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Sample records for field theoretical approach

  1. A Field-Theoretic Approach to the Wiener Sausage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekovar, S.; Pruessner, G.

    2016-05-01

    The Wiener Sausage, the volume traced out by a sphere attached to a Brownian particle, is a classical problem in statistics and mathematical physics. Initially motivated by a range of field-theoretic, technical questions, we present a single loop renormalised perturbation theory of a stochastic process closely related to the Wiener Sausage, which, however, proves to be exact for the exponents and some amplitudes. The field-theoretic approach is particularly elegant and very enjoyable to see at work on such a classic problem. While we recover a number of known, classical results, the field-theoretic techniques deployed provide a particularly versatile framework, which allows easy calculation with different boundary conditions even of higher momenta and more complicated correlation functions. At the same time, we provide a highly instructive, non-trivial example for some of the technical particularities of the field-theoretic description of stochastic processes, such as excluded volume, lack of translational invariance and immobile particles. The aim of the present work is not to improve upon the well-established results for the Wiener Sausage, but to provide a field-theoretic approach to it, in order to gain a better understanding of the field-theoretic obstacles to overcome.

  2. Kaon photoproduction in field theoretic and multipoles approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mart, T.

    2017-07-01

    In this paper we review our strategy to update the phenomenological model Kaon-Maid, which has been used since the year of 2000 and starts to indicate some inconsistencies with the presently available experimental data. There are two approaches used to this end, i.e., the field-theoretic and multipoles models. The advantages and disadvantages of both models are briefly discussed.

  3. Field theoretical approach for bio-membrane coupled with flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oya, Y.; Kawakatsu, T.

    2013-02-01

    Shape deformation of bio-membranes in flow field is well known phenomenon in biological systems, for example red blood cell in blood vessel. To simulate such deformation with use of field theoretical approach, we derived the dynamical equation of phase field for shape of membrane and coupled the equation with Navier-Stokes equation for flow field. In 2-dimensional simulations, we found that a bio-membrane in a Poiseuille flow takes a parachute shape similar to the red blood cells.

  4. A field theoretical approach to the quasi-continuum method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Mrinal; Gavini, Vikram

    2011-08-01

    The quasi-continuum method has provided many insights into the behavior of lattice defects in the past decade. However, recent numerical analysis suggests that the approximations introduced in various formulations of the quasi-continuum method lead to inconsistencies—namely, appearance of ghost forces or residual forces, non-conservative nature of approximate forces, etc.—which affect the numerical accuracy and stability of the method. In this work, we identify the source of these errors to be the incompatibility of using quadrature rules, which is a local notion, on a non-local representation of energy. We eliminate these errors by first reformulating the extended interatomic interactions into a local variational problem that describes the energy of a system via potential fields. We subsequently introduce the quasi-continuum reduction of these potential fields using an adaptive finite-element discretization of the formulation. We demonstrate that the present formulation resolves the inconsistencies present in previous formulations of the quasi-continuum method, and show using numerical examples the remarkable improvement in the accuracy of solutions. Further, this field theoretic formulation of quasi-continuum method makes mathematical analysis of the method more amenable using functional analysis and homogenization theories.

  5. Quantum noise in the mirror-field system: A field theoretic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiang, Jen-Tsung; Wu, Tai-Hung; Lee, Da-Shin; King, Sun-Kun; Wu, Chun-Hsien

    2013-02-15

    We revisit the quantum noise problem in the mirror-field system by a field-theoretic approach. Here a perfectly reflecting mirror is illuminated by a single-mode coherent state of the massless scalar field. The associated radiation pressure is described by a surface integral of the stress-tensor of the field. The read-out field is measured by a monopole detector, from which the effective distance between the detector and mirror can be obtained. In the slow-motion limit of the mirror, this field-theoretic approach allows to identify various sources of quantum noise that all in all leads to uncertainty of the read-out measurement. In addition to well-known sources from shot noise and radiation pressure fluctuations, a new source of noise is found from field fluctuations modified by the mirror's displacement. Correlation between different sources of noise can be established in the read-out measurement as the consequence of interference between the incident field and the field reflected off the mirror. In the case of negative correlation, we found that the uncertainty can be lowered than the value predicted by the standard quantum limit. Since the particle-number approach is often used in quantum optics, we compared results obtained by both approaches and examine its validity. We also derive a Langevin equation that describes the stochastic dynamics of the mirror. The underlying fluctuation-dissipation relation is briefly mentioned. Finally we discuss the backreaction induced by the radiation pressure. It will alter the mean displacement of the mirror, but we argue this backreaction can be ignored for a slowly moving mirror. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The quantum noise problem in the mirror-field system is re-visited by a field-theoretic approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Other than the shot noise and radiation pressure noise, we show there are new sources of noise and correlation between them. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The noise correlations can

  6. Field-theoretical approach to a dense polymer with an ideal binary mixture of clustering centers.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, Riccardo; Müller-Nedebock, Kristian K

    2011-07-01

    We propose a field-theoretical approach to a polymer system immersed in an ideal mixture of clustering centers. The system contains several species of these clustering centers with different functionality, each of which connects a fixed number segments of the chain to each other. The field theory is solved using the saddle point approximation and evaluated for dense polymer melts using the random phase approximation. We find a short-ranged effective intersegment interaction with strength dependent on the average segment density and discuss the structure factor within this approximation. We also determine the fractions of linkers of the different functionalities.

  7. Stochastic modeling and generation of random fields of elasticity tensors: A unified information-theoretic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staber, Brian; Guilleminot, Johann

    2017-06-01

    In this Note, we present a unified approach to the information-theoretic modeling and simulation of a class of elasticity random fields, for all physical symmetry classes. The new stochastic representation builds upon a Walpole tensor decomposition, which allows the maximum entropy constraints to be decoupled in accordance with the tensor (sub)algebras associated with the class under consideration. In contrast to previous works where the construction was carried out on the scalar-valued Walpole coordinates, the proposed strategy involves both matrix-valued and scalar-valued random fields. This enables, in particular, the construction of a generation algorithm based on a memoryless transformation, hence improving the computational efficiency of the framework. Two applications involving weak symmetries and sampling over spherical and cylindrical geometries are subsequently provided. These numerical experiments are relevant to the modeling of elastic interphases in nanocomposites, as well as to the simulation of spatially dependent wood properties for instance.

  8. Regulation of cellular function via electromagnetic field frequency and extracellular environment: A theoretical- experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2015-03-01

    Application of external electric field (EF) as a non-pharmacological, non-invasive tool to control cell function is of great therapeutic interest. We developed a theoretical-experimental approach to investigate the biophysical mechanisms of EF interaction with cells in electrode-free physiologically-relevant configuration. Our numerical results demonstrated that EF frequency is the major parameter to control cell response to EF. Non-oscillating or low-frequency EF leads to charge accumulation on the cell surface membrane that may mediate membrane initiated cell responses. In contrast, high-frequency EF penetrates the cell membrane and reaches cell cytoplasm, where it may directly activate intracellular responses. The theoretical predictions were confirmed in our experimental studies of the effects of applied EF on vascular cell function. Results show that non-oscillating EF increases vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression while field polarity controls cell adhesion rate. High-frequency, but not low frequency, EF provides differential regulation of cytoplasmic focal adhesion kinase and VEGF expression depending on the substrate, with increased expression in cells cultured on RGD-rich synthetic hydrogels, and decreased expression for matrigel culture. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  9. Quantum-field-theoretical approach to phase-space techniques: Generalizing the positive-P representation

    SciTech Connect

    Plimak, L.I.; Fleischhauer, M.; Olsen, M.K.; Collett, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    We present an introduction to phase-space techniques (PST) based on a quantum-field-theoretical (QFT) approach. In addition to bridging the gap between PST and QFT, our approach results in a number of generalizations of the PST. First, for problems where the usual PST do not result in a genuine Fokker-Planck equation (even after phase-space doubling) and hence fail to produce a stochastic differential equation (SDE), we show how the system in question may be approximated via stochastic difference equations (S{delta}E). Second, we show that introducing sources into the SDE's (or S{delta}E's) generalizes them to a full quantum nonlinear stochastic response problem (thus generalizing Kubo's linear reaction theory to a quantum nonlinear stochastic response theory). Third, we establish general relations linking quantum response properties of the system in question to averages of operator products ordered in a way different from time normal. This extends PST to a much wider assemblage of operator products than are usually considered in phase-space approaches. In all cases, our approach yields a very simple and straightforward way of deriving stochastic equations in phase space.

  10. Coarse-grained model of glycosaminoglycans in aqueous salt solutions. A field-theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Andrei L; Budkov, Yurij A; Nogovitsyn, Evgenij A

    2014-11-20

    We present results of self-consistent field calculations of thermodynamic and structural properties of glycosaminoglycans (chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid, and heparin) in aqueous solutions with added monovalent and divalent salts. A semiphenomenological coarse-grained model for semiflexible polyelectrolyte chains in solution is proposed. The coarse-grained model permits one to focus on the essential features of these systems and provides significant computational advantages with respect to more detailed models. Our approach relies on the method of Gaussian equivalent representation for the calculation of the partition functions in the form of functional integrals. This method provides reliable thermodynamic information for polyelectrolyte solutions over wide ranges of monomer concentrations. In the present work, we use the comparison and fitting of the experimental osmotic pressure with a theoretical equation of state within the Gaussian equivalent representation. The degrees of ionization, radii of gyration, persistence lengths, and structure factors of chondroitin sulfate, hyaluronic acid, and heparin in aqueous solutions with added monovalent and divalent salts are calculated and discussed.

  11. Margins of freedom: a field-theoretic approach to class-based health dispositions and practices.

    PubMed

    Burnett, Patrick John; Veenstra, Gerry

    2017-09-01

    Pierre Bourdieu's theory of practice situates social practices in the relational interplay between experiential mental phenomena (habitus), resources (capitals) and objective social structures (fields). When applied to class-based practices in particular, the overarching field of power within which social classes are potentially made manifest is the primary field of interest. Applying relational statistical techniques to original survey data from Toronto and Vancouver, Canada, we investigated whether smoking, engaging in physical activity and consuming fruit and vegetables are dispersed in a three-dimensional field of power shaped by economic and cultural capitals and cultural dispositions and practices. We find that aesthetic dispositions and flexibility of developing and established dispositions are associated with positioning in the Canadian field of power and embedded in the logics of the health practices dispersed in the field. From this field-theoretic perspective, behavioural change requires the disruption of existing relations of harmony between the habitus of agents, the fields within which the practices are enacted and the capitals that inform and enforce the mores and regularities of the fields. The three-dimensional model can be explored at: http://relational-health.ca/margins-freedom. © 2017 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness.

  12. Field Theory in Organizational Psychology: An Analysis of Theoretical Approaches in Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Joseph E.

    This literature review examines Kurt Lewin's influence in leadership psychology. Characteristics of field theory are described in detail and utilized in analyzing leadership research, including the trait approach, leader behavior studies, contingency theory, path-goal theory, and leader decision theory. Important trends in leadership research are…

  13. Field Theory in Organizational Psychology: An Analysis of Theoretical Approaches in Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Joseph E.

    This literature review examines Kurt Lewin's influence in leadership psychology. Characteristics of field theory are described in detail and utilized in analyzing leadership research, including the trait approach, leader behavior studies, contingency theory, path-goal theory, and leader decision theory. Important trends in leadership research are…

  14. Theoretical Approaches to Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempa, Krzysztof

    Nanoparticles can be viewed as wave resonators. Involved waves are, for example, carrier waves, plasmon waves, polariton waves, etc. A few examples of successful theoretical treatments that follow this approach are given. In one, an effective medium theory of a nanoparticle composite is presented. In another, plasmon polaritonic solutions allow to extend concepts of radio technology, such as an antenna and a coaxial transmission line, to the visible frequency range.

  15. Field theoretic approach to dynamical orbital localization in ab initio molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Jordan W.; Iftimie, Radu; Tuckerman, Mark E.

    2004-03-01

    Techniques from gauge-field theory are employed to derive an alternative formulation of the Car-Parrinello ab initio molecular-dynamics method that allows maximally localized Wannier orbitals to be generated dynamically as the calculation proceeds. In particular, the Car-Parrinello Lagrangian is mapped onto an SU(n) non-Abelian gauge-field theory and the fictitious kinetic energy in the Car-Parrinello Lagrangian is modified to yield a fully gauge-invariant form. The Dirac gauge-fixing method is then employed to derive a set of equations of motion that automatically maintain orbital locality by restricting the orbitals to remain in the “Wannier gauge.” An approximate algorithm for integrating the equations of motion that is stable and maintains orbital locality is then developed based on the exact equations of motion. It is shown in a realistic application (64 water molecules plus one hydrogen-chloride molecule in a periodic box) that orbital locality can be maintained with only a modest increase in CPU time. The ability to keep orbitals localized in an ab initio molecular-dynamics calculation is a crucial ingredient in the development of emerging linear scaling approaches.

  16. A Functional Generalization of the Field-Theoretical Renormalization Group Approach for the Single-Impurity Anderson Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Hermann; Corrêa, Eberth

    2012-02-01

    We apply a functional implementation of the field-theoretical renormalization group (RG) method up to two loops to the single-impurity Anderson model. To achieve this, we follow a RG strategy similar to that proposed by Vojta et al. (in Phys. Rev. Lett. 85:4940, 2000), which consists of defining a soft ultraviolet regulator in the space of Matsubara frequencies for the renormalized Green's function. Then we proceed to derive analytically and solve numerically integro-differential flow equations for the effective couplings and the quasiparticle weight of the present model, which fully treat the interplay of particle-particle and particle-hole parquet diagrams and the effect of the two-loop self-energy feedback into them. We show that our results correctly reproduce accurate numerical renormalization group data for weak to slightly moderate interactions. These results are in excellent agreement with other functional Wilsonian RG works available in the literature. Since the field-theoretical RG method turns out to be easier to implement at higher loops than the Wilsonian approach, higher-order calculations within the present approach could improve further the results for this model at stronger couplings. We argue that the present RG scheme could thus offer a possible alternative to other functional RG methods to describe electronic correlations within this model.

  17. Thematic Approach to Theoretical Speculations in the Field of Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Jae

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is a critical reflection on the field of educational administration and its varied and often conflicting epistemologies. It is argued that the field of educational administration is a community of diverse epistemologies. Although epistemological heterogeneity has been persistently vilified by both theorists and…

  18. A theoretical approach based on electromagnetic scattering for analysing dielectric shimming in high-field MRI.

    PubMed

    Brink, Wyger M; Remis, Rob F; Webb, Andrew G

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we analyzed dielectric shimming by formulating it as an electromagnetic scattering problem using integral equations. Three-dimensional simulations of the radiofrequency field in two configurations using different materials were analyzed in terms of induced currents and secondary fields. A two-dimensional integral equation method with different backgrounds was used to identify the underlying physical mechanisms. This framework was then used to develop an inversion method for the design of dielectric pads. The effects of a dielectric pad can be attributed to the interference of a secondary field that is produced by the currents induced in the dielectric pad, radiating in an inhomogeneous background. The integral equation method with inhomogeneous background reduces the complexity of the forward and inverse problem significantly and can be used to optimize the permittivity distribution for a desired B1+ field. Agreement with experimental B1+ maps was obtained in a cylindrical phantom, demonstrating the validity of the method. The integral equation method with inhomogeneous background yields an efficient numerical framework for the analysis and inverse design of dielectric shimming materials. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. A field-theoretic approach to the May-Leonard cyclic population dynamics model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serrao, Shannon; Täuber, Uwe

    Spatially extended stochastic population dynamics models with cyclic predation interactions display intriguing time evolution and spontaneous structure formation. We study a version of the May-Leonard cyclic competition model in d dimensions with diffusive particle propagation. We use the second-quantized Doi-Peliti formalism and ensuing coherent-state path integral representation to construct its continuum representation and explore its collective dynamics. Expanding the resulting action about the mean-field species concentrations enables us to compute the diagonalized harmonic propagators and hence 'masses', i.e., relaxation rates and eigenfrequencies of the fundamental modes. Furthermore, operating near the Hopf bifurcation point, we identify the validity range for the necessary time scale separation that allows us to project out the purely relaxing eigenmode. The remaining oscillating fields obey the complex Ginzburg-Landau equation, which is consistent with spiral pattern formation.

  20. Understanding the edge effect in TASEP with mean-field theoretic approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, J. J.; Zia, R. K. P.; Schmittmann, B.

    2009-01-01

    We study a totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP) with one defect site, hopping rate q < 1, near the system boundary. Regarding our system as a pair of uniform TASEP's coupled through the defect, we study various methods to match a finite TASEP and an infinite one across a common boundary. Several approximation schemes are investigated. Utilizing the finite segment mean-field (FSMF) method, we set up a framework for computing the steady state current J as a function of the entry rate α and q. For the case where the defect is located at the entry site, we obtain an analytical expression for J(α, q) which is in good agreement with Monte Carlo simulation results. When the defect is located deeper in the bulk, we refined the scheme of MacDonald et al (1968 Biopolymers 6 1) and find reasonably good fits to the density profiles before the defect site. We discuss the strengths and limitations of each method, as well as possible avenues for further studies.

  1. Field-theoretical Renormalization-Group approach to critical dynamics of crosslinked polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhamou, M.; Chahid, M.

    2008-09-01

    We consider a crosslinked polymer blend that may undergo a microphase separation. When the temperature is changed from an initial value towards a final one very close to the spinodal point, the mixture is out equilibrium. The aim is the study of dynamics at a given time t , before the system reaches its final equilibrium state. The dynamics is investigated through the structure factor, S(q, t) , which is a function of the wave vector q , temperature T , time t , and reticulation dose D . To determine the phase behavior of this dynamic structure factor, we start from a generalized Langevin equation (model C) solved by the time composition fluctuation. Beside the standard de Gennes Hamiltonian, this equation incorporates a Gaussian local noise, ζ . First, by averaging over ζ , we get an effective Hamiltonian. Second, we renormalize this dynamic field theory and write a Renormalization-Group equation for the dynamic structure factor. Third, solving this equation yields the behavior of S(q, t) , in space of relevant parameters. As result, S(q, t) depends on three kinds of lengths, which are the wavelength q-1, a time length scale R(t) thicksim t1/z , and the mesh size ξ* . The scale R(t) is interpreted as the size of growing microdomains at time t . When R(t) becomes of the order of ξ* , the dynamics is stopped. The final time, t * , then scales as t * thicksim ξ{ast z} , with the dynamic exponent z = 6 - η . Here, η is the usual Ising critical exponent. Since the final size of microdomains ξ* is very small (few nanometers), the dynamics is of short time. Finally, all these results we obtained from renormalization theory are compared to those we stated in some recent work using a scaling argument.

  2. Control Theoretic Approach to Iterative Methods for Large-scale Toeplitz-type Systems with Application to Magnetic Field Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Tomohito; Kashima, Kenji; Imura, Jun-Ichi; Miyazaki, Shuji; Morita, Hiroshi

    In this paper, stationary iterative methods for large-scale Toeplitz-type systems are investigated from a control theoretic point of view. We utilize spatially invariant structure of Toeplitz matrices, to avoid the curse of dimensionality arising in analysis and design of the convergence properties. Nonlinearities in the system are theoretically handled within the small gain and stability analysis for Lur'e systems. This theory enables us to achieve the desired global convergence of the proposed numerical scheme. We also evaluate the efficacy of the proposed method through an application to magnetic field analysis.

  3. Unusual dileptions at RHIC a field theoretic approach based on a non-equilibrium chiral phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, F.

    1997-09-22

    This paper contains viewgraphs on unusual dileptons at Brookhaven RHIC. A field theory approach is used based on a non-equilibrium chiral phase transformation utilizing the schroedinger and Heisenberg picture.

  4. Systematic theoretical investigation of the zero-field splitting in Gd(III) complexes: Wave function and density functional approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Shehryar; Kubica-Misztal, Aleksandra; Kruk, Danuta; Kowalewski, Jozef; Odelius, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The zero-field splitting (ZFS) of the electronic ground state in paramagnetic ions is a sensitive probe of the variations in the electronic and molecular structure with an impact on fields ranging from fundamental physical chemistry to medical applications. A detailed analysis of the ZFS in a series of symmetric Gd(III) complexes is presented in order to establish the applicability and accuracy of computational methods using multiconfigurational complete-active-space self-consistent field wave functions and of density functional theory calculations. The various computational schemes are then applied to larger complexes Gd(III)DOTA(H2O)-, Gd(III)DTPA(H2O)2-, and Gd(III)(H2O)83+ in order to analyze how the theoretical results compare to experimentally derived parameters. In contrast to approximations based on density functional theory, the multiconfigurational methods produce results for the ZFS of Gd(III) complexes on the correct order of magnitude.

  5. Hydrodynamic radius determination with asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation using decaying cross-flows. Part I. A theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Håkansson, Andreas; Magnusson, Emma; Bergenståhl, Björn; Nilsson, Lars

    2012-08-31

    Direct determination of hydrodynamic radius from retention time is an advantage of the field-flow fractionation techniques. However, this is not always completely straight forward since non-idealities exist and assumptions have been made in deriving the retention equations. In this study we investigate the effect on accuracy from two factors: (1) level of sophistication of the equations used to determine channel height from a calibration experiment and (2) the influence of secondary relaxation on the accuracy of hydrodynamic radius determination. A new improved technique for estimating the channel height from calibration experiments is suggested. It is concluded that severe systematic error can arise if the most common channel height equations are used and an alternative more rigorous approach is described. For secondary relaxation it is concluded that this effect increases with the cross-flow decay rate. The secondary relaxation effect is quantified for different conditions. This is part one of two. In the second part the determination of hydrodynamic radius are evaluated experimentally under similar conditions.

  6. Nano/macro-integrated neuromorphic sensorimotor automata--a bioinspired nanoscale field-theoretic approach to motility.

    PubMed

    Santoli, Salvatore

    2010-11-01

    The previously formulated tool dubbed Huyghens Engine, concerning information sensing, processing and actuating through wave motion in connection with the ubiquitous phenomenon of coupled oscillator synchronization, is applied here on the nanoscale for designing deeper metaphors of biosystem sensorimotor behaviour to attain the long sought-after bioinspired autonomous, self-propelled, walking, swimming or flying macro-/microsized robots. A nanoscale description of information processing is in terms of neural images of perception/action coherent flows of information by resonant coupling of inner nano-fields and external aerodynamic/hydrodynamic and gravitational fields in Lie group geometrizable classical functional spaces, possibly through Heisenberg's molecular field. This concerns both metaphor-free biomimicry and nanobiological research.

  7. Classical and quantum field-theoretical approach to the non-linear q-Klein-Gordon equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plastino, A.; Rocca, M. C.

    2016-11-01

    In the wake of efforts made Nobre and Rego-Monteiro in EPL, 97 (2012) 41001 and J. Math. Phys., 54 (2913) 103302, we extend them here by developing the conventional Lagrangian treatment of a classical field theory (FT) to the q-Klein-Gordon equation advanced in Phys. Rev. Lett., 106 (2011) 140601 and J. Math. Phys., 54 (2913) 103302 by the same authors, and the quantum theory corresponding to q=\\frac {3} {2} . This makes it possible to generate a putative conjecture regarding black matter. Our theory reduces to the usual FT for q→ 1 .

  8. Unification of theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Ming; Eugene Stanley, H; Braunstein, Lidia A

    2017-03-01

    Models of epidemic spreading on complex networks have attracted great attention among researchers in physics, mathematics, and epidemiology due to their success in predicting and controlling scenarios of epidemic spreading in real-world scenarios. To understand the interplay between epidemic spreading and the topology of a contact network, several outstanding theoretical approaches have been developed. An accurate theoretical approach describing the spreading dynamics must take both the network topology and dynamical correlations into consideration at the expense of increasing the complexity of the equations. In this short survey we unify the most widely used theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks in terms of increasing complexity, including the mean-field, the heterogeneous mean-field, the quench mean-field, dynamical message-passing, link percolation, and pairwise approximation. We build connections among these approaches to provide new insights into developing an accurate theoretical approach to spreading dynamics on complex networks.

  9. Unification of theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Ming; Stanley, H. Eugene; Braunstein, Lidia A.

    2017-03-01

    Models of epidemic spreading on complex networks have attracted great attention among researchers in physics, mathematics, and epidemiology due to their success in predicting and controlling scenarios of epidemic spreading in real-world scenarios. To understand the interplay between epidemic spreading and the topology of a contact network, several outstanding theoretical approaches have been developed. An accurate theoretical approach describing the spreading dynamics must take both the network topology and dynamical correlations into consideration at the expense of increasing the complexity of the equations. In this short survey we unify the most widely used theoretical approaches for epidemic spreading on complex networks in terms of increasing complexity, including the mean-field, the heterogeneous mean-field, the quench mean-field, dynamical message-passing, link percolation, and pairwise approximation. We build connections among these approaches to provide new insights into developing an accurate theoretical approach to spreading dynamics on complex networks.

  10. A gauge-theoretic approach to gravity

    PubMed Central

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2012-01-01

    Einstein's general relativity (GR) is a dynamical theory of the space–time metric. We describe an approach in which GR becomes an SU(2) gauge theory. We start at the linearized level and show how a gauge-theoretic Lagrangian for non-interacting massless spin two particles (gravitons) takes a much more simple and compact form than in the standard metric description. Moreover, in contrast to the GR situation, the gauge theory Lagrangian is convex. We then proceed with a formulation of the full nonlinear theory. The equivalence to the metric-based GR holds only at the level of solutions of the field equations, that is, on-shell. The gauge-theoretic approach also makes it clear that GR is not the only interacting theory of massless spin two particles, in spite of the GR uniqueness theorems available in the metric description. Thus, there is an infinite-parameter class of gravity theories all describing just two propagating polarizations of the graviton. We describe how matter can be coupled to gravity in this formulation and, in particular, how both the gravity and Yang–Mills arise as sectors of a general diffeomorphism-invariant gauge theory. We finish by outlining a possible scenario of the ultraviolet completion of quantum gravity within this approach. PMID:22792040

  11. A gauge-theoretic approach to gravity.

    PubMed

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2012-08-08

    Einstein's general relativity (GR) is a dynamical theory of the space-time metric. We describe an approach in which GR becomes an SU(2) gauge theory. We start at the linearized level and show how a gauge-theoretic Lagrangian for non-interacting massless spin two particles (gravitons) takes a much more simple and compact form than in the standard metric description. Moreover, in contrast to the GR situation, the gauge theory Lagrangian is convex. We then proceed with a formulation of the full nonlinear theory. The equivalence to the metric-based GR holds only at the level of solutions of the field equations, that is, on-shell. The gauge-theoretic approach also makes it clear that GR is not the only interacting theory of massless spin two particles, in spite of the GR uniqueness theorems available in the metric description. Thus, there is an infinite-parameter class of gravity theories all describing just two propagating polarizations of the graviton. We describe how matter can be coupled to gravity in this formulation and, in particular, how both the gravity and Yang-Mills arise as sectors of a general diffeomorphism-invariant gauge theory. We finish by outlining a possible scenario of the ultraviolet completion of quantum gravity within this approach.

  12. Theoretical approaches to metal chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Partridge, Harry; Halicioglu, Timur; Taylor, Peter R.

    1987-01-01

    Theoretical calculations on metals ranging from very accurate ab initio studies of diatomic and triatomic systems to model studies of larger clusters are presented. Recent improvements in the representation of one-particle and n-particle spaces have made possible the prediction that Al2 has a 3Pi(u) ground state, even though the 3Sigma(-)g state lies within 200/cm. Results suggest that cluster geometry varies dramatically with cluster size, and that rather large clusters are required before the bulk structure becomes optimal. Al cluster studies show that three-body terms are needed for quantitative agreement with ab initio calculations.

  13. Field-theoretical formulation of Regge–Teitelboim gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Sheykin, A. A. Paston, S. A.

    2016-12-15

    Theory of gravity is considered in the Regge–Teitelboim approach in which the pseudo-Rimannian space is treated as a surface isometrically embedded in an ambient Minkowski space of higher dimension. This approach is formulated in terms of a field theory in which the original pseudo-Rimannian space is defined by the field constant-value surfaces. The symmetry properties of the proposed theory are investigated, and possible structure of the field-theoretical Lagrangian is discussed.

  14. New Theoretical Approaches for Human-Computer Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    Presents a critique of recent theoretical developments in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) together with an overview of HCI practice. This chapter discusses why theoretically based approaches have had little impact on the practice of interaction design and suggests mechanisms to enable designers and researchers to better articulate…

  15. New Theoretical Approaches for Human-Computer Interaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Yvonne

    2004-01-01

    Presents a critique of recent theoretical developments in the field of human-computer interaction (HCI) together with an overview of HCI practice. This chapter discusses why theoretically based approaches have had little impact on the practice of interaction design and suggests mechanisms to enable designers and researchers to better articulate…

  16. Rethinking Theoretical Approaches to Stigma

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jack K; Lang, Annie; Olafsdottir, Sigrun

    2008-01-01

    A resurgence of research and policy efforts on stigma both facilitates and forces a reconsideration of the levels and types of factors that shape reactions to persons with conditions that engender prejudice and discrimination. Focusing on the case of mental illness but drawing from theories and studies of stigma across the social sciences, we propose a framework that brings together theoretical insights from micro, meso and macro level research: Framework Integrating Normative Influences on Stigma (FINIS) starts with Goffman’s notion that understanding stigma requires a language of social relationships, but acknowledges that individuals do not come to social interaction devoid of affect and motivation. Further, all social interactions take place in a context in which organizations, media and larger cultures structure normative expectations which create the possibility of marking “difference”. Labelling theory, social network theory, the limited capacity model of media influence, the social psychology of prejudice and discrimination, and theories of the welfare state all contribute to an understanding of the complex web of expectations shaping stigma. FINIS offers the potential to build a broad-based scientific foundation based on understanding the effects of stigma on the lives of persons with mental illness, the resources devoted to the organizations and families who care for them, and policies and programs designed to combat stigma. We end by discussing the clear implications this framework holds for stigma reduction, even in the face of conflicting results. PMID:18436358

  17. Solar and stellar activity - The theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belvedere, G.

    1985-10-01

    The unified approach to understanding solar and stellar activity is examined. Stellar activity observations have stimulated theoretical work, mostly within the framework of the alpha-omega dynamo theory. A number of uncertainties and intrinsic limits in dynamo theory do still exist, and these are discussed together with alternative or complementary suggestions. The relevance is stressed of nonlinear problems in dynamo theory - magnetoconvection, growth and stability of flux tubes against magnetic buoyancy, hydromagnetic global dynamos - to improve the understanding of both small and large scale interaction of rotation, turbulent convection and magnetic fields, and the transition from the linear to the nonlinear regime. Recent dynamo models of stellar activity are critically reviewed regarding the dependence of activity indexes and cycles on rotation rate and spectral type. Open problems to be solved by future work are outlined.

  18. A theoretical approach to measuring pilot workload

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantowitz, B. H.

    1984-01-01

    Theoretical assumptions used by researchers in the area of attention, with emphasis upon errors and inconsistent assumptions used by some researchers were studied. Two GAT experiments, two laboratory studies and one field experiment were conducted.

  19. New Theoretical Approach Integrated Education and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Gang

    2010-01-01

    The paper focuses on exploring new theoretical approach in education with development of online learning technology, from e-learning to u-learning and virtual reality technology, and points out possibilities such as constructing a new teaching ecological system, ubiquitous educational awareness with ubiquitous technology, and changing the…

  20. New Theoretical Approach Integrated Education and Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Gang

    2010-01-01

    The paper focuses on exploring new theoretical approach in education with development of online learning technology, from e-learning to u-learning and virtual reality technology, and points out possibilities such as constructing a new teaching ecological system, ubiquitous educational awareness with ubiquitous technology, and changing the…

  1. Speaking of Gender Identity: Theoretical Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Susan A.

    Various definitions of gender identity have ranged from recognition of one's biological sex to an individual's sense of masculinity or femininity. For the purpose of this paper, which examines some of the theoretical approaches to the subject, gender identity will be defined as "the degree to which individuals are 'aware' of and accept their…

  2. One-dimensional barcode reading: an information theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    Houni, Karim; Sawaya, Wadih; Delignon, Yves

    2008-03-10

    In the convergence context of identification technology and information-data transmission, the barcode found its place as the simplest and the most pervasive solution for new uses, especially within mobile commerce, bringing youth to this long-lived technology. From a communication theory point of view, a barcode is a singular coding based on a graphical representation of the information to be transmitted. We present an information theoretic approach for 1D image-based barcode reading analysis. With a barcode facing the camera, distortions and acquisition are modeled as a communication channel. The performance of the system is evaluated by means of the average mutual information quantity. On the basis of this theoretical criterion for a reliable transmission, we introduce two new measures: the theoretical depth of field and the theoretical resolution. Simulations illustrate the gain of this approach.

  3. Spinning fluids: A group theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capasso, Dario; Sarkar, Debajyoti

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a Lagrangian formulation of relativistic non-Abelian spinning fluids in group theory language. The corresponding Mathisson-Papapetrou equation for spinning fluids in terms of the reduction limit of the de Sitter group has been proposed. The equation we find correctly boils down to the one for nonspinning fluids. Two alternative approaches based on a group theoretical formulation of particle dynamics are also explored.

  4. Game Theoretic Approaches to Protect Cyberspace

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-20

    Theoretic Approaches to Protect Cyberspace 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER N00014-09-1-0752 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ...Sajjan Shiva, Dipankar Dasgupta, Qishi Wu 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ...PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER CS-10-001 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Office of Naval Research 875 North

  5. Sound velocity estimation: A system theoretic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Candy, J.V.; Sullivan, E.J.

    1993-07-30

    A system-theoretic approach is proposed to investigate the feasibility of reconstructing a sound velocity profile (SVP) from acoustical hydrophone measurements. This problem is based on a state-space representation of the normal-mode propagation model. It is shown that this representation can be utilized to investigate the so-called observability of the SVP from noisy measurement data. A model-based processor is developed to extract this information and it is shown that even in cases where limited SVP information is available, the SVP can be estimated using this approach.

  6. Theoretical and methodological approaches in discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Chris

    2004-10-01

    Discourse analysis (DA) embodies two main approaches: Foucauldian DA and radical social constructionist DA. Both are underpinned by social constructionism to a lesser or greater extent. Social constructionism has contested areas in relation to power, embodiment, and materialism, although Foucauldian DA does focus on the issue of power. Embodiment and materialism may be especially relevant for researchers of nursing where the physical body is prominent. However, the contested nature of social constructionism allows a fusion of theoretical and methodological approaches tailored to a specific research interest. In this paper, Chris Stevenson suggests a frame- work for working out and declaring the DA approach to be taken in relation to a research area, as well as to aid anticipating methodological critique. Method, validity, reliability and scholarship are discussed from within a discourse analytic frame of reference.

  7. Theoretical and methodological approaches in discourse analysis.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Chris

    2004-01-01

    Discourse analysis (DA) embodies two main approaches: Foucauldian DA and radical social constructionist DA. Both are underpinned by social constructionism to a lesser or greater extent. Social constructionism has contested areas in relation to power, embodiment, and materialism, although Foucauldian DA does focus on the issue of power Embodiment and materialism may be especially relevant for researchers of nursing where the physical body is prominent. However, the contested nature of social constructionism allows a fusion of theoretical and methodological approaches tailored to a specific research interest. In this paper, Chris Stevenson suggests a framework for working out and declaring the DA approach to be taken in relation to a research area, as well as to aid anticipating methodological critique. Method, validity, reliability and scholarship are discussed from within a discourse analytic frame of reference.

  8. Dynamical mean-field theoretical approach to explore the temperature-dependent magnetization in Ta-doped TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majidi, M. A.; Umar, A. S.; Rusydi, A.

    2017-04-01

    TiO2 has, in recent years, become a hot subject as it holds a promise for spintronic application. Recent experimental study on anatase Ti1-x Ta x O2 (x ~ 0.05) thin films shows that the system changes from non-magnetic to ferromagnetic due to Ti vacancies that are formed when a small percentage of Ti atoms are substituted by Ta. Motivated by those results that reveal the ferromagnetic phase at room temperature, we conduct a theoretical study on the temperature-dependent magnetization and the Currie temperature of that system. We hypothesize that when several Ti vacancies are formed in the system, each of them induces a local magnetic moment, then such moments couple each other through Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction, forming a ferromagnetic order. To study the temperature dependence of the magnetization and predict the Curie temperature, we construct a tight-binding based Hamiltonian for this system and use the method of dynamical mean-field theory to perform calculations for various temperatures. Our work is still preliminary. The model and method may need further improvement to be consistent with known existing facts. We present our preliminary results to show how the present model works.

  9. A decision theoretical approach for diffusion promotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Fei; Liu, Yun

    2009-09-01

    In order to maximize cost efficiency from scarce marketing resources, marketers are facing the problem of which group of consumers to target for promotions. We propose to use a decision theoretical approach to model this strategic situation. According to one promotion model that we develop, marketers balance between probabilities of successful persuasion and the expected profits on a diffusion scale, before making their decisions. In the other promotion model, the cost for identifying influence information is considered, and marketers are allowed to ignore individual heterogeneity. We apply the proposed approach to two threshold influence models, evaluate the utility of each promotion action, and provide discussions about the best strategy. Our results show that efforts for targeting influentials or easily influenced people might be redundant under some conditions.

  10. An information theoretic approach to pedigree reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Almudevar, Anthony

    2016-02-01

    Network structure is a dominant feature of many biological systems, both at the cellular level and within natural populations. Advances in genotype and gene expression screening made over the last few decades have permitted the reconstruction of these networks. However, resolution to a single model estimate will generally not be possible, leaving open the question of the appropriate method of formal statistical inference. The nonstandard structure of the problem precludes most traditional statistical methodologies. Alternatively, a Bayesian approach provides a natural methodology for formal inference. Construction of a posterior density on the space of network structures allows formal inference regarding features of network structure using specific marginal posterior distributions. An information theoretic approach to this problem will be described, based on the Minimum Description Length principle. This leads to a Bayesian inference model based on the information content of data rather than on more commonly used probabilistic models. The approach is applied to the problem of pedigree reconstruction based on genotypic data. Using this application, it is shown how the MDL approach is able to provide a truly objective control for model complexity. A two-cohort model is used for a simulation study. The MDL approach is compared to COLONY-2, a well known pedigree reconstruction application. The study highlights the problem of genotyping error modeling. COLONY-2 requires prior error rate estimates, and its accuracy proves to be highly sensitive to these estimates. In contrast, the MDL approach does not require prior error rate estimates, and is able to accurately adjust for genotyping error across the range of models considered. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Approaching nanoscale oxides: models and theoretical methods.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Stefan T; Moreira, Ibério de P R; Neyman, Konstantin M; Illas, Francesc

    2009-09-01

    This tutorial review deals with the rapidly developing area of modelling oxide materials at the nanoscale. Top-down and bottom-up modelling approaches and currently used theoretical methods are discussed with the help of a selection of case studies. We show that the critical oxide nanoparticle size required to be beyond the scale where every atom counts to where structural and chemical properties are essentially bulk-like (the scalable regime) strongly depends on the structural and chemical parameters of the material under consideration. This oxide-dependent behaviour with respect to size has fundamental implications with respect to their modelling. Strongly ionic materials such as MgO and CeO(2), for example, start to exhibit scalable-to-bulk crystallite-like characteristics for nanoparticles consisting of about 100 ions. For such systems there exists an overlap in nanoparticle size where both top-down and bottom-up theoretical techniques can be applied and the main problem is the choice of the most suitable computational method. However, for more covalent systems such TiO(2) or SiO(2) the onset of the scalable regime is still unclear and for intermediate sized nanoparticles there exists a gap where neither bottom-up nor top-down modelling are fully adequate. In such difficult cases new efforts to design adequate models are required. Further exacerbating these fundamental methodological concerns are oxide nanosystems exhibiting complex electronic and magnetic behaviour. Due to the need for a simultaneous accurate treatment of the atomistic, electronic and spin degrees of freedom for such systems, the top-down vs. bottom-up separation is still large, and only few studies currently exist.

  12. A graph theoretic approach to scene matching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ranganath, Heggere S.; Chipman, Laure J.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to match two scenes is a fundamental requirement in a variety of computer vision tasks. A graph theoretic approach to inexact scene matching is presented which is useful in dealing with problems due to imperfect image segmentation. A scene is described by a set of graphs, with nodes representing objects and arcs representing relationships between objects. Each node has a set of values representing the relations between pairs of objects, such as angle, adjacency, or distance. With this method of scene representation, the task in scene matching is to match two sets of graphs. Because of segmentation errors, variations in camera angle, illumination, and other conditions, an exact match between the sets of observed and stored graphs is usually not possible. In the developed approach, the problem is represented as an association graph, in which each node represents a possible mapping of an observed region to a stored object, and each arc represents the compatibility of two mappings. Nodes and arcs have weights indicating the merit or a region-object mapping and the degree of compatibility between two mappings. A match between the two graphs corresponds to a clique, or fully connected subgraph, in the association graph. The task is to find the clique that represents the best match. Fuzzy relaxation is used to update the node weights using the contextual information contained in the arcs and neighboring nodes. This simplifies the evaluation of cliques. A method of handling oversegmentation and undersegmentation problems is also presented. The approach is tested with a set of realistic images which exhibit many types of sementation errors.

  13. Information-theoretic approach to interactive learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Still, S.

    2009-01-01

    The principles of statistical mechanics and information theory play an important role in learning and have inspired both theory and the design of numerous machine learning algorithms. The new aspect in this paper is a focus on integrating feedback from the learner. A quantitative approach to interactive learning and adaptive behavior is proposed, integrating model- and decision-making into one theoretical framework. This paper follows simple principles by requiring that the observer's world model and action policy should result in maximal predictive power at minimal complexity. Classes of optimal action policies and of optimal models are derived from an objective function that reflects this trade-off between prediction and complexity. The resulting optimal models then summarize, at different levels of abstraction, the process's causal organization in the presence of the learner's actions. A fundamental consequence of the proposed principle is that the learner's optimal action policies balance exploration and control as an emerging property. Interestingly, the explorative component is present in the absence of policy randomness, i.e. in the optimal deterministic behavior. This is a direct result of requiring maximal predictive power in the presence of feedback.

  14. Potential theoretic methods for far field sound radiation calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hariharan, S. I.; Stenger, Edward J.; Scott, J. R.

    1995-01-01

    In the area of computational acoustics, procedures which accurately predict the far-field sound radiation are much sought after. A systematic development of such procedures are found in a sequence of papers by Atassi. The method presented here is an alternate approach to predicting far field sound based on simple layer potential theoretic methods. The main advantages of this method are: it requires only a simple free space Green's function, it can accommodate arbitrary shapes of Kirchoff surfaces, and is readily extendable to three-dimensional problems. Moreover, the procedure presented here, though tested for unsteady lifting airfoil problems, can easily be adapted to other areas of interest, such as jet noise radiation problems. Results are presented for lifting airfoil problems and comparisons are made with the results reported by Atassi. Direct comparisons are also made for the flat plate case.

  15. Theoretical and observational analysis of spacecraft fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neubauer, F. M.; Schatten, K. H.

    1972-01-01

    In order to investigate the nondipolar contributions of spacecraft magnetic fields a simple magnetic field model is proposed. This model consists of randomly oriented dipoles in a given volume. Two sets of formulas are presented which give the rms-multipole field components, for isotropic orientations of the dipoles at given positions and for isotropic orientations of the dipoles distributed uniformly throughout a cube or sphere. The statistical results for an 8 cu m cube together with individual examples computed numerically show the following features: Beyond about 2 to 3 m distance from the center of the cube, the field is dominated by an equivalent dipole. The magnitude of the magnetic moment of the dipolar part is approximated by an expression for equal magnetic moments or generally by the Pythagorean sum of the dipole moments. The radial component is generally greater than either of the transverse components for the dipole portion as well as for the nondipolar field contributions.

  16. Theoretical Analysis of a Model for a Field Displacement Isolator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    model for a field displacement isolator. Sharon, Ram Monterey, California. Naval Postgraduate School http://hdl.handle.net/10945/17975 Downloaded from...NPS Archive: Calhoun THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF A MODEL FOR A FIELD DISPLACEMENT ISOLATOR Ram Sharon NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL Monterey, California...THESIS Theoretical Analysis of a Model for a Field Displacement Isolator by Ram Sharon June 1976 Thesis Advisor: J. B. Knorr Approved for public release

  17. Child Language Acquisition: Contrasting Theoretical Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambridge, Ben; Lieven, Elena V. M.

    2011-01-01

    Is children's language acquisition based on innate linguistic structures or built from cognitive and communicative skills? This book summarises the major theoretical debates in all of the core domains of child language acquisition research (phonology, word-learning, inflectional morphology, syntax and binding) and includes a complete introduction…

  18. Child Language Acquisition: Contrasting Theoretical Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambridge, Ben; Lieven, Elena V. M.

    2011-01-01

    Is children's language acquisition based on innate linguistic structures or built from cognitive and communicative skills? This book summarises the major theoretical debates in all of the core domains of child language acquisition research (phonology, word-learning, inflectional morphology, syntax and binding) and includes a complete introduction…

  19. Preferences for Three Theoretically Derived Counseling Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holen, Michael C.; Kinsey, William M.

    1975-01-01

    This study examined differences in potential-client preference and believed effectiveness for counseling approaches. Analyses of responses to randomly ordered same-client, same-problem tapes of each approach indicated that the behavioral approach was significantly more highly preferred and believed more effective than either the client-centered or…

  20. Optimal information transfer in enzymatic networks: A field theoretic formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Himadri S.; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D.

    2017-07-01

    Signaling in enzymatic networks is typically triggered by environmental fluctuations, resulting in a series of stochastic chemical reactions, leading to corruption of the signal by noise. For example, information flow is initiated by binding of extracellular ligands to receptors, which is transmitted through a cascade involving kinase-phosphatase stochastic chemical reactions. For a class of such networks, we develop a general field-theoretic approach to calculate the error in signal transmission as a function of an appropriate control variable. Application of the theory to a simple push-pull network, a module in the kinase-phosphatase cascade, recovers the exact results for error in signal transmission previously obtained using umbral calculus [Hinczewski and Thirumalai, Phys. Rev. X 4, 041017 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevX.4.041017]. We illustrate the generality of the theory by studying the minimal errors in noise reduction in a reaction cascade with two connected push-pull modules. Such a cascade behaves as an effective three-species network with a pseudointermediate. In this case, optimal information transfer, resulting in the smallest square of the error between the input and output, occurs with a time delay, which is given by the inverse of the decay rate of the pseudointermediate. Surprisingly, in these examples the minimum error computed using simulations that take nonlinearities and discrete nature of molecules into account coincides with the predictions of a linear theory. In contrast, there are substantial deviations between simulations and predictions of the linear theory in error in signal propagation in an enzymatic push-pull network for a certain range of parameters. Inclusion of second-order perturbative corrections shows that differences between simulations and theoretical predictions are minimized. Our study establishes that a field theoretic formulation of stochastic biological signaling offers a systematic way to understand error propagation in

  1. Planar dipolar polymer brush: field theoretical investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahalik, Jyoti; Kumar, Rajeev; Sumpter, Bobby

    2015-03-01

    Physical properties of polymer brushes bearing monomers with permanent dipole moments and immersed in a polar solvent are investigated using self-consistent field theory (SCFT). It is found that mismatch between the permanent dipole moments of the monomer and the solvent plays a significant role in determining the height of the polymer brush. Sign as well as magnitude of the mismatch determines the extent of collapse of the polymer brush. The mismatch in the dipole moments also affects the force-distance relations and interpenetration of polymers in opposing planar brushes. In particular, an attractive force between the opposing dipolar brushes is predicted for stronger mismatch parameter. Furthermore, effects of added monovalent salt on the structure of dipolar brushes will also be presented. This investigation highlights the significance of dipolar interactions in affecting the physical properties of polymer brushes. Csmd division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA.

  2. Efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymer solutions.

    PubMed

    Villet, Michael C; Fredrickson, Glenn H

    2014-12-14

    We present several developments that facilitate the efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymers by complex Langevin sampling. A regularization scheme using finite Gaussian excluded volume interactions is used to derive a polymer solution model that appears free of ultraviolet divergences and hence is well-suited for lattice-discretized field theoretic simulation. We show that such models can exhibit ultraviolet sensitivity, a numerical pathology that dramatically increases sampling error in the continuum lattice limit, and further show that this pathology can be eliminated by appropriate model reformulation by variable transformation. We present an exponential time differencing algorithm for integrating complex Langevin equations for field theoretic simulation, and show that the algorithm exhibits excellent accuracy and stability properties for our regularized polymer model. These developments collectively enable substantially more efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymers, and illustrate the importance of simultaneously addressing analytical and numerical pathologies when implementing such computations.

  3. Efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymer solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Villet, Michael C.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2014-12-14

    We present several developments that facilitate the efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymers by complex Langevin sampling. A regularization scheme using finite Gaussian excluded volume interactions is used to derive a polymer solution model that appears free of ultraviolet divergences and hence is well-suited for lattice-discretized field theoretic simulation. We show that such models can exhibit ultraviolet sensitivity, a numerical pathology that dramatically increases sampling error in the continuum lattice limit, and further show that this pathology can be eliminated by appropriate model reformulation by variable transformation. We present an exponential time differencing algorithm for integrating complex Langevin equations for field theoretic simulation, and show that the algorithm exhibits excellent accuracy and stability properties for our regularized polymer model. These developments collectively enable substantially more efficient field-theoretic simulation of polymers, and illustrate the importance of simultaneously addressing analytical and numerical pathologies when implementing such computations.

  4. Experimental and theoretical approaches to conscious processing.

    PubMed

    Dehaene, Stanislas; Changeux, Jean-Pierre

    2011-04-28

    Recent experimental studies and theoretical models have begun to address the challenge of establishing a causal link between subjective conscious experience and measurable neuronal activity. The present review focuses on the well-delimited issue of how an external or internal piece of information goes beyond nonconscious processing and gains access to conscious processing, a transition characterized by the existence of a reportable subjective experience. Converging neuroimaging and neurophysiological data, acquired during minimal experimental contrasts between conscious and nonconscious processing, point to objective neural measures of conscious access: late amplification of relevant sensory activity, long-distance cortico-cortical synchronization at beta and gamma frequencies, and "ignition" of a large-scale prefronto-parietal network. We compare these findings to current theoretical models of conscious processing, including the Global Neuronal Workspace (GNW) model according to which conscious access occurs when incoming information is made globally available to multiple brain systems through a network of neurons with long-range axons densely distributed in prefrontal, parieto-temporal, and cingulate cortices. The clinical implications of these results for general anesthesia, coma, vegetative state, and schizophrenia are discussed.

  5. An Interpolation Theoretic Approach to Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-11

    Control 3 2.1 Causal Analytic Mappinp ....................................... 3 2.2 Causal Optimisation Problem .................................... 3...will discuss below a new approach for the approximation of Riemann mappings (conformal equivalences from simply connected sub-domains of the complex...multivariable distributed systems. (This is the most general HOO- optimisation problem.) The procedure seems to be numerically robust as evidenced by its

  6. Understanding bimolecular machines: Theoretical and experimental approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goler, Adam Scott

    This dissertation concerns the study of two classes of molecular machines from a physical perspective: enzymes and membrane proteins. Though the functions of these classes of proteins are different, they each represent important test-beds from which new understanding can be developed by the application of different techniques. HIV1 Reverse Transcriptase is an enzyme that performs multiple functions, including reverse transcription of RNA into an RNA/DNA duplex, RNA degradation by the RNaseH domain, and synthesis of dsDNA. These functions allow for the incorporation of the retroviral genes into the host genome. Its catalytic cycle requires repeated large-scale conformational changes fundamental to its mechanism. Motivated by experimental work, these motions were studied theoretically by the application of normal mode analysis. It was observed that the lowest order modes correlate with largest amplitude (low-frequency) motion, which are most likely to be catalytically relevant. Comparisons between normal modes obtained via an elastic network model to those calculated from the essential dynamics of a series of all-atom molecular dynamics simulations show the self-consistency between these calculations. That similar conformational motions are seen between independent theoretical methods reinforces the importance of large-scale subdomain motion for the biochemical action of DNA polymerases in general. Moreover, it was observed that the major subunits of HIV1 Reverse Transcriptase interact quasi-harmonically. The 5HT3A Serotonin receptor and P2X1 receptor, by contrast, are trans-membrane proteins that function as ligand gated ion channels. Such proteins feature a central pore, which allows for the transit of ions necessary for cellular function across a membrane. The pore is opened by the ligation of binding sites on the extracellular portion of different protein subunits. In an attempt to resolve the individual subunits of these membrane proteins beyond the diffraction

  7. A perturbation theoretic approach to the Riccati equation for the Floquet energies, spectral intensities, and cutoff energy of harmonic generation in photon emission from nonadiabatic electron-transfer dynamics driven by infrared CW laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, Yuta; Arasaki, Yasuki; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2016-01-14

    A complicated yet interesting induced photon emission can take place by a nonadiabatic intramolecular electron transfer system like LiF under an intense CW laser [Y. Arasaki, S. Scheit, and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 161103 (2013)]. Behind this phenomena, the crossing point between two potential energy curves of covalent and ionic natures in diabatic representation is forced to oscillate, since only the ionic potential curve is shifted significantly up and down repeatedly (called the Dynamical Stark effect). The wavepacket pumped initially to the excited covalent potential curve frequently encounters such a dynamically moving crossing point and thereby undergoes very complicated dynamics including wavepacket bifurcation and deformation. Intramolecular electron transfer thus driven by the coupling between nonadiabatic state-mixing and laser fields induces irregular photon emission. Here in this report we discuss the complicated spectral features of this kind of photon emission induced by infrared laser. In the low frequency domain, the photon emission is much more involved than those of ultraviolet/visible driving fields, since many field-dressed states are created on the ionic potential, which have their own classical turning points and crossing points with the covalent counterpart. To analyze the physics behind the phenomena, we develop a perturbation theoretic approach to the Riccati equation that is transformed from coupled first-order linear differential equations with periodic coefficients, which are supposed to produce the so-called Floquet states. We give mathematical expressions for the Floquet energies, frequencies, and intensities of the photon emission spectra, and the cutoff energy of their harmonic generation. Agreement between these approximate quantities and those estimated with full quantum calculations is found to be excellent. Furthermore, the present analysis provides with notions to facilitate deeper understanding for the physical and

  8. A perturbation theoretic approach to the Riccati equation for the Floquet energies, spectral intensities, and cutoff energy of harmonic generation in photon emission from nonadiabatic electron-transfer dynamics driven by infrared CW laser fields.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Yuta; Arasaki, Yasuki; Takatsuka, Kazuo

    2016-01-14

    A complicated yet interesting induced photon emission can take place by a nonadiabatic intramolecular electron transfer system like LiF under an intense CW laser [Y. Arasaki, S. Scheit, and K. Takatsuka, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 161103 (2013)]. Behind this phenomena, the crossing point between two potential energy curves of covalent and ionic natures in diabatic representation is forced to oscillate, since only the ionic potential curve is shifted significantly up and down repeatedly (called the Dynamical Stark effect). The wavepacket pumped initially to the excited covalent potential curve frequently encounters such a dynamically moving crossing point and thereby undergoes very complicated dynamics including wavepacket bifurcation and deformation. Intramolecular electron transfer thus driven by the coupling between nonadiabatic state-mixing and laser fields induces irregular photon emission. Here in this report we discuss the complicated spectral features of this kind of photon emission induced by infrared laser. In the low frequency domain, the photon emission is much more involved than those of ultraviolet/visible driving fields, since many field-dressed states are created on the ionic potential, which have their own classical turning points and crossing points with the covalent counterpart. To analyze the physics behind the phenomena, we develop a perturbation theoretic approach to the Riccati equation that is transformed from coupled first-order linear differential equations with periodic coefficients, which are supposed to produce the so-called Floquet states. We give mathematical expressions for the Floquet energies, frequencies, and intensities of the photon emission spectra, and the cutoff energy of their harmonic generation. Agreement between these approximate quantities and those estimated with full quantum calculations is found to be excellent. Furthermore, the present analysis provides with notions to facilitate deeper understanding for the physical and

  9. Biophoton Emission:. Experimental Background and Theoretical Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Fritz-Albert; Gu, Qiao; Li, Ke-Hsueh

    Biophoton emission is a general phenomenon of living systems. It concerns a weak photon radiation from a few to some hundred photons per second, per square centimeter surface area, at least within the spectral region from 200 to 800 nm. The results indicate that biophoton emission can be assigned to a coherent field within living organisms, its functions being intra and intercellular regulation and communication. This review deals with some central results and their interpretation.

  10. Human body surface area: a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianfeng; Hihara, Eiji

    2004-04-01

    Knowledge of the human body surface area has important applications in medical practice, garment design, and other engineering sizing. Therefore, it is not surprising that several expressions correlating body surface area with direct measurements of body mass and length have been reported in the literature. In the present study, based on the assumption that the exterior shape of the human body is the result of convex and concave deformations from a basic cylinder, we derive a theoretical equation minimizing body surface area (BSA) at a fixed volume (V): BSA=(9pi VL)(0.5), where L is the reference length of the body. Assuming a body density value of 1,000 kg.m(-3), the equation becomes BSA=(BM.BH/35.37)(0.5), where BSA is in square meters, BM is the body mass in kilograms, and BH is the body height in meters. BSA values calculated by means of this equation fall within +/-7% of the values obtained by means of the equations available in the literature, in the range of BSA from children to adults. It is also suggested that the above equation, which is obtained by minimizing the outer body surface at a fixed volume, implies a fundamental relation set by the geometrical constraints governing the growth and the development of the human body.

  11. A graph theoretical approach to data fusion

    PubMed Central

    Žurauskienė, Justina; Kirk, Paul D.W.; Stumpf, Michael P.H.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of high throughput experimental techniques has resulted in a growing diversity of genomic datasets being produced and requiring analysis. Therefore, it is increasingly being recognized that we can gain deeper understanding about underlying biology by combining the insights obtained from multiple, diverse datasets. Thus we propose a novel scalable computational approach to unsupervised data fusion. Our technique exploits network representations of the data to identify similarities among the datasets. We may work within the Bayesian formalism, using Bayesian nonparametric approaches to model each dataset; or (for fast, approximate, and massive scale data fusion) can naturally switch to more heuristic modeling techniques. An advantage of the proposed approach is that each dataset can initially be modeled independently (in parallel), before applying a fast post-processing step to perform data integration. This allows us to incorporate new experimental data in an online fashion, without having to rerun all of the analysis. We first demonstrate the applicability of our tool on artificial data, and then on examples from the literature, which include yeast cell cycle, breast cancer and sporadic inclusion body myositis datasets. PMID:26992203

  12. A graph theoretical approach to data fusion.

    PubMed

    Žurauskienė, Justina; Kirk, Paul D W; Stumpf, Michael P H

    2016-04-01

    The rapid development of high throughput experimental techniques has resulted in a growing diversity of genomic datasets being produced and requiring analysis. Therefore, it is increasingly being recognized that we can gain deeper understanding about underlying biology by combining the insights obtained from multiple, diverse datasets. Thus we propose a novel scalable computational approach to unsupervised data fusion. Our technique exploits network representations of the data to identify similarities among the datasets. We may work within the Bayesian formalism, using Bayesian nonparametric approaches to model each dataset; or (for fast, approximate, and massive scale data fusion) can naturally switch to more heuristic modeling techniques. An advantage of the proposed approach is that each dataset can initially be modeled independently (in parallel), before applying a fast post-processing step to perform data integration. This allows us to incorporate new experimental data in an online fashion, without having to rerun all of the analysis. We first demonstrate the applicability of our tool on artificial data, and then on examples from the literature, which include yeast cell cycle, breast cancer and sporadic inclusion body myositis datasets.

  13. Information theoretic approaches to multidimensional neural computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzgerald, Jeffrey D.

    Many systems in nature process information by transforming inputs from their environments into observable output states. These systems are often difficult to study because they are performing computations on multidimensional inputs with many degrees of freedom using highly nonlinear functions. The work presented in this dissertation deals with some of the issues involved with characterizing real-world input/output systems and understanding the properties of idealized systems using information theoretic methods. Using the principle of maximum entropy, a family of models are created that are consistent with certain measurable correlations from an input/output dataset but are maximally unbiased in all other respects, thereby eliminating all unjustified assumptions about the computation. In certain cases, including spiking neurons, we show that these models also minimize the mutual information. This property gives one the advantage of being able to identify the relevant input/output statistics by calculating their information content. We argue that these maximum entropy models provide a much needed quantitative framework for characterizing and understanding sensory processing neurons that are selective for multiple stimulus features. To demonstrate their usefulness, these ideas are applied to neural recordings from macaque retina and thalamus. These neurons, which primarily respond to two stimulus features, are shown to be well described using only first and second order statistics, indicating that their firing rates encode information about stimulus correlations. In addition to modeling multi-feature computations in the relevant feature space, we also show that maximum entropy models are capable of discovering the relevant feature space themselves. This technique overcomes the disadvantages of two commonly used dimensionality reduction methods and is explored using several simulated neurons, as well as retinal and thalamic recordings. Finally, we ask how neurons in a

  14. Biosensor commercialization strategy - a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Tsai; Wang, Su-Man

    2005-01-01

    Biosensors are analytical devices, which use biological interactions to provide either qualitative or quantitative results. They are extensively employed in many fields such as clinical diagnosis and biomedicine, military applications, anti-terrorism, farm, garden and veterinary analysis, process control, fermentation control and analysis, pharmaceutical and drug analysis, food and drink production and analysis, pollution control and monitoring, microbiology, bacterial and viral analysis, mining, and industrial and toxic gases. The biosensor market has significantly increased and will be mushrooming in the next decade. The total biosensor market is estimated to be 10.8 billion dollars by 2007. The emerging biosensor market presents both opportunities and obstacles to start-up biosensor entrepreneurs. The major challenge and threat for these entrepreneurs is how to predict the biosensor market and how to convert promising biosensor technology into commercialized biosensors. By adopting a simple commercialization strategy framework, we identify two key elements of biosensor commercialization strategy: excludability and complementary asset. We further divide biosensor commercialization environments into four distinct sub-environments: the Attacker's Advantage, Reputation-Based Idea Trading, Greenfield Competition and Ideas Factories. This paper explains how the interaction between these two key elements shapes biosensor commercialization strategy and biosensor industry dynamics. This paper also discusses alternative commercialization strategies for each specific commercialization environment and how to choose from these alternatives. The analysis of this study further provides a good reference for start-up biosensor entrepreneurs to formulate effective biosensor commercialization strategy.

  15. Theoretical approaches to lightness and perception.

    PubMed

    Gilchrist, Alan

    2015-01-01

    a better account of illusions and failures of constancy. Evidence for and against these approaches is reviewed.

  16. A first-principles theoretical approach to heterogeneous nanocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Negreiros, Fabio R; Aprà, Edoardo; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Vajda, Stefan; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2012-02-21

    A theoretical approach to heterogeneous catalysis by sub-nanometre supported metal clusters and alloys is presented and discussed. Its goal is to perform a computational sampling of the reaction paths in nanocatalysis via a global search in the phase space of structures and stoichiometry combined with filtering which takes into account the given experimental conditions (catalytically relevant temperature and reactant pressure), and corresponds to an incremental exploration of the disconnectivity diagram of the system. The approach is implemented and applied to the study of propylene partial oxidation by Ag(3) supported on MgO(100). First-principles density-functional theory calculations coupled with a Reactive Global Optimization algorithm are performed, finding that: (1) the presence of an oxide support drastically changes the potential energy landscape of the system with respect to the gas phase, favoring configurations which interact positively with the electrostatic field generated by the surface; (2) the reaction energy barriers for the various mechanisms are crucial in the competition between thermodynamically and kinetically favored reaction products; (3) a topological database of structures and saddle points is produced which has general validity and can serve for future studies or for deriving general trends; (4) the MgO(100) surface captures some major features of the effect of an oxide support and appears to be a good model of a simple oxide substrate; (5) strong cooperative effects are found in the co-adsorption of O(2) and other ligands on small metal clusters. The proposed approach appears as a viable route to advance the role of predictive computational science in the field of heterogeneous nanocatalysis. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  17. A first-principles theoretical approach to heterogeneous nanocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negreiros, Fabio R.; Aprà, Edoardo; Barcaro, Giovanni; Sementa, Luca; Vajda, Stefan; Fortunelli, Alessandro

    2012-02-01

    A theoretical approach to heterogeneous catalysis by sub-nanometre supported metal clusters and alloys is presented and discussed. Its goal is to perform a computational sampling of the reaction paths in nanocatalysis via a global search in the phase space of structures and stoichiometry combined with filtering which takes into account the given experimental conditions (catalytically relevant temperature and reactant pressure), and corresponds to an incremental exploration of the disconnectivity diagram of the system. The approach is implemented and applied to the study of propylene partial oxidation by Ag3 supported on MgO(100). First-principles density-functional theory calculations coupled with a Reactive Global Optimization algorithm are performed, finding that: (1) the presence of an oxide support drastically changes the potential energy landscape of the system with respect to the gas phase, favoring configurations which interact positively with the electrostatic field generated by the surface; (2) the reaction energy barriers for the various mechanisms are crucial in the competition between thermodynamically and kinetically favored reaction products; (3) a topological database of structures and saddle points is produced which has general validity and can serve for future studies or for deriving general trends; (4) the MgO(100) surface captures some major features of the effect of an oxide support and appears to be a good model of a simple oxide substrate; (5) strong cooperative effects are found in the co-adsorption of O2 and other ligands on small metal clusters. The proposed approach appears as a viable route to advance the role of predictive computational science in the field of heterogeneous nanocatalysis.

  18. Game theoretic approach for cooperative feature extraction in camera networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redondi, Alessandro E. C.; Baroffio, Luca; Cesana, Matteo; Tagliasacchi, Marco

    2016-07-01

    Visual sensor networks (VSNs) consist of several camera nodes with wireless communication capabilities that can perform visual analysis tasks such as object identification, recognition, and tracking. Often, VSN deployments result in many camera nodes with overlapping fields of view. In the past, such redundancy has been exploited in two different ways: (1) to improve the accuracy/quality of the visual analysis task by exploiting multiview information or (2) to reduce the energy consumed for performing the visual task, by applying temporal scheduling techniques among the cameras. We propose a game theoretic framework based on the Nash bargaining solution to bridge the gap between the two aforementioned approaches. The key tenet of the proposed framework is for cameras to reduce the consumed energy in the analysis process by exploiting the redundancy in the reciprocal fields of view. Experimental results in both simulated and real-life scenarios confirm that the proposed scheme is able to increase the network lifetime, with a negligible loss in terms of visual analysis accuracy.

  19. Dramaturgical and Music-Theoretical Approaches to Improvisation Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huovinen, Erkki; Tenkanen, Atte; Kuusinen, Vesa-Pekka

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this article is to assess the relative merits of two approaches to teaching musical improvisation: a music-theoretical approach, focusing on chords and scales, and a "dramaturgical" one, emphasizing questions of balance, variation and tension. Adult students of music pedagogy, with limited previous experience in improvisation,…

  20. Preservation of Newspapers: Theoretical Approaches and Practical Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasenay, Damir; Krtalic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    The preservation of newspapers is the main topic of this paper. A theoretical overview of newspaper preservation is given, with an emphasis on the importance of a systematic and comprehensive approach. Efficient newspaper preservation implies understanding the meaning of preservation in general, as well as understanding specific approaches,…

  1. Preservation of Newspapers: Theoretical Approaches and Practical Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasenay, Damir; Krtalic, Maja

    2010-01-01

    The preservation of newspapers is the main topic of this paper. A theoretical overview of newspaper preservation is given, with an emphasis on the importance of a systematic and comprehensive approach. Efficient newspaper preservation implies understanding the meaning of preservation in general, as well as understanding specific approaches,…

  2. Corporate Library Impact, Part I: A Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, William

    2004-01-01

    Drawing on library and information science, strategy, and organizational theory, this article presents a theoretical approach to the determination of corporate library contribution to its parent firm. This approach departs from previous work on this topic, which focused on corporate library contribution to corporate operations and standing,…

  3. A perturbation-theoretic approach to Lagrangian flow networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, Naoya; Kirchen, Kathrin; Donges, Jonathan F.; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-03-01

    Complex network approaches have been successfully applied for studying transport processes in complex systems ranging from road, railway, or airline infrastructures over industrial manufacturing to fluid dynamics. Here, we utilize a generic framework for describing the dynamics of geophysical flows such as ocean currents or atmospheric wind fields in terms of Lagrangian flow networks. In this approach, information on the passive advection of particles is transformed into a Markov chain based on transition probabilities of particles between the volume elements of a given partition of space for a fixed time step. We employ perturbation-theoretic methods to investigate the effects of modifications of transport processes in the underlying flow for three different problem classes: efficient absorption (corresponding to particle trapping or leaking), constant input of particles (with additional source terms modeling, e.g., localized contamination), and shifts of the steady state under probability mass conservation (as arising if the background flow is perturbed itself). Our results demonstrate that in all three cases, changes to the steady state solution can be analytically expressed in terms of the eigensystem of the unperturbed flow and the perturbation itself. These results are potentially relevant for developing more efficient strategies for coping with contaminations of fluid or gaseous media such as ocean and atmosphere by oil spills, radioactive substances, non-reactive chemicals, or volcanic aerosols.

  4. An integrated theoretical and practical approach for teaching hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonomi, Tullia; Fumagalli, Letizia; Cavallin, Angelo

    2013-04-01

    their limitations; C) by an evaluation process whose results contribute to the final examination, so that the students are evaluated on the basis of their ability to discuss theoretical subjects and/or projects and to resolving exercises and case studies either by hand calculations or by modelling. The applied hydrogeology examination is an example of the evaluation process. It involves development of a plan to resolve a real hydrogeological issue, such as the design of a hydraulic barrier for a landfill, the design of a well field to meet the supply requirements of a muncipality, or the control of possible seepage from a contaminated site close to to sensitive discharge features such as wells, springs, rivers. The students are allowed to work on computers for three consecutive mornings for a total 15 hours, and in the end are required to produce a technical report and a hydrogeological model. Obviously their solutions are neither unique nor completely optimized (just as in the real world), but the comparisons and debates among the students are important portals to learning and improvement. A second example: the groundwater pollution and remediation examination is based on the discussion of a remediation project elaborated in stages during the course, with the addition of increasing complex types of data and information. The students have one hour a week, during the course, to submit to the teacher their analysis of the problem and possible solutions. In ten years of experience all students have considered this method of examination a challenge, and found it engaging and helpful, even if unusual, at least in Italy. The University of Milano Bicocca has recently drilled a piezometric well both to monitor the flow of groundwater and to allow students to perform aquifer tests and to conduct standard groundwater sampling procedure, without any longer needing to rely on outside private donors for access to a field site. The overall approach, which includes, lectures

  5. Approach to Mars Field Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlberger, William; Rice, James W.; Parker, Timothy; Lipps, Jere H.; Hoffman, Paul; Burchfiel, Clark; Brasier, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The goals of field study on Mars are nothing less than to understand the processes and history of the planet at whatever level of detail is necessary. A manned mission gives us an unprecedented opportunity to use the immense power of the human mind to comprehend Mars in extraordinary detail. To take advantage of this opportunity, it is important to examine how we should approach the field study of Mars. In this effort, we are guided by over 200 years of field exploration experience on Earth as well as six manned missions exploring the Moon.

  6. Approach to Mars Field Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlberger, William; Rice, James W.; Parker, Timothy; Lipps, Jere H.; Hoffman, Paul; Burchfiel, Clark; Brasier, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The goals of field study on Mars are nothing less than to understand the processes and history of the planet at whatever level of detail is necessary. A manned mission gives us an unprecedented opportunity to use the immense power of the human mind to comprehend Mars in extraordinary detail. To take advantage of this opportunity, it is important to examine how we should approach the field study of Mars. In this effort, we are guided by over 200 years of field exploration experience on Earth as well as six manned missions exploring the Moon.

  7. Transformative Approaches to Student Voice: Theoretical Underpinnings, Recalcitrant Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fielding, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This article explores some of the theoretical underpinnings of radical approaches to student voice and examines a number of practical issues we need to address if we wish to move towards a more transformative future. The framework within which the notion of voice is explored and critiqued falls primarily into two categories. The first,…

  8. The Feminist Supervision Scale: A Rational/Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Dawn M.

    2003-01-01

    This article reports the development and psychometric properties of the Feminist Supervision Scale (FSS), a new scale designed to assess feminist supervision practices in clinical supervision. This 32-item measure was developed using a rational/theoretical approach of test construction and includes four subscales: (a) collaborative relationships,…

  9. The Feminist Supervision Scale: A Rational/Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szymanski, Dawn M.

    2003-01-01

    This article reports the development and psychometric properties of the Feminist Supervision Scale (FSS), a new scale designed to assess feminist supervision practices in clinical supervision. This 32-item measure was developed using a rational/theoretical approach of test construction and includes four subscales: (a) collaborative relationships,…

  10. The State and the Quality Agenda: A Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Filippakou, Ourania; Tapper, Ted

    2010-01-01

    This article adopts a theoretical approach to analyse the evolution of the quality agenda in English higher education. Using the concept of reification, it shows how the quasi-state has attempted to build a "natural" understanding of the idea of quality. However, the policy implementation process has demonstrated the fragility of the…

  11. Theoretical Approaches to Disability Content in Social Work Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilson, Stephen French; DePoy, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Analyzes disability theory and content in the social work curriculum and advances a theoretically expansive approach to disability that is consistent with social work's commitment to diversity and the elimination of oppression. Suggests shifting disability content from an emphasis on individual deficiency toward addressing disability as the…

  12. Magnetic Fields: A Comprehensive Theoretical Treatise for Practical Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoepfel, Heinz E.

    2000-06-01

    A unique resource for physicists and engineers working with magnetic fields An understanding of magnetic phenomena is essential for anyone working on the practical application of electromagnetic theory. Magnetic Fields: A Comprehensive Theoretical Treatise for Practical Use provides physicists and engineers with a thorough treatment of the magnetic aspects of classical electromagnetic theory, focusing on key issues and problems arising in the generation and application of magnetic fields. From magnetic potentials and diffusion phenomena to magnetohydrodynamics and properties of matter-topics are carefully selected for their relevance to the theoretical framework as well as current technologies. Outstanding in its organization, clarity, and scope, Magnetic Fields: Examines a wide range of practical problems, from magnetomechanical devices to magnetic acceleration mechanisms Opens each chapter with reference to pertinent engineering examples Provides sufficient detail enabling readers to follow the derivation of the results Discusses solution methods and their application to different problems Includes more than 300 graphs, 40 tables, 2,000 numbered formulas, and extensive references to the professional literature Reviews the essential mathematics in the appendices

  13. A queer-theoretical approach to community health psychology.

    PubMed

    Easpaig, Bróna R Nic Giolla; Fryer, David M; Linn, Seònaid E; Humphrey, Rhianna H

    2014-01-01

    Queer-theoretical resources offer ways of productively rethinking how central concepts such as 'person-context', 'identity' and 'difference' may be understood for community health psychologists. This would require going beyond consideration of the problems with which queer theory is popularly associated to cautiously engage with the aspects of this work relevant to the promotion of collective practice and engaging with processes of marginalisation. In this article, we will draw upon and illustrate the queer-theoretical concepts of 'performativity' and 'cultural intelligibility' before moving towards a preliminary mapping of what a queer-informed approach to community health psychology might involve.

  14. Field theoretical prediction of a property of the tropical cyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spineanu, F.; Vlad, M.

    2014-01-01

    The large scale atmospheric vortices (tropical cyclones, tornadoes) are complex physical systems combining thermodynamics and fluid-mechanical processes. The late phase of the evolution towards stationarity consists of the vorticity concentration, a well known tendency to self-organization , an universal property of the two-dimensional fluids. It may then be expected that the stationary state of the tropical cyclone has the same nature as the vortices of many other systems in nature: ideal (Euler) fluids, superconductors, Bose-Einsetin condensate, cosmic strings, etc. Indeed it was found that there is a description of the atmospheric vortex in terms of a classical field theory. It is compatible with the more conventional treatment based on conservation laws, but the field theoretical model reveals properties that are almost inaccessible to the conventional formulation: it identifies the stationary states as being close to self-duality. This is of highest importance: the self-duality is known to be the origin of all coherent structures known in natural systems. Therefore the field theoretical (FT) formulation finds that the cuasi-coherent form of the atmospheric vortex (tropical cyclone) at stationarity is an expression of this particular property. In the present work we examine a strong property of the tropical cyclone, which arises in the FT formulation in a natural way: the equality of the masses of the particles associated to the matter field and respectively to the gauge field in the FT model is translated into the equality between the maximum radial extension of the tropical cyclone and the Rossby radius. For the cases where the FT model is a good approximation we calculate characteristic quantities of the tropical cyclone and find good comparison with observational data.

  15. A note on the field-theoretical description of superfluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrianopoli, L.; D'Auria, R.; Grassi, P. A.; Trigiante, M.

    2014-02-01

    Recently, a Lagrangian description of superfluids attracted some interest from the fluid/gravity-correspondence viewpoint. In this respect, the work of Dubovksy et al. has proposed a new field theoretical description of fluids, which has several interesting aspects. On another side, we have recently provided a supersymmetric extension of the original works. In the analysis of the Lagrangian structures a new invariant appeared which, although related to known invariants, provides, in our opinion, a better parametrization of the fluid dynamics in order to describe the fluid/superfluid phases. Above the critical temperature TC the fluid has a normal behavior and is invariant under the chemical-shift symmetry [8]. It is described in terms of the comoving coordinates ϕI(x) and by the U(1)-phase field ψ(x).On the other hand, below the critical temperature the chemical-shift symmetry is spontaneously broken, giving rise to the superfluid. In particular, at T=0, the superfluid is completely described in terms of ψ. One can consider, following [9], an isotropic and homogeneous background where ψ=y0t, ϕI=b01/3xI. It corresponds to taking a configuration where the fields ϕI are comoving with the normal fluid part (which is at rest in this background), the superfluid field ψ being in relative motion with respect to it. Note that the loss of interactions between the two fluids is expressed by the property that ZI=∂μψ∂μϕI=0 in the background. Small perturbations about the background (28): ψ=y0(t+π0(x)), ϕI=b01/3(xI+πI(x)) introduce a small interaction term ZI≠0. Note that the quantity BIJ-1ZIZJ=ɛ stays small in this regime, even if ϕI→0 as T→0. Given these considerations, we can make use of the relation (18) to observe that at very low temperatures the quantity y2=-X+BIJ-1ZIZJ=-X+ɛ approaches the value -X, which is not invariant under the chemical-shift symmetry. In this regime the Lagrangian F(b,y) can be expanded in powers of ɛ around the

  16. Field-theoretic simulations of random copolymers with structural rigidity.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shifan; MacPherson, Quinn; Qin, Jian; Spakowitz, Andrew J

    2017-04-12

    Copolymers play an important role in a range of soft-materials applications and biological phenomena. Prevalent works on block copolymer phase behavior use flexible chain models and incorporate interactions using a mean-field approximation. However, when phase separation takes place on length scales comparable to a few monomers, the structural rigidity of the monomers becomes important. In addition, concentration fluctuations become significant at short length scales, rendering the mean-field approximation invalid. In this work, we use simulation to address the role of finite monomer rigidity and concentration fluctuations in microphase segregation of random copolymers. Using a field-theoretic Monte-Carlo simulation of semiflexible polymers with random chemical sequences, we generate phase diagrams for random copolymers. We find that the melt morphology of random copolymers strongly depends on chain flexibility and chemical sequence correlation. Chemically anti-correlated copolymers undergo first-order phase transitions to local lamellar structures. With increasing degree of chemical correlation, this first-order phase transition is softened, and melts form microphases with irregular shaped domains. Our simulations in the homogeneous phase exhibit agreement with the density-density correlation from mean-field theory. However, conditions near a phase transition result in deviations between simulation and mean-field theory for the density-density correlation and the critical wavemode. Chain rigidity and sequence randomness lead to frustration in the segregated phase, introducing heterogeneity in the resulting morphologies.

  17. Aircraft Control Strategies by Game Theoretic Approach against Wind Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Umemura, Akira

    The safety problem of aircraft that encounters wind shear during the final approach flight phase is addressed using a game theoretic approach. The game consists of two players, an aircraft and wind shear. The control scheme is composed of non-cooperative game between players. In the game, aircraft tries to fly to avoid crashing to ground and down burst attempts to force the aircraft to crash. A new control strategy based on nonlinear receding horizon control is applied to the game. It is shown by simulation that this control strategy is effective against wind shear.

  18. ELECTRON HOLOGRAPHY OF ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS - RECENT THEORETICAL ADVANCES.

    SciTech Connect

    BELEGGIA,M.; POZZI, G.; TONOMURA, A.

    2007-01-01

    It has been shown in this work that the Fourier space approach can be fruitfully applied to the calculation of the fields and the associated electron optical phase shift of several magnetic and electrostatic structures, like superconducting vortices in conventional and high-T{sub c} superconductors, reverse biased p-n junctions, magnetic domains and nanoparticles. In all these cases, this novel approach has led to unexpected but extremely interesting results, very often expressed in analytical form, which allow the quantitative and reliable interpretation of the experimental data collected by means of electron holography or of more conventional Lorentz microscopy techniques. Moreover, it is worth recalling that whenever long-range electromagnetic fields are involved, a physical model of the object under investigation is necessary in order to take into account correctly the perturbation of the reference wave induced by the tail of the field protruding into the vacuum. For these reasons, we believe that the Fourier space approach for phase computations we have introduced and discussed in this chapter will represent an invaluable tool for the investigation of electromagnetic fields at the meso- and nano-scale.

  19. Field theoretic simulations of the interfacial properties of complex coacervates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggleman, Robert; Fredrickson, Glenn

    2011-03-01

    Many biological processes and emerging technologies, such as wet adhesives and biosensors, rely on the association between oppositely charged polyelectrolytes. Such association is driven not only by the electrostatic interactions between the polyelectrolytes, but there is also a substantial entropy gain associated with counterion release upon complexation. In some cases, the association between oppositely charged polymers can lead to a solid precipitate while others can result in a fluid phase rich in polyelectrolytes (coacervate phase) coexisting with a polyelectrolyte-dilute solvent phase. For many of the applications seeking to exploit coacervation, characterization of the interface between the solvent phase and the coacervate is of paramount importance. In this talk, we will present the results of field-theoretic simulations for a coarse-grained polyelectrolyte model that exhibits complex coacervation. Our simulations sample the fully-fluctuating fields in three-dimensions and provide a detailed characterization of the interface between the solvent and the coacervate phase for symmetric polyelectrolytes (where both the polycations and the polyanions carry identical charge densities) as a function of salt concentration and strength of the electrostatic fields. Finally, we characterize the interfacial properties for a select set of asymmetric conditions.

  20. Theoretical and experimental examination of near-field acoustic levitation.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Hideyuki; Kamakura, Tomoo; Matsuda, Kazuhisa

    2002-04-01

    A planar object can be levitated stably close to a piston sound source by making use of acoustic radiation pressure. This phenomenon is called near-field acoustic levitation [Y. Hashimoto et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 100, 2057-2061 (1996)]. In the present article, the levitation distance is predicted theoretically by numerically solving basic equations in a compressible viscous fluid subject to the appropriate initial and boundary conditions. Additionally, experiments are carried out using a 19.5-kHz piston source with a 40-mm aperture and various aluminum disks of different sizes. The measured levitation distance agrees well with the theory, which is different from a conventional theory, and the levitation distance is not inversely proportional to the square root of the surface density of the levitated disk in a strict sense.

  1. New theoretical and experimental approaches on maternal motivation in mammals.

    PubMed

    Olazábal, Daniel E; Pereira, Mariana; Agrati, Daniella; Ferreira, Annabel; Fleming, Alison S; González-Mariscal, Gabriela; Lévy, Frederic; Lucion, Aldo B; Morrell, Joan I; Numan, Michael; Uriarte, Natalia

    2013-09-01

    Maternal behavior is expressed in different modalities, physiological conditions, and contexts. It is the result of a highly motivated brain, that allows the female to flexibily adapt her caring activities to different situations and social demands. To understand how mothers coordinate maternal and other motivated behaviors we discuss the limitations of current theoretical approaches to study maternal motivation (e.g. distinction between appetitive and consummatory behaviors), and propose a different approach (i.e. motorically active vs. passive motivations) and a distinction between maternal motivated state and maternal motivated behaviors. We review the evidence supporting dopamine mediation of maternal motivation and describe how different phases of the dopaminergic response - basal, tonic, and phasic release in the nucleus accumbens - relate to increased salience, invigorating behavior, and behavioral switching. The existing and new experimental paradigms to investigate maternal motivation, and its coexpression and coordination with other social or non-social motivations are also analyzed. An example of how specificity of motivational systems (e.g. maternal and sexual behavior at postpartum estrus) could be processed at the neural level is also provided. This revision offers new theoretical and experimental approaches to address the fundamental question of how mothers flexibly adapt and coordinate the different components of maternal behavior with other motivated behaviors, also critical for the survival of the species.

  2. Theoretical Approach to Electroresistance in Ferroelectric Tunnel Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Sou-Chi; Naeemi, Azad; Nikonov, Dmitri E.; Gruverman, Alexei

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a theoretical approach comprising the nonequilibrium Green's function method for electronic transport and the Landau-Khalatnikov equation for electric polarization dynamics is presented to describe polarization-dependent tunneling electroresistance (TER) in ferroelectric tunnel junctions. Using appropriate contact, interface, and ferroelectric parameters, the measured current-voltage characteristic curves in both inorganic (Co /BaTi O3/La0.67Sr0.33 MnO3 ) and organic (Au /PVDF /W ) ferroelectric tunnel junctions can be well described by the proposed approach. Furthermore, under this theoretical framework, the controversy of opposite TER signs observed experimentally by different groups in Co /BaTi O3/La0.67Sr0.33 MnO3 systems is addressed by considering the interface termination effects using the effective contact ratio defined through the effective screening length and dielectric response at the metal-ferroelectric interfaces. Finally, our approach is extended to investigate the role of a CoOx buffer layer at the Co /BaTi O3 interface in a ferroelectric tunnel memristor. It is shown that in order to have a significant memristor behavior not only the interface oxygen vacancies but also the CoOx layer thickness may vary with the applied bias.

  3. Computational approach for calculating bound states in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Q. Z.; Norris, S.; Brennan, R.; Stefanovich, E.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2016-09-01

    We propose a nonperturbative approach to calculate bound-state energies and wave functions for quantum field theoretical models. It is based on the direct diagonalization of the corresponding quantum field theoretical Hamiltonian in an effectively discretized and truncated Hilbert space. We illustrate this approach for a Yukawa-like interaction between fermions and bosons in one spatial dimension and show where it agrees with the traditional method based on the potential picture and where it deviates due to recoil and radiative corrections. This method permits us also to obtain some insight into the spatial characteristics of the distribution of the fermions in the ground state, such as the bremsstrahlung-induced widening.

  4. Theoretical Description of Teaching-Learning Processes: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordogna, Clelia M.; Albano, Ezequiel V.

    2001-09-01

    A multidisciplinary approach based on concepts from sociology, educational psychology, statistical physics, and computational science is developed for the theoretical description of teaching-learning processes that take place in the classroom. The emerging model is consistent with well-established empirical results, such as the higher achievements reached working in collaborative groups and the influence of the structure of the group on the achievements of the individuals. Furthermore, another social learning process that takes place in massive interactions among individuals via the Internet is also investigated.

  5. Theoretical description of teaching-learning processes: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Bordogna, C M; Albano, E V

    2001-09-10

    A multidisciplinary approach based on concepts from sociology, educational psychology, statistical physics, and computational science is developed for the theoretical description of teaching-learning processes that take place in the classroom. The emerging model is consistent with well-established empirical results, such as the higher achievements reached working in collaborative groups and the influence of the structure of the group on the achievements of the individuals. Furthermore, another social learning process that takes place in massive interactions among individuals via the Internet is also investigated.

  6. Considering children and health literacy: a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Borzekowski, Dina L G

    2009-11-01

    The theoretical approaches of Paulo Freire, Jean Piaget, and Lev Vygotsky frame the consideration of children and health literacy. This article includes a general discussion of literacy from the Freirian perspective. A definition of health literacy is then presented; first, the established meaning is introduced, but then a Freirian extension is proposed. Next, the theories of cognitive development by Piaget and Vygotsky are discussed, and examples related to children's health literacy are given. Finally, there is a discussion of why it is important to encourage and enable health literacy among children and adolescents.

  7. Theoretical analysis of magnetic field interactions with aortic blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Kinouchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, H.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1996-04-01

    The flow of blood in the presence of a magnetic field gives rise to induced voltages in the major arteries of the central circulatory system. Under certain simplifying conditions, such as the assumption that the length of major arteries (e.g., the aorta) is infinite and that the vessel walls are not electrically conductive, the distribution of induced voltages and currents within these blood vessels can be calculated with reasonable precision. However, the propagation of magnetically induced voltages and currents from the aorta into neighboring tissue structures such as the sinuatrial node of the heart has not been previously determined by any experimental or theoretical technique. In the analysis presented in this paper, a solution of the complete Navier-Stokes equation was obtained by the finite element technique for blood flow through the ascending and descending aortic vessels in the presence of a uniform static magnetic field. Spatial distributions of the magnetically induced voltage and current were obtained for the aortic vessel and surrounding tissues under the assumption that the wall of the aorta is electrically conductive. Results are presented for the calculated values of magnetically induced voltages and current densities in the aorta and surrounding tissue structures, including the sinuatrial node, and for their field-strength dependence. In addition, an analysis is presented of magnetohydrodynamic interactions that lead to a small reduction of blood volume flow at high field levels above approximately 10 tesla (T). Quantitative results are presented on the offsetting effects of oppositely directed blood flows in the ascending and descending aortic segments, and a quantitative estimate is made of the effects of assuming an infinite vs. a finite length of the aortic vessel in calculating the magnetically induced voltage and current density distribution in tissue.

  8. Theoretical, Methodological, and Empirical Approaches to Cost Savings: A Compendium

    SciTech Connect

    M Weimar

    1998-12-10

    This publication summarizes and contains the original documentation for understanding why the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) privatization approach provides cost savings and the different approaches that could be used in calculating cost savings for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Phase I contract. The initial section summarizes the approaches in the different papers. The appendices are the individual source papers which have been reviewed by individuals outside of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the TWRS Program. Appendix A provides a theoretical basis for and estimate of the level of savings that can be" obtained from a fixed-priced contract with performance risk maintained by the contractor. Appendix B provides the methodology for determining cost savings when comparing a fixed-priced contractor with a Management and Operations (M&O) contractor (cost-plus contractor). Appendix C summarizes the economic model used to calculate cost savings and provides hypothetical output from preliminary calculations. Appendix D provides the summary of the approach for the DOE-Richland Operations Office (RL) estimate of the M&O contractor to perform the same work as BNFL Inc. Appendix E contains information on cost growth and per metric ton of glass costs for high-level waste at two other DOE sites, West Valley and Savannah River. Appendix F addresses a risk allocation analysis of the BNFL proposal that indicates,that the current approach is still better than the alternative.

  9. A bilevel game theoretic approach to optimum design of flywheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghotbi, Ehsan; Dhingra, Anoop K.

    2012-11-01

    Multiobjective optimization problems arise frequently in mechanical design. One approach to solving these types of problems is to use a game theoretic formulation. This article illustrates the application of a bilevel, leader-follower model for solving an optimum design problem. In particular, the optimization problem is modelled as a Stackelberg game. The partitioning of variables between the leader and follower problem is discussed and a variable partitioning metric is introduced to compare various variable partitions. A computational procedure based on variable updating using sensitivity information is developed for exchanging information between the follower and leader problems. The proposed approach is illustrated through the design of a flywheel. The two objective functions used for the design problem include maximizing the kinetic energy stored in the flywheel while simultaneously minimizing the manufacturing cost.

  10. Theoretical approach to photoinduced inhomogeneous anisotropy in bacteriorhodopsin films.

    PubMed

    Acebal, P; Carretero, L; Blaya, S; Murciano, A; Fimia, A

    2007-07-01

    The aim of this work was to perform a complete study of the dynamic and steady-state photoinduced processes of thick bacteriorhodopsin (bR) films, taking into account all the physical parameters and the coupling of rate equations with the energy transfer equation. The theoretical approach was compared with experimental data, and good concordance was found between both sets of data. The theoretical approach shows that the values of the rate constants for solid bR films are about two or three orders of magnitude lower than those observed in solution. It can also be noted that the temperature change during the experiment had a great influence on the final values of transmittance and, consequently, on the inhomogeneous distribution along the coordinate of light propagation. The study shows that, depending on the intensity and wavelength of the pump beam, we can obtain a very inhomogeneous profile of the population densities, which implies an inhomogeneous profile of the birefringence and dichroism. Therefore, this must be taken into account in the applications described for this system.

  11. Theoretical investigation of bacteria polarizability under direct current electric fields.

    PubMed

    Dingari, Naga Neehar; Buie, Cullen R

    2014-04-22

    We present a theoretical model to investigate the influence of soft polyelectrolyte layers on bacteria polarizability. We resolve soft-layer electrokinetics by considering the pH-dependent dissociation of ionogenic groups and specific interactions of ionogenic groups with the bulk electrolyte to go beyond approximating soft-layer electrokinetics as surface conduction. We model the electrokinetics around a soft particle by modified Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations (PNP) to account for the effects of ion transport in the soft layer and electric double layer. Fluid flow is modeled by modified Stokes equations accounting for soft-layer permeability. Two test cases are presented to demonstrate our model: fibrillated and unfibrillated Streptococcus salivarius bacteria. We show that electrolytic and pH conditions significantly influence the extent of soft-particle polarizability in dc fields. Comparison with an approximate analytical model based on Dukhin-Shilov theory for soft particles shows the importance of resolving soft-layer electrokinetics. Insights from this study can be useful in understanding the parameters that influence soft-particle dielectrophoresis in lab-on-a-chip devices.

  12. Analytic game—theoretic approach to ground-water extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loáiciga, Hugo A.

    2004-09-01

    The roles of cooperation and non-cooperation in the sustainable exploitation of a jointly used groundwater resource have been quantified mathematically using an analytical game-theoretic formulation. Cooperative equilibrium arises when ground-water users respect water-level constraints and consider mutual impacts, which allows them to derive economic benefits from ground-water indefinitely, that is, to achieve sustainability. This work shows that cooperative equilibrium can be obtained from the solution of a quadratic programming problem. For cooperative equilibrium to hold, however, enforcement must be effective. Otherwise, according to the commonized costs-privatized profits paradox, there is a natural tendency towards non-cooperation and non-sustainable aquifer mining, of which overdraft is a typical symptom. Non-cooperative behavior arises when at least one ground-water user neglects the externalities of his adopted ground-water pumping strategy. In this instance, water-level constraints may be violated in a relatively short time and the economic benefits from ground-water extraction fall below those obtained with cooperative aquifer use. One example illustrates the game theoretic approach of this work.

  13. Approaching the theoretical limit of diamagnetic-induced momentum in a rapidly diverging magnetic nozzle.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazunori; Charles, Christine; Boswell, Rod W

    2013-05-10

    Cross-field diffusion and plasma expansion in a rapidly diverging magnetic nozzle are controlled while maintaining constant plasma production in a contiguously attached radio frequency plasma source. It is demonstrated that the measured electron-diamagnetic-induced axial momentum increases with increasing magnetic field strength to approach the theoretical limit derived using an ideal nozzle approximation. The measured axial momentum exerted onto the axial and radial plasma source boundaries validate the prediction from a maximum electron pressure model on the back wall and from a zero net axial momentum model on the radial wall.

  14. We need theoretical physics approaches to study living systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blagoev, Krastan B.; Shukla, Kamal; affil="3" >Herbert Levine,

    2013-08-01

    Living systems, as created initially by the transition from assemblies of large molecules to self-reproducing information-rich cells, have for centuries been studied via the empirical toolkit of biology. This has been a highly successful enterprise, bringing us from the vague non-scientific notions of vitalism to the modern appreciation of the biophysical and biochemical bases of life. Yet, the truly mind-boggling complexity of even the simplest self-sufficient cells, let alone the emergence of multicellular organisms, of brain and consciousness, and to ecological communities and human civilizations, calls out for a complementary approach. In this editorial, we propose that theoretical physics can play an essential role in making sense of living matter. When faced with a highly complex system, a physicist builds simplified models. Quoting Philip W Anderson's Nobel prize address, 'the art of model-building is the exclusion of real but irrelevant parts of the problem and entails hazards for the builder and the reader. The builder may leave out something genuinely relevant and the reader, armed with too sophisticated an experimental probe, may take literally a schematized model. Very often such a simplified model throws more light on the real working of nature....' In his formulation, the job of a theorist is to get at the crux of the system by ignoring details and yet to find a testable consequence of the resulting simple picture. This is rather different than the predilection of the applied mathematician who wants to include all the known details in the hope of a quantitative simulacrum of reality. These efforts may be practically useful, but do not usually lead to increased understanding. To illustrate how this works, we can look at a non-living example of complex behavior that was afforded by spatiotemporal patterning in the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction [1]. Physicists who worked on this system did not attempt to determine all the relevant chemical intermediates

  15. GTA: a game theoretic approach to identifying cancer subnetwork markers.

    PubMed

    Farahmand, S; Goliaei, S; Ansari-Pour, N; Razaghi-Moghadam, Z

    2016-03-01

    The identification of genetic markers (e.g. genes, pathways and subnetworks) for cancer has been one of the most challenging research areas in recent years. A subset of these studies attempt to analyze genome-wide expression profiles to identify markers with high reliability and reusability across independent whole-transcriptome microarray datasets. Therefore, the functional relationships of genes are integrated with their expression data. However, for a more accurate representation of the functional relationships among genes, utilization of the protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) seems to be necessary. Herein, a novel game theoretic approach (GTA) is proposed for the identification of cancer subnetwork markers by integrating genome-wide expression profiles and PPIN. The GTA method was applied to three distinct whole-transcriptome breast cancer datasets to identify the subnetwork markers associated with metastasis. To evaluate the performance of our approach, the identified subnetwork markers were compared with gene-based, pathway-based and network-based markers. We show that GTA is not only capable of identifying robust metastatic markers, it also provides a higher classification performance. In addition, based on these GTA-based subnetworks, we identified a new bonafide candidate gene for breast cancer susceptibility.

  16. Intelligent cognitive radio jamming - a game-theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabcevic, Kresimir; Betancourt, Alejandro; Marcenaro, Lucio; Regazzoni, Carlo S.

    2014-12-01

    Cognitive radio (CR) promises to be a solution for the spectrum underutilization problems. However, security issues pertaining to cognitive radio technology are still an understudied topic. One of the prevailing such issues are intelligent radio frequency (RF) jamming attacks, where adversaries are able to exploit on-the-fly reconfigurability potentials and learning mechanisms of cognitive radios in order to devise and deploy advanced jamming tactics. In this paper, we use a game-theoretical approach to analyze jamming/anti-jamming behavior between cognitive radio systems. A non-zero-sum game with incomplete information on an opponent's strategy and payoff is modelled as an extension of Markov decision process (MDP). Learning algorithms based on adaptive payoff play and fictitious play are considered. A combination of frequency hopping and power alteration is deployed as an anti-jamming scheme. A real-life software-defined radio (SDR) platform is used in order to perform measurements useful for quantifying the jamming impacts, as well as to infer relevant hardware-related properties. Results of these measurements are then used as parameters for the modelled jamming/anti-jamming game and are compared to the Nash equilibrium of the game. Simulation results indicate, among other, the benefit provided to the jammer when it is employed with the spectrum sensing algorithm in proactive frequency hopping and power alteration schemes.

  17. Calibration of cylindrical detectors using a simplified theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Mahmoud I; Nafee, Sherif; Selim, Younis S

    2006-09-01

    The calibration of cylindrical detectors using different types of radioactive sources is a matter of routine. The most accurate method, that of experiment, is limited by several factors when the energy interval is broad, requiring a relatively large number of primary standards, implying considerable investment of money and time. Several other techniques can be used instead, including Monte Carlo simulations and semi-empirical methods. Calculations based on the first technique require good definition of the geometry and materials, including the dead layer and window thickness together with an accurate set of cross-sections. The second technique requires two different types of experimental input, the first being from use of sources emitting cascade gamma rays and the second from use of sources emitting isolated gamma rays in order to cover the wide energy range and provide coincidence-summing corrections, respectively. Here, we introduce a new theoretical approach based on the Direct Statistical method proposed by Selim and Abbas to calculate the total and the full-energy peak (photopeak) efficiencies for both point and thin circular disk sources for scintillation and semiconductor detectors. The present method combines calculation of the average path length covered by the photon inside the detector active volume and the geometrical solid angle Omega, to obtain a simple formula for the different efficiencies. Results from the present model were tested against data sets obtained with previous treatments in order to underline how simple and fast our calculations are.

  18. A novel theoretical approach to the analysis of dendritic transients.

    PubMed Central

    Agmon-Snir, H

    1995-01-01

    A novel theoretical framework for analyzing dendritic transients is introduced. This approach, called the method of moments, is an extension of Rall's cable theory for dendrites. It provides analytic investigation of voltage attenuation, signal delay, and synchronization problems in passive dendritic trees. In this method, the various moments of a transient signal are used to characterize the properties of the transient. The strength of the signal is measured by the time integral of the signal, its characteristic time is determined by its centroid ("center of gravity"), and the width of the signal is determined by a measure similar to the standard deviation in probability theory. Using these signal properties, the method of moments provides theorems, expressions, and efficient algorithms for analyzing the voltage response in arbitrary passive trees. The method yields new insights into spatiotemporal integration, coincidence detection mechanisms, and the properties of local interactions between synaptic inputs in dendritic trees. The method can also be used for matching dendritic neuron models to experimental data and for the analysis of synaptic inputs recorded experimentally. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 10 PMID:8580308

  19. [Economic cost of treating pressure ulcers: a theoretical approach].

    PubMed

    Silva, Ana Júlia; Pereira, Sandra Martins; Rodrigues, Alexandre; Rocha, Ana Paula; Varela, Jesuína; Gomes, Luís Miguel; Messias, Norberto; Carvalhal, Rosa; Luís, Rui; Mendes, Luís Filipe Pereira

    2013-08-01

    The present study consisted of a theoretical approach to the problem posed by the economic costs associated with pressure ulcers (PUs). The initial aim was to assess the target problem from a conceptual perspective and then to report the results of prevalence studies that formed the basis for investigations of the disease's economic impact. The purpose of the present article is to discuss the economic costs associated with PUs from both the global point of view (appraising their financial repercussion) and the individual point of view (addressing the intangible costs). Regarding the economic impact of the costs associated with PUs, the total cost of treatment per healthcare setting was estimated relative to the Autonomous Community of Azores. The total cost of all the PU categories was EUR 7,086,415 in the homecare setting, EUR 1,723,509 in the hospital setting, and EUR 1,002,562 in older people's homes. Therefore, the estimated total treatment cost of all the PU categories was approximately EUR 9,812,486 in Azores. However, the emotional impact of this disease imposes high costs on patients and their relatives as a function of the resultant suffering. Indeed, PUs impose high costs not only related to the treatment but also related to the intangible costs of the suffering caused to patients and their caregivers.

  20. A choice-semantical approach to theoretical truth.

    PubMed

    Andreas, Holger; Schiemer, Georg

    2016-08-01

    A central topic in the logic of science concerns the proper semantic analysis of theoretical sentences, that is sentences containing theoretical terms. In this paper, we present a novel choice-semantical account of theoretical truth based on the epsilon-term definition of theoretical terms. Specifically, we develop two ways of specifying the truth conditions of theoretical statements in a choice functional semantics, each giving rise to a corresponding logic of such statements. In order to investigate the inferential strength of these logical systems, we provide a translation of each truth definition into a modal definition of theoretical truth. Based on this, we show that the stronger notion of choice-semantical truth captures more adequately our informal semantic understanding of scientific statements. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Postionization fragmentation of rare-gas trimers revisited with new theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janeček, Ivan; Cintavá, Silvie; Hrivňák, Daniel; Kalus, René; Fárník, Michal; Gadea, Florent Xavier

    2009-09-01

    A new theoretical approach is presented for the general treatment of nonadiabatic hybrid dynamics (mixing classical and quantum approach) and applied to the postionization of rare-gas trimers. There was an important disagreement between trajectory surface hopping (TSH) or mean field (MF) approaches and the experimental results; noteworthy, with the new method qualitative and almost quantitative agreement is found for the fragmentation ratios of ionic monomers and dimers. For the first time in the theory as in the experiment, the dimers prevail for argon while monomers strongly dominate for the heavier rare gases, krypton and xenon. A new compromise between MF and TSH approaches is proposed and the new method is found quite robust with results not too sensitive to various possible implementations.

  2. An Information Theoretic Approach to Distributed Inference and Learning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    recreate realistic dynamics of Hebbian learning in VLSI using switched capacitor circuits for delayed dendritic connections and synapses. Neural activ...words) The work has focused on developing information-theoretic on probabilistic models for neural network computation . This theoretical basis is then...25 7.5 Applications .......... .................................... 26 8 VLSI Implementation of Probabilistic Neural Networks 27 8.1 Pseudo

  3. Protein domain decomposition using a graph-theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Xu, D; Gabow, H N; Gabow, H

    2000-12-01

    Automatic decomposition of a multi-domain protein into individual domains represents a highly interesting and unsolved problem. As the number of protein structures in PDB is growing at an exponential rate, there is clearly a need for more reliable and efficient methods for protein domain decomposition simply to keep the domain databases up-to-date. We present a new algorithm for solving the domain decomposition problem, using a graph-theoretic approach. We have formulated the problem as a network flow problem, in which each residue of a protein is represented as a node of the network and each residue--residue contact is represented as an edge with a particular capacity, depending on the type of the contact. A two-domain decomposition problem is solved by finding a bottleneck (or a minimum cut) of the network, which minimizes the total cross-edge capacity, using the classical Ford--Fulkerson algorithm. A multi-domain decomposition problem is solved through repeatedly solving a series of two-domain problems. The algorithm has been implemented as a computer program, called DomainParser. We have tested the program on a commonly used test set consisting of 55 proteins. The decomposition results are 78.2% in agreement with the literature on both the number of decomposed domains and the assignments of residues to each domain, which compares favorably to existing programs. On the subset of two-domain proteins (20 in number), the program assigned 96.7% of the residues correctly when we require that the number of decomposed domains is two.

  4. Is there a weak mixed polarity background field? Theoretical arguments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spruit, H. C.; Title, A. M.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    1987-01-01

    A number of processes associated with the formation of active regions produce 'U-loops': fluxtubes having two ends at the photosphere but otherwise still embedded in the convection zone. The mass trapped on the field lines of such loops makes them behave in a qualitatively different way from the 'omega-loops' that form active regions. It is shown that U-loops will disperse though the convection zone and form a weak (down to a few gauss) field that covers a significant fraction of the solar surface. This field is tentatively identified with the inner-network fields observed at Kitt Peak and Big Bear. The process by which these fields escape through the surface is described; a remarkable property is that it can make active region fields apparently disappear in situ. The mixed polarity moving magnetic features near sunspots are interpreted as a locally intense form of this disappearance by escape of U-loops.

  5. A graph-theoretic approach to modeling metabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, Eric; Johnson, Mark; Tsai, Chun-che

    1991-08-01

    The metabolic pathways of medazepam, oxazepam, and diazepam were modeled using graph-theoretic transforms which are incorporable into computer-assisted metabolic analysis programs. The information, represented in the form of a graph-theoretic transform kit, which was obtained from these pathways was then used to predict the metabolites of other benzodiazepine compounds. The transform kits gave statistically significant predictions with respect to a statistical method for evaluating the performance of the transform kits.

  6. Determining Student Competency in Field Placements: An Emerging Theoretical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salm, Twyla L.; Johner, Randy; Luhanga, Florence

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a qualitative case study that explores how twenty-three field advisors, representing three human service professions including education, nursing, and social work, experience the process of assessment with students who are struggling to meet minimum competencies in field placements. Five themes emerged from the analysis of…

  7. Sub-Cycle Dynamics of High Harmonic Generation of He Atoms Excited by Attosecond Pulses and Driven by Near-Infrared Laser Fields: A Self-Interaction-Free TDDFT Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2014-05-01

    In the framework of the self-interaction-free time-dependent density functional theory, we have performed 3D ab initio calculations of He atoms in near-infrared (NIR) laser fields subject to excitation by a single extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse (SAP). We have explored the novel dynamical behavior of the sub-cycle high harmonic generation (HHG) for transitions from the excited states to the ground state and found oscillation structures with respect to the time delay between the SAP and NIR fields. The oscillatory pattern in the photon emission spectra has a period of 1.3 fs which is half of the NIR laser optical cycle, similar to that recently measured in the experiments on transient absorption of He. We present the photon emission spectra from 1s2p, 1s3p, 1s4p, 1s5p, and 1s6p excited states as functions of the time delay. We explore the sub-cycle Stark shift phenomenon in NIR fields and its influence on the photon emission process. Our analysis reveals several new features of the sub-cycle HHG dynamics and we identify the mechanisms responsible for the observed peak splitting in the photon emission spectra. This work was partially supported by DOE.

  8. Subcycle dynamics of high harmonic generation in valence-shell and virtual states of Ar atoms excited by attosecond pulses and driven by near-infrared laser fields: A self-interaction-free TDDFT theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heslar, John; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2015-05-01

    In the framework of the self-interaction-free time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), we have performed an ab initio all-electron study of subcycle structure, dynamics, and spectra of high harmonic generation (HHG) processes of Ar atoms in the presence of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulses and near-infrared (NIR) laser fields. The TDDFT equations are solved accurately and efficiently via the time-dependent generalized pseudospectral (TDGPS) method. We focus on the subcycle (with respect to NIR field) temporal behavior of the level shift of the excited energy levels and related dynamics of harmonic photon emission. We observe and identify the subcycle shifts in the harmonic emission spectrum as a function of the time delay between the XUV and NIR pulses. We present and analyze the harmonic emission spectra from 3snp0, 3p0ns, 3p1nd1,3p1np1, 3p0nd0, 3p0np0, and 3p0ns excited states and the 3p04p0-virtual state as functions of the time delay. In addition, we explore the subcycle a.c. Stark shift phenomenon in NIR fields and its influence on the harmonic emission process. Our analysis reveals several novel features of the subcycle HHG dynamics and spectra as well as temporal energy level shift. This work was partially supported by DOE.

  9. Illness and symptom perception: a theoretical approach towards an integrative measurement model.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Sibylle; van den Berg, Robert A; Janssens, Thomas; Van den Bergh, Omer

    2011-04-01

    Several models have been proposed to conceptualize psychological representations of health, illness, and bodily sensations. These models differ as to the cognitive and affective components they include, whether they study the interaction of these components, and whether associations between psychological representations of bodily states and affective and behavioral reactions to these representations are considered conditional. These different conceptualizations and corresponding measurement approaches exist in parallel without resulting in synergistic effects or theoretical advancements within the field. In this paper, we review theoretical models on perception and attitudes and construct an integrative theoretical framework on psychological representation of bodily symptoms as well as more abstract representations of health and disease. The aim of this combination of approaches is to unify the strengths of different research domains in the conceptualization and measurement of mental representations of bodily states. Furthermore, the aim is to specify new, testable predictions and implications about the (conditional) relationship of these mental representations and affective and behavioral consequences. A core element in this integrative model is comparison. We review how comparison processes can change the cognitive and affective reference frame for illness and symptom perception and in turn affective and behavioral reactions. We discuss implications for measurement of illness and symptom representations as well as implications for clinical practice. Finally, we make suggestions for a research agenda to validate the proposed model as well as to address new questions derived from it.

  10. A Theoretical Design Approach for Passive Shimming of a Magic-Angle-Spinning NMR Magnet.

    PubMed

    Li, Frank X; Voccio, John P; Sammartino, Michael; Ahn, Minchul; Hahn, Seungyong; Bascuñán, Juan; Iwasa, Yukikazu

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a passive shimming design approach for a magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR magnet. In order to achieve a 1.5-T magic-angle field in NMR samples, we created two independent orthogonal magnetic vector fields by two separate coils: the dipole and solenoid. These two coils create a combined 1.5-T magnetic field vector directed at the magic angle (54.74° from the spinning axis). Additionally, the stringent magnetic field homogeneity requirement of the MAS magnet is the same as that of a solenoidal NMR magnet. The challenge for the magic-angle passive shimming design is to correct both the dipole and solenoid magnetic field spherical harmonics with one set of iron pieces, the so-called ferromagnetic shimming. Furthermore, the magnetization of the iron pieces is produced by both the dipole and solenoid coils. In our design approach, a matrix of 2 mm by 5 mm iron pieces with different thicknesses was attached to a thin-walled tube, 90-mm diameter and 40-mm high. Two sets of spherical harmonic coefficients were calculated for both the dipole and solenoid coil windings. By using the multiple-objective linear programming optimization technique and coordinate transformations, we have designed a passive shimming set that can theoretically reduce 22 lower-order spherical harmonics and improve the homogeneity of our MAS NMR magnet.

  11. Conjugate field approaches for active array compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, R. J.

    1989-01-01

    Two approaches for calculating the compensating feed array complex excitations are namely, the indirect conjugate field matching (ICFM) and the direct conjugate field matching (DCFM) approach. In the ICFM approach the compensating feed array excitations are determined by considering the transmitting mode and the reciprocity principle. The DCF, in contrast calculates the array excitations by integrating directly the induced surface currents on the reflector under a receiving mode. DCFM allows the reflector to be illuminated by an incident plane wave with a tapered amplitude. The level of taper can effectively control the sidelobe level of the compensated antenna pattern. Both approaches are examined briefly.

  12. Theoretical study of plasma confinement by magnetic multicusp field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalzov, Ivan; Forest, Cary

    2014-10-01

    Plasma confinement in a magnetic multicusp field is studied numerically using both collisional particle-in-cell and isothermal two-fluid MHD codes and tested against the empirical model. The simulation domain is two-dimensional, periodic in one direction and bounded by absorbing boundaries with multicups field in other direction. First, we study the dependence of plasma loss width on plasma parameters and field strength and compare the results with the well-known empirical formula w = 2√{ρeρi } (two hybrid gyro-radius). Our results show that the loss width has the same scaling with magnetic field w ~ 1 / B , but dependence on other plasma parameters does not agree with this formula. Second, we study the plasma flow drive in the cusp region due to electric field applied by discrete electrodes. The electrode positions are optimized for achieving the highest plasma flow. Comparison with available experimental data from Madison Plasma Dynamo Experiment (MPDX) is made. The work is supported by NSF and DoE.

  13. Theoretical Studies of High Field Transport in III-V Semiconductors.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    AD-A123 947 THEORETICAL STUDIES OF HIGH FIELD TRANSPORT IN Ill-V- 1/2 SENXCONDUCTORS(U) ILLINOIS UNIV AT URBANA COORDINATED SCIENCE LAB H SHICHIJO...CATALOG NUMBER 4. TITLE (and Subtitleo S. TYPE Of REPORT & PERIOD COVERED THEORETICAL STUDIES OF HIGH FIELD TRANSPORT Technical Report IN IllI-V...Continue on reverse aide It necessary and identitfy by block number) High field transport , 3-5 semicopductors, Monte Carlo simulation 20. ABSTRACT

  14. Optimality in College Planning: A Control Theoretic Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, W. Gary; Weathersby, George B.

    In this paper the authors argue that the decision structures of educational institutions are multi-level, multi-decision-maker hierarchies which can be described and analyzed in decision theoretic terms and that these multi-levels, multi-decision-maker hierarchies can be reduced to equivalent one-level, one-decision-maker formulations, which can…

  15. Field-theoretic simulations of block copolymer nanocomposites in a constant interfacial tension ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koski, Jason P.; Riggleman, Robert A.

    2017-04-01

    Block copolymers, due to their ability to self-assemble into periodic structures with long range order, are appealing candidates to control the ordering of functionalized nanoparticles where it is well-accepted that the spatial distribution of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix dictates the resulting material properties. The large parameter space associated with block copolymer nanocomposites makes theory and simulation tools appealing to guide experiments and effectively isolate parameters of interest. We demonstrate a method for performing field-theoretic simulations in a constant volume-constant interfacial tension ensemble (n V γ T ) that enables the determination of the equilibrium properties of block copolymer nanocomposites, including when the composites are placed under tensile or compressive loads. Our approach is compatible with the complex Langevin simulation framework, which allows us to go beyond the mean-field approximation. We validate our approach by comparing our n V γ T approach with free energy calculations to determine the ideal domain spacing and modulus of a symmetric block copolymer melt. We analyze the effect of numerical and thermodynamic parameters on the efficiency of the n V γ T ensemble and subsequently use our method to investigate the ideal domain spacing, modulus, and nanoparticle distribution of a lamellar forming block copolymer nanocomposite. We find that the nanoparticle distribution is directly linked to the resultant domain spacing and is dependent on polymer chain density, nanoparticle size, and nanoparticle chemistry. Furthermore, placing the system under tension or compression can qualitatively alter the nanoparticle distribution within the block copolymer.

  16. Group theoretic approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion

    SciTech Connect

    Biedenharn, L.C.

    1982-01-01

    Three approaches to nuclear and hadronic collective motion are reviewed, compared and contrasted: the standard symmetry approach as typified by the Interacting Boson Model, the kinematic symmetry group approach of Gell-Mann and Tomonaga, and the recent direct construction by Buck. 50 references.

  17. A possible generalization of the field-theoretical Hamilton's equations

    SciTech Connect

    Savchin, V.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The development of classical dynamics as well as many branches of physics shows that the solution or analysis of variety of problems can be greatly simplified if the basic equations admit an analytic representation in terms of Hamilton's equations. The author proposes a generalization of Hamilton's equations in field theory which is applicable to partial differential equations of physical relevance. It is shown that the equations constitute a conceivable basis for the generalization of the theory of contact transformations and of Poisson's method.

  18. Abstract class field theory (a finitary approach)

    SciTech Connect

    Ershov, Yu L

    2003-02-28

    A definition of the reciprocity homomorphism in Neukirch's abstract class field theory is given. This definition uses fairly large additional non-ramified extensions, but they are all finite. This will enable one to apply the theory thus constructed to the effectivization (algorithmization) of local and global class field theory alike. The combination of Neukirch's and Hazewinkel's approaches used in the paper clarifies class field theory even at the abstract level of exposition.

  19. A combined experimental and theoretical approach to atomic scale characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.; Chisholm, M.F.; Yan, Y.; Duscher, G.; Pantelides, S.T.

    1998-02-01

    Recently, the scanning transmission electron microscope has become capable of forming electron probes of atomic dimensions. Through the technique of Z-contrast imaging, it is now possible to form atomic resolution images with high compositional sensitivity from which atomic column positions can be directly determined. An incoherent image of this nature also allows atomic resolution chemical analysis to be performed, by locating the probe over particular columns or planes seen in the image while electron energy loss spectra are collected. Such data represents either an ideal starting point for first principles theoretical calculations or a test of theoretical predictions. The authors present several examples where theory and experiment together give a very complete and often surprising atomic scale view of complex materials.

  20. A field theoretical restoration method for images degraded by non-uniform light attenuation : an application for light microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwee Kuan; Uddin, Mohammad Shorif; Sankaran, Shvetha; Hariharan, Srivats; Ahmed, Sohail

    2009-07-06

    Microscopy has become a de facto tool for biology. However, it suffers from a fundamental problem of poor contrast with increasing depth, as the illuminating light gets attenuated and scattered and hence can not penetrate through thick samples. The resulting decay of light intensity due to attenuation and scattering varies exponentially across the image. The classical space invariant deconvolution approaches alone are not suitable for the restoration of uneven illumination in microscopy images. In this paper, we present a novel physics-based field theoretical approach to solve the contrast degradation problem of light microscopy images. We have confirmed the effectiveness of our technique through simulations as well as through real field experimentations.

  1. Unified Field Theoretical Models from Generalized Affine Geometries II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirilo-Lombardo, Diego Julio

    2011-06-01

    The space-time structure of the new Unified Field Theory presented in previous reference (Int. J. Theor. Phys. 49:1288-1301, 2010) is analyzed from its SL(2C) underlying structure in order to make precise the notion of minimal coupling. To this end, the framework is the language of tensors and particularly differential forms and the condition a priory of the existence of a potential for the torsion is relaxed. We shown trough exact cosmological solutions from this model, where the geometry is Euclidean R⊗ O 3˜ R⊗ SU(2), the relation between the space-time geometry and the structure of the gauge group. Precisely this relation is directly connected with the relation of the spin and torsion fields. The solution of this model is explicitly compared with our previous ones and we find that: (i) the torsion is not identified directly with the Yang Mills type strength field, (ii) there exists a compatibility condition connected with the identification of the gauge group with the geometric structure of the space-time: this fact lead the identification between derivatives of the scale factor a( τ) with the components of the torsion in order to allows the Hosoya-Ogura ansatz (namely, the alignment of the isospin with the frame geometry of the space-time), (iii) this compatibility condition precisely mark the fact that local gauge covariance, coordinate independence and arbitrary space time geometries are harmonious concepts and (iv) of two possible structures of the torsion the "tratorial" form (the only one studied here) forbids wormhole configurations, leading only, cosmological instanton space-time in eternal expansion.

  2. Quantum field theory and coalgebraic logic in theoretical computer science.

    PubMed

    Basti, Gianfranco; Capolupo, Antonio; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2017-05-04

    We suggest that in the framework of the Category Theory it is possible to demonstrate the mathematical and logical dual equivalence between the category of the q-deformed Hopf Coalgebras and the category of the q-deformed Hopf Algebras in quantum field theory (QFT), interpreted as a thermal field theory. Each pair algebra-coalgebra characterizes a QFT system and its mirroring thermal bath, respectively, so to model dissipative quantum systems in far-from-equilibrium conditions, with an evident significance also for biological sciences. Our study is in fact inspired by applications to neuroscience where the brain memory capacity, for instance, has been modeled by using the QFT unitarily inequivalent representations. The q-deformed Hopf Coalgebras and the q-deformed Hopf Algebras constitute two dual categories because characterized by the same functor T, related with the Bogoliubov transform, and by its contravariant application T(op), respectively. The q-deformation parameter is related to the Bogoliubov angle, and it is effectively a thermal parameter. Therefore, the different values of q identify univocally, and label the vacua appearing in the foliation process of the quantum vacuum. This means that, in the framework of Universal Coalgebra, as general theory of dynamic and computing systems ("labelled state-transition systems"), the so labelled infinitely many quantum vacua can be interpreted as the Final Coalgebra of an "Infinite State Black-Box Machine". All this opens the way to the possibility of designing a new class of universal quantum computing architectures based on this coalgebraic QFT formulation, as its ability of naturally generating a Fibonacci progression demonstrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacterial cell division: experimental and theoretical approaches to the divisome.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Claire E; Roper, David I; Van Den Berg, Hugo A; Rodger, Alison

    2015-01-01

    Cell division is a key event in the bacterial life cycle. It involves constriction at the midcell, so that one cell can give rise to two daughter cells. This constriction is mediated by a ring composed offibrous multimers of the protein FtsZ. However a host of additional factors is involved in the formation and dynamics of this "Z-ring" and this complicated apparatus is collectively known as the "divisome". We review the literature, with an emphasis on mathematical modelling, and show how such theoretical efforts have helped experimentalists to make sense of the at times bewildering data, and plan further experiments.

  4. Game Theoretic Approach to Post-Docked Satellite Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiramatsu, Takashi; Fitz-Coy, Norman G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper studies the interaction between two satellites after docking. In order to maintain the docked state with uncertainty in the motion of the target vehicle, a game theoretic controller with Stackelberg strategy to minimize the interaction between the satellites is considered. The small perturbation approximation leads to LQ differential game scheme, which is validated to address the docking interactions between a service vehicle and a target vehicle. The open-loop solution are compared with Nash strategy, and it is shown that less control efforts are obtained with Stackelberg strategy.

  5. A new theoretical approach to adsorption desorption behavior of Ga on GaAs surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangawa, Y.; Ito, T.; Taguchi, A.; Shiraishi, K.; Ohachi, T.

    2001-11-01

    We propose a new theoretical approach for studying adsorption-desorption behavior of atoms on semiconductor surfaces. The new theoretical approach based on the ab initio calculations incorporates the free energy of gas phase; therefore we can calculate how adsorption and desorption depends on growth temperature and beam equivalent pressure (BEP). The versatility of the new theoretical approach was confirmed by the calculation of Ga adsorption-desorption transition temperatures and transition BEPs on the GaAs (0 0 1) -(4×2) β2 Ga-rich surface. This new approach is feasible to predict how adsorption and desorption depend on the growth conditions.

  6. DNA looping in prokaryotes: experimental and theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Cournac, Axel; Plumbridge, Jacqueline

    2013-03-01

    Transcriptional regulation is at the heart of biological functions such as adaptation to a changing environment or to new carbon sources. One of the mechanisms which has been found to modulate transcription, either positively (activation) or negatively (repression), involves the formation of DNA loops. A DNA loop occurs when a protein or a complex of proteins simultaneously binds to two different sites on DNA with looping out of the intervening DNA. This simple mechanism is central to the regulation of several operons in the genome of the bacterium Escherichia coli, like the lac operon, one of the paradigms of genetic regulation. The aim of this review is to gather and discuss concepts and ideas from experimental biology and theoretical physics concerning DNA looping in genetic regulation. We first describe experimental techniques designed to show the formation of a DNA loop. We then present the benefits that can or could be derived from a mechanism involving DNA looping. Some of these are already experimentally proven, but others are theoretical predictions and merit experimental investigation. Then, we try to identify other genetic systems that could be regulated by a DNA looping mechanism in the genome of Escherichia coli. We found many operons that, according to our set of criteria, have a good chance to be regulated with a DNA loop. Finally, we discuss the proposition recently made by both biologists and physicists that this mechanism could also act at the genomic scale and play a crucial role in the spatial organization of genomes.

  7. Theoretical approaches to modeling interfacial structure and EXAFS data

    SciTech Connect

    Schenter, G.K.; McCarthy, M.I.; Chacon-Taylor, M.R.

    1997-12-31

    Understanding the molecular scale processes that control the fate and transport of contaminant metals through the subsurface is a key goal of molecular environmental research. Extended Xray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectra is a powerful experimental technique for determining the structure of solvated metal ions at mineral interfaces. The interpretation of these data is aided by theoretical models of the interfacial chemistry and physics. Using ab initio based potential models and classical mechanics simulations, we are able to predict the structure of (M+)aq/mineral interfaces. We will discuss both the development of the ab initio based classical electrostatic potentials for modeling the interaction between molecules and surfaces and the simulation techniques used to model dynamical processes of ions at water/mineral interfaces. This information is then used as input for calculations of the corresponding EXAFS spectra as a function of temperature and surface topology. Theoretical predicted spectra for Na+(H2O)n clusters on MgO (001) will be presented, emphasizing trends in the observed EXAFS spectra with cluster size, temperature, and surface topology (flat surface, edge and corner MgO sites).

  8. Large Component QCD and Theoretical Framework of Heavy Quark Effective Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yue-Liang

    Based on a large component QCD derived directly from full QCD by integrating over the small components of quark fields with |p| < E + mQ, an alternative quantization procedure is adopted to establish a basic theoretical framework of heavy quark effective field theory (HQEFT) in the sense of effective quantum field theory. The procedure concerns quantum generators of Poincaré group, Hilbert and Fock space, anticommutations and velocity superselection rule, propagator and Feynman rules, finite mass corrections, trivialization of gluon couplings and renormalization of Wilson loop. The Lorentz invariance and discrete symmetries in HQEFT are explicitly illustrated. Some new symmetries in the infinite mass limit are discussed. Weak transition matrix elements and masses of hadrons in HQEFT are well defined to display a manifest spin-flavor symmetry and 1/mQ corrections. A simple trace formulation approach is explicitly demonstrated by using LSZ reduction formula in HQEFT, and shown to be very useful for parametrizing the transition form factors via 1/mQ expansion. As the heavy quark and antiquark fields in HQEFT are treated on the same footing in a fully symmetric way, the quark-antiquark coupling terms naturally appear and play important roles for simplifying the structure of transition matrix elements, and for understanding the introduction of "dressed heavy quark"-hadron duality. In the case that the "longitudinal" and "transverse" residual momenta of heavy quark are at the same order of power counting, HQEFT provides a consistent approach for systematically analyzing heavy quark expansion in terms of 1/mQ. Some interesting features in applications of HQEFT to heavy hadron systems are briefly outlined.

  9. Field Theoretic Study of Bilayer Membrane Fusion. I. Hemifusion Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Katsov, K.; Müller, M.; Schick, M.

    2004-01-01

    Self-consistent field theory is used to determine structural and energetic properties of metastable intermediates and unstable transition states involved in the standard stalk mechanism of bilayer membrane fusion. A microscopic model of flexible amphiphilic chains dissolved in hydrophilic solvent is employed to describe these self-assembled structures. We find that the barrier to formation of the initial stalk is much smaller than previously estimated by phenomenological theories. Therefore its creation it is not the rate-limiting process. The relevant barrier is associated with the rather limited radial expansion of the stalk into a hemifusion diaphragm. It is strongly affected by the architecture of the amphiphile, decreasing as the effective spontaneous curvature of the amphiphile is made more negative. It is also reduced when the tension is increased. At high tension the fusion pore, created when a hole forms in the hemifusion diaphragm, expands without bound. At very low membrane tension, small fusion pores can be trapped in a flickering metastable state. Successful fusion is severely limited by the architecture of the lipids. If the effective spontaneous curvature is not sufficiently negative, fusion does not occur because metastable stalks, whose existence is a seemingly necessary prerequisite, do not form at all. However if the spontaneous curvature is too negative, stalks are so stable that fusion does not occur because the system is unstable either to a phase of stable radial stalks, or to an inverted-hexagonal phase induced by stable linear stalks. Our results on the architecture and tension needed for successful fusion are summarized in a phase diagram. PMID:15326031

  10. New approach for the determination of aerosol refractive indices - Part I: Theoretical bases and numerical methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbin, H.; Pujol, O.; Hubert, P.; Petitprez, D.

    2017-10-01

    The knowledge of aerosol complex refractive indices on wide spectral range with high spectral resolution is important for many research fields and applications. Various combinations of experimental/theoretical/numerical approaches have been employed to determine the optical indices of aerosol particles. However, each approach has its own advantages and limitations that restrict its generalization. This article is first part of a work aimed at proposing a new technique for determining the optical constants of aerosols. Experimentally, the method is based on recording transmittance spectra of an aerosol flow from thermal infrared to UV-visible combined with the size distribution measurements. Herein, we present the theoretical and numerical bases of the algorithm developed to retrieve the imaginary and real parts of refractive indices. This model associates the Mie theory, the single subtractive Kramers-Kronig relations, and the optimal estimation method with an iterative process. In order to quantify the capabilities of the algorithm to retrieve complex refractive indices, inverse calculations are performed from simulated extinction spectra of Quartz particles whose some of optical properties are available in the literature. We have detailed each step of the procedure and performed some comparisons with the most currently employed methods. The impact of experimental accuracy and numerical simulation are investigated in terms of errors, and uncertainties on the retrieved real and imaginary parts of the complex optical index.

  11. Theoretical study of electromagnetic electron cyclotron waves in the presence of AC field in Uranian magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, R. S.; Kaur, Rajbir

    2015-10-01

    Electromagnetic electron cyclotron (EMEC) waves with temperature anisotropy in the magnetosphere of Uranus have been studied in present work. EMEC waves are investigated using method of characteristic solution by kinetic approach, in presence of AC field. In 1986, Voyager 2 encounter with Uranus revealed that magnetosphere of Uranus exhibit non-Maxwellian high-energy tail distribution. So, the dispersion relation, real frequency and growth rate are evaluated using Lorentzian Kappa distribution function. Effect of temperature anisotropy, AC frequency and number density of particles is found. The study is also extended to oblique propagation of EMEC waves in presence and absence of AC field. Through comprehensive mathematical analysis it is found that when EMEC wave propagates parallel to intrinsic magnetic field of Uranus, its growth is more enhanced than in case of oblique propagation. Results are also discussed in context to magnetosphere of Earth and also gives theoretical explanation to existence of high energetic particles observed by Voyager 2 in the magnetosphere of Uranus. The results can present a further insight into the nature of electron-cyclotron instability condition for the whistler mode waves in the outer radiation belts of Uranus or other space plasmas.

  12. A game-theoretical approach to multimedia social networks security.

    PubMed

    Liu, Enqiang; Liu, Zengliang; Shao, Fei; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The contents access and sharing in multimedia social networks (MSNs) mainly rely on access control models and mechanisms. Simple adoptions of security policies in the traditional access control model cannot effectively establish a trust relationship among parties. This paper proposed a novel two-party trust architecture (TPTA) to apply in a generic MSN scenario. According to the architecture, security policies are adopted through game-theoretic analyses and decisions. Based on formalized utilities of security policies and security rules, the choice of security policies in content access is described as a game between the content provider and the content requester. By the game method for the combination of security policies utility and its influences on each party's benefits, the Nash equilibrium is achieved, that is, an optimal and stable combination of security policies, to establish and enhance trust among stakeholders.

  13. Laser debonding of ceramic orthodontic brackets: a theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Kristine L.; Marangoni, Roy D.; Rickabaugh, Jeff L.

    1992-06-01

    Ceramic brackets are an esthetic substitute for conventional stainless steel brackets in orthodontic patients. However, ceramic brackets are more brittle and have higher bond strengths which can lead to bracket breakage and enamel damage during debonding. It has been demonstrated that various lasers can facilitate ceramic bracket removal. One mechanism with the laser is through the softening of the bracket adhesive. The high energy density from the laser on the bracket and adhesive can have a resultant deleterious thermal effect on the pulp of the tooth which may lead to pulpal death. A theoretical computer model of bracket, adhesive, enamel and dentin has been generated for predicting heat flow through this system. Heat fluxes at varying intensities and modes have been input into the program and the resultant temperatures at various points or nodes were determined. Further pursuit should lead to optimum parameters for laser debonding which would have minimal effects on the pulp.

  14. A theoretical approach on controlling agricultural pest by biological controls.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Prasanta Kumar; Jana, Soovoojeet; Kar, T K

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we propose and analyze a prey-predator type dynamical system for pest control where prey population is treated as the pest. We consider two classes for the pest namely susceptible pest and infected pest and the predator population is the natural enemy of the pest. We also consider average delay for both the predation rate i.e. predation to the susceptible pest and infected pest. Considering a subsystem of original system in the absence of infection, we analyze the existence of all possible non-negative equilibria and their stability criteria for both the subsystem as well as the original system. We present the conditions for transcritical bifurcation and Hopf bifurcation in the disease free system. The theoretical evaluations are demonstrated through numerical simulations.

  15. A Theoretical Approach to Engineering a New Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Greg; Behera, Raghu N.; Gomatam, Ravi

    2016-08-01

    Density function theory, a subfield of quantum mechanics (QM), in combination with molecular mechanics (MM) has opened the way to engineer new artificial enzymes. Herein, we report theoretical calculations done using QM/MM to examine whether the regioselectivity and rate of chlorination of the enzyme chloroperoxidase can be improved by replacing the vanadium of this enzyme with niobium through dialysis. Our calculations show that a niobium substituted chloroperoxidase will be able to enter the initial steps of the catalytic cycle for chlorination. Although the protonation state of the niobium substituted enzyme is calculated to be different from than that of the natural vanadium substituted enzyme, our calculations show that the catalytic cycle can still proceed forward. Using natural bond orbitals, we analyse the electronic differences between the niobium substituted enzyme and the natural enzyme. We conclude by briefly examining how good of a model QM/MM provides for understanding the mechanism of catalysis of chloroperoxidase.

  16. Graph theoretical similarity approach to compare molecular electrostatic potentials.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ray M; Aguirre, Nestor F; Daza, Edgar E

    2008-01-01

    In this work we introduce a graph theoretical method to compare MEPs, which is independent of molecular alignment. It is based on the edit distance of weighted rooted trees, which encode the geometrical and topological information of Negative Molecular Isopotential Surfaces. A meaningful chemical classification of a set of 46 molecules with different functional groups was achieved. Structure--activity relationships for the corticosteroid binding affinity (CBG) of 31 steroids by means of hierarchical clustering resulted in a clear partitioning in high, intermediate, and low activity groups, whereas the results from quantitative structure--activity relationships, obtained from a partial least-squares analysis, showed comparable or better cross-validated correlation coefficients than the ones reported for previous methods based solely in the MEP.

  17. Molecular properties of Cinchona alkaloids: a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Oleksyn, B J; Suszko-Purzycka, A; Dive, G; Lamotte-Brasseur, J

    1992-02-01

    In the present work, the conformation analysis, electrostatic potential calculations, and proton affinity evaluation are carried out for Cinchona alkaloids using theoretical molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical methods. The most probable conformation of the active erythro isomers at the receptor site seems to be that which enables the molecule to form intermolecular hydrogen bonds. In epiquinidine, the mutual orientation of O(12) and N(1) atoms favors intra- rather than intermolecular bonding, and this might be responsible for its inactivity. Comparison of the shape and size of the negative electrostatic potential areas provides a tentative explanation for the interaction of different erythro diastereoisomers with the same putative receptor, as well as for lack of such interaction in epiquinidine. The protonation energies calculated for cinchonidine and cinchonine confirm the higher basicity of the aliphatic N(1) as compared with that of the aromatic N(13) atom.

  18. Exploring the joint measurability using an information-theoretic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Li-Yi

    2016-12-01

    We explore the legal purity parameters for the joint measurements. Instead of direct unsharpening the measurements, we perform the quantum cloning before the sharp measurements. The necessary fuzziness in the unsharp measurements is equivalently introduced in the imperfect cloning process. Based on the information causality and the consequent noisy nonlocal computation, one can derive the information-theoretic quadratic inequalities that must be satisfied by any physical theory. On the other hand, to guarantee the classicality, the linear Bell-type inequalities deduced by these quadratic ones must be obeyed. As for the joint measurability, the purity parameters must be chosen to obey both types of inequalities. Finally, the quadratic inequalities for purity parameters in the joint measurability region are derived.

  19. A Game-Theoretical Approach to Multimedia Social Networks Security

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Enqiang; Liu, Zengliang; Shao, Fei; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2014-01-01

    The contents access and sharing in multimedia social networks (MSNs) mainly rely on access control models and mechanisms. Simple adoptions of security policies in the traditional access control model cannot effectively establish a trust relationship among parties. This paper proposed a novel two-party trust architecture (TPTA) to apply in a generic MSN scenario. According to the architecture, security policies are adopted through game-theoretic analyses and decisions. Based on formalized utilities of security policies and security rules, the choice of security policies in content access is described as a game between the content provider and the content requester. By the game method for the combination of security policies utility and its influences on each party's benefits, the Nash equilibrium is achieved, that is, an optimal and stable combination of security policies, to establish and enhance trust among stakeholders. PMID:24977226

  20. Unified Theoretical Approach to Electron-Ion Recombination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, Anil

    1998-05-01

    Electron-ion recombination occurs via the electron continuum and embedded resonances that are coupled to each other and thus unified in nature. However, theoretical methods generally separate the two as ``radiative recombination" (RR), referring to recombination through the non-resonant continuum, and ``di-electronic recombination" (DR) through the autoionizing resonances. A computationally unified scheme(S.N. Nahar and A.K. Pradhan, Phys.Rev.Lett.) 68,1488(1992); H.L. Zhang and A.K. Pradhan, Phys.Rev.Lett. 78,195(1997) is described that employs the coupled channel R-matrix method, and detailed balance (the Milne relation), to obtain photo-recombination cross sections including both the continuum and resonant recombination in an ab intio manner. In the energy region corresponding to high-n Rydberg resonances, where the background recombination (RR) is negligibly small, a precise theory of DR (R.H. Bell and M.J. Seaton, J.Phys.B) 18,1589(1985) yields DR collision strengths consistent with their threshold behaviour leading to the cross section for electron impact excitation. For highly charged ions the relativistic fine structure and the effect of radiation damping of resonances are considered. Theoretical cross sections agree well with recent experiments on ion stograge rings and the electron-beam-ion-trap (EBIT). Total electron-ion recombination rates can be obtained for practical applications. For many complex atomic systems, such as the important Iron-peak elements, the new results differ considerably from those hitherto available.

  1. Mating strategies in primates: a game theoretical approach to infanticide.

    PubMed

    Lyon, James E; Pandit, Sagar A; van Schaik, Carel P; Pradhan, Gauri R

    2011-04-07

    Infanticide by newly immigrated or newly dominant males is reported among a variety of taxa, such as birds, rodents, carnivores and primates. Here we present a game theoretical model to explain the presence and prevalence of infanticide in primate groups. We have formulated a three-player game involving two males and one female and show that the strategies of infanticide on the males' part and polyandrous mating on the females' part emerge as Nash equilibria that are stable under certain conditions. Moreover, we have identified all the Nash equilibria of the game and arranged them in a novel hierarchical scheme. Only in the subspace spanned by the males are the Nash equilibria found to be strict, and hence evolutionarily stable. We have therefore proposed a selection mechanism informed by adaptive dynamics to permit the females to transition to, and remain in, optimal equilibria after successive generations. Our model concludes that polyandrous mating by females is an optimal strategy for the females that minimizes infanticide and that infanticide confers advantage to the males only in certain regions of parameter space. We have shown that infanticide occurs during turbulent changes accompanying male immigration into the group. For changes in the dominance hierarchy within the group, we have shown that infanticide occurs only in primate groups where the chance for the killer to sire the next infant is high. These conclusions are confirmed by observations in the wild. This model thus has enabled us to pinpoint the fundamental processes behind the reproductive decisions of the players involved, which was not possible using earlier theoretical studies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of Warp Yarn Tension During Shedding: A Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subrata; Chary, Prabhakara; Roy, Sukumar

    2015-10-01

    Theoretical investigation on the process of development of warp yarn tension during weaving for tappet shedding is carried out, based on the dynamic nature of shed geometry. The path of warp yarn on a weaving machine is divided into four different zones. The tension developed in each zone is estimated for every minute rotation of the bottom shaft. A model has been developed based on the dynamic nature of shed geometry and the possible yarn flow from one zone to another. A computer program, based on the model of shedding process, is developed for predicting the warp yarn tension variation during shedding. The output of the model and the experimental values of yarn tension developed in zone-D i.e. between the back rest and the back lease rod are compared, which shows a good agreement between them. The warp yarn tension values predicted by the model in zone-D are 10-13 % lesser than the experimentally measured values. By analyzing the theoretical data of the peak value of developed yarn tension at four zones i.e. zone-A, zone-B, zone-C and zone-D, it is observed that the peak yarn tension value of A, B, C-zones are much higher than the peak tension near the back rest i.e. at zone-D. It is about twice or more than the yarn tension near the back rest. The study also reveals that the developed yarn tension peak values are different for the extreme positions of a heald. The impact of coefficient of friction on peak value of yarn tension is nominal.

  3. Field theoretic analysis of a class of planar microwave and optoelectronic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahm, Yeon-Chang

    2000-11-01

    With increasing operating frequencies in CMOS RF/microwave integrated circuits, the performance of on- chip interconnects is becoming significantly affected by the lossy substrate. It is the purpose of the first part of this thesis to develop a rigorous field theoretic analysis approach for efficient characterization of single and multiple coupled interconnects on silicon substrate, which is applicable over a wide range of substrate resistivities. The frequency-dependent transmission line parameters of a microstrip on silicon are determined by a new formulation based on a quasi- electrostatic and quasi-magnetostatic spectral domain approach. It is demonstrated that this new quasi-static formulation provides the complete frequency-dependent interconnect characteristics for all three major transmission line modes of operation. In particular, it is shown that in the case of heavily doped CMOS substrates, the distributed series inductance and series resistance parameters are significantly affected by the presence of longitudinal substrate currents giving rise to the substrate skin-effect. The method is further extended to multiple coupled single and multi-level interconnect structures with ground plane and multiple coupled co-planar stripline structures without ground plane. The finite conductor thickness is taken into account in terms of a stacked conductor model. The new quasi-static approach is validated by comparison with results obtained with a full-wave spectral domain method and the commercial planar full-wave electromagnetic field solver HP/Momentum®, as well as published simulation and measurement data. In the second part of this thesis, coupled planar optical interconnect structures are investigated based on a rigorous field theoretic analysis combined with an application of the normal mode theory for coupled transmission lines. A new transfer matrix description for a general optical directional coupler is presented. Based on this transfer matrix formulation

  4. Theoretical and Methodological Approaches to Social Sciences and Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Varela, Asuncion, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This is a unique and groundbreaking collection of questions and answers coming from higher education institutions on diverse fields and across a wide spectrum of countries and cultures. It creates routes for further innovation, collaboration amidst the Sciences (both Natural and Social), the Humanities, and the private and public sectors of…

  5. Theoretical and Methodological Approaches to Social Sciences and Knowledge Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Varela, Asuncion, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This is a unique and groundbreaking collection of questions and answers coming from higher education institutions on diverse fields and across a wide spectrum of countries and cultures. It creates routes for further innovation, collaboration amidst the Sciences (both Natural and Social), the Humanities, and the private and public sectors of…

  6. [Theoretical approach to motivating people for voluntary blood donation].

    PubMed

    Andjelić, D; Sindjidj, M; Budisin, Z

    1996-01-01

    The study points to the experience of a considerable number of authors and to our own experience in the use of sociopsychological theories and personal approaches to the motivation of people for voluntary blood donation. The experience in the following theories is described: personal norms and contribution of responsibility to oneself, economic theory, modelling theory, theory of reasonable action and contribution theory.

  7. The Acquisition of Chinese Relative Clauses: Contrasting Two Theoretical Approaches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Shenai; Gavarró, Anna; Vernice, Mirta; Guasti, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the comprehension of relative clauses by Chinese-speaking children, and evaluates the validity of the predictions of the Dependency Locality Theory (Gibson, 1998, 2000) and the Relativized Minimality approach (Friedmann, Belletti & Rizzi, 2009). One hundred and twenty children from three to eight years of age were tested by…

  8. A Theoretical Approach to School-based HIV Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMuth, Diane; Symons, Cynthia Wolford

    1989-01-01

    Presents examples of appropriate intervention strategies for professionals working with school-based human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention among adolescents. A multidisciplinary approach is advisable because influencing adolescent sexual behavior is a complex matter. Consistent, continuous messages through multiple channels and by multiple…

  9. Photodynamic therapy: Theoretical and experimental approaches to dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ken Kang-Hsin

    Singlet oxygen (1O2) is the major cytotoxic species generated during photodynamic therapy (PDT), and 1O 2 reactions with biological targets define the photodynamic dose at the most fundamental level. We have developed a theoretical model for rigorously describing the spatial and temporal dynamics of oxygen (3O 2) consumption and transport and microscopic 1O 2 dose deposition during PDT in vivo. Using experimentally established physiological and photophysical parameters, the mathematical model allows computation of the dynamic variation of hemoglobin-3O 2 saturation within vessels, irreversible photosensitizer degradation due to photobleaching, therapy-induced blood flow decrease and the microscopic distributions of 3O2 and 1O 2 dose deposition under various irradiation conditions. mTHPC, a promising photosensitizer for PDT, is approved in Europe for the palliative treatment of head and neck cancer. Using the theoretical model and informed by intratumor sensitizer concentrations and distributions, we calculated photodynamic dose depositions for mTHPC-PDT. Our results demonstrate that the 1O 2 dose to the tumor volume does not track even qualitatively with long-term tumor responses. Thus, in this evaluation of mTHPC-PDT, any PDT dose metric that is proportional to singlet oxygen creation and/or deposition would fail to predict the tumor response. In situations like this one, other reporters of biological response to therapy would be necessary. In addition to the case study of mTHPC-PDT, we also use the mathematical model to simulate clinical photobleaching data, informed by a possible blood flow reduction during treatment. In a recently completed clinical trial at Roswell Park Cancer Institute, patients with superficial basal cell carcinoma received topical application of 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and were irradiated with 633 nm light at 10-150 mW cm-2 . Protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) photobleaching in the lesion and the adjacent perilesion normal margin was monitored by

  10. Oxidative dissolution of silver nanoparticles: A new theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Oćwieja, Magdalena; Mrowiec, Halina; Walas, Stanisław; Lupa, Dawid

    2016-05-01

    A general model of an oxidative dissolution of silver particle suspensions was developed that rigorously considers the bulk and surface solute transport. A two-step surface reaction scheme was proposed that comprises the formation of the silver oxide phase by direct oxidation and the acidic dissolution of this phase leading to silver ion release. By considering this, a complete set of equations is formulated describing oxygen and silver ion transport to and from particles' surfaces. These equations are solved in some limiting cases of nanoparticle dissolution in dilute suspensions. The obtained kinetic equations were used for the interpretation of experimental data pertinent to the dissolution kinetics of citrate-stabilized silver nanoparticles. In these kinetic measurements the role of pH and bulk suspension concentration was quantitatively evaluated by using the atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). It was shown that the theoretical model adequately reflects the main features of the experimental results, especially the significant increase in the dissolution rate for lower pH. Also the presence of two kinetic regimes was quantitatively explained in terms of the decrease in the coverage of the fast dissolving oxide layer. The overall silver dissolution rate constants characterizing these two regimes were determined.

  11. A Game Theoretic Approach to Cyber Attack Prediction

    SciTech Connect

    Peng Liu

    2005-11-28

    The area investigated by this project is cyber attack prediction. With a focus on correlation-based prediction, current attack prediction methodologies overlook the strategic nature of cyber attack-defense scenarios. As a result, current cyber attack prediction methodologies are very limited in predicting strategic behaviors of attackers in enforcing nontrivial cyber attacks such as DDoS attacks, and may result in low accuracy in correlation-based predictions. This project develops a game theoretic framework for cyber attack prediction, where an automatic game-theory-based attack prediction method is proposed. Being able to quantitatively predict the likelihood of (sequences of) attack actions, our attack prediction methodology can predict fine-grained strategic behaviors of attackers and may greatly improve the accuracy of correlation-based prediction. To our best knowledge, this project develops the first comprehensive framework for incentive-based modeling and inference of attack intent, objectives, and strategies; and this project develops the first method that can predict fine-grained strategic behaviors of attackers. The significance of this research and the benefit to the public can be demonstrated to certain extent by (a) the severe threat of cyber attacks to the critical infrastructures of the nation, including many infrastructures overseen by the Department of Energy, (b) the importance of cyber security to critical infrastructure protection, and (c) the importance of cyber attack prediction to achieving cyber security.

  12. Exploring Job Satisfaction of Nursing Faculty: Theoretical Approaches.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yingchen; Liesveld, Judy

    2015-01-01

    The Future of Nursing report identified the shortage of nursing faculty as 1 of the barriers to nursing education. In light of this, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the work-life of nursing faculty. The current research focused on job satisfaction of nursing faculty from 4 theoretical perspectives: human capital theory, which emphasizes the expected monetary and nonmonetary returns for any career choices; structural theory, which emphasizes the impact of institutional features on job satisfaction; positive extrinsic environment by self-determination theory, which asserts that a positive extrinsic environment promotes competency and effective outcomes at work; and psychological theory, which emphasizes the proposed relationship between job performance and satisfaction. In addition to the measures for human capital theory, institutional variables (from structural theory and self-determination theory), and productivity measures (from psychological theory), the authors also selected sets of variables for personal characteristics to investigate their effects on job satisfaction. The results indicated that variables related to human capital theory, especially salary, contributed the most to job satisfaction, followed by those related to institutional variables. Personal variables and productivity variables as a whole contributed as well. The only other variable with marginal significance was faculty's perception of institutional support for teaching.

  13. Is DNA a metal, semiconductor or insulator? A theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Gonzalez, Rafael; Fonseca-Romero, Karen; Plazas, Carlos; Grupo de Óptica e Información Cuántica Team

    Over the last years, scientific interest for designing and making low dimensional electronic devices with traditional or novel materials has been increased. These experimental and theoretical researches in electronic properties at molecular scale are looking for developing efficient devices able to carry out tasks which are currently done by silicon transistors and devices. Among the new materials DNA strands are highlighted, but the experimental results have been contradictories pointing to behaviors as conductor, semiconductor or insulator. To contribute to the understanding of the origin of the disparity of the measurements, we perform a numerical calculation of the electrical conductance of DNA segments, modeled as 1D disordered finite chains. The system is described into a Tight binding model with nearest neighbor interactions and a s orbital per site. Hydration effects are included as random variations of self-energies. The electronic current as a function of applied bias is calculated using Launder formalism, where the transmission probability is determined into the transfer matrix formalism. We find a conductor-to-semiconductor-to-insulator transition as a function of the three effects taken into account: chain size, intrinsic disorder, and hydration We thank Fundación para la Promoción de la Investigación y la Tecnología, Colombia, and Dirección de Investigación de Bogotá, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, for partial financial support.

  14. Theoretical approach to crystallization: foundations and application to proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsko, James

    2012-02-01

    A fundamental issue in the modern study of phase transitions is the description of the process of nucleation, i.e. the choices of nucleation pathways. Proteins, in particular, are well-known to sometimes crystallize by passing through a meta-stable amorphous state and simulation and theory have shown that this is also true of many other systems. The issue also arises in the important case of polymorphic materials. In all cases, the goal is to understand which pathway is favored and how this is affected by the external control parameters. In this talk, I discuss a theoretical description of nucleation that allows for the direct determination of nucleation pathways and of their relative probability of realization that takes into account both thermodynamics and kinetic effects. It is based on a formulation of nucleation as a fundamentally non-equilibrium process and fully incorporates the effect of free-energy landscapes, determined e.g. via Density Functional Theory, in a consistent manner.

  15. A NETWORK-THEORETICAL APPROACH TO UNDERSTANDING INTERSTELLAR CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Jolley, Craig C.; Douglas, Trevor

    2010-10-20

    Recent years have seen dramatic advances in computational models of chemical processes in the interstellar medium (ISM). Typically, these models have been used to calculate changes in chemical abundances with time; the calculated abundances can then be compared with chemical abundances derived from observations. In this study, the output from an astrochemical simulation has been used to generate directed graphs with weighted edges; these have been analyzed with the tools of network theory to uncover whole-network properties of reaction systems in dark molecular clouds. The results allow the development of a model in which global network properties can be rationalized in terms of the basic physical properties of the reaction system. The ISM network exhibits an exponential degree distribution, which is likely to be a generic feature of chemical networks involving a broad range of reaction rate constants. While species abundances span several orders of magnitude, the formation and destruction rates for most species are approximately balanced-departures from this rule indicate species (such as CO) that play a critical role in shaping the dynamics of the system. Future theoretical or observational studies focusing on individual molecular species will be able to situate them in terms of their role in the complete system or quantify the degree to which they deviate from the typical system behavior.

  16. The Case Study Approach: Some Theoretical, Methodological and Applied Considerations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    a large manufacturing organisation in Malaysia . An in- depth case study process (specifically a qualitative approach) was used to illustrate the...researcher closely examined four leaders from generally diverse organisations, who had embraced the learning-organisation concept in order to improve...The researchers focused on the context of learning in the workplace , and they investigated the nature of learning and development opportunities that

  17. Data normalization in biosurveillance: an information-theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    Peter, William; Najmi, Amir H; Burkom, Howard

    2007-10-11

    An approach to identifying public health threats by characterizing syndromic surveillance data in terms of its surprisability is discussed. Surprisability in our model is measured by assigning a probability distribution to a time series, and then calculating its entropy, leading to a straightforward designation of an alert. Initial application of our method is to investigate the applicability of using suitably-normalized syndromic counts (i.e., proportions) to improve early event detection.

  18. The game as strategy for approach to sexuality with adolescents: theoretical-methodological reflections.

    PubMed

    Souza, Vânia de; Gazzinelli, Maria Flávia; Soares, Amanda Nathale; Fernandes, Marconi Moura; Oliveira, Rebeca Nunes Guedes de; Fonseca, Rosa Maria Godoy Serpa da

    2017-04-01

    To describe the Papo Reto [Straight Talk] game and reflect on its theoretical-methodological basis. Analytical study on the process of elaboration of the Papo Reto online game, destined to adolescents aged 15-18 years, with access to the Game between 2014 and 2015. the interactions of 60 adolescents from Belo Horizonte and São Paulo constituted examples of the potentialities of the Game to favor the approach to sexuality with adolescents through simulation of reality, invention and interaction. Based on those potentialities, four thinking categories were discussed: the game as pedagogic device; the game as simulation of realities; the game as device for inventive learning; and the game empowering the interaction. By permitting that the adolescents take risks on new ways, the Game allows them to become creative and active in the production of senses, in the creation of their discourses and in the ways of thinking, feeling and acting in the sexuality field.

  19. Field electron and ion emission from charged surfaces: a strategic historical review of theoretical concepts.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Richard G

    2003-01-01

    The field-electron (FE) and field-ion techniques directly observe and measure atomic-level surface processes that occur in very high electric fields. In theoretical terms, the high fields put large additional terms into Hamiltonians and free energies, and significantly modify many aspects of the surface physics and chemistry, as compared with the field-free situation. This paper presents a strategic review of the fundamental science of some of these high-field surface effects and processes, as developed in the context of the field electron and ion emission techniques. It outlines the main theoretical concepts developed, notes some twists of scientific history, and suggests useful contributions made to mainstream science. Topics covered are basic aspects of FE emission, surface field ionisation, localised field adsorption, charged surfaces theory, field-ion image contrast theory and associated imaging-gas kinetics, field evaporation, and aspects of the thermodynamics of charged surfaces. Despite many years of effort, important aspects of the theory remain incomplete. Some theoretical challenges are noted.

  20. Schrödinger Approach to Mean Field Games.

    PubMed

    Swiecicki, Igor; Gobron, Thierry; Ullmo, Denis

    2016-03-25

    Mean field games (MFG) provide a theoretical frame to model socioeconomic systems. In this Letter, we study a particular class of MFG that shows strong analogies with the nonlinear Schrödinger and Gross-Pitaevskii equations introduced in physics to describe a variety of physical phenomena. Using this bridge, many results and techniques developed along the years in the latter context can be transferred to the former, which provides both a new domain of application for the nonlinear Schrödinger equation and a new and fruitful approach in the study of mean field games. Utilizing this approach, we analyze in detail a population dynamics model in which the "players" are under a strong incentive to coordinate themselves.

  1. Dissipative quantum transport in macromolecules: Effective field theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, E.; a Beccara, S.; Faccioli, P.

    2013-08-01

    We introduce an atomistic approach to the dissipative quantum dynamics of charged or neutral excitations propagating through macromolecular systems. Using the Feynman-Vernon path integral formalism, we analytically trace out from the density matrix the atomic coordinates and the heat bath degrees of freedom. This way we obtain an effective field theory which describes the real-time evolution of the quantum excitation and is fully consistent with the fluctuation-dissipation relation. The main advantage of the field-theoretic approach is that it allows us to avoid using the Keldysh contour formulation. This simplification makes it straightforward to derive Feynman diagrams to analytically compute the effects of the interaction of the propagating quantum excitation with the heat bath and with the molecular atomic vibrations. For illustration purposes, we apply this formalism to investigate the loss of quantum coherence of holes propagating through a poly(3-alkylthiophene) polymer.

  2. Theoretical approach to oxygen atom degradation of silver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fromhold, Albert T., Jr.; Noh, Seung; Beshears, Ronald; Whitaker, Ann F.; Little, Sally A.

    1987-01-01

    Based on available Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), proton induced X-ray emission (PIXE) and ellipsometry data obtained on silver specimens subjected to atomic oxygen attack in low Earth orbit STS flight 41-G, a theory was developed to model the oxygen atom degradation of silver. The diffusion of atomic oxygen in a microscopically nonuniform medium is an essential constituent of the theory. The driving force for diffusion is the macroscopic electrochemical potential gradient developed between the specimen surface exposed to the ambient and the bulk of the silver specimen. The longitudinal electric effect developed parallel to the gradient is modified by space charge of the diffusing charged species. Lateral electric fields and concentration differences also exist due to the nonuniform nature of the medium. The lateral concentration differences are found to be more important than the lateral electric fields in modifying the diffusion rate. The model was evaluated numerically. Qualitative agreement exists between the kinetics predicted by the theory and kinetic data taken in ground-based experiments utilizing a plasma asher.

  3. Theoretical Triangulation as an Approach for Revealing the Complexity of a Classroom Discussion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Drie, Jannet; Dekker, Rijkje

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we explore the value of theoretical triangulation as a methodological approach for the analysis of classroom interaction. We analyze an excerpt of a whole-class discussion in history from three theoretical perspectives: interactivity of the discourse, conceptual level raising and historical reasoning. We conclude that using…

  4. From DNA radiation damage to cell death: theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Ballarini, Francesca

    2010-10-05

    Some representative models of radiation-induced cell death, which is a crucial endpoint in radiobiology, were reviewed. The basic assumptions were identified, their consequences on predicted cell survival were analyzed, and the advantages and drawbacks of each approach were outlined. In addition to "historical" approaches such as the Target Theory, the Linear-Quadratic model, the Theory of Dual Radiation Action and Katz' model, the more recent Local Effect Model was discussed, focusing on its application in Carbon-ion hadrontherapy. Furthermore, a mechanistic model developed at the University of Pavia and based on the relationship between cell inactivation and chromosome aberrations was presented, together with recent results; the good agreement between model predictions and literature experimental data on different radiation types (photons, protons, alpha particles, and Carbon ions) supported the idea that asymmetric chromosome aberrations like dicentrics and rings play a fundamental role for cell death. Basing on these results, a reinterpretation of the TDRA was also proposed, identifying the TDRA "sublesions" and "lesions" as clustered DNA double-strand breaks and (lethal) chromosome aberrations, respectively.

  5. From DNA Radiation Damage to Cell Death: Theoretical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ballarini, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Some representative models of radiation-induced cell death, which is a crucial endpoint in radiobiology, were reviewed. The basic assumptions were identified, their consequences on predicted cell survival were analyzed, and the advantages and drawbacks of each approach were outlined. In addition to “historical” approaches such as the Target Theory, the Linear-Quadratic model, the Theory of Dual Radiation Action and Katz' model, the more recent Local Effect Model was discussed, focusing on its application in Carbon-ion hadrontherapy. Furthermore, a mechanistic model developed at the University of Pavia and based on the relationship between cell inactivation and chromosome aberrations was presented, together with recent results; the good agreement between model predictions and literature experimental data on different radiation types (photons, protons, alpha particles, and Carbon ions) supported the idea that asymmetric chromosome aberrations like dicentrics and rings play a fundamental role for cell death. Basing on these results, a reinterpretation of the TDRA was also proposed, identifying the TDRA “sublesions” and “lesions” as clustered DNA double-strand breaks and (lethal) chromosome aberrations, respectively. PMID:20976308

  6. Radio emission from air showers. Comparison of theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Konstantin

    2013-05-01

    While the fluorescence and the ground counter techniques for the detection of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) were being developed for decades, the interest in the radio detection diminished after the initial experiments in the 1960s. As a result, the fluorescence and the surface array techniques are more mature today, providing more reliable measurements of the primary cosmic particle energy, chemical composition and the inelastic cross-section. The advantages of the radio technique are 100% duty cycle and lower deployment and operational costs. Thus, the radio technique can greatly complement the fluorescence and the ground array detection and can also work independently. With the ANITA balloon detector observing UHECRs and the success of LOPES, CODALEMA and other surface radio detectors, the radio technique received a significant boost in recent years. Reliable Monte Carlo (MC) simulations are needed in order to obtain the energy and other parameters of the primary cosmic ray particle from the radio observations. Several MC techniques, like ZHairesS and the Endpoint Formalism, were proposed in recent years. While they seem to reproduce some of the observed data quite well, there is a divergence between the different approaches under certain conditions. In this work we derive these approaches from Maxwell's equations and prove their identity under certain conditions as well as discuss their applicability to the UHECR air showers and to a proposed experiment at SLAC.

  7. [Restoring the complexity of reality in theoretical health promotion approaches through incorporating the identity of the subject].

    PubMed

    Desgroseilliers, Valérie; Vonarx, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    The theoretical frameworks presently dominating health promotion practices mainly focus on the individual's psychosocial and cognitive components. When focusing on environments, these frameworks barely relate contextual elements to the individuals who give them a real existence. Because of the disjunction and reduction they create, the main theoretical readings only partially recognize the complexity of social life and therefore lose the Subject. Lacking theoretical reliance, these readings fail to meet the Ottawa Charter principles. Based on critical analysis of the main theoretical frameworks, we discuss the influence of disciplinary backgrounds on our modes of knowledge, tackling how epidemiological and behavioral thinking affect how we understand, conceive and problematize the objects in these fields. Based on this analysis, we illustrate how these epistemologies oversimplify social realities related to health. In order to encounter the lost subject of health promotion and thereby achieve Ottawa Charter's principles, we propose an innovative theoretical approach based on Schütz' socio-phenomenological thinking and Morin's complexity paradigm. Our theoretical proposal aims to recognize and reconcile significant aspects of individuals' meaningful life experiences, while integrating common sense principles. By transiting through the subject's identity, this theoretical proposal tends to unify all meaningful aspects that subtend social life at the subject's scale.

  8. Theoretical approach to explore the production routes of astatine radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2009-02-15

    To fulfill the recent thrust of astatine radionuclides in the field of nuclear medicine, various production routes have been explored in the present work. The possible production routes of {sup 209-211}At comprise both light- and heavy-ion-induced reactions at the bombarding energy range starting from threshold to a maximum of 100 MeV. Excitation functions of those radionuclides, produced through various production routes, have been calculated by using nuclear reaction model codes TALYS, ALICE91, and PACE-II and are compared with the available measured data. Contributions of various reaction mechanisms, such as direct, pre-equilibrium, and equilibrium reactions, to the total reaction cross section have been studied using the codes. Results show that the equilibrium reaction dominates in all cases over other reaction mechanisms.

  9. Theoretical approach to explore the production routes of astatine radionuclides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, Moumita; Lahiri, Susanta

    2009-02-01

    To fulfill the recent thrust of astatine radionuclides in the field of nuclear medicine, various production routes have been explored in the present work. The possible production routes of At209-211 comprise both light- and heavy-ion-induced reactions at the bombarding energy range starting from threshold to a maximum of 100 MeV. Excitation functions of those radionuclides, produced through various production routes, have been calculated by using nuclear reaction model codes TALYS, ALICE91, and PACE-II and are compared with the available measured data. Contributions of various reaction mechanisms, such as direct, pre-equilibrium, and equilibrium reactions, to the total reaction cross section have been studied using the codes. Results show that the equilibrium reaction dominates in all cases over other reaction mechanisms.

  10. Progress in Developing a New Field-theoretical Crossover Equation-of-State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, Joseph; Barmatz, M.; Zhong, Fang

    2003-01-01

    A new field-theoretical crossover equation-of-state model is being developed. This model of a liquid-gas critical point provides a bridge between the asymptotic equation-of-state behavior close to the transition, obtained by the Guida and Zinn-Justin parametric model [J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 31, 8103 (1998)], and the expected mean field behavior farther away. The crossover is based on the beta function for the renormalized fourth-order coupling constant and incorporates the correct crossover exponents and critical amplitude ratios in both regimes. A crossover model is now being developed that is consistent with predictions along the critical isochore and along the coexistence curve of the minimal subtraction renormalization approach developed by Dohm and co-workers and recently applied to the O(1) universality class [Phys. Rev. E, 67, 021106 (2003)]. Experimental measurements of the heat capacity at constant volume, isothermal susceptibility, and coexistence curve near the He-3 critical point are being compared to the predictions of this model. The results of these comparisons will be presented.

  11. Progress in Developing a New Field-theoretical Crossover Equation-of-State

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rudnick, Joseph; Barmatz, M.; Zhong, Fang

    2003-01-01

    A new field-theoretical crossover equation-of-state model is being developed. This model of a liquid-gas critical point provides a bridge between the asymptotic equation-of-state behavior close to the transition, obtained by the Guida and Zinn-Justin parametric model [J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 31, 8103 (1998)], and the expected mean field behavior farther away. The crossover is based on the beta function for the renormalized fourth-order coupling constant and incorporates the correct crossover exponents and critical amplitude ratios in both regimes. A crossover model is now being developed that is consistent with predictions along the critical isochore and along the coexistence curve of the minimal subtraction renormalization approach developed by Dohm and co-workers and recently applied to the O(1) universality class [Phys. Rev. E, 67, 021106 (2003)]. Experimental measurements of the heat capacity at constant volume, isothermal susceptibility, and coexistence curve near the He-3 critical point are being compared to the predictions of this model. The results of these comparisons will be presented.

  12. Kinetics and thermodynamics of protein adsorption: a generalized molecular theoretical approach.

    PubMed Central

    Fang, F; Szleifer, I

    2001-01-01

    The thermodynamics and kinetics of protein adsorption are studied using a molecular theoretical approach. The cases studied include competitive adsorption from mixtures and the effect of conformational changes upon adsorption. The kinetic theory is based on a generalized diffusion equation in which the driving force for motion is the gradient of chemical potentials of the proteins. The time-dependent chemical potentials, as well as the equilibrium behavior of the system, are obtained using a molecular mean-field theory. The theory provides, within the same theoretical formulation, the diffusion and the kinetic (activated) controlled regimes. By separation of ideal and nonideal contributions to the chemical potential, the equation of motion shows a purely diffusive part and the motion of the particles in the potential of mean force resulting from the intermolecular interactions. The theory enables the calculation of the time-dependent surface coverage of proteins, the dynamic surface tension, and the structure of the adsorbed layer in contact with the approaching proteins. For the case of competitive adsorption from a solution containing a mixture of large and small proteins, a variety of different adsorption patterns are observed depending upon the bulk composition, the strength of the interaction between the particles, and the surface and size of the proteins. It is found that the experimentally observed Vroman sequence is predicted in the case that the bulk solution is at a composition with an excess of the small protein, and that the interaction between the large protein and the surface is much larger than that of the smaller protein. The effect of surface conformational changes of the adsorbed proteins in the time-dependent adsorption is studied in detail. The theory predicts regimes of constant density and dynamic surface tension that are long lived but are only intermediates before the final approach to equilibrium. The implications of the findings to the

  13. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Charles, P. H. Crowe, S. B.; Langton, C. M.; Trapp, J. V.; Cranmer-Sargison, G.; Thwaites, D. I.; Kairn, T.; Knight, R. T.; Kenny, J.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. Methods: A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. Results: According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6

  14. A practical and theoretical definition of very small field size for radiotherapy output factor measurements.

    PubMed

    Charles, P H; Cranmer-Sargison, G; Thwaites, D I; Crowe, S B; Kairn, T; Knight, R T; Kenny, J; Langton, C M; Trapp, J V

    2014-04-01

    This work introduces the concept of very small field size. Output factor (OPF) measurements at these field sizes require extremely careful experimental methodology including the measurement of dosimetric field size at the same time as each OPF measurement. Two quantifiable scientific definitions of the threshold of very small field size are presented. A practical definition was established by quantifying the effect that a 1 mm error in field size or detector position had on OPFs and setting acceptable uncertainties on OPF at 1%. Alternatively, for a theoretical definition of very small field size, the OPFs were separated into additional factors to investigate the specific effects of lateral electronic disequilibrium, photon scatter in the phantom, and source occlusion. The dominant effect was established and formed the basis of a theoretical definition of very small fields. Each factor was obtained using Monte Carlo simulations of a Varian iX linear accelerator for various square field sizes of side length from 4 to 100 mm, using a nominal photon energy of 6 MV. According to the practical definition established in this project, field sizes ≤ 15 mm were considered to be very small for 6 MV beams for maximal field size uncertainties of 1 mm. If the acceptable uncertainty in the OPF was increased from 1.0% to 2.0%, or field size uncertainties are 0.5 mm, field sizes ≤ 12 mm were considered to be very small. Lateral electronic disequilibrium in the phantom was the dominant cause of change in OPF at very small field sizes. Thus the theoretical definition of very small field size coincided to the field size at which lateral electronic disequilibrium clearly caused a greater change in OPF than any other effects. This was found to occur at field sizes ≤ 12 mm. Source occlusion also caused a large change in OPF for field sizes ≤ 8 mm. Based on the results of this study, field sizes ≤ 12 mm were considered to be theoretically very small for 6 MV beams. Extremely

  15. Modeling of laccase inhibition by formetanate pesticide using theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Martins, Ana C V; Ribeiro, Francisco W P; Zanatta, Geancarlo; Freire, Valder N; Morais, Simone; de Lima-Neto, Pedro; Correia, Adriana N

    2016-04-01

    The inhibition of laccase enzymatic catalytic activity by formetanate hydrochloride (FMT) was investigated by cyclic voltammetry and by quantum chemical calculations based on density functional theory with a protein fragmentation approach. The cyclic voltammograms were obtained using a biosensor prepared by enzyme immobilization on gold electrodes modified with gold nanoparticles and 4-aminophenol as the target molecule. The decrease in the peak current in the presence of FMT was used to characterize the inhibition process. The calculations identified Asp206 as the most relevant moiety in the interaction of FMT with the laccase enzymatic ligand binding domain. The amino acid residue Cys453 was important, because the Cys453-FMT interaction energy was not affected by the dielectric constant, although it was not a very close residue. This study provides an overview of how FMT inhibits laccase catalytic activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Theoretical approaches to entertainment education campaigns: a subaltern critique.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Mohan Jyoti

    2006-01-01

    Entertainment education (E-E) is one of the most widely discussed areas in current scholarship on international health communication. In fact, much of the health communication scholarship has been historically dominated by E-E efforts directed at subaltern spaces. This article applies a subaltern studies perspective to interrogate the location of agency of the subaltern participant in the dominant E-E discourse. Based on a critical approach to E-E, the article offers points of departure for studying health communication in subaltern spaces. Subaltern voices point toward alternative definitions of problems beyond the narrow realm of problems defined by the core actors in E-E. Finally, alternative positions are suggested for applying participatory communication in engaging with subaltern participants for problem definition and solution development.

  17. A theoretical approach for analyzing the restabilization of wakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, D. C.

    1992-01-01

    A linear stability analysis provides the basis for an analysis of the effects of prescribed changes upon the global stability characteristics of a bluff body wake. The analysis is applied in particular to the problem of placing a small cylinder in the wake of a larger one in order to suppress the vortex street. A prediction of the alteration in the critical Reynolds number of the system as a function of the location of the second cylinder relative to the first is presented and is shown to compare favorably with experimental results. The effect upon shedding frequency is also considered. The approach relies on the solution of an adjoint eigenvalue problem and an inhomogeneous adjoint boundary value problem. These adjoint solutions are shown to be a key component in the analysis of a variety of wake control strategies.

  18. Theoretically informed Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals by sampling of alignment-tensor fields.

    PubMed

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C; Londono-Hurtado, Alejandro; Guzmán, Orlando; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P; de Pablo, Juan J

    2015-07-28

    A theoretically informed coarse-grained Monte Carlo method is proposed for studying liquid crystals. The free energy functional of the system is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. The alignment field and its gradients are approximated by finite differences, and the free energy is minimized through a stochastic sampling technique. The validity of the proposed method is established by comparing the results of the proposed approach to those of traditional free energy minimization techniques. Its usefulness is illustrated in the context of three systems, namely, a nematic liquid crystal confined in a slit channel, a nematic liquid crystal droplet, and a chiral liquid crystal in the bulk. It is found that for systems that exhibit multiple metastable morphologies, the proposed Monte Carlo method is generally able to identify lower free energy states that are often missed by traditional approaches. Importantly, the Monte Carlo method identifies such states from random initial configurations, thereby obviating the need for educated initial guesses that can be difficult to formulate.

  19. Theoretically informed Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals by sampling of alignment-tensor fields

    SciTech Connect

    Armas-Pérez, Julio C.; Londono-Hurtado, Alejandro; Guzmán, Orlando; Hernández-Ortiz, Juan P.; Pablo, Juan J. de

    2015-07-28

    A theoretically informed coarse-grained Monte Carlo method is proposed for studying liquid crystals. The free energy functional of the system is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. The alignment field and its gradients are approximated by finite differences, and the free energy is minimized through a stochastic sampling technique. The validity of the proposed method is established by comparing the results of the proposed approach to those of traditional free energy minimization techniques. Its usefulness is illustrated in the context of three systems, namely, a nematic liquid crystal confined in a slit channel, a nematic liquid crystal droplet, and a chiral liquid crystal in the bulk. It is found that for systems that exhibit multiple metastable morphologies, the proposed Monte Carlo method is generally able to identify lower free energy states that are often missed by traditional approaches. Importantly, the Monte Carlo method identifies such states from random initial configurations, thereby obviating the need for educated initial guesses that can be difficult to formulate.

  20. Theoretically informed Monte Carlo simulation of liquid crystals by sampling of alignment-tensor fields.

    SciTech Connect

    Armas-Perez, Julio C.; Londono-Hurtado, Alejandro; Guzman, Orlando; Hernandez-Ortiz, Juan P.; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2015-07-27

    A theoretically informed coarse-grained Monte Carlo method is proposed for studying liquid crystals. The free energy functional of the system is described in the framework of the Landau-de Gennes formalism. The alignment field and its gradients are approximated by finite differences, and the free energy is minimized through a stochastic sampling technique. The validity of the proposed method is established by comparing the results of the proposed approach to those of traditional free energy minimization techniques. Its usefulness is illustrated in the context of three systems, namely, a nematic liquid crystal confined in a slit channel, a nematic liquid crystal droplet, and a chiral liquid crystal in the bulk. It is found that for systems that exhibit multiple metastable morphologies, the proposed Monte Carlo method is generally able to identify lower free energy states that are often missed by traditional approaches. Importantly, the Monte Carlo method identifies such states from random initial configurations, thereby obviating the need for educated initial guesses that can be difficult to formulate.

  1. [Theoretical and experimental dosimetry in evaluation of biological effects of electromagnetic field for portable radio transmitters. Report 1. Flat phantoms].

    PubMed

    Perov, S Iu; Bogacheva, E V

    2014-01-01

    Results of the theoretical (numerical) and experimental dosimetry approach for portable radio transmitters are considered. The simulation and measurement results are shown. A generic type of a portable radio transmitter operating in a very high frequency range was tested as an electromagnetic field source. The analysis of specific absorption rate distribution in the flat homogeneous phantom was carried out on the basis of a portable radio transmitter. The results have shown the admissible divergence between measurements and simulation. According to these results, the authors have come to the conclusion about using the complex dosimetry approach including experimental and numerical dosimetry.

  2. Out-Learning Attackers: A Game Theoretic Approach to Cyber Defense

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    Out-Learning Attackers: A Game Theoretic Approach to Cyber Defense FA9550-09-1-0049 Musacchio, John Frazier , Greg Kreidl, Pat Regents of University of...Security Program Final Report Project Period: 2/1/09 - 11/30/12 John Musacchio, UC Santa Cruz; Greg Frazier and Pat Kreidl BAE Systems 1 Introduction This...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2013-0172 Out-Learning Attackers: A Game Theoretic Approach to Cyber Defense John Musacchio Regents of

  3. A Geometric Feature-aided Game Theoretic Approach to Sensor Management

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-09

    theory is the Nash Equilibrium [15], which is named after John Forbes Nash , who first proposed it. The concept is a solution concept of a game...theoretic sensor management (ANGSm) approach. By incorporating subgame Nash Equilibrium into negotiation, all agent’s needs are considered. With the...surveillance area, we propose an agentbased negotiable game theoretic sensor management (ANGSm) approach. By incorporating subgame Nash Equilibrium into

  4. How to measure soundscapes. A theoretical and practical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulte-Fortkamp, Brigitte

    2002-11-01

    Noise sources interact with the specific acoustic and environmental makeup, topography, meteorology, land use pattern, and lifestyle. The evaluation of soundscapes needs subject-related methodological procedures. With such suitable measurements a way has to be found that allows us to rely on different dimensions on reaction to noise. Improving the soundscape of an urban environment imposes to account for the qualitative appreciation as a cognitive judgment given by listeners and, particularly, for the interaction between acoustic dimensions and other sensory modalities in qualitative judgments of an urban environment (Maffiolo). The structure of the residential area that is, the combination of noise sources are important for the judgment of a soundscope and are also important as subjective parameters which are relevant in people's point of view. Moreover, the relationship of both define the background for assessments. Studies are needed on the subject and its capability in perception and interpretation; studies on the subject inside the society, studies on the social and cultural context, and field studies including physical measurements. Soundscapes may be defined in its effects on man and vice versa and probably acoustical ecology will serve to understand the function of soundscapes.

  5. Fallacies and fantasies: the theoretical underpinnings of the Coexistence Approach for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, G. W.; Potts, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Coexistence Approach has been used infer palaeoclimates for many Eurasian fossil plant assemblage. However, the theory that underpins the method has never been examined in detail. Here we discuss acknowledged and implicit assumptions, and assess the statistical nature and pseudo-logic of the method. We also compare the Coexistence Approach theory with the active field of species distribution modelling. We argue that the assumptions will inevitably be violated to some degree and that the method has no means to identify and quantify these violations. The lack of a statistical framework makes the method highly vulnerable to the vagaries of statistical outliers and exotic elements. In addition, we find numerous logical inconsistencies, such as how climate shifts are quantified (the use of a "center value" of a coexistence interval) and the ability to reconstruct "extinct" climates from modern plant distributions. Given the problems that have surfaced in species distribution modelling, accurate and precise quantitative reconstructions of palaeoclimates (or even climate shifts) using the nearest-living-relative principle and rectilinear niches (the basis of the method) will not be possible. The Coexistence Approach can be summarised as an exercise that shoe-horns a plant fossil assemblages into coexistence and then naively assumes that this must be the climate. Given the theoretical issues, and methodological issues highlighted elsewhere, we suggest that the method be discontinued and that all past reconstructions be disregarded and revisited using less fallacious methods.

  6. Theoretical calculation of zero field splitting parameters of Cr3+ doped ammonium oxalate monohydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kripal, Ram; Yadav, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Zero field splitting parameters (ZFSPs) D and E of Cr3+ ion doped ammonium oxalate monohydrate (AOM) are calculated with formula using the superposition model. The theoretically calculated ZFSPs for Cr3+ in AOM crystal are compared with the experimental value obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Theoretical ZFSPs are in good agreement with the experimental ones. The energy band positions of optical absorption spectra of Cr3+ in AOM crystal calculated with CFA package are in good match with the experimental values.

  7. Theoretical investigation of zero field splitting parameter of Cr3+ doped diammonium hexaaqua magnesium sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kripal, Ram; Yadav, Awadhesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    The zero field splitting parameter D of Cr3+ doped diammonium hexaaqua magnesium sulfate (DHMS) are calculated with perturbation formula using crystal field (CF) parameters from superposition model. The theoretically calculated ZFS parameters for Cr3+ in DHMS single crystal are compared with the experimental value obtained by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The theoretical ZFS parameter D is similar to that from experiment. The energy band positions of optical absorption spectra of Cr3+ doped DHMS single crystal are calculated with CFA package, which are in good match with experimental values.

  8. Theoretical predictions for spatially-focused heating of magnetic nanoparticles guided by magnetic particle imaging field gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhavalikar, Rohan; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles in alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) transfer some of the field's energy to their surroundings in the form of heat, a property that has attracted significant attention for use in cancer treatment through hyperthermia and in developing magnetic drug carriers that can be actuated to release their cargo externally using magnetic fields. To date, most work in this field has focused on the use of AMFs that actuate heat release by nanoparticles over large regions, without the ability to select specific nanoparticle-loaded regions for heating while leaving other nanoparticle-loaded regions unaffected. In parallel, magnetic particle imaging (MPI) has emerged as a promising approach to image the distribution of magnetic nanoparticle tracers in vivo, with sub-millimeter spatial resolution. The underlying principle in MPI is the application of a selection magnetic field gradient, which defines a small region of low bias field, superimposed with an AMF (of lower frequency and amplitude than those normally used to actuate heating by the nanoparticles) to obtain a signal which is proportional to the concentration of particles in the region of low bias field. Here we extend previous models for estimating the energy dissipation rates of magnetic nanoparticles in uniform AMFs to provide theoretical predictions of how the selection magnetic field gradient used in MPI can be used to selectively actuate heating by magnetic nanoparticles in the low bias field region of the selection magnetic field gradient. Theoretical predictions are given for the spatial decay in energy dissipation rate under magnetic field gradients representative of those that can be achieved with current MPI technology. These results underscore the potential of combining MPI and higher amplitude/frequency actuation AMFs to achieve selective magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) guided by MPI.

  9. Field dependence of gaseous-ion mobility - Theoretical tests of approximate formulas.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, H.; Mason, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    The approximate formulas considered include relations based on the Wannier free-flight theory, the Kihara medium-field expansion, and the Frost-Patterson interpolation formulas. A few accurate theoretical results are available for testing the foregoing formulas. Cases concerning high fields, intermediate fields, and resonant charge transfer are examined. It is found that of the formulas tested, the one based on the Wannier free-flight theory is the most flexible, since it can be used for all fields and all ion-neutral force laws and mass ratios.

  10. The prediction of candidate genes for cervix related cancer through gene ontology and graph theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Hindumathi, V; Kranthi, T; Rao, S B; Manimaran, P

    2014-06-01

    With rapidly changing technology, prediction of candidate genes has become an indispensable task in recent years mainly in the field of biological research. The empirical methods for candidate gene prioritization that succors to explore the potential pathway between genetic determinants and complex diseases are highly cumbersome and labor intensive. In such a scenario predicting potential targets for a disease state through in silico approaches are of researcher's interest. The prodigious availability of protein interaction data coupled with gene annotation renders an ease in the accurate determination of disease specific candidate genes. In our work we have prioritized the cervix related cancer candidate genes by employing Csaba Ortutay and his co-workers approach of identifying the candidate genes through graph theoretical centrality measures and gene ontology. With the advantage of the human protein interaction data, cervical cancer gene sets and the ontological terms, we were able to predict 15 novel candidates for cervical carcinogenesis. The disease relevance of the anticipated candidate genes was corroborated through a literature survey. Also the presence of the drugs for these candidates was detected through Therapeutic Target Database (TTD) and DrugMap Central (DMC) which affirms that they may be endowed as potential drug targets for cervical cancer.

  11. A Theoretical Approach to Understanding Population Dynamics with Seasonal Developmental Durations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lou, Yijun; Zhao, Xiao-Qiang

    2017-04-01

    There is a growing body of biological investigations to understand impacts of seasonally changing environmental conditions on population dynamics in various research fields such as single population growth and disease transmission. On the other side, understanding the population dynamics subject to seasonally changing weather conditions plays a fundamental role in predicting the trends of population patterns and disease transmission risks under the scenarios of climate change. With the host-macroparasite interaction as a motivating example, we propose a synthesized approach for investigating the population dynamics subject to seasonal environmental variations from theoretical point of view, where the model development, basic reproduction ratio formulation and computation, and rigorous mathematical analysis are involved. The resultant model with periodic delay presents a novel term related to the rate of change of the developmental duration, bringing new challenges to dynamics analysis. By investigating a periodic semiflow on a suitably chosen phase space, the global dynamics of a threshold type is established: all solutions either go to zero when basic reproduction ratio is less than one, or stabilize at a positive periodic state when the reproduction ratio is greater than one. The synthesized approach developed here is applicable to broader contexts of investigating biological systems with seasonal developmental durations.

  12. Theoretical analysis of the particle gradient distribution in centrifugal field during solidification

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Q.; Jiao, Y.; Yang, Y.; Hu, Z.

    1996-12-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented to obtain gradient distribution of particles in centrifugal field, by which the particle distribution in gradient composite can be predicted. Particle movement in liquid is described and gradient distribution of particles in composite is calculated in a centrifugal field during the solidification. The factors which affect the particle distribution and its gradient are discussed in detail. The theoretical analysis indicated that a composite zone and a blank zone exist in gradient composite, which can be controlled to the outside or inside of the tubular composite by the density difference of particle and liquid metal. The comparison of the SiC particle distribution in Al matrix composite produced by centrifugal casting between the theory model and the experiment denotes that the theoretical analysis is reasonable.

  13. Field evaporation of insulators and semiconductors: Theoretical insights for ZnO.

    PubMed

    Karahka, Markus; Kreuzer, H J

    2015-12-01

    We look at the new challenges associated with Atom Probe Tomography of insulators and semiconductors with regard to local fields inside and on the surface of such materials. The theoretical discovery that in high fields the band gap in these materials is drastically reduced to the point where at the evaporation field strength it vanishes will be crucial in our discussion. To understand Atom Probe results on the field evaporation of insulators and semiconductors we use density functional theory on ZnO clusters to follow the structural and electronic changes during field evaporation and to obtain potential energy curves, HOMO-LUMO gaps, field distributions, desorption pathways and fragments, dielectric constants, and polarizabilities. We also examine the effects of electric field reversal on the evaporation of ZnO and compare the results with Si.

  14. PREFACE: The Second International Conference on Inverse Problems: Recent Theoretical Developments and Numerical Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Jin; Hon, Yiu-Chung; Seo, Jin Keun; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2005-01-01

    The Second International Conference on Inverse Problems: Recent Theoretical Developments and Numerical Approaches was held at Fudan University, Shanghai from 16-21 June 2004. The first conference in this series was held at the City University of Hong Kong in January 2002 and it was agreed to hold the conference once every two years in a Pan-Pacific Asian country. The next conference is scheduled to be held at Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Japan in July 2006. The purpose of this series of biennial conferences is to establish and develop constant international collaboration, especially among the Pan-Pacific Asian countries. In recent decades, interest in inverse problems has been flourishing all over the globe because of both the theoretical interest and practical requirements. In particular, in Asian countries, one is witnessing remarkable new trends of research in inverse problems as well as the participation of many young talents. Considering these trends, the second conference was organized with the chairperson Professor Li Tat-tsien (Fudan University), in order to provide forums for developing research cooperation and to promote activities in the field of inverse problems. Because solutions to inverse problems are needed in various applied fields, we entertained a total of 92 participants at the second conference and arranged various talks which ranged from mathematical analyses to solutions of concrete inverse problems in the real world. This volume contains 18 selected papers, all of which have undergone peer review. The 18 papers are classified as follows: Surveys: four papers give reviews of specific inverse problems. Theoretical aspects: six papers investigate the uniqueness, stability, and reconstruction schemes. Numerical methods: four papers devise new numerical methods and their applications to inverse problems. Solutions to applied inverse problems: four papers discuss concrete inverse problems such as scattering problems and inverse problems in

  15. Historical Perspectives: Pioneering Definitions and Theoretical Positions in the Field of Gifted Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jolly, Jennifer L.

    2005-01-01

    The previous Historical Perspectives column focused on the foundations of gifted education and the influence that Francis Galton, Alfred Binet, and Cesare Lombroso had in shaping the field. This work seeks to extend the examination of the historical roots of gifted education by focusing on definitions and theoretical underpinnings of giftedness…

  16. A Theoretical Approach to One Dimensional Heat Conduction of Solid phase Change with Convective Surface Heat Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamamatsu, Teruhide

    A theoretical approach to heat conduction in phase changing solid with convective surface heat transfer has been tried to disclose the effect of the heat transfer, and to get the governing equation for the phase-changing front movement and the transient temperature field. As a result of the analytical work in the rectangular heat conduction field, the quasi-theoretical solutions containing the Stefan's problem for the phase change front movement and the transient temperature distribution have been obtained, and in addition one of the key parameters newly introduced is a non-dimensional heat transfer factor. HTF (convective heat tranferrability vs. latent heat capacity) which can indicate the acceleration of phase change and the difference from the Stefan's solution.

  17. Feed Forward Programming of Car Drivers’ Eye Movement Behavior: A System Theoretical Approach. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-03-01

    19 5. COMPAEISON BETWEEN BOTH EZPERIMMTS AND DISCUSSION 20 6. CONCLUSIONS 24 Chapter 3: SUCCESSIVE EYE FIXATIONS AND AQUISITION OF U- 27 FORMATION...processing capacity. From a theoretical,as well as a pragmatical ,point of view, therefore, the order of eye fixations must be a rather important variable...a driver and emphasizes the potential applied value of this theoretical approach in improving driving safety. From a pragmatic point of view, it is

  18. Theoretical approach of the photofield emission of a degenerated semiconductor. Case of tipped, weakly P-doped, silicon photocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chbihi, A.; Dupont, M.; Gardès, J.; Jaber, Z.; Querrou, M.

    1998-02-01

    We study theoretically the field and photofield emission in a degenerated semiconductor: a tipped silicon is weakly doped with boron ( ϱ = 3000 Ω cm) and the field near the tip is greater than 1 GV/m. Due to this important field, the conduction band bends down to the Fermi level near the surface. The degenerated electrons are confined in a well near the surface barrier. We develop a new theoretical approach using few discrete energy levels in the well. We calculate field emission current and compare with experimental results. The photoelectric transition probability is calculated for different values of the wavelength of the incident laser. A growth of the photofield current with the increase of the wavelength is shown theoretically, taking into account the optical properties of the semiconductor. Experimentally, we observe such a behaviour with continuous lasers [1-3]. With a pulsed picosecond laser (35 ps from a Nd-Yag) we observed with harmonic 4 (4.68 eV) a pure photoemission charge of 70 pC and a photofield charge with harmonic 2(2.34 eV) as high as 700 pC [4]. We hope to obtain more charges with harmonic 1 (1.17 eV). This original development should enable us to predict the behaviour of our tipped photocathodes in actual photoinjectors. An experiment with CANDELA is in progress.

  19. Fallacies and fantasies: the theoretical underpinnings of the Coexistence Approach for palaeoclimate reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, Guido W.; Potts, Alastair J.

    2016-03-01

    The Coexistence Approach has been used to infer palaeoclimates for many Eurasian fossil plant assemblages. However, the theory that underpins the method has never been examined in detail. Here we discuss acknowledged and implicit assumptions and assess the statistical nature and pseudo-logic of the method. We also compare the Coexistence Approach theory with the active field of species distribution modelling. We argue that the assumptions will inevitably be violated to some degree and that the method lacks any substantive means to identify or quantify these violations. The absence of a statistical framework makes the method highly vulnerable to the vagaries of statistical outliers and exotic elements. In addition, we find numerous logical inconsistencies, such as how climate shifts are quantified (the use of a "centre value" of a coexistence interval) and the ability to reconstruct "extinct" climates from modern plant distributions. Given the problems that have surfaced in species distribution modelling, accurate and precise quantitative reconstructions of palaeoclimates (or even climate shifts) using the nearest-living-relative principle and rectilinear niches (the basis of the method) will not be possible. The Coexistence Approach can be summarised as an exercise that shoehorns a plant fossil assemblage into coexistence and then assumes that this must be the climate. Given the theoretical issues and methodological issues highlighted elsewhere, we suggest that the method be discontinued and that all past reconstructions be disregarded and revisited using less fallacious methods. We outline six steps for (further) validation of available and future taxon-based methods and advocate developing (semi-quantitative) methods that prioritise robustness over precision.

  20. Clustering, randomness and regularity in cloud fields. I - Theoretical considerations. II - Cumulus cloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weger, R. C.; Lee, J.; Zhu, Tianri; Welch, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    The current controversy existing in reference to the regularity vs. clustering in cloud fields is examined by means of analysis and simulation studies based upon nearest-neighbor cumulative distribution statistics. It is shown that the Poisson representation of random point processes is superior to pseudorandom-number-generated models and that pseudorandom-number-generated models bias the observed nearest-neighbor statistics towards regularity. Interpretation of this nearest-neighbor statistics is discussed for many cases of superpositions of clustering, randomness, and regularity. A detailed analysis is carried out of cumulus cloud field spatial distributions based upon Landsat, AVHRR, and Skylab data, showing that, when both large and small clouds are included in the cloud field distributions, the cloud field always has a strong clustering signal.

  1. Clustering, randomness and regularity in cloud fields. I - Theoretical considerations. II - Cumulus cloud fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weger, R. C.; Lee, J.; Zhu, Tianri; Welch, R. M.

    1992-01-01

    The current controversy existing in reference to the regularity vs. clustering in cloud fields is examined by means of analysis and simulation studies based upon nearest-neighbor cumulative distribution statistics. It is shown that the Poisson representation of random point processes is superior to pseudorandom-number-generated models and that pseudorandom-number-generated models bias the observed nearest-neighbor statistics towards regularity. Interpretation of this nearest-neighbor statistics is discussed for many cases of superpositions of clustering, randomness, and regularity. A detailed analysis is carried out of cumulus cloud field spatial distributions based upon Landsat, AVHRR, and Skylab data, showing that, when both large and small clouds are included in the cloud field distributions, the cloud field always has a strong clustering signal.

  2. Elementary Theoretical Forms for the Spatial Power Spectrum of Earth's Crustal Magnetic Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voorhies, C.

    1998-01-01

    The magnetic field produced by magnetization in Earth's crust and lithosphere can be distinguished from the field produced by electric currents in Earth's core because the spatial magnetic power spectrum of the crustal field differs from that of the core field. Theoretical forms for the spectrum of the crustal field are derived by treating each magnetic domain in the crust as the point source of a dipole field. The geologic null-hypothesis that such moments are uncorrelated is used to obtain the magnetic spectrum expected from a randomly magnetized, or unstructured, spherical crust of negligible thickness. This simplest spectral form is modified to allow for uniform crustal thickness, ellipsoidality, and the polarization of domains by an periodically reversing, geocentric axial dipole field from Earth's core. Such spectra are intended to describe the background crustal field. Magnetic anomalies due to correlated magnetization within coherent geologic structures may well be superimposed upon this background; yet representing each such anomaly with a single point dipole may lead to similar spectral forms. Results from attempts to fit these forms to observational spectra, determined via spherical harmonic analysis of MAGSAT data, are summarized in terms of amplitude, source depth, and misfit. Each theoretical spectrum reduces to a source factor multiplied by the usual exponential function of spherical harmonic degree n due to geometric attenuation with attitude above the source layer. The source factors always vary with n and are approximately proportional to n(exp 3) for degrees 12 through 120. The theoretical spectra are therefore not directly proportional to an exponential function of spherical harmonic degree n. There is no radius at which these spectra are flat, level, or otherwise independent of n.

  3. Effective field theory approach to heavy quark fragmentation

    DOE PAGES

    Fickinger, Michael; Fleming, Sean; Kim, Chul; ...

    2016-11-17

    Using an approach based on Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) we determine the b-quark fragmentation function from electron-positron annihilation data at the Z-boson peak at next-to-next-to leading order with next-to-next-to leading log resummation of DGLAP logarithms, and next-to-next-to-next-to leading log resummation of endpoint logarithms. This analysis improves, by one order, the previous extraction of the b-quark fragmentation function. We find that while the addition of the next order in the calculation does not much shift the extracted form of the fragmentation function, it does reduce theoretical errors indicating that the expansion is converging. Usingmore » an approach based on effective field theory allows us to systematically control theoretical errors. Furthermore, while the fits of theory to data are generally good, the fits seem to be hinting that higher order correction from HQET may be needed to explain the b-quark fragmentation function at smaller values of momentum fraction.« less

  4. Effective field theory approach to heavy quark fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Fickinger, Michael; Fleming, Sean; Kim, Chul; Mereghetti, Emanuele

    2016-11-17

    Using an approach based on Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) we determine the b-quark fragmentation function from electron-positron annihilation data at the Z-boson peak at next-to-next-to leading order with next-to-next-to leading log resummation of DGLAP logarithms, and next-to-next-to-next-to leading log resummation of endpoint logarithms. This analysis improves, by one order, the previous extraction of the b-quark fragmentation function. We find that while the addition of the next order in the calculation does not much shift the extracted form of the fragmentation function, it does reduce theoretical errors indicating that the expansion is converging. Using an approach based on effective field theory allows us to systematically control theoretical errors. Furthermore, while the fits of theory to data are generally good, the fits seem to be hinting that higher order correction from HQET may be needed to explain the b-quark fragmentation function at smaller values of momentum fraction.

  5. Effective Field Theory approach to heavy quark fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fickinger, Michael; Fleming, Sean; Kim, Chul; Mereghetti, Emanuele

    2016-11-01

    Using an approach based on Soft Collinear Effective Theory (SCET) and Heavy Quark Effective Theory (HQET) we determine the b-quark fragmentation function from electron-positron annihilation data at the Z-boson peak at next-to-next-to leading order with next-to-next-to leading log resummation of DGLAP logarithms, and next-to-next-to-next-to leading log resummation of endpoint logarithms. This analysis improves, by one order, the previous extraction of the b-quark fragmentation function. We find that while the addition of the next order in the calculation does not much shift the extracted form of the fragmentation function, it does reduce theoretical errors indicating that the expansion is converging. Using an approach based on effective field theory allows us to systematically control theoretical errors. While the fits of theory to data are generally good, the fits seem to be hinting that higher order correction from HQET may be needed to explain the b-quark fragmentation function at smaller values of momentum fraction.

  6. Game Theoretic Real Option Approach of the Procurement of Department of Defense: Competition or Collaboration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-30

    Intelligence Base? is being proposed to approach intelligence and game options in a holistic way for the strategy and the investments. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16...theoretical, must point to some termination in action; academics have a responsibility to make their work intelligible to practitioners. Thus we continue to... Intelligence Base” is being proposed to approach intelligence and game options in a holistic way for the strategy and the investments. Introduction The

  7. Theoretical modeling of the plasma-assisted catalytic growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Suresh C.; Gupta, Neha

    2015-12-15

    A theoretical modeling for the catalyst-assisted growth of graphene sheet in the presence of plasma has been investigated. It is observed that the plasma parameters can strongly affect the growth and field emission properties of graphene sheet. The model developed accounts for the charging rate of the graphene sheet; number density of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms; various elementary processes on the surface of the catalyst nanoparticle; surface diffusion and accretion of ions; and formation of carbon-clusters and large graphene islands. In our investigation, it is found that the thickness of the graphene sheet decreases with the plasma parameters, number density of hydrogen ions and RF power, and consequently, the field emission of electrons from the graphene sheet surface increases. The time evolution of the height of graphene sheet with ion density and sticking coefficient of carbon species has also been examined. Some of our theoretical results are in compliance with the experimental observations.

  8. Multivariate Multi-Objective Allocation in Stratified Random Sampling: A Game Theoretic Approach.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Yousaf Shad; Hussain, Ijaz; Shoukry, Alaa Mohamd

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of multivariate multi-objective allocation where no or limited information is available within the stratum variance. Results show that a game theoretic approach (based on weighted goal programming) can be applied to sample size allocation problems. We use simulation technique to determine payoff matrix and to solve a minimax game.

  9. Understanding Older Adults' Physical Activity Behavior: A Multi-Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grodesky, Janene M.; Kosma, Maria; Solmon, Melinda A.

    2006-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a health issue with serious consequences for older adults. Investigating physical activity promotion within a multi-theoretical approach may increase the predictive strength of physical activity determinants and facilitate the development and implementation of effective interventions for older adults. This article examines…

  10. Speaking Back to the Deficit Discourses: A Theoretical and Methodological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogarth, Melitta

    2017-01-01

    The educational attainment of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students is often presented within a deficit view. The need for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander researchers to challenge the societal norms is necessary to contribute to the struggle for self-determination. This paper presents a theoretical and methodological approach that…

  11. A Critical Analysis of Approaches To Targeted PTSD Prevention: Current Status and Theoretically Derived Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldner, Matthew T.; Monson, Candice M.; Friedman, Matthew J.

    2007-01-01

    Although efforts to prevent posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have met with relatively limited success, theoretically driven preventive approaches with promising efficacy are emerging. The current article critically reviews investigations of PTSD prevention programs that target persons at risk for being exposed to a traumatic event or who have…

  12. Understanding Older Adults' Physical Activity Behavior: A Multi-Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grodesky, Janene M.; Kosma, Maria; Solmon, Melinda A.

    2006-01-01

    Physical inactivity is a health issue with serious consequences for older adults. Investigating physical activity promotion within a multi-theoretical approach may increase the predictive strength of physical activity determinants and facilitate the development and implementation of effective interventions for older adults. This article examines…

  13. Multivariate Multi-Objective Allocation in Stratified Random Sampling: A Game Theoretic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Ijaz; Shoukry, Alaa Mohamd

    2016-01-01

    We consider the problem of multivariate multi-objective allocation where no or limited information is available within the stratum variance. Results show that a game theoretic approach (based on weighted goal programming) can be applied to sample size allocation problems. We use simulation technique to determine payoff matrix and to solve a minimax game. PMID:27936039

  14. An Information-Theoretic-based Evolutionary Approach for the Dynamic Search Path Planning Problem

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    action outcomes/observations as exogenous events, to timely adjust search path plans using coevolution . The approach takes advantage of objective...an information-theoretic framework. Path planning ultimately results from the coevolution of two populations of “plan” individuals describing a

  15. Making a Traditional Study-Abroad Program Geographic: A Theoretically Informed Regional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokisch, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Geographers have been active in numerous focused study-abroad programs, but few have created or led language-based programs overseas. This article describes the development of a Spanish language program in Ecuador and how it was made geographic primarily through a theoretically informed regional geography course. The approach employs theoretical…

  16. Making a Traditional Study-Abroad Program Geographic: A Theoretically Informed Regional Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jokisch, Brad

    2009-01-01

    Geographers have been active in numerous focused study-abroad programs, but few have created or led language-based programs overseas. This article describes the development of a Spanish language program in Ecuador and how it was made geographic primarily through a theoretically informed regional geography course. The approach employs theoretical…

  17. Comparison of experimental and theoretical reaction rail currents, rail voltages, and airgap fields for the linear induction motor research vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elliott, D. G.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of reaction rail currents, reaction rail voltages, and airgap magnetic fields in tests of the Linear Induction Motor Research Vehicle (LIMRV) were compared with theoretical calculations from the mesh/matrix theory. It was found that the rail currents and magnetic fields predicted by the theory are within 20 percent of the measured currents and fields at most motor locations in most of the runs, but differ by as much as a factor of two in some cases. The most consistent difference is a higher experimental than theoretical magnetic field near the entrance of the motor and a lower experimental than theoretical magnetic field near the exit. The observed differences between the theoretical and experimental magnetic fields and currents do not account for the differences of as much as 26 percent between the theoretical and experimental thrusts.

  18. Investigation of the interfacial tension of complex coacervates using field-theoretic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggleman, Robert A.; Kumar, Rajeev; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2012-01-01

    Complex coacervation, a liquid-liquid phase separation that occurs when two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes are mixed in a solution, has the potential to be exploited for many emerging applications including wet adhesives and drug delivery vehicles. The ultra-low interfacial tension of coacervate systems against water is critical for such applications, and it would be advantageous if molecular models could be used to characterize how various system properties (e.g., salt concentration) affect the interfacial tension. In this article we use field-theoretic simulations to characterize the interfacial tension between a complex coacervate and its supernatant. After demonstrating that our model is free of ultraviolet divergences (calculated properties converge as the collocation grid is refined), we develop two methods for calculating the interfacial tension from field-theoretic simulations. One method relies on the mechanical interpretation of the interfacial tension as the interfacial pressure, and the second method estimates the change in free energy as the area between the two phases is changed. These are the first calculations of the interfacial tension from full field-theoretic simulation of which we are aware, and both the magnitude and scaling behaviors of our calculated interfacial tension agree with recent experiments.

  19. Investigation of the interfacial tension of complex coacervates using field-theoretic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Complex coacervation, a liquid-liquid phase separation that occurs when two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes are mixed in a solution, has the potential to be exploited for many emerging applications including wet adhesives and drug delivery vehicles. The ultra-low interfacial tension of coacervate systems against water is critical for such applications, and it would be advantageous if molecular models could be used to characterize how various system properties (e.g., salt concentration) affect the interfacial tension. In this article we use field-theoretic simulations to characterize the interfacial tension between a complex coacervate and its supernatant. After demonstrating that our model is free of ultraviolet divergences (calculated properties converge as the collocation grid is refined), we develop two methods for calculating the interfacial tension from field-theoretic simulations. One method relies on the mechanical interpretation of the interfacial tension as the interfacial pressure, and the second method estimates the change in free energy as the area between the two phases is changed. These are the first calculations of the interfacial tension from full field theoretic simulation of which we are aware, and both the magnitude and scaling behaviors of our calculated interfacial tension agree with recent experiments.

  20. Investigation of the interfacial tension of complex coacervates using field-theoretic simulations.

    PubMed

    Riggleman, Robert A; Kumar, Rajeev; Fredrickson, Glenn H

    2012-01-14

    Complex coacervation, a liquid-liquid phase separation that occurs when two oppositely charged polyelectrolytes are mixed in a solution, has the potential to be exploited for many emerging applications including wet adhesives and drug delivery vehicles. The ultra-low interfacial tension of coacervate systems against water is critical for such applications, and it would be advantageous if molecular models could be used to characterize how various system properties (e.g., salt concentration) affect the interfacial tension. In this article we use field-theoretic simulations to characterize the interfacial tension between a complex coacervate and its supernatant. After demonstrating that our model is free of ultraviolet divergences (calculated properties converge as the collocation grid is refined), we develop two methods for calculating the interfacial tension from field-theoretic simulations. One method relies on the mechanical interpretation of the interfacial tension as the interfacial pressure, and the second method estimates the change in free energy as the area between the two phases is changed. These are the first calculations of the interfacial tension from full field-theoretic simulation of which we are aware, and both the magnitude and scaling behaviors of our calculated interfacial tension agree with recent experiments.

  1. Theoretical study of nanophotonic directional couplers comprising near-field-coupled metal nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Holmström, Petter; Yuan, Jun; Qiu, Min; Thylén, Lars; Bratkovsky, Alexander M

    2011-04-11

    The properties of integrated-photonics directional couplers composed of near-field-coupled arrays of metal nanoparticles are analyzed theoretically. It is found that it is possible to generate very compact, submicron length, high field-confinement and functionality devices with very low switch energies. The analysis is carried out for a hypothetical lossless silver to demonstrate the potential of this type of circuits for applications in telecom and interconnects. Employing losses of real silver, standalone devices with the above properties are still feasible in optimized metal nanoparticle structures.

  2. Theoretical analysis of AC electric field transmission into biological tissue through frozen saline for electroporation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Chunyan; Rubinsky, Boris

    2014-12-01

    An analytical model was used to explore the feasibility of sinusoidal electric field transmission across a frozen saline layer into biological tissue. The study is relevant to electroporation and permeabilization of the cell membrane by electric fields. The concept was analyzed for frequencies in the range of conventional electroporation frequencies and electric field intensity. Theoretical analysis for a variety of tissues show that the transmission of electroporation type electric fields through a layer of frozen saline into tissue is feasible and the behavior of this composite system depends on tissue type, frozen domain temperature, and frequency. Freezing could become a valuable method for adherence of electroporation electrodes to moving tissue surfaces, such as the heart in the treatment of atrial fibrillation or blood vessels for the treatment of restenosis. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Influence of a stationary magnetic field on water relations in lettuce seeds. Part I: theoretical considerations.

    PubMed

    Reina, F G; Pascual, L A

    2001-12-01

    The theoretical calculation about the dependence of the ionic current density across the cellular membrane on the intensity of the magnetic field applied to cellular tissue is presented. This interaction induces changes in the magnitude of the ionic current density across the cellular membrane and in the ionic concentration, and it also causes alterations in the osmotic pressure and in the capacity of the cellular tissues to absorb water. The magnetic field dependence of the ionic current densities J(p) (B) (positive ions) and J(n) (B) (negative ions), the membrane conductivity sigma (B), the ionic concentration in both membrane sides c(B), the osmotic pressure pi (B), and the water uptake rate by seeds k(w) (B) are presented. The increase in water uptake rate due to the applied magnetic field may be the explanation of the recently reported increase in the germination speed of the seeds treated with stationary magnetic fields. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Theoretical analysis of the coupling effect for the seepage field, stress field, and temperature field in underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.H.

    2005-10-01

    In this article, the derivative control equations of the simultaneous mathematical models on the temperature field, stress field of coal and rock mass, and the seepage field of retort gases in the gasification panel were established. The finite element form of the three-fields coupling problem for gas-solid solutions by means of a six-node triangular element was deduced. The numerical analysis software for three-fields coupling was developed. Combined with the calculation example, the mechanism of the thermodynamic effect was illustrated. The impact of the heating effect on the measured value and the simulated value of the seepage field, stress field, and displacement field was discussed and analyzed at length.

  5. Toward a novel theoretical approach for determining the nature of electronic excitations in quasi-two-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politano, A.; Chiarello, G.; Cupolillo, A.

    2015-08-01

    The discovery of quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) crystals has started a new era of materials science. Novel materials, atomically thin and mechanically, thermally and chemically stable, with a large variety of electronic properties are available and they can be assembled in ultrathin flexible devices. Understanding collective electronic excitations (plasmons) in Q2D systems is mandatory for engineering applications in plasmonics. In view of recent developments in the emerging field of graphene-based plasmonics, the correspondence between the theoretically calculated quantities and the observables experimentally measured in Q2D crystals is still unsatisfactory. Motivated by recent Nazarov’s findings (Nazarov 2015 New J. Phys. 17 073018), here we discuss some crucial issues of current theoretical approaches as well as the computational methods applied to two-dimensional materials with special emphasis to cover their peculiarities, range of application and pitfalls.

  6. THEORETICAL LIMITS ON MAGNETIC FIELD STRENGTHS IN LOW-MASS STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Browning, Matthew K.; Weber, Maria A.; Chabrier, Gilles; Massey, Angela P.

    2016-02-20

    Observations have suggested that some low-mass stars have larger radii than predicted by 1D structure models. Some theoretical models have invoked very strong interior magnetic fields (of order 1 MG or more) as a possible cause of such large radii. Whether fields of that strength could in principle be generated by dynamo action in these objects is unclear, and we do not address the matter directly. Instead, we examine whether such fields could remain in the interior of a low-mass object for a significant amount of time, and whether they would have any other obvious signatures. First, we estimate the timescales for the loss of strong fields by magnetic buoyancy instabilities. We consider a range of field strengths and simple morphologies, including both idealized flux tubes and smooth layers of field. We confirm some of our analytical estimates using thin flux tube magnetohydrodynamic simulations of the rise of buoyant fields in a fully convective M-dwarf. Separately, we consider the Ohmic dissipation of such fields. We find that dissipation provides a complementary constraint to buoyancy: while small-scale, fibril fields might be regenerated faster than they rise, the dissipative heating associated with such fields would in some cases greatly exceed the luminosity of the star. We show how these constraints combine to yield limits on the internal field strength and morphology in low-mass stars. In particular, we find that for stars of 0.3 solar masses, no fields in flux tubes stronger than about 800 kG are simultaneously consistent with both constraints.

  7. Noise and Oscillations in Biological Systems: Multidisciplinary Approach Between Experimental Biology, Theoretical Modelling and Synthetic Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullner, E.; Ares, S.; Morelli, L. G.; Oates, A. C.; Jülicher, F.; Nicola, E.; Heussen, R.; Whitmore, D.; Blyuss, K.; Fryett, M.; Zakharova, A.; Koseska, A.; Nene, N. R.; Zaikin, A.

    2012-10-01

    Rapid progress of experimental biology has provided a huge flow of quantitative data, which can be analyzed and understood only through the application of advanced techniques recently developed in theoretical sciences. On the other hand, synthetic biology enabled us to engineer biological models with reduced complexity. In this review we discuss that a multidisciplinary approach between this sciences can lead to deeper understanding of the underlying mechanisms behind complex processes in biology. Following the mini symposia "Noise and oscillations in biological systems" on Physcon 2011 we have collected different research examples from theoretical modeling, experimental and synthetic biology.

  8. Field-widened Michelson interferometer for spectral discrimination in high-spectral-resolution lidar: theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Zhongtao; Liu, Dong; Luo, Jing; Yang, Yongying; Zhou, Yudi; Zhang, Yupeng; Duan, Lulin; Su, Lin; Yang, Liming; Shen, Yibing; Wang, Kaiwei; Bai, Jian

    2015-05-04

    A field-widened Michelson interferometer (FWMI) is developed to act as the spectral discriminator in high-spectral-resolution lidar (HSRL). This realization is motivated by the wide-angle Michelson interferometer (WAMI) which has been used broadly in the atmospheric wind and temperature detection. This paper describes an independent theoretical framework about the application of the FWMI in HSRL for the first time. In the framework, the operation principles and application requirements of the FWMI are discussed in comparison with that of the WAMI. Theoretical foundations for designing this type of interferometer are introduced based on these comparisons. Moreover, a general performance estimation model for the FWMI is established, which can provide common guidelines for the performance budget and evaluation of the FWMI in the both design and operation stages. Examples incorporating many practical imperfections or conditions that may degrade the performance of the FWMI are given to illustrate the implementation of the modeling. This theoretical framework presents a complete and powerful tool for solving most of theoretical or engineering problems encountered in the FWMI application, including the designing, parameter calibration, prior performance budget, posterior performance estimation, and so on. It will be a valuable contribution to the lidar community to develop a new generation of HSRLs based on the FWMI spectroscopic filter.

  9. Impacts of noise on a field theoretical model of the human brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, T. D.; Daffertshofer, A.; Beek, P. J.; Haken, H.

    1999-03-01

    Salient properties of the spatio-temporal patterns in MEG recordings of human brain activity, such as macroscopic coherence of a limited number of modes and the occurrence of phase transitions, have been successfully described with the help of field theoretical models for the dendritic currents in the cortex. So far, however, these models have ignored the effects of noise which play an important role in the emergence of such properties. The present article provides a formal treatment of the effects of stochastic fluctuations in the vicinity of the phase transitions that were observed by Kelso in his so-called Julliard experiment [Fuchs et al., Phase transition in the human brain: spatial mode dynamics, Int. J. Bifurcation and Chaos 2 (1992) 917-939; H. Haken, Principles of Brain Functioning, Springer, Berlin, 1996; J.A.S. Kelso, Dynamic Patterns - The Self-organization of Brain and Behavior, MIT Press, Cambridge, 1995]. To describe and examine these effects, the field theoretical model proposed by Jirsa and Haken [A field theory of electromagnetic brain activity, Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 960-963; A derivation of a macroscopic field theory of the brain from the quasi-microscopic neural dynamics, Physica D 99 (1997) 503-526] was extended by incorporating Gaussian white noise. The extended model describes the stochastic properties of the most dominant spatio-temporal components, including stochastic variations of the amplitudes of the extracted spatial modes. Furthermore, the model captures critical phenomena such as critical slowing down and critical fluctuations, which are derived analytically. These theoretical results are generalized by means of numerical simulations of amplitude and phase dynamics.

  10. Medical reporting recommendations: a gap between practical and theoretical approach of journalists in Italy.

    PubMed

    Di Croce, Marianna; Vercellesi, Luisa; Laccisaglia, Martina; Bruno, Flavia

    2012-01-01

    This survey involved medical reporters to identify degrees of theoretical and actual compliance to recommendations for health reporting. The questionnaire was addressed to 450 Italian journalists and obtained a redemption of 23.1%. Major gaps between theoretical agreement and professional practice were: need of scientific background and continuing education; importance of avoiding sensationalism, assessment of scientific protocols and results, reporting of results as absolute risk and numbers needed to treat, attention to the conflict of interest. Two homogeneous profiles emerged. Group 1 includes journalists working in newspapers and shows a large gap between theory and practice. Group 2 includes mainly journalists working in technical medical media and shows a higher consistency between the two settings. An improvement in theoretical understanding of medical literature is advisable, but interventions are needed in the working practice in particular in newspapers, a setting where approaches are more difficult.

  11. Research on the Field of Education Policy: Exploring Different Levels of Approach and Abstraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mainardes, Jefferson; Tello, César

    2016-01-01

    This paper, of theoretical nature, explores the levels of approach and abstraction of research in the field of education policy: description, analysis and understanding. Such categories were developed based on concepts of Bourdieu's theory and on the grounds of epistemological studies focused on education policy and meta-research. This paper…

  12. Inferring electric fields and currents from ground magnetometer data - A test with theoretically derived inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, R. A.; Kamide, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Advanced techniques considered by Kamide et al. (1981) seem to have the potential for providing observation-based high time resolution pictures of the global ionospheric current and electric field patterns for interesting events. However, a reliance on the proposed magnetogram-inversion schemes for the deduction of global ionospheric current and electric field patterns requires proof that reliable results are obtained. 'Theoretical' tests of the accuracy of the magnetogram inversion schemes have, therefore, been considered. The present investigation is concerned with a test, involving the developed KRM algorithm and the Rice Convection Model (RCM). The test was successful in the sense that there was overall agreement between electric fields and currents calculated by the RCM and KRM schemes.

  13. Work and Inter-subjectivity: a theoretical reflection on its dialectics in the field of health and nursing.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Brígida Gimenez; Peduzzi, Marina; Mandú, Edir Nei Teixeira; Ayres, José Ricardo de Carvalho Mesquita

    2012-01-01

    This theoretical reflection intends to show the inter-subjective relationship that takes place in health and nursing practices under the following theoretical perspectives: Institutional Analysis, Psychodynamics of Labor and the Theory of Communicative Action, with an emphasis on the latter. Linking these concepts to the Marxist approach to work in the field of health emerges from recognizing the need for its continuous reconstruction-in this case, with a view to understand the interaction and communication intrinsic to work in action. The theory of Communicative Action seeks to consider these two inextricable dimensions: work as productive action and as interaction. The first corresponds to instrumental action based on technical rules with a production-guided rationale. The second refers to the interaction that takes place as communicative action and seeks understanding among subjects. We assume that adopting this theoretical perspective in the analysis of health and nursing practices opens new possibilities for clarifying its social and historical process and inter-subjective connections.

  14. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. Asmore » a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.« less

  15. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. As a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  16. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that a nonperturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single-walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. We test this theory explicitly on the data reported by Dukovic et al. [Nano Lett. 5, 2314 (2005), 10.1021/nl0518122] and Sfeir et al. [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.195424] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  17. Investigations of turbulent scalar fields using probability density function approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Feng

    1991-01-01

    Scalar fields undergoing random advection have attracted much attention from researchers in both the theoretical and practical sectors. Research interest spans from the study of the small scale structures of turbulent scalar fields to the modeling and simulations of turbulent reacting flows. The probability density function (PDF) method is an effective tool in the study of turbulent scalar fields, especially for those which involve chemical reactions. It has been argued that a one-point, joint PDF approach is the one to choose from among many simulation and closure methods for turbulent combustion and chemically reacting flows based on its practical feasibility in the foreseeable future for multiple reactants. Instead of the multi-point PDF, the joint PDF of a scalar and its gradient which represents the roles of both scalar and scalar diffusion is introduced. A proper closure model for the molecular diffusion term in the PDF equation is investigated. Another direction in this research is to study the mapping closure method that has been recently proposed to deal with the PDF's in turbulent fields. This method seems to have captured the physics correctly when applied to diffusion problems. However, if the turbulent stretching is included, the amplitude mapping has to be supplemented by either adjusting the parameters representing turbulent stretching at each time step or by introducing the coordinate mapping. This technique is still under development and seems to be quite promising. The final objective of this project is to understand some fundamental properties of the turbulent scalar fields and to develop practical numerical schemes that are capable of handling turbulent reacting flows.

  18. A theoretical approach to sound propagation and radiation for ducts with suppressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.; Sawdy, D. T.

    1981-01-01

    The several phenomena involved in theoretical prediction of the far-field sound radiation attenuation from an acoustically lined duct were studied. These include absorption by the suppressor, termination reflections, and far-field radiation. Extensive parametric studies show that the suppressor absorption performance can be correlated with mode cut-off ratio or angle of propagation. The other phenomena can be shown to depend explicitly upon mode cut-off ratio. A complete system can thus be generated which can be used to evaluate aircraft sound suppressors and which can be related to the sound source through the cut-off ratio-acoustic power distribution. Although the method is most fully developed for inlet suppressors, several aft radiated noise phenomena are also discussed. This simplified suppressor design and evaluation method is summarized, the recent improvements in the technique are presented, and areas where further refinement is necessary are discussed. Noise suppressor data from engine experiments are compared with the theoretical calculations.

  19. Classical field approach to quantum weak measurements.

    PubMed

    Dressel, Justin; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-21

    By generalizing the quantum weak measurement protocol to the case of quantum fields, we show that weak measurements probe an effective classical background field that describes the average field configuration in the spacetime region between pre- and postselection boundary conditions. The classical field is itself a weak value of the corresponding quantum field operator and satisfies equations of motion that extremize an effective action. Weak measurements perturb this effective action, producing measurable changes to the classical field dynamics. As such, weakly measured effects always correspond to an effective classical field. This general result explains why these effects appear to be robust for pre- and postselected ensembles, and why they can also be measured using classical field techniques that are not weak for individual excitations of the field.

  20. Nuclear radii calculations in various theoretical approaches for nucleus-nucleus interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Merino, C.; Novikov, I. S.; Shabelski, Yu.

    2009-12-15

    The information about sizes and nuclear density distributions in unstable (radioactive) nuclei is usually extracted from the data on interaction of radioactive nuclear beams with a nuclear target. We show that in the case of nucleus-nucleus collisions the values of the parameters depend somewhat strongly on the considered theoretical approach and on the assumption about the parametrization of the nuclear density distribution. The obtained values of root-mean-square radii (R{sub rms}) for stable nuclei with atomic weights A=12-40 vary by approximately 0.1 fm when calculated in the optical approximation, in the rigid target approximation, and using the exact expression of the Glauber theory. We present several examples of R{sub rms} radii calculations using these three theoretical approaches and compare these results with the data obtained from electron-nucleus scattering.

  1. Theoretical estimates of maximum fields in superconducting resonant radio frequency cavities: stability theory, disorder, and laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liarte, Danilo B.; Posen, Sam; Transtrum, Mark K.; Catelani, Gianluigi; Liepe, Matthias; Sethna, James P.

    2017-03-01

    Theoretical limits to the performance of superconductors in high magnetic fields parallel to their surfaces are of key relevance to current and future accelerating cavities, especially those made of new higher-T c materials such as Nb3Sn, NbN, and MgB2. Indeed, beyond the so-called superheating field {H}{sh}, flux will spontaneously penetrate even a perfect superconducting surface and ruin the performance. We present intuitive arguments and simple estimates for {H}{sh}, and combine them with our previous rigorous calculations, which we summarize. We briefly discuss experimental measurements of the superheating field, comparing to our estimates. We explore the effects of materials anisotropy and the danger of disorder in nucleating vortex entry. Will we need to control surface orientation in the layered compound MgB2? Can we estimate theoretically whether dirt and defects make these new materials fundamentally more challenging to optimize than niobium? Finally, we discuss and analyze recent proposals to use thin superconducting layers or laminates to enhance the performance of superconducting cavities. Flux entering a laminate can lead to so-called pancake vortices; we consider the physics of the dislocation motion and potential re-annihilation or stabilization of these vortices after their entry.

  2. Extremal and Game-Theoretic Characterizations of the Probabilistic Approach to Income Redistribution.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    but it is biased toward low income indivi- duals. The linear income system does give a reasonable redistribution plan. This plan as we know from...approved i 83 06 30 068 CCS Research Report 453 EXTREMAL AND GAME-THEORETIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF THE PROBABILISTIC APPROACH TO INCOME REDISTRIBUTION by A...Abstract In this paper we cast the problem of income redistribution in two different ways, one as a non-linear goal programming model, and the other as a

  3. Quantum electron-vibrational dynamics at finite temperature: Thermo field dynamics approach.

    PubMed

    Borrelli, Raffaele; Gelin, Maxim F

    2016-12-14

    Quantum electron-vibrational dynamics in molecular systems at finite temperature is described using an approach based on the thermo field dynamics theory. This formulation treats temperature effects in the Hilbert space without introducing the Liouville space. A comparison with the theoretically equivalent density matrix formulation shows the key numerical advantages of the present approach. The solution of thermo field dynamics equations with a novel technique for the propagation of tensor trains (matrix product states) is discussed. Numerical applications to model spin-boson systems show that the present approach is a promising tool for the description of quantum dynamics of complex molecular systems at finite temperature.

  4. A Comparison of Two Topos-Theoretic Approaches to Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolters, Sander A. M.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the two topos-theoretic approaches to quantum mechanics that may be found in the literature to date. The first approach, which we will call the contravariant approach, was originally proposed by Isham and Butterfield, and was later extended by Döring and Isham. The second approach, which we will call the covariant approach, was developed by Heunen, Landsman and Spitters. Motivated by coarse-graining and the Kochen-Specker theorem, the contravariant approach uses the topos of presheaves on a specific context category, defined as the poset of commutative von Neumann subalgebras of some given von Neumann algebra. In particular, the approach uses the spectral presheaf. The intuitionistic logic of this approach is given by the (complete) Heyting algebra of closed open subobjects of the spectral presheaf. We show that this Heyting algebra is, in a natural way, a locale in the ambient topos, and compare this locale with the internal Gelfand spectrum of the covariant approach. In the covariant approach, a non-commutative C*-algebra (in the topos Set) defines a commutative C*-algebra internal to the topos of covariant functors from the context category to the category of sets. We give an explicit description of the internal Gelfand spectrum of this commutative C*-algebra, from which it follows that the external spectrum is spatial. Using the daseinisation of self-adjoint operators from the contravariant approach, we give a new definition of the daseinisation arrow in the covariant approach and compare it with the original version. States and state-proposition pairing in both approaches are compared. We also investigate the physical interpretation of the covariant approach.

  5. Quantitative photoacoustic assessment of red blood cell aggregation under pulsatile blood flow: experimental and theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bok, Tae-Hoon; Hysi, Eno; Kolios, Michael C.

    2017-03-01

    In the present paper, the optical wavelength dependence on the photoacoustic (PA) assessment of the pulsatile blood flow was investigated by means of the experimental and theoretical approaches analyzing PA radiofrequency spectral parameters such as the spectral slope (SS) and mid-band fit (MBF). For the experimental approach, the pulsatile flow of human whole blood at 60 bpm was imaged using the VevoLAZR system (40-MHz-linear-array probe, 700-900 nm illuminations). For the theoretical approach, a Monte Carlo simulation for the light transmit into a layered tissue phantom and a Green's function based method for the PA wave generation was implemented for illumination wavelengths of 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900 nm. The SS and MBF for the experimental results were compared to theoretical ones as a function of the illumination wavelength. The MBF increased with the optical wavelength in both theory and experiments. This was expected because the MBF is representative of the PA magnitude, and the PA signal from red blood cell (RBC) is dependent on the molar extinction coefficient of oxyhemoglobin. On the other hand, the SS decreased with the wavelength, even though the RBC size (absorber size which is related to the SS) cannot depend on the illumination wavelength. This conflicting result can be interpreted by means of the changes of the fluence pattern for different illumination wavelengths. The SS decrease with the increasing illumination wavelength should be further investigated.

  6. Decision support models for solid waste management: Review and game-theoretic approaches

    SciTech Connect

    Karmperis, Athanasios C.; Aravossis, Konstantinos; Tatsiopoulos, Ilias P.; Sotirchos, Anastasios

    2013-05-15

    Highlights: ► The mainly used decision support frameworks for solid waste management are reviewed. ► The LCA, CBA and MCDM models are presented and their strengths, weaknesses, similarities and possible combinations are analyzed. ► The game-theoretic approach in a solid waste management context is presented. ► The waste management bargaining game is introduced as a specific decision support framework. ► Cooperative and non-cooperative game-theoretic approaches to decision support for solid waste management are discussed. - Abstract: This paper surveys decision support models that are commonly used in the solid waste management area. Most models are mainly developed within three decision support frameworks, which are the life-cycle assessment, the cost–benefit analysis and the multi-criteria decision-making. These frameworks are reviewed and their strengths and weaknesses as well as their critical issues are analyzed, while their possible combinations and extensions are also discussed. Furthermore, the paper presents how cooperative and non-cooperative game-theoretic approaches can be used for the purpose of modeling and analyzing decision-making in situations with multiple stakeholders. Specifically, since a waste management model is sustainable when considering not only environmental and economic but also social aspects, the waste management bargaining game is introduced as a specific decision support framework in which future models can be developed.

  7. Theoretical and Observational Consequences of Rotation and Magnetic Fields in Stellar Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignace, Richard

    1996-05-01

    My dissertation concerns the study of stellar winds from theoretical modeling of the wind structure and the development of observational diagnostics. First, I have investigated the effects of stellar rotation for the wind structure of stars across the H-R Diagram. The effect of rotation is to increase the wind density at the equator while decreasing the density near the poles. The model, known as the Wind-Compressed Zone (WCZ) model, predicts that equatorial wind compressions are most likely to occur for stars with rapid rotation, low terminal speeds, and/or radial velocity distributions that increase gradually from the base of the wind. It is found that in favorable cases, stellar rotation can play a significant role in shaping the winds of Wolf Rayet stars, B supergiants, Asymptotic Giant Branch stars, and even some novae. The second major part of my thesis relates to the fact that the WCZ model will predict the magnetic field structure in the wind, if the field strength is relatively weak. However, there are generally no good diagnostics of stellar magnetic fields in the weak field limit, where Zeeman splitting is smaller than Doppler broadening. Thus, I have explored applications of the Hanle effect for probing magnetic fields in stellar winds. This effect (which has been used in studies of the solar atmosphere) deals with the modification of resonance line scattering polarization by a magnetic field. Solutions for the Hanle effect in optically thin axisymmetric extended stellar envelopes have been derived. Relative to the zero field case, the Hanle effect can result in significant changes of the line polarization, in some cases causing a position angle flip of 90(deg) . With multiline observations the Hanle effect is a viable diagnostic of stellar magnetic fields in the range 1-1000 Gauss. This thesis work was completed under the supervision of Joseph Cassinelli and in collaboration with Kenneth Nordsieck and Jon Bjorkman.

  8. Illustrating the quantum approach with an Earth magnetic field MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pars Benli, Kami; Dillmann, Baudouin; Louelh, Ryma; Poirier-Quinot, Marie; Darrasse, Luc

    2015-05-01

    Teaching imaging of magnetic resonance (MR) today is still as challenging as it has always been, because it requires admitting that we cannot express fundamental questions of quantum mechanics with straightforward language or without using extensive theory. Here we allow students to face a real MR setup based on the Earth's magnetic field. We address the applied side of teaching MR using a device that is affordable and that proves to be sufficiently robust, at universities in Orsay, France, and San Sebastian, Spain, in experimental practicals at undergraduate and graduate levels. We specifically present some of the advantages of low field for measuring R2 relaxation rates, reaching a power of separation of 1.5 μmol on Mn(II) ions between two water bottles each of half a liter. Finally we propose key approaches for the lecturers to adopt when they are asked to pass from theoretical knowledge to teachable knowhow. The outcomes are fast calibration and the MR acquisition protocols, demonstrating the reproducibility of energy transfer during the saturation pulses, and the quantitative nature of MR, with water protons and a helium-3 sample.

  9. Exact electric field strength over the packed capillary electrochromatography column bed, theoretical considerations and practical determination.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Yang, Changhua; Xu, Bingjiu

    2004-12-03

    On the basis of the experiments, it was proved that Ohm's law holds true in a capillary electrochromatography (CEC) column. By using the additivity of the potential drop over the packed and unpacked sections, the exact values of the electric field strength over the packed CEC column bed were determined experimentally. The ratio of the resistance of packed CEC column sections to that of an open capillary of the same length (Rp/Ro,Lp) were calculated. Some theoretical calculations were made to show how some structural parameters of particle lattice affect the resulting Rp/Ro,Lp value of the column bed formed accordingly. It is suggested that to correctly elucidate the EOF phenomenon in a CEC column, the potential drop over the packed and unpacked column sections, Ep and Eo, should be accounted for respectively, rather than using the average field strength over the total column length.

  10. Theoretical Analyses of Oxide-Bypassed Superjunction Power Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Liang, Yung C.; Samudra, Ganesh S.

    2005-02-01

    The performance merit of silicon unipolar power devices is best described by a trade-off relationship between specific on-state resistance (Ron,sp) and breakdown voltage (Vbr), which leads to the establishment of an ideal unipolar limit on device performance. Recently, engineering the electric field in the device drift region to break this unipolar silicon limit for superior performance has become an important research topic. The superjunction (SJ) structure achieves this by paralleling precisely matched higher doping alternate p--n layers to replace the typically low doping drift region. Alternatively, for fabrication simplicity in an oxide-bypassed (OB) structure, an oxide layer of predetermined thickness together with a polycontact is used to replace the p-column of the SJ structure to modulate the electric field. The further improved gradient OB (GOB) structure with slanted oxide sidewalls delivers a performance similar to ideal SJ devices. In this paper, detailed theoretical analyses in closed-form equations on OB and GOB devices are made for the first time to model the performance in various operating regions. The theoretical analyses were also carefully verified through two-dimensional numerical simulations.

  11. Combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the gas bubble motion in an acoustic field.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xiaojian; Xing, Tianyu; Huang, Biao; Li, Qiuhe; Yang, Yifei

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to apply the combined experimental and theoretical method to investigate the various behaviors of gas bubbles in an acoustic field. In the experiments, high-speed video and ultrasonic processor are used to capture the transient evolution of gas bubble patterns, as well as velocity profiles. In the theoretical analysis, the theories of primary and secondary Bjerknes forces and buoyancy force are introduced to accurately demonstrate the variations of bubble volume and motion. Results are presented for gas bubbles with the radius of 1.4mm under an acoustic field with a frequency of 18kHz, for three cases, namely single bubble rising in a quiescent liquid, acoustic single bubble oscillation and two bubbles coalescence conditions. The results show that the fragments around the single gas bubble presents the periodical behaviors, namely, splitting, attraction, and secondary splitting motion. The centroid of the single gas bubble almost oscillates without motion upwards or downwards, because of the equilibrium of the primary Bjerknes force caused by acoustic waves and the effect of the buoyancy force. For the two coalescing bubbles, the resultant of buoyancy, primary and secondary Bjerknes forces acting on two bubbles are same in magnitude, but in opposite direction, which indicates that two gas bubbles attract each other and and coalesce into one. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Unveiling the solar wind - Earth's magnetic field coupling and storm/substorm relationship by information-theoretic multivariate causality measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Balasis, Georgios; Papadimitriou, Constantinos; Donner, Reik; Daglis, Ioannis; Kurths, Juergen

    2016-04-01

    The identification of directed interdependencies between variables related to causal relationships in various geoscientific processes is necessary for an improved process-based understanding of the coupling between different variables or even systems. Especially in geomagnetism, the time-dependent coupling between solar wind and the Earth's magnetic field as well as the relationship between magnetic storms and magnetospheric substorms are of paramount importance for the development of appropriate numerical simulation models of space weather. Here we utilize an information-theoretic method of directional, multivariate causality measures using graphical models that goes beyond bivariate transfer entropy approaches and allows for the identification and statistical evaluation of linear as well as nonlinear causality between variables. In this study, we present and discuss results from an application of this method to the time series of various solar wind parameters as well as the AE and SYM-H geomagnetic activity indices.

  13. Structure formation with scalar field dark matter: the field approach

    SciTech Connect

    Magaña, Juan; Sánchez-Salcedo, F.J.; Matos, Tonatiuh; Suárez, Abril E-mail: tmatos@fis.cinvestav.mx E-mail: jsanchez@astro.unam.mx

    2012-10-01

    We study the formation of structure in the Universe assuming that dark matter can be described by a scalar field Φ-tilde with a potential V(Φ) = −m{sup 2}Φ-tilde {sup 2}/2+λΦ-tilde {sup 4}/4. We derive the evolution equations of the scalar field in the linear regime of perturbations. We investigate the symmetry breaking and possibly a phase transition of this scalar field in the early Universe. At low temperatures, the scalar perturbations have an oscillating growing mode and therefore, this kind of dark matter could lead to the formation of gravitational structures. In order to study the nonlinear regime, we use the spherical collapse model and show that, in the quadratic potential limit, this kind of dark matter can form virialized structures. The main difference with the traditional Cold Dark Matter paradigm is that the formation of structure in the scalar field model can occur at earlier times. Thus, if the dark matter behaves as a scalar field, large galaxies are expected to be formed already at high redshifts.

  14. Quantum field theoretic properties of Lorentz-violating operators of nonrenormalizable dimension in the photon sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, M.

    2014-05-01

    In the context of the nonminimal Standard Model extension a special subset of the CPT-even higher-dimensional operators in the photon sector is discussed from a quantum field theoretical point of view. The modified dispersion laws, photon polarization vectors and the gauge field propagator are obtained and their properties are analyzed. It is demonstrated that for certain sectors of the modified theory a puzzle arises for the optical theorem at tree level. This is followed by a discussion of how it can be interpreted and resolved at first order Lorentz violation. Furthermore the commutator of two gauge fields that are evaluated at different spacetime points is obtained and discussed. The structure of the theory is shown to resemble the structure of the modification based on the corresponding dimension-4 operator. However some properties are altered due to the nonrenormalizable nature of the theory considered. The results provide more insight into the characteristics of Lorentz-violating quantum field theories that rest upon contributions of nonrenormalizable dimension.

  15. Semiclassical and quantum field theoretic bounds for traversable Lorentzian stringy wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Nandi, Kamal Kanti; Zhang Yuanzhong; Kumar, K.B. Vijaya

    2004-09-15

    A lower bound on the size of a Lorentzian wormhole can be obtained by semiclassically introducing the Planck cutoff on the magnitude of tidal forces (Horowitz-Ross constraint). Also, an upper bound is provided by the quantum field theoretic constraint in the form of the Ford-Roman Quantum Inequality for massless minimally coupled scalar fields. To date, however, exact static solutions belonging to this scalar field theory have not been worked out to verify these bounds. To fill this gap, we examine the wormhole features of two examples from the Einstein frame description of the vacuum low energy string theory in four dimensions which is the same as the minimally coupled scalar field theory. Analyses in this paper support the conclusion of Ford and Roman that wormholes in this theory can have sizes that are indeed only a few order of magnitudes larger than the Planck scale. It is shown that the two types of bounds are also compatible. In the process, we point out a 'wormhole' analog of naked black holes.

  16. Quantum field theoretic properties of Lorentz-violating operators of nonrenormalizable dimension in the fermion sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreck, M.

    2014-10-01

    In the current paper the properties of a quantum field theory based on certain sets of Lorentz-violating coefficients in the nonminimal fermion sector of the Standard Model extension are analyzed. In particular, three families of coefficients are considered, where two of them are C P T even and the third is C P T odd. As a first step the modified fermion dispersion relations are obtained. Then the positive- and negative-energy solutions of the modified Dirac equation and the fermion propagator are derived. These are used to demonstrate the validity of the optical theorem at tree level, which provides a cross-check for the results obtained. Furthermore unitarity is examined and seems to be valid for the first set of C P T -even coefficients. However for the remaining sets certain issues with unitarity are found. The article demonstrates that the adapted quantum field theoretical methods at tree level work for the nonminimal, Lorentz-violating framework considered. Besides, the quantum field theory based on the first family of C P T -even coefficients is most likely well behaved at lowest order perturbation theory. The results are important for future phenomenological investigations carried out in the context of field theory, e.g., the computation of decay rates and cross sections at tree level.

  17. Forming Limits in Sheet Metal Forming for Non-Proportional Loading Conditions - Experimental and Theoretical Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ofenheimer, Aldo; Buchmayr, Bruno; Kolleck, Ralf

    2005-08-05

    The influence of strain paths (loading history) on material formability is well known in sheet forming processes. Sophisticated experimental methods are used to determine the entire shape of strain paths of forming limits for aluminum AA6016-T4 alloy. Forming limits for sheet metal in as-received condition as well as for different pre-deformation are presented. A theoretical approach based on Arrieux's intrinsic Forming Limit Stress Curve (FLSC) concept is employed to numerically predict the influence of loading history on forming severity. The detailed experimental strain paths are used in the theoretical study instead of any linear or bilinear simplified loading histories to demonstrate the predictive quality of forming limits in the state of stress.

  18. STL, a new approach to field development

    SciTech Connect

    Smedal, A.; Syvertsen, K.

    1995-12-31

    Submerged Turret and Loading (STL) is an efficient and safe system for offshore loading and storage. The loading system can effectively be adapted to specific field requirements and operational conditions. The STL is designed to meet the requirements for versatile and flexible field development, allowing loading operations to take place all year round in the harshest environments. The STL concept has been selected for field development projects with different operational requirements i.e. (1) Direct Shuttle Loading (DSL) which permits loading of processed crude oil directly into shuttle tankers without the requirement for oil storage at the field. A Direct Shuttle Loading system is installed at the Heidrun Field (Conoco). (2) STL as a Floating Storage Unit (FSU) application has been selected for the Fulmar Field (Shell/Esso) and the Yme Field (Statoil). Both FSU`s are converted standard tankers (Aframax and Suezmax) and designed for operation in extreme North Sea environments. (3) An STL buoy can be arranged as an effective offshore loading terminal. BP have selected STL for the Harding Field. The STL loading terminal will be used for export from a subsea field storage. (4) Based on the STL technology Statoil have launched a new design, Multipurpose Shuttle Tanker (MST). This unit will be equipped with the STL ship systems allowing it to operate as an STL tanker for direct shuttle loading, as an STL loading terminal or as a storage unit. In addition the vessel is equipped for operation as a standard North Sea shuttle tanker capable of loading from floating storage units and standard North Sea loading terminals via a loading hose in the conventional manner. (5) The production concept, developed from STL technology can effectively be used for conversion of standard tankers to FPSO or for new-built FPSOs.

  19. Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability method with quadratic flux approach

    SciTech Connect

    Shafii, Mohammad Ali Meidianti, Rahma Wildian, Fitriyani, Dian; Tongkukut, Seni H. J.; Arkundato, Artoto

    2014-09-30

    Theoretical analysis of integral neutron transport equation using collision probability (CP) method with quadratic flux approach has been carried out. In general, the solution of the neutron transport using the CP method is performed with the flat flux approach. In this research, the CP method is implemented in the cylindrical nuclear fuel cell with the spatial of mesh being conducted into non flat flux approach. It means that the neutron flux at any point in the nuclear fuel cell are considered different each other followed the distribution pattern of quadratic flux. The result is presented here in the form of quadratic flux that is better understanding of the real condition in the cell calculation and as a starting point to be applied in computational calculation.

  20. From moral theory to penal attitudes and back: a theoretically integrated modeling approach.

    PubMed

    de Keijser, Jan W; van der Leeden, Rien; Jackson, Janet L

    2002-01-01

    From a moral standpoint, we would expect the practice of punishment to reflect a solid and commonly shared legitimizing framework. Several moral legal theories explicitly aim to provide such frameworks. Based on the theories of Retributivism, Utilitarianism, and Restorative Justice, this article first sets out to develop a theoretically integrated model of penal attitudes and then explores the extent to which Dutch judges' attitudes to punishment fit the model. Results indicate that penal attitudes can be measured in a meaningful way that is consistent with an integrated approach to moral theory. The general structure of penal attitudes among Dutch judges suggests a streamlined and pragmatic approach to legal punishment that is identifiably founded on the separate concepts central to moral theories of punishment. While Restorative Justice is frequently presented as an alternative paradigm, results show it to be smoothly incorporated within the streamlined approach. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. A Maximum-Likelihood Approach to Force-Field Calibration.

    PubMed

    Zaborowski, Bartłomiej; Jagieła, Dawid; Czaplewski, Cezary; Hałabis, Anna; Lewandowska, Agnieszka; Żmudzińska, Wioletta; Ołdziej, Stanisław; Karczyńska, Agnieszka; Omieczynski, Christian; Wirecki, Tomasz; Liwo, Adam

    2015-09-28

    A new approach to the calibration of the force fields is proposed, in which the force-field parameters are obtained by maximum-likelihood fitting of the calculated conformational ensembles to the experimental ensembles of training system(s). The maximum-likelihood function is composed of logarithms of the Boltzmann probabilities of the experimental conformations, calculated with the current energy function. Because the theoretical distribution is given in the form of the simulated conformations only, the contributions from all of the simulated conformations, with Gaussian weights in the distances from a given experimental conformation, are added to give the contribution to the target function from this conformation. In contrast to earlier methods for force-field calibration, the approach does not suffer from the arbitrariness of dividing the decoy set into native-like and non-native structures; however, if such a division is made instead of using Gaussian weights, application of the maximum-likelihood method results in the well-known energy-gap maximization. The computational procedure consists of cycles of decoy generation and maximum-likelihood-function optimization, which are iterated until convergence is reached. The method was tested with Gaussian distributions and then applied to the physics-based coarse-grained UNRES force field for proteins. The NMR structures of the tryptophan cage, a small α-helical protein, determined at three temperatures (T = 280, 305, and 313 K) by Hałabis et al. ( J. Phys. Chem. B 2012 , 116 , 6898 - 6907 ), were used. Multiplexed replica-exchange molecular dynamics was used to generate the decoys. The iterative procedure exhibited steady convergence. Three variants of optimization were tried: optimization of the energy-term weights alone and use of the experimental ensemble of the folded protein only at T = 280 K (run 1); optimization of the energy-term weights and use of experimental ensembles at all three temperatures (run 2

  2. When the Mannequin Dies, Creation and Exploration of a Theoretical Framework Using a Mixed Methods Approach.

    PubMed

    Tripathy, Shreepada; Miller, Karen H; Berkenbosch, John W; McKinley, Tara F; Boland, Kimberly A; Brown, Seth A; Calhoun, Aaron W

    2016-06-01

    Controversy exists in the simulation community as to the emotional and educational ramifications of mannequin death due to learner action or inaction. No theoretical framework to guide future investigations of learner actions currently exists. The purpose of our study was to generate a model of the learner experience of mannequin death using a mixed methods approach. The study consisted of an initial focus group phase composed of 11 learners who had previously experienced mannequin death due to action or inaction on the part of learners as defined by Leighton (Clin Simul Nurs. 2009;5(2):e59-e62). Transcripts were analyzed using grounded theory to generate a list of relevant themes that were further organized into a theoretical framework. With the use of this framework, a survey was generated and distributed to additional learners who had experienced mannequin death due to action or inaction. Results were analyzed using a mixed methods approach. Forty-one clinicians completed the survey. A correlation was found between the emotional experience of mannequin death and degree of presession anxiety (P < 0.001). Debriefing was found to significantly reduce negative emotion and enhance satisfaction. Sixty-nine percent of respondents indicated that mannequin death enhanced learning. These results were used to modify our framework. Using the previous approach, we created a model of the effect of mannequin death on the educational and psychological state of learners. We offer the final model as a guide to future research regarding the learner experience of mannequin death.

  3. A review of the nurtured heart approach to parenting: evaluation of its theoretical and empirical foundations.

    PubMed

    Hektner, Joel M; Brennan, Alison L; Brotherson, Sean E

    2013-09-01

    The Nurtured Heart Approach to parenting (NHA; Glasser & Easley, 2008) is summarized and evaluated in terms of its alignment with current theoretical perspectives and empirical evidence in family studies and developmental science. Originally conceived and promoted as a behavior management approach for parents of difficult children (i.e., with behavior disorders), NHA is increasingly offered as a valuable strategy for parents of any children, despite a lack of published empirical support. Parents using NHA are trained to minimize attention to undesired behaviors, provide positive attention and praise for compliance with rules, help children be successful by scaffolding and shaping desired behavior, and establish a set of clear rules and consequences. Many elements of the approach have strong support in the theoretical and empirical literature; however, some of the assumptions are more questionable, such as that negative child behavior can always be attributed to unintentional positive reinforcement by parents responding with negative attention. On balance, NHA appears to promote effective and validated parenting practices, but its effectiveness now needs to be tested empirically.

  4. Electronic orbital response of regular extended and infinite periodic systems to magnetic fields. I. Theoretical foundations for static case.

    PubMed

    Springborg, Michael; Molayem, Mohammad; Kirtman, Bernard

    2017-09-14

    A theoretical treatment for the orbital response of an infinite, periodic system to a static, homogeneous, magnetic field is presented. It is assumed that the system of interest has an energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied orbitals and a zero Chern number. In contrast to earlier studies, we do not utilize a perturbation expansion, although we do assume the field is sufficiently weak that the occurrence of Landau levels can be ignored. The theory is developed by analyzing results for large, finite systems and also by comparing with the analogous treatment of an electrostatic field. The resulting many-electron Hamilton operator is forced to be hermitian, but hermiticity is not preserved, in general, for the subsequently derived single-particle operators that determine the electronic orbitals. However, we demonstrate that when focusing on the canonical solutions to the single-particle equations, hermiticity is preserved. The issue of gauge-origin dependence of approximate solutions is addressed. Our approach is compared with several previously proposed treatments, whereby limitations in some of the latter are identified.

  5. Electronic orbital response of regular extended and infinite periodic systems to magnetic fields. I. Theoretical foundations for static case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springborg, Michael; Molayem, Mohammad; Kirtman, Bernard

    2017-09-01

    A theoretical treatment for the orbital response of an infinite, periodic system to a static, homogeneous, magnetic field is presented. It is assumed that the system of interest has an energy gap separating occupied and unoccupied orbitals and a zero Chern number. In contrast to earlier studies, we do not utilize a perturbation expansion, although we do assume the field is sufficiently weak that the occurrence of Landau levels can be ignored. The theory is developed by analyzing results for large, finite systems and also by comparing with the analogous treatment of an electrostatic field. The resulting many-electron Hamilton operator is forced to be hermitian, but hermiticity is not preserved, in general, for the subsequently derived single-particle operators that determine the electronic orbitals. However, we demonstrate that when focusing on the canonical solutions to the single-particle equations, hermiticity is preserved. The issue of gauge-origin dependence of approximate solutions is addressed. Our approach is compared with several previously proposed treatments, whereby limitations in some of the latter are identified.

  6. Development of theoretical approach for describing electronic properties of hetero-interface systems under applied bias voltage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iida, Kenji; Noda, Masashi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a theoretical approach for describing the electronic properties of hetero-interface systems under an applied electrode bias. The finite-temperature density functional theory is employed for controlling the chemical potential in their interfacial region, and thereby the electronic charge of the system is obtained. The electric field generated by the electronic charging is described as a saw-tooth-like electrostatic potential. Because of the continuum approximation of dielectrics sandwiched between electrodes, we treat dielectrics with thicknesses in a wide range from a few nanometers to more than several meters. Furthermore, the approach is implemented in our original computational program named grid-based coupled electron and electromagnetic field dynamics (GCEED), facilitating its application to nanostructures. Thus, the approach is capable of comprehensively revealing electronic structure changes in hetero-interface systems with an applied bias that are practically useful for experimental studies. We calculate the electronic structure of a SiO2-graphene-boron nitride (BN) system in which an electrode bias is applied between the graphene layer and an electrode attached on the SiO2 film. The electronic energy barrier between graphene and BN is varied with an applied bias, and the energy variation depends on the thickness of the BN film. This is because the density of states of graphene is so low that the graphene layer cannot fully screen the electric field generated by the electrodes. We have demonstrated that the electronic properties of hetero-interface systems are well controlled by the combination of the electronic charging and the generated electric field.

  7. Development of theoretical approach for describing electronic properties of hetero-interface systems under applied bias voltage.

    PubMed

    Iida, Kenji; Noda, Masashi; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2017-02-28

    We have developed a theoretical approach for describing the electronic properties of hetero-interface systems under an applied electrode bias. The finite-temperature density functional theory is employed for controlling the chemical potential in their interfacial region, and thereby the electronic charge of the system is obtained. The electric field generated by the electronic charging is described as a saw-tooth-like electrostatic potential. Because of the continuum approximation of dielectrics sandwiched between electrodes, we treat dielectrics with thicknesses in a wide range from a few nanometers to more than several meters. Furthermore, the approach is implemented in our original computational program named grid-based coupled electron and electromagnetic field dynamics (GCEED), facilitating its application to nanostructures. Thus, the approach is capable of comprehensively revealing electronic structure changes in hetero-interface systems with an applied bias that are practically useful for experimental studies. We calculate the electronic structure of a SiO2-graphene-boron nitride (BN) system in which an electrode bias is applied between the graphene layer and an electrode attached on the SiO2 film. The electronic energy barrier between graphene and BN is varied with an applied bias, and the energy variation depends on the thickness of the BN film. This is because the density of states of graphene is so low that the graphene layer cannot fully screen the electric field generated by the electrodes. We have demonstrated that the electronic properties of hetero-interface systems are well controlled by the combination of the electronic charging and the generated electric field.

  8. A Theoretical Method for Characterizing Nonlinear Effects in Paul Traps with Added Octopole Field.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Caiqiao; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Ning; Zhan, Lingpeng; Chen, Yongtai; Chen, Suming; Nie, Zongxiu

    2015-08-01

    In comparison with numerical methods, theoretical characterizations of ion motion in the nonlinear Paul traps always suffer from low accuracy and little applicability. To overcome the difficulties, the theoretical harmonic balance (HB) method was developed, and was validated by the numerical fourth-order Runge-Kutta (4th RK) method. Using the HB method, analytical ion trajectory and ion motion frequency in the superimposed octopole field, ε, were obtained by solving the nonlinear Mathieu equation (NME). The obtained accuracy of the HB method was comparable with that of the 4th RK method at the Mathieu parameter, q = 0.6, and the applicable q values could be extended to the entire first stability region with satisfactory accuracy. Two sorts of nonlinear effects of ion motion were studied, including ion frequency shift, Δβ, and ion amplitude variation, Δ(C(2n)/C0) (n ≠ 0). New phenomena regarding Δβ were observed, although extensive studies have been performed based on the pseudo-potential well (PW) model. For instance, the |Δβ| at ε = 0.1 and ε = -0.1 were found to be different, but they were the same in the PW model. This is the first time the nonlinear effects regarding Δ(C(2n)/C0) (n ≠ 0) are studied, and the associated study has been a challenge for both theoretical and numerical methods. The nonlinear effects of Δ(C(2n)/C0) (n ≠ 0) and Δβ were found to share some similarities at q < 0.6: both of them were proportional to ε, and the square of the initial ion displacement, z(0)(2).

  9. Experimental and theoretical investigation of implantable cardiac pacemaker exposed to low frequency magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Babouri, A; Hedjeidj, A; Guendouz, L

    2009-04-01

    This paper presents in vitro investigation of an implantable cardiac pacemaker exposed to low frequency magnetic fields. The method used in this study is based on the interaction by inductive coupling through the loop formed by the pacemaker and its loads and the surrounding medium. This interaction results in an induced electromotive force between the terminals of the pacemaker, which can potentially disturb its operation. The studied frequencies are 50/60 Hz and 10/25 kHz. The experimental tests were carried out on several cardiac pacemakers, single chamber, and dual chamber. The results show a window effect of the detection circuits of cardiac pacemakers for the four studied frequencies. The modelling of the test bed requires studying the effects of the induced currents generated by the application of a magnetic field. Analytical calculations and Numerical simulations were carried out. We modelled the interactions of the magnetic field with a simplified representation of pacemaker embedded in the medium. The comparison of the results in the air and in vitro enabled us to make an equivalent electric model. The results obtained in experimental and theoretical studies allowed us to validate the test bed. The method applied is valid for other medical implants such as cardiac defibrillators, implant hearing aids system...etc.

  10. Anomeric effect revisited: Perspective from information-theoretic approach in density functional reactivity theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xiayu; Yu, Donghai; Rong, Chunying; Lu, Tian; Liu, Shubin

    2017-09-01

    In this work, we apply the quantities from the information-theoretic approach in density functional reactivity theory to examine the origin and nature of the anomeric effect, which is the preference of heteroatomic substituents within the cyclohexane ring to be in the axial orientation rather than the sterically less hindered equatorial position. Using α-D-glucopyranose as an example, we confirmed its complex stereoelectronic origin. With Shannon entropy, Fisher information, GBP entropy, information gain, Onicescu information energy, and relative Renyi entropy, we are able to accurately account for the axial-equatorial energy difference in general, with the anomeric effect included as a special case.

  11. Inclusion of persistence length-based secondary structure in replica field theoretic models of heteropolymer freezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Jeffrey K.; Pande, Vijay S.

    2013-09-01

    The protein folding problem has long represented a "holy grail" in statistical physics due to its physical complexity and its relevance to many human diseases. While past theoretical work has yielded apt descriptions of protein folding landscapes, recent large-scale simulations have provided insights into protein folding that were impractical to obtain from early theories. In particular, the role that non-native contacts play in protein folding, and their relation to the existence of misfolded, β-sheet rich trap states on folding landscapes, has emerged as a topic of interest in the field. In this paper, we present a modified model of heteropolymer freezing that includes explicit secondary structural characteristics which allow observations of "intramolecular amyloid" states to be probed from a theoretical perspective. We introduce a variable persistence length-based energy penalty to a model Hamiltonian, and we illustrate how this modification alters the phase transitions present in the theory. We find, in particular, that inclusion of this variable persistence length increases both generic freezing and folding temperatures in the model, allowing both folding and glass transitions to occur in a more highly optimized fashion. We go on to discuss how these changes might relate to protein evolution, misfolding, and the emergence of intramolecular amyloid states.

  12. Theoretical Investigation of Dynamic Properties of Magnetic Molecule Systems as Probed by NMR and Pulsed Fields Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Rousochatzakis, Ioannis

    2005-12-17

    The field of molecular magnetism[l-6] has become a subject of intense theoretical and experimental interest and has rapidly evolved during the last years. This inter-disciplinary field concerns magnetic systems at the molecular or "nanoscopic" level, whose realization has become feasible due to recent advances in the field of chemical synthesis. The present theoretical work provides a first step towards exploiting the possibilities that are offered by probing magnetic molecules using external magnetic fields with high sweep rates. These probes, apart for providing information specific to magnetic molecules, offer the possibility of conducting a detailed study of the relaxational behavior of interacting spin systems as a result of their coupling with a "heat bath" and in particular the excitations of the host lattice. Development of a broad theoretical framework for dealing with relaxational phenomena induced by dynamical magnetic fields is indeed a worthy goal.

  13. Experimental and theoretical researches on arc structure in a self-field thruster

    SciTech Connect

    Kagaya, Y.; Yoshikawa, T.; Tahara, H.; Yasui, H.

    1987-05-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies on the MPD arc structure in a self-field thruster have been done with the plasma diagnostics and computational simulation analyses in order to understand the mechanisms of the heating, acceleration and limiting phenomenon. It is found that the current patterns depend strongly on the propellant species and discharge current level and that the features on current conduction below the critical current are divided into two cases, depending on the rare and molecular gases as the propellants. Furthermore, the existence of two energetic heating regions is confirmed. In the cathode active region, more than 50 percent of the electric power is consumed; the heated plasma is compressed radially by the strong pumping force and expanded as the cathode jet. In the anode active region, the potential with the negative slope is formed adjacently to the anode surface at the low current level except for H2 propellant. 18 references.

  14. Joint United States-European Union Theoretical and Practical Course on Molecular Approaches for In Situ Biogradation

    SciTech Connect

    Suflita, Joseph M.; Duncan, Kathleen E.

    2010-08-14

    The Joint United States - European Union Theoretical and Practical Course on Molecular Approaches for in situ Biodegradation was held May 24 through June 7 at The University of Oklahoma. Twenty-four graduate and postgraduate students from both the United States and the European Union attended the course. Nine states and ten European countries were represented. Students were assigned living quarters and laboratory partners to maximize interactions between US and EU participants as well as to mix people with different technical backgrounds together. The students used the latest methods in molecular biology to characterize beneficial microorganisms and genes involved in the biodegradation of pollutants at a nearby landfill as well as an active hydrocarbon-producing site, part of which is undergoing bioremediation. Seminars by distinguished scientists were organized to expose the students to the breadth of the environmental field, including field assay and engineering applications, laboratory scale bioreactors, microbiology, genetics, regulation, pathway analysis, design of recombinant bacteria, and application of the associated techniques to the field. Lectures were given by various OU faculty on the principles behind the techniques to be used in the laboratory. These lectures included troubleshooting hints and encouraged questions and comments from the audience. The laboratory experiments covered chemical, microbiological, and molecular genetic analyses of soils; bioavailability of contaminants; enrichment cultures; gene probing; PCR amplification of known genes and gene families; identification of microbes based traditional and nontraditional approaches, nutritional capabilities, and 16S rRNA sequence; mRNA detection; and enzyme assays. Field trips were made to the USGS landfill field sampling site, and to the Tall Grass Prairie Preserve, a Nature Conservancy site which also featured long-term studies of bioremediation of crude oil and brine spills by one of the

  15. A Developmental Intervention Science (DIS) Outreach Research Approach to Promoting Youth Development: Theoretical, Methodological, and Meta-Theoretical Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Marilyn J.; Kurtines, William M.; Ferrer-Wreder, Laura; Berman, Steven L.; Lorente, Carolyn Cass; Briones, Ervin; Silverman, Wendy; Ritchie, Rachel; Eichas, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes work directed toward creating community-supported positive youth development interventions that draw on a developmental intervention science outreach research approach. With respect to developmental interventions, this approach focuses on creating evidence-based longitudinal change intervention strategies for promoting…

  16. A study of Ti-doped WO3 thin films using comparative theoretical and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paez, Aurelio

    Metal oxides like Tungsten Oxide (WO3) are well documented and characterized in the literature, with uses in darkening windows and mirrors, flat computer displays, solar panel cooling, and sensors (of interest in this study). Ti doping of WO3 is less documented and the focus of this study. Sample thin films of pure WO3 and varyingly Ti doped WO3 were prepared using Radio Frequency magnetron sputtering (RF) (13.56 MHz) to grow thin films on a silicon substrate. This study aims to compare multiple Ti doping percentages in WO3 theoretically and then compare with experimental data taken from thin films of various Ti doping levels grown at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 400 0°C. Characterization of the materials was to be conducted using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and other theoretical and simulated approaches. Theoretical calculations optimized Ti doping at somewhere between 6.25% and 12%. Experimental data indicates that under the given growing conditions optimal Ti doping is 5%. The percentage of Ti may be able to be increased and the material retain desired characteristics with an increased growth temperature above 400 0°C as annealing samples post-growth has no positive impact on the thin film structure.

  17. Tractors and twistors from conformal Cartan geometry: a gauge theoretic approach II. Twistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attard, J.; François, J.

    2017-04-01

    Tractor and Twistor bundles provide natural conformally covariant calculi on 4D-Riemannian manifolds. They have different origins but are closely related, and usually constructed bottom–up through prolongation of defining differential equations. We propose alternative top–down gauge theoretic constructions, starting from the conformal Cartan bundle P and its vectorial E and spinorial {E associated bundles. Our key ingredient is the dressing field method of gauge symmetry reduction, which allows tractors and twistors and their associated connections to exhibit as gauge fields of a non-standard kind as far as Weyl rescaling transformation is concerned. By non-standard we mean that they implement the gauge principle of physics, but are of a different geometric nature than the well-known differential geometric objects usually underlying gauge theories. We provide the corresponding BRST treatment. In a companion paper we dealt with tractors, in the present one we address the case of twistors.

  18. Avian genetics: A field and ecological approach

    SciTech Connect

    Cooke, F.; Buckley, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors wanted to present the ecological/population approach they used in their own research, and a compendium of carefully referred chapters written by invited experts was essential. The book follows the historical evolution of work in avian genetics, proceeding from a discussion of Mendelian (i.e. classical) genes through quantitative genetics, chromosomal genetics, biochemical genetics, to extensive treatment of population genetics, and concluding with some examples of long-term studies. In this book concentration has been more on intra- than on inter-specific variation; in that sense the approach has been more genetic than evolutionary or taxonomic.

  19. Afterschool Education: Approaches to an Emerging Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noam, Gil G.; Biancarosa, Gina; Dechausay, Nadine

    Noting that there exists little systematic and conclusive research on after-school education to guide the development of practices in this emerging field, this book contributes to the definition of after-school education by focusing on three essential aspects of such programming: (1) bridging school to after-school (2) homework, or extended…

  20. Afterschool Education: Approaches to an Emerging Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noam, Gil G.; Biancarosa, Gina; Dechausay, Nadine

    Noting that there exists little systematic and conclusive research on after-school education to guide the development of practices in this emerging field, this book contributes to the definition of after-school education by focusing on three essential aspects of such programming: (1) bridging school to after-school (2) homework, or extended…

  1. A new approach to observe toroidal magnetic fields of magnetars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, H.; Makishima, K.; Enoto, T.; Nakano, T.; Furuta, Y.; Nakazawa, K.

    2016-06-01

    Over the last decade, observational evidence has amounted that magnetars harbor enormous surface dipole magnetic fields (MFs) of B_{d} = 10^{14-15} {G}. Theoretically, we expect even stronger toroidal MFs B_{t} (e.g., Takiwaki+2009), which is observationally supported by a discovery of low-B_{d} magnetars (e.g., SGR 0418+5729; Rea+2013). Here, we will present a new approach to access B_{t} more directly. Suzaku allows us to simultaneously observe a soft thermal component and a distinct hard X-ray tail of magnetars. Extensively analyzing two magnetars, 4U 0142+61 and 1E 1547.0-5408, we found that their hard X-ray pulses suffered from slow phase modulations (Makishima+2014, 2015). This can be interpreted as a manifestation of free precession, under an axial deformation by ˜0.01%. If this effect is attributed to the magnetic stress, B_{t}˜10^{16} G is inferred. We further found that, within 6 years observation of 4U 0142+61, the modulation periods remained constant, while the amplitude gradually increased from < 0.4 to ˜1.3 sec. These results suggest the shift of the hard X-ray emission region (or direction).

  2. [A theoretical analysis of coordination in the field of health care: application to coordinated care systems].

    PubMed

    Sebai, Jihane

    2016-01-01

    Various organizational, functional or structural issues have led to a review of the foundations of the former health care system based on a traditional market segmentation between general practice and hospital medicine, and between health and social sectors and marked by competition between private and public sectors. The current reconfiguration of the health care system has resulted in “new” levers explained by the development of a new organizational reconfiguration of the primary health care model. Coordinated care structures (SSC) have been developed in this context by making coordination the cornerstone of relations between professionals to ensure global, continuous and quality health care. This article highlights the contributions of various theoretical approaches to the understanding of the concept of coordination in the analysis of the current specificity of health care.

  3. a Field-Theoretical Investigation of 2-D Coulomb Systems with Short-Range Yukawa Repulsion.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jargocki, Krzysztof Piotr

    The two-dimensional Coulomb gas, consisting of positive and negative charges, is an important system which, on one hand, is equivalent to the vortex sector of the planar X-Y model, and, on the other, to the sine-Gordon field theory. In most treatments the charged particles are assumed to have a repulsive hard core which prevents arbitrarily close approaches. In the present work a new regularization scheme based on a soft short-range Yukawa repulsion between the Coulomb gas particles is presented. This formulation is transcribed into a local sine-Gordon-like field theory involving two Bose fields, one the original massless sine -Gordon field corresponding to the long-range Coulomb interaction and an auxiliary massive field corresponding to the short -range Yukawa repulsion. The resulting Lagrangian is not Hermitian. Using the techniques of functional integration, an effective field theory involving the Coulomb field alone is obtained by integrating out the massive field. The resulting Lagrangian is now Hermitian. Then a generalization of Peierls' inequality is used to make a variational calculation of the ground state energy of the Coulomb system. Unlike in the pure sine-Gordon case the theory has a well-defined ground state energy for (beta)q('2) > 2 (or (beta)c('2) > 8(pi)). A new method is used to derive the Kosterlitz -Thouless renormalization group equations, starting with the original sine-Gordon-like theory. The equations are identical to those found previously by other authors. A wave function renormalization is found to be necessary in addition to the normal ordering discussed by Coleman. A fermionized version of the theory is obtained, using the dictionary provided by Kogut and Susskind, which involves two Fermi fields and an electromagnetic potential. Position -space correlation functions are calculated at the critical point. The effective potential is computed in the one -loop approximation. A nonlinear field theory with derivative couplings is found to

  4. An alternative theoretical approach to escape decision-making: the role of visual cues.

    PubMed

    Javůrková, Veronika; Šizling, Arnošt Leoš; Kreisinger, Jakub; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Escape enables prey to avoid an approaching predator. The escape decision-making process has traditionally been interpreted using theoretical models that consider ultimate explanations based on the cost/benefit paradigm. Ultimate approaches, however, suffer from inseparable extra-assumptions due to an inability to accurately parameterize the model's variables and their interactive relationships. In this study, we propose a mathematical model that uses intensity of predator-mediated visual stimuli as a basic cue for the escape response. We consider looming stimuli (i.e. expanding retinal image of the moving predator) as a cue to flight initiation distance (FID; distance at which escape begins) of incubating Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). We then examine the relationship between FID, vegetation cover and directness of predator trajectory, and fit the resultant model to experimental data. As predicted by the model, vegetation concealment and directness of predator trajectory interact, with FID decreasing with increased concealment during a direct approach toward prey, but not during a tangential approach. Thus, we show that a simple proximate expectation, which involves only visual processing of a moving predator, may explain interactive effects of environmental and predator-induced variables on an escape response. We assume that our proximate approach, which offers a plausible and parsimonious explanation for variation in FID, may serve as an evolutionary background for traditional, ultimate explanations and should be incorporated into interpretation of escape behavior.

  5. An Alternative Theoretical Approach to Escape Decision-Making: The Role of Visual Cues

    PubMed Central

    Javůrková, Veronika; Šizling, Arnošt Leoš; Kreisinger, Jakub; Albrecht, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Escape enables prey to avoid an approaching predator. The escape decision-making process has traditionally been interpreted using theoretical models that consider ultimate explanations based on the cost/benefit paradigm. Ultimate approaches, however, suffer from inseparable extra-assumptions due to an inability to accurately parameterize the model's variables and their interactive relationships. In this study, we propose a mathematical model that uses intensity of predator-mediated visual stimuli as a basic cue for the escape response. We consider looming stimuli (i.e. expanding retinal image of the moving predator) as a cue to flight initiation distance (FID; distance at which escape begins) of incubating Mallards (Anas platyrhynchos). We then examine the relationship between FID, vegetation cover and directness of predator trajectory, and fit the resultant model to experimental data. As predicted by the model, vegetation concealment and directness of predator trajectory interact, with FID decreasing with increased concealment during a direct approach toward prey, but not during a tangential approach. Thus, we show that a simple proximate expectation, which involves only visual processing of a moving predator, may explain interactive effects of environmental and predator-induced variables on an escape response. We assume that our proximate approach, which offers a plausible and parsimonious explanation for variation in FID, may serve as an evolutionary background for traditional, ultimate explanations and should be incorporated into interpretation of escape behavior. PMID:22427851

  6. A theoretical approach to sound propagation and radiation for ducts with suppressors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, E. J.; Sawdy, D. T.

    1981-01-01

    The several phenomena involved in theoretical prediction of the far-field sound radiation attenuation from an acoustically lined duct have been studied. These include absorption by the suppressor, termination reflection, and far-field radiation. Extensive parameteric studies have shown that the suppressor absorption performance can be correlated with mode cut-off ratio or angle of propagation. The other phenomena can be shown to depend explicitly upon mode cut-off ratio. A complete system can thus be generated which can be used to evaluate aircraft sound suppressors and which can be related to the sound source through the cut-off ratio-acoustic power distribution. Although the method is most fully developed for inlet suppressors, several aft radiated noise phenomena will also be discussed. This paper summarized this simplified suppressor design and evaluation method, presents the recent improvements in the technique and discusses areas where further refinement is necessary. Noise suppressor data from engine experiments are compared with the theoretical calculations.

  7. A bond-topological approach to theoretical mineralogy: crystal structure, chemical composition and chemical reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawthorne, Frank C.

    2012-11-01

    Here, I describe a theoretical approach to the structure and chemical composition of minerals based on their bond topology. This approach allows consideration of many aspects of minerals and mineral behaviour that cannot be addressed by current theoretical methods. It consists of combining the bond topology of the structure with aspects of graph theory and bond-valence theory (both long range and short range), and using the moments approach to the electronic energy density-of-states to interpret topological aspects of crystal structures. The structure hierarchy hypothesis states that higher bond-valence polyhedra polymerize to form the (usually anionic) structural unit, the excess charge of which is balanced by the interstitial complex (usually consisting of large low-valence cations and (H2O) groups). This hypothesis may be justified within the framework of bond topology and bond-valence theory, and may be used to hierarchically classify oxysalt minerals. It is the weak interaction between the structural unit and the interstitial complex that controls the stability of the structural arrangement. The principle of correspondence of Lewis acidity-basicity states that stable structures will form when the Lewis-acid strength of the interstitial complex closely matches the Lewis-base strength of the structural unit, and allows us to examine the factors that control the chemical composition and aspects of the structural arrangements of minerals. It also provides a connection between a structure, the speciation of its constituents in aqueous solution and its mechanism of crystallization. The moments approach to the electronic energy density-of-states provides a link between the bond topology of a structure and its thermodynamic properties, as indicated by correlations between average anion coordination number and reduced enthalpy of formation from the oxides for [6]Mg{/m [4]}Si n O( m+2 n) and MgSO4(H2O) n .

  8. A Study of Brain Networks Associated with Swallowing Using Graph-Theoretical Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Bo; Sörös, Peter; Sejdić, Ervin

    2013-01-01

    Functional connectivity between brain regions during swallowing tasks is still not well understood. Understanding these complex interactions is of great interest from both a scientific and a clinical perspective. In this study, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was utilized to study brain functional networks during voluntary saliva swallowing in twenty-two adult healthy subjects (all females, years of age). To construct these functional connections, we computed mean partial correlation matrices over ninety brain regions for each participant. Two regions were determined to be functionally connected if their correlation was above a certain threshold. These correlation matrices were then analyzed using graph-theoretical approaches. In particular, we considered several network measures for the whole brain and for swallowing-related brain regions. The results have shown that significant pairwise functional connections were, mostly, either local and intra-hemispheric or symmetrically inter-hemispheric. Furthermore, we showed that all human brain functional network, although varying in some degree, had typical small-world properties as compared to regular networks and random networks. These properties allow information transfer within the network at a relatively high efficiency. Swallowing-related brain regions also had higher values for some of the network measures in comparison to when these measures were calculated for the whole brain. The current results warrant further investigation of graph-theoretical approaches as a potential tool for understanding the neural basis of dysphagia. PMID:24009758

  9. A set-theoretic approach for compensated signature embedding using projections onto convex sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababneh, Sufyan; Ansari, Rashid; Khokhar, Ashfaq

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we use a set-theoretic approach to provide an efficient and deterministic iterative solution for the compensated signature embedding (CSE) scheme introduced in an earlier work. 4 In CSE, a fragile signature is derived and embedded into the media using a robust watermarking technique. Since the embedding process leads to altering the media, the media samples are iteratively adjusted to compensate for the embedding distortion. Projections Onto Convex Sets (POCS) is an iterative set-theoretic approach known to be deterministic, effective and has been used in many image processing applications. We propose to use POCS for providing a compensation mechanism to address the CSE problem. We identify two convex constraint sets defined according to image fidelity and signature-generation criteria, and use them in a POCS-based CSE image authentication system. The system utilizes the wavelet transform domain for embedding and compensation. Simulation results are presented to show that the proposed scheme is efficient and accurate in terms of both achieving high convergence speed and maintaining image fidelity.

  10. Mechanistic insight into degradation of endocrine disrupting chemical by hydroxyl radical: An experimental and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Gao, Lingwei; Wei, Zongsu; Spinney, Richard; Luo, Shuang; Wang, Donghong; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Tang, Chong-Jian; Yang, Weichun

    2017-09-13

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) based on formation of free radicals at ambient temperature and pressure are effective for treating endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in waters. In this study, we systematically investigated the degradation kinetics of bisphenol A (BPA), a representative EDC by hydroxyl radical (OH) with a combination of experimental and theoretical approaches. The second-order rate constant (k) of BPA with OH was experimentally determined to be 7.2 ± 0.34 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1) at pH 7.55. We also calculated the thermodynamic and kinetic behaviors for the bimolecular reactions by density functional theory (DFT) using the M05-2X method with 6-311++G** basis set and solvation model based on density (SMD). The results revealed that H-abstraction on the phenol group is the most favorable pathway for OH. The theoretical k value corrected by the Collins-Kimball approach was determined to be 1.03 × 10(10) M(-1) s(-1), which is in reasonable agreement with the experimental observation. These results are of fundamental and practical importance in understanding the chemical interactions between OH and BPA, and aid further AOPs design in treating EDCs during wastewater treatment processes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Transport in polymer-gel composites: theoretical methodology and response to an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Reghan J.

    2006-03-01

    A theoretical model of electromigrative, diffusive and convective transport in polymer-gel composites is presented. Bulk properties are derived from the standard electrokinetic model with an impenetrable charged sphere embedded in an electrolyte-saturated Brinkman medium. Because the microstructure can be carefully controlled, these materials are promising candidates for enhanced gel-electrophoresis, chemical sensing, drug delivery, and microfluidic pumping technologies. The methodology provides solutions for situations where perturbations from equilibrium are induced by gradients of electrostatic potential, concentration and pressure. While the volume fraction of the inclusions should be small, Maxwell's well-known theory of conduction suggests that the model may also be accurate at moderate volume fractions. In this work, the theory is used to compute ion fluxes, electrical current density, and convective flow driven by an electric field applied to an homogeneous composite. The electric-field-induced (electro-osmotic) flow is a sensitive indicator of the inclusion zeta-potential and size, electrolyte concentration, and Darcy permeability of the gel, while the electrical conductivity is usually independent of the polymer gel and is relatively insensitive to characteristics of the inclusions and electrolyte.

  12. Theoretical study of spectroscopic constants and anharmonic force field of SiF2.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Wang, Meishan; Yang, Chuanlu; Ma, Meizhong; Tong, Dianmin

    2015-05-01

    The equilibrium structure, spectroscopy constants, and anharmonic force field of SiF2 have been investigated at MP2, B3LYP, and B3PW91 levels of theory employing two basis sets cc-pVQZ and cc-pVTZ, respectively. The obtained equilibrium geometries, rotational constants, fundamental vibrational wave numbers, and centrifugal distortion constants are compared with the available experimental data or the previous theoretical values. The MP2/cc-pVQZ results of SiF2 are in excellent agreement with the available experimental data and afford a marked improvement over B3LYP/cc-pVQZ and B3PW91/cc-pVQZ in the calculation of spectroscopic constants and force constants of SiF2. The basis set enhancement beyond cc-pVQZ does not lead to a major improvement so that the cc-pVQZ basis set is sufficient for SiF2. The MP2/cc-pVQZ results may provide useful data for the spectroscopic experiment studies of SiF2. The used DFT method is also an advisable choice to study anharmonic force field of SiF2.

  13. MAGNETARS VERSUS HIGH MAGNETIC FIELD PULSARS: A THEORETICAL INTERPRETATION OF THE APPARENT DICHOTOMY

    SciTech Connect

    Pons, Jose A.; Perna, Rosalba

    2011-11-10

    Highly magnetized neutron stars (NSs) are characterized by a bewildering range of astrophysical manifestations. Here, building on our simulations of the evolution of magnetic stresses in the NS crust and its ensuing fractures, we explore in detail, for the middle-aged and old NSs, the dependence of starquake frequency and energetics on the relative strength of the poloidal (B{sub p}) and toroidal (B{sub tor}) components. We find that, for B{sub p} {approx}> 10{sup 14} G, since a strong crustal toroidal field B{sub tor} {approx} B{sub p} is quickly formed on a Hall timescale, the initial toroidal field needs to be B{sub tor} >> B{sub p} to have a clear influence on the outbursting behavior. For initial fields B{sub p} {approx}< 10{sup 14} G, it is very unlikely that a middle-aged (t {approx} 10{sup 5} years) NS shows any bursting activity. This study allows us to solve the apparent puzzle of how NSs with similar dipolar magnetic fields can behave in a remarkably different way: an outbursting 'magnetar' with a high X-ray luminosity, or a quiet, low-luminosity, 'high-B' radio pulsar. As an example, we consider the specific cases of the magnetar 1E 2259+586 and the radio pulsar PSR J1814-1744, which at present have a similar dipolar field {approx}6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} G. We determine for each object an initial magnetic field configuration that reproduces the observed timing parameters at their current age. The same two configurations also account for the differences in quiescent X-ray luminosity and for the 'magnetar/outbursting' behavior of 1E 2259+586 but not of PSR J1814-1744. We further use the theoretically predicted surface temperature distribution to compute the light curve for these objects. In the case of 1E 2259+586, for which data are available, our predicted temperature distribution gives rise to a pulse profile whose double-peaked nature and modulation level are consistent with the observations.

  14. Photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM): theoretical and experimental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Tae; Lin, Milo; Zewail, Ahmed H.

    2010-12-01

    Electron imaging in space and time is achieved in microscopy with timed (near relativistic) electron packets of picometer wavelength coincident with light pulses of femtosecond duration. The photons (with an energy of a few electronvolts) are used to impulsively heat or excite the specimen so that the evolution of structures from their nonequilibrium state can be followed in real time. As such, and at relatively low fluences, there is no interaction between the electrons and the photons; certainly that is the case in vacuum because energy-momentum conservation is not possible. In the presence of nanostructures and at higher fluences, energy-momentum conservation is possible and the electron packet can either gain or lose light quanta. Recently, it was reported that, when only electrons with gained energy are filtered, near-field imaging enables the visualization of nanoscale particles and interfaces with enhanced contrast (Barwick et al 2009 Nature 462 902). To explore a variety of applications, it is important to express, through analytical formulation, the key parameters involved in this photon-induced near-field electron microscopy (PINEM) and to predict the associated phenomena of, e.g., forty-photon absorption by the electron packet. In this paper, we give an account of the theoretical and experimental results of PINEM. In particular, the time-dependent quantum solution for ultrafast electron packets in the nanostructure scattered electromagnetic (near) field is solved in the high kinetic energy limit to obtain the evolution of the incident electron packet into a superposition of discrete momentum wavelets. The characteristic length and time scales of the halo of electron-photon coupling are discussed in the framework of Rayleigh and Mie scatterings, providing the dependence of the PINEM effect on size, polarization, material and spatiotemporal localization. We also provide a simple classical description that is based on features of plasmonics. A major part of

  15. The Goodwyn Field - an integrated approach to optimal field development

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, S.H.; Taylor, N.C.

    1996-12-31

    The Goodwyn gas field is located some 130 km offshore of Western Australia in a water depth of 130m and is currently under development. First production commenced in February 1995. The rich gas (CGR - 90 bbl/MMscf) is trapped within fluvio-deltaic reservoirs of the Triassic Mungaroo Formation In a large notated fault block on the northwestern edge of the Dampier Sub-Basin. The reservoir units, ranging in thickness between 30 and 80 meters, dip gently below the overlying Cretaceous shales which provide the updip seal. The target production levels and ultimate recovery are based on the optimization of gas recycling along strike in the individual reservoir units. The success of the development plan depends on an accurate model of the reservoir architecture. Prior to development drilling, only four wells had penetrated the primary reservoir units. Successful development planning required the recognition and management of key subsurface uncertainties. Integration between seismic interpretation, stochastic reservoir modelling and reservoir engineering proved essential to achieve the development objectives. A detailed evaluation of the reservoir stratigraphy, sedimentology, high resolution seismic and high resolution palynology provided the framework for the 3D stochastic reservoir modeling. The modelling converted the information into a number of geological realizations which were then used to generate a family of dynamic reservoir models. The location of the various development wells was thus optimized on a risked basis. Seven development wells have now been drilled and although these wells have shown that there is more variability than originally envisaged, the broad framework of the reservoir model remains robust.

  16. The Goodwyn Field - an integrated approach to optimal field development

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, S.H.; Taylor, N.C.

    1996-01-01

    The Goodwyn gas field is located some 130 km offshore of Western Australia in a water depth of 130m and is currently under development. First production commenced in February 1995. The rich gas (CGR - 90 bbl/MMscf) is trapped within fluvio-deltaic reservoirs of the Triassic Mungaroo Formation In a large notated fault block on the northwestern edge of the Dampier Sub-Basin. The reservoir units, ranging in thickness between 30 and 80 meters, dip gently below the overlying Cretaceous shales which provide the updip seal. The target production levels and ultimate recovery are based on the optimization of gas recycling along strike in the individual reservoir units. The success of the development plan depends on an accurate model of the reservoir architecture. Prior to development drilling, only four wells had penetrated the primary reservoir units. Successful development planning required the recognition and management of key subsurface uncertainties. Integration between seismic interpretation, stochastic reservoir modelling and reservoir engineering proved essential to achieve the development objectives. A detailed evaluation of the reservoir stratigraphy, sedimentology, high resolution seismic and high resolution palynology provided the framework for the 3D stochastic reservoir modeling. The modelling converted the information into a number of geological realizations which were then used to generate a family of dynamic reservoir models. The location of the various development wells was thus optimized on a risked basis. Seven development wells have now been drilled and although these wells have shown that there is more variability than originally envisaged, the broad framework of the reservoir model remains robust.

  17. Reducing the computational complexity of information theoretic approaches for reconstructing gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peng; Gentles, Andrew J; Plevritis, Sylvia K

    2010-02-01

    Information theoretic approaches are increasingly being used for reconstructing regulatory networks from microarray data. These approaches start by computing the pairwise mutual information (MI) between all gene pairs. The resulting MI matrix is then manipulated to identify regulatory relationships. A barrier to these approaches is the time-consuming step of computing the MI matrix. We present a method to reduce this computation time. We apply spectral analysis to re-order the genes, so that genes that share regulatory relationships are more likely to be placed close to each other. Then, using a "sliding window" approach with appropriate window size and step size, we compute the MI for the genes within the sliding window, and the remainder is assumed to be zero. Using both simulated data and microarray data, we demonstrate that our method does not incur performance loss in regions of high-precision and low-recall, while the computational time is significantly lowered. The proposed method can be used with any method that relies on the mutual information to reconstruct networks.

  18. A Theoretical Study of the Runaway Electron Energy Spectrum Inside the High Field Regions of Thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, E. S.; Dwyer, J. R.; Arabshahi, S.; Liu, N.; Vodopiyanov, I. B.; Rassoul, H.

    2013-12-01

    Runaway electrons are produced in Earth's atmosphere when the particles rate of energy gain from an externally applied electric field exceeds the rate of energy loss it experiences from various interactions in air. In this presentation, we theoretically study the creation, propagation, and properties of runaway electrons during the avalanche process. Specifically, we use analytical and numerical models to study the runaway electron energy spectrum, and predict its shape and dependence on the electric field strength and air density. We also develop simple relationships between avalanche variables, including the electron avalanche length, radiation length, and minimum runaway electron kinetic energy. In order to guide the calculations presented here, a Monte Carlo simulation code is used, which was created by Dr. Joseph Dwyer at Florida Institute of Technology. The simulation includes all the relevant physics involved in propagating an energetic electron through air under the influence of an electric field. One motivation for this project is to express the results of the Monte Carlo simulation analytically, giving a better perspective on the nature of the avalanche region inside thunderclouds. Although the kinetic theory for runaway electrons has been studied previously (e.g., Roussel-Dupre et al. [1994], and Gurevich et al. [1992]), the equations derived are quite complex. Here, we present a simplified transport equation based on the classical continuity equation in phase space, and develop the proper form for describing the acceleration/deceleration and collisional processes that runaway electrons experience while propagating through air. Analytical results of the steady state distribution are possible with the help of several mathematical techniques, simplifications and assumptions. In particular, we find that when the bremsstrahlung energy losses are included, the high energy portion of the electron distribution is greatly affected. Finally, a numerical solution

  19. Substituent effects on the relaxation dynamics of furan, furfural and β-furfural: a combined theoretical and experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Oesterling, Sven; Schalk, Oliver; Geng, Ting; Thomas, Richard D; Hansson, Tony; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2017-01-18

    For the series furan, furfural and β-furfural we investigated the effect of substituents and their positioning on the photoinduced relaxation dynamics in a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Using time resolved photoelectron spectroscopy with a high intensity probe pulse, we can, for the first time, follow the whole deactivation process of furan through a two photon probe signal. Using the extended 2-electron 2-orbital model [Nenov et al., J. Chem. Phys., 2011, 135, 034304] we explain the formation of one central conical intersection and predict the influence of the aldehyde group of the derivatives on its geometry. This, as well as the relaxation mechanisms from photoexcitation to the final outcome was investigated using a variety of theoretical methods. Complete active space self consistent field was used for on-the-fly calculations while complete active space perturbation theory and coupled cluster theory were used to accurately describe critical configurations. Experiment and theory show the relaxation dynamics of furfural and β-furfural to be slowed down, and together they disclose an additional deactivation pathway, which is attributed to the nO lonepair state introduced with the aldehyde group.

  20. Modeling the atmospheric convective boundary layer within a zero-order jump approach: An extended theoretical framework

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorovich, E.

    1995-09-01

    The paper presents an extended theoretical background for applied modeling of the atmospheric convective boundary layer within the so-called zero-order jump approach, which implies vertical homogeneity of meteorological fields in the bulk of convective boundary layer (CBL) and zero-order discontinuities of variables at the interfaces of the layer. The zero-order jump model equations for the most typical cases of CBL are derived. The models of nonsteady, horizontally homogeneous CBL with and without shear, extensively studied in the past with the aid of zero-order jump models, are shown to be particular cases of the general zero-order jump theoretical framework. The integral budgets of momentum and heat are considered for different types of dry CBL. The profiles of vertical turbulent fluxes are presented and analyzed. The general version of the equation of CBL depth growth rate (entrainment rate equation) is obtained by the integration of the turbulence kinetic energy balance equation, invoking basic assumptions of the zero-order parameterizations of the CBL vertical structure. The problems of parameterizing the turbulence vertical structure and closure of the entrainment rate equation for specific cases of CBL are discussed. A parameterization scheme for the horizontal turbulent exchange in zero-order jump models of CBL is proposed. The developed theory is generalized for the case of CBL over irregular terrain. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Theoretical approaches to maternal-infant interaction: which approach best discriminates between mothers with and without postpartum depression?

    PubMed

    Logsdon, M Cynthia; Mittelberg, Meghan; Morrison, David; Robertson, Ashley; Luther, James F; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Confer, Andrea; Eng, Heather; Sit, Dorothy K Y; Wisner, Katherine L

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine which of the four common approaches to coding maternal-infant interaction best discriminates between mothers with and without postpartum depression. After extensive training, four research assistants coded 83 three minute videotapes of maternal infant interaction at 12month postpartum visits. Four theoretical approaches to coding (Maternal Behavior Q-Sort, the Dyadic Mini Code, Ainsworth Maternal Sensitivity Scale, and the Child-Caregiver Mutual Regulation Scale) were used. Twelve month data were chosen to allow the maximum possible exposure of the infant to maternal depression during the first postpartum year. The videotapes were created in a laboratory with standard procedures. Inter-rater reliabilities for each coding method ranged from .7 to .9. The coders were blind to depression status of the mother. Twenty-seven of the women had major depressive disorder during the 12month postpartum period. Receiver operating characteristics analysis indicated that none of the four methods of analyzing maternal infant interaction discriminated between mothers with and without major depressive disorder. Limitations of the study include the cross-sectional design and the low number of women with major depressive disorder. Further analysis should include data from videotapes at earlier postpartum time periods, and alternative coding approaches should be considered. Nurses should continue to examine culturally appropriate ways in which new mothers can be supported in how to best nurture their babies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Theoretical approaches of online social network interventions and implications for behavioral change: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Arguel, Amaël; Perez-Concha, Oscar; Li, Simon Y W; Lau, Annie Y S

    2016-10-06

    The aim of this review was to identify general theoretical frameworks used in online social network interventions for behavioral change. To address this research question, a PRISMA-compliant systematic review was conducted. A systematic review (PROSPERO registration number CRD42014007555) was conducted using 3 electronic databases (PsycINFO, Pubmed, and Embase). Four reviewers screened 1788 abstracts. 15 studies were selected according to the eligibility criteria. Randomized controlled trials and controlled studies were assessed using Cochrane Collaboration's "risk-of-bias" tool, and narrative synthesis. Five eligible articles used the social cognitive theory as a framework to develop interventions targeting behavioral change. Other theoretical frameworks were related to the dynamics of social networks, intention models, and community engagement theories. Only one of the studies selected in the review mentioned a well-known theory from the field of health psychology. Conclusions were that guidelines are lacking in the design of online social network interventions for behavioral change. Existing theories and models from health psychology that are traditionally used for in situ behavioral change should be considered when designing online social network interventions in a health care setting. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Logarithmic conformal field theory: a lattice approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, A. M.; Jacobsen, J. L.; Read, N.; Saleur, H.; Vasseur, R.

    2013-12-01

    Logarithmic conformal field theories (LCFT) play a key role, for instance, in the description of critical geometrical problems (percolation, self-avoiding walks, etc), or of critical points in several classes of disordered systems (transition between plateaux in the integer and spin quantum Hall effects). Much progress in their understanding has been obtained by studying algebraic features of their lattice regularizations. For reasons which are not entirely understood, the non-semi-simple associative algebras underlying these lattice models—such as the Temperley-Lieb algebra or the blob algebra—indeed exhibit, in finite size, properties that are in full correspondence with those of their continuum limits. This applies not only to the structure of indecomposable modules, but also to fusion rules, and provides an ‘experimental’ way of measuring couplings, such as the ‘number b’ quantifying the logarithmic coupling of the stress-energy tensor with its partner. Most results obtained so far have concerned boundary LCFTs and the associated indecomposability in the chiral sector. While the bulk case is considerably more involved (mixing in general left and right moving sectors), progress has also recently been made in this direction, uncovering fascinating structures. This study provides a short general review of our work in this area.

  4. Electrocaloric effect in core-shell ferroelectric ceramics: Theoretical approach and practical conclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anoufa, M.; Kiat, J. M.; Bogicevic, C.

    2015-10-01

    Most of the theoretical and experimental studies on the electrocaloric effect (ECE) are devoted to thin films, but they can be hardly envisaged for cooling macroscopic systems; moreover, the results obtained cannot be easily transposed for larger systems like multilayered ceramics. Therefore, efforts should also be focused on predicting, synthesizing, and characterizing interesting bulk single crystal or ceramics. In ferroelectric nanoparticles and ceramics, the core-shell structure of grains is of uttermost importance to explain the experimental results at small sizes. Moreover, it can be used to tailor physical properties, such as energy storage, by experimenting with the composition, thickness, and permittivity of the shell. Here, we report the effect of such structures on the electrocaloric effects in a variety of ferroelectric materials. The magnitude of ECE as well as its field and temperature-dependence are obtained for different types of core-shells. The optimal configuration for a maximal ECE is deduced.

  5. Direct-to-consumer-advertising of prescription medicines: a theoretical approach to understanding.

    PubMed

    Harker, Michael; Harker, Debra

    2007-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is a leader in research and development investment. New treatments need to be communicated to the market, and consumers are increasingly interested in learning about new drugs. Direct to consumer advertising of prescription medicines (DTCA) is a controversial practice where many of the arguments for and against are not supported by strong evidence. This paper aims to contribute to a research agenda that is forming in this area. The paper reports on a systematic review that was conducted and applies accepted theoretical models to the DTCA context. The systematic review methodology is widely accepted in the medical sector and is successfully applied here in the marketing field. The hierarchy of effects model is specifically applied to DTCA with a clear emphasis on consumer rights, empowerment, protection and knowledge. This paper provides healthcare practitioners with insight into how consumers process DTCA messages and provides guidance into how to assist in this message processing.

  6. Pointwise analysis of scalar fields: A nonstandard approach

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Hideyasu

    2006-09-15

    A new nonstandard-analytical approach to quantum fields is presented, which gives a mathematical foundation for manipulating pointwise-defined quantum fields. In our approach, a field operator {phi}(x) is not a standard operator-valued distribution, but a nonstandard operator-valued function. Then formal expressions containing, e.g., {phi}(x){sup 2} can be understood literally, and shown to be well defined. In the free field cases, we show that the Wightman functions are explicitly calculated with the pointwise field, without any regularization, e.g., Wick product. Our notion of pointwise fields is applied also to the path integral formalisms of scalar fields. We show that some of physicists' naive expressions of Lagrangian path integral formulas can be rigorously justified.

  7. Array measurements adapted to the number of available sensors: Theoretical and practical approach for ESAC method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiana-Merino, J. J.; Rosa-Cintas, S.; Rosa-Herranz, J.; Garrido, J.; Peláez, J. A.; Martino, S.; Delgado, J.

    2016-05-01

    Array measurements of ambient noise have become a useful technique to estimate the surface wave dispersion curves and subsequently the subsurface elastic parameters that characterize the studied soil. One of the logistical handicaps associated with this kind of measurements is the requirement of several stations recording at the same time, which limits their applicability in the case of research groups without enough infrastructure resources. In this paper, we describe the theoretical basis of the ESAC method and we deduce how the number of stations needed to implement any array layout can be reduced to only two stations. In this way, we propose a new methodology to implement an N stations array layout by using only M stations (M < N), which will be recording in different positions of the original prearranged N stations geometry at different times. We also provide some practical guidelines to implement the proposed approach and we show different examples where the obtained results confirm the theoretical foundations. Thus, the study carried out reflects that we can use a minimum of 2 stations to deploy any array layout originally designed for higher number of sensors.

  8. An information-theoretic approach to assess practical identifiability of parametric dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Pant, Sanjay; Lombardi, Damiano

    2015-10-01

    A new approach for assessing parameter identifiability of dynamical systems in a Bayesian setting is presented. The concept of Shannon entropy is employed to measure the inherent uncertainty in the parameters. The expected reduction in this uncertainty is seen as the amount of information one expects to gain about the parameters due to the availability of noisy measurements of the dynamical system. Such expected information gain is interpreted in terms of the variance of a hypothetical measurement device that can measure the parameters directly, and is related to practical identifiability of the parameters. If the individual parameters are unidentifiable, correlation between parameter combinations is assessed through conditional mutual information to determine which sets of parameters can be identified together. The information theoretic quantities of entropy and information are evaluated numerically through a combination of Monte Carlo and k-nearest neighbour methods in a non-parametric fashion. Unlike many methods to evaluate identifiability proposed in the literature, the proposed approach takes the measurement-noise into account and is not restricted to any particular noise-structure. Whilst computationally intensive for large dynamical systems, it is easily parallelisable and is non-intrusive as it does not necessitate re-writing of the numerical solvers of the dynamical system. The application of such an approach is presented for a variety of dynamical systems--ranging from systems governed by ordinary differential equations to partial differential equations--and, where possible, validated against results previously published in the literature.

  9. Bridging the theoretical divide in Holocene landscape studies: social and ecological approaches to ancient Oaxacan landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Arthur A.; Goman, Michelle

    2012-11-01

    In this article we discuss two theoretical approaches to landscape studies in archaeology: the ecological and social/symbolic. We suggest that an integrated approach can provide a more effective means through which archaeologists and earth scientists can model the complex interplay between people and the environment. Our perspective views peoples' engagements with the landscape as simultaneously ecological and social, material and symbolic. To illustrate this synthetic approach we discuss our research from the highland and lowland regions of the Mexican state of Oaxaca using archaeological, ethnographic, ethnohistorical, paleoecological, and geomorphological data. In highland Oaxaca we examine the ways in which political and religious principles were embedded in the landscape as well as the social, symbolic, and material dimensions of anthropogenic landscape change during the Formative period. For the coastal lowlands, we discuss the social and ecological implications of the transition to sedentism and the effects of anthropogenic landscape change during the Formative period. We also examine the interplay between politics and land use during the Classic and Postclassic periods.

  10. Model-free information-theoretic approach to infer leadership in pairs of zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butail, Sachit; Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior affords several advantages to fish in avoiding predators, foraging, mating, and swimming. Although fish schools have been traditionally considered egalitarian superorganisms, a number of empirical observations suggest the emergence of leadership in gregarious groups. Detecting and classifying leader-follower relationships is central to elucidate the behavioral and physiological causes of leadership and understand its consequences. Here, we demonstrate an information-theoretic approach to infer leadership from positional data of fish swimming. In this framework, we measure social interactions between fish pairs through the mathematical construct of transfer entropy, which quantifies the predictive power of a time series to anticipate another, possibly coupled, time series. We focus on the zebrafish model organism, which is rapidly emerging as a species of choice in preclinical research for its genetic similarity to humans and reduced neurobiological complexity with respect to mammals. To overcome experimental confounds and generate test data sets on which we can thoroughly assess our approach, we adapt and calibrate a data-driven stochastic model of zebrafish motion for the simulation of a coupled dynamical system of zebrafish pairs. In this synthetic data set, the extent and direction of the coupling between the fish are systematically varied across a wide parameter range to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of transfer entropy in inferring leadership. Our approach is expected to aid in the analysis of collective behavior, providing a data-driven perspective to understand social interactions.

  11. A theoretical validation of the B-matrix spatial distribution approach to diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, Karol; Kłodowski, Krzysztof; Figiel, Henryk; Krzyżak, Artur Tadeusz

    2017-02-01

    The recently presented B-matrix Spatial Distribution (BSD) approach is a calibration technique which derives the actual distribution of the B-matrix in space. It is claimed that taking into account the spatial variability of the B-matrix improves the accuracy of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The purpose of this study is to verify this approach theoretically through computer simulations. Assuming three different spatial distributions of the B-matrix, diffusion weighted signals were calculated for the six orientations of a model anisotropic phantom. Subsequently two variants of the BSD calibration were performed for each of the three cases; one with the assumption of high uniformity of the model phantom (uBSD-DTI) and the other taking into account imperfections in phantom structure (BSD-DTI). Several cases of varying degrees of phantom uniformity were analyzed and the distributions of the B-matrix obtained were used for the calculation of the diffusion tensor of a model isotropic phantom. The results were compared with standard diffusion tensor calculation. The simulations confirmed the improvement of accuracy in the determination of the diffusion tensor after the calibration. BSD-DTI improves accuracy independent of both the degree of uniformity of the phantom and the inhomogeneity of the B-matrix. In cases of a relatively good uniformity of the phantom and minor distortions in the spatial distribution of the B-matrix, the uBSD-DTI approach is sufficient.

  12. Model-free information-theoretic approach to infer leadership in pairs of zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Butail, Sachit; Mwaffo, Violet; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2016-04-01

    Collective behavior affords several advantages to fish in avoiding predators, foraging, mating, and swimming. Although fish schools have been traditionally considered egalitarian superorganisms, a number of empirical observations suggest the emergence of leadership in gregarious groups. Detecting and classifying leader-follower relationships is central to elucidate the behavioral and physiological causes of leadership and understand its consequences. Here, we demonstrate an information-theoretic approach to infer leadership from positional data of fish swimming. In this framework, we measure social interactions between fish pairs through the mathematical construct of transfer entropy, which quantifies the predictive power of a time series to anticipate another, possibly coupled, time series. We focus on the zebrafish model organism, which is rapidly emerging as a species of choice in preclinical research for its genetic similarity to humans and reduced neurobiological complexity with respect to mammals. To overcome experimental confounds and generate test data sets on which we can thoroughly assess our approach, we adapt and calibrate a data-driven stochastic model of zebrafish motion for the simulation of a coupled dynamical system of zebrafish pairs. In this synthetic data set, the extent and direction of the coupling between the fish are systematically varied across a wide parameter range to demonstrate the accuracy and reliability of transfer entropy in inferring leadership. Our approach is expected to aid in the analysis of collective behavior, providing a data-driven perspective to understand social interactions.

  13. Expanding Access to Large-Scale Genomic Data While Promoting Privacy: A Game Theoretic Approach.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhiyu; Vorobeychik, Yevgeniy; Xia, Weiyi; Clayton, Ellen Wright; Kantarcioglu, Murat; Malin, Bradley

    2017-02-02

    Emerging scientific endeavors are creating big data repositories of data from millions of individuals. Sharing data in a privacy-respecting manner could lead to important discoveries, but high-profile demonstrations show that links between de-identified genomic data and named persons can sometimes be reestablished. Such re-identification attacks have focused on worst-case scenarios and spurred the adoption of data-sharing practices that unnecessarily impede research. To mitigate concerns, organizations have traditionally relied upon legal deterrents, like data use agreements, and are considering suppressing or adding noise to genomic variants. In this report, we use a game theoretic lens to develop more effective, quantifiable protections for genomic data sharing. This is a fundamentally different approach because it accounts for adversarial behavior and capabilities and tailors protections to anticipated recipients with reasonable resources, not adversaries with unlimited means. We demonstrate this approach via a new public resource with genomic summary data from over 8,000 individuals-the Sequence and Phenotype Integration Exchange (SPHINX)-and show that risks can be balanced against utility more effectively than with traditional approaches. We further show the generalizability of this framework by applying it to other genomic data collection and sharing endeavors. Recognizing that such models are dependent on a variety of parameters, we perform extensive sensitivity analyses to show that our findings are robust to their fluctuations.

  14. Analysing Buyers' and Sellers' Strategic Interactions in Marketplaces: An Evolutionary Game Theoretic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vytelingum, Perukrishnen; Cliff, Dave; Jennings, Nicholas R.

    We develop a new model to analyse the strategic behaviour of buyers and sellers in market mechanisms. In particular, we wish to understand how the different strategies they adopt affect their economic efficiency in the market and to understand the impact of these choices on the overall efficiency of the marketplace. To this end, we adopt a two-population evolutionary game theoretic approach, where we consider how the behaviours of both buyers and sellers evolve in marketplaces. In so doing, we address the shortcomings of the previous state-of-the-art analytical model that assumes that buyers and sellers have to adopt the same mixed strategy in the market. Finally, we apply our model in one of the most common market mechanisms, the Continuous Double Auction, and demonstrate how it allows us to provide new insights into the strategic interactions of such trading agents.

  15. A Game-Theoretic Approach to Branching Time Abstract-Check-Refine Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yi; Tamai, Tetsuo

    2009-01-01

    Since the complexity of software systems continues to grow, most engineers face two serious problems: the state space explosion problem and the problem of how to debug systems. In this paper, we propose a game-theoretic approach to full branching time model checking on three-valued semantics. The three-valued models and logics provide successful abstraction that overcomes the state space explosion problem. The game style model checking that generates counter-examples can guide refinement or identify validated formulas, which solves the system debugging problem. Furthermore, output of our game style method will give significant information to engineers in detecting where errors have occurred and what the causes of the errors are.

  16. Theoretical approach to characterize the non-Markovianity and diffusion through the influx of the information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we study the Fisher information for a quantum system consisting of two identical qubits, each of them locally interacting with a bosonic reservoir in the same environment for non-Markovian open, dissipative quantum system. Based on the influx of the information, we propose an information-theoretical approach for characterizing the time-dependent memory effect of environment and diffusion function under the effect of the physical parameters. More precisely, an interesting monotonic relation between the time derivative of quantum Fisher information (QFI) and diffusion function behavior is observed during the time evolution. The phenomenon is that the QFI, namely the precision of estimation, changes dramatically with the environment structure. The dependence of the physical parameters shows that the increasing in the temperature will damage the amount of the QFI with respect of the ratio between the reservoir cutoff frequency and the system oscillation frequency.

  17. Information-theoretic approach for the discovery of design rules for crystal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kong, Chang Sun; Luo, Wei; Arapan, Sergiu; Villars, Pierre; Iwata, Shuichi; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rajan, Krishna

    2012-07-23

    In this work, it is shown that for the first time that, using information-entropy-based methods, one can quantitatively explore the relative impact of a wide multidimensional array of electronic and chemical bonding parameters on the structural stability of intermetallic compounds. Using an inorganic AB2 compound database as a template data platform, the evolution of design rules for crystal chemistry based on an information-theoretic partitioning classifier for a high-dimensional manifold of crystal chemistry descriptors is monitored. An application of this data-mining approach to establish chemical and structural design rules for crystal chemistry is demonstrated by showing that, when coupled with first-principles calculations, statistical inference methods can serve as a tool for significantly accelerating the prediction of unknown crystal structures.

  18. Understanding Confounding Effects in Linguistic Coordination: An Information-Theoretic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shuyang; Ver Steeg, Greg; Galstyan, Aram

    2015-01-01

    We suggest an information-theoretic approach for measuring stylistic coordination in dialogues. The proposed measure has a simple predictive interpretation and can account for various confounding factors through proper conditioning. We revisit some of the previous studies that reported strong signatures of stylistic accommodation, and find that a significant part of the observed coordination can be attributed to a simple confounding effect—length coordination. Specifically, longer utterances tend to be followed by longer responses, which gives rise to spurious correlations in the other stylistic features. We propose a test to distinguish correlations in length due to contextual factors (topic of conversation, user verbosity, etc.) and turn-by-turn coordination. We also suggest a test to identify whether stylistic coordination persists even after accounting for length coordination and contextual factors. PMID:26115446

  19. Theoretical approaches to creation of robotic coal mines based on the synthesis of simulation technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fryanov, V. N.; Pavlova, L. D.; Temlyantsev, M. V.

    2017-09-01

    Methodological approaches to theoretical substantiation of the structure and parameters of robotic coal mines are outlined. The results of mathematical and numerical modeling revealed the features of manifestation of geomechanical and gas dynamic processes in the conditions of robotic mines. Technological solutions for the design and manufacture of technical means for robotic mine are adopted using the method of economic and mathematical modeling and in accordance with the current regulatory documents. For a comparative performance evaluation of technological schemes of traditional and robotic mines, methods of cognitive modeling and matrix search for subsystem elements in the synthesis of a complex geotechnological system are applied. It is substantiated that the process of technical re-equipment of a traditional mine with a phased transition to a robotic mine will reduce unit costs by almost 1.5 times with a significant social effect due to a reduction in the number of personnel engaged in hazardous work.

  20. Information-Theoretic Approaches for Evaluating Complex Adaptive Social Simulation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Ganguly, Auroop R; Jiao, Yu

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose information-theoretic approaches for comparing and evaluating complex agent-based models. In information theoretic terms, entropy and mutual information are two measures of system complexity. We used entropy as a measure of the regularity of the number of agents in a social class; and mutual information as a measure of information shared by two social classes. Using our approaches, we compared two analogous agent-based (AB) models developed for regional-scale social-simulation system. The first AB model, called ABM-1, is a complex AB built with 10,000 agents on a desktop environment and used aggregate data; the second AB model, ABM-2, was built with 31 million agents on a highperformance computing framework located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and fine-resolution data from the LandScan Global Population Database. The initializations were slightly different, with ABM-1 using samples from a probability distribution and ABM-2 using polling data from Gallop for a deterministic initialization. The geographical and temporal domain was present-day Afghanistan, and the end result was the number of agents with one of three behavioral modes (proinsurgent, neutral, and pro-government) corresponding to the population mindshare. The theories embedded in each model were identical, and the test simulations focused on a test of three leadership theories - legitimacy, coercion, and representative, and two social mobilization theories - social influence and repression. The theories are tied together using the Cobb-Douglas utility function. Based on our results, the hypothesis that performance measures can be developed to compare and contrast AB models appears to be supported. Furthermore, we observed significant bias in the two models. Even so, further tests and investigations are required not only with a wider class of theories and AB models, but also with additional observed or simulated data and more comprehensive performance measures.

  1. Reaction dynamics of the D+ + H2 system. A comparison of theoretical approaches.

    PubMed

    Jambrina, P G; Alvariño, J M; Aoiz, F J; Herrero, Víctor J; Sáez-Rábanos, Vicente

    2010-10-21

    The dynamics of the deuteron-proton exchange D(+) + H(2) → HD + H(+) reaction on its ground 1(1)A' potential energy surface has been the subject of a theoretical study for collision energies below 1.5 eV. The results obtained with three theoretical approaches: quasi-classical trajectory (QCT), statistical quasi-classical trajectory (SQCT), and accurate time-independent quantum mechanical (QM) calculations are compared in the range of collision energies from 5 meV to 0.2 eV. The QM calculations included all total angular momentum quantum numbers, J, up to J(max) ≈ 40 and all the Coriolis couplings. For higher collision energies, the comparison was restricted to the QCT and SQCT results given the enormous computational cost implied in the QM calculations. Reaction cross sections as a function of collision energy (excitation functions) for various initial rovibrational states have been determined and compared with the corresponding results for the endothermic H(+) + D(2) → HD + D(+) isotopic variant. The excitation function for the title reaction decays monotonically with collision energy as expected for an exothermic reaction without a barrier, in contrast to the behaviour observed in the mentioned H(+) + D(2) (v = 0, j ≤ 3). Reaction probabilities as a function of J (opacity functions) at several collision energies calculated with the different approaches were also examined and important differences between them were found. The effect of using the gaussian binning procedure that preserves, to a large extent, the zero point energy, as compared to the standard histogram binning in the QCT calculations, is also examined. At low collision energy, the best agreement with the accurate QM results is given by the SQCT data, although they tend to overestimate the reactivity. The deviations from the statistical behaviour of the QCT data at higher energies are remarkable. Nevertheless, on the whole, the title reaction can be deemed more statistical than the H(+) + D(2

  2. Thermal benefits of melanism in cordylid lizards: a theoretical and field test.

    PubMed

    Clusella-Trullas, Susana; van Wyk, Johannes H; Spotila, James R

    2009-08-01

    The hypothesis that low skin reflectance (melanism) provides an advantage for thermoregulation under cold conditions has received mixed support in ectothermic vertebrates. We selected a model system, three allopatric closely related species of cordylid lizards that differ in skin reflectance, to test this hypothesis. Cordylus niger and Cordylus oelofseni are melanistic and inhabit peninsular and montane areas, respectively, whereas Cordylus cordylus is more widespread and inhabits low inland areas. By combining theoretical, experimental, and field data on these species, we demonstrate that the difference in body temperature (T(b)) between melanistic and non-melanistic lizards under ecologically relevant climate variation ranged from 0 degrees to 2 degrees C. Despite its small magnitude, however, the faster heating rate and higher T(b) of melanistic species relative to non-melanistic species conferred an advantage under cold conditions. Comparison of habitat thermal quality (d(e)) and thermal accuracy (d(b)) across species indicated that, in winter, melanism conferred the greatest advantage during small windows of thermal opportunity. This finding was most pronounced for C. oelofseni, which is most constrained by cold temperatures in its habitat. By contrast, due to their rock-dwelling habits, melanistic and non-melanistic species benefited from rock refugia in summer, giving similar levels of thermoregulatory effectiveness across species, regardless of skin reflectance. This study therefore demonstrates that skin reflectance variation across cordylids has significant effects on their thermal balance. Furthermore, studies investigating the role of varying skin reflectance in field populations and species should incorporate fine and broad temporal scales (daily, monthly, and seasonal), environmental variability, and cost-benefit trade-offs of thermoregulation.

  3. Decay widths of bottomonium states in matter: A field theoretic model for composite hadrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, Amruta; Misra, S. P.

    2017-06-01

    We compute the in-medium partial decay widths of the bottomonium states to open bottom mesons (B B ¯ ) using a field theoretical model for composite hadrons with quark constituents. These decay widths are calculated by using the explicit constructions for the bottomonium states and the open bottom mesons (B and B ¯) and the quark-antiquark pair creation term of the free Dirac Hamiltonian written in terms of the constituent quark field operators. These decay widths in the hadronic medium are calculated as arising from the mass modifications of the bottomonium states and the B and B ¯ mesons, obtained in a chiral effective model. The decay amplitude in the present model is multiplied with a strength parameter for the light quark pair creation, which is fitted from the observed vacuum partial decay width of the bottomonium state, Υ (4 S ) to B B ¯ . The effects of the isospin asymmetry, the strangeness fraction of the hadronic matter on the decay widths, arising due to the mass modifications due to these effects, have also been studied. There is observed to be appreciable effects from density, and the effects from isospin asymmetry on the parital decay widths of Υ →B B ¯ are observed to be quite pronounced at high densities. These effects should show up in the asymmetric heavy ion collisions in Compressed baryonic matter (CBM) experiments planned at the future facility at FAIR. The study of the Υ states will, however, require access to energies higher than the energy regime planned at the CBM experiment. The density effects on the decay widths of the bottomonium states should show up in the production of these states, as well as in dilepton spectra at the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) energies.

  4. A Mean Field Theoretic Study of Friction between Polyelectrolyte Polymer Brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokoloff, Jeffrey

    2007-03-01

    It is proposed that the fluctuations from the mean field theoretic parabolic monomer density profile for polymer brushes will result in a type of static friction between two polymer brush coated solid surfaces, which results from polymers that fluctuate out of the parabolic density profile belonging to one brush and get entangled with polymers belonging to the second brush. This occurs when the brushes are pushed together with a sufficiently large normal force so that the monomer density in the interface region separating the two polymer brushes is in the semidilute regime. The friction is not the usual static friction, in that when a force below this ``maximum force of static friction'' is applied, there is a ``creep velocity'' which is as large as a few millimeters per hour. At sufficiently light load so that the monomer density is in the dilute regime, the ``static friction'' goes away and there only exists a viscous kinetic friction (i.e., kinetic friction proportional to the sliding velocity) between the brushes. When the polymers are electrically charged, the counter ions produce additional osmotic pressure to support the load. Calculations of this additional load carrying mechanism using a Debye-Huckel theory treatment due to Miklavic and Marcelja, predict that the counterions do not provide a significant additional contribution to load carrying ability of polymer brushes.

  5. Nonrotating and rotating neutron stars in the extended field theoretical model

    SciTech Connect

    Dhiman, Shashi K.; Kumar, Raj; Agrawal, B. K.

    2007-10-15

    We study the properties of nonrotating and rotating neutron stars for a new set of equations of state (EOSs) with different high-density behavior obtained using the extended field theoretical model. The high-density behavior for these EOSs are varied by varying the {omega}-meson self-coupling and hyperon-meson couplings in such a way that the quality of fit to the bulk nuclear observables, nuclear matter incompressibility coefficient, and hyperon-nucleon potential depths remain practically unaffected. We find that the largest value for maximum mass for the nonrotating neutron star is 2.1M{sub {center_dot}}. The radius for a neutron star with canonical mass is 12.8-14.1 km, provided only those EOSs are considered for which the maximum mass is larger than 1.6M{sub {center_dot}}, the lower bound on the maximum mass measured so far. Our results for the very recently discovered fastest rotating neutron star indicate that this star is supramassive with mass 1.7M{sub {center_dot}}-2.7M{sub {center_dot}} and circumferential equatorial radius 12-19 km.

  6. Theoretical study on the shape instability of an encapsulated bubble in an ultrasound field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunqiao; Sugiyama, Kazuyasu; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2012-09-01

    A theoretical study on the shape instability of a slightly deformed bubble encapsulated by a viscoelastic membrane in an ultrasound field is performed. The membrane effects of the inplane stress and the bending moment are incorporated into the traction jump condition at the bubble surface. The spherical motion of the bubble is numerically obtained by solving the Rayleigh-Plesset equation with the elastic stress. The deflection therefrom is linearized and expanded with respect to the Legendre polynomial. Two amplitudes for each shape mode are introduced because the membrane has mobility not only in the radial direction but also in the tangential direction. A simple expression for the natural frequency of shape mode is derived. Stability diagrams for the higherorder shape mode are mapped out in the phase space of driving amplitude versus driving frequency. The most unstable driving frequency is found to satisfy an integer multiple relationship with twice of the higher-order natural frequency. This finding is justified by a fact that the system with a boundary layer approximation is simplified into Mathieu's equation. Liquid viscosity plays an important role in the shape stability due to the vorticity generation on the deformed membrane.

  7. Vibrational circular dichroism in general anisotropic thin solid films: measurement and theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Buffeteau, Thierry; Lagugné-Labarthet, François; Sourisseau, Claude

    2005-06-01

    In this study, the measurement of the true vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectrum is considered from an experimental and theoretical approach for any general anisotropic thin solid sample exhibiting linear as well as circular birefringence (LB, CB) and dichroism (LD, CD) properties. For this purpose, we have made use of a simple model alpha-helix polypeptide, namely, the poly(gamma-benzyl-L-glutamate) or PBLG, reference sample possessing a well-known VCD spectrum and giving rise to slightly oriented films by deposition onto a solid substrate. Also, we have used a different Fourier transform infrared modulation of polarization (PM-FTIR) optical setup with two-channel electronic processing in order to record the PM-VLD and PM-VCD spectra for various sample orientations in its film plane. All the corresponding general relations of the expected intensities in these experiments and the related properly designed calibration measurements were established using the Stokes-Mueller formalism; in addition, the residual birefringence of the optical setup and the transmittance anisotropy of the detector were estimated. From a comparative study of the results obtained in solution and in the solid state, we then propose a simple new experimental procedure to extract the true VCD spectrum of an oriented PBLG thin film: its consists of calculating the half-sum of two spectra recorded at theta and at theta +/- 90 degrees sample orientations. Moreover, the complete linear and circular birefringence and dichroism properties of the ordered PBLG thin film are estimated in the amide I and amide II vibrational regions. This allows us to establish for any sample orientation various theoretical simulations of the VCD spectra that agree nicely with the observed experimental results; this confirms that the measurement of LD and LB is in this case a prerequisite in simulating the true VCD spectrum of a partly oriented anisotropic sample. This validates our combined experimental and

  8. Theoretical approaches to the steady-state statistical physics of interacting dissipative units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertin, Eric

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this review is to provide a concise overview of some of the generic approaches that have been developed to deal with the statistical description of large systems of interacting dissipative ‘units’. The latter notion includes, e.g. inelastic grains, active or self-propelled particles, bubbles in a foam, low-dimensional dynamical systems like driven oscillators, or even spatially extended modes like Fourier modes of the velocity field in a fluid. We first review methods based on the statistical properties of a single unit, starting with elementary mean-field approximations, either static or dynamic, that describe a unit embedded in a ‘self-consistent’ environment. We then discuss how this basic mean-field approach can be extended to account for spatial dependences, in the form of space-dependent mean-field Fokker–Planck equations, for example. We also briefly review the use of kinetic theory in the framework of the Boltzmann equation, which is an appropriate description for dilute systems. We then turn to descriptions in terms of the full N-body distribution, starting from exact solutions of one-dimensional models, using a matrix-product ansatz method when correlations are present. Since exactly solvable models are scarce, we also present some approximation methods which can be used to determine the N-body distribution in a large system of dissipative units. These methods include the Edwards approach for dense granular matter and the approximate treatment of multiparticle Langevin equations with colored noise, which models systems of self-propelled particles. Throughout this review, emphasis is put on methodological aspects of the statistical modeling and on formal similarities between different physical problems, rather than on the specific behavior of a given system.

  9. Electrokinetics dependence on water-content: laboratory and field approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allègre, Vincent; Sénéchal, Pascale; Lehmann, François; Bordes, Clarisse; Jouniaux, Laurence; Sailhac, Pascal; Bano, Maksim

    2010-05-01

    Electrokinetics results from the coupling between the water flow and the electrical current through the electrokinetic coefficient. The Self-Potential (SP) method, which is based on this phenomenon, is currently used to investigate shallow transport in the vadose zone. Thus, the understanding of the electrokinetic coefficient behaviour in unsaturated conditions is crucial to interpret such methods. Empirical and theoretical models proposed in the literature to describe this behaviour are still discussed. Consequently, physical processes involved in the electrokinetic coefficient behaviour in unsaturated conditions need to be futher investigate. We propose here to study the electrokinetics dependence on water content through an experimental approach and the numerical solving of the Richards' equation. We show several continuous records of the electrokinetic coefficient as a function of water saturation. We found that the normalized electrokinetic coefficient behaviour in unsaturated conditions is more complex than it was previously proposed. Indeed, we first observed its increasing with decreasing water saturation. After it reaches a maximum, identified around 80 % of water saturation, it begins to decrease with decreasing saturation. It is an important result since previous works predicted a monotically decreasing of the electrokinetic coefficient with decreasing saturation. We found that the normalized value of the measured electrokinetic coefficient could be two orders of magnitude greater than the classical value in saturated conditions, Csat. We performed several experiments and tried to invert the electrokinetic coefficient data and interpret it in terms of physical processes. We also propose a field study through several geophysical methods, as electrical resistivity tomography, seismoelectrics, and GPR, in order to combine the results in terms of water-content dependence in soils.

  10. Elastic field of approaching dislocation loop in isotropic bimaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wenwang; Xia, Re; Xu, Shucai; Qian, Guian; Zhang, Jinhuan

    2015-10-01

    A semi-analytical solution is developed for calculating interface traction stress (ITS) fields due to elastic modulus mismatch across the interface plane of isotropic perfectly bounded bimaterial system. Based on the semi-analytical approaches developed, ITS is used to correct the bulk elastic field of dislocation loop within infinite homogenous medium, and to produce continuous displacement and stress fields across the perfectly-bounded interface. Firstly, calculation examples of dislocation loops in Al-Cu bimaterial system are performed to demonstrate the efficiency of the developed semi-analytical approach; Then, the elastic fields of dislocation loops in twinning Cu and Cu-Nb bimaterial are analyzed; Finally, the effect of modulus mismatch across interface plane on the elastic field of bimaterial system is investigated, it is found that modulus mismatch has a drastic impact on the elastic fields of dislocation loops within bimaterial system.

  11. A Study of the Mean Field Approach to Knapsack Problems.

    PubMed

    Pi, Hong; Ohlsson, Mattias

    1997-03-01

    The mean field theory approach to knapsack problems is extended to multiple knapsacks and generalized assignment problems with Potts mean field equations governing the dynamics. Numerical tests against "state of the art" conventional algorithms shows good performance for the mean field approach. The inherently parallelism of the mean field equations makes them suitable for direct implementations in microchips. It is demonstrated numerically that the performance is essentially not affected when only a limited number of bits is used in the mean field equations. Also, a hybrid algorithm with linear programming and mean field components is showed to further improve the performance for the difficult homogeneous N x M knapsack problem. Copyright 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd. All Rights Reserved.

  12. Approach to non-equilibrium behaviour in quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kripfganz, J.; Perlt, H.

    1989-05-01

    We study the real-time evolution of quantum field theoretic systems in non-equilibrium situations. Results are presented for the example of scalar /lambda//phi//sup 4/ theory. The degrees of freedom are discretized by studying the system on a torus. Short-wavelength modes are integrated out to one-loop order. The long-wavelength modes considered to be the relevant degrees of freedom are treated by semiclassical phase-space methods. /copyright/ 1989 Academic Press, Inc.

  13. A dynamic systems approach to psychotherapy: A meta-theoretical framework for explaining psychotherapy change processes.

    PubMed

    Gelo, Omar Carlo Gioacchino; Salvatore, Sergio

    2016-07-01

    Notwithstanding the many methodological advances made in the field of psychotherapy research, at present a metatheoretical, school-independent framework to explain psychotherapy change processes taking into account their dynamic and complex nature is still lacking. Over the last years, several authors have suggested that a dynamic systems (DS) approach might provide such a framework. In the present paper, we review the main characteristics of a DS approach to psychotherapy. After an overview of the general principles of the DS approach, we describe the extent to which psychotherapy can be considered as a self-organizing open complex system, whose developmental change processes are described in terms of a dialectic dynamics between stability and change over time. Empirical evidence in support of this conceptualization is provided and discussed. Finally, we propose a research design strategy for the empirical investigation of psychotherapy from a DS approach, together with a research case example. We conclude that a DS approach may provide a metatheoretical, school-independent framework allowing us to constructively rethink and enhance the way we conceptualize and empirically investigate psychotherapy. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  14. A theoretical study of the feasibility of acoustical tweezer: Ray acoustics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo; Shung, Kirk

    2005-04-01

    Optical tweezer has been found to have many biomedical applications in trapping macromolecules and cells. For the trapping mechanism, there has to be a sharp spatial change in axial optical intensity and the particle size must be much greater than the wavelength. Similar phenomenon may exist in acoustics. This work was undertaken to demonstrate theoretically that it is possible to acoustically trap particles near the focal point if certain conditions are met. Acoustic force exerted on fat tissue in ultrasonic fields is analyzed in ray acoustics regime where the wavelength of acoustic beam is much smaller than the size of the particle. In this paper, the analysis is therefore based on the field pattern produced by a strongly focused 100 MHz ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian intensity distribution. The magnitude of force and Fresnel coefficients at various positions are calculated. According to the simulation results, acoustical tweezer works particularly when the beam width at focus is one wavelength and the tolerance of acoustic impedance mismatch between two media lies within 6.7%. [Work supported by NIH Grant P41-EB2182.

  15. CALIPERS. Planning the Systems Approach to Field Testing Educational Products.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southwest Educational Development Lab., Austin, TX.

    Field testing, the last step in the developmental cycle for educational products, must ascertain whether the test product, placed in a natural environment, will actually elicit the behavioral changes it was designed to effect. A systems approach to field testing requires that certain basic areas of investigation first be established. Specific…

  16. The Electromagnetic Dipole Radiation Field through the Hamiltonian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likar, A.; Razpet, N.

    2009-01-01

    The dipole radiation from an oscillating charge is treated using the Hamiltonian approach to electrodynamics where the concept of cavity modes plays a central role. We show that the calculation of the radiation field can be obtained in a closed form within this approach by emphasizing the role of coherence between the cavity modes, which is…

  17. The Electromagnetic Dipole Radiation Field through the Hamiltonian Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Likar, A.; Razpet, N.

    2009-01-01

    The dipole radiation from an oscillating charge is treated using the Hamiltonian approach to electrodynamics where the concept of cavity modes plays a central role. We show that the calculation of the radiation field can be obtained in a closed form within this approach by emphasizing the role of coherence between the cavity modes, which is…

  18. Multiscale Modeling of Upper Mantle Plasticity: Integrating Experimental and Theoretical data into Mean-field Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raterron, P.; Castelnau, O.; Detrez, F.; Bollinger, C.; Cordier, P.; Fraysse, G.; Merkel, S.

    2013-12-01

    Quantifying peridotite plastic properties has been a major quest for experimental mineralogy, with direct implications for upper-mantle seismology and geodynamics. It raises, however, serious difficulties such as understanding the complex mechanisms involved within grains and at grain boundaries in multiphase aggregates deforming at high temperature (T), quantifying the effects of extreme pressures (P) on these mechanisms, and addressing stress and strain scaling issues between laboratory experiments and natural deformations. In order to address some of these issues, we developed a multiscale approach which integrates experimental deformation and diffusion data, together with first-principle calculations and theoretical considerations on mineral lattice friction (Peierls stress), within a viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) model for peridotite aggregates. We will present an application of a recently improved second-order (SO) VPSC scheme (e.g., Ponte Castañeda, 2002, J. Mech. Phys. Solids, 50, 737) to an olivine rich + pyroxenes aggregate deformed at geological strain rate along an oceanic geotherm. Beside mineral dislocation slip systems, the SO-model extension accounts for an isotropic relaxation mechanism representing ';diffusion-related' creep in olivine. Slip-system critical resolved shear stresses (CRSS) are evaluated - as functions of P, T, oxygen fugacity and strain rate - from previously reported (e.g., Raterron et al., 2012, PEPI, 200-201, 105) and new experimental data (see Fraysse et al., this session), or from theoretical Peierls stress computations (e.g., Metsue et al, 2010, PCM, 37, 711). The isotropic-mechanism dependence on T and P matches that of Si self-diffusion in olivine, while its relative activity with respect to that of dislocations is constrained by reported data. The model accounts for olivine and pyroxenes known lattice preferred orientations (LPO), as well as for observed sensitivities of aggregate strength to the volume fraction of

  19. GRAIL gravity field determination using the Celestial Mechanics Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Daniel; Bertone, Stefano; Jäggi, Adrian; Beutler, Gerhard; Mervart, Leos

    2015-11-01

    The NASA mission GRAIL (Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory) inherited its concept from the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment) mission to determine the gravity field of the Moon. We present lunar gravity fields based on the data of GRAIL's primary mission phase. Gravity field recovery is realized in the framework of the Celestial Mechanics Approach, using a development version of the Bernese GNSS Software along with Ka-band range-rate data series as observations and the GNI1B positions provided by NASA JPL as pseudo-observations. By comparing our results with the official level-2 GRAIL gravity field models we show that the lunar gravity field can be recovered with a high quality by adapting the Celestial Mechanics Approach, even when using pre-GRAIL gravity field models as a priori fields and when replacing sophisticated models of non-gravitational accelerations by appropriately spaced pseudo-stochastic pulses (i.e., instantaneous velocity changes). We present and evaluate two lunar gravity field solutions up to degree and order 200 - AIUB-GRL200A and AIUB-GRL200B. While the first solution uses no gravity field information beyond degree 200, the second is obtained by using the official GRAIL field GRGM900C up to degree and order 660 as a priori information. This reduces the omission errors and demonstrates the potential quality of our solution if we resolved the gravity field to higher degree.

  20. Game-theoretic approach to joint transmitter adaptation and power control in wireless systems.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Dimitrie C; Rawat, Danda B; Popescu, Otilia; Saquib, Mohamad

    2010-06-01

    Game theory has emerged as a new mathematical tool in the analysis and design of wireless communication systems, being particularly useful in studying the interactions among adaptive transmitters that attempt to achieve specific objectives without cooperation. In this paper, we present a game-theoretic approach to the problem of joint transmitter adaptation and power control in wireless systems, where users' transmissions are subject to quality-of-service requirements specified in terms of target signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratios (SINRs) and nonideal vector channels between transmitters and receivers are explicitly considered. Our approach is based on application of separable games, which are a specific class of noncooperative games where the players' cost is a separable function of their strategic choices. We formally state a joint codeword and power adaptation game, which is separable, and we study its properties in terms of its subgames, namely, the codeword adaptation subgame and the power adaptation subgame. We investigate the necessary conditions for an optimal Nash equilibrium and show that this corresponds to an ensemble of user codewords and powers, which maximizes the sum capacity of the corresponding multiaccess vector channel model, and for which the specified target SINRs are achieved with minimum transmitted power.

  1. An effectiveness analysis of healthcare systems using a systems theoretic approach

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Sheuwen; Inder, Kerry

    2009-01-01

    provides a systematic search for improving the impact of accreditation on quality of care and hence on the accreditation/performance correlation. Conclusion There is clear value in developing a theoretical systems approach to achieving quality in health care. The introduction of the systematic surveyor-based search for improvements creates an adaptive-control system to optimize health care quality. It is hoped that these outcomes will stimulate further research in the development of strategic planning using systems theoretic approach for the improvement of quality in health care. PMID:19852837

  2. Time lagged information theoretic approaches to the reverse engineering of gene regulatory networks

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A number of models and algorithms have been proposed in the past for gene regulatory network (GRN) inference; however, none of them address the effects of the size of time-series microarray expression data in terms of the number of time-points. In this paper, we study this problem by analyzing the behaviour of three algorithms based on information theory and dynamic Bayesian network (DBN) models. These algorithms were implemented on different sizes of data generated by synthetic networks. Experiments show that the inference accuracy of these algorithms reaches a saturation point after a specific data size brought about by a saturation in the pair-wise mutual information (MI) metric; hence there is a theoretical limit on the inference accuracy of information theory based schemes that depends on the number of time points of micro-array data used to infer GRNs. This illustrates the fact that MI might not be the best metric to use for GRN inference algorithms. To circumvent the limitations of the MI metric, we introduce a new method of computing time lags between any pair of genes and present the pair-wise time lagged Mutual Information (TLMI) and time lagged Conditional Mutual Information (TLCMI) metrics. Next we use these new metrics to propose novel GRN inference schemes which provides higher inference accuracy based on the precision and recall parameters. Results It was observed that beyond a certain number of time-points (i.e., a specific size) of micro-array data, the performance of the algorithms measured in terms of the recall-to-precision ratio saturated due to the saturation in the calculated pair-wise MI metric with increasing data size. The proposed algorithms were compared to existing approaches on four different biological networks. The resulting networks were evaluated based on the benchmark precision and recall metrics and the results favour our approach. Conclusions To alleviate the effects of data size on information theory based GRN

  3. Flow field design development using the segmented cell approach

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, G.; Ramsey, J. C.

    2002-01-01

    We report on fuel cell flow-field development employing two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (2-D CFD). Simulation of the flow distribution of a parallel channel flow-field, with a simple one-channel manifold, predicted inhomogeneous performance distribution within the cell. Further modeling, focusing on modification of the inlet and outlet flow fields, was used to predict a more homogeneous flow distribution in the flow-field. Attempts were made to verify the theoretical predictions experimentally by application of the segmented cell system. Measurements of the current distribution and CO transient response supported the 2-D CFD predictions. However, the margin of error between predicted and experimental results was considered insufficient to be of practical use. Future work will involve the evaluation of 3-D CFD to achieve the appropriate level of accuracy.

  4. Theoretical third-order hyperpolarizability of paratellurite from the finite field perturbation method.

    PubMed

    Yahia, Mouna Ben; Orhan, Emmanuelle; Beltrán, Armando; Masson, Olivier; Merle-Méjean, Thérèse; Mirgorodski, Andreï; Thomas, Philippe

    2008-09-04

    Density functional theory was used to estimate the third-order hypersusceptibility chi (3) of the alpha-TeO2 paratellurite (as a model structure for TeO2 glass) and the same value for alpha-SiO2 cristobalite (as a model structure for glassy silica). The attempt was made to gain a physical insight into the nature of the extraordinarily high hypersusceptibility of TeO2 glass. A finite field perturbation method implemented in the CRYSTAL code with the "sawtooth" approach was employed. The chi (3) values calculated for alpha-TeO2 were found to be of the same order as that measured for TeO2 glass and much higher than the values computed for alpha-SiO2 which, in turn, were close to that of glassy silica.

  5. The dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles exposed to non-heating alternating magnetic field in biochemical applications: theoretical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovin, Yuri I.; Gribanovsky, Sergey L.; Golovin, Dmitry Y.; Zhigachev, Alexander O.; Klyachko, Natalia L.; Majouga, Alexander G.; Sokolsky, Marina; Kabanov, Alexander V.

    2017-02-01

    In the past decade, magneto-nanomechanical approach to biochemical systems stimulation has been studied intensively. This method involves macromolecule structure local deformation via mechanical actuation of functionalized magnetic nanoparticles (f-MNPs) by non-heating low frequency (LF) alternating magnetic field (AMF). Specificity at cellular or molecular level and spatial locality in nanometer scale are its key advantages as compared to magnetic fluid hyperthermia. However, current experimental studies have weak theoretical basis. Several models of magneto-nanomechanical actuation of macromolecules and cells in non-heating uniform LF AMF are presented in the article. Single core-shell spherical, rod-like, and Janus MNPs, as well as dimers consisting of two f-MNPs with macromolecules immobilized on their surfaces are considered. AMF-induced rotational oscillations of MNPs can affect properties and functioning of macromolecules or cellular membranes attached to them via periodic deformations in nanometer scale. This could be widely used in therapy, in particular for targeted drug delivery, controlled drug release, and cancer cell killing. An aggregate composed of MNPs can affect associated macromolecules by force up to several hundreds of piconewton in the case of MNPs of tens of nanometers in diameter and LF AMF below 1 T. AMF parameters and MNP design requirements for effective in vitro and in vivo magneto-nanomechanical treatment are presented.

  6. Theoretical Analysis of the Local Field Potential in Deep Brain Stimulation Applications

    PubMed Central

    Lempka, Scott F.; McIntyre, Cameron C.

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a common therapy for treating movement disorders, such as Parkinson’s disease (PD), and provides a unique opportunity to study the neural activity of various subcortical structures in human patients. Local field potential (LFP) recordings are often performed with either intraoperative microelectrodes or DBS leads and reflect oscillatory activity within nuclei of the basal ganglia. These LFP recordings have numerous clinical implications and might someday be used to optimize DBS outcomes in closed-loop systems. However, the origin of the recorded LFP is poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to theoretically analyze LFP recordings within the context of clinical DBS applications. This goal was achieved with a detailed recording model of beta oscillations (∼20 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus. The recording model consisted of finite element models of intraoperative microelectrodes and DBS macroelectrodes implanted in the brain along with multi-compartment cable models of STN projection neurons. Model analysis permitted systematic investigation into a number of variables that can affect the composition of the recorded LFP (e.g. electrode size, electrode impedance, recording configuration, and filtering effects of the brain, electrode-electrolyte interface, and recording electronics). The results of the study suggest that the spatial reach of the LFP can extend several millimeters. Model analysis also showed that variables such as electrode geometry and recording configuration can have a significant effect on LFP amplitude and spatial reach, while the effects of other variables, such as electrode impedance, are often negligible. The results of this study provide insight into the origin of the LFP and identify variables that need to be considered when analyzing LFP recordings in clinical DBS applications. PMID:23555799

  7. Theoretical analysis of the local field potential in deep brain stimulation applications.

    PubMed

    Lempka, Scott F; McIntyre, Cameron C

    2013-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a common therapy for treating movement disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), and provides a unique opportunity to study the neural activity of various subcortical structures in human patients. Local field potential (LFP) recordings are often performed with either intraoperative microelectrodes or DBS leads and reflect oscillatory activity within nuclei of the basal ganglia. These LFP recordings have numerous clinical implications and might someday be used to optimize DBS outcomes in closed-loop systems. However, the origin of the recorded LFP is poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to theoretically analyze LFP recordings within the context of clinical DBS applications. This goal was achieved with a detailed recording model of beta oscillations (∼20 Hz) in the subthalamic nucleus. The recording model consisted of finite element models of intraoperative microelectrodes and DBS macroelectrodes implanted in the brain along with multi-compartment cable models of STN projection neurons. Model analysis permitted systematic investigation into a number of variables that can affect the composition of the recorded LFP (e.g. electrode size, electrode impedance, recording configuration, and filtering effects of the brain, electrode-electrolyte interface, and recording electronics). The results of the study suggest that the spatial reach of the LFP can extend several millimeters. Model analysis also showed that variables such as electrode geometry and recording configuration can have a significant effect on LFP amplitude and spatial reach, while the effects of other variables, such as electrode impedance, are often negligible. The results of this study provide insight into the origin of the LFP and identify variables that need to be considered when analyzing LFP recordings in clinical DBS applications.

  8. Universality of Preferential Flow in Field Soils across Scales: Theoretical Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H.

    2009-12-01

    Preferential flow (PF) is a fundamentally important soil hydrologic process that directly links to hydrological connectivity across scales. Based on three connected theories and extensive published experimental evidence, this paper attempts to justify the universality of PF in natural soils--meaning that PF can potentially occur in any soil anywhere in nature. First, we examine non-equilibrium thermodynamics as applied to the open dissipative system of field soils with continuous energy inputs. This provides a theoretical foundation for explaining the genesis and evolution of ubiquitous structured heterogeneity in soils that leads to widespread potential for PF occurrence. A dual-partitioning of pedogenesis results in ΔSsoil = ΔSmatrix + ΔSstructure, where ΔSmatrix is the entropy change related to dissipative processes and soil matrix formation, while ΔSstructure is the entropy exchange with the surrounding that is associated with organizing processes and soil structure formation. Second, we explore constructal theory to explain universal dual-flow regimes in natural soils--one with high resistivity (Darcy flow) and the other with low resistivity (PF)--together, they form natural PF configuration that provides the least global resistance to flow. While limited chronologic data suggest reduction in subsoil saturated hydraulic conductivity as soil ages, constructal theory appears to partially explain some general characteristics of weathering process. Third, the theory of evolving networks sheds light on diverse flow networks in soils that increase the efficiency or effectiveness of matter or energy transfer in the subsurface, because networks are part of the organization resulting from minimum energy dissipation and far-from-equilibrium thermodynamics. All the three theories discussed support the notion that PF is universal in natural soils.

  9. Multilayer coating for higher accelerating fields in superconducting radio-frequency cavities: a review of theoretical aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubo, Takayuki

    2017-02-01

    The theory of the superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) multilayer structure for application in superconducting accelerating cavities is reviewed. The theoretical field limit, optimum layer thicknesses and material combination, and surface resistance are discussed for the SIS structure and are also reviewed for the superconductor-superconductor bilayer structure.

  10. Schooling's "Contribution" to Contemporary Violent Conflict: Review of Theoretical Ideas and Case Studies in the Field of Education and Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Mitsuko

    2015-01-01

    Some argue that the field of study of "education and conflict" has yet to be solidified since its emergence in the 1990s, partly due to the weak theory base. This article reviews the literature on the "contribution" of schooling in contemporary violent conflict, via three strands of theoretical ideas, to demonstrate the…

  11. Schooling's "Contribution" to Contemporary Violent Conflict: Review of Theoretical Ideas and Case Studies in the Field of Education and Conflict

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsumoto, Mitsuko

    2015-01-01

    Some argue that the field of study of "education and conflict" has yet to be solidified since its emergence in the 1990s, partly due to the weak theory base. This article reviews the literature on the "contribution" of schooling in contemporary violent conflict, via three strands of theoretical ideas, to demonstrate the…

  12. Magnetic Hyperfine Fields in Lu_2V_2O_7: A Model Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agzamova, Polina; Nikiforov, Anatoliy; Nazipov, Dmitriy

    2016-12-01

    We report a theoretical approach to the investigation of the magnetic hyperfine interaction on the ^{51}V nucleus in Lu_2V_2O_7 with the view of understanding the orbital ordering pattern in this compound. First, we have evaluated the vanadium 3d^1-level splitting (Δ ) under the crystal field with the D _{3d}-symmetry using the point charges approximation. Second, we have calculated the exchange interaction constant ( J) using the ab initio approach. It is shown that the crystal field energy is much stronger than the exchange interaction one and hence the orbital liquid state cannot occur in Lu_2V_2O_7. Finally we have analyzed the magnetic hyperfine field affecting the vanadium nucleus leaning upon these results.

  13. Understanding uncertainty in seagrass injury recovery: an information-theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    Uhrin, Amy V; Kenworthy, W Judson; Fonseca, Mark S

    2011-06-01

    Vessel groundings cause severe, persistent gaps in seagrass beds. Varying degrees of natural recovery have been observed for grounding injuries, limiting recovery prediction capabilities, and therefore, management's ability to focus restoration efforts where natural recovery is unlikely. To improve our capacity for predicting seagrass injury recovery, we used an information-theoretic approach to evaluate the relative contribution of specific injury attributes to the natural recovery of 30 seagrass groundings in Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, Florida, USA. Injury recovery was defined by three response variables examined independently: (1) initiation of seagrass colonization, (2) areal contraction, and (3) sediment in-filling. We used a global model and all possible subsets for four predictor variables: (1) injury age, (2) original injury volume, (3) original injury perimeter-to-area ratio, and (4) wave energy. Successional processes were underway for many injuries with fast-growing, opportunistic seagrass species contributing most to colonization. The majority of groundings that exhibited natural seagrass colonization also exhibited areal contraction and sediment in-filling. Injuries demonstrating colonization, contraction, and in-filling were on average older and smaller, and they had larger initial perimeter-to-area ratios. Wave energy was highest for colonizing injuries. The information-theoretic approach was unable to select a single "best" model for any response variable. For colonization and contraction, injury age had the highest relative importance as a predictor variable; wave energy appeared to be associated with second-order effects, such as sediment in-filling, which in turn, facilitated seagrass colonization. For sediment in-filling, volume and perimeter-to-area ratio had similar relative importance as predictor variables with age playing a lesser role than seen for colonization and contraction. Our findings confirm that these injuries

  14. A theoretical study of the feasibility of acoustical tweezers: Ray acoustics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jungwoo; Ha, Kanglyeol; Shung, K. Kirk

    2005-05-01

    The optical tweezer has been found to have many biomedical applications in trapping macromolecules and cells. For the trapping mechanism, there has to be a sharp spatial change in axial optical intensity and the particle size must be much greater than the wavelength. Similar phenomenon may exist in acoustics. This work was undertaken to demonstrate theoretically that it is possible to acoustically trap particles near the focal point where most of the acoustic energy is concentrated if certain conditions are met. Acoustic force exerted on a fluid particle in ultrasonic fields is analyzed in a ray acoustics regime where the wavelength of acoustic beam is much smaller than the size of the particle. In order to apply the acoustical tweezer to manipulating macromolecules and cells whose size is in the order of a few microns or less, a prerequisite is that the ultrasound wavelength has to be much smaller than a few microns. In this paper, the analysis is therefore based on the field pattern produced by a strongly focused 100 MHz ultrasonic transducer with Gaussian intensity distribution. For the realization of acoustic trapping, negative axial radiation force has to be generated to pull a particle towards a focus. The fat particle considered for acoustic trapping in this paper has an acoustic impedance of 1.4 MRayls. The magnitude of the acoustic axial radiation force that has been calculated as the size of the fat particle is varied from 8λ to 14λ. In addition, both Fresnel coefficients at various positions are also calculated to assess the interaction of reflection and refraction and their relative contribution to the effect of the acoustical tweezer. The simulation results show that the feasibility of the acoustical tweezer depends on both the degree of acoustic impedance mismatch and the degree of focusing relative to the particle size. .

  15. A comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoisser, C. M.; Audebert, S.

    2008-05-01

    In order to describe the state-of-the-art on cracked rotor related problems, the current work presents the comprehensive theoretical, numerical and experimental approach adopted by EDF for crack detection in power plant rotating machinery. The work mainly focuses on the theoretical cracked beam model developed in the past years by S. Andrieux and C. Varé and associates both numerical and experimental aspects related to the crack detection problem in either turboset or turbo pump units. The theoretical part consists of the derivation of a lumped cracked beam model from the three-dimensional formulation of the general problem of elasticity with unilateral contact conditions on the crack lips, valid for any shape and number of cracks in the beam section and extended to cracks not located in a cross-section. This leads to the assessment of the cracked beam rigidity as a function of the rotation angle, in case of pure bending load or bending plus shear load. In this way the function can be implemented in a 1D rotordynamics code. An extension of the cracked beam model taking into account the torsion behaviour is also proposed. It is based on the assumption of full adherence between crack lips, when the crack closes, and on an incremental formulation of deformation energy. An experimental validation has been carried out using different cracked samples, both in static and dynamic configurations, considering one or three elliptic cracks in the same cross-section and helix-shaped cracks. Concerning the static configuration, a good agreement between numerical and experimental results is found. It is shown to be equal to 1% maximal gap of the beam deflection. Concerning the dynamical analysis, the main well-known indicator 2× rev. bending vibration component at half critical speed is approximated at maximum by 18% near the crack position. Our experiments also allowed for the observation of the bending and torsion resonance frequency shifts determined by the extra

  16. Development of theoretical oxygen saturation calibration curve based on optical density ratio and optical simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumadi, Nur Anida; Beng, Gan Kok; Ali, Mohd Alauddin Mohd; Zahedi, Edmond; Morsin, Marlia

    2017-09-01

    The implementation of surface-based Monte Carlo simulation technique for oxygen saturation (SaO2) calibration curve estimation is demonstrated in this paper. Generally, the calibration curve is estimated either from the empirical study using animals as the subject of experiment or is derived from mathematical equations. However, the determination of calibration curve using animal is time consuming and requires expertise to conduct the experiment. Alternatively, an optical simulation technique has been used widely in the biomedical optics field due to its capability to exhibit the real tissue behavior. The mathematical relationship between optical density (OD) and optical density ratios (ODR) associated with SaO2 during systole and diastole is used as the basis of obtaining the theoretical calibration curve. The optical properties correspond to systolic and diastolic behaviors were applied to the tissue model to mimic the optical properties of the tissues. Based on the absorbed ray flux at detectors, the OD and ODR were successfully calculated. The simulation results of optical density ratio occurred at every 20 % interval of SaO2 is presented with maximum error of 2.17 % when comparing it with previous numerical simulation technique (MC model). The findings reveal the potential of the proposed method to be used for extended calibration curve study using other wavelength pair.

  17. Two-photon polarization dependent spectroscopy in chirality: a novel experimental-theoretical approach to study optically active systems.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Florencio E; Rizzo, Antonio

    2011-04-18

    Many phenomena, including life itself and its biochemical foundations are fundamentally rooted in chirality. Combinatorial methodologies for catalyst discovery and optimization remain an invaluable tool for gaining access to enantiomerically pure compounds in the development of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, and flavors. Some exotic metamaterials exhibiting negative refractive index at optical frequencies are based on chiral structures. Chiroptical activity is commonly quantified in terms of circular dichroism (CD) and optical rotatory dispersion (ORD). However, the linear nature of these effects limits their application in the far and near-UV region in highly absorbing and scattering biological systems. In order to surmount this barrier, in recent years we made important advancements on a novel non linear, low-scatter, long-wavelength CD approach called two-photon absorption circular dichroism (TPACD). Herein we present a descriptive analysis of the optics principles behind the experimental measurement of TPACD, i.e., the double L-scan technique, and its significance using pulsed lasers. We also make an instructive examination and discuss the reliability of our theoretical-computational approach, which uses modern analytical response theory, within a Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT) approach. In order to illustrate the potential of this novel spectroscopic tool, we first present the experimental and theoretical results obtained in C(2)-symmetric, axially chiral R-(+)-1,1'-bi(2-naphthol), R-BINOL, a molecule studied at the beginning of our investigation in this field. Next, we reveal some preliminary results obtained for (R)-3,3'-diphenyl-2,2'-bi-1-naphthol, R-VANOL, and (R)-2,2'-diphenyl-3,3'-(4-biphenanthrol), R-VAPOL. This family of optically active compounds has been proven to be a suitable model for the structure-property relationship study of TPACD, because its members are highly conjugated yet photo-stable, and easily derivatized at the 5

  18. Network-Based Enriched Gene Subnetwork Identification: A Game-Theoretic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Razi, Abolfazl; Afghah, Fatemeh; Singh, Salendra; Varadan, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Identifying subsets of genes that jointly mediate cancer etiology, progression, or therapy response remains a challenging problem due to the complexity and heterogeneity in cancer biology, a problem further exacerbated by the relatively small number of cancer samples profiled as compared with the sheer number of potential molecular factors involved. Pure data-driven methods that merely rely on multiomics data have been successful in discovering potentially functional genes but suffer from high false-positive rates and tend to report subsets of genes whose biological interrelationships are unclear. Recently, integrative data-driven models have been developed to integrate multiomics data with signaling pathway networks in order to identify pathways associated with clinical or biological phenotypes. However, these approaches suffer from an important drawback of being restricted to previously discovered pathway structures and miss novel genomic interactions as well as potential crosstalk among the pathways. In this article, we propose a novel coalition-based game-theoretic approach to overcome the challenge of identifying biologically relevant gene subnetworks associated with disease phenotypes. The algorithm starts from a set of seed genes and traverses a protein–protein interaction network to identify modulated subnetworks. The optimal set of modulated subnetworks is identified using Shapley value that accounts for both individual and collective utility of the subnetwork of genes. The algorithm is applied to two illustrative applications, including the identification of subnetworks associated with (i) disease progression risk in response to platinum-based therapy in ovarian cancer and (ii) immune infiltration in triple-negative breast cancer. The results demonstrate an improved predictive power of the proposed method when compared with state-of-the-art feature selection methods, with the added advantage of identifying novel potentially functional gene subnetworks

  19. Network-Based Enriched Gene Subnetwork Identification: A Game-Theoretic Approach.

    PubMed

    Razi, Abolfazl; Afghah, Fatemeh; Singh, Salendra; Varadan, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Identifying subsets of genes that jointly mediate cancer etiology, progression, or therapy response remains a challenging problem due to the complexity and heterogeneity in cancer biology, a problem further exacerbated by the relatively small number of cancer samples profiled as compared with the sheer number of potential molecular factors involved. Pure data-driven methods that merely rely on multiomics data have been successful in discovering potentially functional genes but suffer from high false-positive rates and tend to report subsets of genes whose biological interrelationships are unclear. Recently, integrative data-driven models have been developed to integrate multiomics data with signaling pathway networks in order to identify pathways associated with clinical or biological phenotypes. However, these approaches suffer from an important drawback of being restricted to previously discovered pathway structures and miss novel genomic interactions as well as potential crosstalk among the pathways. In this article, we propose a novel coalition-based game-theoretic approach to overcome the challenge of identifying biologically relevant gene subnetworks associated with disease phenotypes. The algorithm starts from a set of seed genes and traverses a protein-protein interaction network to identify modulated subnetworks. The optimal set of modulated subnetworks is identified using Shapley value that accounts for both individual and collective utility of the subnetwork of genes. The algorithm is applied to two illustrative applications, including the identification of subnetworks associated with (i) disease progression risk in response to platinum-based therapy in ovarian cancer and (ii) immune infiltration in triple-negative breast cancer. The results demonstrate an improved predictive power of the proposed method when compared with state-of-the-art feature selection methods, with the added advantage of identifying novel potentially functional gene subnetworks

  20. Theoretical description of the mixed-field orientation of asymmetric-top molecules: A time-dependent study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omiste, Juan J.; González-Férez, Rosario

    2016-12-01

    We present a theoretical study of the mixed-field-orientation of asymmetric-top molecules in tilted static electric field and nonresonant linearly polarized laser pulse by solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. Within this framework, we compute the mixed-field orientation of a state-selected molecular beam of benzonitrile (C7H5N ) and compare with the experimental observations [J. L. Hansen et al., Phys. Rev. A 83, 023406 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.023406] and with our previous time-independent descriptions [J. J. Omiste et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 18815 (2011), 10.1039/c1cp21195a]. For an excited rotational state, we investigate the field-dressed dynamics for several field configurations as those used in the mixed-field experiments. The nonadiabatic phenomena and their consequences on the rotational dynamics are analyzed in detail.

  1. Information theoretic approach using neural network for determining radiometer observations from radar and vice versa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kannan, Srinivasa Ramanujam; Chandrasekar, V.

    2016-05-01

    Even though both the rain measuring instruments, radar and radiometer onboard the TRMM observe the same rain scenes, they both are fundamentally different instruments. Radar is an active instrument and measures backscatter component from vertical rain structure; whereas radiometer is a passive instrument that obtains integrated observation of full depth of the cloud and rain structure. Further, their spatial resolutions on ground are different. Nevertheless, both the instruments are observing the same rain scene and retrieve three dimensional rainfall products. Hence it is only natural to seek answer to the question, what type of information about radiometric observations can be directly retrieved from radar observations. While there are several ways to answer this question, an informational theoretic approach using neural networks has been described in the present work to find if radiometer observations can be predicted from radar observations. A database of TMI brightness temperature and collocated TRMM vertical attenuation corrected reflectivity factor from the year 2012 was considered. The entire database is further classified according to surface type. Separate neural networks were trained for land and ocean and the results are presented.

  2. Theoretical simulations on the antioxidant mechanism of naturally occurring flavonoid: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praveena, R.; Sadasivam, K.

    2016-05-01

    Synthetic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) are found to be toxic, hence non-carcinogenic naturally occurring radical scavengers especially flavonoids have gained considerable importance in the past two decades. In the present investigation, the radical scavenging activity of C-glycosyl flavonoids is evaluated using theoretical approach which could broaden its scope in therapeutic applications. Gas and solvent phase studies of structural and molecular characteristics of C-glycosyl flavonoid, isovitexin is investigated through hydrogen atom transfer mechanism (HAT), Electron transfer-proton transfer (ET-PT) and Sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) by Density functional theory (DFT) using hybrid parameters. The computed values of the adiabatic ionization potential, electron affinity, hardness, softness, electronegativity and electrophilic index indicate that isovitexin possess good radical scavenging activity. The behavior of different -OH groups in polyphenolic compounds is assessed by considering electronic effects of the neighbouring groups and the overall geometry of molecule which in turn helps in analyzing the antioxidant capacity of the polyphenolic molecule. The studies indicate that the H-atom abstraction from 4'-OH site is preferred during the radical scavenging process. From Mulliken spin density analysis and FMOs, B-ring is found to be more delocalized center and capable of electron donation. Comparison of antioxidant activity of vitexin and isovitexin leads to the conclusion that isovitexin acts as a better radical scavenger. This is an evidence for the importance of position of glucose unit in the flavonoid.

  3. Information theoretical approaches to chick-a-dee calls of Carolina chickadees (Poecile carolinensis).

    PubMed

    Freeberg, Todd M; Lucas, Jeffrey R

    2012-02-01

    One aim of this study was to apply information theoretical analyses to understanding the structural complexity of chick-a-dee calls of Carolina chickadees, Poecile carolinensis. A second aim of this study was to compare this structural complexity to that of the calls of black-capped chickadees, P. atricapillus, described in an earlier published report (Hailman, Ficken, & Ficken, 1985). Chick-a-dee calls were recorded from Carolina chickadees in a naturalistic observation study in eastern Tennessee. Calls were analyzed using approaches from information theory, including transition probability matrices, Zipf's rules, entropies, and information coding capacities of calls and notes of calls. As described for black-capped chickadees, calls of Carolina chickadees exhibited considerable structural complexity. Most results suggested that the call of Carolina chickadees is more structurally complex than that of black-capped chickadees. These findings add support to the growing literature on the complexity of this call system in Paridae species. Furthermore, these results point to the feasibility of detailed cross-species comparative analyses that may allow strong testing of hypotheses regarding signal evolution.

  4. Estimation-theoretic approach to delayed decoding of predictively encoded video sequences.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingning; Melkote, Vinay; Rose, Kenneth

    2013-03-01

    Current video coders employ predictive coding with motion compensation to exploit temporal redundancies in the signal. In particular, blocks along a motion trajectory are modeled as an auto-regressive (AR) process, and it is generally assumed that the prediction errors are temporally independent and approximate the innovations of this process. Thus, zero-delay encoding and decoding is considered efficient. This paper is premised on the largely ignored fact that these prediction errors are, in fact, temporally dependent due to quantization effects in the prediction loop. It presents an estimation-theoretic delayed decoding scheme, which exploits information from future frames to improve the reconstruction quality of the current frame. In contrast to the standard decoder that reproduces every block instantaneously once the corresponding quantization indices of residues are available, the proposed delayed decoder efficiently combines all accessible (including any future) information in an appropriately derived probability density function, to obtain the optimal delayed reconstruction per transform coefficient. Experiments demonstrate significant gains over the standard decoder. Requisite information about the source AR model is estimated in a spatio-temporally adaptive manner from a bit-stream conforming to the H.264/AVC standard, i.e., no side information needs to be sent to the decoder in order to employ the proposed approach, thereby compatibility with the standard syntax and existing encoders is retained.

  5. An information-theoretic approach to evaluating the size and temperature dependence of metabolic rate

    PubMed Central

    White, Craig R.; Frappell, Peter B.; Chown, Steven L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of body mass and temperature on metabolic rate (MR) are among the most widely examined physiological relationships. Recently, these relationships have been incorporated into the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) that links the ecology of populations, communities and ecosystems to the MR of individual organisms. The fundamental equation of MTE derives the relation between mass and MR using first principles and predicts the temperature dependence of MR based on biochemical kinetics. It is a deliberately simple, zeroth-order approximation that represents a baseline against which variation in real biological systems can be examined. In the present study, we evaluate the fundamental equation of MTE against other more parameter-rich models for MR using an information-theoretic approach to penalize the inclusion of additional parameters. Using a comparative database of MR measurements for 1359 species, from 11 groups ranging from prokaryotes to mammals, and spanning 16 orders of magnitude in mass and a 59°C range in body temperature, we show that differences between taxa in the mass and temperature dependence of MR are sufficiently large as to be retained in the best model for MR despite the requirement for estimation of 22 more parameters than the fundamental equation of MTE. PMID:22673353

  6. A game theoretic approach to a finite-time disturbance attenuation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, Ihnseok; Speyer, Jason L.

    1991-01-01

    A disturbance attenuation problem over a finite-time interval is considered by a game theoretic approach where the control, restricted to a function of the measurement history, plays against adversaries composed of the process and measurement disturbances, and the initial state. A zero-sum game, formulated as a quadratic cost criterion subject to linear time-varying dynamics and measurements, is solved by a calculus of variation technique. By first maximizing the quadratic cost criterion with respect to the process disturbance and initial state, a full information game between the control and the measurement residual subject to the estimator dynamics results. The resulting solution produces an n-dimensional compensator which expresses the controller as a linear combination of the measurement history. A disturbance attenuation problem is solved based on the results of the game problem. For time-invariant systems it is shown that under certain conditions the time-varying controller becomes time-invariant on the infinite-time interval. The resulting controller satisfies an H(infinity) norm bound.

  7. GTXOP: A Game Theoretic Approach for QoS Provisioning Using Transmission Opportunity Tuning

    PubMed Central

    Ghazvini, Mahdieh; Movahedinia, Naser; Jamshidi, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    In unsupervised contention-based networks such as EDCA mode of IEEE 802.11(e)(s), upon winning the channel, each node gets a transmission opportunity (TXOP) in which the node can transmit multiple frames consequently without releasing the channel. Adjusting TXOP can lead to better bandwidth utilization and QoS provisioning. To improve WLAN throughput performance, EDCA packet bursting can be used in 802.11e, meaning that once a station has gained an EDCA-TXOP, it can be allowed to transmit more than one frame without re-contending for the channel. Following the access to the channel, the station can send multiple frames as long as the total access time does not exceed the TXOP Limit. This mechanism can reduce the network overhead and increase the channel utilization instead. However, packet bursting may cause unfairness in addition to increasing jitter, delay and loss. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, although TXOP tuning has been investigated through different methods, it has not been considered within a game theory framework. In this study, based on the analytical models of EDCA, a game theoretic approach called GTXOP is proposed to determine TXOP dynamically (i.e. according to the dynamisms of WLAN networks and the number of nodes in the network). Using GTXOP, each node can choose its TXOP autonomously, such that in addition to QoS improvement, the overall network performance is also improved. PMID:23650539

  8. A game theoretic approach to a finite-time disturbance attenuation problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhee, Ihnseok; Speyer, Jason L.

    1991-01-01

    A disturbance attenuation problem over a finite-time interval is considered by a game theoretic approach where the control, restricted to a function of the measurement history, plays against adversaries composed of the process and measurement disturbances, and the initial state. A zero-sum game, formulated as a quadratic cost criterion subject to linear time-varying dynamics and measurements, is solved by a calculus of variation technique. By first maximizing the quadratic cost criterion with respect to the process disturbance and initial state, a full information game between the control and the measurement residual subject to the estimator dynamics results. The resulting solution produces an n-dimensional compensator which expresses the controller as a linear combination of the measurement history. A disturbance attenuation problem is solved based on the results of the game problem. For time-invariant systems it is shown that under certain conditions the time-varying controller becomes time-invariant on the infinite-time interval. The resulting controller satisfies an H(infinity) norm bound.

  9. Optimal hemoglobin concentration and high altitude: a theoretical approach for Andean men at rest.

    PubMed

    Villafuerte, Francisco C; Cárdenas, Rosa; Monge-C, Carlos

    2004-05-01

    The beneficial role of erythrocytosis for O2 transport has been questioned by evidence from bloodletting and hemodilution research as well as by studies suggesting the existence of an "optimal" hematocrit (Hct) or hemoglobin concentration ([Hb]) value. To assess to what extent erythrocytosis is beneficial in Andean men at high altitude, we examined and discussed optimal [Hb] using a mathematical approach by modeling the mixed (mean) venous Po2 (Pv(O2)) and arterial O2 content, considering for both the relation between [Hb] and arterial Po2. Relations of [Hb] to other physiological variables such as cardiac output and convective arterial O2 transport were also discussed, revealing the importance of Pv(O2) in this model. Our theoretical analysis suggests that increasing [Hb] allows increase and maintenance of Pv(O2) with only moderate declines in arterial Po2 as a consequence of moderate increases in altitude, reaching its maximum at the optimal [Hb] of 14.7 g/dl. Our analysis also shows that [Hb] corresponding to high arterial O2 content and O2 transport values is apparently not quite advantageous for improvement of oxygenation. Furthermore, chronic mountain sickness is discussed as an insightful example of the effects of excessive erythrocytosis at high altitude.

  10. Force-induced bone growth and adaptation: A system theoretical approach to understanding bone mechanotransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Solvey; Findeisen, Rolf

    2010-06-01

    The modeling, analysis, and design of treatment therapies for bone disorders based on the paradigm of force-induced bone growth and adaptation is a challenging task. Mathematical models provide, in comparison to clinical, medical and biological approaches an structured alternative framework to understand the concurrent effects of the multiple factors involved in bone remodeling. By now, there are few mathematical models describing the appearing complex interactions. However, the resulting models are complex and difficult to analyze, due to the strong nonlinearities appearing in the equations, the wide range of variability of the states, and the uncertainties in parameters. In this work, we focus on analyzing the effects of changes in model structure and parameters/inputs variations on the overall steady state behavior using systems theoretical methods. Based on an briefly reviewed existing model that describes force-induced bone adaptation, the main objective of this work is to analyze the stationary behavior and to identify plausible treatment targets for remodeling related bone disorders. Identifying plausible targets can help in the development of optimal treatments combining both physical activity and drug-medication. Such treatments help to improve/maintain/restore bone strength, which deteriorates under bone disorder conditions, such as estrogen deficiency.

  11. Biodiversity and multifunctionality in a microbial community: a novel theoretical approach to quantify functional redundancy.

    PubMed

    Miki, Takeshi; Yokokawa, Taichi; Matsui, Kazuaki

    2014-02-07

    Ecosystems have a limited buffering capacity of multiple ecosystem functions against biodiversity loss (i.e. low multifunctional redundancy). We developed a novel theoretical approach to evaluate multifunctional redundancy in a microbial community using the microbial genome database (MBGD) for comparative analysis. In order to fully implement functional information, we defined orthologue richness in a community, each of which is a functionally conservative evolutionary unit in genomes, as an index of community multifunctionality (MF). We constructed a graph of expected orthologue richness in a community (MF) as a function of species richness (SR), fit the power function to SR (i.e. MF = cSR(a)), and interpreted the higher exponent a as the lower multifunctional redundancy. Through a microcosm experiment, we confirmed that MF defined by orthologue richness could predict the actual multiple functions. We simulated random and non-random community assemblages using full genomic data of 478 prokaryotic species in the MBGD, and determined that the exponent in microbial communities ranged from 0.55 to 0.75. This exponent range provided a quantitative estimate that a 6.6-8.9% loss limit in SR occurred in a microbial community for an MF reduction no greater than 5%, suggesting a non-negligible initial loss effect of microbial diversity on MF.

  12. A decision-theoretic approach to identifying future high-cost patients.

    PubMed

    Pietz, Kenneth; Byrne, Margaret M; Petersen, Laura A

    2006-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a method of allocating funding for very-high-cost (VHC) patients among hospitals. Diagnostic cost groups (DCGs) were used for risk adjustment. The patient population consisted of 253,013 veterans who used Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical care services in fiscal year (FY) 2003 (October 1, 2002-September 30, 2003) in a network of 8 VA hospitals. We defined VHC as greater than 75,000 dollars (0.81%). The upper fifth percentile was also used for comparison. A Bayesian decision rule for classifying patients as VHC/not VHC using DCGs was developed and evaluated. The method uses FY 2003 DCGs to allocate VHC funds for FY 2004. We also used FY 2002 DCGs to allocate VHC funds for FY 2003 for comparison. The resulting allocation was compared with using the allocation of VHC patients among the hospitals in the previous year. The decision rule identified DCG 17 as the optimal cutoff for identifying VHC patients for the next year. The previous year's allocation came closest to the actual distribution of VHC patients. The decision-theoretic approach may provide insight into the economic consequences of classifying a patient as VHC or not VHC. More research is needed into methods of identifying future VHC patients so that capitation plans can fairly reimburse healthcare systems for appropriately treating these patients.

  13. Theoretical simulations on the antioxidant mechanism of naturally occurring flavonoid: A DFT approach

    SciTech Connect

    Praveena, R.; Sadasivam, K.

    2016-05-06

    Synthetic antioxidants such as butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) are found to be toxic, hence non-carcinogenic naturally occurring radical scavengers especially flavonoids have gained considerable importance in the past two decades. In the present investigation, the radical scavenging activity of C-glycosyl flavonoids is evaluated using theoretical approach which could broaden its scope in therapeutic applications. Gas and solvent phase studies of structural and molecular characteristics of C-glycosyl flavonoid, isovitexin is investigated through hydrogen atom transfer mechanism (HAT), Electron transfer-proton transfer (ET–PT) and Sequential proton loss electron transfer (SPLET) by Density functional theory (DFT) using hybrid parameters. The computed values of the adiabatic ionization potential, electron affinity, hardness, softness, electronegativity and electrophilic index indicate that isovitexin possess good radical scavenging activity. The behavior of different –OH groups in polyphenolic compounds is assessed by considering electronic effects of the neighbouring groups and the overall geometry of molecule which in turn helps in analyzing the antioxidant capacity of the polyphenolic molecule. The studies indicate that the H–atom abstraction from 4’–OH site is preferred during the radical scavenging process. From Mulliken spin density analysis and FMOs, B–ring is found to be more delocalized center and capable of electron donation. Comparison of antioxidant activity of vitexin and isovitexin leads to the conclusion that isovitexin acts as a better radical scavenger. This is an evidence for the importance of position of glucose unit in the flavonoid.

  14. Biodiversity and multifunctionality in a microbial community: a novel theoretical approach to quantify functional redundancy

    PubMed Central

    Miki, Takeshi; Yokokawa, Taichi; Matsui, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Ecosystems have a limited buffering capacity of multiple ecosystem functions against biodiversity loss (i.e. low multifunctional redundancy). We developed a novel theoretical approach to evaluate multifunctional redundancy in a microbial community using the microbial genome database (MBGD) for comparative analysis. In order to fully implement functional information, we defined orthologue richness in a community, each of which is a functionally conservative evolutionary unit in genomes, as an index of community multifunctionality (MF). We constructed a graph of expected orthologue richness in a community (MF) as a function of species richness (SR), fit the power function to SR (i.e. MF = cSRa), and interpreted the higher exponent a as the lower multifunctional redundancy. Through a microcosm experiment, we confirmed that MF defined by orthologue richness could predict the actual multiple functions. We simulated random and non-random community assemblages using full genomic data of 478 prokaryotic species in the MBGD, and determined that the exponent in microbial communities ranged from 0.55 to 0.75. This exponent range provided a quantitative estimate that a 6.6–8.9% loss limit in SR occurred in a microbial community for an MF reduction no greater than 5%, suggesting a non-negligible initial loss effect of microbial diversity on MF. PMID:24352945

  15. An information-theoretic approach to evaluating the size and temperature dependence of metabolic rate.

    PubMed

    White, Craig R; Frappell, Peter B; Chown, Steven L

    2012-09-07

    The effects of body mass and temperature on metabolic rate (MR) are among the most widely examined physiological relationships. Recently, these relationships have been incorporated into the metabolic theory of ecology (MTE) that links the ecology of populations, communities and ecosystems to the MR of individual organisms. The fundamental equation of MTE derives the relation between mass and MR using first principles and predicts the temperature dependence of MR based on biochemical kinetics. It is a deliberately simple, zeroth-order approximation that represents a baseline against which variation in real biological systems can be examined. In the present study, we evaluate the fundamental equation of MTE against other more parameter-rich models for MR using an information-theoretic approach to penalize the inclusion of additional parameters. Using a comparative database of MR measurements for 1359 species, from 11 groups ranging from prokaryotes to mammals, and spanning 16 orders of magnitude in mass and a 59°C range in body temperature, we show that differences between taxa in the mass and temperature dependence of MR are sufficiently large as to be retained in the best model for MR despite the requirement for estimation of 22 more parameters than the fundamental equation of MTE.

  16. Joint Network Selection and Discrete Power Control in Heterogeneous MIMO Networks: A Game Theoretical Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gang; Tian, Hua; Xie, Wei; Zhong, Wei

    2013-09-01

    Next-generation wireless networks will integrate multiple wireless access technologies and the users will access the network using one of several available radio access technologies. In this paper, we study the spectrum access problem in heterogeneous multipleinput multiple-output (MIMO) networks through a game theoretic approach. The spectrum access problem in the considered system model is defined as joint network selection and discrete power control. We formulate the problem as a noncooperative game where the players are the multi-mode terminals and. The proposed common utility function takes both transmission rate and the power consumption into account. This game is shown to be a potential game which possess at least one pure strategy Nash equilibrium (NE) and the optimal strategy profile which maximizes the total energy efficiency of the heterogeneous MIMO network constitutes a pure strategy NE of our proposed game. Furthermore, we prove that the price of anarchy of the proposed game is equal to 1. In order to achieve the pure strategy NE, we design an iterative spectrum access algorithm. The convergence and the complexity of our designed algorithm is discussed. It is shown that the designed algorithm can achieve optimal performance with low complexity.

  17. Fossilization and degradation of intact polar lipids in deep subsurface sediments: A theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schouten, Stefan; Middelburg, Jack J.; Hopmans, Ellen C.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.

    2010-07-01

    Intact polar membrane lipids (IPLs) are frequently used as markers for living microbial cells in sedimentary environments. The assumption with these studies is that IPLs are rapidly degraded upon cell lysis and therefore IPLs present in sediments are derived from in situ microbial production. We used a theoretical approach to assess whether IPLs in surface sediments can potentially represent fossilized IPLs derived from the upper part of the water column and whether IPLs can be preserved during sediment burial. Previous studies which examined the degradation kinetics of IPLs show that phospholipids, i.e. ester-linked lipids with a phosphor-containing head group, degrade more rapidly than glycosidic ether lipids, i.e. ether-linked lipids with a glycosidically bound sugar moiety. Based on these studies, we calculate that only a minor fraction of phospholipids but a major fraction of glycosidic ether lipids biosynthesized in the upper part of the water column can potentially reach deep-sea surface sediments. Using a simple model and power law kinetic degradation parameters reported in the literature, we also evaluated the degradation of IPLs during sediment burial. Our model predicts a log-log relationship between IPL concentrations and depth, consistent with what has been observed in studies of IPLs in subsurface sediments. Although our results do not exclude production of IPLs in subsurface sediment, they do suggest that IPLs present in the deep biosphere may contain a substantial fossil component potentially masking in situ IPL production.

  18. Control of industrial exposure to tetrachloroethylene by measuring alveolar concentrations: theoretical approach using a mathematical model

    PubMed Central

    Guberan, E.; Fernandez, J.

    1974-01-01

    Guberan, E. and Fernandez, J. (1974).British Journal of Industrial Medicine,31, 159-167. Control of industrial exposure to tetrachloroethylene by measuring alveolar concentrations: theoretical approach using a mathematical model. The uptake, distribution, and elimination of tetrachloroethylene were studied using a mathematical model, and predicted alveolar concentrations were compared with experimental data. Because of its high fat solubility the solvent accumulated in adipose tissue with a predicted biological half-life of 71·5 hours. The relation between the alveolar concentrations and the level or duration of exposure was discussed. The alveolar concentrations of tetrachloroethylene during and after similar exposure were predicted in subjects who differed in age, body weight, height, and body fat content, both at rest and during physical effort. Predictions were made of the alveolar concentrations following exposures to steady and variable concentrations in ambient air, and following exposures of several weeks of the type occuring in industry. It was concluded that measurement of the postexposure alveolar concentrations could be used to estimate the mean exposure to tetrachloroethylene in most industrial situations. PMID:4830767

  19. Combination of real options and game-theoretic approach in investment analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arasteh, Abdollah

    2016-02-01

    Investments in technology create a large amount of capital investments by major companies. Assessing such investment projects is identified as critical to the efficient assignment of resources. Viewing investment projects as real options, this paper expands a method for assessing technology investment decisions in the linkage existence of uncertainty and competition. It combines the game-theoretic models of strategic market interactions with a real options approach. Several key characteristics underlie the model. First, our study shows how investment strategies rely on competitive interactions. Under the force of competition, firms hurry to exercise their options early. The resulting "hurry equilibrium" destroys the option value of waiting and involves violent investment behavior. Second, we get best investment policies and critical investment entrances. This suggests that integrating will be unavoidable in some information product markets. The model creates some new intuitions into the forces that shape market behavior as noticed in the information technology industry. It can be used to specify best investment policies for technology innovations and adoptions, multistage R&D, and investment projects in information technology.

  20. Strategic exploration of battery waste management: A game-theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    Kaushal, Rajendra Kumar; Nema, Arvind K; Chaudhary, Jyoti

    2015-07-01

    Electronic waste or e-waste is the fastest growing stream of solid waste today. It contains both toxic substances as well as valuable resources. The present study uses a non-cooperative game-theoretic approach for efficient management of e-waste, particularly batteries that contribute a major portion of any e-waste stream and further analyses the economic consequences of recycling of these obsolete, discarded batteries. Results suggest that the recycler would prefer to collect the obsolete batteries directly from the consumer rather than from the manufacturer, only if, the incentive return to the consumer is less than 33.92% of the price of the battery, the recycling fee is less than 6.46% of the price of the battery, and the price of the recycled material is more than 31.08% of the price of the battery. The manufacturer's preferred choice of charging a green tax from the consumer can be fruitful for the battery recycling chain.

  1. Perspectives on Cybersecurity Information Sharing among Multiple Stakeholders Using a Decision-Theoretic Approach.

    PubMed

    He, Meilin; Devine, Laura; Zhuang, Jun

    2017-08-11

    The government, private sectors, and others users of the Internet are increasingly faced with the risk of cyber incidents. Damage to computer systems and theft of sensitive data caused by cyber attacks have the potential to result in lasting harm to entities under attack, or to society as a whole. The effects of cyber attacks are not always obvious, and detecting them is not a simple proposition. As the U.S. federal government believes that information sharing on cybersecurity issues among organizations is essential to safety, security, and resilience, the importance of trusted information exchange has been emphasized to support public and private decision making by encouraging the creation of the Information Sharing and Analysis Center (ISAC). Through a decision-theoretic approach, this article provides new perspectives on ISAC, and the advent of the new Information Sharing and Analysis Organizations (ISAOs), which are intended to provide similar benefits to organizations that cannot fit easily into the ISAC structure. To help understand the processes of information sharing against cyber threats, this article illustrates 15 representative information sharing structures between ISAC, government, and other participating entities, and provide discussions on the strategic interactions between different stakeholders. This article also identifies the costs of information sharing and information security borne by different parties in this public-private partnership both before and after cyber attacks, as well as the two main benefits. This article provides perspectives on the mechanism of information sharing and some detailed cost-benefit analysis. © 2017 Society for Risk Analysis.

  2. Field-dependence, extraversion and perception of the vertical: empirical and theoretical perspectives of the rod-and-frame test.

    PubMed

    Fine, B J; Danforth, A V

    1975-06-01

    Using conventional scoring procedures for the Rod-and-frame Test (RFT), extraversion was shown to interact with field-dependence (defined by scores on the Hidden-shapes Test), with the field dependent extraverts being most inaccurate performers on the rod and frame. Of greater importance, serious questions were raised about theoretical and empirical aspects of the relationship between paper-and-pencil measures of field-dependence and performance on the rod and frame, and it was concluded that "what has...been demonstrated over the past ten years is the reliability of a relationship of questionable validity."

  3. Theoretical and Experimental Investigation of the Subsonic-Flow Fields Beneath Swept and Unswept Wings with Tables or Vortex-induced Velocities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alford, William J , Jr

    1957-01-01

    The flow-field characteristics beneath swept and unswept wings as determined by potential-flow theory are compared with the experimentally determined flow fields beneath swept and unswept wing-fuselage combinations. The potential-flow theory utilized considered both spanwise and chordwise distributions of vorticity as well as the wing-thickness effects. The perturbation velocities induced by a unit horseshoe vortex are included in tabular form. The theoretical predictions of the flow-field characteristics were qualitatively correct in all cases considered, although there were indications that the magnitudes of the downwash angles tended to be overpredicted as the tip of the swept wing was approached and that the sidewash angles ahead of the unswept wing were underpredicted. The calculated effects of compressibility indicated that significant increases in the chordwise variation of flow angles and dynamic-pressure ratios should be expected in going from low to high subsonic speeds.

  4. Energy partitioning during incubation and consequences for embryo temperature: a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Lourens, A; Meijerhof, R; Kemp, B; van den Brand, H

    2011-02-01

    In practice, many hatchability and chick quality problems have been related to the control of embryo temperature (ET) during incubation. Within an incubator, set at a constant machine temperature (MT), ET can vary substantially. Embryo temperature is the result of the balance between heat transfer to and from the embryo and heat production (HP) of the embryo. We investigated which factors theoretically could account for the variation in ET within an incubator. First, the effects egg weight, MT, and oxygen availability on HP of embryos were quantified. Differences in HP could be due only to differences in the amount of energy utilized from the egg or to differences in the efficiency of the conversion of energy in the egg to energy in the chicken, indicated as E(YFB). Results of these analyses showed that differences in HP attributable to egg weight or oxygen availability were mainly a result of the amount of energy used from the egg constituents and not of a change in E(YFB). However, at a given MT, this variation in HP could account for a maximum increase in ET of only 1.21°C, suggesting that other factors played a role because in practice within an incubator, larger differences in ET have been found. The most important factor was probably the difference in air velocity within an incubator, resulting in differences in heat transfer. Because of this variation, ET varied within an incubator and with increasing ET, E(YFB) decreased, resulting in an even higher HP and consequently ET. We concluded that this theoretical approach could explain the wide variation in ET, and consequently could explain the negative effects of high ET on hatchability and chick quality found in the literature. This indicates that, in both practice and in incubation experiments, it is of great importance to realize that any factor affecting HP or heat transfer influences ET. We strongly suggest that ET (or eggshell temperature) be controlled in any incubation experiment involving hatchability

  5. Subjective evaluation and electroacoustic theoretical validation of a new approach to audio upmixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, John S.

    Audio signal processing systems for converting two-channel (stereo) recordings to four or five channels are increasingly relevant. These audio upmixers can be used with conventional stereo sound recordings and reproduced with multichannel home theatre or automotive loudspeaker audio systems to create a more engaging and natural-sounding listening experience. This dissertation discusses existing approaches to audio upmixing for recordings of musical performances and presents specific design criteria for a system to enhance spatial sound quality. A new upmixing system is proposed and evaluated according to these criteria and a theoretical model for its behavior is validated using empirical measurements. The new system removes short-term correlated components from two electronic audio signals using a pair of adaptive filters, updated according to a frequency domain implementation of the normalized-least-means-square algorithm. The major difference of the new system with all extant audio upmixers is that unsupervised time-alignment of the input signals (typically, by up to +/-10 ms) as a function of frequency (typically, using a 1024-band equalizer) is accomplished due to the non-minimum phase adaptive filter. Two new signals are created from the weighted difference of the inputs, and are then radiated with two loudspeakers behind the listener. According to the consensus in the literature on the effect of interaural correlation on auditory image formation, the self-orthogonalizing properties of the algorithm ensure minimal distortion of the frontal source imagery and natural-sounding, enveloping reverberance (ambiance) imagery. Performance evaluation of the new upmix system was accomplished in two ways: Firstly, using empirical electroacoustic measurements which validate a theoretical model of the system; and secondly, with formal listening tests which investigated auditory spatial imagery with a graphical mapping tool and a preference experiment. Both electroacoustic

  6. GRACE gravity field recovery using refined acceleration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhao; van Dam, Tonie; Weigelt, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    Since 2002, the GRACE mission has yielded monthly gravity field solutions with such a high level of quality that we have been able to observe so many changes to the Earth mass system. Based on GRACE L1B observations, a number of official monthly gravity field models have been developed and published using different methods, e.g. the CSR RL05, JPL RL05, and GFZ RL05 are being computed by a dynamic approach, the ITSG and Tongji GRACE are generated using what is known as the short-arc approach, the AIUB models are computed using celestial mechanics approach, and the DMT-1 model is calculated by means of an acceleration approach. Different from the DMT-1 model, which links the gravity field parameters directly to the bias-corrected range measurements at three adjacent epochs, in this work we present an alternative acceleration approach which connects range accelerations and velocity differences to the gradient of the gravitational potential. Due to the fact that GPS derived velocity difference is provided at a lower precision, we must reduce this approach to residual quantities using an a priori gravity field which allows us to subsequently neglect the residual velocity difference term. We find that this assumption would cause a problem in the low-degree gravity field coefficient, particularly for degree 2 and also from degree 16 to 26. To solve this problem, we present a new way of handling the residual velocity difference term, that is to treat this residual velocity difference term as unknown but estimable quantity, as it depends on the unknown residual gravity field parameters and initial conditions. In other word, we regard the kinematic orbit position vectors as pseudo observations, and the corrections of orbits are estimated together with both the geopotential coefficients and the accelerometer scale/bias by using a weighted least square adjustment. The new approach is therefore a refinement of the existing approach but offers a better approximation to reality

  7. Cognitive Learning Style: A Review of the Field Dependent-Field Independent Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pithers, R. T.

    2002-01-01

    Cumulative research evidence on field dependence-field independence suggests that matching teacher and learner cognitive styles has limits, but can be used to identify varied teaching methods. Both learners and teachers should develop a flexible approach to cognitive style attitudes and behavior. (Contains 41 references.) (SK)

  8. Spherical wave decompostion approach to ultrasonic field calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Griffice, C.P.; Seydel, J.A.

    1981-12-01

    A simple, flexible, accurate, and comprehensive numerical method is presented for theoretically analyzing the diffraction field of a continuous wave transducer of arbitrary size, shape, and frequency. Using the extensively studied circular transducer for comparison, numerical results are shown for an unfocused transducer with uniform velocity excitation as well as for a focused transducer with Gaussian velocity excitation. Data concerning the execution time, program size, and convergence of the method are also presented for its implementation as a design tool on a minicomputer system.

  9. Sexuality Education for Young People: A Theoretically Integrated Approach from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Juliette D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Teachers of sexuality education can often be uncertain about what theoretical basis and pedagogical strategies to use in their teaching. Sexuality educational programmes designed by teachers can often show few evident theoretical principles that have been applied in its construction. Thus, there seems to be a dearth of evidence of ways…

  10. Sexuality Education for Young People: A Theoretically Integrated Approach from Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Juliette D. G.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Teachers of sexuality education can often be uncertain about what theoretical basis and pedagogical strategies to use in their teaching. Sexuality educational programmes designed by teachers can often show few evident theoretical principles that have been applied in its construction. Thus, there seems to be a dearth of evidence of ways…

  11. The theoretical, discrete, and actual response of the Barnes objective analysis scheme for one- and two-dimensional fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauley, Patricia M.; Wu, Xiaohua

    1990-01-01

    The response of the Barnes objective analysis scheme is studied as a function of wavenumber or wavelength. The first- and second-pass theoretical response functions for continuous two-dimensional fields are derived using Fourier transforms. The results are compared with Barnes' (1973) responses for one-dimensional waves. The continuous theoretical response for one- and two-dimensional waves is compared with the response for discrete applications using uniformly spaced observations for the case where interpolation points and observation points are coincident and for the case where interpolation points are midway between observation points. The actual response of an idealized discrete application of the Barnes scheme is examined, confirming the results of the analysis of the discrete theoretical response.

  12. The turbulent recirculating flow field in a coreless induction furnace. A comparison of theoretical predictions with measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    A mathematical representation for the electromagnetic force field and the fluid flow field in a coreless induction furnace is presented. The fluid flow field was represented by writing the axisymmetric turbulent Navier-Stokes equation, containing the electromagnetic body force term. The electromagnetic body force field was calculated by using a technique of mutual inductances. The kappa-epsilon model was employed for evaluating the turbulent viscosity and the resultant differential equations were solved numerically. Theoretically predicted velocity fields are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental measurements reported by Hunt and Moore; furthermore, the agreement regarding the turbulent intensities are essentially quantitative. These results indicate that the kappa-epsilon model provides a good engineering representation of the turbulent recirculating flows occurring in induction furnaces. At this stage it is not clear whether the discrepancies between measurements and the predictions, which were not very great in any case, are attributable either to the model or to the measurement techniques employed.

  13. The turbulent recirculating flow field in a coreless induction furnace. A comparison of theoretical predictions with measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Kaddah, N.; Szekely, J.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical representation for the electromagnetic force field and the fluid flow field in a coreless induction furnace is presented. The fluid flow field was represented by writing the axisymmetric turbulent Navier-Stokes equation, containing the electromagnetic body force term. The electromagnetic body force field was calculated by using a technique of mutual inductances. The kappa-epsilon model was employed for evaluating the turbulent viscosity and the resultant differential equations were solved numerically. Theoretically predicted velocity fields are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental measurements reported by Hunt and Moore; furthermore, the agreement regarding the turbulent intensities are essentially quantitative. These results indicate that the kappa-epsilon model provides a good engineering representation of the turbulent recirculating flows occurring in induction furnaces. At this stage it is not clear whether the discrepancies between measurements and the predictions, which were not very great in any case, are attributable either to the model or to the measurement techniques employed.

  14. Magnetic field signatures near Galileo's closest approach to Gaspra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kivelson, M. G.; Bargatze, L. F.; Khurana, K. K.; Southwood, D. J.; Walker, R. J.; Coleman, P. J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Two large magnetic field rotations were recorded by the spacecraft Galileo 1 minute before and 2 minutes after its closest approach to the asteroid Gaspra. The timing and the geometry of the field changes suggest a connection with Gaspra, and the events can be interpreted as the result of the draping of the solar wind field around a magnetospheric obstacle. Gaspra's surface field is inferred to be within an order of magnitude of Earth's surface field, and its magnetic moment per unit mass is in the range observed for iron meteorites and highly magnetized chondrites. The location of the magnetic signatures suggests that perturbations are carried by waves in the magnetosonic-whistler mode with wavelengths between electron and ion gyro radii.

  15. Game-theoretic approach for improving cooperation in wireless multihop networks.

    PubMed

    Ng, See-Kee; Seah, Winston K G

    2010-06-01

    Traditional networks are built on the assumption that network entities cooperate based on a mandatory network communication semantic to achieve desirable qualities such as efficiency and scalability. Over the years, this assumption has been eroded by the emergence of users that alter network behavior in a way to benefit themselves at the expense of others. At one extreme, a malicious user/node may eavesdrop on sensitive data or deliberately inject packets into the network to disrupt network operations. The solution to this generally lies in encryption and authentication. In contrast, a rational node acts only to achieve an outcome that he desires most. In such a case, cooperation is still achievable if the outcome is to the best interest of the node. The node misbehavior problem would be more pronounced in multihop wireless networks like mobile ad hoc and sensor networks, which are typically made up of wireless battery-powered devices that must cooperate to forward packets for one another. However, cooperation may be hard to maintain as it consumes scarce resources such as bandwidth, computational power, and battery power. This paper applies game theory to achieve collusive networking behavior in such network environments. In this paper, pricing, promiscuous listening, and mass punishments are avoided altogether. Our model builds on recent work in the field of Economics on the theory of imperfect private monitoring for the dynamic Bertrand oligopoly, and adapts it to the wireless multihop network. The model derives conditions for collusive packet forwarding, truthful routing broadcasts, and packet acknowledgments under a lossy wireless multihop environment, thus capturing many important characteristics of the network layer and link layer in one integrated analysis that has not been achieved previously. We also provide a proof of the viability of the model under a theoretical wireless environment. Finally, we show how the model can be applied to design a generic

  16. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF MULTI-SPECIES TRANSPORT IN SOILS UNDER ELECTRIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project investigated an innovative approach for transport of inorganic species under the influence of electric fields. This process, commonly known as electrokinetics uses low-level direct current (dc) electrical potential difference across a soil mass applied through inert...

  17. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY: THEORETICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MODELING OF MULTI-SPECIES TRANSPORT IN SOILS UNDER ELECTRIC FIELDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project investigated an innovative approach for transport of inorganic species under the influence of electric fields. This process, commonly known as electrokinetics uses low-level direct current (dc) electrical potential difference across a soil mass applied through inert...

  18. TIME3D-IGGCAS: A New Three-Dimension Theoretical Ionospheric Model in realistic geomagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Zhipeng; Liu, Libo; Huijun Le, lake709.; Wan, Weixing

    Based on the previous work, a new global three-dimension theoretical ionospheric model in realistic geomagnetic fields is developed, named Three-Dimension Theoretical Ionospheric Model of the Earth in the Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (TIME3D-IGGCAS). This new model covers the whole ionosphere and plasmasphere. It self-consistently solves the equations of mass continuity, motion and energy of electron and ions to give out the time-dependent three-dimensional structures of the main ionospheric and plasmaspheric parameters in realistic geomagnetic fields, including ion number densities of O+, H+, He+, NO+, O2+ , N2+ and electron; electron and ion temperature; and ion velocity vectors. TIME3D-IGGCAS can also self-consistently run as the module of ionosphere-plasmasphere of GCITEM-IGGCAS (Global Coupled Ionosphere-Thermosphere-Electrodynamics Model developed at Institute of Geology and Geophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences). We carry out simulations in March Equinox and in June Solstice, and compare the simulated results with that from IRI empirical model. TIME3D-IGGCAS can well reproduce the main ionospheric features in all simulations. We also simulate the ionospheric differences between different kinds of geomagnetic fields. The results suggest that the geomagnetic field configuration obviously affect the ionospheric plasma density, and the differences between NmF2 in realistic geomagnetic fields and that in tilted dipole fields can be larger than 60%.

  19. Volumetric response of vertebrate hepatocytes challenged by osmotic gradients: a theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Espelt, M V; Alleva, K; Amodeo, G; Krumschnabel, G; Rossi, R C; Schwarzbaum, P J

    2008-05-01

    In this study we use a theoretical approach to study the volumetric response of goldfish hepatocytes challenged by osmotic gradients and compared it with that of hepatocytes from another teleost (the trout) and a mammal (the rat). Particular focus was given to the multiple non-linear interactions of transport systems enabling hypotonically challenged cells to trigger a compensatory response known as volume regulatory decrease or RVD. For this purpose we employed a mathematical model which describes the rates of change of the intracellular concentrations of main diffusible ions, of the cell volume, and of the membrane potential. The model was fitted to experimental data on the kinetics of volume change of hepatocytes challenged by anisotonic media. In trout and rat hepatocytes, experimental results had shown that hypotonic cell swelling was followed by RVD, whereas goldfish cells swelled with no concomitant RVD (M.V. Espelt et al., 2003, J. Exp. Biol. 206, 513-522). A comparison between data predicted by the model and that obtained experimentally suggests that in trout and rat hepatocytes hypotonicity activates a sensor element and this, in turn, activates an otherwise silent efflux of KCl - whose kinetics could be successfully predicted - thereby leading to volume down-regulation. In contrast, with regard to the absence of RVD in goldfish hepatocytes the model proposed suggests that either a sensor element triggering RVD is absent or that the effector mechanism (the loss of KCl) remains inactive under the conditions employed. In line with this, we recently found that extracellular nucleotides may be required to induce RVD in these cells, indicating that our model could indeed lead to useful predictions.

  20. A Graph Theoretic Approach for Hydraulic Fracturing and Wellbore Leakage Risk Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glosser, D.; Rose, K.; Bauer, J. R.; Warner, T.

    2016-12-01

    Recent large scale development of unconventional formations for fossil energy has raised concerns over the potential for fluid leakage between subsurface systems and wellbores. This is particularly true in regions with extensive drilling history, where spatial densities of wellbores are higher, and where significant uncertainties in the location and mechanical integrity of such wellbores exist. The generation of induced fracture networks during hydraulic fracturing may increase subsurface connectivity, and create the potential for unwanted fluid migration between operational and legacy wellbores and subsurface fracture networks. We present a graph theoretic approach for identifying geospatial regions and wellbores at increased risk for subsurface connectivity based on wellbore proximity and local geologic characteristics. The algorithm transforms user inputted geospatial data (geologic and wellbore x,y,z) to graph structure, where wellbores are represented as nodes, and where potential overlapping fracture network zones are represented as edges. The algorithm can be used to complement existing fracture models to better account for the reach of induced fractures, and to identify spatial extents at increased risk for unwanted subsurface connectivity. Additionally, the model can be used to identify regions in need of geophysical detection methods for locating undocumented wells. As a result, the method can be part of a cumulative strategy to reduce uncertainty inherent to combined geologic and engineered systems. The algorithm has been successfully tested against a known leakage scenario in Pennsylvania. In addition to identifying wells associated with the leakage event, the algorithm identified two other higher risk networks in the region. The algorithm output provides valuable information for industry to develop environmentally safe drilling and injection plans; and for regulators to identify specific wellbores at greater risk for leakage, and to develop targeted

  1. A spectral graph theoretic approach to quantification and calibration of collective morphological differences in cell images

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yu-Shi; Lin, Chung-Chih; Tsai, Yuh-Show; Ku, Tien-Chuan; Huang, Yi-Hung; Hsu, Chun-Nan

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: High-throughput image-based assay technologies can rapidly produce a large number of cell images for drug screening, but data analysis is still a major bottleneck that limits their utility. Quantifying a wide variety of morphological differences observed in cell images under different drug influences is still a challenging task because the result can be highly sensitive to sampling and noise. Results: We propose a graph-based approach to cell image analysis. We define graph transition energy to quantify morphological differences between image sets. A spectral graph theoretic regularization is applied to transform the feature space based on training examples of extremely different images to calibrate the quantification. Calibration is essential for a practical quantification method because we need to measure the confidence of the quantification. We applied our method to quantify the degree of partial fragmentation of mitochondria in collections of fluorescent cell images. We show that with transformation, the quantification can be more accurate and sensitive than that without transformation. We also show that our method outperforms competing methods, including neighbourhood component analysis and the multi-variate drug profiling method by Loo et al. We illustrate its utility with a study of Annonaceous acetogenins, a family of compounds with drug potential. Our result reveals that squamocin induces more fragmented mitochondria than muricin A. Availability: Mitochondrial cell images, their corresponding feature sets (SSLF and WSLF) and the source code of our proposed method are available at http://aiia.iis.sinica.edu.tw/. Contact: chunnan@iis.sinica.edu.tw Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20529919

  2. Intraocular lens power calculation after intrastromal femtosecond laser treatment for presbyopia: Theoretic approach.

    PubMed

    Rabsilber, Tanja M; Haigis, Wolfgang; Auffarth, Gerd U; Mannsfeld, Annett; Ehmer, Angela; Holzer, Mike P

    2011-03-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of intraocular lens (IOL) power calculation after an intrastromal femtosecond laser procedure to treat presbyopia using a theoretic approach. International Vision Correction Research Centre, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany. Nonrandomized clinical trial. Preoperatively and 12 months after intrastromal femtosecond laser treatment (IntraCor) of presbyopia, biometry was performed by partial coherence interferometry (PCI) (IOLMaster). The postoperative keratometry (K) values and IOL power calculation formulas (Holladay I, Haigis, SRK/T, Hoffer Q) were compared with results derived from the clinical history method, taking the manifest refraction change into account. The study enrolled 25 patients (median age 54 years). Three eyes were excluded for age-related lens changes. The median spherical equivalent change in the other 22 eyes was -0.38 diopter (D). The median difference in K values between the clinical history method and PCI was -0.21 D, resulting in a median IOL power difference between -0.23 D (SRK/T) and -0.29 D (Haigis) (range -1.58 to +1.00 D). The IOL power was underestimated in 59.1% of cases with the Hoffer Q and 63.6% of cases with the Holladay I, Haigis, and SRK/T. There was a difference of ±0.75 D in 72.7% of eyes using the Holladay I, Haigis, and Hoffer Q and in 86.4% of eyes using the SRK/T. Neither K values nor IOL power differences were statistically significant (P > .17). Intraocular lens power calculation using modern standard formulas incorporated in a PCI biometry device after intrastromal femtosecond presbyopia treatment was reliable, with minimum underestimation on average. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Question 9: Theoretical and Artificial Construction of the Living: Redefining the Approach from an Autopoietic Point of View

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bich, Leonardo; Damiano, Luisa

    2007-10-01

    In this article, we would like to discuss some aspects of a theoretical framework for Artificial Life, focusing on the problem of an explicit definition of living systems useful for an effective artificial construction of them. The limits of a descriptive approach will be critically discussed, and a constructive (synthetic) approach will be proposed on the basis of the autopoietic theory of Maturana and Varela.

  4. Theoretical Approaches to the Study of Career Mobility: Applications to Administrative Career Mobility in Colleges and Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Twombly, Susan B.

    Major theoretical approaches to the study of career mobility were reviewed, with particular emphasis on those that focus on the organizational-structural level of analysis, on careers as structures of organizations. In particular, internal labor market theory was explored as a framework through which to study administrative careers in colleges and…

  5. The effective field theorist's approach to gravitational dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porto, Rafael A.

    2016-05-01

    We review the effective field theory (EFT) approach to gravitational dynamics. We focus on extended objects in long-wavelength backgrounds and gravitational wave emission from spinning binary systems. We conclude with an introduction to EFT methods for the study of cosmological large scale structures.

  6. An algorithmic and information-theoretic approach to multimetric index construction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Grace, James B.; Schweiger, E. William; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Mitchell, Brian R.; Miller, Kathryn M.; Little, Amanda M.

    2013-01-01

    The use of multimetric indices (MMIs), such as the widely used index of biological integrity (IBI), to measure, track, summarize and infer the overall impact of human disturbance on biological communities has been steadily growing in recent years. Initially, MMIs were developed for aquatic communities using pre-selected biological metrics as indicators of system integrity. As interest in these bioassessment tools has grown, so have the types of biological systems to which they are applied. For many ecosystem types the appropriate biological metrics to use as measures of biological integrity are not known a priori. As a result, a variety of ad hoc protocols for selecting metrics empirically has developed. However, the assumptions made by proposed protocols have not be explicitly described or justified, causing many investigators to call for a clear, repeatable methodology for developing empirically derived metrics and indices that can be applied to any biological system. An issue of particular importance that has not been sufficiently addressed is the way that individual metrics combine to produce an MMI that is a sensitive composite indicator of human disturbance. In this paper, we present and demonstrate an algorithm for constructing MMIs given a set of candidate metrics and a measure of human disturbance. The algorithm uses each metric to inform a candidate MMI, and then uses information-theoretic principles to select MMIs that capture the information in the multidimensional system response from among possible MMIs. Such an approach can be used to create purely empirical (data-based) MMIs or can, optionally, be influenced by expert opinion or biological theory through the use of a weighting vector to create value-weighted MMIs. We demonstrate the algorithm with simulated data to demonstrate the predictive capacity of the final MMIs and with real data from wetlands from Acadia and Rocky Mountain National Parks. For the Acadia wetland data, the algorithm identified

  7. Curriculum, Curriculum Development, Curriculum Studies? Problematising Theoretical Ambiguities in Doctoral Theses in the Education Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    du Preez, Petro; Simmonds, Shan

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical ambiguities in curriculum studies result in conceptual mayhem. Accordingly, they hinder the development of the complicated conversation on curriculum as a verb. This article aims to contribute to reconceptualizing curriculum studies as a dynamic social practice that aspires to thinking and acting with intelligences and sensitivity so…

  8. Rock Abrasion and Ventifact Formation on Mars from Field Analog, Theoretical, and Experimental Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Laity, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    rocks on Mars should erode at a rate of 7.7 to 210 micrometers/yr. These rates cannot have operated over the entire history of the Pathfinder site or elsewhere on Mars, because craters, knobs, and other obstacles would be quickly worn away. More likely, rock abrasion occurs over short time periods when sand supplies are sufficient and saltation friction speeds are frequently reached. Depletion or exhaustion of sand and a decline in wind fluxes at speeds greater than that of saltation friction will then act to reduce the rate of further abrasion. We are currently engaged in a new set of wind tunnel experiments coupled with theoretical models and field studies that address rock abrasion and ventifact formation on Mars and Earth. These studies have implications for the Noachian, when sand supplies were probably more plentiful and the threshold friction speed was possibly lower because of a more dense atmosphere. Under these conditions, erosion rates from the wind could have been much greater than to day, contributing, along with probable fluvial erosion, to the Noachian landscape that is in limited preservation today.

  9. Rock Abrasion and Ventifact Formation on Mars from Field Analog, Theoretical, and Experimental Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Laity, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    rocks on Mars should erode at a rate of 7.7 to 210 micrometers/yr. These rates cannot have operated over the entire history of the Pathfinder site or elsewhere on Mars, because craters, knobs, and other obstacles would be quickly worn away. More likely, rock abrasion occurs over short time periods when sand supplies are sufficient and saltation friction speeds are frequently reached. Depletion or exhaustion of sand and a decline in wind fluxes at speeds greater than that of saltation friction will then act to reduce the rate of further abrasion. We are currently engaged in a new set of wind tunnel experiments coupled with theoretical models and field studies that address rock abrasion and ventifact formation on Mars and Earth. These studies have implications for the Noachian, when sand supplies were probably more plentiful and the threshold friction speed was possibly lower because of a more dense atmosphere. Under these conditions, erosion rates from the wind could have been much greater than to day, contributing, along with probable fluvial erosion, to the Noachian landscape that is in limited preservation today.

  10. New Experimental Approaches and Theoretical Modeling Methods for Laser Cooling Atoms and Molecules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-27

    project involved continued development of theoretical models of diatomic molecular electronic level structure for application to the production of... dimers . For states near the dissociation limit, hyperfine structure dominates rotational structure, so this analysis is needed in order to characterize

  11. Group theoretical approach to nonlinear evolution equations of lax type III. The Boussinesq equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, D.; Olshanetsky, M. A.; Perelomov, A. M.; Ragnisco, O.

    1980-06-01

    Within the group theoretical framework recently proposed by Berezin and Perelomov, we are able to derive an abstract (operator) generalization of the classical Boussinesq equation, which possesses an infinite sequence of conserved quantities.

  12. Theoretical interpretation of upstreaming electrons and elevated conics on auroral field lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Schriver, D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent VIKING satellite observations in the auroral zone have shown the association of elevated ion conics (conics with a low energy cutoff above zero) with upward streaming electrons in the presence of low frequency electric field fluctuations. A self-consistent particle simulation was developed which assumed the presence of a steady state electric field on auroral zone field lines capable of accelerating ions up the magnetic field lines. Results from this study show that a low frequency ion-ion two stream instability can be excited. This low frequency instability creates a fluctuating electric field which heats the ions oblique to the magnetic field forming distributions similar to the elevated ion comics. The ion-ion waves also interact resonantly with electrons and accelerates them in the direction of the ion beam.

  13. Managing US-Mexico "border health": an organizational field approach.

    PubMed

    Collins-Dogrul, Julie

    2006-12-01

    During World War II Mexican and US health professionals and organizations constructed a transnational organizational field to manage the border's public health problems. Despite barriers to inter-organizational cooperation, including disparate administrative structures and North-South stratification, the field's transnational approach to health on the border has continued for 60 years. Using archival data to track changes in the number and types of organizations, this article argues that the field practitioners call "border health" reconfigured during the North American Free Trade Association (NAFTA) decade from an era of loosely organized professionals to a specialized bureaucracies era. This change brought new vitality to border health, with transnational ties increasing and diversifying, but has not weakened entrenched cross-border inequalities. The organizational history of the US-Mexico border health field demonstrates how macro-politics and inter-organizational stratification shape transnational public health problems.

  14. Information theoretic approach to complex biological network reconstruction: application to cytokine release in RAW 264.7 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput methods for biological measurements generate vast amounts of quantitative data, which necessitate the development of advanced approaches to data analysis to help understand the underlying mechanisms and networks. Reconstruction of biological networks from measured data of different components is a significant challenge in systems biology. Results We use an information theoretic approach to reconstruct phosphoprotein-cytokine networks in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells. Cytokines are secreted upon activation of a wide range of regulatory signals transduced by the phosphoprotein network. Identifying these components can help identify regulatory modules responsible for the inflammatory phenotype. The information theoretic approach is based on estimation of mutual information of interactions by using kernel density estimators. Mutual information provides a measure of statistical dependencies between interacting components. Using the topology of the network derived, we develop a data-driven parsimonious input–output model of the phosphoprotein-cytokine network. Conclusions We demonstrate the applicability of our information theoretic approach to reconstruction of biological networks. For the phosphoprotein-cytokine network, this approach not only captures most of the known signaling components involved in cytokine release but also predicts new signaling components involved in the release of cytokines. The results of this study are important for gaining a clear understanding of macrophage activation during the inflammation process. PMID:24964861

  15. Assessment of the tautomeric population of benzimidazole derivatives in solution: a simple and versatile theoretical-experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Carlos; Llovera, Ligia; Echevarria, Lorenzo; Hernández, Florencio E.

    2015-02-01

    Herein, we present a simple and versatile theoretical-experimental approach to assess the tautomeric distribution on 5(6)-aminobenzimidazole (5(6)-ABZ) derivatives in solution via one-photon absorption. The method is based on the optimized weighted sum of the theoretical spectra of the corresponding tautomers. In this article we show how the choice of exchange-correlation functional (XCF) employed in the calculations becomes crucial for the success of the approach. After the systematic analysis of XCFs with different amounts of exact-exchange we found a better performance for B3LYP and PBE0. The direct test of the proposed method on omeprazole, a well-known 5(6)-benzimidazole based pharmacotherapeutic, demonstrate its broader applicability. The proposed approach is expected to find direct applications on the tautomeric analysis of other molecular systems exhibiting similar tautomeric equilibria.

  16. Assessment of the tautomeric population of benzimidazole derivatives in solution: a simple and versatile theoretical-experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Carlos; Llovera, Ligia; Echevarria, Lorenzo; Hernández, Florencio E

    2015-02-01

    Herein, we present a simple and versatile theoretical-experimental approach to assess the tautomeric distribution on 5(6)-aminobenzimidazole (5(6)-ABZ) derivatives in solution via one-photon absorption. The method is based on the optimized weighted sum of the theoretical spectra of the corresponding tautomers. In this article we show how the choice of exchange-correlation functional (XCF) employed in the calculations becomes crucial for the success of the approach. After the systematic analysis of XCFs with different amounts of exact-exchange we found a better performance for B3LYP and PBE0. The direct test of the proposed method on omeprazole, a well-known 5(6)-benzimidazole based pharmacotherapeutic, demonstrate its broader applicability. The proposed approach is expected to find direct applications on the tautomeric analysis of other molecular systems exhibiting similar tautomeric equilibria.

  17. Moving beyond the Galloway diagrams for delta classification: A graph-theoretic approach.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejedor, Alejandro; Longjas, Anthony; Caldwell, Rebecca; Edmonds, Douglas; Zaliapin, Ilya; Foufoula-Georgiou, Efi

    2016-04-01

    Delta channel networks self-organize to a variety of stunning and complex patterns in response to different forcings (e.g., river, tides and waves) and the physical properties of their sediment (e.g., particle size, cohesiveness). Understanding and quantifying properties of these patterns is an essential step to solve the inverse problem of inferring process from form. A recently introduced framework based on spectral graph theory allows us to assess delta channel network complexity from a topologic (channel connectivity) and dynamic (flux exchange) perspective [Tejedor et al., 2015a,b]. We demonstrate the potential of this framework, together with numerical and experimental deltas, wherein different delta properties can be varied individually, to replace the qualitative approach still in use today [Galloway, 1975; Orton and Reading, 1993]. Specifically, in this work we have examined the effect of sediment parameters (grain size, cohesiveness) on the channel structure of river dominated deltas generated by a morphodynamic model (Delft3D). Our analysis shows that deltas with coarser incoming sediment are more complex topologically (increased number of looped pathways) but simpler dynamically (reduced flux exchange between subnetworks). We capitalize on the combined approach of controlled simulation (with known drivers) and quantitative comparison by positioning field and simulated deltas in the so-called TopoDynamic space to open up a path to provide valuable information towards a refined classification and inference scheme of delta morphology. Furthermore, numerical deltas allow us to explore the delta channel structure not only in a spatially explicit manner but also temporally, since the complete temporal record of delta evolution is available

  18. THEORETICAL ESTIMATES OF TWO-POINT SHEAR CORRELATION FUNCTIONS USING TANGLED MAGNETIC FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Kanhaiya L.; Sethi, Shiv K.

    2012-03-20

    The existence of primordial magnetic fields can induce matter perturbations with additional power at small scales as compared to the usual {Lambda}CDM model. We study its implication within the context of a two-point shear correlation function from gravitational lensing. We show that a primordial magnetic field can leave its imprints on the shear correlation function at angular scales {approx}< a few arcminutes. The results are compared with CFHTLS data, which yield some of the strongest known constraints on the parameters (strength and spectral index) of the primordial magnetic field. We also discuss the possibility of detecting sub-nano Gauss fields using future missions such as SNAP.

  19. On Theoretical Broadband Shock-Associated Noise Near-Field Cross-Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Steven A. E.

    2015-01-01

    The cross-spectral acoustic analogy is used to predict auto-spectra and cross-spectra of broadband shock-associated noise in the near-field and far-field from a range of heated and unheated supersonic off-design jets. A single equivalent source model is proposed for the near-field, mid-field, and far-field terms, that contains flow-field statistics of the shock wave shear layer interactions. Flow-field statistics are modeled based upon experimental observation and computational fluid dynamics solutions. An axisymmetric assumption is used to reduce the model to a closed-form equation involving a double summation over the equivalent source at each shock wave shear layer interaction. Predictions are compared with a wide variety of measurements at numerous jet Mach numbers and temperature ratios from multiple facilities. Auto-spectral predictions of broadband shock-associated noise in the near-field and far-field capture trends observed in measurement and other prediction theories. Predictions of spatial coherence of broadband shock-associated noise accurately capture the peak coherent intensity, frequency, and spectral width.

  20. Quantifying multi-dimensional functional trait spaces of trees: empirical versus theoretical approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogle, K.; Fell, M.; Barber, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Empirical, field studies of plant functional traits have revealed important trade-offs among pairs or triplets of traits, such as the leaf (LES) and wood (WES) economics spectra. Trade-offs include correlations between leaf longevity (LL) vs specific leaf area (SLA), LL vs mass-specific leaf respiration rate (RmL), SLA vs RmL, and resistance to breakage vs wood density. Ordination analyses (e.g., PCA) show groupings of traits that tend to align with different life-history strategies or taxonomic groups. It is unclear, however, what underlies such trade-offs and emergent spectra. Do they arise from inherent physiological constraints on growth, or are they more reflective of environmental filtering? The relative importance of these mechanisms has implications for predicting biogeochemical cycling, which is influenced by trait distributions of the plant community. We address this question using an individual-based model of tree growth (ACGCA) to quantify the theoretical trait space of trees that emerges from physiological constraints. ACGCA's inputs include 32 physiological, anatomical, and allometric traits, many of which are related to the LES and WES. We fit ACGCA to 1.6 million USFS FIA observations of tree diameters and heights to obtain vectors of trait values that produce realistic growth, and we explored the structure of this trait space. No notable correlations emerged among the 496 trait pairs, but stepwise regressions revealed complicated multi-variate structure: e.g., relationships between pairs of traits (e.g., RmL and SLA) are governed by other traits (e.g., LL, radiation-use efficiency [RUE]). We also simulated growth under various canopy gap scenarios that impose varying degrees of environmental filtering to explore the multi-dimensional trait space (hypervolume) of trees that died vs survived. The centroid and volume of the hypervolumes differed among dead and live trees, especially under gap conditions leading to low mortality. Traits most predictive

  1. Theoretical Prediction of Melting Relations in the Deep Mantle: the Phase Diagram Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belmonte, D.; Ottonello, G. A.; Vetuschi Zuccolini, M.; Attene, M.

    2016-12-01

    Despite the outstanding progress in computer technology and experimental facilities, understanding melting phase relations in the deep mantle is still an open challenge. In this work a novel computational scheme to predict melting relations at HP-HT by a combination of first principles DFT calculations, polymer chemistry and equilibrium thermodynamics is presented and discussed. The adopted theoretical framework is physically-consistent and allows to compute multi-component phase diagrams relevant to Earth's deep interior in a broad range of P-T conditions by a convex-hull algorithm for Gibbs free energy minimisation purposely developed for high-rank simplexes. The calculated phase diagrams are in turn used as a source of information to gain new insights on the P-T-X evolution of magmas in the deep mantle, providing some thermodynamic constraints to both present-day and early Earth melting processes. High-pressure melting curves of mantle silicates are also obtained as by-product of phase diagram calculation. Application of the above method to the MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 (MAS) ternary system highlights as pressure effects are not only able to change the nature of melting of some minerals (like olivine and pyroxene) from eutectic to peritectic (and vice versa), but also simplify melting relations by drastically reducing the number of phases with a primary phase field at HP-HT conditions. It turns out that mineral phases like Majorite-Pyrope garnet and Anhydrous Phase B (Mg14Si5O24), which are often disregarded in modelling melting processes of mantle assemblages, are stable phases at solidus or liquidus conditions in a P-T range compatible with the mantle transition zone (i.e. P = 16 - 23 GPa and T = 2200 - 2700 °C) when their thermodynamic and thermophysical properties are properly assessed. Financial support to the Senior Author (D.B.) during his stay as Invited Scientist at the Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris (IPGP, Paris) is warmly acknowledged.

  2. A theoretical and experimental approach for correlating nanoparticle structure and electrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Rachel M; Yancey, David F; Zhang, Liang; Chill, Samuel T; Henkelman, Graeme; Crooks, Richard M

    2015-05-19

    The objective of the research described in this Account is the development of high-throughput computational-based screening methods for discovery of catalyst candidates and subsequent experimental validation using appropriate catalytic nanoparticles. Dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs), which are well-defined 1-2 nm diameter metal nanoparticles, fulfill the role of model electrocatalysts. Effective comparison of theory and experiment requires that the theoretical and experimental models map onto one another perfectly. We use novel synthetic methods, advanced characterization techniques, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations to approach this ideal. For example, well-defined core@shell DENs can be synthesized by electrochemical underpotential deposition (UPD), and the observed deposition potentials can be compared to those calculated by DFT. Theory is also used to learn more about structure than can be determined by analytical characterization alone. For example, density functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) was used to show that the core@shell configuration of Au@Pt DENs undergoes a surface reconstruction that dramatically affects its electrocatalytic properties. A separate Pd@Pt DENs study also revealed reorganization, in this case a core-shell inversion to a Pt@Pd structure. Understanding these types of structural changes is critical to building correlations between structure and catalytic function. Indeed, the second principal focus of the work described here is correlating structure and catalytic function through the combined use of theory and experiment. For example, the Au@Pt DENs system described earlier is used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as well as for the electro-oxidation of formic acid. The surface reorganization predicted by theory enhances our understanding of the catalytic measurements. In the case of formic acid oxidation, the deformed nanoparticle structure leads to reduced CO binding energy and therefore

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of a high-current vacuum arc in a uniform axial magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimiya, Osami

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the electron temperature, floating potential, plasma density, and average plasma pressure in a magnetically confined high-current vacuum arc are described. A 40-mm-diam, 30-mm-long arc was initiated between OFCu copper electrodes in a uniform axial magnetic field by triggering the gap. The crest values of the arc current ranged from 3 to 20 kA. The electron temperature by Langmuir probe measurement was Te= 2.5-3.0 eV with a uniform space distribution and was independent of the arc current. The space distribution of the ion density was parabolic in the radial direction and with a zero derivative in the axial direction. The average plasma pressure by paramagnetic measurement increased with the square of the arc current. The experiment showed that the arc column could be considered as an infinitely long column in which the plasma parameters have zero axial derivatives. Theoretical analysis has been carried out under the following assumptions. An infinitely long cylindrical and fully ionized steady-state plasma in which all quantities varied in the r direction only was considered. The anisotropy factor σ∥/σ⊥ for electrical conductivities was taken into account in the theoretical analysis, where σ∥ and σ⊥ were electrical conductivities parallel to the magnetic field and perpendicular to it, respectively. The plasma parameters determined from the experiments and theoretical analysis agreed closely with each other when the factor σ∥/σ⊥ was equal to ˜2, which is the theoretical upper limit in a high magnetic field. Constant temperature characteristics independent of the arc current have been found to be clearly seen by using line radiation as the dominant power loss in the power balance equation.

  4. Recent theoretical studies of internal structure and stability of field-reversed configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Webster, R.B.; Lewis, H.R.; Staudenmeier, J.L.; Milroy, R.D.; Barnes, D.C.; Bishop, R.C.; Spencer, R.L.; Xu, Y.H.; Matheson, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of recent examinations of the low frequency, large scale stability of the field-reversed configurations (FRC). We also examined the ability to accurately infer internal transport quantities (e.g., field null resistivity) in an FRC. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  5. PDF approach for turbulent scalar field: Some recent developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Feng

    1993-01-01

    The probability density function (PDF) method has been proven a very useful approach in turbulence research. It has been particularly effective in simulating turbulent reacting flows and in studying some detailed statistical properties generated by a turbulent field There are, however, some important questions that have yet to be answered in PDF studies. Our efforts in the past year have been focused on two areas. First, a simple mixing model suitable for Monte Carlo simulations has been developed based on the mapping closure. Secondly, the mechanism of turbulent transport has been analyzed in order to understand the recently observed abnormal PDF's of turbulent temperature fields generated by linear heat sources.

  6. Revolution in Field Science: Apollo Approach to Inaccessible Surface Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, P. E.

    2010-07-01

    The extraordinary challenge mission designers, scientists, and engineers, faced in planning the first human expeditions to the surface of another solar system body led to the development of a distinctive and even revolutionary approach to field work. Not only were those involved required to deal effectively with the extreme limitation in resources available for and access to a target as remote as the lunar surface; they were required to developed a rigorous approach to science activities ranging from geological field work to deploying field instruments. Principal aspects and keys to the success of the field work are discussed here, including the highly integrated, intensive, and lengthy science planning, simulation, and astronaut training; the development of a systematic scheme for description and documentation of geological sites and samples; and a flexible yet disciplined methodology for site documentation and sample collection. The capability for constant communication with a ‘backroom’ of geological experts who make requests and weigh in on surface operations was innovative and very useful in encouraging rapid dissemination of information to the greater community in general. An extensive archive of the Apollo era science activity related documents provides evidence of the principal aspects and keys to the success of the field work. The Apollo Surface Journal allows analysis of the astronaut’s performance in terms of capability for traveling on foot, documentation and sampling of field stations, and manual operation of tools and instruments, all as a function of time. The application of these analysis as ‘lessons learned’ for planning the next generation of human or robotic field science activities on the Moon and elsewhere are considered here as well.

  7. Breaking the theoretical scaling limit for predicting quasiparticle energies: the stochastic GW approach.

    PubMed

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Gao, Yi; Arntsen, Christopher; Karshenas, Cyrus; Rabani, Eran; Baer, Roi

    2014-08-15

    We develop a formalism to calculate the quasiparticle energy within the GW many-body perturbation correction to the density functional theory. The occupied and virtual orbitals of the Kohn-Sham Hamiltonian are replaced by stochastic orbitals used to evaluate the Green function G, the polarization potential W, and, thereby, the GW self-energy. The stochastic GW (sGW) formalism relies on novel theoretical concepts such as stochastic time-dependent Hartree propagation, stochastic matrix compression, and spatial or temporal stochastic decoupling techniques. Beyond the theoretical interest, the formalism enables linear scaling GW calculations breaking the theoretical scaling limit for GW as well as circumventing the need for energy cutoff approximations. We illustrate the method for silicon nanocrystals of varying sizes with N_{e}>3000 electrons.

  8. Theoretical investigation of boundary contours of ground-state atoms in uniform electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Zhao, Dong-Xia; Yang, Zhong-Zhi

    2015-12-01

    The boundary contours were investigated for first 54 ground-state atoms of the periodic table when they are in uniform electric fields of strengths 106, 107 and 108 V/m. The atomic characteristic boundary model in combination with an ab-initio method was employed. Some regularities of the deformation of atoms, ΔR, in above electric fields are revealed. Furthermore, atomic polarisabilities of the first 54 elements of the periodic table are shown to correlate strongly with the mean variation rate of atomic radial size divided by the strength of the electric field F, ?, which provides a predictive method of calculating atomic polarisabilities of 54 atoms.

  9. An appraisal of theoretical approaches to examining behaviours in relation to Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of young women

    PubMed Central

    Batista Ferrer, Harriet; Audrey, Suzanne; Trotter, Caroline; Hickman, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Background Interventions to increase uptake of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination by young women may be more effective if they are underpinned by an appropriate theoretical model or framework. The aims of this review were: to describe the theoretical models or frameworks used to explain behaviours in relation to HPV vaccination of young women, and: to consider the appropriateness of the theoretical models or frameworks used for informing the development of interventions to increase uptake. Methods Primary studies were identified through a comprehensive search of databases from inception to December 2013. Results Thirty-four relevant studies were identified, of which 31 incorporated psychological health behaviour models or frameworks and three used socio-cultural models or theories. The primary studies used a variety of approaches to measure a diverse range of outcomes in relation to behaviours of professionals, parents, and young women. The majority appeared to use theory appropriately throughout. About half of the quantitative studies presented data in relation to goodness of fit tests and the proportion of the variability in the data. Conclusion Due to diverse approaches and inconsistent findings across studies, the current contribution of theory to understanding and promoting HPV vaccination uptake is difficult to assess. Ecological frameworks encourage the integration of individual and social approaches by encouraging exploration of the intrapersonal, interpersonal, organisational, community and policy levels when examining public health issues. Given the small number of studies using such approach, combined with the importance of these factors in predicting behaviour, more research in this area is warranted. PMID:26314783

  10. Experimental and theoretical study on nonsequential double ionization of carbon disulfide in strong near-IR laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Wanlong; Ben, Shuai; Lv, Hang; Zhao, Lei; Guo, Jing; Liu, Xue-Shen; Xu, Haifeng; Jin, Mingxing; Ding, Dajun

    2016-05-01

    Nonsequential double ionization (NSDI) of carbon disulfide CS2 in strong 800-nm laser fields is studied experimentally and theoretically. A knee structure is observed in the intensity-dependent double ionization (DI) yield in linearly polarized laser fields, which exhibits a strong dependence on the laser ellipticity. The electron momentum distributions and energy trajectories after DI in both linearly and circularly polarized laser fields are investigated by employing the two-dimensional classical ensemble method. The results clearly show the evidence of NSDI in the strong-field DI of CS2 molecules. It is demonstrated that, similar to that of atoms, NSDI of CS2 molecules is produced via laser-driven electron recollision with the ion core and presents electron-electron correlations in the process. Analysis indicates that both mechanisms in atomic strong-field NSDI, i.e., recollision impact ionization and recollision excitation with subsequent ionization, may also be contributed to NSDI of CS2 in strong laser fields. Further studies are no doubt necessary for a full understanding of the underlying physical mechanism of molecular strong-field NSDI, due to the multicenter character of the molecular structure and the complex molecular excited states that could be involved in the ionization.

  11. Theoretical analysis of 1D resonant tunneling behavior in ion-enhanced cold field and thermo-field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xi; Rumbach, Paul; Griggs, Nathaniel; Jensen, Kevin L.; Go, David B.

    2016-12-01

    In cold field and thermo-field emission, positive ions or adsorbates very close to the cathode surface can enhance emission current by both resonant and non-resonant processes. In this paper, resonant tunneling behavior is investigated by solving the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation in the presence of an ion, and the enhancement due to resonant processes is evaluated. Results shows that as the applied electric field increases, the resonant states move from higher to lower energies as the ion energy levels are shifted down. Conversely, as the ion position moves closer to the cathode, the resonant states shift up in energy. Further, through a simplified perturbation analysis, the general scaling of these trends can be predicted. These shifts of resonant states directly impact the emission current density, and they are especially relevant when the applied field is on the order of a few volts per nanometer (˜0.5-3 V/nm) and the ion is a few nanometers (˜0.5-3 nm) away from the cathode. Further, when the energy level for resonant emission coincides with the Fermi level of a metallic cathode, the current density is particularly enhanced. The results of this study suggest that it may be possible to control (augment/inhibit) the resonant emission current by manipulating the supply function of a cathode relative to the operating conditions of the emitter in either ion-enhanced or adsorbate-enhanced field emission, which can be applied to various plasma and electron emission technologies.

  12. Theoretical model of DC electric field formation in the ionosphere stimulated by seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorokin, V. M.; Chmyrev, V. M.; Yaschenko, A. K.

    2005-09-01

    Seismic activity is accompanied by emanation of soil gases into the atmosphere. These gases transfer positive and negative charged aerosols. Atmospheric convection of charged aerosols forms external electric current, which works as a source of perturbation in the atmosphere ionosphere electric circuit. It is shown that DC electric field generated in the ionosphere by this current reaches up to 10 mV/m, while the long-term vertical electric field disturbances near the Earth's surface do not exceed 100 V/m. Such a limitation of the near-ground field is caused by the formation of potential barrier for charged particles at the Earth's surface in a process of their transport from soil to atmosphere. This paper presents the method for calculation of the electric field in the atmosphere and the ionosphere generated by given distribution of external electric current in the atmosphere.

  13. Theoretical and experimental comparisons of nearfield electrogalvanic fields due to nonlinear polarization layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, R. G.

    1985-02-01

    Based on completed experimental electric-field scans and the corresponding finite-element field predictions, it appears that the finite-element numerical technique presents a strong analytical tool in calculating the nearfield (within 650 micrometers electric-field distributions about active microcells. This was analytically achieved with the new double membrane finite-element configuration representing nonlinear polarization and by using a local tangent slope (impedance) definition dependent on the local potential difference. The experimental determination of the normal current was realized with a newly developed scanning vibrating electrode technique. The finite-element model utilizes a priori measured uncoupled polarization curves for pure iron and pure copper. The current densities and the electric field intensity was calculated for all the grid points within the electrolyte and on its boundaries. Results appear to indicate that first order anodic mass loss can be predicted using finite-element predicted current density distributions on the anodic surface and the imposition of Faraday's law. The electric-field correlation established for the normal current-density vector provides the confidence to proceed in the evaluation of electric fields associated with pitting and crevice corrosion.

  14. Radiative properties of a plasma moving across a magnetic field. I - Theoretical analysis. II - Numerical results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roussel-Dupre, Robert; Miller, Ronald H.

    1993-01-01

    The early-time evolution of plasmas moving across a background magnetic field is addressed with a 2D model in which a plasma cloud is assumed to have formed instantaneously with a velocity across a uniform background magnetic field and with a Gaussian density profile in the two dimensions perpendicular to the direction of motion. This model treats both the dynamics associated with the formation of a polarization field and the generation and propagation of electromagnetic waves. In general, the results indicate that, to zeroth order, the plasma cloud behaves like a large dipole antenna oriented in the direction of the polarization field which oscillates at frequencies defined by the normal mode of the system. Radiation damping is shown to play an important role in defining the plasma cloud evolution, causing a rapid decay of the polarizaiton field and a loss of plasma kinetic energy and momentum on time scales comprable to several ion gyroperiods. Scaling laws are derived for the plasma momentum and energy loss rates, and predictions for the braking time, the amplitude and spectrum of the radiation field, and the total radiated power are presented for conditions relevant to the recent Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite experiments.

  15. Theoretical study of molecular vibrations in electron momentum spectroscopy experiments on furan: An analytical versus a molecular dynamical approach

    SciTech Connect

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S.; Watanabe, Noboru; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-07

    The influence of thermally induced nuclear dynamics (molecular vibrations) in the initial electronic ground state on the valence orbital momentum profiles of furan has been theoretically investigated using two different approaches. The first of these approaches employs the principles of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, whereas the so-called harmonic analytical quantum mechanical approach resorts to an analytical decomposition of contributions arising from quantized harmonic vibrational eigenstates. In spite of their intrinsic differences, the two approaches enable consistent insights into the electron momentum distributions inferred from new measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy and an electron impact energy of 1.2 keV. Both approaches point out in particular an appreciable influence of a few specific molecular vibrations of A{sub 1} symmetry on the 9a{sub 1} momentum profile, which can be unravelled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  16. Theoretical study of molecular vibrations in electron momentum spectroscopy experiments on furan: an analytical versus a molecular dynamical approach.

    PubMed

    Morini, Filippo; Deleuze, Michael S; Watanabe, Noboru; Takahashi, Masahiko

    2015-03-07

    The influence of thermally induced nuclear dynamics (molecular vibrations) in the initial electronic ground state on the valence orbital momentum profiles of furan has been theoretically investigated using two different approaches. The first of these approaches employs the principles of Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics, whereas the so-called harmonic analytical quantum mechanical approach resorts to an analytical decomposition of contributions arising from quantized harmonic vibrational eigenstates. In spite of their intrinsic differences, the two approaches enable consistent insights into the electron momentum distributions inferred from new measurements employing electron momentum spectroscopy and an electron impact energy of 1.2 keV. Both approaches point out in particular an appreciable influence of a few specific molecular vibrations of A1 symmetry on the 9a1 momentum profile, which can be unravelled from considerations on the symmetry characteristics of orbitals and their energy spacing.

  17. Theoretical exploration of control factors for the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectrum in two-color field.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xinting; Yang, Dapeng; Yao, Li

    2014-09-15

    In this work, the laser-parameter effects on the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) spectrum and attosecond trains by mixing two-color laser field, a visible light field of 800 nm and a mid-infrared (mid-IR) laser pulses of 2400 nm, are theoretically demonstrated for the first time. Different schemes are applied to discuss the function of intensity, carrier-envelope phase (CEP) and pulse duration on the generation of an isolated attosecond pulse. As a consequence, an isolated 16as pulse is obtained by Fourier transforming an ultrabroad XUV continuum of 208 eV with the fundamental field of duration of 6 fs, 9×10(14)W/cm2 of intensity, the duration of 12 fs, the CEPs of the two driving pulses of -π and the relative strength ratio √R=0.2.

  18. Theoretical model of gravitational perturbation of current collector axisymmetric flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, John S.; Brown, Samuel H.; Sondergaard, Neal A.

    1990-05-01

    Some designs of liquid-metal current collectors in homopolar motors and generators are essentially rotating liquid-metal fluids in cylindrical channels with free surfaces and will, at critical rotational speeds, become unstable. An investigation at David Taylor Research Center is being performed to understand the role of gravity in modifying this ejection instability. Some gravitational effects can be theoretically treated by perturbation techniques on the axisymmetric base flow of the liquid metal. This leads to a modification of previously calculated critical-current-collector ejection values neglecting gravity effects. The purpose of this paper is to document the derivation of the mathematical model which determines the perturbation of the liquid-metal base flow due to gravitational effects. Since gravity is a small force compared with the centrifugal effects, the base flow solutions can be expanded in inverse powers of the Froude number and modified liquid-flow profiles can be determined as a function of the azimuthal angle. This model will be used in later work to theoretically study the effects of gravity on the ejection point of the current collector.

  19. Theoretical model of gravitational perturbation of current collector axisymmetric flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, John S.; Brown, Samuel H.; Sondergaard, Neal A.

    1989-03-01

    Some designs of liquid metal collectors in homopolar motors and generators are essentially rotating liquid metal fluids in cylindrical channels with free surfaces and will, at critical rotational speeds, become unstable. The role of gravity in modifying this ejection instability is investigated. Some gravitational effects can be theoretically treated by perturbation techniques on the axisymmetric base flow of the liquid metal. This leads to a modification of previously calculated critical current collector ejection values neglecting gravity effects. The derivation of the mathematical model which determines the perturbation of the liquid metal base flow due to gravitational effects is documented. Since gravity is a small force compared with the centrifugal effects, the base flow solutions can be expanded in inverse powers of the Froude number and modified liquid flow profiles can be determined as a function of the azimuthal angle. This model will be used in later work to theoretically study the effects of gravity on the ejection point of the current collector. A rederivation of the hydrodynamic instability threshold of a liquid metal current collector is presented.

  20. Approaches, field considerations and problems associated with radio tracking carnivores

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sargeant, A.B.; Amlaner, C. J.; MacDonald, D.W.

    1979-01-01

    The adaptation of radio tracking to ecological studies was a major technological advance affecting field investigations of animal movements and behavior. Carnivores have been the recipients of much attention with this new technology and study approaches have varied from simple to complex. Equipment performance has much improved over the years, but users still face many difficulties. The beginning of all radio tracking studies should be a precise definition of objectives. Study objectives dictate type of gear required and field procedures. Field conditions affect equipment performance and investigator ability to gather data. Radio tracking carnivores is demanding and generally requires greater time than anticipated. Problems should be expected and planned for in study design. Radio tracking can be an asset in carnivore studies but caution is needed in its application.

  1. Dual Effort to Correlate the Electron Field Emission Performance of Carbon Nanotubes with Synthesis As Well As Annealing Temperature: Theoretical Support of the Experimental Finding.

    PubMed

    Maity, Supratim; Banerjee, Diptonil; Das, Nirmalya Sankar; Chattopadhyay, Kalyan Kumar

    2016-05-01

    Here a dual approach has been adopted to study the effect of both synthesis as well as annealing temperature on the electron field emission property of differently synthesized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) that include solid state chemical reaction as well as chemical vapour deposition (CVD). Experimental findings were supported by theoretical simulation. All the samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). XRD as well as TEM study confirms the amorphous nature (aCNTs) of the samples for both the synthesis techniques which is attributed to lower synthesis temperature. Prominent morphological differences of these two types of aCNTs are clearly observed from both FESEM and TEM images. It is found that electron field emission characteristics of aCNTs synthesized by CVD shows better field emission properties as compared to aCNTs synthesized by solid state reaction. Finite element based simulation shows that temperature has prominent effect on morphology, screening effect or degree of graphitization that leads to improved field emission characteristics for the CVD synthesized aCNTs.

  2. The interacting gaps model: reconciling theoretical and numerical approaches to limit-order models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muchnik, Lev; Slanina, Frantisek; Solomon, Sorin

    2003-12-01

    We consider the emergence of power-law tails in the returns distribution of limit-order driven markets. We explain a previously observed clash between the theoretical and numerical studies of such models. We introduce a solvable model that interpolates between the previous studies and agrees with each of them in the relevant limit.

  3. A New Theoretical Approach to Postsecondary Student Disability: Disability-Diversity (Dis)Connect Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aquino, Katherine C.

    2016-01-01

    Disability is often viewed as an obstacle to postsecondary inclusion, but not a characteristic of student diversity. Additionally, current theoretical frameworks isolate disability from other student diversity characteristics. In response, a new conceptual framework, the Disability-Diversity (Dis)Connect Model (DDDM), was created to address…

  4. A group-theoretic approach to constructions of non-relativistic spin-statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, J. M.; Robbins, J. M.

    2000-11-01

    We give a group-theoretical generalization of Berry and Robbins' treatment of identical particles with spin. The original construction, which leads to the correct spin-statistics relation, is seen to arise from particular irreducible representations—the totally symmetric representations—of the group SU(4). Here we calculate the exchange signs and corresponding statistics for all irreducible representations of SU(4).

  5. Defining and measuring blood donor altruism: a theoretical approach from biology, economics and psychology

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R; Ferguson, E

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives While blood donation is traditionally described as a behaviour motivated by pure altruism, the assessment of altruism in the blood donation literature has not been theoretically informed. Drawing on theories of altruism from psychology, economics and evolutionary biology, it is argued that a theoretically derived psychometric assessment of altruism is needed. Such a measure is developed in this study that can be used to help inform both our understanding of the altruistic motives of blood donors and recruitment intervention strategies. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional survey (N = 414), with a 1-month behavioural follow-up (time 2, N = 77), was designed to assess theoretically derived constructs from psychological, economic and evolutionary biological theories of altruism. Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) variables and co-operation were also assessed at time 1 and a measure of behavioural co-operation at time 2. Results Five theoretical dimensions (impure altruism, kinship, self-regarding motives, reluctant altruism and egalitarian warm glow) of altruism were identified through factor analyses. These five altruistic motives differentiated blood donors from non-donors (donors scored higher on impure altruism and reluctant altruism), showed incremental validity over TPB constructs to predict donor intention and predicted future co-operative behaviour. Conclusions These findings show that altruism in the context of blood donation is multifaceted and complex and, does not reflect pure altruism. This has implication for recruitment campaigns that focus solely on pure altruism. PMID:24117697

  6. Analysing Teachers' Practices in Technology Environments from an Activity Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abboud-Blanchard, Maha; Vandebrouck, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to emphasize some research results about teachers' practices in technology-based-lessons. Articulating several theoretical developments of Activity Theory enables us to conceive a frame to characterise the evolutions of these practices and to interpret them in terms of "geneses of technology uses". We consider these…

  7. Explaining Teacher-Student Interactions in Early Childhood: An Interpersonal Theoretical Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thijs, Jochem; Koomen, Helma; Roorda, Debora; ten Hagen, Judith

    2011-01-01

    The present study used an interpersonal theoretical perspective to examine the interactions between Dutch teachers and kindergartners. Interpersonal theory provides explanations for dyadic interaction behaviors by stating that complementary behaviors (dissimilar in terms of control, and similar in terms of affiliation) elicit and sustain each…

  8. A conservative approach for flow field calculations on multiple grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kathong, Monchai; Tiwari, Surendra N.

    1988-01-01

    In the computation of flow fields about complex configurations, it is very difficult to construct body-fitted coordinate systems. An alternative approach is to use several grids at once, each of which is generated independently. This procedure is called the multiple grids or zonal grids approach and its applications are investigated in this study. The method follows the conservative approach and provides conservation of fluxes at grid interfaces. The Euler equations are solved numerically on such grids for various configurations. The numerical scheme used is the finite-volume technique with a three-state Runge-Kutta time integration. The code is vectorized and programmed to run on the CDC VPS-32 computer. Some steady state solutions of the Euler equations are presented and discussed.

  9. Theoretical analysis of the electromagnetic field inside an anomalous-dispersion microresonator under synthetical pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Xu; Xiaohong, Hu; Ye, Feng; Yuanshan, Liu; Wei, Zhang; Zhi, Yang; Wei, Zhao; Yishan, Wang

    2016-03-01

    We study the spatiotemporal evolution of the electromagnetic field inside a microresonator showing an anomalous dispersion at the pump wavelength by using the normalized Lugiato-Lefever equation. Unlike the traditional single continuous wave (CW) pumping, an additional pump source consisting of periodical pulse train with variable repetition rate is adopted. The influences of the microresonator properties and the pump parameters on the field evolution and the electromagnetic field profile are analyzed. The simulation results indicate that, in the anomalous dispersion regime, both increases of the input pulse amplitude and the repetition frequency can result in the field profiles consisting of multiple peaks. A series of equidistant pulses can also be obtained by increasing the CW pump power. In addition, we find that a large physical detuning between the pump laser carrier and the cavity resonance frequency also causes the splitting of the inside field. Project supported by the National Major Scientific Instrumentation Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011YQ120022), CAS/SAFEA International Partnership Program for Creative Research Teams, China, and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61275164).

  10. A theoretical model of subsidence caused by petroleum production: Big Hill Field, Jefferson County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, D.W.; Sharp, J.M. Jr. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-02-01

    In the Texas Gulf Coastal Plain, there is a history of oil and gas production extending over 2 to 5 decades. Concurrent with this production history, there has been unprecedented population growth accompanied by vastly increased groundwater demands. Land subsidence on both local and regional bases in this geologic province has been measured and predicted in several studies. The vast majority of these studies have addressed the problem from the standpoint of groundwater usage while only a few have considered the effects of oil and gas production. Based upon field-based computational techniques (Helm, 1984), a model has been developed to predict land subsidence caused by oil and gas production. This method is applied to the Big Hill Field in Jefferson County, Texas. Inputs include production data from a series of wells in this field and lithologic data from electric logs of these same wells. Outputs include predicted amounts of subsidence, the time frame of subsidence, and sensitivity analyses of compressibility and hydraulic conductivity estimates. Depending upon estimated compressibility, subsidence, to date, is predicted to be as high as 20 cm. Similarly, depending upon estimated vertical hydraulic conductivity, the time frame may be decades for this subsidence. These same methods can be applied to other oil/gas fields with established production histories as well as new fields when production scenarios are assumed. Where subsidence has been carefully measured above petroleum reservoir, the model may be used inversely to calculate sediment compressibilities.

  11. A Comparison of Approaches for Solving Hard Graph-Theoretic Problems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-29

    combinatorial problems are NP-hard and the computational complexity makes this research approach difficult using a standard brute force approach on a...typical computer . One sample problem explored is that of finding a minimum identifying code. To work around the computational issues, a variety of methods...are explored and consist of a parallel computing approach using Matlab, a quantum annealing approach using the D-Wave computer , and lastly using

  12. Possible theoretical explanations for occasional days of non-field-aligned diffusion at neutron monitor energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    It has been shown previously (Anath et al., 1973 and Kane, 1974) that 20 to 25% of days, the diffusion component of the cosmic-ray neutron diurnal anisotropy is directed more than 30 degrees away from the ecliptic projection of the interplanetary magnetic field averaged over the same 24 hours. A number of explanations for this deviation are discussed and it is concluded that transverse gradient drifts due to gradients perpendicular to the ecliptic are likely, that diurnal variations in the diffusion component of the neutron anisotropy may affect results from single stations and that the 24 hour mean interplanetary magnetic field may not be the field appropriate to the streaming equation at neutron monitor energies.

  13. Possible theoretical explanations for occasional days of non-field-aligned diffusion at neutron monitor energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, M. A.

    1975-01-01

    It has been shown previously (Anath et al., 1973 and Kane, 1974) that 20 to 25% of days, the diffusion component of the cosmic-ray neutron diurnal anisotropy is directed more than 30 degrees away from the ecliptic projection of the interplanetary magnetic field averaged over the same 24 hours. A number of explanations for this deviation are discussed and it is concluded that transverse gradient drifts due to gradients perpendicular to the ecliptic are likely, that diurnal variations in the diffusion component of the neutron anisotropy may affect results from single stations and that the 24 hour mean interplanetary magnetic field may not be the field appropriate to the streaming equation at neutron monitor energies.

  14. Detection of the gravitomagnetic field using an orbiting superconducting gravity gradiometer. Theoretical principles

    SciTech Connect

    Mashhoon, B.; Paik, H. J.; Will, C. M.

    1989-05-15

    The angular momentum of the Earth produces gravitomagnetic components of the Riemann curvature tensor, which are of the order of 10/sup /minus/10/ of the Newtonian tidal terms arising from the mass of the Earth. These components could be detected in principle by sensitive superconducting gravity gradiometers currently under development. We lay out the theoretical principles of such an experiment by using the parametrized post-Newtonian formalism to derive the locally measured Riemann tensor in an orbiting proper reference frame, in a class of metric theories of gravity that includes general relativity. A gradiometer assembly consisting of three gradiometers with axes at mutually right angles measures three diagonal components of a 3/times/3 ''tidal tensor,'' related to the Riemann tensor. We find that, by choosing a particular assembly orientation relative to the orbit and taking a sum and difference of two of the three gradiometer outputs, one can isolate the gravitomagnetic relativistic effect from the large Newtonian background.

  15. A Thematic Analysis of Theoretical Models for Translational Science in Nursing: Mapping the Field

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Sandra A.; Fisher, Cheryl A.; Hastings, Clare E.; Silverman, Leanne B.; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2010-01-01

    Background The quantity and diversity of conceptual models in translational science may complicate rather than advance the use of theory. Purpose This paper offers a comparative thematic analysis of the models available to inform knowledge development, transfer, and utilization. Method Literature searches identified 47 models for knowledge translation. Four thematic areas emerged: (1) evidence-based practice and knowledge transformation processes; (2) strategic change to promote adoption of new knowledge; (3) knowledge exchange and synthesis for application and inquiry; (4) designing and interpreting dissemination research. Discussion This analysis distinguishes the contributions made by leaders and researchers at each phase in the process of discovery, development, and service delivery. It also informs the selection of models to guide activities in knowledge translation. Conclusions A flexible theoretical stance is essential to simultaneously develop new knowledge and accelerate the translation of that knowledge into practice behaviors and programs of care that support optimal patient outcomes. PMID:21074646

  16. A thematic analysis of theoretical models for translational science in nursing: mapping the field.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Sandra A; Fisher, Cheryl A; Hastings, Clare E; Silverman, Leanne B; Wallen, Gwenyth R

    2010-01-01

    The quantity and diversity of conceptual models in translational science may complicate rather than advance the use of theory. This paper offers a comparative thematic analysis of the models available to inform knowledge development, transfer, and utilization. Literature searches identified 47 models for knowledge translation. Four thematic areas emerged: (1) evidence-based practice and knowledge transformation processes, (2) strategic change to promote adoption of new knowledge, (3) knowledge exchange and synthesis for application and inquiry, and (4) designing and interpreting dissemination research. This analysis distinguishes the contributions made by leaders and researchers at each phase in the process of discovery, development, and service delivery. It also informs the selection of models to guide activities in knowledge translation. A flexible theoretical stance is essential to simultaneously develop new knowledge and accelerate the translation of that knowledge into practice behaviors and programs of care that support optimal patient outcomes.

  17. Theoretical description of protein field effects on electronic excitations of biological chromophores.

    PubMed

    Varsano, Daniele; Caprasecca, Stefano; Coccia, Emanuele

    2017-01-11

    Photoinitiated phenomena play a crucial role in many living organisms. Plants, algae, and bacteria absorb sunlight to perform photosynthesis, and convert water and carbon dioxide into molecular oxygen and carbohydrates, thus forming the basis for life on Earth. The vision of vertebrates is accomplished in the eye by a protein called rhodopsin, which upon photon absorption performs an ultrafast isomerisation of the retinal chromophore, triggering the signal cascade. Many other biological functions start with the photoexcitation of a protein-embedded pigment, followed by complex processes comprising, for example, electron or excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. The optical properties of chromophores in living systems are strongly dependent on the interaction with the surrounding environment (nearby protein residues, membrane, water), and the complexity of such interplay is, in most cases, at the origin of the functional diversity of the photoactive proteins. The specific interactions with the environment often lead to a significant shift of the chromophore excitation energies, compared with their absorption in solution or gas phase. The investigation of the optical response of chromophores is generally not straightforward, from both experimental and theoretical standpoints; this is due to the difficulty in understanding diverse behaviours and effects, occurring at different scales, with a single technique. In particular, the role played by ab initio calculations in assisting and guiding experiments, as well as in understanding the physics of photoactive proteins, is fundamental. At the same time, owing to the large size of the systems, more approximate strategies which take into account the environmental effects on the absorption spectra are also of paramount importance. Here we review the recent advances in the first-principle description of electronic and optical properties of biological chromophores embedded in a protein environment. We show

  18. Theoretical description of protein field effects on electronic excitations of biological chromophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varsano, Daniele; Caprasecca, Stefano; Coccia, Emanuele

    2017-01-01

    Photoinitiated phenomena play a crucial role in many living organisms. Plants, algae, and bacteria absorb sunlight to perform photosynthesis, and convert water and carbon dioxide into molecular oxygen and carbohydrates, thus forming the basis for life on Earth. The vision of vertebrates is accomplished in the eye by a protein called rhodopsin, which upon photon absorption performs an ultrafast isomerisation of the retinal chromophore, triggering the signal cascade. Many other biological functions start with the photoexcitation of a protein-embedded pigment, followed by complex processes comprising, for example, electron or excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic complexes. The optical properties of chromophores in living systems are strongly dependent on the interaction with the surrounding environment (nearby protein residues, membrane, water), and the complexity of such interplay is, in most cases, at the origin of the functional diversity of the photoactive proteins. The specific interactions with the environment often lead to a significant shift of the chromophore excitation energies, compared with their absorption in solution or gas phase. The investigation of the optical response of chromophores is generally not straightforward, from both experimental and theoretical standpoints; this is due to the difficulty in understanding diverse behaviours and effects, occurring at different scales, with a single technique. In particular, the role played by ab initio calculations in assisting and guiding experiments, as well as in understanding the physics of photoactive proteins, is fundamental. At the same time, owing to the large size of the systems, more approximate strategies which take into account the environmental effects on the absorption spectra are also of paramount importance. Here we review the recent advances in the first-principle description of electronic and optical properties of biological chromophores embedded in a protein environment. We show

  19. Primordial statistical anisotropies: the effective field theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Abolhasani, Ali Akbar; Akhshik, Mohammad; Emami, Razieh; Firouzjahi, Hassan E-mail: m.akhshik@ipm.ir E-mail: firouz@ipm.ir

    2016-03-01

    In this work we present the effective field theory of primordial statistical anisotropies generated during anisotropic inflation involving a background U(1) gauge field. Besides the usual Goldstone boson associated with the breaking of time diffeomorphism we have two additional Goldstone bosons associated with the breaking of spatial diffeomorphisms. We further identify these two new Goldstone bosons with the expected two transverse degrees of the U(1) gauge field fluctuations. Upon defining the appropriate unitary gauge, we present the most general quadratic action which respects the remnant symmetry in the unitary gauge. The interactions between various Goldstone bosons leads to statistical anisotropy in curvature perturbation power spectrum. Calculating the general results for power spectrum anisotropy, we recover the previously known results in specific models of anisotropic inflation. In addition, we present novel results for statistical anisotropy in models with non-trivial sound speed for inflaton fluctuations. Also we identify the interaction which leads to birefringence-like effects in anisotropic power spectrum in which the speed of gauge field fluctuations depends on the direction of the mode propagation and the two polarization of gauge field fluctuations contribute differently in statistical anisotropy. As another interesting application, our EFT approach naturally captures interactions generating parity violating statistical anisotropies.

  20. A hypothesis-driven approach to optimize field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Wolfgang; Rubin, Yoram; de Barros, Felipe P. J.

    2012-06-01

    Most field campaigns aim at helping in specified scientific or practical tasks, such as modeling, prediction, optimization, or management. Often these tasks involve binary decisions or seek answers to yes/no questions under uncertainty, e.g., Is a model adequate? Will contamination exceed a critical level? In this context, the information needs of hydro(geo)logical modeling should be satisfied with efficient and rational field campaigns, e.g., because budgets are limited. We propose a new framework to optimize field campaigns that defines the quest for defensible decisions as the ultimate goal. The key steps are to formulate yes/no questions under uncertainty as Bayesian hypothesis tests, and then use the expected failure probability of hypothesis testing as objective function. Our formalism is unique in that it optimizes field campaigns for maximum confidence in decisions on model choice, binary engineering or management decisions, or questions concerning compliance with environmental performance metrics. It is goal oriented, recognizing that different models, questions, or metrics deserve different treatment. We use a formal Bayesian scheme called PreDIA, which is free of linearization, and can handle arbitrary data types, scientific tasks, and sources of uncertainty (e.g., conceptual, physical, (geo)statistical, measurement errors). This reduces the bias due to possibly subjective assumptions prior to data collection and improves the chances of successful field campaigns even under conditions of model uncertainty. We illustrate our approach on two instructive examples from stochastic hydrogeology with increasing complexity.

  1. Luttinger-field approach to thermoelectric transport in nanoscale conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eich, F. G.; Principi, A.; Di Ventra, M.; Vignale, G.

    2014-09-01

    Thermoelectric transport in nanoscale conductors is analyzed in terms of the response of the system to a thermomechanical field, first introduced by Luttinger, which couples to the electronic energy density. While in this approach, the temperature remains spatially uniform, we show that a spatially varying thermomechanical field effectively simulates a temperature gradient across the system and allows us to calculate the electric and thermal currents that flow due to the thermomechanical field. In particular, we show that in the long-time limit, the currents thus calculated reduce to those that one obtains from the Landauer-Büttiker formula, suitably generalized to allow for different temperatures in the reservoirs, if the thermomechanical field is applied to prepare the system, and subsequently turned off at t =0. Alternatively, we can drive the system out of equilibrium by switching the thermomechanical field after the initial preparation. We compare these two scenarios, employing a model noninteracting Hamiltonian, in the linear regime, in which they coincide, and in the nonlinear regime, in which they show marked differences. We also show how an operationally defined local effective temperature can be computed within this formalism.

  2. BOLD-based Techniques for Quantifying Brain Hemodynamic and Metabolic Properties – Theoretical Models and Experimental Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Yablonskiy, Dmitriy A.; Sukstanskii, Alexander L.; He, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain hemodynamics and metabolism, particularly the relationship between brain function and oxygen utilization, is important for understanding normal human brain operation as well as pathophysiology of neurological disorders. It can also be of great importance for evaluation of hypoxia within tumors of the brain and other organs. A fundamental discovery by Ogawa and co-workers of the BOLD (Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent) contrast opened a possibility to use this effect to study brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties by means of MRI measurements. Such measurements require developing theoretical models connecting MRI signal to brain structure and functioning and designing experimental techniques allowing MR measurements of salient features of theoretical models. In our review we discuss several such theoretical models and experimental methods for quantification brain hemodynamic and metabolic properties. Our review aims mostly at methods for measuring oxygen extraction fraction, OEF, based on measuring blood oxygenation level. Combining measurement of OEF with measurement of CBF allows evaluation of oxygen consumption, CMRO2. We first consider in detail magnetic properties of blood – magnetic susceptibility, MR relaxation and theoretical models of intravascular contribution to MR signal under different experimental conditions. Then, we describe a “through-space” effect – the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic fields, created in the extravascular space by intravascular deoxygenated blood, on the MR signal formation. Further we describe several experimental techniques taking advantage of these theoretical models. Some of these techniques - MR susceptometry, and T2-based quantification of oxygen OEF – utilize intravascular MR signal. Another technique – qBOLD – evaluates OEF by making use of through-space effects. In this review we targeted both scientists just entering the MR field and more experienced MR researchers

  3. Theoretical Developments in Decision Field Theory: Comment on Tsetsos, Usher, and Chater (2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotaling, Jared M.; Busemeyer, Jerome R.; Li, Jiyun

    2010-01-01

    Tsetsos, Usher, and Chater (2010) presented several criticisms of decision field theory (DFT) involving its distance function, instability under externally controlled stopping times, and lack of robustness to various multialternative choice scenarios. Here, we counter those claims with a specification of a distance function based on the…

  4. Theoretical analyses of cellular transmembrane voltage in suspensions induced by high-frequency fields.

    PubMed

    Zou, Yong; Wang, Changzhen; Peng, Ruiyun; Wang, Lifeng; Hu, Xiangjun

    2015-04-01

    A change of the transmembrane voltage is considered to cause biophysical and biochemical responses in cells. The present study focuses on the cellular transmembrane voltage (Δφ) induced by external fields. We detail analytical equations for the transmembrane voltage induced by external high-frequency (above the relaxation frequency of the cell membrane) fields on cells of a spherical shape in suspensions and layers. At direct current (DC) and low frequencies, the cell membrane was assumed to be non-conductive under physiologic conditions. However, with increasing frequency, the permittivity of the cytoplasm/extracellular medium and conductivity of the membrane must be accounted for. Our main work is to extend application of the analytical solution of Δφ to the high-frequency range. We first introduce the transmembrane voltage generated by DC and low-frequency exposures on a single cell. Then, we focus on cell suspensions exposed to high-frequency fields. Using the effective medium theory and the reasonable assumption, the approximate analytical solution of Δφ on cells in suspensions and layers can be derived. Phenomenological effective medium theory equations cannot be used to calculate the local electric field of cell suspensions, so we raised a possible solution based on the Bergman theory.

  5. Theoretical Developments in Decision Field Theory: Comment on Tsetsos, Usher, and Chater (2010)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotaling, Jared M.; Busemeyer, Jerome R.; Li, Jiyun

    2010-01-01

    Tsetsos, Usher, and Chater (2010) presented several criticisms of decision field theory (DFT) involving its distance function, instability under externally controlled stopping times, and lack of robustness to various multialternative choice scenarios. Here, we counter those claims with a specification of a distance function based on the…

  6. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Flow Fields and Heat Transfer in Modern Gas Turbines.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-31

    34 NASA CR-2729, July 1977. 2 Thompson, J.F., Thames, F.C. and Mastin, C.W., "TOMCAT-- A Code for Numerical Generation of Boundary Fitted Curvilinear Coordinate Systems on Fields Containing Any Number of Arbitrary Two - Dimensional Bodies ." J

  7. MODEL OF THE FIELD LINE RANDOM WALK EVOLUTION AND APPROACH TO ASYMPTOTIC DIFFUSION IN MAGNETIC TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect

    Snodin, A. P.; Ruffolo, D.; Matthaeus, W. H. E-mail: david.ruf@mahidol.ac.th

    2013-01-01

    The turbulent random walk of magnetic field lines plays an important role in the transport of plasmas and energetic particles in a wide variety of astrophysical situations, but most theoretical work has concentrated on determination of the asymptotic field line diffusion coefficient. Here we consider the evolution with distance of the field line random walk using a general ordinary differential equation (ODE), which for most cases of interest in astrophysics describes a transition from free streaming to asymptotic diffusion. By challenging theories of asymptotic diffusion to also describe the evolution, one gains insight on how accurately they describe the random walk process. Previous theoretical work has effectively involved closure of the ODE, often by assuming Corrsin's hypothesis and a Gaussian displacement distribution. Approaches that use quasilinear theory and prescribe the mean squared displacement ({Delta}x {sup 2}) according to free streaming (random ballistic decorrelation, RBD) or asymptotic diffusion (diffusive decorrelation, DD) can match computer simulation results, but only over specific parameter ranges, with no obvious 'marker' of the range of validity. Here we make use of a unified description in which the ODE determines ({Delta}x {sup 2}) self-consistently, providing a natural transition between the assumptions of RBD and DD. We find that the minimum kurtosis of the displacement distribution provides a good indicator of whether the self-consistent ODE is applicable, i.e., inaccuracy of the self-consistent ODE is associated with non-Gaussian displacement distributions.

  8. Field theoretical model of multilayered Josephson junction and dynamics of Josephson vortices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Toshiaki; Iida, Hideaki; Nitta, Muneto

    2016-09-01

    Multilayered Josephson junctions are modeled in the context of a field theory, and dynamics of Josephson vortices trapped inside insulators are studied. Starting from a theory consisting of complex and real scalar fields coupled to a U(1) gauge field which admit parallel N -1 domain-wall solutions, Josephson couplings are introduced weakly between the complex scalar fields. The N -1 domain walls behave as insulators separating N superconductors, where one of the complex scalar fields has a gap. We construct the effective Lagrangian on the domain walls, which reduces to a coupled sine-Gordon model for well-separated walls and contains more interactions for walls at short distance. We then construct sine-Gordon solitons emerging in an effective theory in which we identify Josephson vortices carrying singly quantized magnetic fluxes. When two neighboring superconductors tend to have the same phase, the ground state does not change with the positions of domain walls (the width of superconductors). On the other hand, when two neighboring superconductors tend to have π -phase differences, the ground state has a phase transition depending on the positions of domain walls; when the two walls are close to each other (one superconductor is thin), frustration occurs because of the coupling between the two superconductors besides the thin superconductor. Focusing on the case of three superconductors separated by two insulators, we find for the former case that the interaction between two Josephson vortices on different insulators changes its nature, i.e., attractive or repulsive, depending on the positions of the domain walls. In the latter case, there emerges fractional Josephson vortices when two degenerate ground states appear due to spontaneous charge-symmetry breaking, and the number of the Josephson vortices varies with the position of the domain walls. Our predictions should be verified in multilayered Josephson junctions.

  9. Analysis of the electric field propagation method: theoretical model applied to perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fiber links.

    PubMed

    Montero, D S; Vázquez, C

    2011-10-15

    We evaluate a theoretical model based on the electric field propagation method but applied for the first time to amorphous perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fibers (PF GIPOFs). The belief is that a better understanding of the factors that affect the fiber frequency response will prove very useful in increasing the performance of PF-GIPOF-based optical links in real situations. The influence of some parameters involved in the frequency response is addressed, and results show experimental data that validate, with tolerable discrepancy, the model described applied to this kind of optical fibers.

  10. Ab-Initio Hamiltonian Approach to Light Nuclei And to Quantum Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Vary, J.P.; Honkanen, H.; Li, Jun; Maris, P.; Shirokov, A.M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; de Teramond, G.F.; Ng, E.G.; Yang, C.; Sosonkina, M.; /Ames Lab

    2012-06-22

    Nuclear structure physics is on the threshold of confronting several long-standing problems such as the origin of shell structure from basic nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions. At the same time those interactions are being developed with increasing contact to QCD, the underlying theory of the strong interactions, using effective field theory. The motivation is clear - QCD offers the promise of great predictive power spanning phenomena on multiple scales from quarks and gluons to nuclear structure. However, new tools that involve non-perturbative methods are required to build bridges from one scale to the next. We present an overview of recent theoretical and computational progress with a Hamiltonian approach to build these bridges and provide illustrative results for the nuclear structure of light nuclei and quantum field theory.

  11. A novel game theoretic approach for modeling competitive information diffusion in social networks with heterogeneous nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agha Mohammad Ali Kermani, Mehrdad; Fatemi Ardestani, Seyed Farshad; Aliahmadi, Alireza; Barzinpour, Farnaz

    2017-01-01

    Influence maximization deals with identification of the most influential nodes in a social network given an influence model. In this paper, a game theoretic framework is developed that models a competitive influence maximization problem. A novel competitive influence model is additionally proposed that incorporates user heterogeneity, message content, and network structure. The proposed game-theoretic model is solved using Nash Equilibrium in a real-world dataset. It is shown that none of the well-known strategies are stable and at least one player has the incentive to deviate from the proposed strategy. Moreover, violation of Nash equilibrium strategy by each player leads to their reduced payoff. Contrary to previous works, our results demonstrate that graph topology, as well as the nodes' sociability and initial tendency measures have an effect on the determination of the influential node in the network.

  12. Enhancement of figure of merit of thermoelectric materials: a new theoretical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sofi, A. H.; Abubakr, B.; Shah, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Thermoelectric materials have attained importance because of the gargantuan energy crisis the world faces today. A thermoelectric material can be used efficiently and frequently, provided, its figure of merit ZT is increased. Also, easy availability, manufacturing, and low cost are the other factors to be considered for a novel thermoelectric material. A theoretical model is proposed in this paper for the enhancement of the figure of merit of thermoelectric materials.

  13. Black hole state counting in loop quantum gravity: a number-theoretical approach.

    PubMed

    Agulló, Iván; Barbero G, J Fernando; Díaz-Polo, Jacobo; Fernández-Borja, Enrique; Villaseñor, Eduardo J S

    2008-05-30

    We give an efficient method, combining number-theoretic and combinatorial ideas, to exactly compute black hole entropy in the framework of loop quantum gravity. Along the way we provide a complete characterization of the relevant sector of the spectrum of the area operator, including degeneracies, and explicitly determine the number of solutions to the projection constraint. We use a computer implementation of the proposed algorithm to confirm and extend previous results on the detailed structure of the black hole degeneracy spectrum.

  14. Defining and measuring blood donor altruism: a theoretical approach from biology, economics and psychology.

    PubMed

    Evans, R; Ferguson, E

    2014-02-01

    While blood donation is traditionally described as a behaviour motivated by pure altruism, the assessment of altruism in the blood donation literature has not been theoretically informed. Drawing on theories of altruism from psychology, economics and evolutionary biology, it is argued that a theoretically derived psychometric assessment of altruism is needed. Such a measure is developed in this study that can be used to help inform both our understanding of the altruistic motives of blood donors and recruitment intervention strategies. A cross-sectional survey (N = 414), with a 1-month behavioural follow-up (time 2, N = 77), was designed to assess theoretically derived constructs from psychological, economic and evolutionary biological theories of altruism. Theory of planned behaviour (TPB) variables and co-operation were also assessed at time 1 and a measure of behavioural co-operation at time 2. Five theoretical dimensions (impure altruism, kinship, self-regarding motives, reluctant altruism and egalitarian warm glow) of altruism were identified through factor analyses. These five altruistic motives differentiated blood donors from non-donors (donors scored higher on impure altruism and reluctant altruism), showed incremental validity over TPB constructs to predict donor intention and predicted future co-operative behaviour. These findings show that altruism in the context of blood donation is multifaceted and complex and, does not reflect pure altruism. This has implication for recruitment campaigns that focus solely on pure altruism. © 2013 The Authors. Vox Sanguinis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. on behalf of International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  15. Robot Path Planning in Uncertain Environments: A Language-Measure-Theoretic Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    effects of these dis- turbances is critical for mission success. Consequently, the algo- rithms of path planning must be capable of real -time execution...of robust adaptation in real time [5]. The situation becomes worse for lack of observability, because the formulation of a partially observable MDP...would become com- putationally intractable for a real -time solution. Language-measure-theoretic path planning offers an inherent advantage of global

  16. Phenomenological approach to a hyperkagome spin liquid: Emergent gauge fields and spinons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yuan; Kim, Yong Baek

    2016-12-01

    A number of experiments on the hyperkagome iridate, Na4Ir3O8 , suggest existence of a gapless quantum spin liquid state at low temperature. Circumventing the slave-particle approach commonly used in theoretical analyses of frustrated magnets, we provide a more intuitive, albeit more phenomenological, construction of a quantum spin liquid state for the hyperkagome Heisenberg model. An effective monomer-dimer model on the hyperkagome lattice is proposed à la Hao and Tchernyshyov's approach cultivated from the Husimi cactus model. Employing an arrow representation for the monomer-dimer model, we obtain a compact U (1 ) gauge theory with a finite density of fermionic spinons on the hyperoctagon lattice. The resulting theory and its mean-field treatment are consistent with previous slave-particle construction of a quantum spin liquid state on the hyperkagome lattice. Our results offer novel insights into the emergence of spinon Fermi surfaces and useful predictions for future experiments.

  17. δ-Cut decision-theoretic rough set approach: model and attribute reductions.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hengrong; Dou, Huili; Qi, Yong; Yu, Hualong; Yu, Dongjun; Yang, Jingyu

    2014-01-01

    Decision-theoretic rough set is a quite useful rough set by introducing the decision cost into probabilistic approximations of the target. However, Yao's decision-theoretic rough set is based on the classical indiscernibility relation; such a relation may be too strict in many applications. To solve this problem, a δ-cut decision-theoretic rough set is proposed, which is based on the δ-cut quantitative indiscernibility relation. Furthermore, with respect to criterions of decision-monotonicity and cost decreasing, two different algorithms are designed to compute reducts, respectively. The comparisons between these two algorithms show us the following: (1) with respect to the original data set, the reducts based on decision-monotonicity criterion can generate more rules supported by the lower approximation region and less rules supported by the boundary region, and it follows that the uncertainty which comes from boundary region can be decreased; (2) with respect to the reducts based on decision-monotonicity criterion, the reducts based on cost minimum criterion can obtain the lowest decision costs and the largest approximation qualities. This study suggests potential application areas and new research trends concerning rough set theory.

  18. δ-Cut Decision-Theoretic Rough Set Approach: Model and Attribute Reductions

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hengrong; Dou, Huili; Qi, Yong; Yu, Hualong; Yu, Dongjun; Yang, Jingyu

    2014-01-01

    Decision-theoretic rough set is a quite useful rough set by introducing the decision cost into probabilistic approximations of the target. However, Yao's decision-theoretic rough set is based on the classical indiscernibility relation; such a relation may be too strict in many applications. To solve this problem, a δ-cut decision-theoretic rough set is proposed, which is based on the δ-cut quantitative indiscernibility relation. Furthermore, with respect to criterions of decision-monotonicity and cost decreasing, two different algorithms are designed to compute reducts, respectively. The comparisons between these two algorithms show us the following: (1) with respect to the original data set, the reducts based on decision-monotonicity criterion can generate more rules supported by the lower approximation region and less rules supported by the boundary region, and it follows that the uncertainty which comes from boundary region can be decreased; (2) with respect to the reducts based on decision-monotonicity criterion, the reducts based on cost minimum criterion can obtain the lowest decision costs and the largest approximation qualities. This study suggests potential application areas and new research trends concerning rough set theory. PMID:25147847

  19. Conceptual and empirical problems with game theoretic approaches to language evolution

    PubMed Central

    Watumull, Jeffrey; Hauser, Marc D.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of game theoretic models to evolutionary theory has been in formulating elegant equations that specify the strategies to be played and the conditions to be satisfied for particular traits to evolve. These models, in conjunction with experimental tests of their predictions, have successfully described and explained the costs and benefits of varying strategies and the dynamics for establishing equilibria in a number of evolutionary scenarios, including especially cooperation, mating, and aggression. Over the past decade or so, game theory has been applied to model the evolution of language. In contrast to the aforementioned scenarios, however, we argue that these models are problematic due to conceptual confusions and empirical difficiences. In particular, these models conflate the comptutations and representations of our language faculty (mechanism) with its utility in communication (function); model languages as having different fitness functions for which there is no evidence; depend on assumptions for the starting state of the system, thereby begging the question of how these systems evolved; and to date, have generated no empirical studies at all. Game theoretic models of language evolution have therefore failed to advance how or why language evolved, or why it has the particular representations and computations that it does. We conclude with some brief suggestions for how this situation might be ameliorated, enabling this important theoretical tool to make substantive empirical contributions. PMID:24678305

  20. Practical approaches to field problems of stationary combustion systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.W.

    1997-09-01

    The CANMET Energy Technology Centre (CETC) business plan dictates collaboration with industrial clients and other government agencies to promote energy efficiency, health and safety, pollution reduction and productivity enhancement. The Advanced Combustion Technologies group of CETC provides consultation to numerous organizations in combustion related areas by conducting laboratory and field investigations of fossil fuel-fired combustion equipment. CETC, with its modern research facilities and technical expertise, has taken this practical approach since the seventies and has assisted many organizations in overcoming field problems and in providing cost saving measures and improved profit margins. This paper presents a few selected research projects conducted for industrial clients in north and central America. The combustion systems investigated are mostly liquid fuel fired, with the exception of the utility boiler which was coal-fired. The key areas involved include fuel quality, fuel storage/delivery system contamination, waste derived oils, crude oil combustion, unacceptable pollutant emissions, ambient soot deposition, slagging, fouling, boiler component degradation, and particulate characterization. Some of the practical approaches taken to remedy these field problems on several combustion systems including residential, commercial and industrial scale units are discussed.