head speed.

    PubMed

    Read, Paul J; Lloyd, Rhodri S; De Ste Croix, Mark; Oliver, Jon L

    2013-10-01

    Increased golf club head speed (CHS) has been shown to result in greater driving distances and is also correlated with golf handicap. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships between field-based measures of strength and power and golf CHS with a secondary aim to determine the reliability of the selected tests. A correlation design was used to assess the following variables: anthropometrics, squat jump (SJ) height and squat jump peak power (SJPP), unilateral countermovement jump (CMJ) heights (right leg countermovement jump and left leg countermovement jump [LLCMJ]), bilateral CMJ heights, countermovement jump peak power (CMJPP), and medicine ball seated throw (MBST) and medicine ball rotational throw (MBRT). Fouty-eight male subjects participated in the study (age: 20.1 ± 3.2 years, height: 1.76 ± 0.07 m, mass: 72.8 ± 7.8 kg, handicap: 5.8 ± 2.2). Moderate significant correlations were reported between CHS and MBRT (r = 0.67; p < 0.01), MBST (r = 0.63; p < 0.01), CMJPP (r = 0.54; p < 0.01), and SJPP (r = 0.53; p < 0.01). Weak significant correlations (r = 0.3-0.5) were identified between CHS and the other remaining variables excluding LLCMJ. Stepwise multiple regression analysis identified that the MBST and SJ were the greatest predictors of CHS, explaining 49% of the variance. Additionally the intraclass correlation coefficients reported for tests of CHS and all performance variables were deemed acceptable (r = 0.7-0.9). The results of this study suggest that the strength and conditioning coach can accurately assess and monitor the physical abilities of golf athletes using the proposed battery of field tests. Additionally, movements that are more concentrically dominant in nature may display stronger relationships with CHS due to MBST and SJ displaying the highest explained variance after a stepwise linear regression.

  20. A study of field independence versus field dependence of school teachers and university students in mathematics.

    PubMed

    Chao, Li; Huang, Jianyi; Li, Angie

    2003-12-01

    The Group Embedded Figures Test was administered to 72 secondary school teachers and 54 university students in mathematics to measure their cognitive styles of field independence-dependence. A mean difference was found between the teachers and students as teachers scored more field-independent than the students. There was also a group-by-sex interaction, which indicated that the female teachers scored more field-independent than the male teachers, whereas the male students scored as more field-independent than the female students. Implications of the findings are reflected in the discussion.

  1. The issues and tentative solutions for contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at ultra-high field strength.

    PubMed

    Fries, Peter; Morelli, John N; Lux, Francois; Tillement, Olivier; Schneider, Günther; Buecker, Arno

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed at ultra-high field strengths beyond 3 Tesla (T) has become increasingly prevalent in research and preclinical applications. As such, the inevitable clinical implementation of such systems lies on the horizon. The major benefit of ultra-high field MRI is the markedly increased signal-to-noise ratios achievable, enabling acquisition of MR images with simultaneously greater spatial and temporal resolution. However, at field strengths higher than 3 T, the efficacy of Gd(III)-based contrast agents is diminished due to decreased r1 relaxivity, somewhat limiting imaging of the vasculature and contrast-enhanced imaging of tumors. There have been extensive efforts to design new contrast agents with high r1 relaxivities based on macromolecular compounds or nanoparticles; however, the efficacy of these agents at ultra-high field strengths has not yet been proven. The aim of this review article is to provide an overview of the basic principles of MR contrast enhancement processes and to highlight the main factors influencing relaxivity. In addition, challenges and opportunities for contrast-enhanced MRI at ultra-high field strengths will be explored. Various approaches for the development of effective contrast agent molecules that are suitable for a broad spectrum of applied field strengths will be discussed in the context of the current literature.

  2. Further constraints for the Plio-Pleistocene geomagnetic field strength: New results from the Los Tuxtlas volcanic field (Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Goguitchaichvili, A.; Urrutia-Fucugauchi, J.

    2001-09-01

    A rock-magnetic, paleomagnetic and paleointensity study was carried out on 13 Plio-Pleistocene volcanic flows from the Los Tuxtlas volcanic field (Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt) in order to obtain some decisive constraints for the geomagnetic field strength during the Plio-Pleistocene time. The age of the volcanic units, which yielded reliable paleointensity estimates, lies between 2.2 and 0.8 Ma according to the available K/Ar radiometric data. Thermomagnetic investigations reveal that remanence is carried in most cases by Ti-poor titanomagnetite, resulting from oxy-exsolution that probably occurred during the initial flow cooling. Unblocking temperature spectra and relatively high coercivity point to 'small' pseudo-single domain magnetic grains for these (titano)magnetites. Single-component, linear demagnetization plots were observed in most cases. Six flows yield reverse polarity magnetization, five flows are normally magnetized, and one flow shows intermediate polarity magnetization. Evidence of a strong lightning-produced magnetization overprint was detected for one site. The mean pole position obtained in this study is Plat = 83.7°, Plong = 178.1°, K = 36, A95 = 8.1°, N =10 and the corresponding mean paleodirection is I = 31.3°, D = 352°, k = 37, a95 = 8.2°, which is not significantly different from the expected direction estimated from the North American apparent polar wander path. Thirty-nine samples were pre-selected for Thellier palaeointensity experiments because of their stable remanent magnetization and relatively weak-within-site dispersion. Only 21 samples, coming from four individual basaltic lava flows, yielded reliable paleointensity estimates with the flow-mean virtual dipole moments (VDM) ranging from 6.4 to 9.1 × 1022 Am2. Combining the coeval Mexican data with the available comparable quality Pliocene paleointensity results yield a mean VDM of 6.4 × 1022 Am2, which is almost 80% of the present geomagnetic axial dipole. Reliable

  3. Age-related maintenance of eccentric strength: a study of temperature dependence.

    PubMed

    Power, Geoffrey A; Flaaten, Nordan; Dalton, Brian H; Herzog, Walter

    2016-04-01

    With adult aging, eccentric strength is maintained better than isometric strength leading to a higher ratio of eccentric/isometric force production (ECC/ISO) in older than younger adults. The purpose was to investigate the ECC/ISO during electrical activation of the adductor pollicis during lengthening (20-320° s(-1)) contractions in 24 young (n = 12, ∼24 years) and old (n = 12, ∼72 years) males across muscle temperatures (cold ∼19 °C; normal ∼30 °C; warm ∼35 °C). For isometric force, the old were 20-30 % weaker in the normal and cold conditions (P < 0.05) with no difference for the warm condition compared to young (P > 0.05). Half-relaxation time (HRT) did not differ across age for the normal and warm temperatures (P > 0.05), but it slowed significantly for old in the cold condition compared with young (∼15 %; P < 0.05), as well, there was a 20 and 40 % increase in muscle stiffness for the young and old, respectively. ECC/ISO was 50-60 % greater for the cold condition than the normal and warm conditions. There was no age difference in ECC/ISO across ages for the normal and warm conditions (P > 0.05), but for the cold, the old exhibited a 20-35 % higher ECC/ISO than did the young for velocities above 60° s(-1) (P < 0.05). A contributing factor to the elevated ECC/ISO is an increased proportion of weakly compared to strongly bound crossbridges. These findings highlight the relationship (r = 0.70) between intrinsic muscle contractile speed (HRT) and eccentric strength in old age. PMID:27028894

  4. Time-of-day dependence of isokinetic leg strength and associated interday variability.

    PubMed Central

    Wyse, J P; Mercer, T H; Gleeson, N P

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the interday variability and time-of-day effects on selected isokinetic leg strength indices. Nine adult collegiate sportsmen (mean(s.e.) age 19.6(0.5) years; mean(s.e.) height 1.81(0.02) m; mean(s.e.) body mass 76.5(3.1) kg) completed a series of nine test sessions, organized so that each subject was tested three times within a day (08.00-09.00 hours; 13.00-14.00 hours; 18.00-19.30 hours), on three occasions, each separated by a minimum of 7 days. Gravity-corrected indices of extension peak torque (EPT), flexion peak torque (FPT), and the peak torque ratio (PTR), at contraction velocities of 1.05 rad s-1 and 3.14 rad s-1, were calculated for each subject using an isokinetic dynamometer. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance of coefficient of variation (V%) scores revealed no significant differences in performance variability across within-subject factors of time-of-day and performance index (P > 0.05). Overall mean(s.e.) V% for scores across experimental conditions were 3.97(0.72)% at 1.05 rad s-1 and 5.98(1.23)% at 3.14 rad s-1, suggesting that similar levels of measurement error occur between 08.00-19.30 hours. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance of absolute strength indices (EPT, FPT and PTR) revealed that significantly higher scores were achieved during session 3 (18.00-19.30 hours), with mean(s.e.) values of 249.1(40.0) N m, 149.0(32.3) N m, 59.5(5.0)% at 1.05 rad s-1, and 172.1(38.7) N m, 121.3(27.7) N m, 71.1(6.2)% at 3.14 rad s-1, respectively (P < 0.05). This finding appears to be consistent with current knowledge about time-of-day effects on the assessment of muscular strength. Thus for stable and maximal values to be obtained during isokinetic leg testing, the use of multiple-trial protocols is recommended, with testing occurring as close to 18.00-19.30 hours as possible. In addition, the observed significant time-of-day effect suggests that appropriate comparison of maximal isokinetic leg

  5. Polarization-dependent optics using gauge-field metamaterials

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Fu; Xiao, Shiyi; Li, Jensen; Wang, Saisai; Hang, Zhi Hong

    2015-12-14

    We show that effective gauge field for photons with polarization-split dispersion surfaces, being realized using uniaxial metamaterials, can be used for polarization control with unique opportunities. The metamaterials with the proposed gauge field correspond to a special choice of eigenpolarizations on the Poincaré sphere as pseudo-spins, in contrary to those from either conventional birefringent crystals or optical active media. It gives rise to all-angle polarization control and a generic route to manipulate photon trajectories or polarizations in the pseudo-spin domain. As demonstrations, we show beam splitting (birefringent polarizer), all-angle polarization control, unidirectional polarization filter, and interferometer as various polarization control devices in the pseudo-spin domain. We expect that more polarization-dependent devices can be designed under the same framework.

  6. Nonlinear dependence of complex plasma parameters on applied electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Sodha, M. S.; Mishra, S. K.; Misra, Shikha

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents an analysis of the effect of an applied static or alternating electric field on the electron density and temperature, charge on the particles, the electron collision frequency, the electronic conductivity, and the coefficient of electron diffusion in a complex plasma (i) when not illuminated by light, which can cause photoelectric emission from the particles, and (ii) when so illuminated. A parametric analysis based on computations for some typical sets of parameters has also been made. The significance of this work to (i) the disappearance of a polar mesospheric summer echoes structure by radio wave and (ii) magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) power generation has also been indicated. The time dependence of the various parameters after the application of the electric field has also been discussed.

  7. String pair production in a time-dependent gravitational field

    SciTech Connect

    Tolley, Andrew J.; Wesley, Daniel H.

    2005-12-15

    We study the pair creation of point particles and strings in a time-dependent, weak gravitational field. We find that, for massive string states, there are surprising and significant differences between the string and point-particle results. Central to our approach is the fact that a weakly curved spacetime can be represented by a coherent state of gravitons, and therefore we employ standard techniques in string perturbation theory. String and point-particle pairs are created through tree-level interactions between the background gravitons. In particular, we focus on the production of excited string states and perform explicit calculations of the production of a set of string states of arbitrary excitation level. The differences between the string and point-particle results may contain important lessons for the pair production of strings in the strong gravitational fields of interest in cosmology and black hole physics.

  8. Field-dependent energy barriers in Co/CoO core-shell nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieves, P.; Kechrakos, D.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.

    2016-02-01

    We perform atomistic modeling of Co/CoO nanoparticles with a diameter of a few nanometers and realistic values of the exchange and anisotropy parameters in order to study the field-dependent energy barriers under forward and backward reversal of the magnetization. The barriers are extracted from the constrained energy minimization using the integration of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations and the Lagrange multiplier method. We show that the applied field and the interface exchange strength have opposite effects on the values of the energy barriers. In particular, while the backward (forward) energy barrier increases (decreases) linearly with the strength of the interface exchange coupling, it decreases (increases) almost quadratically with the applied magnetic field. Our results are in good agreement with the well-known Meiklejohn-Bean model of exchange bias, and allow us to analyze the limits of applicability of the macrospin approach to the study of energy barriers in core-shell Co/CoO nanoparticles.

  9. Finite field-dependent symmetry in the Thirring model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker; Ganai, Prince A.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we consider a D-dimensional massive Thirring model with (2field-dependent parameter. Further we compute the Jacobian of functional measure under such an extended transformation. Remarkably, we find that such a Jacobian extends the BRST exact part of the action which leads to a mapping between different gauges. We illustrate this with the help of the Lorentz and R_ξ gauges. We also discuss the results in the Batalin-Vilkovisky framework.

  10. Heliocentric distance dependence of the interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Behannon, K. W.

    1977-01-01

    Recent and ongoing planetary missions have provided extensive observations of the variations of the Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) both in time and with heliocentric distance from the sun. Large time variations in both the IMF and its fluctuations were observed. These are produced predominantly by dynamical processes in the interplanetary medium associated with stream interactions. Magnetic field variations near the sun are propagated to greater heliocentric distances, also contributing to the observed variablity of the IMF. Temporal variations on a time-scale comparable to or less than the corotation period complicate attempts to deduce radial gradients of the field and its fluctuations from the various observations. However, recent measurements inward to 0.46 AU and outward to 5 AU suggest that the radial component of the field on average decreases approximately as r to the minus second power, while the azimuthal component decreases more rapidly than the r to the minum first power dependence predicted by simple theory. This, and other observations, are discussed.

  11. Non-Markovian Brownian motion in a magnetic field and time-dependent force fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo-Gonzalez, J. C.; Jiménez-Aquino, J. I.; Romero-Bastida, M.

    2016-11-01

    This work focuses on the derivation of the velocity and phase-space generalized Fokker-Planck equations for a Brownian charged particle embedded in a memory thermal bath and under the action of force fields: a constant magnetic field and arbitrary time-dependent force fields. To achieve the aforementioned goal we use a Gaussian but non-Markovian generalized Langevin equation with an arbitrary friction memory kernel. In a similar way, the generalized diffusion equation in the zero inertia limit is also derived. Additionally we show, in the absence of the time-dependent external forces, that, if the fluctuation-dissipation relation of the second kind is valid, then the generalized Langevin dynamics associated with the charged particle reaches a stationary state in the large-time limit. The consistency of our theoretical results is also verified when they are compared with those derived in the absence of the force fields and in the Markovian case.

  12. Effect of dislocation pile-up on size-dependent yield strength in finite single-crystal micro-samples

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Bo; Shibutani, Yoji; Zhang, Xu; Shang, Fulin

    2015-07-07

    Recent research has explained that the steeply increasing yield strength in metals depends on decreasing sample size. In this work, we derive a statistical physical model of the yield strength of finite single-crystal micro-pillars that depends on single-ended dislocation pile-up inside the micro-pillars. We show that this size effect can be explained almost completely by considering the stochastic lengths of the dislocation source and the dislocation pile-up length in the single-crystal micro-pillars. The Hall–Petch-type relation holds even in a microscale single-crystal, which is characterized by its dislocation source lengths. Our quantitative conclusions suggest that the number of dislocation sources and pile-ups are significant factors for the size effect. They also indicate that starvation of dislocation sources is another reason for the size effect. Moreover, we investigated the explicit relationship between the stacking fault energy and the dislocation “pile-up” effect inside the sample: materials with low stacking fault energy exhibit an obvious dislocation pile-up effect. Our proposed physical model predicts a sample strength that agrees well with experimental data, and our model can give a more precise prediction than the current single arm source model, especially for materials with low stacking fault energy.

  13. Sintered Silver Joint Strength Dependence on Substrate Topography and Attachment Pad Geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, Andrew A; Vuono, Daniel J; Liang, Zhenxian; Fox, Ethan E

    2012-01-01

    The sum of chemical and mechanical bonding limits the adhesive strength of die-attach and substrate-attach layers. This is also true for sintered silver joints whose development and employment are underway in the electronic packaging community. Chemical bonding is dictated by numerous parameters associated with the compatibility of the metallurgical bond of the two mating surfaces and the processing history that brings them together. However, the efficacy of mechanical bonding is likely affected by the topographies (e.g., roughness) of the two adjoined surfaces and also perhaps the shape of the attachment layer itself (e.g., circles, squares, and sizes thereof). In this study the mechanical bonding component is examined through the modification of the copper cladding surface on direct bonded copper (DBC) substrates, the shape of the silver pad attachment bonded to it, and the use of a joined 'DBC sandwich' that facilitates their study. It was found that simple employment of both surface topography control and printed pad geometry can affect and improve shear strength of silver sintered joints, and that there is logic to perhaps hybridize their effects. This is an important observation as more future attention is devoted to joining constituents with larger areas (> 100 mm2) in electronic packages.

  14. MCZ: Striations in CZ silicon crystals grown under various axial magnetic field strengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, G. K. M.

    1985-01-01

    Suppression of fluid flow instabilities in the melt by the axial magnetic field in Czochralski silicon crystal growth (AMCZ) is investigated precisely by a high-sensitivity striation etching in conjunction with temperature measurements. The magnetic strength (B) was varied up to 4.0 kG, incremented in 0.5 kG/5 cm crystal length. The convection flow was substantially suppressed at B 1.0 kG. A low oxygen level of 2-3 ppma and a high resistivity of 400 ohm-cm is achieved in the AMCZ silicon crystals at B 1.0 kG. Details of the striation formation as a function of B are presented. Computer simulation of the magnetohydrodynamics of the AMCZ silicon crystal growth are discussed briefly with regard to the solute, especially oxygen segregation at B=0, 1.0, and 2.0 kG. Earlier studies in the inverted Bridgman growth of InSb and Ge, which have established the cause and effect relationship between the convection in the melt and the striation formation as well as the suppression of the convections in the melt by transverse magnetic field are reviewed.

  15. Magnetic field effects on yields and decays of fluorescence of pyrimidine vapor: Excited rovibronic level dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohta, Nobuhiro; Takemura, Takeshi; Fujita, Masahisa; Baba, Hiroaki

    1988-04-01

    External magnetic field effects on yields and decays of fluorescence of pyrimidine vapor on excitation into various rotational levels belonging to the vibrationless level or the 6a1 level of S1 have been studied in a supersonic jet or in a bulk gas at room temperature with a field strength of 0-150 G. The fast component of fluorescence is not affected by an external magnetic field, whereas the slow fluorescence is quenched by a field except for excitation at the R(0) line belonging to the 0-0 transition. The fluorescence quenching is more effective at the 6a1 level than that at 00, indicating that the level density of the triplet state coupled to the singlet state plays an important role in the magnetic mixing of the triplet spin sublevels, in terms of which the fluorescence quenching by a magnetic field is interpreted. The excited rotational level dependence of the fluorescence quenching by a magnetic field is attributed to K scrambling in the triplet manifold following intersystem crossing.

  16. Influence of magnetic field strength on potential well in the ionization stage of a double stage Hall thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Daren; Song Maojiang; Liu Hui; Zhang Xu; Li Hong

    2012-07-15

    Similar to a single stage Hall thruster, the magnetic field, which controls electron trajectory and electric field distribution, is the most important factor determining the performance of a double stage Hall thruster. Especially, a potential well, which is helpful to reduce the ion loss on the thruster walls, is shaped in the ionization stage due to the existence of an annular magnetic field topology there. In this paper, the influence of magnetic field strength in the ionization stage on the potential well is researched with both experiments and particle-in-cell simulations. It is found that the depth of potential well increases with the magnetic field strength as a result of enhanced magnetic confinement and lowered electron conductivity. Consequently, the plasma density as well as the ion current entering the acceleration stage increases. However, an excessive magnetic field strength leads to an excess of ion loss on the walls of the acceleration stage. Therefore, there is an appropriate magnetic field strength in the ionization stage that results in a proper potential well and consequently an optimal performance of a double stage Hall thruster.

  17. Time/Temperature Dependent Tensile Strength of SiC and Al2O3-Based Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Hee Mann; DiCarlo, James A.

    1997-01-01

    In order to understand and model the thermomechanical behavior of fiber-reinforced composites, stress-rupture, fast-fracture, and warm-up rupture studies were conducted on various advanced SiC and Al2O3-based fibers in the,temperature range from 20 to 1400 C in air as well as in inert environments. The measured stress-rupture, fast fracture, and warm-up rupture strengths were correlated into a single master time/temperature-dependent strength plot for each fiber type using thermal activation and slow crack growth theories. It is shown that these plots are useful for comparing and selecting fibers for CMC and MMC reinforcement and that, in comparison to stress rupture tests, the fast-fracture and warm-up tests can be used for rapid generation of these plots.

  18. Finite field-dependent symmetries in perturbative quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyay, Sudhaker

    2014-01-15

    In this paper we discuss the absolutely anticommuting nilpotent symmetries for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime in linear and non-linear gauges. Further, we analyze the finite field-dependent BRST (FFBRST) transformation for perturbative quantum gravity in general curved spacetime. The FFBRST transformation changes the gauge-fixing and ghost parts of the perturbative quantum gravity within functional integration. However, the operation of such symmetry transformation on the generating functional of perturbative quantum gravity does not affect the theory on physical ground. The FFBRST transformation with appropriate choices of finite BRST parameter connects non-linear Curci–Ferrari and Landau gauges of perturbative quantum gravity. The validity of the results is also established at quantum level using Batalin–Vilkovisky (BV) formulation. -- Highlights: •The perturbative quantum gravity is treated as gauge theory. •BRST and anti-BRST transformations are developed in linear and non-linear gauges. •BRST transformation is generalized by making it finite and field dependent. •Connection between linear and non-linear gauges is established. •Using BV formulation the results are established at quantum level also.

  19. Dependence of frictional strength on compositional variations of Hayward fault rock gouges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrow, Carolyn A.; Moore, Diane E.; Lockner, David A.

    2010-01-01

    The northern termination of the locked portion of the Hayward Fault near Berkeley, California, is found to coincide with the transition from strong Franciscan metagraywacke to melange on the western side of the fault. Both of these units are juxtaposed with various serpentinite, gabbro and graywacke units to the east, suggesting that the gouges formed within the Hayward Fault zone may vary widely due to the mixing of adjacent rock units and that the mechanical behavior of the fault would be best modeled by determining the frictional properties of mixtures of the principal rock types. To this end, room temperature, water-saturated, triaxial shearing tests were conducted on binary and ternary mixtures of fine-grained gouges prepared from serpentinite and gabbro from the Coast Range Ophiolite, a Great Valley Sequence graywacke, and three different Franciscan Complex metasedimentary rocks. Friction coefficients ranged from 0.36 for the serpentinite to 0.84 for the gabbro, with four of the rock types having coefficients of friction ranging from 0.67-0.84. The friction coefficients of the mixtures can be predicted reliably by a simple weighted average of the end-member dry-weight percentages and strengths for all samples except those containing serpentinite. For the serpentinite mixtures, a linear trend between end-member values slightly overestimates the coefficients of friction in the midcomposition ranges. The range in strength for these rock admixtures suggests that both theoretical and numerical modeling of the fault should attempt to account for variations in rock and gouge properties.

  20. Levels of electric field strength within the immediate vicinity of FM radio stations in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Azah, C K; Amoako, J K; Fletcher, J J

    2013-10-01

    Heightened awareness of the ever-expanding use of radiofrequency (RF) techniques and technology has led to mounting concerns from the general public and the scientific community regarding the possible health effects that may arise as a consequence of exposure to RF radiations and has drawn the attention of many researchers the world over. A survey of the RF electromagnetic radiation at public access points in the vicinity of 20 frequency-modulated (FM) radio stations has been made in Accra, Ghana. The fundamental object was to determine the levels of RF fields from FM broadcast antennae within 10-200 m radius about the foot of the FM base station and at a height of 1.5 m above the ground at selected locations. A spectrum analyser and a bi-conical antenna element sensitive and effective within the frequency band of 30-300 MHz were used. Results obtained indicated that the levels of electric field strength ranged from 5.4E-04 V m(-1) at FM station 'O' to 7.4E-08 V m(-1) at FM station 'D'. At a transmission frequency range of 88-108 MHz, the variation of power densities is from 2.5E-10 to 1.5E-17 Wm(-2). These values are very low and are far below the reference level set by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and therefore do not pose any known hazard to the inhabitants of Accra, Ghana. The electric field levels presented in this work are comparable with those reported from epidemiological studies conducted elsewhere. PMID:23567196

  1. Levels of electric field strength within the immediate vicinity of FM radio stations in Accra, Ghana.

    PubMed

    Azah, C K; Amoako, J K; Fletcher, J J

    2013-10-01

    Heightened awareness of the ever-expanding use of radiofrequency (RF) techniques and technology has led to mounting concerns from the general public and the scientific community regarding the possible health effects that may arise as a consequence of exposure to RF radiations and has drawn the attention of many researchers the world over. A survey of the RF electromagnetic radiation at public access points in the vicinity of 20 frequency-modulated (FM) radio stations has been made in Accra, Ghana. The fundamental object was to determine the levels of RF fields from FM broadcast antennae within 10-200 m radius about the foot of the FM base station and at a height of 1.5 m above the ground at selected locations. A spectrum analyser and a bi-conical antenna element sensitive and effective within the frequency band of 30-300 MHz were used. Results obtained indicated that the levels of electric field strength ranged from 5.4E-04 V m(-1) at FM station 'O' to 7.4E-08 V m(-1) at FM station 'D'. At a transmission frequency range of 88-108 MHz, the variation of power densities is from 2.5E-10 to 1.5E-17 Wm(-2). These values are very low and are far below the reference level set by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and therefore do not pose any known hazard to the inhabitants of Accra, Ghana. The electric field levels presented in this work are comparable with those reported from epidemiological studies conducted elsewhere.

  2. Time-dependent neutron and photon dose-field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Hasani Omar

    2005-11-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The code Pandemonium, originally designed to determine flux and dose rates only, has been improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. The photon model has been significantly enhanced by expanding the energy range to 10 MeV to include fission photons, and by including a set of new buildup factors, the result of an extensive study into the previously unknown "purely-angular effect" on photon buildup. Purely-angular photon buildup factors are determined using discrete ordinates and coupled electron-photon cross sections to account for coherent and incoherent scattering and secondary photon effects of bremsstrahlung and florescence. Improvements to Pandemonium result in significant modeling capabilities for processing facilities using intense neutron and photon sources, and the code obtains comparable results to Monte Carlo calculations but within a fraction of the time required to run such codes as MCNPX.

  3. Science Process Skills of Students Having Field Dependent and Field Independent Cognitive Styles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mutlu, Mehmet; Temiz, Burak Kagan

    2013-01-01

    This study has been carried out to compare the integrated science process of the students having field dependent and independent cognitive style. A total of 496 students (285 female, 211 male) participated using by stratified sampling method from seven high schools located in the Cappadocia Region of Turkey. While students' science process…

  4. Relationship Between Field Dependence - Field Independence, Piaget Conservation Tasks and School Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wicker, Tommie E.; O'Tuel, Frances S.

    This study investigates relationships among conservation, field dependence/independence, school variables, achievement, screening measures, sex and race. A total of 124 first, second and third graders in a Southern rural school were administered 8 typical Piagetian conservation tasks (PCT), Children's Embedded Figures Test (CEFT), Comprehensive…

  5. Heliomagnetic latitude dependence of the heliospheric magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, M. E.; Smith, E. J.; Balogh, A.

    1995-06-01

    Previous studies have revealed systematic variations of the interplanetary magnetic field with heliographic latitude. Luhmann et al. (1987) modeled Pioneer Venus (PVO) and ISEE-3 observations by assuming an asymmetric dependence on heliolatitude with stronger fields in the northern hemisphere. In a subsequent study, using data from ISEE-3/ICE and IMP-8, Burton et al. (1990) found evidence for a similar asymmetry. However, neither model has been completely successful. The model derived from PVO/ICE observations agrees quite well near solar maximum but shows significant discrepancies during the descending phase of the solar cycle. The model derived from the ICE/IMP-8 comparison suffers from significant phase delays between the difference in field magnitude at the two spacecraft and their latitude difference. In an attempt to account for these phase shifts, the IMP-8 and ICE data have been reexamined in heliomagnetic coordinates which are defined by the orientation of the solar magnetic dipole. The latitude and longitude of the dipole inferred from the data have then been compared with those implicit in source surface calculations. The IMP/ICE correlations have been extended into the recent solar maximum and descending phase. Comparisons have also been carried out between IMP-8 and Ulysses as it traveled to -30 deg south heliographic latitude.

  6. Magnetic field-dependent spin structures of nanocrystalline holmium

    PubMed Central

    Szary, Philipp; Kaiser, Daniel; Bick, Jens-Peter; Lott, Dieter; Heinemann, André; Dewhurst, Charles; Birringer, Rainer; Michels, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The results are reported of magnetic field-dependent neutron diffraction experiments on polycrystalline inert-gas condensed holmium with a nanometre crystallite size (D = 33 nm). At T = 50 K, no evidence is found for the existence of helifan(3/2) or helifan(2) structures for the nanocrystalline sample, in contrast with results reported in the literature for the single crystal. Instead, when the applied field H is increased, the helix pattern transforms progressively, most likely into a fan structure. It is the component of H which acts on the basal-plane spins of a given nanocrystallite that drives the disappearance of the helix; for nanocrystalline Ho, this field is about 1.3 T, and it is related to a characteristic kink in the virgin magnetization curve. For a coarse-grained Ho sample, concomitant with the destruction of the helix phase, the emergence of an unusual angular anisotropy (streak pattern) and the appearance of novel spin structures are observed. PMID:27047307

  7. Whole-body vibration combined with extra-load training for enhancing the strength and speed of track and field athletes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hsiang-Hsin; Chen, Wei-Han; Liu, Chiang; Yang, Wen-Wen; Huang, Mao-Ying; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether whole-body vibration (WBV) combined with extra-load training can enhance the strength and speed of trained athletes compared with isolated WBV training or loaded training (LT) only. Twenty-one elite male track and field athletes were randomly assigned to a loaded vibration (LV) training group (n = 7), an unloaded vibration (ULV) training group (n = 7), and a LT group (n = 7). During 4 weeks of training, the LV group received the vibration stimulus (30 Hz and 4 mm) accompanied by a load comprising 75% of the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC), the ULV group received the same vibration stimulus without any load, and the LT group received only a load of 75% MVC without any vibration stimulus. The knee extensor isometric strength, and the concentric and eccentric strength were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer at 300°·s at a 30-m sprint speed before and after the training period. A 2-way mixed analysis of variance (time × group) was used to analyze the differences. Significant time × group interactions were observed for all the dependent variables (p ≤ 0.05). Regarding the post hoc analysis results, the LV group exhibited significant improvements for all the dependent variables after training (p ≤ 0.05), whereas the ULV group exhibited significantly reduced sprint speeds (p ≤ 0.05). The LV group demonstrated significantly superior eccentric strength compared with the ULV and LT groups after training (p ≤ 0.05), and the LV group also produced significantly superior sprint speeds compared with the ULV group after training (p ≤ 0.05). Vibration combined with extra-load training for 4 weeks significantly increased the muscle strength and speed of the elite male track and field athletes.

  8. Reprint of: Coulomb field strength measurement by electro-optic spectral decoding system at the CALIFES beam line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, R.; Jamison, S. P.; Lefevre, T.; Gillespie, W. A.

    2016-09-01

    Electro-optic (EO) techniques are increasingly used for longitudinal bunch profile measurements. A bunch profile monitor, based on electro-optic spectral decoding (EOSD), has been developed and demonstrated on the CALIFES beam line at CERN. The EO response is analysed using a frequency domain description, and two methods for extraction of absolute Coulomb field strengths from the electron bunch are demonstrated. Measurements at field strengths up to 1.3 MV/m agree with the expectation based on independent charge measurements.

  9. High field strength (4.7T) magnetic resonance imaging of hydrocephalus in an African Grey parrot (Psittacus erithacus).

    PubMed

    Fleming, Gregory J; Lester, Nola V; Stevenson, Rhoda; Silver, Xeve S

    2003-01-01

    Hydrocephalus was diagnosed in a juvenile African Grey parrot by high-field strength (4.7-Tesla) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Excellent anatomic detail was achieved, and there was severe dilation of all ventricles. Relative obstruction was localized to the level of or beyond the outflow of the fourth ventricle. There have been several reports of hydrocephalus diagnosed postmortem in psittacines (i.e., hook-billed parrots), however, this is the first report of an antemortem diagnosis in a psittacine using high-field strength MRI.

  10. Comparing Simulations of Rising Flux Tubes Through the Solar Convection Zone with Observations of Solar Active Regions: Constraining the Dynamo Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, M. A.; Fan, Y.; Miesch, M. S.

    2013-10-01

    We study how active-region-scale flux tubes rise buoyantly from the base of the convection zone to near the solar surface by embedding a thin flux tube model in a rotating spherical shell of solar-like turbulent convection. These toroidal flux tubes that we simulate range in magnetic field strength from 15 kG to 100 kG at initial latitudes of 1∘ to 40∘ in both hemispheres. This article expands upon Weber, Fan, and Miesch ( Astrophys. J. 741, 11, 2011) (Article 1) with the inclusion of tubes with magnetic flux of 1020 Mx and 1021 Mx, and more simulations of the previously investigated case of 1022 Mx, sampling more convective flows than the previous article, greatly improving statistics. Observed properties of active regions are compared to properties of the simulated emerging flux tubes, including: the tilt of active regions in accordance with Joy's Law as in Article 1, and in addition the scatter of tilt angles about the Joy's Law trend, the most commonly occurring tilt angle, the rotation rate of the emerging loops with respect to the surrounding plasma, and the nature of the magnetic field at the flux tube apex. We discuss how these diagnostic properties constrain the initial field strength of the active-region flux tubes at the bottom of the solar convection zone, and suggest that flux tubes of initial magnetic field strengths of ≥ 40 kG are good candidates for the progenitors of large (1021 Mx to 1022 Mx) solar active regions, which agrees with the results from Article 1 for flux tubes of 1022 Mx. With the addition of more magnetic flux values and more simulations, we find that for all magnetic field strengths, the emerging tubes show a positive Joy's Law trend, and that this trend does not show a statistically significant dependence on the magnetic flux.

  11. Temperature-dependent ideal strength and stacking fault energy of fcc Ni: a first-principles study of shear deformation.

    PubMed

    Shang, S L; Wang, W Y; Wang, Y; Du, Y; Zhang, J X; Patel, A D; Liu, Z K

    2012-04-18

    Variations of energy, stress, and magnetic moment of fcc Ni as a response to shear deformation and the associated ideal shear strength (τ(IS)), intrinsic (γ(SF)) and unstable (γ(US)) stacking fault energies have been studied in terms of first-principles calculations under both the alias and affine shear regimes within the {111} slip plane along the <112> and <110> directions. It is found that (i) the intrinsic stacking fault energy γ(SF) is nearly independent of the shear deformation regimes used, albeit a slightly smaller value is predicted by pure shear (with relaxation) compared to the one from simple shear (without relaxation); (ii) the minimum ideal shear strength τ(IS) is obtained by pure alias shear of {111}<112>; and (iii) the dissociation of the 1/2[110] dislocation into two partial Shockley dislocations (1/6[211] + 1/6[121]) is observed under pure alias shear of {111}<110>. Based on the quasiharmonic approach from first-principles phonon calculations, the predicted γ(SF) has been extended to finite temperatures. In particular, using a proposed quasistatic approach on the basis of the predicted volume versus temperature relation, the temperature dependence of τ(IS) is also obtained. Both the γ(SF) and the τ(IS) of fcc Ni decrease with increasing temperature. The computed ideal shear strengths as well as the intrinsic and unstable stacking fault energies are in favorable accord with experiments and other predictions in the literature.

  12. Electrochemical properties of columns in capillary electrochromatography. I. Ohm's law, resistivity and field strength.

    PubMed

    Henry, Michael P; Ratnayake, Chitra K

    2005-06-24

    The most commonly used type of column in capillary electrochromatography (CEC) consists of a packed segment and an open (but buffer-filled) segment. The two segments differ importantly in two respects: firstly, their electrical resistivity; and secondly, their zeta potentials at a multitude of solid-liquid interfaces. Determination of the magnitude of these properties for each segment cannot be made using only results from the column as a whole. Instead, measurements of resistivity and zeta potentials of an entirely open, unpacked column can be used in conjunction with those of the CEC column to determine the electrochemical nature of both segments. This review of basic electrochemical properties will describe simple procedures that can be used to determine resistance, resistivity, conductivity, conductance, and field strength in each segment. In addition, it will be shown how the properties of each segment add together to give the same properties of the CEC column as a whole. The equations so derived will be applied to data from the literature and conclusions drawn from the results.

  13. Towards a Consensus View of the Heliospheric Magnetic Field Strength Since 1900

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cliver, E. W.; Svalgaard, L.

    2008-12-01

    McCracken (2007) inverted the galactic cosmic ray record for the interval 1428-2005 to estimate annual averages of the heliomagnetic field (HMF) near Earth during this interval. Quoting from his abstract, "There is good agreement with the results obtained by others using two independent methodologies based upon the sunspot [Solanki et al., 2002] and geomagnetic [Lockwood et al., 1999] records There is disagreement with another method based on the geomagnetic record [Svalgaard and Cliver, 2005] that needs to be resolved." We address the reported disagreement of our long-term reconstruction of the HMF strength with that obtained in the other three studies. We show that a recent reconstruction of the HMF by Rouillard, Lockwood, and Finch [2007] agrees much more closely with that of Svalgaard and Cliver than that of Lockwood et al. to the point where a consensus seems to be reached. We suggest that the discrepancy between McCracken's cosmic-ray-based HMF reconstruction and those based on geomagnetic data originates in the Forbush and Neher ionization chamber data (1933-1957) used to bridge the time gap between the 10Be time series (1428-1930) and the Climax neutron monitor record (1951-present).

  14. Corneal temperature changes induced by high-field-strength MR imaging with a head coil.

    PubMed

    Shellock, F G; Crues, J V

    1988-06-01

    High-field-strength/high-frequency magnetic resonance (MR) imaging systems can cause tissue heating. Since the eye is particularly susceptible to temperature elevations because of its relatively poor blood supply, the authors measured corneal temperatures in 33 patients immediately before and after MR imaging performed with a 1.5-T (64-MHz) imager and a transmit/receive head coil at estimated peak specific absorption rates (SAR) ranging from 2.54 to 3.05 W/kg. There was a statistically (P less than .001) significant increase in the average corneal temperature (32.7 degrees C +/- 0.7 before imaging, 33.2 degrees C +/- 0.5 after). The changes in corneal temperature ranged from 0.0 degrees C to 1.8 degrees C (mean, 0.5 degrees C), and the highest corneal temperature measured after imaging was 34.4 degrees C. In animal models, the eye temperature threshold for radio frequency-induced cataractogenesis is between 41 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The authors conclude that clinical MR imaging with use of a head coil at the SARs studied causes relatively minor increases in corneal temperature that do not appear to pose any thermal hazard to ocular tissue. PMID:3363146

  15. The 1983-84 Connecticut 45-Hz-band field-strength measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, P. R.

    1986-03-01

    Extremely low frequency (ELF) measurements are made of the transverse horizontal magnetic field strength received in Connecticut. The AN/BSR-1 receiver consists of an AN/UYK-20 minicomputer, a signal timing and interface unit (STIU), a rubidium frequency time standard, two magnetic tape recorders, and a preamplifier. The transmission source of these farfield (1.6-Mm range) measurements is the U.S. Navy's ELF Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF), located in the Chequamegon National Forest in north central Wisconsin, about 8 km south of the village of Clam Lake. The WTF consists of two 22.5-km antennas; one of which is situated approximately in the north-south (NS) direction and the other approximately in the east-west (EW) direction. Each antenna is grounded at both ends. The electrical axis of the WTF EW antenna is 11 deg east of north at 45 Hz and 14 deg east of north at 75Hz. The electrical axis of the WTF NS antenna is 11 deg east of north at 45 Hz and 14 deg east of north at 75 Hz. The WTF array can be steered electrically. Its radiated power is approximately 0.5 W at 45 Hz and 1 W at 75 Hz. This report will compare results of 45 Hz band data taken during 1983 to 1984 with previous 45 Hz band measurements.

  16. Light pressure of time-dependent fields in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Zeidler, A.; Schnabl, H.; Mulser, P.

    1985-01-01

    An expression of the light pressure Pi is derived for the case of a nearly monochromatic electromagnetic wave with arbitrarily time-dependent amplitude. Thereby Pi is defined as the time-averaged force density exerted on a plasma by the wave. The resulting equations are valid for both transverse and longitudinal waves. The light pressure turns out to consist of two components: the well-known gradient-type term and a new nonstationary solenoidal term. This is true for warm as well as cold plasmas. The importance of the new term for the generation of static magnetic fields is shown, and a model in which shear forces may result is given. Formulas for the nonstationary light pressure developed previously are discussed.

  17. Dependence of sinusoidal electric field effect on neuronal morphological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xile; Yin, Xiaowei; Lu, Meili; Yi, Guosheng; Wang, Jiang

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the neuronal firing patterns under extracellular sinusoidal electric field (EF) are investigated based on a reduced two-compartment model with focus on the effects of morphological and internal coupling parameters. We observe that the neuron can exhibit bursting, synchronous firing and subthreshold oscillation depending on EF amplitude A and frequency f. Furthermore, neuronal firing properties change obviously over a range of morphological parameter p. As p increases, the firing region expands first and then diminishes gradually until it disappears in the observed (A, f) parameter space and the transition from bursting to synchronous firing is also markedly distinct. Meanwhile, the morphological parameter also has significant effects on the EF threshold for triggering neuronal spikes. Unlike morphological parameter, though the internal coupling conductance gc can also induce some changes in firing behavior and EF threshold, it cannot qualitatively change neuronal dynamical properties. All these results demonstrate that neuronal morphology plays a crucial role in neuronal responses to sinusoidal EF.

  18. Temperature dependent relativistic mean field for highly excited hot nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambhir, Y. K.; Maharana, J. P.; Lalazissis, G. A.; Panos, C. P.; Ring, P.

    2000-11-01

    The temperature dependent relativistic mean field (RMF-T) results obtained by using nonlinear Lagrangian parameter set NL3 are presented for a few selected representative spherical and deformed nuclei. The calculated total binding energy (entropy) decrease (increase) as temperature (T) increases. The depths of the potentials and the single particle (sp) energies change very little with temperature. The density slightly spreads out; as a result the radius increases as temperature rises. For well deformed nuclei the shell effects disappear at around T~3 MeV. This value of T is relatively higher as compared to the corresponding value of T (~1.8 MeV) obtained in the Strutinsky-type calculations. This difference in the value of T is shown to be due to the use of the effective nucleon mass (< the bare mass) appearing in the Skyrme III interaction or emerging from the RMF Lagrangian.

  19. Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation and diffusion in the presence of internal gradients: the effect of magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, J; Chandrasekera, T C; Johns, M L; Gladden, L F; Fordham, E J

    2010-02-01

    It is known that internal magnetic field gradients in porous materials, caused by susceptibility differences at the solid-fluid interfaces, alter the observed effective Nuclear Magnetic Resonance transverse relaxation times T2,eff. The internal gradients scale with the strength of the static background magnetic field B0. Here, we acquire data at various magnitudes of B0 to observe the influence of internal gradients on T2-T2 exchange measurements; the theory discussed and observations made are applicable to any T2-T2 analysis of heterogeneous materials. At high magnetic field strengths, it is possible to observe diffusive exchange between regions of local internal gradient extrema within individual pores. Therefore, the observed exchange pathways are not associated with pore-to-pore exchange. Understanding the significance of internal gradients in transverse relaxation measurements is critical to interpreting these results. We present the example of water in porous sandstone rock and offer a guideline to determine whether an observed T2,eff relaxation time distribution reflects the pore size distribution for a given susceptibility contrast (magnetic field strength) and spin echo separation. More generally, we confirm that for porous materials T1 provides a better indication of the pore size distribution than T2,eff at high magnetic field strengths (B0>1 T), and demonstrate the data analysis necessary to validate pore size interpretations of T2,eff measurements.

  20. Reconsolidation involves histone acetylation depending on the strength of the memory.

    PubMed

    Federman, N; Fustiñana, M S; Romano, A

    2012-09-01

    Gene expression is a necessary step for memory re-stabilization after retrieval, a process known as reconsolidation. Histone acetylation is a fundamental mechanism involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and has been implicated in memory consolidation. However, few studies are available in reconsolidation, all of them in vertebrate models. Additionally, the recruitment of histone acetylation as a function of different memory strengths has not been systematically analyzed before. Here we studied the role of histone acetylation in reconsolidation using a well-characterized memory model in invertebrate, the context-signal memory in the crab Chasmagnathus. Firstly, we found an increase in histone H3 acetylation 1h after memory reactivation returning to basal levels at 3 h. Strikingly, this increment was only detected during reconsolidation of a long-term memory induced by a strong training of 30 trials, but not for a short-term memory formed by a weak training of five trials or for a long-term memory induced by a standard training of 15 trials. Furthermore, we showed that a weak memory which was enhanced during consolidation by histone deacetylases inhibition, also recruited histone H3 acetylation in reconsolidation as the strong training does. Accordingly, we found the first evidence that the administration of a histone acetyl transferase inhibitor during memory reconsolidation impairs long-term memory re-stabilization. Finally, we found that strong training memory, at variance with the standard training memory, was resistant to extinction, indicating that such strong training induced in fact a stronger memory. In conclusion, the results presented here support that the participation of histone acetylation during reconsolidation is an evolutionary conserved feature and constitutes a specific molecular characteristic of strong memories.

  1. Time-Dependent Neutron and Photon Dose-Field Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wooten, Hasani Omar

    2005-08-01

    A unique tool is developed that allows the user to model physical representations of complicated glovebox facilities in two dimensions and determine neutral-particle flux and ambient dose-equivalent fields throughout that geometry. The Pandemonium code, originally designed to determine flux and dose-rates only, is improved to include realistic glovebox geometries, time-dependent source and detector positions, time-dependent shielding thickness calculations, time-integrated doses, a representative criticality accident scenario based on time-dependent reactor kinetics, and more rigorous photon treatment. A primary benefit of this work has been an extensive analysis and improvement of the photon model that is not limited to the application described in this thesis. The photon model has been extended in energy range to 10 MeV to include photons from fission and new photon buildup factors have been included that account for the effects of photon buildup at slant-path thicknesses as a function of angle, where the mean free path thickness has been preserved. The overall system of codes is user-friendly and it is directly applicable to facilities such as the plutonium facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, where high-intensity neutron and photon emitters are regularly used. The codes may be used to determine a priori doses for given work scenarios in an effort to supply dose information to process models which will in turn assist decision makers on ensuring as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) compliance. In addition, coupling the computational results of these tools with the process model visualization tools will help to increase worker safety and radiological safety awareness.

  2. Push-out strength of fiber posts depending on the type of root canal filling and resin cement.

    PubMed

    Dimitrouli, Maria; Günay, Hüsamettin; Geurtsen, Werner; Lührs, Anne-Katrin

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze the push-out strength of two fiber post systems/resin cements (RelyX Unicem/RelyX Fiber Post (RLX) and Variolink II/DT Light SL (VL)) depending on the root canal filling (RF). One hundred sixty extracted human teeth were divided into four groups: gutta-percha/AH Plus (GP), gutta-percha/Guttaflow (GF), pre-existing root canal filling (PRF), and without root canal filling (WRF). After root canal treatment, fiber posts were inserted using either RelyX® or Variolink II®/Excite DSC®. Half of the specimens were thermocycled (TC, 5,000 cycles, 5-55°C). All specimens were subjected to the push-out test (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). Three-way ANOVA showed a significant influence of either the RF or the resin cement/post system (p < 0.001). The highest bond strength was measured for VL-WRF without TC (16.5 ± 6.4 MPa). TC had no significant influence within the RLX groups. For groups PRF and WRF, significant differences were documented between VL and RLX (PRF 16.3 ± 6.0 vs 7.0 ± 2.4 MPa, p = 0.001; WRF 16.5 ± 6.4 vs 8.0 ± 5.0, p = 0.004) before TC. No differences were found after TC. The fracture mode analysis for VL showed mainly adhesive fractures between post and cement. For RLX, mixed fractures between post and tooth and between tooth and cement were predominantly determined. The adhesion of resin cements/post systems could be dependent on the type of RF. Higher bond strength values were found for the conventional ("etch and rinse") adhesive than for the "self-adhesive resin cement."

  3. Kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution:. ionic strength effects and temperature dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaß, Frank; Elias, Horst; Wannowius, Klaus J.

    Conductometry was used to study the kinetics of the oxidation of hydrogen sulfite, HSO -3, by hydrogen peroxide in aqueous non-buffered solution at the low concentration level of 10 -5-10 -6 M, typically found in cloud water. The kinetic data confirm that the rate law reported for the pH range 3-6 at higher concentration levels, rate= kH·[H +]·[HSO -3]·[H 2O 2], is valid at the low concentration level and at low ionic strength Ic. At 298 K and Ic=1.5×10 -4 M, third-order rate constant kH was found to be kH=(9.1±0.5)×10 7 M -2 s -1. The temperature dependence of kH led to an activation energy of Ea=29.7±0.9 kJ mol -1. The effect of the ionic strength (adjusted with NaCl) on rate constant kH was studied in the range Ic=2×10 -4-5.0 M at pH=4.5-5.2 by conductometry and stopped-flow spectrophotometry. The dependence of kH on Ic can be described with a semi-empirical relationship, which is useful for the purpose of comparison and extrapolation. The kinetic data obtained are critically compared with those reported earlier.

  4. Electric field dependent photocurrent decay length in single lead sulfide nanowire field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Graham, Rion; Miller, Chris; Oh, Eunsoon; Yu, Dong

    2011-02-01

    We determined the minority carrier diffusion length to be ∼1 μm in single PbS nanowire field effect transistors by scanning photocurrent microscopy. PbS nanowires grown by the vapor-liquid-solid method were p-type with hole mobilities up to 49 cm(2)/(V s). We measured a photoresponse time faster than 14 μs with near-unity charge separation efficiency at the contacts. For the first time, we also observed a field-dependent photocurrent decay length, indicating a drift dominant carrier transport at high bias.

  5. Survey of Processing Methods for High Strength High Conductivity Wires for High Field Magnet Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Han, K.; Embury, J.D.

    1998-10-01

    This paper will deal with the basic concepts of attaining combination of high strength and high conductivity in pure materials, in-situ composites and macrocomposites. It will survey current attainments, and outline where some future developments may lie in developing wire products that are close to the theoretical strength of future magnet applications.

  6. Hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor subjected to oscillating magnetic fields: ferromagnetic effect and frequency dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Guang-Tong

    2014-06-01

    Numerical simulations of the hysteretic ac loss in a coated superconductor with a more realistic version of the architecture were performed via the finite-element technique in the presence of an oscillating magnetic field. The coated superconductor was electromagnetically modeled by resorting to the quasistatic approximation of a vector potential approach in conjunction with nonlinear descriptions of the superconducting layer and the ferromagnetic substrate therein by a power-law model and the Langevin equation, respectively. A diverse effect of the ferromagnetic substrate on the hysteretic ac loss, depending on the strength of the applied magnetic field, was displayed, and its underlying cause was identified. The dependence of the hysteretic ac loss on the applied frequency is found to be related to a critical amplitude of the applied magnetic field, and the eddy-current loss dissipated in the metal coatings becomes prominent as the frequency increases only at high applied magnetic fields.

  7. Effects of muscle strength asymmetry between left and right on isokinetic strength of the knee and ankle joints depending on athletic performance level

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Chun, Sungyung; Seo, Byoungdo

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to collect basic data on the effect of asymmetry on the muscle strength of the left and right knee and ankle joints of soccer players at varying athletic performance levels, to guide the development of improved exercise programs. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-nine soccer players at three athletic performance levels participated: 15 professional, 16 amateur, and 18 college. Knee extensor and flexor strength were measured at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, and ankle plantar flexor and dorsiflexor strength were measured at 30°/sec and at 120°/sec. Variables were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. [Results] College soccer players showed greater muscle strength at 60°/sec and 180°/sec in the knee extension muscles of both the right and the left sides, lower muscle strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec in the dorsiflexor of the right ankle, and similar levels of asymmetry between left and right. The maximum muscle strength on the same side significantly differed in the right ankle joint, with asymmetry between left and right at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that muscle strength asymmetry in the ankle joint may lead to counterbalancing muscle strengthening of the knee joint to maintain the center of body mass. PMID:27190469

  8. Effects of muscle strength asymmetry between left and right on isokinetic strength of the knee and ankle joints depending on athletic performance level.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Chun, Sungyung; Seo, Byoungdo

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to collect basic data on the effect of asymmetry on the muscle strength of the left and right knee and ankle joints of soccer players at varying athletic performance levels, to guide the development of improved exercise programs. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-nine soccer players at three athletic performance levels participated: 15 professional, 16 amateur, and 18 college. Knee extensor and flexor strength were measured at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, and ankle plantar flexor and dorsiflexor strength were measured at 30°/sec and at 120°/sec. Variables were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. [Results] College soccer players showed greater muscle strength at 60°/sec and 180°/sec in the knee extension muscles of both the right and the left sides, lower muscle strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec in the dorsiflexor of the right ankle, and similar levels of asymmetry between left and right. The maximum muscle strength on the same side significantly differed in the right ankle joint, with asymmetry between left and right at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that muscle strength asymmetry in the ankle joint may lead to counterbalancing muscle strengthening of the knee joint to maintain the center of body mass. PMID:27190469

  9. Effects of muscle strength asymmetry between left and right on isokinetic strength of the knee and ankle joints depending on athletic performance level.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Kyoungkyu; Chun, Sungyung; Seo, Byoungdo

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to collect basic data on the effect of asymmetry on the muscle strength of the left and right knee and ankle joints of soccer players at varying athletic performance levels, to guide the development of improved exercise programs. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-nine soccer players at three athletic performance levels participated: 15 professional, 16 amateur, and 18 college. Knee extensor and flexor strength were measured at 60°/sec and 180°/sec, and ankle plantar flexor and dorsiflexor strength were measured at 30°/sec and at 120°/sec. Variables were analyzed by one-way ANOVA. [Results] College soccer players showed greater muscle strength at 60°/sec and 180°/sec in the knee extension muscles of both the right and the left sides, lower muscle strength at 30°/sec and 120°/sec in the dorsiflexor of the right ankle, and similar levels of asymmetry between left and right. The maximum muscle strength on the same side significantly differed in the right ankle joint, with asymmetry between left and right at 30°/sec and 120°/sec. [Conclusion] These findings suggest that muscle strength asymmetry in the ankle joint may lead to counterbalancing muscle strengthening of the knee joint to maintain the center of body mass.

  10. Morphology dependent field emission of acid-spun carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fairchild, S. B.; Boeckl, J.; Back, T. C.; Ferguson, J. B.; Koerner, H.; Murray, P. T.; Maruyama, B.; Lange, M. A.; Cahay, M. M.; Behabtu, N.; Young, C. C.; Pasquali, M.; Lockwood, N. P.; Averett, K. L.; Gruen, G.; Tsentalovich, D. E.

    2015-03-01

    Acid spun carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers were investigated for their field emission properties and performance was determined to be dependent on fiber morphology. The fibers were fabricated by wet-spinning of pre-made CNTs. Fiber morphology was controlled by a fabrication method and processing conditions, as well as purity, size, and type of the CNT starting material. The internal fiber structure consisted of CNT fibrils held together by van der Waals forces. Alignment and packing density of the CNTs affects the fiber’s electrical and thermal conductivity. Fibers with similar diameters and differing morphology were compared, and those composed of the most densely packed and well aligned CNTs were the best field emitters as exhibited by a lower turn-on voltage and a larger field enhancement factor. Fibers with higher electrical and thermal conductivity demonstrated higher maximum current before failure and longer lifetimes. A stable emission current at 3 mA was obtained for 10 h at a field strength of <1 V μm-1. This stable high current operation makes these CNT fibers excellent candidates for use as low voltage electron sources for vacuum electronic devices.

  11. Morphology dependent field emission of acid-spun carbon nanotube fibers.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, S B; Boeckl, J; Back, T C; Ferguson, J B; Koerner, H; Murray, P T; Maruyama, B; Lange, M A; Cahay, M M; Behabtu, N; Young, C C; Pasquali, M; Lockwood, N P; Averett, K L; Gruen, G; Tsentalovich, D E

    2015-03-13

    Acid spun carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers were investigated for their field emission properties and performance was determined to be dependent on fiber morphology. The fibers were fabricated by wet-spinning of pre-made CNTs. Fiber morphology was controlled by a fabrication method and processing conditions, as well as purity, size, and type of the CNT starting material. The internal fiber structure consisted of CNT fibrils held together by van der Waals forces. Alignment and packing density of the CNTs affects the fiber's electrical and thermal conductivity. Fibers with similar diameters and differing morphology were compared, and those composed of the most densely packed and well aligned CNTs were the best field emitters as exhibited by a lower turn-on voltage and a larger field enhancement factor. Fibers with higher electrical and thermal conductivity demonstrated higher maximum current before failure and longer lifetimes. A stable emission current at 3 mA was obtained for 10 h at a field strength of <1 V μm(-1). This stable high current operation makes these CNT fibers excellent candidates for use as low voltage electron sources for vacuum electronic devices. PMID:25694166

  12. Identification of Electric-Field-Dependent Steps in the Na+,K+-Pump Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Mares, Laura J.; Garcia, Alvaro; Rasmussen, Helge H.; Cornelius, Flemming; Mahmmoud, Yasser A.; Berlin, Joshua R.; Lev, Bogdan; Allen, Toby W.; Clarke, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    The charge-transporting activity of the Na+,K+-ATPase depends on its surrounding electric field. To isolate which steps of the enzyme’s reaction cycle involve charge movement, we have investigated the response of the voltage-sensitive fluorescent probe RH421 to interaction of the protein with BTEA (benzyltriethylammonium), which binds from the extracellular medium to the Na+,K+-ATPase’s transport sites in competition with Na+ and K+, but is not occluded within the protein. We find that only the occludable ions Na+, K+, Rb+, and Cs+ cause a drop in RH421 fluorescence. We conclude that RH421 detects intramembrane electric field strength changes arising from charge transport associated with conformational changes occluding the transported ions within the protein, not the electric fields of the bound ions themselves. This appears at first to conflict with electrophysiological studies suggesting extracellular Na+ or K+ binding in a high field access channel is a major electrogenic reaction of the Na+,K+-ATPase. All results can be explained consistently if ion occlusion involves local deformations in the lipid membrane surrounding the protein occurring simultaneously with conformational changes necessary for ion occlusion. The most likely origin of the RH421 fluorescence response is a change in membrane dipole potential caused by membrane deformation. PMID:25229143

  13. Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1 Observations during 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the "microscale fluctuations" of the magnetic field strength Beta on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager I (VI) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of Beta range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of Beta during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) I to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or "pink noise" spectrum on scales from I to 100 days, and it has a broad multi fractal spectrum f(alpha) with 0.57 much < alpha much < 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + r) - SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with alpha' = 0.88 +/- 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 +/- 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and Set) are often associated with a change in Beta across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The "turbulence" observed by VI during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of "turbulence" in the heliosheath.

  14. Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath: Voyager 1 Observations During 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brulaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the microscale fluctuations of the magnetic field strength B on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of B range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of B during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) 1 to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or "pink noise" spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days, and it has a broad multifractal spectrum f(alpha) with 0.57 less than or equal to alpha less than or equal to 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + tau) -- SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with alpha(1) = 0.88 plus or minus 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 plus or minus 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and S(t) are often associated with a change in B across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The "turbulence" observed by V1 during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of turbulence in the heliosheath.

  15. MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS IN THE HELIOSHEATH: VOYAGER 1 OBSERVATIONS DURING 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the ''microscale fluctuations'' of the magnetic field strength B on a scale of several hours observed by Voyager1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009. The microscale fluctuations of B range from coherent to stochastic structures. The amplitude of microscale fluctuations of B during 1 day is measured by the standard deviation (SD) of 48 s averages of B. The distribution of the daily values of SD is lognormal. SD(t) from day of year (DOY) 1 to 331, 2009, is very intermittent. SD(t) has a 1/f or 'pink noise' spectrum on scales from 1 to 100 days, and it has a broad multifractal spectrum f({alpha}) with 0.57 {<=} {alpha} {<=} 1.39. The time series of increments SD(t + {tau}) - SD(t) has a pink noise spectrum with {alpha}' = 0.88 {+-} 0.14 on scales from 1 to 100 days. The increments have a Tsallis (q-Gaussian) distribution on scales from 1 to 165 days, with an average q = 1.75 {+-} 0.12. The skewness S and kurtosis K have Gaussian and lognormal distributions, respectively. The largest spikes in K(t) and S(t) are often associated with a change in B across a data gap and with identifiable physical structures. The 'turbulence' observed by V1 during 2009 was weakly compressible on average but still very intermittent, highly variable, and highly compressible at times. The turbulence observed just behind the termination shock by Voyager 2 was twice as strong. These observations place strong constraints on any model of 'turbulence' in the heliosheath.

  16. The effect of electrical field strength on activation and development of cloned caprine embryos.

    PubMed

    Shen, P C; Lee, S N; Wu, J S; Huang, J C; Chu, F H; Chang, C C; Kung, J C; Lin, H H; Chen, L R; Shiau, J W; Yen, N T; Cheng, W T K

    2006-05-01

    The activation procedure used in nuclear transfer (NT) is one of the critical factors affecting the efficiency of animal cloning. The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of two electrical field strengths (EFS) for activation on the developmental competence of caprine NT embryos reconstructed from ear skin fibroblasts of adult Alpine does. The NT embryos were obtained by transfer of the quiescent fibroblasts at the fourth passage into the enucleated metaphase II (M II) oocytes. Four to five hours after electrical fusion, the NT-embryos were activated by EFS either at 1.67 or at 2.33 kV/cm and immediately incubated in 6-DMAP (2 mM) for 4 h. The cleavage rate of the NT-embryos activated with 2.33 kV/cm was greater than that activated with 1.67 kV/cm after in vitro culture for 18 h (65.6% versus 19.6%, p < 0.001). No pregnancy was found in 14 recipient does after transferring 51 NT embryos at 1-2 cell stages activated with 1.67 kV/cm. In contrast, two of the seven recipients were pregnant and gave birth to three kids after transferring 61 NT embryos at 1-2 cell stages activated by 2.33 kV/cm. The birth weights of three cloned kids were within the normal range of Alpine goats. However, one kid died 1h after birth while the remaining two are still healthy. DNA analysis by polymerase chain reaction (single-strand conformation polymorphism, SSCP) confirmed that the three kids were genetically identical to the nuclear donor.

  17. Mechanical strength of extrusion briquettes (brex) for blast-furnace and ferroalloy production: I. dependence of the strength properties of extrusion briquettes on the binder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bizhanov, A. M.; Kurunov, I. F.; Dashevskii, V. Ya.

    2015-03-01

    The efficiency of preliminary homogenization of a briquetted charge using bentonite is shown. The dynamics of increasing the strength of commercial extrusion briquettes (brex) during storage under natural conditions is studied. A combined cement-bentonite binder is used to reveal a new effect of local maximum of the cold strength of brex at the third day of hardening, which is accompanied by a change in the character of its fracture

  18. Activity-dependent dendritic spine neck changes are correlated with synaptic strength

    PubMed Central

    Araya, Roberto; Vogels, Tim P.; Yuste, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Most excitatory inputs in the mammalian brain are made on dendritic spines, rather than on dendritic shafts. Spines compartmentalize calcium, and this biochemical isolation can underlie input-specific synaptic plasticity, providing a raison d’etre for spines. However, recent results indicate that the spine can experience a membrane potential different from that in the parent dendrite, as though the spine neck electrically isolated the spine. Here we use two-photon calcium imaging of mouse neocortical pyramidal neurons to analyze the correlation between the morphologies of spines activated under minimal synaptic stimulation and the excitatory postsynaptic potentials they generate. We find that excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitudes are inversely correlated with spine neck lengths. Furthermore, a spike timing-dependent plasticity protocol, in which two-photon glutamate uncaging over a spine is paired with postsynaptic spikes, produces rapid shrinkage of the spine neck and concomitant increases in the amplitude of the evoked spine potentials. Using numerical simulations, we explore the parameter regimes for the spine neck resistance and synaptic conductance changes necessary to explain our observations. Our data, directly correlating synaptic and morphological plasticity, imply that long-necked spines have small or negligible somatic voltage contributions, but that, upon synaptic stimulation paired with postsynaptic activity, they can shorten their necks and increase synaptic efficacy, thus changing the input/output gain of pyramidal neurons. PMID:24982196

  19. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  20. Local spectrum analysis of field propagation in an anisotropic medium. Part II. Time-dependent fields.

    PubMed

    Tinkelman, Igor; Melamed, Timor

    2005-06-01

    In Part I of this two-part investigation [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 22, 1200 (2005)], we presented a theory for phase-space propagation of time-harmonic electromagnetic fields in an anisotropic medium characterized by a generic wave-number profile. In this Part II, these investigations are extended to transient fields, setting a general analytical framework for local analysis and modeling of radiation from time-dependent extended-source distributions. In this formulation the field is expressed as a superposition of pulsed-beam propagators that emanate from all space-time points in the source domain and in all directions. Using time-dependent quadratic-Lorentzian windows, we represent the field by a phase-space spectral distribution in which the propagating elements are pulsed beams, which are formulated by a transient plane-wave spectrum over the extended-source plane. By applying saddle-point asymptotics, we extract the beam phenomenology in the anisotropic environment resulting from short-pulsed processing. Finally, the general results are applied to the special case of uniaxial crystal and compared with a reference solution.

  1. On the nature of the magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability in astrophysical plasma: the case of uniform magnetic field strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillier, Andrew S.

    2016-10-01

    The magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability has been shown to play a key role in many astrophysical systems. The equation for the growth rate of this instability in the incompressible limit, and the most-unstable mode that can be derived from it, are often used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field that is associated with the observed dynamics. However, there are some issues with the interpretations given. Here, we show that the class of most unstable modes ku for a given θ, the class of modes often used to estimate the strength of the magnetic field from observations, for the system leads to the instability growing as σ2 = 1/2Agku, a growth rate which is independent of the strength of the magnetic field and which highlights that small scales are preferred by the system, but not does not give the fastest growing mode for that given k. We also highlight that outside of the interchange (k ṡ B = 0) and undular (k parallel to B) modes, all the other modes have a perturbation pair of the same wavenumber and growth rate that when excited in the linear regime can result in an interference pattern that gives field aligned filamentary structure often seen in 3D simulations. The analysis was extended to a sheared magnetic field, where it was found that it was possible to extend the results for a non-sheared field to this case. We suggest that without magnetic shear it is too simplistic to be used to infer magnetic field strengths in astrophysical systems.

  2. Stray light field dependence for the James Webb Space Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lightsey, Paul A.

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a large space based astronomical telescope that will operate at cryogenic temperatures. The architecture has the telescope exposed to space, with a large sun shield providing thermal isolation and protection from direct illumination from the sun. The instruments will have the capability to observe over a spectral range from 0.6 μm to 29 μm wavelengths. Stray light analysis has been performed to characterize the stray light getting to the instrument focal planes from the celestial sky. A Radiance Transfer Function (RTF) is defined for the susceptibility of stray light to sky radiance relative to the observatory frame of reference. The stray light is calculated by overlaying the radiance maps of the celestial sky background (both galactic and zodiacal background) onto the RTF map. The product of the two is summed to obtain the total stray light background at the instrument detectors. The orientation of the observatory for observing a given field location in the sky depends on the direction of the sun, hence the day of the year. The variability of stray light with time of year for observing a given sky locations is determined.

  3. Absolute stability window and upper bound on the magnetic field strength in a strongly magnetized strange quark star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isayev, A. A.

    2014-11-01

    Magnetized strange quark stars, composed of strange quark matter (SQM) and self-bound by strong interactions, can be formed if the energy per baryon of magnetized SQM is less than that of the most stable 56Fe nucleus under the zero external pressure and temperature. Utilizing the MIT bag model description of magnetized SQM under charge neutrality and beta equilibrium conditions, the corresponding absolute stability window in the parameter space of the theory is determined. It is shown that there exists the maximum magnetic field strength allowed by the condition of absolute stability of magnetized SQM. The value of this field, H 3 × 1018G, represents the upper bound on the magnetic field strength which can be reached in a strongly magnetized strange quark star.

  4. Cracking Prediction in Hot Stamping of High-Strength Steel by a Temperature-Dependent Forming Limit Surface Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongsheng; Cui, Junjia; Jiang, Kaiyong; Zhou, Guangtao

    2016-10-01

    Hot stamping of high-strength steel (HSS) can significantly improve ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of hot-stamped part and thus meet the increasing demands for weight reduction and safety standards in vehicles. However, the prediction of forming defect such as cracking in hot stamping using traditional forming limit curve (FLC) is still challenging. In this paper, to predict HSS BR1500HS cracking in hot stamping, a temperature-dependent forming limit surface (FLS) is developed by simulations combined with experiments of biaxial tension of the plate with a groove at different temperatures. Different from the FLC, the newly developed FLS in which temperature is included suits the hot stamping of HSS. Considering the interplay among phase transformation, stress and strain, a finite element (FE)-coupled thermo-mechanical model of the hot stamping is developed and implemented under ABAQUS/Explicit platform where the developed FLS is built-in to predict strain distributions and HSS BR1500HS cracking in the hot stamping. Finally, the developed FLS is used to evaluate hot formability of HSS BR1500HS by using a hot stamping experiment for forming a box-shaped part. Results confirm that the developed FLS can accurately predict HSS BR1500HS cracking occurrence in the hot stamping.

  5. Kinetic parameters, collision rates, energy exchanges and transport coefficients of non-thermal electrons in premixed flames at sub-breakdown electric field strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisetti, Fabrizio; El Morsli, Mbark

    2014-01-01

    The effects of an electric field on the collision rates, energy exchanges and transport properties of electrons in premixed flames are investigated via solutions to the Boltzmann kinetic equation. The case of high electric field strength, which results in high-energy, non-thermal electrons, is analysed in detail at sub-breakdown conditions. The rates of inelastic collisions and the energy exchange between electrons and neutrals in the reaction zone of the flame are characterised quantitatively. The analysis includes attachment, ionisation, impact dissociation, and vibrational and electronic excitation processes. Our results suggest that Townsend breakdown occurs for E/N = 140 Td. Vibrational excitation is the dominant process up to breakdown, despite important rates of electronic excitation of CO, CO2 and N2 as well as impact dissociation of O2 being apparent from 50 Td onwards. Ohmic heating in the reaction zone is found to be negligible (less than 2% of peak heat release rate) up to breakdown field strengths for realistic electron densities equal to 1010 cm-3. The observed trends are largely independent of equivalence ratio. In the non-thermal regime, electron transport coefficients are insensitive to mixture composition and approximately constant across the flame, but are highly dependent on the electric field strength. In the thermal limit, kinetic parameters and transport coefficients vary substantially across the flame due to the spatially inhomogeneous concentration of water vapour. A practical approach for identifying the plasma regime (thermal versus non-thermal) in studies of electric field effects on flames is proposed.

  6. A fast parallel code for calculating energies and oscillator strengths of many-electron atoms at neutron star magnetic field strengths in adiabatic approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, D.; Klews, M.; Wunner, G.

    2009-02-01

    We have developed a new method for the fast computation of wavelengths and oscillator strengths for medium-Z atoms and ions, up to iron, at neutron star magnetic field strengths. The method is a parallelized Hartree-Fock approach in adiabatic approximation based on finite-element and B-spline techniques. It turns out that typically 15-20 finite elements are sufficient to calculate energies to within a relative accuracy of 10-5 in 4 or 5 iteration steps using B-splines of 6th order, with parallelization speed-ups of 20 on a 26-processor machine. Results have been obtained for the energies of the ground states and excited levels and for the transition strengths of astrophysically relevant atoms and ions in the range Z=2…26 in different ionization stages. Catalogue identifier: AECC_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AECC_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3845 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 989 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: MPI/Fortran 95 and Python Computer: Cluster of 1-26 HP Compaq dc5750 Operating system: Fedora 7 Has the code been vectorised or parallelized?: Yes RAM: 1 GByte Classification: 2.1 External routines: MPI/GFortran, LAPACK, PyLab/Matplotlib Nature of problem: Calculations of synthetic spectra [1] of strongly magnetized neutron stars are bedevilled by the lack of data for atoms in intense magnetic fields. While the behaviour of hydrogen and helium has been investigated in detail (see, e.g., [2]), complete and reliable data for heavier elements, in particular iron, are still missing. Since neutron stars are formed by the collapse of the iron cores of massive stars, it may be assumed that their atmospheres contain an iron plasma. Our objective is to fill the gap

  7. Electric-field strength and doping level controlled spin-valley transport in a silicene np junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Tao; Zhai, Xuechao; Yang, Zhihong; Wang, Shendong; Li, Bin

    2016-10-01

    The performance of np junction, as the basic unit of electronic devices, often determines the prospect of a material. We here investigate the spin- and valley-polarized transport in a silicene np junction, where a ferromagnetic field and a perpendicular electric field are applied in the p-doped region. It is found that pure spin current with valley polarization can be obtained under the control of electric-field strength and doping level, arising from the specific dispersion with spin- and valley-polarizations. By tuning the electric field properly, one can even realize a controllable state that supports 100% spin- and valley-polarized transport. At fixed electric field, we also demonstrate that the ferromagnetic field can greatly affect the ratios of spin- and valley-polarizations. These findings suggest that silicene is a promising material for application in future spintronics and valleytronics devices.

  8. The high field strength element budget of atmospheric aerosols (puy de Dôme, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlastelic, Ivan; Suchorski, Krzysztof; Sellegri, Karine; Colomb, Aurélie; Nauret, François; Bouvier, Laetitia; Piro, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-01

    High field strength elements (HFSE), including Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta and Ti have low solubility in aqueous fluids and partition into dense and resistant minerals. HFSE proved useful in studying terrestrial weathering and sediment transport, but little is known about their behavior during atmospheric processes, which play an important role in global sedimentary cycles. The atmospheric budget of HFSE is evaluated from the sequential dissolution of aerosol samples collected between 2011 and 2014 at puy de Dôme (1465 m elevation, French Massif Central). Aerosols were sampled during nighttime, while the site is generally located above the planetary boundary layer. Systematic, partial recovery of HFSE during gentle dissolution of aerosols indicates that resistant minerals are ubiquitous in air samples. Total dissolution of aerosols in pressure vessels reveals that Zr and Hf occur on average in sub-crustal abundance, which is consistent with the sampling site being dominantly influenced by oceanic air masses depleted in zircons. Conversely, zircon excess occasionally occurs in continental air masses, in particular those originating from northern Africa. Overall, the Hf/Nd ratio, a proxy for zircon fractionation, varies from 0.26 to 3.94 times the Upper Continental Crust (UCC) value, encompassing the range of worldwide loess. This wide compositional range is consistent with (1) the occurrence of coarse zircons (10-30 μm) in dust source, with possible local enrichments relative to bulk UCC in residual wind-winnowed soils, and (2) gravitational settling of coarse zircons during long-distance (>ca. 1000 km) transport. Niobium and Ta are systematically more abundant (by a mean factor of ∼3) in puy de Dôme aerosols than expected from average crustal or soil concentrations. The volume-weighted average Nb/Ta ratio of 15.5 ± 2.6 (1σ) is also higher than in bulk UCC (11.4-13.3). The positive Nb-Ta anomaly of free troposphere aerosols unlikely reflects a net Nb-Ta enrichment but

  9. ROLE OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH AND NUMERICAL RESOLUTION IN SIMULATIONS OF THE HEAT-FLUX-DRIVEN BUOYANCY INSTABILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Avara, Mark J.; Reynolds, Christopher S.; Bogdanovic, Tamara E-mail: chris@astro.umd.edu

    2013-08-20

    The role played by magnetic fields in the intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxy clusters is complex. The weakly collisional nature of the ICM leads to thermal conduction that is channeled along field lines. This anisotropic heat conduction profoundly changes the instabilities of the ICM atmosphere, with convective stabilities being driven by temperature gradients of either sign. Here, we employ the Athena magnetohydrodynamic code to investigate the local non-linear behavior of the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI) relevant in the cores of cooling-core clusters where the temperature increases with radius. We study a grid of two-dimensional simulations that span a large range of initial magnetic field strengths and numerical resolutions. For very weak initial fields, we recover the previously known result that the HBI wraps the field in the horizontal direction, thereby shutting off the heat flux. However, we find that simulations that begin with intermediate initial field strengths have a qualitatively different behavior, forming HBI-stable filaments that resist field-line wrapping and enable sustained vertical conductive heat flux at a level of 10%-25% of the Spitzer value. While astrophysical conclusions regarding the role of conduction in cooling cores require detailed global models, our local study proves that systems dominated by the HBI do not necessarily quench the conductive heat flux.

  10. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2–5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20–40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110–120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99–164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue. PMID:25825545

  11. Magnetic nanoparticles with high specific absorption rate of electromagnetic energy at low field strength for hyperthermia therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shubitidze, Fridon; Kekalo, Katsiaryna; Stigliano, Robert; Baker, Ian

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), referred to as the Dartmouth MNPs, which exhibit high specific absorption rate at low applied field strength have been developed for hyperthermia therapy applications. The MNPs consist of small (2-5 nm) single crystals of gamma-Fe2O3 with saccharide chains implanted in their crystalline structure, forming 20-40 nm flower-like aggregates with a hydrodynamic diameter of 110-120 nm. The MNPs form stable (>12 months) colloidal solutions in water and exhibit no hysteresis under an applied quasistatic magnetic field, and produce a significant amount of heat at field strengths as low as 100 Oe at 99-164 kHz. The MNP heating mechanisms under an alternating magnetic field (AMF) are discussed and analyzed quantitatively based on (a) the calculated multi-scale MNP interactions obtained using a three dimensional numerical model called the method of auxiliary sources, (b) measured MNP frequency spectra, and (c) quantified MNP friction losses based on magneto-viscous theory. The frequency responses and hysteresis curves of the Dartmouth MNPs are measured and compared to the modeled data. The specific absorption rate of the particles is measured at various AMF strengths and frequencies, and compared to commercially available MNPs. The comparisons demonstrate the superior heating properties of the Dartmouth MNPs at low field strengths (<250 Oe). This may extend MNP hyperthermia therapy to deeper tumors that were previously non-viable targets, potentially enabling the treatment of some of the most difficult cancers, such as pancreatic and rectal cancers, without damaging normal tissue.

  12. He 2++ molecular ion in a strong time-dependent magnetic field: a current-density functional study.

    PubMed

    Vikas

    2011-08-01

    The He 2++ molecular ion exposed to a strong ultrashort time-dependent (TD) magnetic field of the order of 10(9) G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) and current-density functional theory (CDFT) based approach using vector exchange-correlation (XC) potential and energy density functional that depend not only on the electronic charge-density but also on the current density. The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed in a parallel internuclear-axis and magnetic field-axis configuration at the field-free equilibrium internuclear separation R = 1.3 au with the field-strength varying between 0 and 10(11) G. The TD behavior of the exchange- and correlation energy of the He 2++ is analyzed and compared with that obtained using a [B-TD-QFD-density functional theory (DFT)] approach based on the conventional TD-DFT under similar computational constraints but using only scalar XC potential and energy density functional dependent on the electronic charge-density alone. The CDFT based approach yields TD exchange- and correlation energy and TD electronic charge-density significantly different from that obtained using the conventional TD-DFT based approach, particularly, at typical magnetic field strengths and during a typical time period of the TD field. This peculiar behavior of the CDFT-based approach is traced to the TD current-density dependent vector XC potential, which can induce nonadiabatic effects causing retardation of the oscillating electronic charge density. Such dissipative electron dynamics of the He 2++ molecular ion is elucidated by treating electronic charge density as an electron-"fluid" in the terminology of QFD. PMID:21598275

  13. Long-term Trends in Interplanetary Magnetic Field Strength and Solar Wind Structure during the 20th Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cliver, E. W.; Cane, H. V.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Lockwood et al have recently reported an approximately 40% increase in the radial component of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) at Earth between 1964 and 1996. We argue that this increase does not constitute a secular trend but is largely the consequence of lower than average fields during solar cycle 20 (1964-1976) in comparison with surrounding cycles. For times after 1976 the average IMF strength has actually decreased slightly. Examination of the cosmic ray intensity, an indirect measure of the IMF strength, over the last five solar cycles (19-23) also indicates that cycle averages of the IMF strength have been relatively constant since approximately 1954. We also consider the origin of the well-documented increase in the geomagnetic alphaalpha index that occurred primarily during the first half of the twentieth century. We surmise that the coronal mass ejection (CME) rate for recent solar cycles was approximately twice as high as that for solar cycles 100 years ago. However, this change in the CME rate and the accompanying increase in 27-day recurrent storm activity reported by others are unable to account completely for the increase in alphaalpha. Rather, the CMEs and recurrent high-speed streams at the beginning of the twentieth century must have been embedded in a background of slow solar wind that was less geoeffective (having, for example, lower IMF strength and/or flow speed) than its modern counterpart.

  14. Electric field strength of membrane lipids from vertebrate species: membrane lipid composition and Na+-K+-ATPase molecular activity.

    PubMed

    Starke-Peterkovic, Thomas; Turner, Nigel; Else, Paul L; Clarke, Ronald J

    2005-03-01

    Intramembrane electric field strength is a very likely determinant of the activity of ion-transporting membrane proteins in living cells. In the absence of any transmembrane electrical potential or surface potential, its magnitude is determined by the dipole potential of the membrane's lipid components and their associated water of hydration. Here we have used a fluorometric method to quantify the dipole potential of vesicles formed from lipids extracted from kidney and brain of 11 different animal species from four different vertebrate classes. The dipole potential was compared with the fatty acid composition and with the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase molecular activity of each preparation. The magnitude of the dipole potential was found to be relatively constant across all animal species, i.e., 236-334 mV for vesicles prepared from the total membrane lipids and 223-256 mV for phospholipids alone. The significantly lower value for phospholipids alone is potentially related to the removal of cholesterol and/or other common soluble lipid molecules from the membrane. Surprisingly, no significant dependence of the dipole potential on fatty acid composition was found. This may, however, be due to concomitant compensatory variations in lipid head group composition. The molecular activity of the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase was found to increase with increasing dipole potential. The fact that the dipole potential is maintained at a relatively constant value over a wide range of animal species suggests that it may play a fundamental role in ensuring correct ion pump conformation and function within the membrane.

  15. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS: Model Potential Calculations of Oscillator Strength Spectra of Rydberg Li Atoms in External Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Hui-Yan; Shi, Ting-Yun

    2009-08-01

    By combining the B-spline basis set with model potential (B-spline + MP), we present oscillator strength spectra of Rydberg Li atoms in external fields. The photoabsorption spectra are analyzed. Over the narrow energy ranges considered in this paper, the structure of the spectra can be independent of the initial state chosen for a given atom. Our results are in good agreement with previous high-precision experimental data and theoretical calculations, where the R-matrix approach together with multichannel quantum defect theory (R-matrix+MQDT) was used. It is suggested that the present methods can be applied to deal with the oscillator strength spectra of Rydberg atoms in crossed electric and magnetic fields.

  16. How accurately can subject-specific finite element models predict strains and strength of human femora? Investigation using full-field measurements.

    PubMed

    Grassi, Lorenzo; Väänänen, Sami P; Ristinmaa, Matti; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Isaksson, Hanna

    2016-03-21

    Subject-specific finite element models have been proposed as a tool to improve fracture risk assessment in individuals. A thorough laboratory validation against experimental data is required before introducing such models in clinical practice. Results from digital image correlation can provide full-field strain distribution over the specimen surface during in vitro test, instead of at a few pre-defined locations as with strain gauges. The aim of this study was to validate finite element models of human femora against experimental data from three cadaver femora, both in terms of femoral strength and of the full-field strain distribution collected with digital image correlation. The results showed a high accuracy between predicted and measured principal strains (R(2)=0.93, RMSE=10%, 1600 validated data points per specimen). Femoral strength was predicted using a rate dependent material model with specific strain limit values for yield and failure. This provided an accurate prediction (<2% error) for two out of three specimens. In the third specimen, an accidental change in the boundary conditions occurred during the experiment, which compromised the femoral strength validation. The achieved strain accuracy was comparable to that obtained in state-of-the-art studies which validated their prediction accuracy against 10-16 strain gauge measurements. Fracture force was accurately predicted, with the predicted failure location being very close to the experimental fracture rim. Despite the low sample size and the single loading condition tested, the present combined numerical-experimental method showed that finite element models can predict femoral strength by providing a thorough description of the local bone mechanical response. PMID:26944687

  17. A robust method to estimate the intracranial volume across MRI field strengths (1.5T and 3T).

    PubMed

    Keihaninejad, Shiva; Heckemann, Rolf A; Fagiolo, Gianlorenzo; Symms, Mark R; Hajnal, Joseph V; Hammers, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    As population-based studies may obtain images from scanners with different field strengths, a method to normalize regional brain volumes according to intracranial volume (ICV) independent of field strength is needed. We found systematic differences in ICV estimation, tested in a cohort of healthy subjects (n=5) that had been imaged using 1.5T and 3T scanners, and confirmed in two independent cohorts. This was related to systematic differences in the intensity of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), with higher intensities for CSF located in the ventricles compared with CSF in the cisterns, at 3T versus 1.5T, which could not be removed with three different applied bias correction algorithms. We developed a method based on tissue probability maps in MNI (Montreal Neurological Institute) space and reverse normalization (reverse brain mask, RBM) and validated it against manual ICV measurements. We also compared it with alternative automated ICV estimation methods based on Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM5) and Brain Extraction Tool (FSL). The proposed RBM method was equivalent to manual ICV normalization with a high intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC=0.99) and reliable across different field strengths. RBM achieved the best combination of precision and reliability in a group of healthy subjects, a group of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and can be used as a common normalization framework.

  18. Relationship of magnetic field strength and brightness of fine-structure elements in the solar temperature minimum region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Ewing, J. A.

    1990-01-01

    A quantitative relationship was determined between magnetic field strength (or magnetic flux) from photospheric magnetograph observations and the brightness temperature of solar fine-structure elements observed at 1600 A, where the predominant flux source is continuum emission from the solar temperature minimum region. A Kitt Peak magnetogram and spectroheliograph observations at 1600 A taken during a sounding rocket flight of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph from December 11, 1987 were used. The statistical distributions of brightness temperature in the quiet sun at 1600 A, and absolute value of magnetic field strength in the same area were determined from these observations. Using a technique which obtains the best-fit relationship of a given functional form between these two histogram distributions, a quantitative relationship was determined between absolute value of magnetic field strength B and brightness temperature which is essentially linear from 10 to 150 G. An interpretation is suggested, in which a basal heating occurs generally, while brighter elements are produced in magnetic regions with temperature enhancements proportional to B.

  19. On the importance of body posture and skin modelling with respect to in situ electric field strengths in magnetic field exposure scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, Gernot; Hirtl, Rene

    2016-06-01

    The reference levels and maximum permissible exposure values for magnetic fields that are currently used have been derived from basic restrictions under the assumption of upright standing body models in a standard posture, i.e. with arms laterally down and without contact with metallic objects. Moreover, if anatomical modelling of the body was used at all, the skin was represented as a single homogeneous tissue layer. In the present paper we addressed the possible impacts of posture and skin modelling in scenarios of exposure to a 50 Hz uniform magnetic field on the in situ electric field strength in peripheral tissues, which must be limited in order to avoid peripheral nerve stimulation. We considered different body postures including situations where body parts form large induction loops (e.g. clasped hands) with skin-to-skin and skin-to-metal contact spots and compared the results obtained with a homogeneous single-layer skin model to results obtained with a more realistic two-layer skin representation consisting of a low-conductivity stratum corneum layer on top of a combined layer for the cellular epidermis and dermis. Our results clearly indicated that postures with loops formed of body parts may lead to substantially higher maximum values of induced in situ electric field strengths than in the case of standard postures due to a highly concentrated current density and in situ electric field strength in the skin-to-skin and skin-to-metal contact regions. With a homogeneous single-layer skin, as is used for even the most recent anatomical body models in exposure assessment, the in situ electric field strength may exceed the basic restrictions in such situations, even when the reference levels and maximum permissible exposure values are not exceeded. However, when using the more realistic two-layer skin model the obtained in situ electric field strengths were substantially lower and no violations of the basic restrictions occurred, which can be explained by the

  20. Influence of applied magnetic field strength and frequency response of pick-up coil on the magnetic barkhausen noise profile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vashista, M.; Moorthy, V.

    2013-11-01

    The influence of applied magnetic field strength and frequency response of the pick-up coil on the shape of Magnetic Barkhausen Noise (MBN) profile have been studied. The low frequency MBN measurements have been carried out using 5 different MBN pick-up coils at two different ranges of applied magnetic field strengths on quenched and tempered (QT) and case-carburised and tempered (CT) 18CrNiMo7 steel bar samples. The MBN pick-up coils have been designed to obtain different frequency response such that the peak frequency response varies from ˜4 kHz to ˜32 kHz and the amplitude of low frequency signals decreases gradually. At lower applied magnetic field strength of ±14,000 A/m, all the pick-up coils produced a single peak MBN profile for both QT and CT sample. However, at higher applied magnetic field strength of ±22,000 A/m, the MBN profile showed two peaks for both QT and CT samples for pick-up coils with peak frequency response up to ˜17 kHz. Also, there is systematic reduction in peak 2 for QT sample and asymmetric reduction in the heights of peak 1 and peak 2 for CT sample with increase in peak frequency response of the pick-up coils. The decreasing sensitivity of pick-up coils with increasing peak frequency response to MBN signal generation is indicated by the gradual reduction in width of MBN profile and height of peak 2 in the QT sample. The drastic reduction in peak 1 as compared to peak 2 in the CT sample shows the effect of decreasing low frequency response of the pick-up coils on lowering skin-depth of MBN signal detection. This study clearly suggests that it is essential to optimise both maximum applied magnetic field strength and frequency response of the MBN pick-up coil for maximising the shape of the MBN profile for appropriate correlation with the magnetisation process and hence the material properties.

  1. Upper bound on the magnetic field strength in the quark core of a strongly-magnetized compact star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isayev, Alexander; Yang, Jongmann

    2014-09-01

    Two types of strongly-magnetized compact stars, represented by magnetized strange quark stars and magnetized hybrid stars, are considered. In each case, there exists an upper bound H max on the magnetic field strength in the interior of a compact star. For a magnetized strange quark star, H max is determined by the magnetic field at which the upper bound on the bag pressure from the absolute stability window of magnetized strange quark matter (SQM) vanishes, assuming the Massachusetts Institute of Technology bag model description of SQM. For a hybrid star, H max is represented by the critical magnetic field for the occurrence of a longitudinal (along the magnetic field) instability in the quark core, at which the longitudinal pressure in magnetized SQM vanishes.

  2. The effects of different speed training protocols on sprint acceleration kinematics and muscle strength and power in field sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Schultz, Adrian B; Knight, Timothy J; Janse de Jonge, Xanne A K

    2012-06-01

    A variety of resistance training interventions are used to improve field sport acceleration (e.g., free sprinting, weights, plyometrics, resisted sprinting). The effects these protocols have on acceleration performance and components of sprint technique have not been clearly defined in the literature. This study assessed 4 common protocols (free sprint training [FST], weight training [WT], plyometric training [PT], and resisted sprint training [RST]) for changes in acceleration kinematics, power, and strength in field sport athletes. Thirty-five men were divided into 4 groups (FST: n = 9; WT: n = 8; PT: n = 9; RST: n = 9) matched for 10-m velocity. Training involved two 60-minute sessions per week for 6 weeks. After the interventions, paired-sample t-tests identified significant (p ≤ 0.05) within-group changes. All the groups increased the 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m velocity by 9-10%. The WT and PT groups increased the 5- to 10-m velocity by approximately 10%. All the groups increased step length for all distance intervals. The FST group decreased 0- to 5-m flight time and step frequency in all intervals and increased 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m contact time. Power and strength adaptations were protocol specific. The FST group improved horizontal power as measured by a 5-bound test. The FST, PT, and RST groups all improved reactive strength index derived from a 40-cm drop jump, indicating enhanced muscle stretch-shortening capacity during rebound from impacts. The WT group increased absolute and relative strength measured by a 3-repetition maximum squat by approximately 15%. Step length was the major limiting sprint performance factor for the athletes in this study. Correctly administered, each training protocol can be effective in improving acceleration. To increase step length and improve acceleration, field sport athletes should develop specific horizontal and reactive power. PMID:21912294

  3. The effects of different speed training protocols on sprint acceleration kinematics and muscle strength and power in field sport athletes.

    PubMed

    Lockie, Robert G; Murphy, Aron J; Schultz, Adrian B; Knight, Timothy J; Janse de Jonge, Xanne A K

    2012-06-01

    A variety of resistance training interventions are used to improve field sport acceleration (e.g., free sprinting, weights, plyometrics, resisted sprinting). The effects these protocols have on acceleration performance and components of sprint technique have not been clearly defined in the literature. This study assessed 4 common protocols (free sprint training [FST], weight training [WT], plyometric training [PT], and resisted sprint training [RST]) for changes in acceleration kinematics, power, and strength in field sport athletes. Thirty-five men were divided into 4 groups (FST: n = 9; WT: n = 8; PT: n = 9; RST: n = 9) matched for 10-m velocity. Training involved two 60-minute sessions per week for 6 weeks. After the interventions, paired-sample t-tests identified significant (p ≤ 0.05) within-group changes. All the groups increased the 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m velocity by 9-10%. The WT and PT groups increased the 5- to 10-m velocity by approximately 10%. All the groups increased step length for all distance intervals. The FST group decreased 0- to 5-m flight time and step frequency in all intervals and increased 0- to 5-m and 0- to 10-m contact time. Power and strength adaptations were protocol specific. The FST group improved horizontal power as measured by a 5-bound test. The FST, PT, and RST groups all improved reactive strength index derived from a 40-cm drop jump, indicating enhanced muscle stretch-shortening capacity during rebound from impacts. The WT group increased absolute and relative strength measured by a 3-repetition maximum squat by approximately 15%. Step length was the major limiting sprint performance factor for the athletes in this study. Correctly administered, each training protocol can be effective in improving acceleration. To increase step length and improve acceleration, field sport athletes should develop specific horizontal and reactive power.

  4. Field Dependence-Independence Cognitive Style and Academic Achievement: A Review of Research and Theory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tinajero, Carolina; Paramo, M. Fernanda

    1998-01-01

    Reviews research into the possible effects of field dependence/independence on achievement at school. Finds that field-independent subjects perform better than field-dependent subjects, whether in a specific discipline or across all subjects. Discusses possible explanations for this difference in performance. Includes a chart summarizing the…

  5. Assessment of time-dependent density functional schemes for computing the oscillator strengths of benzene, phenol, aniline, and fluorobenzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Masanori; Aoki, Yuriko; Champagne, Benoît

    2007-08-01

    In present study the relevance of using the time-dependent density functional theory (DFT) within the adiabatic approximation for computing oscillator strengths (f) is assessed using different LDA, GGA, and hybrid exchange-correlation (XC) functionals. In particular, we focus on the lowest-energy valence excitations, dominating the UV/visible absorption spectra and originating from benzenelike HOMO (π)→LUMO(π*) transitions, of several aromatic molecules: benzene, phenol, aniline, and fluorobenzene. The TDDFT values are compared to both experimental results obtained from gas phase measurements and to results determined using several ab initio schemes: random phase approximation (RPA), configuration interaction single (CIS), and a series of linear response coupled-cluster calculations, CCS, CC2, and CCSD. In particular, the effect of the amount of Hartree-Fock (HF) exchange in the functional is highlighted, whereas a basis set investigation demonstrates the need of including diffuse functions. So, the hybrid XC functionals—and particularly BHandHLYP—provide f values in good agreement with the highly correlated CCSD scheme while these can be strongly underestimated using pure DFT functionals. These results also display systematic behaviors: (i) larger f and squares of the transition dipole moments (∣μ∣2) are associated with larger excitation energies (ΔE); (ii) these relationships present generally a linear character with R >0.9 in least-squares fit procedures; (iii) larger amounts of HF exchange in the XC functional lead to larger f, ∣μ∣2, as well as ΔE values; (iv) these increases in f, ∣μ ∣2, and ΔE are related to increased HOMO-LUMO character; and (v) these relationships are, however, not universal since the linear regression parameters (the slopes and the intercepts at the origin) depend on the system under investigation as well as on the nature of the excited state.

  6. Strain-Rate Dependence of Material Strength: Large-Scale Atomistic Simulations of Defective Cu and Ta Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeywardhana, M.; Vasquez, A.; Gaglione, J.; Germann, T. C.; Ravelo, R.

    2015-06-01

    Large-Scale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to model shock wave (SW) and quasi-isentropic compression (QIC) in defective copper and tantalum crystals. The atomic interactions were modeled employing embedded-atom method (EAM) potentials. In the QIC simulations, the MD equations of motion are modified by incorporating a collective strain rate function in the positions and velocities equations, so that the change in internal energy equals the PV work on the system. We examined the deformation mechanisms and material strength for strain rates in the 109-1012 s-1 range For both Cu and Ta defective crystals, we find that the strain rate dependence of the flow stress in this strain rate regime, follows a power law with an exponent close to 0.40. This work was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under AFOSR Award No. FA9550-12-1-0476. Work at Los Alamos was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  7. The effect of human microtubule-associated-protein tau on the assembly structure of microtubules and its ionic strength dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. C.; Raviv, U.; Miller, H. P.; Gaylord, M. R.; Kiris, E.; Ventimiglia, D.; Needleman, D. J.; Chung, P. J.; Deek, J.; Lapointe, N.; Kim, M. W.; Wilson, L.; Feinstein, S. C.; Safinya, C. R.

    2010-03-01

    Microtubules (MTs), 25 nm protein nanotubes, are among the major filamentous elements of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton involved in intracellular trafficking, cell division and the establishment and maintenance of cell shape. Microtubule-associated-protein tau regulates tubulin assembly, MT dynamics and stability. Aberrant tau action has long been correlated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, and fronto-temporal dementia with Parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17) Using synchrotron small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) and binding assay, we examine the effects of tau on the assembly structure of taxol-stabilized MTs. We find that tau regulates the distribution of protofilament numbers in MTs as reflected in the observed increase in the average radius of MTs with increasing the tau/tubulin molar ratio. Additionally, tau-MT interactions are mediated to a large extent via electrostatic interactions: the binding affinity of tau to MTs is ionic strength dependent. Supported by DOE-BES DE-FG02-06ER46314, NSF DMR-0803103, NIH NS35010, NIH NS13560. (Ref) M.C. Choi, S.C. Feinstein, and C.R. Safinya et al. Biophys. J. 97; 519 (2009).

  8. Using Educational Data Mining Methods to Assess Field-Dependent and Field-Independent Learners' Complex Problem Solving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Charoula; Valanides, Nicos

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the problem-solving performance of 101 university students and their interactions with a computer modeling tool in order to solve a complex problem. Based on their performance on the hidden figures test, students were assigned to three groups of field-dependent (FD), field-mixed (FM), and field-independent (FI)…

  9. Temperature dependent charge transport in organic field-effect transistors with the variation of both carrier concentration and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbas, Mamatimin; Pivrikas, Almantas; Arici, Elif; Tekin, Nalan; Ullah, Mujeeb; Sitter, Helmut; Sariciftci, Niyazi Serdar

    2013-12-01

    We present experimental evidence of combined effects of temperature, carrier concentration, electric field as well as disorder on charge transport in an organic field-effect transistor (OFET). Transfer characteristics of an OFET based on sexithiophene active layer were measured from 80 to 300 K. Thermally activated carrier mobility followed Arrhenius law with two activation energies. Carrier density variation led to finite extrapolated Meyer-Neldel (MN) temperature (780 K) at low fields. Negative electric field-dependent mobility was observed in available field range. MN temperature shifted towards higher temperature when the electric field increased, and did not retain its finite character above the field of 4 × 103 V cm-1.

  10. Multi-scale Anti-correlation Between Electron Density and Magnetic Field Strength in the Solar Wind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Shuo; He, J.-S.; Marsch, E.; Tu, C.-Y.; Pedersen, A.; Rème, H.; Trotignon, J. G.

    2011-02-01

    This work focuses on the relation between the electron density and the magnetic field strength in the solar wind, and aims to reveal its compressive nature and to determine the level of compressibility. For this purpose, we choose a period of quiet solar wind data obtained at 1 AU by the Cluster C1 satellite. The electron density is derived with a sampling time as high as 0.2 s from the spacecraft-potential measurements made by the Electric Field and Waves instrument. We use the wavelet cross-coherence method to analyze the correlation between the electron density and the magnetic field strength on various scales. We find a dominant anti-correlation between them at different timescales ranging from 1000 s down to 10 s, a result which has never been reported before. This may indicate the existence of pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) with different sizes in the solar wind. The small (mini) PBSs appear to be embedded in the large PBSs, without affecting the pressure balance between the large structures. Thus, a nesting of these possible multi-scale PBSs is found. Moreover, we find for the first time that the relative fluctuation spectra of both the electron number density and the magnetic field strength look almost the same in the range from 0.01 Hz to 2.5 Hz, implying a similar cascading for these two types of fluctuations. Probable formation mechanisms for the multi-scale possible PBSs are discussed. The results of our work are believed to be helpful for understanding the compressive nature of solar wind turbulence as well as the connections between the solar wind streams and their coronal sources.

  11. Field Thermal Infrared Emissivity Dependence on Soil Moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate estimate of land surface temperature, a key parameter in surface energy balance models, requires knowledge of the surface emissivity. Emissivity dependence on soil water content has been already reported and modeled under controlled conditions at the laboratory. This study completes and ext...

  12. Quantum fluid dynamics based current-density functional study of a helium atom in a strong time-dependent magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vikas, Hash(0x125f4490)

    2011-02-01

    Evolution of the helium atom in a strong time-dependent (TD) magnetic field ( B) of strength up to 1011 G is investigated through a quantum fluid dynamics (QFD) based current-density functional theory (CDFT). The TD-QFD-CDFT computations are performed through numerical solution of a single generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation employing vector exchange-correlation potentials and scalar exchange-correlation density functionals that depend both on the electronic charge-density and the current-density. The results are compared with that obtained from a B-TD-QFD-DFT approach (based on conventional TD-DFT) under similar numerical constraints but employing only scalar exchange-correlation potential dependent on electronic charge-density only. The B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, at a particular TD magnetic field-strength, yields electronic charge- and current-densities as well as exchange-correlation potential resembling with that obtained from the time-independent studies involving static (time-independent) magnetic fields. However, TD-QFD-CDFT electronic charge- and current-densities along with the exchange-correlation potential and energy differ significantly from that obtained using B-TD-QFD-DFT approach, particularly at field-strengths >109 G, representing dynamical effects of a TD field. The work concludes that when a helium atom is subjected to a strong TD magnetic field of order >109 G, the conventional TD-DFT based approach differs "dynamically" from the CDFT based approach under similar computational constraints.

  13. Feasibility of normal tissue dose reduction in radiotherapy using low strength magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Youngseob; Jung, In-Hye; Kwak, Jungwon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Toxicity of mucosa is one of the major concerns of radiotherapy (RT), when a target tumor is located near a mucosal lined organ. Energy of photon RT is transferred primarily by secondary electrons. If these secondary electrons could be removed in an internal cavity of mucosal lined organ, the mucosa will be spared without compromising the target tumor dose. The purpose of this study was to present a RT dose reduction in near target inner-surface (NTIS) of internal cavity, using Lorentz force of magnetic field. Materials and Methods Tissue equivalent phantoms, composed with a cylinder shaped internal cavity, and adjacent a target tumor part, were developed. The phantoms were irradiated using 6 MV photon beam, with or without 0.3 T of perpendicular magnetic field. Two experimental models were developed: single beam model (SBM) to analyze central axis dose distributions and multiple beam model (MBM) to simulate a clinical case of prostate cancer with rectum. RT dose of NTIS of internal cavity and target tumor area (TTA) were measured. Results With magnetic field applied, bending effect of dose distribution was visualized. The depth dose distribution of SBM showed 28.1% dose reduction of NTIS and little difference in dose of TTA with magnetic field. In MBM, cross-sectional dose of NTIS was reduced by 33.1% with magnetic field, while TTA dose were the same, irrespective of magnetic field. Conclusion RT dose of mucosal lined organ, located near treatment target, could be modulated by perpendicular magnetic field. PMID:26484306

  14. [Modulation of Ca(2+)-Dependent Proteiolysis under the Action of Weak Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields].

    PubMed

    Kantserova, N P; Lysenko, L A; Ushakova, N V; Krylov, V V; Nemova, N N

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to determine the molecular targets of magnetic fields in living objects. Time-dependent effects of weak low-frequency magnetic field tuned to the parametric resonance for calcium ions were studied on model organisms (fish, whelk). The dynamics of Ca(2+)-dependent proteinase activity under the exposure to magnetic fields with given parameters was determined and minimal time of exposure in order to achieve inactivation of these proteinases was find out as well. As hyperactivation of Ca(2+)-dependent proteinases is a basis of degenerative pathology development the therapeutic potential of weak low-frequency magnetic fields enabling to modulate Ca(2+)-dependent proteinase activity is supported. PMID:27125027

  15. Determination of the electric field strength of filamentary DBDs by CARS-based four-wave mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhm, P.; Kettlitz, M.; Brandenburg, R.; Höft, H.; Czarnetzki, U.

    2016-10-01

    It is demonstrated that a four-wave mixing technique based on coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) can determine the electric field strength of a pulsed-driven filamentary dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) of 1 mm gap, using hydrogen as a tracer medium in nitrogen at atmospheric pressure. The measurements are presented for a hydrogen admixture of 10%, but even 5% H2 admixture delivers sufficient infrared signals. The lasers do not affect the discharge by photoionization or by other radiation-induced processes. The absolute values of the electric field strength can be determined by the calibration of the CARS setup with high voltage amplitudes below the ignition threshold of the arrangement. This procedure also enables the determination of the applied breakdown voltage. The alteration of the electric field is observed during the internal polarity reversal and the breakdown process. One advantage of the CARS technique over emission-based methods is that it can be used independently of emission, e.g. in the pre-phase and in between two consecutive discharges, where no emission occurs at all.

  16. Second quantized scalar QED in homogeneous time-dependent electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2014-12-15

    We formulate the second quantization of a charged scalar field in homogeneous, time-dependent electromagnetic fields, in which the Hamiltonian is an infinite system of decoupled, time-dependent oscillators for electric fields, but it is another infinite system of coupled, time-dependent oscillators for magnetic fields. We then employ the quantum invariant method to find various quantum states for the charged field. For time-dependent electric fields, a pair of quantum invariant operators for each oscillator with the given momentum plays the role of the time-dependent annihilation and the creation operators, constructs the exact quantum states, and gives the vacuum persistence amplitude as well as the pair-production rate. We also find the quantum invariants for the coupled oscillators for the charged field in time-dependent magnetic fields and advance a perturbation method when the magnetic fields change adiabatically. Finally, the quantum state and the pair production are discussed when a time-dependent electric field is present in parallel to the magnetic field.

  17. Energization of Charged Particles By a Time-Dependent Chaotic Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyle, C. J.; Dasgupta, B.; Heerikhuisen, J.

    2014-12-01

    Energization of particles to ultra high energies remains a challenging problem in the plasma physics community. One possible mechanism involves chaotic magnetic fields. It is noteworthy that the equations describing the spatial evolution of field lines of a magnetic field having dependence on three spatial coordinates are not integrable and such field lines are chaotic. Such chaotic magnetic fields are ubiquitous in nature including many astrophysical scenarios. The motion of charged particles in such magnetic fields comprise an important topic of study since it has been suggested that they may be energized if the field is time-dependent. We considered a particular chaotic field, which is often called the Sine field, and assumed a simple sinusoidal time dependence. Sine fields were first introduced for chaotic fluid motion in the study of nonlinear dynamos, and it can be shown that such fields are a particular solution of the double curl equation for the magnetic field. We construct the equation of motion of a charged particle in the presence of the time-dependent magnetic field and the induced time dependent electric field using Faraday's Law. These three coupled nonlinear differential equations are solved using the adaptive Dormand-Prince Runge-Kutta method. We calculate the energy of the charged particle and examine the evolution of this energy over time. Our results suggest that the energy of the particle increases indefinitely.

  18. High dynamic range diamond magnetometry for time dependent magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummal Momeen, M.; Nusran, N. M.; Gurudev Dutt, M. V.

    2012-02-01

    Nitrogen-Vacancy (NV) centers in diamond have become a topic of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in high resolution nanoscale magnetometry and quantum information processing devices at ambient conditions. We will present our recent progress on implementing novel phase estimation algorithms with a single electron spin qubit associated with the NV center, in combination with dynamical decoupling techniques, to improve the dynamic range and sensitivity of magnetometry with time-varying magnetic fields.

  19. Magnetic field dependence of singlet oxygen generation by nanoporous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amonkosolpan, Jamaree; Aliev, Gazi N.; Wolverson, Daniel; Snow, Paul A.; Davies, James John

    2014-07-01

    Energy transfer from photoexcited excitons localized in silicon nanoparticles to adsorbed oxygen molecules excites them to the reactive singlet spin state. This process has been studied experimentally as a function of nanoparticle size and applied external magnetic field as a test of the accepted understanding of this process in terms of the exchange coupling between the nano-Si exciton and the adsorbed O2 molecules.

  20. Review of recent Chinese research on field dependence-independence in high-level athletes.

    PubMed

    Liu, W H

    1996-12-01

    A review of seven studies in China concerning field dependence-independence among 500 athletes in 10 different sports is presented. Athletes participating in closed-skill sports were more field-independent than those in open-skill sports. In closed-skill sports, high-level athletes were more field-independent than those of medium level. In open-skill sports involving direct contact, high-level athletes were more field-dependent than those of medium level. No significant relationship was found between field dependence-independence and athletes' performance in open skill sports in which no direct contact was involved. PMID:9017730

  1. Can Images Obtained With High Field Strength Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reduce Contouring Variability of the Prostate?

    SciTech Connect

    Usmani, Nawaid; Sloboda, Ron; Kamal, Wafa; Ghosh, Sunita; Pervez, Nadeem; Pedersen, John; Yee, Don; Danielson, Brita; Murtha, Albert; Amanie, John; Monajemi, Tara

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study is to determine whether there is less contouring variability of the prostate using higher-strength magnetic resonance images (MRI) compared with standard MRI and computed tomography (CT). Methods and Materials: Forty patients treated with prostate brachytherapy were accrued to a prospective study that included the acquisition of 1.5-T MR and CT images at specified time points. A subset of 10 patients had additional 3.0-T MR images acquired at the same time as their 1.5-T MR scans. Images from each of these patients were contoured by 5 radiation oncologists, with a random subset of patients repeated to quantify intraobserver contouring variability. To minimize bias in contouring the prostate, the image sets were placed in folders in a random order with all identifiers removed from the images. Results: Although there was less interobserver contouring variability in the overall prostate volumes in 1.5-T MRI compared with 3.0-T MRI (p < 0.01), there was no significant differences in contouring variability in the different regions of the prostate between 1.5-T MRI and 3.0-T MRI. MRI demonstrated significantly less interobserver contouring variability in both 1.5-T and 3.0-T compared with CT in overall prostate volumes (p < 0.01, p = 0.01), with the greatest benefits being appreciated in the base of the prostate. Overall, there was less intraobserver contouring variability than interobserver contouring variability for all of the measurements analyzed. Conclusions: Use of 3.0-T MRI does not demonstrate a significant improvement in contouring variability compared with 1.5-T MRI, although both magnetic strengths demonstrated less contouring variability compared with CT.

  2. WE-G-18C-05: Characterization of Cross-Vendor, Cross-Field Strength MR Image Intensity Variations

    SciTech Connect

    Paulson, E; Prah, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Variations in MR image intensity and image intensity nonuniformity (IINU) can challenge the accuracy of intensity-based image segmentation and registration algorithms commonly applied in radiotherapy. The goal of this work was to characterize MR image intensity variations across scanner vendors and field strengths commonly used in radiotherapy. Methods: ACR-MRI phantom images were acquired at 1.5T and 3.0T on GE (450w and 750, 23.1), Siemens (Espree and Verio, VB17B), and Philips (Ingenia, 4.1.3) scanners using commercial spin-echo sequences with matched parameters (TE/TR: 20/500 ms, rBW: 62.5 kHz, TH/skip: 5/5mm). Two radiofrequency (RF) coil combinations were used for each scanner: body coil alone, and combined body and phased-array head coils. Vendorspecific B1- corrections (PURE/Pre-Scan Normalize/CLEAR) were applied in all head coil cases. Images were transferred offline, corrected for IINU using the MNI N3 algorithm, and normalized. Coefficients of variation (CV=σ/μ) and peak image uniformity (PIU = 1−(Smax−Smin)/(Smax+Smin)) estimates were calculated for one homogeneous phantom slice. Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon matched-pairs tests compared mean MR signal intensities and differences between original and N3 image CV and PIU. Results: Wide variations in both MR image intensity and IINU were observed across scanner vendors, field strengths, and RF coil configurations. Applying the MNI N3 correction for IINU resulted in significant improvements in both CV and PIU (p=0.0115, p=0.0235). However, wide variations in overall image intensity persisted, requiring image normalization to improve consistency across vendors, field strengths, and RF coils. These results indicate that B1- correction routines alone may be insufficient in compensating for IINU and image scaling, warranting additional corrections prior to use of MR images in radiotherapy. Conclusions: MR image intensities and IINU vary as a function of scanner vendor, field strength, and RF coil

  3. Disorder Strength and Field-Driven Ground State Domain Formation in Artificial Spin Ice: Experiment, Simulation, and Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budrikis, Zoe; Morgan, J. P.; Akerman, J.; Stein, A.; Politi, Paolo; Langridge, S.; Marrows, C. H.; Stamps, R. L.

    2012-07-01

    Quenched disorder affects how nonequilibrium systems respond to driving. In the context of artificial spin ice, an athermal system comprised of geometrically frustrated classical Ising spins with a twofold degenerate ground state, we give experimental and numerical evidence of how such disorder washes out edge effects and provide an estimate of disorder strength in the experimental system. We prove analytically that a sequence of applied fields with fixed amplitude is unable to drive the system to its ground state from a saturated state. These results should be relevant for other systems where disorder does not change the nature of the ground state.

  4. An estimate of the magnetic field strength associated with a solar coronal mass ejection from low frequency radio observations

    SciTech Connect

    Sasikumar Raja, K.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Wang, T. J.

    2014-11-20

    We report ground based, low frequency heliograph (80 MHz), spectral (85-35 MHz), and polarimeter (80 and 40 MHz) observations of drifting, non-thermal radio continuum associated with the 'halo' coronal mass ejection that occurred in the solar atmosphere on 2013 March 15. The magnetic field strengths (B) near the radio source were estimated to be B ≈ 2.2 ± 0.4 G at 80 MHz and B ≈ 1.4 ± 0.2 G at 40 MHz. The corresponding radial distances (r) are r ≈ 1.9 R {sub ☉} (80 MHz) and r ≈ 2.2 R {sub ☉} (40 MHz).

  5. In-situ investigation of the influence of the long-term shear strength of faults on the regional stress field in a granite rock mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiredo, Bruno; Cornet, Francois; Lamas, Luís; Muralha, José

    2016-04-01

    A case study is presented to show how stress field measurements may be used to assess the long-term rheological behaviour of an equivalent geo-material. The example concerns a granitic rock mass at the km3 scale, where an underground hydropower scheme including a new 10 km long power conduit and a powerhouse complex will be constructed. For design of the underground cavern and hydraulic pressure tunnel, several in situ stress measurements were carried out, using hydraulic borehole testing, overcoring and flat jack techniques. A first continuum mechanics model, with a homogenous material, was developed to integrate the several in situ test results and to assess the regional stress field. This model is based on elasticity and relaxation of the elastic properties measured through laboratory tests conducted on cores. Results of integration show that the long-term behavior of this granite rock mass differs markedly from the short-term behaviour as defined by laboratory tests. This suggests that the in-situ stress field depends mostly on the softer material that fills up the faults and hence results from the shear stress relaxation over a large number of pre-existing fractures and faults. A second continuum mechanics model, with consideration of two fault planes located nearby the hydraulic tests, was studied. This model is based on elasticity for the overall rock mass, with the elastic properties extracted from laboratory measurements, and visco-elasticity with small long-term shear strength for the two fault planes. Results show that the overall granite rock mass may be viewed as a combination of stiff elastic blocks separated by soft low strength material, leading to a fairly large scale homogeneous axisymmetrical stress field with vertical axis. Advantages and limitations of the two modelling approaches are discussed.

  6. Strain rate-dependent deformation and strength modeling of a polymer matrix composite utilizing a micromechanics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Robert Keith

    1999-11-01

    Potential gas turbine applications will expose polymer matrix composites to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under extreme conditions. Specifically, analytical methods designed for these applications must have the capability of properly capturing the strain rate sensitivities and nonlinearities that are present in the material response. The Ramaswamy-Stouffer constitutive equations, originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals, have been modified to simulate the nonlinear deformation response of ductile, crystalline polymers. The constitutive model is characterized and correlated for two representative ductile polymers, Fiberite 977-2 and PEEK, and the computed results correlate well with experimental values. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented in a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics model to predict the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of a composite ply. Uniform stress and uniform strain assumptions are applied to compute the effective stresses of a composite unit cell from the applied strains. The micromechanics equations are successfully verified for two polymer matrix composites, IM7/977-2 and AS4/PEEK. The ultimate strength of a composite ply is predicted with the Hashin failure criteria that were implemented in the composite micromechanics model. The failure stresses of the two composite material systems are accurately predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The composite deformation model is implemented in LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic explicit finite element code. The matrix constitutive equations are converted into an incremental form, and the model is implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of a user defined material subroutine. The deformation response of a bulk polymer and a polymer matrix composite are predicted by finite element analyses. The results

  7. Field-dependent magneto-optical Kerr effect spectroscopy applied to the magnetic component diagnosis of a rubrene/Ni system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen; Fronk, Michael; Albrecht, Manfred; Franke, Mechthild; Zahn, Dietrich R T; Salvan, Georgeta

    2014-07-28

    Polar magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE) spectroscopy in the energy range from 1.75 eV to 5 eV at different magnetic field strength was applied to study Ni nanostructures formed on rubrene nanoislands. The magnetic hysteresis curves measured by MOKE change the shape depending on the photon energy and therefore deviate from those measured by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometry. Similar optical effects were previously observed in inorganic heterostructures. Our observations show that it correlates to the change in lineshape of the MOKE rotation and ellipticity spectra as a function of magnetic field strength. We show that this spectral dependence on magnetic field can be exploited to separate the contributions of two magnetic components to the magneto-optical spectra and hysteresis. The proposed model does not require the a priori knowledge of the (magneto-)optical constants of the heterostructure and its components. PMID:25089464

  8. Field dependent surface resistance of niobium on copper cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junginger, T.

    2015-07-01

    The surface resistance RS of superconducting cavities prepared by sputter coating a niobium film on a copper substrate increases significantly stronger with the applied rf field compared to cavities of bulk material. A possible cause is that the thermal boundary resistance between the copper substrate and the niobium film induces heating of the inner cavity wall, resulting in a higher RS. Introducing helium gas in the cavity, and measuring its pressure as a function of applied field allowed to conclude that the inner surface of the cavity is heated up by less than 120 mK when RS increases with Eacc by 100 n Ω . This is more than one order of magnitude less than what one would expect from global heating. Additionally, the effects of cooldown speed and low temperature baking have been investigated in the framework of these experiments. It is shown that for the current state of the art niobium on copper cavities there is only a detrimental effect of low temperature baking. A fast cooldown results in a lowered RS.

  9. VLF Radio Field Strength Measurement of power line carrier system in San Diego, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mertel, H. K.

    1981-01-01

    The radio frequency interference (RFI) potential was evaluated for a Powerline Carriet (PLC) installed in San Diego which monitors the performance of an electrical power system. The PLC system generated 30 amperes at 5.79 kHz. The RF radiations were measured to be (typically) 120 dBuV/m at the beginning of the 12 kV powerline and 60 dBuV/m at the end of the powerline. The RF fields varied inversely as the distance squared. Measurements were also performed with a 45 kHz PLC system. The RF fields were of similar amplitude.

  10. Specific absorption rate dependence on temperature in magnetic field hyperthermia measured by dynamic hysteresis losses (ac magnetometry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garaio, Eneko; Sandre, Olivier; Collantes, Juan-Mari; Garcia, Jose Angel; Mornet, Stéphane; Plazaola, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) are intensively studied for their potential use for magnetic hyperthermia, a treatment that has passed a phase II clinical trial against severe brain cancer (glioblastoma) at the end of 2011. Their heating power, characterized by the ‘specific absorption rate (SAR)’, is often considered temperature independent in the literature, mainly because of the difficulties that arise from the measurement methodology. Using a dynamic magnetometer presented in a recent paper, we measure here the thermal dependence of SAR for superparamagnetic iron oxide (maghemite) NPs of four different size-ranges corresponding to mean diameters around 12 nm, 14 nm, 15 nm and 16 nm. The article reports a parametrical study extending from 10 to 60 {}^\\circ C in temperature, from 75 to 1031 kHz in frequency, and from 2 to 24 kA m-1 in magnetic field strength. It was observed that SAR values of smaller NPs decrease with temperature whereas for the larger sample (16 nm) SAR values increase with temperature. The measured variation of SAR with temperature is frequency dependent. This behaviour is fully explained within the scope of linear response theory based on Néel and Brown relaxation processes, using independent magnetic measurements of the specific magnetization and the magnetic anisotropy constant. A good quantitative agreement between experimental values and theoretical values is confirmed in a tri-dimensional space that uses as coordinates the field strength, the frequency and the temperature.

  11. A highly optimized code for calculating atomic data at neutron star magnetic field strengths using a doubly self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Engel, D.; Wunner, G.

    2012-07-01

    Our previously published code for calculating energies and bound-bound transitions of medium-Z elements at neutron star magnetic field strengths [D. Engel, M. Klews, G. Wunner, Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 302-311] was based on the adiabatic approximation. It assumes a complete decoupling of the (fast) gyration of the electrons under the action of the magnetic field and the (slow) bound motion along the field under the action of the Coulomb forces. For the single-particle orbitals this implied that each is a product of a Landau state and an (unknown) longitudinal wave function whose B-spline coefficients were determined self-consistently by solving the Hartree-Fock equations for the many-electron problem on a finite-element grid. In the present code we go beyond the adiabatic approximation, by allowing the transverse part of each orbital to be a superposition of Landau states, while assuming that the longitudinal part can be approximated by the same wave function in each Landau level. Inserting this ansatz into the energy variational principle leads to a system of coupled equations in which the B-spline coefficients depend on the weights of the individual Landau states, and vice versa, and which therefore has to be solved in a doubly self-consistent manner. The extended ansatz takes into account the back-reaction of the Coulomb motion of the electrons along the field direction on their motion in the plane perpendicular to the field, an effect which cannot be captured by the adiabatic approximation. The new code allows for the inclusion of up to 8 Landau levels. This reduces the relative error of energy values as compared to the adiabatic approximation results by typically a factor of three (1/3 of the original error), and yields accurate results also in regions of lower neutron star magnetic field strengths where the adiabatic approximation fails. Further improvements in the code are a more sophisticated choice of the initial wave functions, which takes into

  12. Smaller Forbush Decreases in Solar Cycle 24: Effect of the Weak CME Field Strength?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, N.

    2015-12-01

    A Forbush decrease (FD) is a sudden depression in the intensity of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) background, followed by a gradual recovery. One of the major causes of FDs is the presence of magnetic structures such as magnetic clouds (MCs) or corotating interaction regions (CIRs) that have enhanced magnetic field, which can scatter particles away reducing the observed GCR intensity. Recent work (Gopalswamy et al. 2014, GRL 41, 2673) suggests that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are expanding anomalously in solar cycle 24 due to the reduced total pressure in the ambient medium. One of the consequences of the anomalous expansion is the reduced magnetic content of MCs, so we expect subdued FDs in cycle 24. In this paper, we present preliminary results from a survey of FDs during MC events in cycle 24 in comparison with those in cycle 23. We find that only ~17% FDs in cycle 24 had an amplitude >3%, as compared to ~31% in cycle 23. This result is consistent with the difference in the maximum magnetic field intensities (Bmax) of MCs in the two cycles: only ~ 10% of MCs in cycle 24 have Bmax>20nT, compared to 22% in cycle 23, confirming that MCs of cycle 24 have weaker magnetic field content. Therefore, we suggest that weaker magnetic field intensity in the magnetic clouds of cycle 24 has led to FDs with smaller amplitudes.

  13. 47 CFR 2.1053 - Measurements required: Field strength of spurious radiation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FREQUENCY ALLOCATIONS AND RADIO TREATY MATTERS; GENERAL RULES AND REGULATIONS Equipment Authorization... the measuring instrument antenna located in the far-field at all test frequencies. In the event it is... the transmitter, assuming all emissions are radiated from halfwave dipole antennas. (b)...

  14. Electric-field dependent freezing in relaxor ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirc, R.; Kutnjak, Z.

    2014-05-01

    The concept of polar nanoregions (PNRs) in relaxor ferroelectrics has recently been discussed in several numerical and theoretical studies for the special case of barium zirconate-titanate Ba(ZrxTi1-x)O3 (BZT). Here we present a semiphenomenological model of relaxation in BZT and related systems in order to show that the correlation radius of a PNR is determined by the condition that the surrounding medium undergoes a local phase transformation into a correlated polar state. The model describes the growth and percolation of the PNRs on lowering the temperature or under the application of an electric field, leading to a generalized Vogel-Fulcher-type dielectric relaxation time. It is suggested that the above condition might be applied to discriminate between the relaxor state and the analogous dipolar glass state.

  15. Field Dependence-Independence and Physical Activity Engagement among Middle School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Wenhao; Chepyator-Thomson, Jepkorir Rose

    2009-01-01

    Background: Field dependence-independence (FDI) is a tendency to rely on external frames (given situations and authoritative people) or internal frames (oneself, including one's own body) for one's information processing and behavior. Literature has constantly reported that field-dependent (FD) individuals, who are less autonomous in…

  16. Cognitive Style and Reading: Implications from Field Dependence Research for Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rasinski, Timothy

    Of all cognitive styles, field dependence/independence (FD/I) is by far the most researched and has the greatest application potential to educational problems. Briefly stated, the FD/I dimension refers to people's ability to experience and interpret their environment in terms of a global versus analytic continuum. Field dependents are likely to…

  17. Field dependence of the photoionization current from N,N,N',N'-tetramethyl-p-phenylenediamine in the presence of an electron scavenger

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K.; Lipsky, S.

    1984-09-13

    The photocurrent from TMPD in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane (isooctane) excited at 213.8 nm was measured as a function of electric field strength (to approx. = to 170 KV/cm) and, at each field strength, as a function of the concentration, c, of n-perfluoroheptane (to 0.61 M). The form of the field dependence confirms that the perfluorocarbon acts to somehow reduce the spatial extent of the distribution function of initial separation distances of the geminate pair. The field dependence can be well fitted to the Onsager theory with distribution functions of the form f(r)r/sup 2/ dr = (..cap alpha../sup n + 1/ /nexclamation)r/sup n/e/sup -ar/ dr with n = 1, 2 in both the presence and absence of perfluorocarbon. The dependence of ..cap alpha.. on c is discussed; a conclusion is drawn that the most satisfactory distribution function of the exponential form for describing both the concentration dependence and the field dependence of the photocurrent is obtained with n = 2. 9 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  18. Experimental investigation of the visual field dependency in the erect and supine positions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenstein, J. H.; Saucer, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The increasing utilization of simulators in many fields, in addition to aeronautics and space, requires the efficient use of these devices. It seemed that personnel highly influenced by the visual scene would make desirable subjects, particularly for those simulators without sufficient motion cues. In order to evaluate this concept, some measure of the degree of influence of the visual field on the subject in necessary. As part of this undertaking, 37 male and female subjects, including eight test pilots, were tested for their visual field dependency or independency. A version of Witkin's rod and frame apparatus was used for the tests. The results showed that nearly all the test subjects exhibited some degree of field dependency, the degree varying from very high field dependency to nearly zero field dependency in a normal distribution. The results for the test pilots were scattered throughout a range similar to the results for the bulk of male subjects. The few female subjects exhibited a higher field dependency than the male subjects. The male subjects exhibited a greater field dependency in the supine position than in the erect position, whereas the field dependency of the female subjects changed only slightly.

  19. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  20. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals.

  1. Angle-dependent strong-field molecular ionization rates with tuned range-separated time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Sissay, Adonay; Abanador, Paul; Mauger, François; Gaarde, Mette; Schafer, Kenneth J; Lopata, Kenneth

    2016-09-01

    Strong-field ionization and the resulting electronic dynamics are important for a range of processes such as high harmonic generation, photodamage, charge resonance enhanced ionization, and ionization-triggered charge migration. Modeling ionization dynamics in molecular systems from first-principles can be challenging due to the large spatial extent of the wavefunction which stresses the accuracy of basis sets, and the intense fields which require non-perturbative time-dependent electronic structure methods. In this paper, we develop a time-dependent density functional theory approach which uses a Gaussian-type orbital (GTO) basis set to capture strong-field ionization rates and dynamics in atoms and small molecules. This involves propagating the electronic density matrix in time with a time-dependent laser potential and a spatial non-Hermitian complex absorbing potential which is projected onto an atom-centered basis set to remove ionized charge from the simulation. For the density functional theory (DFT) functional we use a tuned range-separated functional LC-PBE*, which has the correct asymptotic 1/r form of the potential and a reduced delocalization error compared to traditional DFT functionals. Ionization rates are computed for hydrogen, molecular nitrogen, and iodoacetylene under various field frequencies, intensities, and polarizations (angle-dependent ionization), and the results are shown to quantitatively agree with time-dependent Schrödinger equation and strong-field approximation calculations. This tuned DFT with GTO method opens the door to predictive all-electron time-dependent density functional theory simulations of ionization and ionization-triggered dynamics in molecular systems using tuned range-separated hybrid functionals. PMID:27608987

  2. Event-related potentials in adolescents with different cognitive styles: field dependence and field independence.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianghong; Mao, Wei; Sun, Wei; Zhang, Xiating; Han, Chunyu; Lu, Changfeng; Huang, Zhaoyang; Wang, Yuping

    2012-01-01

    Field dependence/independence (FD/FI) is an important dimension of personality and cognitive styles. Different ability in mobilizing and/or allocating mental-attentional capacity was considered to be the most possible explanation for the FDI cognitive style. Many studies on characterizing the functional neuroanatomy of attentional control indicated the existence of a dissociable sub-process of conflict-monitoring and "cognitive control" system. However, little was known about it. We might dissociate "cognitive control" system from conflict processing by taking advantage of the variable of the FDI cognitive style. In addition, essentially cognitive styles (FDI) are often widely studied in psychological and educational fields, but hardly in neuroscience. We speculated that ERP components could help to explain the difference between how FD and FI individuals process information. The purpose of the reported study was to explore the possible relation between the "cognitive control" system and the conflict processing system during stimulus-matching task. We first characterized the standard FD/FI of senior-high-school Han students in grade two in Beijing, China, based on 160 students with similar age, education, living and cultural background. Twenty-six adolescents were selected and divided into two groups (extreme FD group and extreme FI group) according to their Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) results (FD: 5-8; FI: 17-19). They were tested on both Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale (WAIS) and stimulus-matching task. ERP was measured while the subjects performed the stimulus-matching tasks by categorizing two figures that were presented sequentially either as a match (same shape) or as a conflict (different shape) conditions. The results showed that the mean amplitude of N270 in FI group was higher relative to that in FD group at nearly all centrofrontal areas in the conflict condition. We conclude that the FDI cognitive styles could influence the conflict processing

  3. Dependence of the microwave surface resistance of superconducting niobium on the magnitude of the rf field

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-06-24

    Utilizing difference in temperature dependencies we decoupled Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer (BCS) and residual components of the microwave surface resistance of superconducting niobium at all rf fields up to B{sub rf}{approx}115 mT. We reveal that the residual resistance decreases with field at B{sub rf} Less-Than-Or-Equivalent-To 40 mT and strongly increases in chemically treated niobium at B{sub rf}>80 mT. We find that BCS surface resistance is weakly dependent on field in the clean limit, whereas a strong and peculiar field dependence emerges after 120 Degree-Sign C vacuum baking.

  4. Local Electric Field Strength in a Hollow Cathode Determined by Stark Splitting of the 2S Level of Hydrogen Isotopes by Optogalvanic Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, C.; Rosa, M. I. de la; Gruetzmacher, K.; Fuentes, L. M.; Gonzalo, A. B.

    2008-10-22

    In this work we present Doppler-free two-photon optogalvanic spectroscopy as a tool to measure the electric field strength in the cathode fall region of a hollow cathode discharge via the Stark splitting of the 2S level of atomic deuterium. The strong electric field strength present in the hollow cathode is determined for various discharge conditions which allows studying the corresponding variations of the cathode fall, and its changes with discharge operation time.

  5. Microparticles in a Collisional Rf Plasma Sheath under Hypergravity Conditions as Probes for the Electric Field Strength and the Particle Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Beckers, J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Dijk, J. van; Kroesen, G. M. W.; Ockenga, T.; Wolter, M.; Kersten, H.

    2011-03-18

    We used microparticles under hypergravity conditions, induced by a centrifuge, in order to measure nonintrusively and spatially resolved the electric field strength as well as the particle charge in the collisional rf plasma sheath. The measured electric field strengths demonstrate good agreement with the literature, while the particle charge shows decreasing values towards the electrode. We demonstrate that it is indeed possible to measure these important quantities without changing or disturbing the plasma.

  6. Fiber-Optic Magnetic-Field-Strength Measurement System for Lightning Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurecki, Jay; Scully, Robert; Davis, Allen; Kirkendall, Clay; Bucholtz, Frank

    2011-01-01

    A fiber-optic sensor system is designed to measure magnetic fields associated with a lightning stroke. Field vector magnitudes are detected and processed for multiple locations. Since physical limitations prevent the sensor elements from being located in close proximity to highly conductive materials such as aluminum, the copper wire sensor elements (3) are located inside a 4-cubic-in. (.66-cubic-cm) plastic housing sensor head and connected to a fiber-optic conversion module by shielded cabling, which is limited to the shortest length feasible. The signal path between the conversion module and the avionics unit which processes the signals are fiber optic, providing enhanced immunity from electromagnetic radiation incident in the vicinity of the measurements. The sensors are passive, lightweight, and much smaller than commercial B-dot sensors in the configuration which measures a three-dimensional magnetic field. The system is expandable, and provides a standard-format output signal for downstream processing. Inside of the sensor head, three small search coils, each having a few turns on a circular form, are mounted orthogonally inside the non-metallic housing. The fiber-optic conversion module comprises three interferometers, one for each search coil. Each interferometer has a high bandwidth optical phase modulator that impresses the signal received from its search coil onto its output. The output of each interferometer travels by fiber optic cable to the avionics unit, and the search coil signal is recovered by an optical phase demodulator. The output of each demodulator is fed to an analog-to-digital converter, whose sampling rate is determined by the maximum expected rate of rise and peak signal magnitude. The output of the digital processor is a faithful reproduction of the coil response to the incident magnetic field. This information is provided in a standard output format on a 50-ohm port that can be connected to any number of data collection and processing

  7. High strength kiloampere Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox cables for high-field magnet applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Tengming; Li, Pei; Jiang, Jianyi; Cooley, Lance; Tompkins, John; McRae, Dustin; Walsh, Robert

    2015-06-01

    Multifilamentary Ag-sheathed Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox (Bi-2212) wire can carry sufficient critical current density Jc for the development of powerful superconducting magnets. However, the range of its applications is limited by the low mechanical strength of the Ag/Bi-2212 strand. A potential solution is to cable Ag/Bi-2212 wire with high-strength materials that are compatible with the Bi-2212 heat treatment in an oxygen atmosphere. Past attempts have not always been successful, because the high-strength materials reacted with Bi-2212 wires, significantly reducing their Jc. We examined the nature of reactions occurring when Ag/Bi-2212 wires are heat-treated in direct contact with several commonly used high-strength alloys and a new Fe-Cr-Al alloy. INCONEL X750 and INCONEL 600 resulted in significant Jc loss, whereas Ni80-Cr caused little or no Jc loss; however, all of them formed chromium oxide that subsequently reacted with silver, creating cracks in the silver sheath. We found that Fe-Cr-Al did not show significant reactions with Ag/Bi-2212 strands. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray (EDS) examinations revealed that the Fe-Cr-Al alloy benefits from the formation of a uniform, crack-free, continuous alumina layer on its surface that does not react with Ag and that helps minimize the Cu loss found with INCONEL X750 and INCONEL 600. We fabricated prototype 6-around-1 cables with six Bi-2212 strands twisted and transposed around an Fe-Cr-Al alloy core coated with TiO2. After standard 1 bar melt processing, the cable retained 100% of the total current-carrying capability of its strands, and, after a 10 bar overpressure processing, the cable reached a total current of 1025 A at 4.2 K and 10 T. Tensile tests showed that Fe-Cr-Al becomes brittle after being cooled to 4.2 K, whereas INCONEL X750 remains ductile and retains a modulus of 183 GPa. We proposed new cable designs that take advantage of the chemical compatibility of Fe-Cr-Al and high strength of

  8. Scale-dependent Normalized Amplitude and Weak Spectral Anisotropy of Magnetic Field Fluctuations in the Solar Wind Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xin; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; He, Jiansen; Wang, Linghua

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence in the solar wind was recently reported to be anisotropic, with the average power spectral index close to -2 when sampling parallel to the local mean magnetic field {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0 and close to -5/3 when sampling perpendicular to the local {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0. This result was widely considered to be observational evidence for the critical balance theory (CBT), which is derived by making the assumption that the turbulence strength is close to one. However, this basic assumption has not yet been checked carefully with observational data. Here we present for the first time the scale-dependent magnetic-field fluctuation amplitude, which is normalized by the local {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0 and evaluated for both parallel and perpendicular sampling directions, using two 30-day intervals of Ulysses data. From our results, the turbulence strength is evaluated as much less than one at small scales in the parallel direction. An even stricter criterion is imposed when selecting the wavelet coefficients for a given sampling direction, so that the time stationarity of the local {{\\boldsymbol{B}}}0 is better ensured during the local sampling interval. The spectral index for the parallel direction is then found to be -1.75, whereas the spectral index in the perpendicular direction remains close to -1.65. These two new results, namely that the value of the turbulence strength is much less than one in the parallel direction and that the angle dependence of the spectral index is weak, cannot be explained by existing turbulence theories, like CBT, and thus will require new theoretical considerations and promote further observations of solar-wind turbulence.

  9. Internal field strength measurements in chick forebrains at 50, 147, and 450 MHz.

    PubMed

    Weil, C M; Spiegel, R J; Joines, W T

    1984-01-01

    This report describes some experimental measurements of the internal field levels induced within isolated chick-forebrains irradiated at 50, 147, and 450 MHz, under essentially the same conditions as those used in the in vitro calcium-ion efflux experiments. Ratios of incident power at 50/147 MHz and 147/450 MHz that are needed to establish the same probe output are given and comparisons made with values predicted by different spherical models. Data predicted by the layered-sphere model were found to be in close agreement with measured values for the 50/147-MHz ratio. Agreement for the 147/450-MHz ratio was poorer.

  10. Magnetic field dependant backscattering of light in water based ferrofluid containing polymer covered Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brojabasi, Surajit; Philip, John

    2013-02-01

    We probe the effect of applied magnetic field on the backscattering light intensity from a magnetic nanofluid consisting of poly-acrylic acid coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles of diameter, ˜15 nm dispersed in water. We observe a continuous evolution of backscattered speckle pattern as a function of magnetic field strength. The speckle contrast is found to increase linearly with external magnetic field possibly due to the evolution from highly dynamic to static scatterers in the dispersion. The backscattered light intensity is found to diminish with external magnetic field, which is attributed to the delay of light propagation for the formation of standing waves within the scatterer due to the resonances in backscattered efficiency and forward-backward anisotropy factor. Interestingly, the backscattered light intensity completely recovers when magnetic field is switched off. We discuss the possible reasons for the angular variation of backscattered light intensity. Our results suggest that the field dependent light propagation through the magnetic nanofluid may find interesting applications in tunable light controlling devices.

  11. Intensity dependence of nonsequential double ionization of helium in IR+XUV two-color laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Facheng; Chen, Jing; Yang, Yujun; Yan, Zong-Chao; Wang, Bingbing

    2016-10-01

    By applying the frequency-domain theory, we investigate the dependence of momentum spectra on laser intensity in a nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) process of helium in infrared (IR) and extreme ultraviolet (XUV) two-color laser fields. We find that the two-color laser fields play distinct roles in an NSDI process, where the IR laser field mainly determines the width of each band, and the XUV laser field mainly plays a role on the NSDI probability. Furthermore, an NSDI process can be decoupled into a two-step process: an above-threshold ionization (ATI), followed by a laser-assisted collision (LAC). It is found that, the IR laser field is responsible for broadening the peak in the ATI process and providing additional momenta to the two ionized electrons in the LAC process; while the XUV laser field plays a crucial role on the strength of the spectrum in the ATI process, and influences the radii of orbits in momentum space in the LAC process.

  12. A NEW DIAGNOSTIC OF MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTHS IN RADIATIVELY COOLED SHOCKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hartigan, P.; Wright, A.

    2015-09-20

    We show that it is possible to measure Alfvénic Mach numbers, defined as the shock velocity in the flow divided by the Alfvén velocity, for low-velocity (V{sub shock} ≲ 100 km s{sup −1}) radiative shocks. The method combines observations of bright forbidden lines with a measure of the size of the cooling zone, the latter typically obtained from spatial separation between the Balmer emission lines and the forbidden lines. Because magnetic fields become compressed as gas in the postshock region cools, even relatively weak preshock magnetic fields can be detected with this method. We derive analytical formulae that explain how the spatial separations relate to emission-line ratios, and compute a large grid of radiatively cooled shock models to develop diagnostic diagrams that can be used to derive Alfvénic Mach numbers in flows. Applying the method to existing data for a bright knot in the HH 111 jet, we obtain a relatively low Alfvénic Mach number of ∼2, indicative of a magnetized jet that has super-magnetosonic velocity perturbations within it.

  13. Study of the behavioral and biological effects of high-strength 60-Hz electric fields. Quarterly technical progress report number 10, 18 December 1982-18 March 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-20

    The objective of this contract is to use the baboon as a surrogate for the human in studies of the possible deleterious effects of exposure to high strength, 60 Hz electric fields. The specific aims of this contract are to (1) design and construct an exposure facility in which baboons can be exposed to an electric field up to 60 kV/m in intensity for experiments and (2) to develop computer models relating the fields and currents produced in both baboons and humans by exposure to high strength, 60 Hz electric fields.

  14. Field-dependent superradiant quantum phase transition of molecular magnets in microwave cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanenko, Dimitrije; Trif, Mircea; Tsyplyatyev, Oleksandr; Loss, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    We study a superradiant quantum phase transition in the model of triangular molecular magnets coupled to the electric component of a microwave cavity field. The transition occurs when the coupling strength exceeds a critical value, d c, which, in sharp contrast to the standard two-level emitters, can be tuned by an external magnetic field. In addition to emitted radiation, the molecules develop an in-plane electric dipole moment at the transition. We estimate that the transition can be detected in state-of-the-art microwave cavities if their electric field couples to a crystal containing a sufficient number of oriented molecules.

  15. Microhardness, strength and strain field characterization of self-reacting friction stir and plug welds of dissimilar aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horton, Karla Renee

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. Friction plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential SR-FSW. This work reports on material properties and strain patterns developed in a SR-FSW with a friction plug weld. Specifically, this study examines the behavior of a SR-FSW formed between an AA2014-T6 plate on the advancing side and an AA2219-T87 plate on the retreating side and a SR-FSW (AA2014-T6 to AA2219-T87) with a 2219-T87 plug weld. This study presents the results of a characterization of the micro-hardness, joint strength, and strain field characterization of SR-FSW and FPW joints tested at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures. The initial weld microstructure analysis showed a nugget region with fine grains and a displaced weld seam from the advancing side past the thermo-mechanical affected zone (TMAZ) into the nugget region. The displaced material shared the same hardness as the parent material. Dynamic recrystallization was observed in the SR-FSW zone and the displaced weld seam region. The welds revealed a fine grain structure in the SR-FSW zone with a sharp demarcation seen on the advancing side and fairly diffuse flow observed on the retreating side. The parent material hardness is 145 HV700g with a drop in hardness starting at the HAZ to 130 HV700g. The hardness further drops in the TMAZ to118 HV700g with an increase representing a dispersed interface of AA2014-T6 material to 135 HV700g. The hardness then drops significantly within the nugget region to 85 HV700g followed by an increase through the retreating side TMAZ into the HAZ to 135 HV 700g. There was a sharp increase in the hardness value within

  16. Asymptotic expansion of pair production probability in a time-dependent electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Takashi

    2015-12-01

    We study particle creation in a single pulse of an electric field in scalar quantum electrodynamics. We investigate the parameter condition for the case where the dynamical pair creation and Schwinger mechanism respectively dominate. Then, an asymptotic expansion for the particle distribution in terms of the time interval of the applied electric field is derived. We compare our result with particle creation in a constant electric field with a finite-time interval. These results coincide in an extremely strong field, however they differ in general field strength. We interpret the reason of this difference as a nonperturbative effect of high-frequency photons in external electric fields. Moreover, we find that the next-to-leading-order term in our asymptotic expansion coincides with the derivative expansion of the effective action.

  17. Geometric properties-dependent neural synchrony modulated by extracellular subthreshold electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xile; Si, Kaili; Yi, Guosheng; Wang, Jiang; Lu, Meili

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we use a reduced two-compartment neuron model to investigate the interaction between extracellular subthreshold electric field and synchrony in small world networks. It is observed that network synchronization is closely related to the strength of electric field and geometric properties of the two-compartment model. Specifically, increasing the electric field induces a gradual improvement in network synchrony, while increasing the geometric factor results in an abrupt decrease in synchronization of network. In addition, increasing electric field can make the network become synchronous from asynchronous when the geometric parameter is set to a given value. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that network synchrony can also be affected by the firing frequency and dynamical bifurcation feature of single neuron. These results highlight the effect of weak field on network synchrony from the view of biophysical model, which may contribute to further understanding the effect of electric field on network activity.

  18. Linearly polarized radiation from astrophysical masers due to magnetic fields of intermediate strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nedoluha, Gerald E.; Watson, William D.

    1990-01-01

    Previous solutions for polarization of astrophysical maser radiation due to closed-shell molecules in a magnetic field have potentially serious limitations. These solutions are mostly based on the approximation that the Zeeman frequency g-Omega is much greater than the rate for stimulated emission R and the rate for decay Gamma of the molecular state. Others are asymptotic solutions obtained for an angular momentum J = 1-0 transition. It has been unclear whether the polarizations due to plausible Zeeman splittings are adequately represented by the solutions obtained for g-Omega/Gamma much greater than 1 and g-Omega/R much greater than 1. Actual masing transitions tend to involve molecular states with angular momenta that are higher than J = 1 and 0. Numerical solutions for the linear polarization are presented here which do not have the foregoing restrictions on the g-Omega and which are not limited to a J = 1-0 transition.

  19. Effects of incident field refraction on scattered field from vertically extended cylindrical targets in range-dependent ocean waveguides.

    PubMed

    Küsel, Elizabeth T; Ratilal, Purnima

    2009-04-01

    The effect of incident field refraction on the scattered field from vertically extended cylindrical targets is investigated. A theoretical model for the total scattered field from a cylindrical target in a range-dependent ocean waveguide is developed from Green's theorem. The locally scattered field on the target surface is estimated as a function of the incident field by applying the appropriate boundary conditions on continuity of acoustic pressure and normal velocity, making the model applicable to general penetrable cylinders. The model can account for depth dependence in medium sound speed and hence refraction in the incident field along the target depth. Numerical implementation is done for a passive acoustic reflector, a long cylindrical air-filled rubber hose, often deployed vertically in experiments to provide calibration and charting consistency for wide-area active sonar systems. Analysis with the model indicates that refraction in the incident field along the target depth must be taken into account to accurately estimate the scattered field level from vertically extended cylindrical targets. It is demonstrated that the standard Ingenito waveguide target scattering model, which assumes that the incident field is planar along the target extent, can lead to significant errors of 10 dB or more in estimating the scattered field level.

  20. A highly optimized code for calculating atomic data at neutron star magnetic field strengths using a doubly self-consistent Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schimeczek, C.; Engel, D.; Wunner, G.

    2014-05-01

    Our previously published code for calculating energies and bound-bound transitions of medium-Z elements at neutron star magnetic field strengths [D. Engel, M. Klews, G. Wunner, Comp. Phys. Comm. 180, 3-2-311 (2009)] was based on the adiabatic approximation. It assumes a complete decoupling of the (fast) gyration of the electrons under the action of the magnetic field and the (slow) bound motion along the field under the action of the Coulomb forces. For the single-particle orbitals this implied that each is a product of a Landau state and an (unknown) longitudinal wave function whose B-spline coefficients were determined self-consistently by solving the Hartree-Fock equations for the many-electron problem on a finite-element grid. In the present code we go beyond the adiabatic approximation, by allowing the transverse part of each orbital to be a superposition of Landau states, while assuming that the longitudinal part can be approximated by the same wave function in each Landau level. Inserting this ansatz into the energy variational principle leads to a system of coupled equations in which the B-spline coefficients depend on the weights of the individual Landau states, and vice versa, and which therefore has to be solved in a doubly self-consistent manner. The extended ansatz takes into account the back-reaction of the Coulomb motion of the electrons along the field direction on their motion in the plane perpendicular to the field, an effect which cannot be captured by the adiabatic approximation. The new code allows for the inclusion of up to 8 Landau levels. This reduces the relative error of energy values as compared to the adiabatic approximation results by typically a factor of three (1/3 of the original error) and yields accurate results also in regions of lower neutron star magnetic field strengths where the adiabatic approximation fails. Further improvements in the code are a more sophisticated choice of the initial wave functions, which takes into

  1. Non-perturbative particle production mechanism in time-dependent strong non-Abelian fields

    SciTech Connect

    Levai, Peter; Skokov, Vladimir V.

    2011-04-26

    Non-perturbative production of quark-antiquarks is investigated in the early stage of heavy-ion collisions. The time-dependent study is based on a kinetic description of the fermion-pair production in strong non-Abelian fields. We introduce time-dependent chromo-electric external field with a pulse-like time evolution to simulate the overlap of two colliding heavy ions. We have found that the small inverse duration time of the field pulse determines the efficiency of the quark-pair production. The expected suppression for heavy quark production, as follows from the Schwinger formula for a constant field, is not seen, but an enhanced heavy quark production appears at ultrarelativistic energies. We convert our pulse duration time-dependent results into collisional energy dependence and introduce energy and flavour-dependent string tensions, which can be used in string based model calculations at RHIC and LHC energies.

  2. Frequency-dependent local field factors in dielectric liquids by a polarizable force field and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Davari, Nazanin; Haghdani, Shokouh; Åstrand, Per-Olof

    2015-12-31

    A force field model for calculating local field factors, i.e. the linear response of the local electric field for example at a nucleus in a molecule with respect to an applied electric field, is discussed. It is based on a combined charge-transfer and point-dipole interaction model for the polarizability, and thereby it includes two physically distinct terms for describing electronic polarization: changes in atomic charges arising from transfer of charge between the atoms and atomic induced dipole moments. A time dependence is included both for the atomic charges and the atomic dipole moments and if they are assumed to oscillate with the same frequency as the applied electric field, a model for frequency-dependent properties are obtained. Furthermore, if a life-time of excited states are included, a model for the complex frequency-dependent polariability is obtained including also information about excited states and the absorption spectrum. We thus present a model for the frequency-dependent local field factors through the first molecular excitation energy. It is combined with molecular dynamics simulations of liquids where a large set of configurations are sampled and for which local field factors are calculated. We are normally not interested in the average of the local field factor but rather in configurations where it is as high as possible. In electrical insulation, we would like to avoid high local field factors to reduce the risk for electrical breakdown, whereas for example in surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, high local field factors are desired to give dramatically increased intensities.

  3. Signal Amplification in Field Effect-Based Sandwich Enzyme-Linked Immunosensing by Tuned Buffer Concentration with Ionic Strength Adjuster.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satyendra; Kumar, Narendra; Panda, Siddhartha

    2016-04-01

    Miniaturization of the sandwich enzyme-based immunosensor has several advantages but could result in lower signal strength due to lower enzyme loading. Hence, technologies for amplification of the signal are needed. Signal amplification in a field effect-based electrochemical immunosensor utilizing chip-based ELISA is presented in this work. First, the molarities of phosphate buffer saline (PBS) and concentrations of KCl as ionic strength adjuster were optimized to maximize the GOx glucose-based enzymatic reactions in a beaker for signal amplification measured by change in the voltage shift with an EIS device (using 20 μl of solution) and validated with a commercial pH meter (using 3 ml of solution). The PBS molarity of 100 μM with 25 mM KCl provided the maximum voltage shift. These optimized buffer conditions were further verified for GOx immobilized on silicon chips, and similar trends with decreased PBS molarity were obtained; however, the voltage shift values obtained on chip reaction were lower as compared to the reactions occurring in the beaker. The decreased voltage shift with immobilized enzyme on chip could be attributed to the increased Km (Michaelis-Menten constant) values in the immobilized GOx. Finally, a more than sixfold signal enhancement (from 8 to 47 mV) for the chip-based sandwich immunoassay was obtained by altering the PBS molarity from 10 to 100 μM with 25 mM KCl.

  4. Crystal Field Splitting is Limiting the Stability and Strength of Ultra-incompressible Orthorhombic Transition Metal Tetraborides

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, R. F.; Wen, X. D.; Legut, D.; Fu, Z. H.; Veprek, S.; Zurek, E.; Mao, H. K.

    2016-01-01

    The lattice stability and mechanical strengths of the supposedly superhard transition metal tetraborides (TmB4, Tm = Cr, Mn and Fe) evoked recently much attention from the scientific community due to the potential applications of these materials, as well as because of general scientific interests. In the present study, we show that the surprising stabilization of these compounds from a high symmetry to a low symmetry structure is accomplished by an in-plane rotation of the boron network, which maximizes the in-plane hybridization by crystal field splitting between d orbitals of Tm and p orbitals of B. Studies of mechanical and electronic properties of TmB4 suggest that these tetraborides cannot be intrinsically superhard. The mechanical instability is facilitated by a unique in-plane or out-of-plane weakening of the three-dimensional covalent bond network of boron along different shear deformation paths. These results shed a novel view on the origin of the stability and strength of orthorhombic TmB4, highlighting the importance of combinational analysis of a variety of parameters related to plastic deformation of the crystalline materials when attempting to design new ultra-incompressible, and potentially strong and hard solids. PMID:26976479

  5. Relationship between hamstring strains and leg muscle strength. A follow-up study of collegiate track and field athletes.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T

    1993-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationship between hamstring strains and leg muscle strength. The bilateral isometric extensions and flexion maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) of knee and hip were measured among 64 collegiate track and field athletes (128 legs). The values of MVC per body-weight, flexion to extension ratio and bilateral legs imbalance index were calculated as the parameters for the investigation. The follow-up research was performed within the following two years. Among the 64 subjects (128 legs): 26 subjects (31 legs), 24.2 percent had suffered from hamstring strains. Then, the subjects were divided into injured (31 legs) and uninjured (97 legs) groups respectively. The parameters of the lower extremities measured at the beginning were compared for the two groups. The different rates of the hip flexion and knee extension of bilateral legs of the injured group were significantly higher than those of the uninjured group (p < 0.05). In the injured group, the value of MVC per body-weight of the knee flexor and the flexion-extension ratio were significantly lower than in the uninjured group (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the imbalance of the bilateral legs, the hamstring strength and the ratio of the flexor to extensor were shown to be parameters related to the occurrence of hamstring strains.

  6. Electrical Characterization of Molecular Beam Epitaxy Grown Mercury-Cadmium Alloy Under Low Magnetic Field Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijewarnasuriya, P. S.

    HgCdTe alloy is currently the most important semiconductor material for IR detection technology. Different growth techniques are used to produce HgCdTe, but achieving a high-quality material is still a major objective in the field. Among the growth techniques for HgCdTe, molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is one of the most promising, mainly because of its versatility. Furthermore, the growth by MBE is carried out at a low temperature which limits interdiffusion processes. The focus of this research is the understanding of the electrical properties of HgCdTe layers grown by MBE technique. Using a model based on a single discrete acceptor level near the valence band and a corresponding fully ionized donor level, a good fit to the observed Hall data on p-type epilayers was obtained. In some samples, another acceptor level was needed. Also, analysis of R _{h} data and low temperature mobilities indicated that the p-type MBE growth layers were highly compensated. This was also confirmed by mercury saturated annealing experiments. Annealing of (111)B epilayers with Hg pressure leads us to believe that Hg vacancies are responsible for the p-type character. The findings reveal that the electrical properties differ drastically between different growth orientations, with (111)B having the highest residual doping levels for a particular Cd composition. It is concluded that MBE growth for HgCdTe is essentially a Te rich growth and our understanding is that this extra Te is responsible for the n-type character in the epilayers. A comparison between HgCdTe twinned layers and twin-free layers has shown that electrically active acceptors and high hole mobilities are associated with the presence of twins. Incorporation of several foreign elements also tried and all were found to substitute the metal sites during growth. With magnetic field studies on R_ {h}, resistivity and conductivity tensor analysis, the band structure of the HgCdTe alloy is also investigated. Junction depth and the

  7. Field dependence-independence (FDI) cognitive style: an analysis of attentional functioning.

    PubMed

    Guisande, M Adelina; Páramo, M Fernanda; Tinajero, Carolina; Almeida, Leandro S

    2007-11-01

    Previous research has indicated that field-dependent children display poorer performance than field-independent children in almost all academic subjects and cognitive tasks. However, the processes underlying this poorer performance remain unclear. The present study aimed to assess whether children with different FDI cognitive styles show differences in performance of tasks measuring aspects of attentional functioning. Specifically, 149 children aged 8 - 11 years were classified according to FDI cognitive style (field-dependent, intermediate, or field-independent), and to storage capacity (Digits Forward Test), verbal working memory (Digits Backward Test), capacity to focus, shift, and maintain attention (Digit Symbol Test), and capacity for sustained attention (Visual Search and Attention Test). Field-independent children displayed better performance than intermediate and field-dependent children on all tests except the Digits Forward Test. Theoretical and practical implications of these results are discussed.

  8. Non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm effect with the time-dependent gauge fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Mansoori, Seyed Ali; Mirza, Behrouz

    2016-04-01

    We investigate the non-Abelian Aharonov-Bohm (AB) effect for time-dependent gauge fields. We prove that the non-Abelian AB phase shift related to time-dependent gauge fields, in which the electric and magnetic fields are written in the adjoint representation of SU (N) generators, vanishes up to the first order expansion of the phase factor. Therefore, the flux quantization in a superconductor ring does not appear in the time-dependent Abelian or non-Abelian AB effect.

  9. Traceable calibration of a horizontally polarised reference antenna with omnidirectional pattern at VHF frequencies for ILS field strength validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrader, T.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Bredemeyer, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a traceable calibration of a specially designed horizontally polarised reference antenna with an omnidirectional pattern in the E-plane for the frequency range between 105 MHz and 120 MHz. This antenna is used as a validation tool for absolute field strength measurements at the localizer transmitter of an instrument landing system (ILS) at airports and is carried by a helicopter. We investigate whether we can treat it as a dipole-like antenna in the calibration setup despite its disk-shape body. We also investigate the suitability of an anechoic chamber for antenna calibration though it was not designed for that purpose. The measurements are based on scattering parameters (S-parameters) which we apply in the 3-antenna-method (TAM or 3-AM) to obtain the antenna gain and the antenna factor, respectively. An uncertainty budget for the antenna gain calibration is derived. We also report on the first practical application of the calibrated reference antenna.

  10. Bi-Component T2* Analysis of Bound and Pore Bone Water Fractions Fails at High Field Strengths

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Alan C.; Wehrli, Suzanne L.; Wehrli, Felix W.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis involves degradation of bone’s trabecular architecture, cortical thinning, and enlargement of cortical pores. Increased cortical porosity is a major cause of the decreased strength of osteoporotic bone. The majority of cortical pores, however, are below the resolution limit of MRI. Recent work has shown that porosity can be evaluated by MRI-based quantification of bone water. Bi-exponential T2* fitting and adiabatic inversion preparation are the two most common methods purported to distinguish bound and pore water in order to quantify matrix density and porosity. To assess the viability of T2* bi-component analysis as a method for quantifying bound and pore water fractions, we have applied this method to human cortical bone at 1.5T, 3T, 7T, and 9.4T, and validated the resulting pool fractions against μCT-derived porosity and gravimetrically-determined bone densities. We also investigated alternative methods: 2D T1–T2* bi-component fitting by incorporating saturation-recovery, 1D and 2D fitting of CPMG echo amplitudes, and deuterium inversion recovery. Short-T2* pool fraction was moderately correlated with porosity (R2 = 0.70) and matrix density (R2 = 0.63) at 1.5T, but the strengths of these associations were found to diminish rapidly as field strength increases, falling below R2 = 0.5 at 3T. Addition of the T1 dimension to bi-component analysis only slightly improved the strengths of these correlations. T2*-based bi-component analysis should therefore be used with caution. Performance of deuterium inversion-recovery at 9.4T was also poor (R2 = 0.50 versus porosity and R2 = 0.46 versus matrix density). CPMG-derived short-T2 fraction at 9.4T, however, is highly correlated with porosity (R2 = 0.87) and matrix density (R2 = 0.88), confirming the utility of this method for independent validation of bone water pools. PMID:25981785

  11. Orion’s Veil: Magnetic Field Strengths and Other Properties of a PDR in Front of the Trapezium Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troland, T. H.; Goss, W. M.; Brogan, C. L.; Crutcher, R. M.; Roberts, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present an analysis of physical conditions in the Orion Veil, an atomic photon-dominated region (PDR) that lies just in front (≈2 pc) of the Trapezium stars of Orion. This region offers an unusual opportunity to study the properties of PDRs, including the magnetic field. We have obtained 21 cm H i and 18 cm (1665 and 1667 MHz) OH Zeeman effect data that yield images of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength B los in atomic and molecular regions of the Veil. We find B los ≈ ‑50 to ‑75 μG in the atomic gas across much of the Veil (25″ resolution) and B los ≈ ‑350 μG at one position in the molecular gas (40″ resolution). The Veil has two principal H i velocity components. Magnetic and kinematical data suggest a close connection between these components. They may represent gas on either side of a shock wave preceding a weak-D ionization front. Magnetic fields in the Veil H i components are 3–5 times stronger than they are elsewhere in the interstellar medium where N(H) and n(H) are comparable. The H i components are magnetically subcritical (magnetically dominated), like the cold neutral medium, although they are about 1 dex denser. Comparatively strong fields in the Veil H i components may have resulted from low-turbulence conditions in the diffuse gas that gave rise to OMC-1. Strong fields may also be related to magnetostatic equilibrium that has developed in the Veil since star formation. We also consider the location of the Orion-S molecular core, proposing a location behind the main Orion H+ region.

  12. Orion’s Veil: Magnetic Field Strengths and Other Properties of a PDR in Front of the Trapezium Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troland, T. H.; Goss, W. M.; Brogan, C. L.; Crutcher, R. M.; Roberts, D. A.

    2016-07-01

    We present an analysis of physical conditions in the Orion Veil, an atomic photon-dominated region (PDR) that lies just in front (≈2 pc) of the Trapezium stars of Orion. This region offers an unusual opportunity to study the properties of PDRs, including the magnetic field. We have obtained 21 cm H i and 18 cm (1665 and 1667 MHz) OH Zeeman effect data that yield images of the line-of-sight magnetic field strength B los in atomic and molecular regions of the Veil. We find B los ≈ -50 to -75 μG in the atomic gas across much of the Veil (25″ resolution) and B los ≈ -350 μG at one position in the molecular gas (40″ resolution). The Veil has two principal H i velocity components. Magnetic and kinematical data suggest a close connection between these components. They may represent gas on either side of a shock wave preceding a weak-D ionization front. Magnetic fields in the Veil H i components are 3-5 times stronger than they are elsewhere in the interstellar medium where N(H) and n(H) are comparable. The H i components are magnetically subcritical (magnetically dominated), like the cold neutral medium, although they are about 1 dex denser. Comparatively strong fields in the Veil H i components may have resulted from low-turbulence conditions in the diffuse gas that gave rise to OMC-1. Strong fields may also be related to magnetostatic equilibrium that has developed in the Veil since star formation. We also consider the location of the Orion-S molecular core, proposing a location behind the main Orion H+ region.

  13. 31P NMR relaxation of cortical bone mineral at multiple magnetic field strengths and levels of demineralization.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Alan C; Wright, Alexander C; Wehrli, Suzanne L; Ong, Henry H; Li, Cheng; Wehrli, Felix W

    2013-09-01

    Recent work has shown that solid-state (1) H and (31) P MRI can provide detailed insight into bone matrix and mineral properties, thereby potentially enabling differentiation of osteoporosis from osteomalacia. However, (31) P MRI of bone mineral is hampered by unfavorable relaxation properties. Hence, accurate knowledge of these properties is critical to optimizing MRI of bone phosphorus. In this work, (31) P MRI signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) was predicted on the basis of T1 and T2 * (effective transverse relaxation time) measured in lamb bone at six field strengths (1.5-11.7 T) and subsequently verified by 3D ultra-short echo-time and zero echo-time imaging. Further, T1 was measured in deuterium-exchanged bone and partially demineralized bone. (31) P T2 * was found to decrease from 220.3 ± 4.3 µs to 98.0 ± 1.4 µs from 1.5 to 11.7 T, and T1 to increase from 12.8 ± 0.5 s to 97.3 ± 6.4 s. Deuteron substitution of exchangeable water showed that 76% of the (31) P longitudinal relaxation rate is due to (1) H-(31) P dipolar interactions. Lastly, hypomineralization was found to decrease T1, which may have implications for (31) P MRI based mineralization density quantification. Despite the steep decrease in the T2 */T1 ratio, SNR should increase with field strength as B0 (0.4) for sample-dominated noise and as B0 (1.1) for coil-dominated noise. This was confirmed by imaging experiments. PMID:23505120

  14. Lifshitz field theories, Snyder noncommutative spacetime and momentum-dependent metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Juan M.; Vergara, J. David

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, we propose three different modified relativistic particles. In the first case, we propose a particle with metrics depending on the momenta and we show that the quantum version of these systems includes different field theories, as Lifshitz field theories. As a second case, we propose a particle that implies a modified symplectic structure and we show that the quantum version of this system gives different noncommutative spacetimes, for example the Snyder spacetime. In the third case, we combine both structures before mentioned, namely noncommutative spacetimes and momentum-dependent metrics. In this last case, we show that anisotropic field theories can be seen as a limit of noncommutative field theory.

  15. Unitarity Bounds and RG Flows in Time Dependent Quantum Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, Xi; Horn, Bart; Silverstein, Eva; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., ITP /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-04-05

    We generalize unitarity bounds on operator dimensions in conformal field theory to field theories with spacetime dependent couplings. Below the energy scale of spacetime variation of the couplings, their evolution can strongly affect the physics, effectively shifting the infrared operator scaling and unitarity bounds determined from correlation functions in the theory. We analyze this explicitly for large-N double-trace flows, and connect these to UV complete field theories. One motivating class of examples comes from our previous work on FRW holography, where this effect explains the range of flavors allowed in the dual, time dependent, field theory.

  16. Design and construction of an actively frequency-switchable RF coil for field-dependent Magnetisation Transfer Contrast MRI with fast field-cycling.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Hoon; Hutchison, James M S; Lurie, David J

    2010-11-01

    Magnetisation Transfer Contrast (MTC) is an important MR contrast-generating mechanism to characterise the MR-invisible macromolecular protons using an off-resonance pre-saturation RF irradiation pulse (or MT pulse). MTC MRI is normally implemented at a fixed magnetic field; however, it may be useful to evaluate changes of the MT effect as a function of external magnetic field strength (B₀). In order to conduct field-dependent MTC experiments with a single MR system, two techniques are crucially needed. B₀ should be able to be switched between levels during irradiation of the MT pulse. At the same time, the resonance frequency of the RF coil (f₀) should also be able to be shifted to the corresponding value. Switching B₀ is attained by the fast field-cycling technique, while in order to switch f₀, a specially designed multi-tunable RF coil is required. Here, we designed and constructed an actively frequency-switchable RF coil for frequencies at and below 2.5 MHz. The design employed PIN diodes, and enabled switching f₀ between five different values, with excellent impedance matching (approximately -37 dB S₁₁ reflection) and Q-factor of about 100 at each configuration.

  17. Seed orientation and magnetic field strength have more influence on tomato seed performance than relative humidity and duration of exposure to non-uniform static magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Poinapen, Danny; Brown, Daniel C W; Beeharry, Girish K

    2013-09-15

    Different factors (e.g., light, humidity, and temperature) including exposure to static magnetic fields (SMFs), referred here as critical factors, can significantly affect horticultural seed performance. However, the link between magnetic field parameters and other interdependent factors affecting seed viability is unclear. The importance of these critical factors affecting tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) var. MST/32 seed performance was assessed after performing several treatments based on a L9 (3(4)) (four factors at three levels) orthogonal array (OA) design. The variable factors in the design were magnetic flux density (R1=332.1±37.8mT; R2=108.7±26.9mT; and R3=50.6±10.5mT), exposure time (1, 2, and 24h), seed orientation (North polarity, South polarity, and control - no magnetic field), and relative humidity (RH) (7.0, 25.5, and 75.5%). After seed moisture content stabilisation at the different chosen RH, seeds were exposed in dark under laboratory conditions to several treatments based on the OA design before performance evaluation. Treatments not employing magnetic field exposure were used as controls. Results indicate that electrolyte leakage rate was reduced by a factor of 1.62 times during seed imbibition when non-uniform SMFs were employed. Higher germination (∼11.0%) was observed in magnetically-exposed seeds than in non-exposed ones, although seedlings emerging from SMF treatments did not show a consistent increase in biomass accumulation. The respective influence of the four critical factors tested on seed performance was ranked (in decreasing order) as seed orientation to external magnetic fields, magnetic field strength, RH, and exposure time. This study suggests a significant effect of non-uniform SMFs on seed performance with respect to RH, and more pronounced effects are observed during seed imbibition rather than during later developmental stages. PMID:23759543

  18. Separation of field-independent and field-dependent susceptibility tensors using a sequence of fully automated AMS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Studynka, J.; Chadima, M.; Hrouda, F.; Suza, P.

    2013-12-01

    Low-field magnetic susceptibility of diamagnetic and paramagnetic minerals as well as that of pure magnetite and all single-domain ferromagnetic (s.l.) minerals is field-independent. In contrast, magnetic susceptibility of multi-domain pyrrhotite, hematite and titanomagnetite may significantly depend on the field intensity. Hence, the AMS data acquired in various fields have a great potential to separate the magnetic fabric carried by the latter group of minerals from the whole-rock fabric. The determination of the field variation of AMS consist of separate measurements of each sample in several fields within the Rayleigh Law range and subsequent processing in which the field-independent and field-dependent susceptibility tensors are calculated. The disadvantage of this technique is that each sample must be measured several times in various positions, which is relatively laborious and time consuming. Recently, a new 3D rotator was developed for the MFK1 Kappabridges which rotates the sample simultaneously about two axes with different velocities. The measurement is fully automated in such a way that, once the sample is mounted into the rotator, it requires no additional positioning to measure the full AMS tensor. The important advantage of the 3D rotator is that it enables to measure AMS in a sequence of pre-set field intensities without any operator manipulation. Whole procedure is computer-controlled and, once a sequence of measurements is finished, the acquired data are immediately processed and visualized. Examples of natural rocks demonstrating various types of field dependence of AMS are given.

  19. Position and mode dependent coupling of terahertz quantum cascade laser fields to an integrated diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Gregory C.; Nordquist, Christopher D.; Cich, Michael J.; Ribaudo, Troy; Grine, Albert D.; Fuller, Charles T.; Reno, John L.; Wanke, Michael C.

    2013-10-01

    A Schottky diode integrated into a terahertz quantum cascade laser waveguide couples directly to the internal laser fields. In a multimode laser, the diode response is correlated with both the instantaneous power and the coupling strength to the diode of each lasing mode. Measurements of the rectified response of diodes integrated in two quantum cascade laser cavities at different locations indicate that the relative diode position strongly influences the laser-diode coupling.

  20. A new test statistic for climate models that includes field and spatial dependencies using Gaussian Markov random fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosedal-Sanchez, Alvaro; Jackson, Charles S.; Huerta, Gabriel

    2016-07-01

    A new test statistic for climate model evaluation has been developed that potentially mitigates some of the limitations that exist for observing and representing field and space dependencies of climate phenomena. Traditionally such dependencies have been ignored when climate models have been evaluated against observational data, which makes it difficult to assess whether any given model is simulating observed climate for the right reasons. The new statistic uses Gaussian Markov random fields for estimating field and space dependencies within a first-order grid point neighborhood structure. We illustrate the ability of Gaussian Markov random fields to represent empirical estimates of field and space covariances using "witch hat" graphs. We further use the new statistic to evaluate the tropical response of a climate model (CAM3.1) to changes in two parameters important to its representation of cloud and precipitation physics. Overall, the inclusion of dependency information did not alter significantly the recognition of those regions of parameter space that best approximated observations. However, there were some qualitative differences in the shape of the response surface that suggest how such a measure could affect estimates of model uncertainty.

  1. Azimuthal dependence of the Garton-Tomkins orbit in crossed magnetic and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleasdale, C.; Lewis, R. A.; Bruno-Alfonso, A.

    2016-08-01

    Work on classical closed orbits in the diamagnetic Kepler problem is predominately focused on the chaos observed in the polar launch angle as opposed to the azimuthal launch angle. This is due to atomic systems, along with widely studied external-field geometries (parallel magnetic and electric fields or pure magnetic field), being uniform in azimuthal angle, rendering the azimuthal angle unimportant. In the case of crossed magnetic and electric fields, this is no longer the case, and closed orbits do present an azimuthal launch angle dependence. In atomic systems, due to their spherical symmetry, the electric-field orientation in the plane perpendicular to the magnetic field does not affect the spectrum of orbits. However, in shallow n -type donors in anisotropic semiconductors such as silicon, the orientation of the external fields with respect to conduction-band valleys will be important. In this work we examine the Garton-Tomkins orbit in crossed magnetic and electric fields, and analyze how it and its harmonics' azimuthal dependencies behave through variation of the scaled field or scaled energy. At low scaled fields, harmonics have either twofold or fourfold azimuthal dependencies determined by the rotational symmetry of the individual harmonics. As the scaled field or scaled energy is increased, several harmonics undergo significant bifurcations, resulting in large azimuthal angular regions of essentially closed orbits, which will lead to strong resonances in experimental work.

  2. Magnetic field strength at the innermost circular orbit in accretion disk of supermassive black hole in active galactic nuclei: comparison with the equipartition value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrovich, M. Y.; Buliga, S. D.; Gnedin, Y. N.; Natsvlishvili, T. M.; Silant'ev, N. A.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper we present the results of the determination of the magnetic field strength at the innermost stable circular orbit (ISCO) of an active galactic nuclei (AGN) derived from the polarimetric data for radiation emerging from broad line regions (BLR). These results are obtained by the radiative transfer method that takes into account the effect of Faraday rotation depolarization. The observed polarization degree allows to estimate the value of the magnetic field in the BLR and then to derive the ISCO magnetic field strength using the standard accretion disk model (Shakura and Sunyaev in Astron. Astrophys. 24:337, 1973). We used the polarimetric data obtained by Smith et al. (Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 335:773, 2002) to calculate the values of relativistic jet kinetic power of AGN from the derived values of the magnetic field strength at the ISCO radius.

  3. Microchip capillary gel electrophoresis using programmed field strength gradients for the ultra-fast analysis of genetically modified organisms in soybeans.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun-Jeong; Chae, Joon-Seok; Chang, Jun Keun; Kang, Seong Ho

    2005-08-12

    We have developed a novel method for the ultra-fast analysis of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in soybeans by microchip capillary gel electrophoresis (MCGE) using programmed field strength gradients (PFSG) in a conventional glass double-T microchip. Under the programmed electric field strength and 0.3% poly(ethylene oxide) sieving matrix, the GMO in soybeans was analyzed within only 11 s of the microchip. The MCGE-PFSG method was a program that changes the electric field strength during GMO analysis, and was also applied to the ultra-fast analysis of PCR products. Compared to MCGE using a conventional and constantly applied electric field, the MCGE-PFSG analysis generated faster results without the loss of resolving power and reproducibility for specific DNA fragments (100- and 250-bp DNA) of GM-soybeans. The MCGE-PFSG technique may prove to be a new tool in the GMO analysis due to its speed, simplicity, and high efficiency.

  4. The Effect of Dissipation Mechanism and Guide Field Strength on X-line Spreading in 3D Magnetic Reconnection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Lucas; Cassak, P.; Drake, J.; Gosling, J.; Phan, T.; Shay, M. A.

    2013-07-01

    In two-ribbon flares, the fact that the ribbons separate in time is considered evidence of magnetic reconnection. However, in addition to the ribbons separating, they can also elongate (as seen in animations of, for example, the Bastille Day flare). The elongation is undoubtedly related to the reconnection spreading in the out-of-plane direction. Indeed, naturally occurring magnetic reconnection generally begins in a spatially localized region and spreads in the direction perpendicular to the reconnection plane as time progresses. For example, it was suggested that X-line spreading is necessary to explain the observation of X-lines extending more than 390 Earth radii (Phan et al., Nature, 404, 848, 2006), and has been seen in reconnection experiments. A sizeable out-of-plane (guide) magnetic field is present at flare sites and in the solar wind. Here, we study the effect of dissipation mechanism and the strength of the guide field has on X-line spreading. We present results from three-dimensional numerical simulations of magnetic reconnection, comparing spreading with the Hall term to spreading with anomalous resistivity. Applications to solar flares and magnetic reconnection in the solar wind will be discussed.

  5. Effects of the local structure dependence of evaporation fields on field evaporation behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Lan; Marquis, Emmanuelle A.; Withrow, Travis; Restrepo, Oscar D.; Windl, Wolfgang

    2015-12-14

    Accurate three dimensional reconstructions of atomic positions and full quantification of the information contained in atom probe microscopy data rely on understanding the physical processes taking place during field evaporation of atoms from needle-shaped specimens. However, the modeling framework for atom probe microscopy has only limited quantitative justification. Building on the continuum field models previously developed, we introduce a more physical approach with the selection of evaporation events based on density functional theory calculations. This model reproduces key features observed experimentally in terms of sequence of evaporation, evaporation maps, and depth resolution, and provides insights into the physical limit for spatial resolution.

  6. Recasts, Field Dependence/Independence Cognitive Style, and L2 Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rassaei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    While previous research has indicated that learners with field-dependence (FD) and field-independence (FI) cognitive styles benefit differentially from different instructional modes, previous corrective feedback studies have ignored the issue of matching error correction strategies to learners' cognitive style. To shed some light on this issue,…

  7. Development of a three-dimensional time-dependent flow field model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R. C.; Waldrop, W. R.; Pitts, F. H.; Shah, K. R.

    1975-01-01

    A three-dimensional, time-dependent mathematical model to represent Mobile Bay was developed. Computer programs were developed which numerically solve the appropriate conservation equations for predicting bay and estuary flow fields. The model is useful for analyzing the dispersion of sea water into fresh water and the transport of sediment, and for relating field and physical model data.

  8. Field Dependence-Independence as a Variable in Second Language Cloze Test Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansfield, Charles; Hansen, Jacqueline

    1983-01-01

    A study of test performance and field dependent-independent (FD/I) cognitive style in 250 college students showed consistently positive correlation between FI and cloze test scores, and other measures such as final grade. It is suggested cloze tests may call forth cognitive restructuring capabilities more easily for more field independent…

  9. Spin polarization transfer mechanisms of SABRE: A magnetic field dependent study.

    PubMed

    Pravdivtsev, Andrey N; Ivanov, Konstantin L; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V; Petrov, Pavel A; Limbach, Hans-Heinrich; Kaptein, Robert; Vieth, Hans-Martin

    2015-12-01

    We have investigated the magnetic field dependence of Signal Amplification By Reversible Exchange (SABRE) arising from binding of para-hydrogen (p-H2) and a substrate to a suitable transition metal complex. The magnetic field dependence of the amplification of the (1)H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) signals of the released substrates and dihydrogen, and the transient transition metal dihydride species shows characteristic patterns, which is explained using the theory presented here. The generation of SABRE is most efficient at low magnetic fields due to coherent spin mixing at nuclear spin Level Anti-Crossings (LACs) in the SABRE complexes. We studied two Ir-complexes and have shown that the presence of a (31)P atom in the SABRE complex doubles the number of LACs and, consequently, the number of peaks in the SABRE field dependence. Interestingly, the polarization of SABRE substrates is always accompanied by the para-to-ortho conversion in dihydride species that results in enhancement of the NMR signal of free (H2) and catalyst-bound H2 (Ir-HH). The field dependences of hyperpolarized H2 and Ir-HH by means of SABRE are studied here, for the first time, in detail. The field dependences depend on the chemical shifts and coupling constants of Ir-HH, in which the polarization transfer takes place. A negative coupling constant of -7Hz between the two chemically equivalent but magnetically inequivalent hydride nuclei is determined, which indicates that Ir-HH is a dihydride with an HH distance larger than 2Å. Finally, the field dependence of SABRE at high fields as found earlier has been investigated and attributed to polarization transfer to the substrate by cross-relaxation. The present study provides further evidence for the key role of LACs in the formation of SABRE-derived polarization. Understanding the spin dynamics behind the SABRE method opens the way to optimizing its performance and overcoming the main limitation of NMR, its notoriously low sensitivity.

  10. A new test statistic for climate models that includes field and spatial dependencies using Gaussian Markov random fields

    DOE PAGES

    Nosedal-Sanchez, Alvaro; Jackson, Charles S.; Huerta, Gabriel

    2016-07-20

    A new test statistic for climate model evaluation has been developed that potentially mitigates some of the limitations that exist for observing and representing field and space dependencies of climate phenomena. Traditionally such dependencies have been ignored when climate models have been evaluated against observational data, which makes it difficult to assess whether any given model is simulating observed climate for the right reasons. The new statistic uses Gaussian Markov random fields for estimating field and space dependencies within a first-order grid point neighborhood structure. We illustrate the ability of Gaussian Markov random fields to represent empirical estimates of fieldmore » and space covariances using "witch hat" graphs. We further use the new statistic to evaluate the tropical response of a climate model (CAM3.1) to changes in two parameters important to its representation of cloud and precipitation physics. Overall, the inclusion of dependency information did not alter significantly the recognition of those regions of parameter space that best approximated observations. However, there were some qualitative differences in the shape of the response surface that suggest how such a measure could affect estimates of model uncertainty.« less

  11. A comparison of retentive strength of implant cement depending on various methods of removing provisional cement from implant abutment

    PubMed Central

    Keum, Eun-Cheol

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE This study evaluated the effectiveness of various methods for removing provisional cement from implant abutments, and what effect these methods have on the retention of prosthesis during the definitive cementation. MATERIALS AND METHODS Forty implant fixture analogues and abutments were embedded in resin blocks. Forty cast crowns were fabricated and divided into 4 groups each containing 10 implants. Group A was cemented directly with the definitive cement (Cem-Implant). The remainder were cemented with provisional cement (Temp-Bond NE), and classified according to the method for cleaning the abutments. Group B used a plastic curette and wet gauze, Group C used a rubber cup and pumice, and Group D used an airborne particle abrasion technique. The abutments were observed using a stereomicroscope after removing the provisional cement. The tensile bond strength was measured after the definitive cementation. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance test (α=.05). RESULTS Group B clearly showed provisional cement remaining, whereas the other groups showed almost no cement. Groups A and B showed a relatively smooth surface. More roughness was observed in Group C, and apparent roughness was noted in Group D. The tensile bond strength tests revealed Group D to have significantly the highest tensile bond strength followed in order by Groups C, A and B. CONCLUSION A plastic curette and wet gauze alone cannot effectively remove the residual provisional cement on the abutment. The definitive retention increased when the abutments were treated with rubber cup/pumice or airborne particle abraded to remove the provisional cement. PMID:24049563

  12. Time-dependent scalar fields in modified gravities in a stationary spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Yi; Gu, Bao-Ming; Wei, Shao-Wen; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-07-01

    Most no-hair theorems involve the assumption that the scalar field is independent of time. Recently in Graham and Jha (Phys. Rev. D90: 041501, 2014) the existence of time-dependent scalar hair outside a stationary black hole in general relativity was ruled out. We generalize this work to modified gravities and non-minimally coupled scalar field with the additional assumption that the spacetime is axisymmetric. It is shown that in higher-order gravity such as metric f( R) gravity the time-dependent scalar hair does not exist. In Palatini f( R) gravity and the non-minimally coupled case the time-dependent scalar hair may exist.

  13. Magnetic field and temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity in type-II superconducting films.

    PubMed

    Grimaldi, G; Leo, A; Cirillo, C; Attanasio, C; Nigro, A; Pace, S

    2009-06-24

    We study the vortex dynamics in the instability regime induced by high dissipative states well above the critical current in Nb superconducting strips. The magnetic field and temperature behavior of the critical vortex velocity corresponding to the observed dynamic instability is ascribed to intrinsic non-equilibrium phenomena. The Larkin-Ovchinnikov (LO) theory of electronic instability in high velocity vortex motion has been applied to interpret the temperature dependence of the critical vortex velocity. The magnetic field dependence of the vortex critical velocity shows new features in the low-field regime not predicted by LO.

  14. Charged Particle in a Time-dependent Electric Field: A White Noise Functional Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Gravador, E. B.; Bornales, J. B.; Liwanag, M. J.

    2008-06-18

    The propagator for a charged particle in a time-dependent electric field is calculated following Hida and Streit's framework where the propagator is the T-transform of Feynman functional. However, we have to regard the potential V = -qE({tau})x{identical_to}{radical}((m/({Dirac_h}/2{pi}))){xi}x following C. C. Bernido and M. V. Carpio-Bernido's prescription of time-dependent potentials. The result agrees with the limiting form of Eqn. (16) of N. Morgenstern Horing, H. L. Cui, and G. Fiorenza, when the magnetic field is switched off, and Eqn. (17) of [3] when the electric field is constant in time.

  15. Charged Particle in a Time-dependent Electric Field: A White Noise Functional Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gravador, E. B.; Bornales, J. B.; Liwanag, M. J.

    2008-06-01

    The propagator for a charged particle in a time-dependent electric field is calculated following Hida and Streit's framework [1] where the propagator is the T-transform of Feynman functional. However, we have to regard the potential V = -qE(τ)x≡√m/ℏ ξ˙x following C. C. Bernido and M. V. Carpio-Bernido's [2] prescription of time-dependent potentials. The result agrees with the limiting form of Eqn. (16) of N. Morgenstern Horing, H. L. Cui, and G. Fiorenza [3], when the magnetic field is switched off, and Eqn. (17) of [3] when the electric field is constant in time.

  16. Magnetic field dependence of singlet fission in solutions of diphenyl tetracene

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Nicholas J.; Hontz, Eric; Chang, Wendi; Van Voorhis, Troy; Baldo, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic field effects provide a convenient and specific probe of singlet exciton fission within optoelectronic devices. Here, we demonstrate that this tool may also be applied to screen potential fission material candidates in solution. We characterize the phenomenon in diphenyl tetracene (DPT), which shows strong fluorescence modulation and the expected field dependence in its transient decay as a function of concentration. Solution measurements may also be used to test for the presence of an intermediate charge transfer state, but we observe no changes to the field dependence of DPT singlet exciton fission in toluene relative to chloroform. PMID:25987573

  17. Photodetachment of the H‑ ion in a linear time-dependent electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, De-Hua; Chen, Zhaohang; Cheng, Shaohao

    2016-10-01

    Using the time-dependent closed orbit theory, we study the photodetachment of the H‑ ion in a linear time-dependent electric field for the first time. An analytical formula for calculating the time-dependent photodetachment cross section of this system has been put forward. It is found when the external electric field changes very slowly with time, there is only one closed orbit of the detached electron and the photodetachment cross section is quite stable. However, when the electric field changes quickly with time, three different types of closed orbits are found and the photodetachment cross section oscillates in a much more complex way. The connection of each type of closed orbit with the oscillatory structure in the photodetachment cross section is analyzed quantitatively. In addition, the photon energy and the laser field parameters can also have great influence on the time-dependent photodetachment cross section of this system. This study provides a clear and intuitive picture for the photodetachment dynamics of a negative ion in the presence of a time-dependent electric field and may guide future experimental studies exploring the quantum effect in the photodetachment dynamics of negative ions from a time-dependent viewpoint.

  18. Temperature and field dependence of the anisotropy of MgB2.

    PubMed

    Angst, M; Puzniak, R; Wisniewski, A; Jun, J; Kazakov, S M; Karpinski, J; Roos, J; Keller, H

    2002-04-22

    The anisotropy gamma of the superconducting state of high quality single crystals of MgB2 was determined, using torque magnetometry with two different methods. The anisotropy of the upper critical field was found to be temperature dependent, decreasing from gamma approximately 6 at 15 K to 2.8 at 35 K. Reversible torque data near T(c) reveal a field dependent anisotropy, increasing nearly linearly from gamma approximately equal to 2 in zero field to 3.7 in 10 kOe. The unusual temperature dependence is a true bulk property and can be explained by nonlocal effects of anisotropic pairing and/or the k--> dependence of the effective mass tensor.

  19. Intermediate filament–membrane attachments function synergistically with actin-dependent contacts to regulate intercellular adhesive strength

    PubMed Central

    Huen, Arthur C.; Park, Jung K.; Godsel, Lisa M.; Chen, Xuejun; Bannon, Leslie J.; Amargo, Evangeline V.; Hudson, Tracie Y.; Mongiu, Anne K.; Leigh, Irene M.; Kelsell, David P.; Gumbiner, Barry M.; Green, Kathleen J.

    2002-01-01

    By tethering intermediate filaments (IFs) to sites of intercellular adhesion, desmosomes facilitate formation of a supercellular scaffold that imparts mechanical strength to a tissue. However, the role IF–membrane attachments play in strengthening adhesion has not been directly examined. To address this question, we generated Tet-On A431 cells inducibly expressing a desmoplakin (DP) mutant lacking the rod and IF-binding domains (DPNTP). DPNTP localized to the plasma membrane and led to dissociation of IFs from the junctional plaque, without altering total or cell surface distribution of adherens junction or desmosomal proteins. However, a specific decrease in the detergent-insoluble pool of desmoglein suggested a reduced association with the IF cytoskeleton. DPNTP-expressing cell aggregates in suspension or substrate-released cell sheets readily dissociated when subjected to mechanical stress whereas controls remained largely intact. Dissociation occurred without lactate dehydrogenase release, suggesting that loss of tissue integrity was due to reduced adhesion rather than increased cytolysis. JD-1 cells from a patient with a DP COOH-terminal truncation were also more weakly adherent compared with normal keratinocytes. When used in combination with DPNTP, latrunculin A, which disassembles actin filaments and disrupts adherens junctions, led to dissociation up to an order of magnitude greater than either treatment alone. These data provide direct in vitro evidence that IF–membrane attachments regulate adhesive strength and suggest furthermore that actin- and IF-based junctions act synergistically to strengthen adhesion. PMID:12499357

  20. MRS thermometry calibration at 3 T: effects of protein, ionic concentration and magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Babourina-Brooks, Ben; Simpson, Robert; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Machin, Graham; Peet, Andrew C; Davies, Nigel P

    2015-07-01

    MRS thermometry has been utilized to measure temperature changes in the brain, which may aid in the diagnosis of brain trauma and tumours. However, the temperature calibration of the technique has been shown to be sensitive to non-temperature-based factors, which may provide unique information on the tissue microenvironment if the mechanisms can be further understood. The focus of this study was to investigate the effects of varied protein content on the calibration of MRS thermometry at 3 T, which has not been thoroughly explored in the literature. The effects of ionic concentration and magnetic field strength were also considered. Temperature reference materials were controlled by water circulation and freezing organic fixed-point compounds (diphenyl ether and ethylene carbonate) stable to within 0.2 °C. The temperature was measured throughout the scan time with a fluoro-optic probe, with an uncertainty of 0.16 °C. The probe was calibrated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) with traceability to the International Temperature Scale 1990 (ITS-90). MRS thermometry measures were based on single-voxel spectroscopy chemical shift differences between water and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Δ(H20-NAA), using a Philips Achieva 3 T scanner. Six different phantom solutions with varying protein or ionic concentration, simulating potential tissue differences, were investigated within a temperature range of 21-42 °C. Results were compared with a similar study performed at 1.5 T to observe the effect of field strengths. Temperature calibration curves were plotted to convert Δ(H20-NAA) to apparent temperature. The apparent temperature changed by -0.2 °C/% of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a trend of 0.5 °C/50 mM ionic concentration was observed. Differences in the calibration coefficients for the 10% BSA solution were seen in this study at 3 T compared with a study at 1.5 T. MRS thermometry may be utilized to measure temperature and the tissue

  1. MRS thermometry calibration at 3 T: effects of protein, ionic concentration and magnetic field strength.

    PubMed

    Babourina-Brooks, Ben; Simpson, Robert; Arvanitis, Theodoros N; Machin, Graham; Peet, Andrew C; Davies, Nigel P

    2015-07-01

    MRS thermometry has been utilized to measure temperature changes in the brain, which may aid in the diagnosis of brain trauma and tumours. However, the temperature calibration of the technique has been shown to be sensitive to non-temperature-based factors, which may provide unique information on the tissue microenvironment if the mechanisms can be further understood. The focus of this study was to investigate the effects of varied protein content on the calibration of MRS thermometry at 3 T, which has not been thoroughly explored in the literature. The effects of ionic concentration and magnetic field strength were also considered. Temperature reference materials were controlled by water circulation and freezing organic fixed-point compounds (diphenyl ether and ethylene carbonate) stable to within 0.2 °C. The temperature was measured throughout the scan time with a fluoro-optic probe, with an uncertainty of 0.16 °C. The probe was calibrated at the National Physical Laboratory (NPL) with traceability to the International Temperature Scale 1990 (ITS-90). MRS thermometry measures were based on single-voxel spectroscopy chemical shift differences between water and N-acetylaspartate (NAA), Δ(H20-NAA), using a Philips Achieva 3 T scanner. Six different phantom solutions with varying protein or ionic concentration, simulating potential tissue differences, were investigated within a temperature range of 21-42 °C. Results were compared with a similar study performed at 1.5 T to observe the effect of field strengths. Temperature calibration curves were plotted to convert Δ(H20-NAA) to apparent temperature. The apparent temperature changed by -0.2 °C/% of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a trend of 0.5 °C/50 mM ionic concentration was observed. Differences in the calibration coefficients for the 10% BSA solution were seen in this study at 3 T compared with a study at 1.5 T. MRS thermometry may be utilized to measure temperature and the tissue

  2. Long-term variation of statistical properties of sunspot field strengths and their relation to the characteristics of solar cycles in 1917-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tlatova, Kseniya; Pevtsov, Alexei; Tlatov, Andrey; Vasilieva, Valeria; Kalevi Mursula

    We use the digitized sunspot daily drawings from the Mount Wilson Observatory (MWO) from 1917—2013 to study the long-term variations in sunspot magnetic fields. Tabulated data include the heliographic coordinates, area and magnetic field strength of all sunspots on solar disk. Sunspot field strengths exhibit several trends, which can be of instrumental or truly solar in its nature. For example, in depth analysis of the sunspot field strength and the sunspot areas indicates long-term changes in the observing system at the MWO, when systematically larger number of measurements in sub-features (e.g., multiple umbrae) was made beginning mid-20th century. The final data set is used to study several properties of active regions including difference (in field strength and area) between leading and following sunspots, the orientation of magnetic field in sunspots and pores relative to vertical direction, and the Hale (polarity) and Joy (tilt) laws over the period of about ten solar cycles.

  3. Low-field Tails in EuBCO Vortex Field Distributions: a T-dependence muSR Study*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Y.; Ruiz, E. J.; Aslanian, H. H.; Santiago, R. D.; Li, Y.; Boekema, C.

    2002-03-01

    Muon-Spin-Rotation (muSR) vortex data ranging from 3.5 K to roomtemperature of EuBa2Cu3O7 have been analyzed using a Maximum-Entropy (ME) technique [1-3]. With a 1-kOe applied field, anomalous low-field tails [1, 4] stretching from about 0.5 kOe to 0.8 kOe are observed for magnetic field distributions below 40 K. The muSR time-histogram data are weighted with a Gaussian filter. The low-field tail in the vortex field distribution is best viewed within a filter-time interval, determined to lie between 0.73 and 0.95 microseconds. As temperature decreases, an increase in the low-field tail intensity is observed. We note, the presence of the low-field tail indicates that extra superconductivity could exist in the CuO-chain layers well below critical temperature. Currently, we are studying the temperature dependence of the low-field tail by fitting the ME transforms with a tail function and two Gaussians (representing the main vortex and grainboundary signals [1]). Fit-analysis results and comparison with YBCO vortex-tail behavior [1, 2] are reported. [1] Santiago et al, Phys Rev B63 132509 (2001); [2] Alves et al, Phys Rev B49 12396 (1994); [3] Cooke et al, Phys Rev B39 2748 (1989); [4] Aslanian et al, Physica C364-365 582 (2001).

  4. Dependence of neoclassical toroidal viscosity on the poloidal spectrum of applied nonaxisymmetric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Lanctot, M. J.; Smith, S. P.; Burrell, K. H.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a single mode model that accurately predicts the coupling of applied nonaxisymmetric fields to the plasma response that induces neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) torque in DIII-D H-mode plasmas. The torque is measured and modeled to have a sinusoidal dependence on the relative phase of multiple nonaxisymmetric field sources, including a minimum in which large amounts of nonaxisymmetric drive is decoupled from the NTV torque. This corresponds to the coupling and decoupling of the applied field to a NTV-driving mode spectrum. Modeling using the perturbed equilibrium nonambipolar transport (PENT) code confirms an effective single mode coupling between the applied field and the resultant torque, despite its inherent nonlinearity. The coupling to the NTV mode is shown to have a similar dependence on the relative phasing as that of the IPEC dominant mode, providing a physical basis for the efficacy of this linear metric in predicting error field correction optima in NTV dominated regimes.

  5. Dynamics of runaway tails with time-dependent sub-Dreicer dc fields in magnetized plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moghaddam-Taaheri, E.; Vlahos, L.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of runaway tails driven by sub-Dreicer time-dependent dc fields in a magnetized plasma are studied numerically using a quasi-linear code based on the Ritz-Galerkin method and finite elements. It is found that the runaway tail maintained a negative slope during the dc field increase. Depending on the values of the dc electric field at t = 0 and the electron gyrofrequency to the plasma frequency ratio the runaway tail became unstable to the anomalous Doppler resonance or remained stable before the saturation of the dc field at some maximum value. The systems that remained stable during this stage became unstable to the anomalous Doppler or the Cerenkov resonances when the dc field was kept at the saturation level or decreased. Once the instability is triggered, the runaway tail is isotropized.

  6. Mixed quantum-classical dynamics with time-dependent external fields: A time-dependent density-functional-theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Tavernelli, Ivano; Curchod, Basile F. E.; Rothlisberger, Ursula

    2010-05-15

    A mixed quantum-classical method aimed at the study of nonadiabatic dynamics in the presence of external electromagnetic fields is developed within the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. To this end, we use a trajectory-based description of the quantum nature of the nuclear degrees of freedom according to Tully's fewest switches trajectories surface hopping, where both the nonadiabatic coupling elements between the different potential energy surfaces, and the coupling with the external field are given as functionals of the ground-state electron density or, equivalently, of the corresponding Kohn-Sham orbitals. The method is applied to the study of the photodissociation dynamics of some simple molecules in gas phase.

  7. Ionic strength dependence of cytochrome c structure and Trp-59 H/D exchange from ultraviolet resonance Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, G Y; Grygon, C A; Spiro, T G

    1989-06-13

    Ultraviolet resonance Raman spectra are reported for cytochrome c (cyt c) in FeII and FeIII oxidation states at low (0.005 M) and high (0.9-1.5 M) ionic strength. With 200-nm excitation the amide band intensities are shown to remain constant, establishing that redox state and ionic strength have no influence on the alpha-helical content. The tyrosine 830/850-cm-1 doublet, however, shows a loss in 830-cm-1 intensity at I = 0.005 M for the FeIII protein, suggesting a weakening or a loss of H-bonding from an internal tyrosine, probably Tyr-48, which is H-bonded to a heme propionate group in cyt c crystals. Excitation profiles of tryptophan peak at approximately 229 nm for both FeII and FeIII forms of cyt c, but at approximately 218 nm for aqueous tryptophan. The approximately 2200-cm-1 red shift of the resonant electronic transition is attributed to the Trp-59 residue being buried and H-bonded. Consistent with this Trp environment, the H-bond-sensitive 877-cm-1 Trp band is strong and sharp, and the 1357/1341-cm-1 doublet has a large intensity ratio, approximately 1.5, for both FeII and FeIII cyt c. The 877-cm-1-band frequency shifts to 860 cm-1 when the Trp indole proton is replaced by a deuteron. This band was used to show that Trp H/D exchange in D2O is much faster for FeIII than FeII cyt c. The half-time for exchange at room temperature is estimated to be approximately 30 and approximately 5 h, respectively, for FeII and FeIII when examined at I = 0.005.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Interdependence of contact properties and field- and density-dependent mobility in organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheinert, Susanne; Paasch, Gernot

    2009-01-01

    The current characteristics of organic field-effect transistors (OFET) often show a disadvantageous nonlinearity at low drain voltages. It has been shown recently [J. Appl. Phys. 102, 054509 (2007)] that in top contact (TOC) OFETs this effect can be caused by trap recharging if the contacts are of Schottky type. For bottom contact (BOC) OFETs, in spite of controversial discussions, Schottky contacts as origin of the nonlinearity are often stated. At first, it is shown here by a mixed mode simulation that for large ideality factors a Schottky contact only at drain leads to such a nonlinearity. However, with the same Schottky contacts at drain and source the effect is covered by the high resistance of the contact at source. Next, the different influences of Schottky contacts on BOC OFETs and TOC OFETs with varying overlap of the source/drain contacts with the gate are clarified. Further, it is demonstrated with detailed two-dimensional simulations that the combination of the presence of Schottky contacts with a field dependence of the mobility can cause the nonlinearity. For the mobility we use the field dependent Pool/Frenkel model, and the models of Limketai et al.[Phys. Rev. B 75, 113203 (2007)] and Pasveer/Coehoorn et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 94, 206601 (2005)], which depend in addition on the carrier concentration. Their influence on the device performance has been clarified by the simulations. Simulated profiles of concentrations and fields lead to the understanding of the mechanism causing the nonlinearity. This mechanism is especially effective for the Pasveer/Coehoorn model. The field dependence of the mobility is a consequence of the energetic distribution of the hopping states and can hardly be avoided in solution based deposition of the active polymer layer. A strategy to prevent the nonlinearity is therefore an optimization of the contact-polymer interface such that the contacts become Ohmic.

  9. Sectors and Large-Scale Magnetic Field Strength Fluctuations in the Heliosheath Near 110 AU: Voyager 1,2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes observations of daily averages of the magnetic field strength B and the magnetic polarity measured by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009 between 108.5 and 112.1 AU and at heliographic latitude 34. . 4. A negative magnetic polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 43.255. A positive polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 256.365. We offer the hypothesis that the existence of the two sectors is the result of the displacement of the wavy heliospheric current sheet to the position of V1 as a result of northward flow in the heliosheath. The large size of the sectors is caused by the slow radial motion of the flow observed by V1 in the heliosheath. The distribution of B during 2009 was lognormal, in contrast to the Gaussian distributions observed by V1 in the heliosheath prior to 2009. The large-scale fluctuations of B, described by the distribution of increments of daily averages of B, have a Tsallis distribution with q = 1.6. The large-scale fluctuations of B observed by V1 during 2009 have a multifractal spectrum with the same parameters that V1 observed during 2005 close to the termination shock at 94 AU. These results suggest that the large-scale magnetic fluctuations of B are in a metastable equilibrium state in the heliosheath between 94 AU and 112.1 AU.

  10. SECTORS AND LARGE-SCALE MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH FLUCTUATIONS IN THE HELIOSHEATH NEAR 110 AU: VOYAGER 1, 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F. E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.co

    2010-12-10

    This paper describes observations of daily averages of the magnetic field strength B and the magnetic polarity measured by Voyager 1 (V1) in the heliosheath during 2009 between 108.5 and 112.1 AU and at heliographic latitude 34.{sup 0}4. A negative magnetic polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 43-255. A positive polarity sector was observed during 2009 DOY 256-365. We offer the hypothesis that the existence of the two sectors is the result of the displacement of the wavy heliospheric current sheet to the position of V1 as a result of northward flow in the heliosheath. The large size of the sectors is caused by the slow radial motion of the flow observed by V1 in the heliosheath. The distribution of B during 2009 was lognormal, in contrast to the Gaussian distributions observed by V1 in the heliosheath prior to 2009. The large-scale fluctuations of B, described by the distribution of increments of daily averages of B, have a Tsallis distribution with q = 1.6. The large-scale fluctuations of B observed by V1 during 2009 have a multifractal spectrum with the same parameters that V1 observed during 2005 close to the termination shock at 94 AU. These results suggest that the large-scale magnetic fluctuations of B are in a metastable equilibrium state in the heliosheath between 94 AU and 112.1 AU.

  11. A time-dependent vector field topology based on streak surfaces.

    PubMed

    Uffinger, Markus; Sadlo, Filip; Ertl, Thomas

    2013-03-01

    It was shown recently how the 2D vector field topology concept, directly applicable to stationary vector fields only, can be generalized to time-dependent vector fields by replacing the role of stream lines by streak lines. The present paper extends this concept to 3D vector fields. In traditional 3D vector field topology separatrices can be obtained by integrating stream lines from 0D seeds corresponding to critical points. We show that in our new concept, in contrast, 1D seeding constructs are required for computing streak-based separatrices. In analogy to the 2D generalization we show that invariant manifolds can be obtained by seeding streak surfaces along distinguished path surfaces emanating from intersection curves between codimension-1 ridges in the forward and reverse finite-time Lyapunov exponent (FTLE) fields. These path surfaces represent a time-dependent generalization of critical points and convey further structure in time-dependent topology of vector fields. Compared to the traditional approach based on FTLE ridges, the resulting streak manifolds ease the analysis of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) with respect to visual quality and computational cost, especially when time series of LCS are computed. We exemplify validity and utility of the new approach using both synthetic examples and computational fluid dynamics results.

  12. Dependence on the incident light power of the internal electric fields in a GaAs p-i-n solar cell according to bright photoreflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hyun-Jun; Mun, Young Hee; Kim, Jong Su; Lee, Sang Jun

    2016-07-01

    Bright photoreflectance (BPR) spectroscopy at room temperature is used to examine the internal electric fields in a GaAs p-i-n solar cell for their dependence on the incident light power. Electric fields are observed at 30 µW and 100 µW of incident light. With increasing power, the strengths of the two electric fields are reduced due to the photovoltage effect. The electric field observed at 30 µW is assigned to the p-i interface, which is close to the surface. The other electric field is due to the i-n interface because the incident light penetrates deeper as the light power is increased. The electric field strength of 35.6 kV/cm at the p-i interface is lower than that of 42.9 kV/cm at the i-n interface at 500 µW of light power because the photovoltage effect is proportional to the number of photo-generated carriers, which is reduced as the distance from the surface increases. When the incident light power is similar to the excitation beam power, the electric fields at the p-i interface are saturated.

  13. The latitude dependencies of the solar wind. [of interplanetary magnetic field polarity and configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, R. L.; Winge, C. R., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    The motion of spacecraft following the earth's orbit occurs within the solar latitude range of 7 deg 15 min N on approximately September 7 to 7 deg 15 min S on approximately March 6. The latitude dependencies so far detected within this range have shown that the photospheric dipole-like field of the sun makes very important contributions to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) observed near the ecliptic. Changes in geomagnetic activity from even to odd numbered 11-year solar cycles are related to changes in the sun's dipolar field. The north-south IMF component and meridional, nonradial flow are important to a complete understanding of steady-state solar wind dynamics. Coronal conditions must be latitude-dependent in a way that accounts for the observed latitude dependence of the velocity and density of the solar wind.

  14. Relativistic mean-field model with energy dependent self-energies

    SciTech Connect

    Antic, S.; Typel, S.

    2015-02-24

    Conventional relativistic mean-field theory is extended with the introduction of higher-order derivative couplings of nucleons with the meson fields. The Euler-Lagrange equations follow from the principle of stationary action. From invariance principles of the Lagrangian density the most general expressions for the conserved current and energy-momentum tensor are derived. The nucleon self-energies show the explicit dependence on the meson fields. They contain additional regulator functions which describe the energy dependence. The density dependence of meson-nucleon couplings causes the apperance of additional rearrangement contributions in the self-energies. The equation of state of infinite nuclear matter is obtained and the thermodynamical consistency of the model is demonstrated. This model is applied to the description of spherical, non-rotating stars in β-equilibrium. Stellar structure is calculated by solving the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkov (TOV) equations. The results for neutron stars are shown in terms of mass-radius relations.

  15. ON THE NATURE OF THE FIRST TRANSIENT Z SOURCE XTE J1701-462: ITS ACCRETION DISK STRUCTURE, NEUTRON STAR MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTH, AND HARD TAIL

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, G. Q.; Wang, N.; Yan, S. P.; Zhang, S. N.; Qu, J. L. E-mail: dinggq@gmail.com

    2011-08-15

    Using data from the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer, we investigate the spectral evolution along a 'Z' track and a '{nu}' track on the hardness-intensity diagrams of the first transient Z source XTE J1701-462. The spectral analyses suggest that the inner disk radius depends on the mass accretion rate, in agreement with the model prediction, R{sub in}{proportional_to}M-dot{sup 2/7}{sub disk}, for a radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disk interacting with the magnetosphere of a neutron star (NS). The changes in the disk mass accretion rate M-dot{sub disk} are responsible for the evolution of the 'Z' or '{nu}' track. Radiation pressure thickens the disk considerably and also produces significant outflows. The NS surface magnetic field strength, derived from the interaction between the magnetosphere and the radiation-pressure-dominated accretion disk, is {approx}(1-3) x 10{sup 9} G, which is possibly between normal atoll and Z sources. A significant hard tail is detected in the horizontal branches and we discuss several possible origins of the hard tail.

  16. Relaxation time measurements of bone marrow protons in the calcaneus using a compact MRI system at 0.2 Tesla field strength.

    PubMed

    Tomiha, Sadanori; Iita, Nachiko; Okada, Fumi; Handa, Shinya; Kose, Katsumi

    2008-08-01

    Relaxation times (T(1) and T(2)) of the bone marrow protons and trabecular bone volume fraction (TBVF) in the calcaneus were measured for 100 female volunteers using a compact MRI system at 0.2 T field strength. The speed of sound (SOS) through the calcaneus was measured also for the same subjects using a quantitative ultrasound system. Both relaxation times were found to have positive correlations with age (R = 0.40; P < 0.0001 and R = 0.31; P < 0.002, respectively) and negative correlations with SOS (R = -0.38; P < 0.0001 and R = -0.38; P < 0.0001, respectively). Although TBVF had a fairly high positive correlation with the SOS (R = 0.67), neither T(1) nor T(2) were correlated with TBVF (R = -0.062 and -0.024, respectively). These results suggest that the age dependence of both T(1) and T(2) is caused by the microdynamic properties of the lipid molecules in bone marrow observed using acoustic or elastic modalities. PMID:18666107

  17. Thickness and electric-field-dependent polarizability and dielectric constant in phosphorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Piyush; Bhadoria, B. S.; Kumar, Sanjay; Bhowmick, Somnath; Chauhan, Yogesh Singh; Agarwal, Amit

    2016-05-01

    Based on extensive first-principles calculations, we explore the thickness-dependent effective dielectric constant and slab polarizability of few-layer black phosphorene. We find that the dielectric constant in ultrathin phosphorene is thickness-dependent and it can be further tuned by applying an out-of-plane electric field. The decreasing dielectric constant with reducing number of layers of phosphorene is a direct consequence of the lower permittivity of the outer layers and the increasing surface-to-volume ratio. We also show that the slab polarizability depends linearly on the number of layers, implying a nearly constant polarizability per phosphorus atom. Our calculation of the thickness- and electric-field-dependent dielectric properties will be useful for designing and interpreting transport experiments in gated phosphorene devices, wherever electrostatic effects such as capacitance and charge screening are important.

  18. Effect of electrical field strength applied by PEF processing and storage temperature on the outgrowth of yeasts and moulds naturally present in a fresh fruit smoothie.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, R A H; Nederhoff, A L; Nierop Groot, M N; van Boekel, M A J S; Mastwijk, H C

    2016-08-01

    Pulsed electrical field (PEF) technology offers an alternative to thermal pasteurisation of high-acid fruit juices, by extending the shelf life of food products, while retaining its fresh taste and nutritional value. Substantial research has been performed on the effect of electrical field strength on the inactivation kinetics of spoilage and pathogenic micro-organisms and on the outgrowth of spoilage micro-organisms during shelf life. However, studies on the effect of electrical field strength on the inactivation and outgrowth of surviving populations during shelf life are missing. In this study, we assessed the influence of electrical field strength applied by PEF processing and storage temperature on the outgrowth of surviving yeast and mould populations naturally present in fresh fruit smoothie in time. Therefore, an apple-strawberry-banana smoothie was treated in a continuous-flow PEF system (130L/h), using similar inlet and outlet conditions (preheating temperature 41°C, maximum temperature 58°C) to assure that the amount of energy across the different conditions was kept constant. Smoothies treated with variable electrical field strengths (13.5, 17.0, 20.0 and 24.0kV/cm) were compared to smoothies without treatment for outgrowth of yeasts and moulds. Outgrowth of yeasts and moulds stored at 4°C and 7°C was analysed by plating and visual observation and yeast growth was modelled using the modified logistic growth model (Zwietering model). Results showed that the intensity of the electrical field strength had an influence on the degree of inactivation of yeast cells, resulting in a faster outgrowth over time at lower electrical field strength. Outgrowth of moulds over time was not affected by the intensity of the electrical field strength used. Application of PEF introduces a trade-off between type of spoilage: in untreated smoothie yeasts lead to spoilage after 8days when stored at 4 or 7°C, whereas in PEF treated smoothie yeasts were (partly

  19. Diagnosing the seasonal land-atmosphere correspondence over northern Australia: dependence on soil moisture state and correspondence strength definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, M.; Pitman, A.; Evans, J.

    2015-08-01

    The similarity of the temporal variations of land and atmospheric states during the onset (September) through to the peak (February) of the wet season over northern Australia is statistically diagnosed using ensembles of offline land surface model simulations that produce a range of different background soil moisture states. We derive the temporal correspondence between variations in the soil moisture and the planetary boundary layer via a statistical measure of rank correlation. The simulated evaporative fraction and the boundary layer are shown to be strongly correlated during both SON (September-October-November) and DJF (December-January-February) despite the differing background soil moisture states between the two seasons and among the ensemble members. The sign and magnitude of the boundary layer-surface layer soil moisture association during the onset of the wet season (SON) differs from the correlation between the evaporative fraction and boundary layer from the same season, and from the correlation between the surface soil moisture and boundary layer association during DJF. The patterns and magnitude of the surface flux-boundary layer correspondence are not captured when the relationship is diagnosed using the surface layer soil moisture alone. The conflicting results arise because the surface layer soil moisture lacks strong correlation with the atmosphere during the monsoon onset because the evapotranspiration is dominated by transpiration. Our results indicate that accurately diagnosing the correspondence and therefore coupling strength in seasonally dry regions, such as northern Australia, requires root zone soil moisture to be included.

  20. Field-dependent perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in CoFeB thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Barsukov, I. Krivorotov, I. N.; Fu, Yu; Gonçalves, A. M.; Sampaio, L. C.; Spasova, M.; Farle, M.; Arias, R. E.

    2014-10-13

    We report ferromagnetic resonance measurements of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in thin films of Ta/Co{sub 20}Fe{sub 60}B{sub 20}/MgO as a function of the Co{sub 20}Fe{sub 60}B{sub 20} layer thickness. The first and second order anisotropy terms show unexpectedly strong dependence on the external magnetic field applied to the system during the measurements. We propose strong interfacial spin pinning as a possible origin of the field-dependent anisotropy. Our results imply that high-field anisotropy measurements cannot be directly used for quantitative evaluation of zero-field performance parameters of CoFeB-based devices such as spin torque memory.

  1. Magnetic field dependent tunneling of atoms and molecules in non-magnetic disordered solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enss, C.

    2003-01-01

    The low-temperature properties of disordered solids, such as glasses or crystals with certain substitutional defects are governed by atomic tunneling systems. Until recently it was believed that the dielectric properties of insulating materials devoid of magnetic impurities should not - or only very weakly - depend on external magnetic fields. In contrast, new experiments on glasses and crystalline defect systems show a pronounced magnetic field dependence of the dielectric properties of such materials at ultra-low temperatures. In particular, the low-frequency dielectric susceptibility and the amplitude of polarization echoes appear to be strongly affected by magnetic fields. These very surprising findings clearly indicate that atomic tunneling systems can couple to magnetic fields. We summarize the available data and discuss the possible origin of these intriguing phenomena.

  2. Landau levels of scalar QED in time-dependent magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang Pyo

    2014-05-15

    The Landau levels of scalar QED undergo continuous transitions under a homogeneous, time-dependent magnetic field. We analytically formulate the Klein–Gordon equation for a charged spinless scalar as a Cauchy initial value problem in the two-component first order formalism and then put forth a measure that classifies the quantum motions into the adiabatic change, the nonadiabatic change, and the sudden change. We find the exact quantum motion and calculate the pair-production rate when the magnetic field suddenly changes as a step function. -- Highlights: •We study the Landau levels of scalar QED in time-dependent magnetic fields. •Instantaneous Landau levels make continuous transitions but keep parity. •The Klein–Gordon equation is expressed in the two-component first order formalism. •A measure is advanced that characterizes the quantum motions into three categories. •A suddenly changing magnetic field produces pairs of charged scalars from vacuum.

  3. Correlated multielectron systems in strong laser fields: A multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach

    SciTech Connect

    Caillat, J.; Scrinzi, A.; Koch, O.; Kreuzer, W.

    2005-01-01

    The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock approach for the description of correlated few-electron dynamics in the presence of strong laser fields is introduced and a comprehensive description of the method is given. Total ionization and electron spectra for the ground and first excited ionic channels are calculated for one-dimensional model systems with up to six active electrons. Strong correlation effects are found in the shape of photoelectron peaks and the dependence of ionization on molecule size.

  4. Spin-Dependent Beats Created by Irradiation of Microwave Field Through a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagani, M. Bagheri; Soleimani, H. Rahimpour

    We study spin-dependent transport through a quantum dot with Zeeman split levels coupled to ferromagnetic leads and under influence of microwave irradiation. Current polarization, spin current, spin accumulation and tunneling magnetoresistance are analyzed using nonequilibrium Green's function formalism and rate equations. Spin-dependent beats in spin resolved currents are observed. The effects of magnetic field, temperature and Coulomb interaction on these beats are studied.

  5. The Strength and Radial Profile of the Coronal Magnetic Field from the Standoff Distance of a Coronal Mass Ejection-driven Shock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji

    2011-07-01

    We determine the coronal magnetic field strength in the heliocentric distance range 6-23 solar radii (Rs) by measuring the shock standoff distance and the radius of curvature of the flux rope during the 2008 March 25 coronal mass ejection imaged by white-light coronagraphs. Assuming the adiabatic index, we determine the Alfvén Mach number, and hence the Alfvén speed in the ambient medium using the measured shock speed. By measuring the upstream plasma density using polarization brightness images, we finally get the magnetic field strength upstream of the shock. The estimated magnetic field decreases from ~48 mG around 6 Rs to 8 mG at 23 Rs. The radial profile of the magnetic field can be described by a power law in agreement with other estimates at similar heliocentric distances.

  6. The Strength and Radial Profile of the Coronal Magnetic Field from the Standoff Distance of a Coronal Mass Ejection-Driven Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gopalswamy, Nat; Yashiro, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    We determine the coronal magnetic field strength in the heliocentric distance range 6-23 solar radii (Rs) by measuring the shock standoff distance and the radius of curvature of the flux rope during the 2008 March 25 coronal mass ejection imaged by white-light coronagraphs. Assuming the adiabatic index, we determine the Alfven Mach number, and hence the Alfven speed in the ambient medium using the measured shock speed. By measuring the upstream plasma density using polarization brightness images, we finally get the magnetic field strength upstream of the shock. The estimated magnetic field decreases from approximately 48 mG around 6 Rs to 8 mG at 23 Rs. The radial profile of the magnetic field can be described by a power law in agreement with other estimates at similar heliocentric distances.

  7. Analysis of the static magnetic field-dependent optical transmission of Ni nanorod colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krämer, Florian; Gratz, Micha; Tschöpe, Andreas

    2016-07-01

    The magnetic field-dependent optical transmission of dilute Ni nanorod aqueous suspensions was investigated. A series of four samples of nanorods were synthesized using the AAO template method and processed to stable colloids. The distributions of their length and diameter were characterized by analysis of TEM images and revealed average diameters of ˜25 nm and different lengths in the range of 60 nm-1100 nm. The collinear magnetic and optical anisotropy was studied by static field-dependent transmission measurements of linearly polarized light parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field direction. The experimental results were modelled assuming the field-dependent orientation distribution function of a superparamagnetic ensemble for the uniaxial ferromagnetic nanorods in liquid dispersion and extinction cross sections for longitudinal and transversal optical polarization derived from different approaches, including the electrostatic approximation and the separation of variables method, both applied to spheroidal particles, as well as finite element method simulations of spheroids and capped cylindrical particles. The extinction cross sections were compared to reveal the differences associated with the approximations of homogeneous polarization and/or particle shape. The consequences of these approximations for the quantitative analysis of magnetic field-dependent optical transmission measurements were investigated and a reliable protocol derived. Furthermore, the changes in optical cross sections induced by electromagnetic interaction between two nanorods in parallel end-to-end and side-by-side configuration as a function of their separation were studied.

  8. Electric-field dependence of electron drift velocity in 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, P. A.; Potapov, A. S.; Samsonova, T. P.; Grekhov, I. V.

    2016-09-01

    Room temperature isothermal forward current-voltage characteristics of mesa-epitaxial 4H-SiC Schottky diodes were measured at high electric fields (beyond 105 V/cm) in the 34-μm thick n-base doped at 1 × 1015 cm-3. The effect of diode self-heating on current was minimized when using single 4-ns pulses. The analytical formula was derived for the dependence of electron drift velocity on electric field along c-axis.

  9. Using a Combination of Experimental and Computational Methods to Explore the Impact of Metal Identity and Ligand Field Strength on the Electronic Structure of Metal Ions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pernicone, Naomi C.; Geri, Jacob B.; York, John T.

    2011-01-01

    In this exercise, students apply a combination of techniques to investigate the impact of metal identity and ligand field strength on the spin states of three d[superscript 5] transition-metal complexes: Fe(acac)[subscript 3], K[subscript 3][Fe(CN)[subscript 6

  10. Field-dependent critical state of high-Tc superconducting strip simultaneously exposed to transport current and perpendicular magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Cun; He, An; Yong, Huadong; Zhou, Youhe

    2013-12-15

    We present an exact analytical approach for arbitrary field-dependent critical state of high-T{sub c} superconducting strip with transport current. The sheet current and flux-density profiles are derived by solving the integral equations, which agree with experiments quite well. For small transport current, the approximate explicit expressions of sheet current, flux-density and penetration depth for the Kim model are derived based on the mean value theorem for integration. We also extend the results to the field-dependent critical state of superconducting strip in the simultaneous presence of applied field and transport current. The sheet current distributions calculated by the Kim model agree with experiments better than that by the Bean model. Moreover, the lines in the I{sub a}-B{sub a} plane for the Kim model are not monotonic, which is quite different from that the Bean model. The results reveal that the maximum transport current in thin superconducting strip will decrease with increasing applied field which vanishes for the Bean model. The results of this paper are useful to calculate ac susceptibility and ac loss.

  11. On the Dependence of the Ionospheric E-Region Electric Field of the Solar Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denardini, Clezio Marcos; Schuch, Nelson Jorge; Moro, Juliano; Araujo Resende, Laysa Cristina; Chen, Sony Su; Costa, D. Joaquim

    2016-07-01

    We have being studying the zonal and vertical E region electric field components inferred from the Doppler shifts of type 2 echoes (gradient drift irregularities) detected with the 50 MHz backscatter coherent (RESCO) radar set at Sao Luis, Brazil (SLZ, 2.3° S, 44.2° W) during the solar cycle 24. In this report we present the dependence of the vertical and zonal components of this electric field with the solar activity, based on the solar flux F10.7. For this study we consider the geomagnetically quiet days only (Kp <= 3+). A magnetic field-aligned-integrated conductivity model was developed for proving the conductivities, using the IRI-2007, the MISIS-2000 and the IGRF-11 models as input parameters for ionosphere, neutral atmosphere and Earth magnetic field, respectively. The ion-neutron collision frequencies of all the species are combined through the momentum transfer collision frequency equation. The mean zonal component of the electric field, which normally ranged from 0.19 to 0.35 mV/m between the 8 and 18 h (LT) in the Brazilian sector, show a small dependency with the solar activity. Whereas, the mean vertical component of the electric field, which normally ranges from 4.65 to 10.12 mV/m, highlight the more pronounced dependency of the solar flux.

  12. The development of the time dependence of the nuclear EMP electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Eng, C

    2009-10-30

    The nuclear electromagnetic pulse (EMP) electric field calculated with the legacy code CHAP is compared with the field given by an integral solution of Maxwell's equations, also known as the Jefimenko equation, to aid our current understanding on the factors that affect the time dependence of the EMP. For a fair comparison the CHAP current density is used as a source in the Jefimenko equation. At first, the comparison is simplified by neglecting the conduction current and replacing the standard atmosphere with a constant density air slab. The simplicity of the resultant current density aids in determining the factors that affect the rise, peak and tail of the EMP electric field versus time. The three dimensional nature of the radiating source, i.e. sources off the line-of-sight, and the time dependence of the derivative of the current density with respect to time are found to play significant roles in shaping the EMP electric field time dependence. These results are found to hold even when the conduction current and the standard atmosphere are properly accounted for. Comparison of the CHAP electric field with the Jefimenko electric field offers a direct validation of the high-frequency/outgoing wave approximation.

  13. Frictional strength, rate-dependence, and healing in DFDP-1 borehole samples from the Alpine Fault, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikari, Matt J.; Carpenter, Brett M.; Kopf, Achim J.; Marone, Chris

    2014-09-01

    The Alpine Fault in southern New Zealand is a major plate-boundary fault zone that, according to various lines of evidence, may be nearing the end of its seismic cycle and approaching earthquake failure. In order to better characterize this fault and obtain a better understanding of its seismic potential, two pilot boreholes have been completed as part of a larger drilling project. Samples representative of the major lithologic subdivisions of the fault zone at shallow (~ 100 m) depths were recovered and investigated in laboratory friction experiments. We show here that materials from within and very near the principal slip zone (PSZ) tend to exhibit velocity strengthening frictional behavior, and restrengthen (heal) rapidly compared to samples of the wall rock recovered near the PSZ. Fluid saturation causes the PSZ to be noticeably weaker than the surrounding cataclasites (μ = 0.45), and eliminates the velocity-weakening behavior in these cataclasites that is observed in dry tests. Our results indicate that the PSZ has the ability to regain its strength in a manner required for repeated rupture, but its ability to nucleate a seismic event is limited by its velocity-strengthening nature. We suggest that seismogenic behavior at depth would require alteration of the PSZ material to become velocity weakening, or that earthquake nucleation occurs either within the wall rock or at the interface between the wall rock and the PSZ. Coseismic ruptures which propagate to the surface have been inferred for previous earthquakes on the Alpine Fault, and may be facilitated by the slightly weaker PSZ material and/or high rates of healing in the PSZ which support fault locking and eventual stress drops.

  14. Nonequilibrium itinerant-electron magnetism: A time-dependent mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Secchi, A.; Lichtenstein, A. I.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2016-08-01

    We study the dynamical magnetic susceptibility of a strongly correlated electronic system in the presence of a time-dependent hopping field, deriving a generalized Bethe-Salpeter equation that is valid also out of equilibrium. Focusing on the single-orbital Hubbard model within the time-dependent Hartree-Fock approximation, we solve the equation in the nonequilibrium adiabatic regime, obtaining a closed expression for the transverse magnetic susceptibility. From this, we provide a rigorous definition of nonequilibrium (time-dependent) magnon frequencies and exchange parameters, expressed in terms of nonequilibrium single-electron Green's functions and self-energies. In the particular case of equilibrium, we recover previously known results.

  15. Ligand Field Strength Mediates Electron Delocalization in Octahedral [((H)L)2Fe6(L')m](n+) Clusters.

    PubMed

    Hernández Sánchez, Raúl; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Betley, Theodore A

    2015-09-01

    To assess the impact of terminal ligand binding on a variety of cluster properties (redox delocalization, ground-state stabilization, and breadth of redox state accessibility), we prepared three electron-transfer series based on the hexanuclear iron cluster [((H)L)2Fe6(L')m](n+) in which the terminal ligand field strength was modulated from weak to strong (L' = DMF, MeCN, CN). The extent of intracore M-M interactions is gauged by M-M distances, spin ground state persistence, and preference for mixed-valence states as determined by electrochemical comproportionation constants. Coordination of DMF to the [((H)L)2Fe6] core leads to weaker Fe-Fe interactions, as manifested by the observation of ground states populated only at lower temperatures (<100 K) and by the greater evidence of valence trapping within the mixed-valence states. Comproportionation constants determined electrochemically (Kc = 10(4)-10(8)) indicate that the redox series exhibits electronic delocalization (class II-III), yet no intervalence charge transfer (IVCT) bands are observable in the near-IR spectra. Ligation of the stronger σ donor acetonitrile results in stabilization of spin ground states to higher temperatures (∼300 K) and a high degree of valence delocalization (Kc = 10(2)-10(8)) with observable IVCT bands. Finally, the anionic cyanide-bound series reveals the highest degree of valence delocalization with the most intense IVCT bands (Kc = 10(12)-10(20)) and spin ground state population beyond room temperature. Across the series, at a given formal oxidation level, the capping ligand on the hexairon cluster dictates the overall properties of the aggregate, modulating the redox delocalization and the persistence of the intracore coupling of the metal sites.

  16. Effects of magnetic field strength and b value on the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative breast diffusion-weighted MRI

    PubMed Central

    Eghtedari, Mohammad; Fox, Patricia; Guvenc, Inanc; Yang, Wei T.; Dogan, Basak E.

    2016-01-01

    Background To evaluate the effect of b value or the magnetic field strength (B0) on the sensitivity and specificity of quantitative breast diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Methods A total of 126 patients underwent clinical breast MRI that included pre-contrast DWI imaging using b values of both 1,000 and 1,500 s/mm2 at either 1.5 T (n=86) or 3.0 T (n=40). Quantitative apparent diffusion coefficients (ADC) were measured and compared for 18 benign, 33 malignant lesions, and 126 normal breast tissues. Optimal ADCmean threshold for differentiating benign and malignant lesions was estimated and the effect of b values and B0 were examined using a generalized estimating equations (GEE) model. Results The optimal ADCmean threshold was 1.235×10–3 mm2/s for b value of 1,000 and 0.934×10–3 mm2/s for b value of 1,500. Using these thresholds, the sensitivities and specificities were 96% and 89% (b value =1,000, B0 =1.5 T), 89% and 98% (b value =1,000, B0 =3.0 T), 88% and 96% (b value =1,500, B0 =1.5 T), and 67% and 100% (b value =1,500, B0 =3.0 T). No significant difference was found between different B0 (P=0.26) or b values (P=0.28). Conclusions Better sensitivity is achieved with DWI of b value =1,000 than with b value =1,500. However, b value and B0 do not significantly impact diagnostic performance of DWI when using appropriate thresholds. PMID:27709073

  17. Comparison of Intravoxel Incoherent Motion Parameters across MR Imagers and Field Strengths: Evaluation in Upper Abdominal Organs.

    PubMed

    Barbieri, Sebastiano; Donati, Olivio F; Froehlich, Johannes M; Thoeny, Harriet C

    2016-06-01

    Purpose To determine the reproducibility of intravoxel incoherent motion (IVIM) parameters measured in upper abdominal organs with magnetic resonance (MR) imagers from different vendors and with different field strengths. Materials and Methods This prospective study was approved by the independent ethics committees of Kanton Bern and Kanton Zurich, and signed informed consent was obtained from all participants. Abdominal diffusion-weighted images in 10 healthy men (mean age, 37 years ± 8 [standard deviation]) were acquired by using 1.5- and 3.0-T MR imagers from three different vendors. Two readers independently delineated regions of interest that were used to measure IVIM parameters (diffusion coefficient [Dt], perfusion fraction [Fp], and pseudodiffusion coefficient [Dp]) in the left and right lobes of the liver, and in the pancreas, spleen, renal cortex, and renal medulla. Measurement reproducibility between readers was assessed with intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Variability across MR imagers was analyzed by using between- and within-subject coefficients of variation (CVs) and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Results Between-reader reproducibility was high for Dt (ICC, 94.6%), intermediate for Fp (ICC, 81.7%), and low for Dp (ICC, 69.5%). Between- and within-subject CVs of Dt were relatively high (>20%) in the left lobe of the liver and relatively low (<10%) in the renal cortex and renal medulla. CVs generally exceeded 15% for Fp values and 20% for Dp. ANOVA indicated significant differences (P < .05) between MR imagers. Conclusion IVIM parameters in the upper abdomen may differ substantially across MR imagers. (©) RSNA, 2015 Online supplemental material is available for this article. PMID:26678455

  18. Evidence for a dose-dependent effect of pulsed magnetic fields on pain processing.

    PubMed

    Robertson, John A; Juen, Nicole; Théberge, Jean; Weller, Julie; Drost, Dick J; Prato, Frank S; Thomas, Alex W

    2010-09-27

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used to investigate the dose-response relationship (sham, 100, 200, 1000 microT) between a pulsed extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELFMF) and acute thermal pain on the dominant right hand. Forty-seven participants were recruited, and pulsed ELFMF was applied through the MRI gradient system using a novel technique. Regions of interest (ROIs) matching those of previous studies were examined for a potential dose response. Significant correlations between applied field strength and change in BOLD activity were found in the anterior cingulate and the ipsilateral insula, indicating that there might be either a dose response or a threshold effect of the ELFMF. PMID:20643187

  19. Quantum logic gates from time-dependent global magnetic field in a system with constant exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Nenashev, A. V. Dvurechenskii, A. V.; Zinovieva, A. F.; Gornov, A. Yu.; Zarodnyuk, T. S.

    2015-03-21

    We propose a method that implements a universal set of one- and two-quantum-bit gates for quantum computation in a system of coupled electron pairs with constant non-diagonal exchange interaction. In our proposal, suppression of the exchange interaction is performed by the continual repetition of single-spin rotations. A small g-factor difference between the electrons allows for addressing qubits and avoiding strong magnetic field pulses. Numerical experiments were performed to show that, to implement the one- and two-qubit operations, it is sufficient to change the strength of the magnetic field by a few Gauss. This introduces one and then the other electron in a resonance. To determine the evolution of the two-qubit system, we use the algorithms of optimal control theory.

  20. Image Charge and Electric Field Effects on Hydrogen-like Impurity-bound Polaron Energies and Oscillator Strengths in a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardanyan, L. A.; Vartanian, A. L.; Asatryan, A. L.; Kirakosyan, A. A.

    2016-11-01

    By using Landau-Pekar variational method, the ground and the first excited state energies and the transition frequencies between the ground and the first excited states of a hydrogen-like impurity-bound polaron in a spherical quantum dot (QD) have been studied by taking into account the image charge effect (ICE). We employ the dielectric continuum model to describe the phonon confinement effects. The oscillator strengths (OSs) of transitions from the 1 s-like state to excited states of 2 s, 2 p x , and 2 p z symmetries are calculated as functions of the applied electric field and strength of the confinement potential. We have shown that with and without image charge effect, the increase of the strength of the parabolic confinement potential leads to the increase of the oscillator strengths of 1 s - 2 p x and 1 s - 2 p z transitions. This indicates that the energy differences between 1 s- and 2 p x - as well as 1 s- and 2 p z -like states have a dominant role determining the oscillator strength. Although there is almost no difference in the oscillator strengths for transitions 1 s - 2 p x and 1 s -2 p z when the image charge effect is not taken into account, it becomes significant with the image charge effect.