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Sample records for field water balances

  1. Field Water Balance of Landfill Final Covers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Landfill covers are critical to waste containment, yet field performance of specific cover designs has not been well documented and seldom been compared in side-by-side testing. A study was conducted to assess the ability of landfill final covers to control percolation into unde...

  2. Effect of spatial variation of textural layers on regional field water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weidong; Li, Baoguo; Shi, Yuanchun; Jacques, Diederik; Feyen, Jan

    2001-05-01

    The spatial variability of textural layers is a major factor influencing the field water and solute transport in alluvial soils. To quantify the water transport process at a regional scale accurately, one has to take the spatial variability of textural layers into account. In this paper, a recently presented Markov chain simulation model for soil textural profiles was coupled with a deterministic field water balance model to conduct a stochastic analysis of the field water balance in a 15 km2 alluvial soil region. The aim is to assess the effect of spatial variability of textural layers on the field water balance at a regional scale. By combining simulated soil textural profiles with the field water balance model, the mean values, extreme values, and probability distributions of field water balance variables were calculated. Results showed large differences in the magnitude of soil water balance variables between different profiles. The extreme difference in the water storage in 1 m depth soil during the winter wheat growth varied with time between 175 mm and 180 mm, which accounted for 86.5-135.0% of the mean of the soil water storage. This indicates that the soil water balance variables derived from only a few soil profiles are not representative for the situation of field water balance in the entire region. The simulated root water uptake showed different types of probability density functions when the soil water storage and the deficit of soil water in the field changed with time. The simulated water storage in 1 m depth soil showed obviously a lognormal distribution, but the measured data showed an approximate normal distribution. It may be heterogeneous irrigation and cropping and some other factors that induce this discrepancy.

  3. Balancing the Interactions of Ions, Water, and DNA in the Drude Polarizable Force Field

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Recently we presented a first-generation all-atom Drude polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model, focusing on optimization of key dihedral angles followed by extensive validation of the force field parameters. Presently, we describe the procedure for balancing the electrostatic interactions between ions, water, and DNA as required for development of the Drude force field for DNA. The proper balance of these interactions is shown to impact DNA stability and subtler conformational properties, including the conformational equilibrium between the BI and BII states, and the A and B forms of DNA. The parametrization efforts were simultaneously guided by gas-phase quantum mechanics (QM) data on small model compounds and condensed-phase experimental data on the hydration and osmotic properties of biologically relevant ions and their solutions, as well as theoretical predictions for ionic distribution around DNA oligomer. In addition, fine-tuning of the internal base parameters was performed to obtain the final DNA model. Notably, the Drude model is shown to more accurately reproduce counterion condensation theory predictions of DNA charge neutralization by the condensed ions as compared to the CHARMM36 additive DNA force field, indicating an improved physical description of the forces dictating the ionic solvation of DNA due to the explicit treatment of electronic polarizability. In combination with the polarizable DNA force field, the availability of Drude polarizable parameters for proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates will allow for simulation studies of heterogeneous biological systems. PMID:24874104

  4. Balancing the interactions of ions, water, and DNA in the Drude polarizable force field.

    PubMed

    Savelyev, Alexey; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2014-06-19

    Recently we presented a first-generation all-atom Drude polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model, focusing on optimization of key dihedral angles followed by extensive validation of the force field parameters. Presently, we describe the procedure for balancing the electrostatic interactions between ions, water, and DNA as required for development of the Drude force field for DNA. The proper balance of these interactions is shown to impact DNA stability and subtler conformational properties, including the conformational equilibrium between the BI and BII states, and the A and B forms of DNA. The parametrization efforts were simultaneously guided by gas-phase quantum mechanics (QM) data on small model compounds and condensed-phase experimental data on the hydration and osmotic properties of biologically relevant ions and their solutions, as well as theoretical predictions for ionic distribution around DNA oligomer. In addition, fine-tuning of the internal base parameters was performed to obtain the final DNA model. Notably, the Drude model is shown to more accurately reproduce counterion condensation theory predictions of DNA charge neutralization by the condensed ions as compared to the CHARMM36 additive DNA force field, indicating an improved physical description of the forces dictating the ionic solvation of DNA due to the explicit treatment of electronic polarizability. In combination with the polarizable DNA force field, the availability of Drude polarizable parameters for proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates will allow for simulation studies of heterogeneous biological systems. PMID:24874104

  5. Water balance and soil moisture dynamics of field plots with barley and grass ley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnsson, Holger; Jansson, Per-Erik

    1991-12-01

    A physically based soilwater and heat model was used to estimate the water balance of an arable field in central Sweden for each of three different crop covers (barley with and without N fertilization and grass ley). Annual water balances were calculated for each year from 1981 to 1985. On-site measurements of soil physical properties, meteorological variables and plant development were used as input to the model. Simulated soil forst, snow cover, soilwater contents, soilwater tensions and relative differences in simulated drainage between treatments were in agreement with the corresponding measured values. In the simulation, surface runoff (70 mm year -1 in all treatments) mainly occurred during snowmelt periods and accounted for much of the variation in the total runoff estimate. Annual mean precipitation amounted to 610 mm year -1, whereas average evapotranspiration was calculated to be 320, 360 and 435 mm year -1 in barley without N fertilization, barley with N fertilization and grass ley, respectively. Soil evaporation accounted for 60, 43 and 23% whereas evaporation of intercepted water accounted for 5, 12 and 19% of the total evapotranspiration, respectively. Drainage estimates amounted to 205, 170 and 110 mm year -1.

  6. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 1: Integrated approach and field campaign results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Vugts, H. F.; Ramothwa, G. K.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. Results of the first part of the program (Botswana 1) which ran from 1 Jan. 1988 - 31 Dec. 1990 are summarized. Botswana 1 consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components in general are described and activities performed during the surface energy modeling component including the extensive field campaign are summarized. The results of the passive microwave component are summarized. The key of the field campaign was a multilevel approach, whereby measurements by various similar sensors were made at several altitudes and resolution. Data collection was performed at two adjacent sites of contrasting surface character. The following measurements were made: micrometeorological measurements, surface temperatures, soil temperatures, soil moisture, vegetation (leaf area index and biomass), satellite data, aircraft data, atmospheric soundings, stomatal resistance, and surface emissivity.

  7. Skylab water balance analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    The water balance of the Skylab crew was analyzed. Evaporative water loss using a whole body input/output balance equation, water, body tissue, and energy balance was analyzed. The approach utilizes the results of several major Skylab medical experiments. Subsystems were designed for the use of the software necessary for the analysis. A partitional water balance that graphically depicts the changes due to water intake is presented. The energy balance analysis determines the net available energy to the individual crewman during any period. The balances produce a visual description of the total change of a particular body component during the course of the mission. The information is salvaged from metabolic balance data if certain techniques are used to reduce errors inherent in the balance method.

  8. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field dominated basin in Southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-02-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are declining as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of streamflow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River Basin in southern China where massive industrialization has occurred in the region during the past three decades. We found that streamflow increased by 58% and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23% during 1986-2013 as a result of an increase in urban areas of three folds and reduction of rice paddy field by 27%. Both highflows and lowflows increased significantly by about 28% from 2002 to 2013. The increases in streamflow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS data. The reduction in ET and increase in streamflow was attributed to the large cropland conversion that overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from a water-dominated to a human-dominated landscape, and thus was considered as one of the extreme types of contemporary hydrologic disturbances. The ongoing large-scale urbanization in the rice paddy-dominated regions in the humid southern China, and East Asia, will likely elevate stormflow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban heat island effects. Understanding the linkage between land use change and changes in hydrological processes is essential for better management of urbanizing watersheds.

  9. Urbanization dramatically altered the water balances of a paddy field-dominated basin in southern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, L.; Sun, G.; Liu, Y.; Wan, J.; Qin, M.; Qian, H.; Liu, C.; Zheng, J.; John, R.; Fan, P.; Chen, J.

    2015-07-01

    Rice paddy fields provide important ecosystem services (e.g., food production, water retention, carbon sequestration) to a large population globally. However, these benefits are diminishing as a result of rapid environmental and socioeconomic transformations, characterized by population growth, urbanization, and climate change in many Asian countries. This case study examined the responses of stream flow and watershed water balances to the decline of rice paddy fields due to urbanization in the Qinhuai River basin in southern China, where massive industrialization has occurred during the past 3 decades. We found that stream flow increased by 58 % and evapotranspiration (ET) decreased by 23 % during 1986-2013 as a result of a three-fold increase in urban areas and a reduction of rice paddy fields by 27 %. Both high flows and low flows increased significantly by about 28 % from 2002 to 2013. The increases in stream flow were consistent with the decreases in ET and leaf area index monitored by independent remote sensing MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data. Attribution analysis, based on two empirical models, indicated that land-use/land-cover change contributed about 82-108 % of the observed increase in stream flow from 353 ± 287 mm yr-1 during 1986-2002 to 556 ± 145 during 2003-2013. We concluded that the reduction in ET was largely attributed to the conversion of cropland to urban use. The effects of land-use change overwhelmed the effects of regional climate warming and climate variability. Converting traditional rice paddy fields to urban use dramatically altered land surface conditions from an artificial wetland-dominated landscape to an urban land-use- dominated one, and thus was considered an extreme type of contemporary hydrologic disturbance. The ongoing large-scale urbanization of the rice paddy-dominated regions, in humid southern China and East Asia, will likely elevate storm-flow volume, aggravate flood risks, and intensify urban

  10. Estimation of Actual Crop ET of Paddy Using the Energy Balance Model SMARET and Validation with Field Water Balance Measurements and a Crop Growth Model (ORYZA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nallasamy, N. D.; Muraleedharan, B. V.; Kathirvel, K.; Narasimhan, B.

    2014-12-01

    Sustainable management of water resources requires reliable estimates of actual evapotranspiration (ET) at fine spatial and temporal resolution. This is significant in the case of rice based irrigation systems, one of the major consumers of surface water resources and where ET forms a major component of water consumption. However huge tradeoff in the spatial and temporal resolution of satellite images coupled with lack of adequate number of cloud free images within a growing season act as major constraints in deriving ET at fine spatial and temporal resolution using remote sensing based energy balance models. The scale at which ET is determined is decided by the spatial and temporal scale of Land Surface Temperature (LST) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), which form inputs to energy balance models. In this context, the current study employed disaggregation algorithms (NL-DisTrad and DisNDVI) to generate time series of LST and NDVI images at fine resolution. The disaggregation algorithms aimed at generating LST and NDVI at finer scale by integrating temporal information from concurrent coarse resolution data and spatial information from a single fine resolution image. The temporal frequency of the disaggregated images is further improved by employing composite images of NDVI and LST in the spatio-temporal disaggregation method. The study further employed half-hourly incoming surface insolation and outgoing long wave radiation obtained from the Indian geostationary satellite (Kalpana-1) to convert the instantaneous ET into daily ET and subsequently to the seasonal ET, thereby improving the accuracy of ET estimates. The estimates of ET were validated with field based water balance measurements carried out in Gadana, a subbasin predominated by rice paddy fields, located in Tamil Nadu, India.

  11. 3-D modeling of water balance and soil erosion in a clayey subsurface drained agricultural field in boreal climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turunen, M.; Warsta, L.; Koivusalo, H. J.; Paasonen-Kivekäs, M.; Nurminen, J.; Myllys, M.; Alakukku, L.; Äijö, H.; Puustinen, M.

    2012-12-01

    Fluxes of nutrients and other substances from cultivated fields cause eutrophication and deterioration of water quality in aquatic ecosystems worldwide. In order to develop effective strategies to control the environmental impacts of crop cultivation, it is crucial to identify the main transport pathways and the effects of different water management methods on the loads. Reduction of sediment loads is essential since sediment particles typically carry nutrients (especially sorbed phosphorus) and other potentially harmful substances, e.g. pesticides, from the fields to the adjacent surface waters. The novel part of this study was the investigation of suspended sediment transport in soil macropores to the subsurface drains and to the deep groundwater. We applied a 3-D distributed dual-permeability model (FLUSH) using a dataset collected from a subsurface drained, clayey agricultural field (15 ha) to holistically assess water balance, soil erosion and sediment transport from the field to an adjacent stream. The data set included five years of hydrological and water quality measurements from four intensively monitored field sections with different soil properties, topography, drainage systems (drain spacing and drain depth), drain installation methods (trenchless and trench drainage) and drain envelope materials (gravel and fiber). The 3-D model allowed us to quantify how soil erosion and sediment transport differed between the field sections within the field area. The simulations were conducted during snow- and frost-free periods. The simulation results include closure of water balance of the cultivated field, distribution of soil erosion and sediment transport within the field area and the effects of different subsurface drainage systems on sediment loads. The 3-D dual-permeability subsurface flow model was able to reproduce the measured drainflows and sediment fluxes in the clayey field and according to the simulations over 90% of drainflow waters were conveyed to

  12. Par Pond water balance

    SciTech Connect

    Hiergesell, R.A.; Dixon, K.L.

    1996-06-01

    A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs.

  13. Regulation of water and sodium balance in the field by Australian honeyeaters (Aves: Meliphagidae).

    PubMed

    Goldstein, D L; Bradshaw, S D

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated the use of water and sodium by free-living individuals of several species of Australian honeyeaters (Acanthorhynchos superciliosus, Phylidonyris novaehollandiae, Phylidonyris nigra, Manorina flavigula, and Anthochaera carunculata). Water and Na fluxes were highly variable between species, largely reflecting differences in diet. Water fluxes ranged from approximately 300% of total body water per day in 10-g, nectarivorous A. superciliosus to approximately 45% of total body water per day, typical of a desert species, in M. flavigula, a 50-g, insectivorous, arid-zone bird. Similarly, Na fluxes ranged from nearly 60% of Na pool per day in A. superciliosus to about 25% per day in M. flavigula. Despite these different fluxes, values of regulated osmoregulatory variables, including plasma osmolality, hematocrit, plasma concentrations of Na+ and K+, and exchangeable Na pool, were relatively invariant both between species and within species at different seasons. In contrast, values of variables reflecting the operation of regulatory systems did differ between species and seasons. Urine concentrations were highest in M. flavigula and, in A. carunculata, varied seasonally (higher in summer than winter). Plasma concentrations of aldosterone were lowest in A. carunculata (5-25 pg/mL), highest in P. novaehollandiae (70-200 pg/mL), and in the latter species were higher in winter than summer. Concentrations of arginine vasotocin ranged from 5 pg/mL in A. carunculata to greater than 30 pg/mL in M. flavigula. Our data demonstrate that within the family Meliphagidae, there exists substantial variation in the fluxes of water and Na and that these relate in part to body size variation but more importantly to diet. The different fluxes between species are reflected in the values of numerous osmoregulatory variables.

  14. Influence of potential evapotranspiration on the water balance of sugarcane fields in Maui, Hawaii

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The year-long warm temperatures and other climatic characteristics of the Pacific Ocean Islands have made Hawaii an optimum place for growing sugarcane; however, irrigation is essential to satisfy the large water demand of sugarcane. Under the Hawaiian tropical weather, actual evapotranspiration (A...

  15. Skylab water balance error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, J. I.

    1977-01-01

    Estimates of the precision of the net water balance were obtained for the entire Skylab preflight and inflight phases as well as for the first two weeks of flight. Quantitative estimates of both total sampling errors and instrumentation errors were obtained. It was shown that measurement error is minimal in comparison to biological variability and little can be gained from improvement in analytical accuracy. In addition, a propagation of error analysis demonstrated that total water balance error could be accounted for almost entirely by the errors associated with body mass changes. Errors due to interaction between terms in the water balance equation (covariances) represented less than 10% of the total error. Overall, the analysis provides evidence that daily measurements of body water changes obtained from the indirect balance technique are reasonable, precise, and relaible. The method is not biased toward net retention or loss.

  16. Ecological Elements of Water Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, X.; Fisher, S. G.; Grimm, N. B.

    2011-12-01

    In simplest terms, "water balance" can refer to the water budget in a bounded system within a specified time frame. While this mass-balance approach is important, a broader concept that includes ecological notions of balance, stability, and feedbacks is useful, especially when management goals extend to maintenance of ecological health and ecosystem integrity concomitant with water delivery. Here, we propose three ecological elements to enrich the concept of hydrologic balance. (1) A spatially explicit perspective of water and nutrient balance replaces the holistic view. For example, in fluvial landscapes, routing of water generates hydrologic connectivity via flowpaths and creates a hydrologic network. Important patches in the network include hillslopes, floodplains, riparian areas, surface channels, and hyporheic zones, each of which is characterized by unique biogeochemical processes. Different hydrologic network structures have different nutrient-removal capacities, which depend upon how their flowpaths intersect patch-specific processing. The connectivity among these patches is an important variable influencing nutrient-retention capacity of landscapes, and thereby the resulting water quality in receiving systems. (2) Temporal regime is an important component of balance. Organisms in a fluvial landscape reflect the inherent time schedule of the system, as a result of long-term interactions and adaptation to the environment. In aridland streams, the drying and flood cycle select flora whose life cycles and activities fit the hydrological regime. The existence of particular species relies on the temporal distribution of water-the input regime-more than the integral input and output balance. The match of organism life cycle and hydrologic regime is the basis for biodiversity and ecosystem functions. (3) Ecosystems are self-organized systems based on feedbacks among organisms and between organisms and the abiotic environment. They do not simply respond to

  17. Field balancing in the real world

    SciTech Connect

    Bracher, B.

    1997-09-05

    Field balancing can achieve significant results when other problems are present in the frequency spectrum and multiple vibrations are evident in the waveform. Many references suggest eliminating other problems before attempting to balance. That`s great - if you can do it. There are valid reasons for this approach, and it would be much easier to balance machinery when other problems have been corrected. It is the theoretical ideal in field balancing. However, in the real world of machinery maintained for years by reacting to immediate problems, the classic vibration signature for unbalance is rarely seen. Maintenance personnel make most of their decisions with limited information. The decision to balance or not to balance is usually made the same way. This paper will demonstrate significant results of field balancing in the presence of multiple problems. By examining the data available and analyzing the probabilities, a reasonable chance for success can be assured.

  18. Simulation of water balance in a clayey, subsurface drained agricultural field with three-dimensional FLUSH model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warsta, Lassi; Karvonen, Tuomo; Koivusalo, Harri; Paasonen-Kivekäs, Maija; Taskinen, Antti

    2013-01-01

    SummaryWater flow is a key component in the evaluation of soil erosion and nutrient loads from agricultural fields. Field cultivation is the main non-point pollution source threatening water quality of surface waters in Nordic and many other countries. Few models exist that can describe key hydrological processes in clayey soils, i.e. overland flow, preferential flow in macropores and soil shrinkage and swelling. A new three-dimensional (3-D) distributed numerical model called FLUSH is introduced in this study to simulate these processes. FLUSH describes overland flow with the diffuse wave simplification of the Saint Venant equations and subsurface flow with a dual-permeability approach using the Richards equation in both macropore and matrix pore systems. A method based on the pentadiagonal matrix algorithm solves flow in both macropore and matrix systems directly in a column of cells in the computational grid. Flow between the columns is solved with iteration accelerated with OpenMP parallelisation. The model validity is tested with data from a 3-D analytical model and a clayey subsurface drained agricultural field in southern Finland. According to the simulation results, over 99% of the drainflow originated from the macropore system and drainflow started in some cases within the same hour when precipitation started indicating preferential flow in the profile. The moisture content of the clay soil had a profound effect on runoff distribution between surface runoff and drainflow. In summer, when the soil was dry and cracked, drainflow dominated the total runoff, while in autumn, when the shrinkage crack network had swollen shut, surface runoff fraction clearly increased. Observed differences in surface runoff fraction before and after tillage indicated that the operation decreased hydraulic conductivity of the profile.

  19. Water balance dynamics in the Nile Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, G.B.; Asante, Kwasi; Artan, G.

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the temporal and spatial dynamics of key water balance components of the Nile River will provide important information for the management of its water resources. This study used satellite-derived rainfall and other key weather variables derived from the Global Data Assimilation System to estimate and map the distribution of rainfall, actual evapotranspiration (ETa), and runoff. Daily water balance components were modelled in a grid-cell environment at 0.1 degree (~10 km) spatial resolution for 7 years from 2001 through 2007. Annual maps of the key water balance components and derived variables such as runoff and ETa as a percent of rainfall were produced. Generally, the spatial patterns of rainfall and ETa indicate high values in the upstream watersheds (Uganda, southern Sudan, and southwestern Ethiopia) and low values in the downstream watersheds. However, runoff as a percent of rainfall is much higher in the Ethiopian highlands around the Blue Nile subwatershed. The analysis also showed the possible impact of land degradation in the Ethiopian highlands in reducing ETa magnitudes despite the availability of sufficient rainfall. Although the model estimates require field validation for the different subwatersheds, the runoff volume estimate for the Blue Nile subwatershed is within 7.0% of a figure reported from an earlier study. Further research is required for a thorough validation of the results and their integration with ecohydrologic models for better management of water and land resources in the various Nile Basin ecosystems. Published in 2009 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Field measurement of seepage and evapotranspiration rate for a soil under plant cover: A comparison of soil water balance and tritium labeling procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreutzer, K.; Strebel, O.; Renger, M.

    1980-08-01

    Vertical water flux at 90 cm depth and evapotranspiration were measured in a loess Parabraunerde soil profile, under spring wheat and sugar beets, respectively, during a time period of nearly 21 months. Two field methods were compared: the HTO-tracer method (labeling soil water at a depth of 60 cm followed by core sampling) and the soil water balance method (measuring soil water suction and water content as a function of depth and time). Outside the vegetation season the results of the two methods agreed well, but not during the vegetation season. The reason is that the reference soil compartment, with its reference depth of 90 cm, lies within the root zone and the HTO-method does not correctly reflect the water flux through the roots and the water withdrawal by the roots from this reference compartment. It is shown, that after correcting the HTO-values for these root-activity-dependent effects, a good agreement between the two methods was found also during periods with root activity. Investigations with the HTO-method lead to inaccurate results if the reference depth or the median value of the tracer distribution lie within the zone of active roots.

  1. Quantitative analysis of water use of forests in comparison to agricultural fields in Flanders using time series techniques and the water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Veroustraete, F.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.

    2003-04-01

    It is assumed that evapotranspiration from forests is larger than that from any other vegetation type. In the literature, examples in conflict are found. The objective of this study is to compare the water use terms of forest stands with those of agricultural crops in Flanders by implementing calibrated and validated model parameters for the different vegetations types in the water balance model WAVE (Vanclooster et al., 1994, 1996) for a simulation period with a time horizon of 30 years (1971-2000). The data analysis of the time series of the different water use terms is carried out at two levels: (1) the analysis of each individual time series using autocorrelation detection, trend analysis (Mann-Kendall) and autoregressive models (AR, Durbin-Watson) and; (2) grouping of the time series according to the distinctive factor, being water use of forest stands and agricultural crops. Mixed General Linear Models and Profile Analysis are implemented. The actual vegetation transpiration, the actual soil and interception evaporation of the different tree and crop species are compared as well as the general agricultural crop and forest stand. From this study it can be concluded that different statistical methods suggest that forest in Flanders does consume more water than agricultural crops. The water use terms also differ for the two land-use types considered. Generally only a few trends and autocorrelations are detected, especially in the time series from agricultural crops.

  2. Towards a Fully Conservative Water Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, L. B.; Vionnet, C. A.; Younger, P. L.; Parkin, G.

    2001-12-01

    Hydrological modeling is nowadays an essential tool in many aspects of water resources assessment and management. For practical purposes, hydrological models may be defined as mathematical procedures, which transform meteorological input data such as precipitation and evapotranspiration into hydrological output values such as riverflows. Conceptual water balance models are one kind of hydrological models still quite popular among engineers and scientists for three main reasons: firstly the "book-keeping" procedure they are based upon makes them computationally inexpensive, secondly, they require far less data than any physically based model, and thirdly, once calibrated and validated, they can yield the proper order of magnitude of the water cycle component on the basin under investigation. A common criticism of water balance models is their lack of sound theoretical basis. In this work a fully conservative water balance model for basin applications which takes into account physical processes is presented. The two-storage level model contains four calibration parameters: a, b, l and Umax. The saturated storage component resembles the abcd model by Thomas, corrected by the presence of the aquifer storativity coefficient s and the river-aquifer interface conductance l. The resulting model is capable of estimating monthly basin-average of actual evapotranspiration, soil moisture, effective groundwater recharge, groundwater level fluctuations, baseflows and direct runoff using an integral form of the mass conservation law in the saturated/unsaturated layers. The model was applied to a 600 Km2 catchment in the United Kingdom. An eight-year record was used for calibration, while a similar record was reserved for validation of model results. Total streamflows as well as baseflows calculated by the model were compared with observed and estimated data. A quite good agreement was obtained. Finally, simulated groundwater levels were compared with observation data collected at

  3. [Disorders in sodium-water balance].

    PubMed

    Petitclerc, Thierry

    2013-02-01

    Water balance control is aimed at normalizing cellular hydration, and sodium balance control at normalizing extracellular volume. Water balance control is based on the regulation of body fluid tonicity, while the control of sodium balance is based on the regulation of effective arterial volume. Disorders of water balance act on cellular hydration: primary disorders induce a proportional change in tonicity; secondary disorders are induced by a change in tonicity or effective arterial volume. Disorders of sodium balance act on extracellular volume: primary disorders of sodium balance induce a change in effective arterial volume; secondary disorders are induced by a change in effective arterial volume. Physical examination of the patient allows assessing the extracellular volume and the severity of the sodium balance disorder. Natremia - that generally reflects tonicity - allows to assess cellular hydration and to determine the type of water balance disorder. In the case of natremia disturbance, the assessment of both the tonicity and the extracellular volume allows the determination of the type of water and/or sodium balance disorder that is necessary for prescribing the adequate therapy. PMID:23177272

  4. Analyzing Hydrological Sustainability Through Water Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menció, Anna; Folch, Albert; Mas-Pla, Josep

    2010-05-01

    The objective of the Water Framework Directive (2000/60/EC) is to assist in the development of management plans that will lead to the sustainable use of water resources in all EU member states. However, defining the degree of sustainability aimed at is not a straightforward task. It requires detailed knowledge of the hydrogeological characteristics of the basin in question, its environmental needs, the amount of human water demand, and the opportunity to construct a proper water balance that describes the behavior of the hydrological system and estimates available water resources. An analysis of the water balance in the Selva basin (Girona, NE Spain) points to the importance of regional groundwater fluxes in satisfying current exploitation rates, and shows that regional scale approaches are often necessary to evaluate water availability. In addition, we discuss the pressures on water resources, and analyze potential actions, based on the water balance results, directed towards achieving sustainable water management in the basin.

  5. Population and water resources: a delicate balance.

    PubMed

    Falkenmark, M; Widstrand, C

    1992-11-01

    Various avenues exist to minimize the effects of the current water crisis in some regions of the world and the more widespread problems that will threaten the world in the future. Active management of existing water resources and a reduction in population growth in water-scarce areas are needed to minimize the effects of the water crisis. National boundaries do not effect water systems. Cooperation and commitment of local, national, and international governments, institutions, and other organizations are needed to manage water systems. Development in each country must entail conscientious and effective balancing of unavoidable manipulations of the land and the unavoidable environmental impacts of those manipulations. The conditions of environmental sustainability must include protection of land productivity, ground water potability, and biodiversity. Humans must deal with these factors either by adopting methods to protect natural systems or by correcting existing damage and reducing future problems. They need to understand the demographic forces in each country so they can balance society's rising needs for clean water with the finite amount of water available. Factors affecting future needs at all levels include rapid rural-urban migration, high fertility, and changing patterns of international population movement. Given an increased awareness of global water systems, demographic trends, and active management of resources, the fragile balance between population and water can be maintained. PMID:12344702

  6. Population and water resources: a delicate balance.

    PubMed

    Falkenmark, M; Widstrand, C

    1992-11-01

    Various avenues exist to minimize the effects of the current water crisis in some regions of the world and the more widespread problems that will threaten the world in the future. Active management of existing water resources and a reduction in population growth in water-scarce areas are needed to minimize the effects of the water crisis. National boundaries do not effect water systems. Cooperation and commitment of local, national, and international governments, institutions, and other organizations are needed to manage water systems. Development in each country must entail conscientious and effective balancing of unavoidable manipulations of the land and the unavoidable environmental impacts of those manipulations. The conditions of environmental sustainability must include protection of land productivity, ground water potability, and biodiversity. Humans must deal with these factors either by adopting methods to protect natural systems or by correcting existing damage and reducing future problems. They need to understand the demographic forces in each country so they can balance society's rising needs for clean water with the finite amount of water available. Factors affecting future needs at all levels include rapid rural-urban migration, high fertility, and changing patterns of international population movement. Given an increased awareness of global water systems, demographic trends, and active management of resources, the fragile balance between population and water can be maintained.

  7. Regulation of urine reprocessing in the maintenance of sodium and water balance in the terrestrial Christmas Island red crab Gecarcoidea natalis investigated under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Morris, Stephen; Ahern, Mark D

    2003-08-01

    Land crabs produce isosmotic urine but reduce salt loss by reabsorbing salt via the gills to produce a dilute excretory fluid (P). This branchial salt reclamation is regulated in response to changes in dietary salt availability. The regulation of branchial Na reabsorption and osmotic status was investigated in the terrestrial crab Gecarcoidea natalis on Christmas Island. Confinement within field enclosures had no general effect on salt and water balance compared with crabs free in the rainforest but there were seasonal effects. Extracellular fluid volume was 27.9% body mass during the wet season but only 22.7% in the dry season. Urine production was 53 ml kg(-1) day(-1) in the dry season but 111 ml kg(-1) day(-1) in the wet season, while water flux rates were 140 ml kg(-1) day(-1) and 280 ml kg(-1) day(-1), respectively. Serotonin but not dopamine increased urine production by at least 16% but only during the dry season when rates were seasonally lowered. Crabs acclimated to drinking 50% seawater increased haemolymph osmotic pressure and downregulated branchial reabsorption of salt. Net Na flux (J(net)) and unidirectional Na influx (J(in)) were investigated in branchial perfusion experiments. In red crabs acclimated to drinking freshwater, J(in), J(net) and the activity of the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase were increased by serotonin, indicating that the increase of sodium absorption was due to a stimulation of the ATPase. Red crabs drinking 50% seawater reduced J(net) primarily due to increased passive loss (J(out)), since both J(in) and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase were unchanged. Serotonin and dopamine abolished the increased diffusive loss and re-established J(net) with no change in J(in). G. natalis exhibits different regulatory systems. Branchial salt uptake can be adjusted via the leak component when adequate salt is available but also by stimulated active uptake under diluting conditions. The gills are important sites of ion pumping in euryhaline aquatic crabs, and the

  8. Virtual water balance estimation in Tunisia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stambouli, Talel; Benalaya, Abdallah; Ghezal, Lamia; Ali, Chebil; Hammami, Rifka; Souissi, Asma

    2015-04-01

    The water in Tunisia is limited and unevenly distributed in the different regions, especially in arid zones. In fact, the annual rainfall average varies from less than 100 mm in the extreme South to over 1500 mm in the extreme North of the country. Currently, the conventional potential of water resources of the country is estimated about 4.84 billion m³ / year of which 2.7 billion cubic meters / year of surface water and 2.14 billion cubic meters / year of groundwater, characterizing a structural shortage for water safety in Tunisia (under 500m3/inhabitant/year). With over than 80% of water volumes have been mobilized for agriculture. The virtual water concept, defined by Allan (1997), as the amount of water needed to generate a product of both natural and artificial origin, this concept establish a similarity between product marketing and water trade. Given the influence of water in food production, virtual water studies focus generally on food products. At a global scale, the influence of these product's markets with water management was not seen. Influence has appreciated only by analyzing water-scarce countries, but at the detail level, should be increased, as most studies consider a country as a single geographical point, leading to considerable inaccuracies. The main objective of this work is the virtual water balance estimation of strategic crops in Tunisia (both irrigated and dry crops) to determine their influence on the water resources management and to establish patterns for improving it. The virtual water balance was performed basing on farmer's surveys, crop and meteorological data, irrigation management and regional statistics. Results show that the majority of farmers realize a waste of the irrigation water especially at the vegetable crops and fruit trees. Thus, a good control of the cultural package may result in lower quantities of water used by crops while ensuring good production with a suitable economic profitability. Then, the virtual water

  9. Inter-comparison of four remote sensing based surface energy balance methods to retrieve surface evapotranspiration and water stress of irrigated fields in semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirouze, J.; Boulet, G.; Jarlan, L.; Fieuzal, R.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Ezzahar, J.; Er-Raki, S.; Bigeard, G.; Merlin, O.; Garatuza-Payan, J.; Watts, C.; Chehbouni, G.

    2013-01-01

    Remotely sensed surface temperature can provide a good proxy for water stress level and is therefore particularly useful to estimate spatially distributed evapotranspiration. Instantaneous stress levels or instantaneous latent heat flux are deduced from the surface energy balance equation constrained by this equilibrium temperature. Pixel average surface temperature depends on two main factors: stress and vegetation fraction cover. Methods estimating stress vary according to the way they treat each factor. Two families of methods can be defined: the contextual methods, where stress levels are scaled on a given image between hot/dry and cool/wet pixels for a particular vegetation cover, and single-pixel methods which evaluate latent heat as the residual of the surface energy balance for one pixel independently from the others. Four models, two contextual (S-SEBI and a triangle method, inspired by Moran et al., 1994) and two single-pixel (TSEB, SEBS) are applied at seasonal scale over a four by four km irrigated agricultural area in semi-arid northern Mexico. Their performances, both at local and spatial standpoints, are compared relatively to energy balance data acquired at seven locations within the area, as well as a more complex soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer model forced with true irrigation and rainfall data. Stress levels are not always well retrieved by most models, but S-SEBI as well as TSEB, although slightly biased, show good performances. Drop in model performances is observed when vegetation is senescent, mostly due to a poor partitioning both between turbulent fluxes and between the soil/plant components of the latent heat flux and the available energy. As expected, contextual methods perform well when extreme hydric and vegetation conditions are encountered in the same image (therefore, esp. in spring and early summer) while they tend to exaggerate the spread in water status in more homogeneous conditions (esp. in winter).

  10. Intercomparison of four remote-sensing-based energy balance methods to retrieve surface evapotranspiration and water stress of irrigated fields in semi-arid climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirouze, J.; Boulet, G.; Jarlan, L.; Fieuzal, R.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Ezzahar, J.; Er-Raki, S.; Bigeard, G.; Merlin, O.; Garatuza-Payan, J.; Watts, C.; Chehbouni, G.

    2014-03-01

    Instantaneous evapotranspiration rates and surface water stress levels can be deduced from remotely sensed surface temperature data through the surface energy budget. Two families of methods can be defined: the contextual methods, where stress levels are scaled on a given image between hot/dry and cool/wet pixels for a particular vegetation cover, and single-pixel methods, which evaluate latent heat as the residual of the surface energy balance for one pixel independently from the others. Four models, two contextual (S-SEBI and a modified triangle method, named VIT) and two single-pixel (TSEB, SEBS) are applied over one growing season (December-May) for a 4 km × 4 km irrigated agricultural area in the semi-arid northern Mexico. Their performance, both at local and spatial standpoints, are compared relatively to energy balance data acquired at seven locations within the area, as well as an uncalibrated soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer (SVAT) model forced with local in situ data including observed irrigation and rainfall amounts. Stress levels are not always well retrieved by most models, but S-SEBI as well as TSEB, although slightly biased, show good performance. The drop in model performance is observed for all models when vegetation is senescent, mostly due to a poor partitioning both between turbulent fluxes and between the soil/plant components of the latent heat flux and the available energy. As expected, contextual methods perform well when contrasted soil moisture and vegetation conditions are encountered in the same image (therefore, especially in spring and early summer) while they tend to exaggerate the spread in water status in more homogeneous conditions (especially in winter). Surface energy balance models run with available remotely sensed products prove to be nearly as accurate as the uncalibrated SVAT model forced with in situ data.

  11. Global monthly water stress: 1. Water balance and water availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Beek, L. P. H.; Wada, Yoshihide; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2011-07-01

    Surface fresh water (i.e., blue water) is a vital and indispensable resource for human water use in the agricultural, industrial, and domestic sectors. In this paper, global water availability is calculated by forcing the global hydrological model PCR-GLOBWB with daily global meteorological fields for the period 1958-2001. To represent blue water availability, a prognostic reservoir operation scheme was included in order to produce monthly time series of global river discharge modulated by reservoir operations. To specify green water availability for irrigated areas, actual transpiration from the model was used. Thus, the computed water availability reflects the climatic variability over 1958-2001 and is contrasted against the monthly water demand using the year 2000 as a benchmark in the companion paper. As the water that is withdrawn to meet demand directly interferes with blue water availability along the drainage network, this paper evaluates model performance for three regimes reflecting different degrees of human interference: natural discharge, discharge regulated by reservoirs, and modified discharge. In the case of modified discharge, the net blue water demand for the year 2000 is subtracted directly from the regulated discharge, taking water demand equal to consumptive water use. Results show that model simulations of monthly river discharge compare well with observations from most of the large rivers. Exceptions are basins subject to large extractions for irrigation purposes, where simulated discharge exceeds the observations even when water demand is taken into account. Including the prognostic reservoir operation scheme results in mixed performance, with a poorer approximation of peak flows but with a marginally better simulation of low flows and persistence. A comparison of simulated actual evapotranspiration with that from the ERA-40 reanalysis as a proxy for observed rates shows similar patterns over nonirrigated areas but substantial deviations

  12. International Space Station Water Balance Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Barry; Garr, John D., II; Erne, Meghan

    2011-01-01

    In November 2008, the Water Regenerative System racks were launched aboard Space Shuttle flight, STS-126 (ULF2) and installed and activated on the International Space Station (ISS). These racks, consisting of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), completed the installation of the Regenerative (Regen) Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS), which includes the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA) that was launched 2 years prior. With the onset of active water management on the US segment of the ISS, a new operational concept was required, that of water balance . In November of 2010, the Sabatier system, which converts H2 and CO2 into water and methane, was brought on line. The Regen ECLSS systems accept condensation from the atmosphere, urine from crew, and processes that fluid via various means into potable water, which is used for crew drinking, building up skip-cycle water inventory, and water for electrolysis to produce oxygen. Specification (spec) rates of crew urine output, condensate output, O2 requirements, toilet flush water, and drinking needs are well documented and used as the best guess planning rates when Regen ECLSS came online. Spec rates are useful in long term planning, however, daily or weekly rates are dependent upon a number of variables. The constantly changing rates created a new challenge for the ECLSS flight controllers, who are responsible for operating the ECLSS systems onboard ISS from Mission Control in Houston. This paper reviews the various inputs to water planning, rate changes, and dynamic events, including but not limited to: crew personnel makeup, Regen ECLSS system operability, vehicle traffic, water storage availability, and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA), Sabatier, and OGA capability. Along with the inputs that change the various rates, the paper will review the different systems, their constraints, and finally the operational challenges and means by which flight controllers

  13. Regenerative (Regen) ECLSS Operations Water Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Barry

    2010-01-01

    In November 2008, the Water Regenerative System racks were launched aboard Space Shuttle flight, STS-126 (ULF2) and installed and activated on the International Space Station (ISS). These racks, consisting of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and Urine Processor Assembly (UPA), completed the installation of the Regenerative (Regen) ECLSS systems which includes the Oxygen Generator Assembly (OGA) that was launched 2 years prior. With the onset of active water management on the US segment of the ISS, a new operational concept was required, that of "water balance." Even more recently, in 2010 the Sabatier system came online which converts H2 and CO2 into water and methane. The Regen ECLSS systems accept condensation from the atmosphere, urine from crew, and processes that fluid via various means into potable water which is used for crew drinking, building up skip-cycle water inventory, and water for electrolysis to produce oxygen. Specification rates of crew urine output, condensate output, O2 requirements, toilet flush water and drinking needs are well documented and used as a general plan when Regen ECLSS came online. Spec rates are useful in long term planning, however, daily or weekly rates are dependent on a number of variables. The constantly changing rates created a new challenge for the ECLSS flight controllers, who are responsible for operating the ECLSS systems onboard ISS. This paper will review the various inputs to rate changes and inputs to planning events, including but not limited to; crew personnel makeup, Regen ECLSS system operability, vehicle traffic, water containment availability, and Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) capability. Along with the inputs that change the various rates, the paper will review the different systems, their constraints and finally the operational means by which flight controllers manage this new challenge of "water balance."

  14. Balancing Energy-Water-Agriculture Tradeoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidwell, V.; Hightower, M.

    2011-12-01

    In 2005 thermoelectric power production accounted for withdrawals of 201 billion gallons per day (BGD) representing 49% of total withdrawals, making it the largest user of water in the U.S. In terms of freshwater withdrawals thermoelectric power production is the second largest user at 140 BGD just slightly behind freshwater withdrawals for irrigation (USGS 2005). In contrast thermoelectric water consumption is projected at 3.7 BGD or about 3% of total U.S. consumption (NETL 2008). Thermoelectric water consumption is roughly equivalent to that of all other industrial demands and represents one of the fastest growing sectors since 1980. In fact thermoelectric consumption is projected to increase by 42 to 63% between 2005 and 2030 (NETL 2008). Agricultural water consumption has remained relatively constant at roughly 84 BGD or about 84% of total water consumption. While long-term regional electricity transmission planning has traditionally focused on cost, infrastructure utilization, and reliability, issues concerning the availability of water represent an emerging issue. Thermoelectric expansion must be considered in the context of competing demands from other water use sectors balanced with fresh and non-fresh water supplies subject to climate variability. Often such expansion targets water rights transfers from irrigated agriculture. To explore evolving tradeoffs an integrated energy-water-agriculture decision support system has been developed. The tool considers alternative expansion scenarios for the future power plant fleet and the related demand for water. The availability of fresh and non-fresh water supplies, subject to local institutional controls is then explored. This paper addresses integrated energy-water-agriculture planning in the western U.S. and Canada involving an open and participatory process comprising decision-makers, regulators, utility and water managers.

  15. Arid site water balance: evapotranspiration modeling and measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-09-01

    In order to evaluate the magnitude of radionuclide transport at an aird site, a field and modeling study was conducted to measure and predict water movement under vegetated and bare soil conditions. Significant quantities of water were found to move below the roo of a shallow-rooted grass-covered area during wet years at the Hanford site. The unsaturated water flow model, UNSAT-1D, was resonably successful in simulating the transient behavior of the water balance at this site. The effects of layered soils on water balance were demonstrated using the model. Models used to evaluate water balance in arid regions should not rely on annual averages and assume that all precipitation is removed by evapotranspiration. The potential for drainage at arid sites exists under conditions where shallow rooted plants grow on coarse textured soils. This condition was observed at our study site at Hanford. Neutron probe data collected on a cheatgrass community at the Hanford site during a wet year indicated that over 5 cm of water drained below the 3.5-m depth. The unsaturated water flow model, UNSAT-1D, predicted water drainage of about 5 cm (single layer, 10 months) and 3.5 cm (two layers, 12 months) for the same time period. Additional field measurements of hydraulic conductivity will likely improve the drainage estimate made by UNSAT-1D. Additional information describing cheatgrass growth and water use at the grass site could improve model predictions of sink terms and subsequent calculations of water storage within the rooting zone. In arid areas where the major part of the annual precipitation occurs during months with low average potential evapotranspiration and where soils are vegetated but are coarse textured and well drained, significant drainage can occur. 31 references, 18 figures, 1 table.

  16. Simulation of the soil water balance of an undeveloped prairie in west-central Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, W.R.; Boetcher, P.F.

    1996-01-01

    A one-dimensional numerical model was developed to simulate the soil water balance of a densely vegetated prairie site in west-central Florida. Transient simulations of the soil water balance were performed using field-measured soil and vegetation properties. Simulated and measured soil water content generally agreed to within 0.04; however, simulated water storage and recharge were sensitive to air-entry soil-water pressure potential and depth to the water table.

  17. Water Balance Covers For Waste Containment: Principles and Practice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Water Balance Covers for Waste Containment: Principles and Practices introduces water balance covers and compares them with conventional approaches to waste containment. The authors provided detailed analysis of the fundamentals of soil physics and design issues, introduce appl...

  18. Water balance in fuel cells systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Kopasz, J.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    2002-01-10

    Fuel cell systems are attractive for their high efficiency (i.e., electric power generated per weight/volume of fuel,) and lower emissions. These systems are being developed for applications that include transportation (propulsion and auxiliary), remote stationary, and portable. Where these systems use on-board fuel processing of available fuels, the fuel processor requires high-purity water. For utility applications, this water may be available on-site, but for most applications, the process water must be recovered from the fuel cell system exhaust gas. For such applications, it is critically important that the fuel cell system be a net water-producing device. A variety of environmental conditions (e.g., ambient temperature, pressure), fuel cell system design, and operating conditions determine whether the fuel cell system is water-producing or water-consuming. This paper will review and discuss the conditions that determine the net-water balance of a generic fuel cell system and identify some options that will help meet the water needs of the fuel processor.

  19. Concepts to accelerate water balance model computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gronz, Oliver; Casper, Markus; Gemmar, Peter

    2010-05-01

    Computation time of water balance models has decreased with the increasing performance of CPUs within the last decades. Often, these advantages have been used to enhance the models, e. g. by enlarging spatial resolution or by using smaller simulation time steps. During the last few years, CPU development tended to focus on strong multi core concepts rather than 'simply being generally faster'. Additionally, computer clusters or even computer clouds have become much more commonly available. All these facts again extend our degrees of freedom in simulating water balance models - if the models are able to efficiently use the computer infrastructure. In the following, we present concepts to optimize especially repeated runs and we generally discuss concepts of parallel computing opportunities. Surveyed model In our examinations, we focused on the water balance model LARSIM. In this model, the catchment is subdivided into elements, each of which representing a certain section of a river and its contributory area. Each element is again subdivided into single compartments of homogeneous land use. During the simulation, the relevant hydrological processes are simulated individually for each compartment. The simulated runoff of all compartments leads into the river channel of the corresponding element. Finally, channel routing is simulated for all elements. Optimizing repeated runs During a typical simulation, several input files have to be read before simulation starts: the model structure, the initial model state and meteorological input files. Furthermore, some calculations have to be solved, like interpolating meteorological values. Thus, e. g. the application of Monte Carlo methods will typically use the following algorithm: 1) choose parameters, 2) set parameters in control files, 3) run model, 4) save result, 5) repeat from step 1. Obviously, the third step always includes the previously mentioned steps of reading and preprocessing. Consequently, the model can be

  20. Trends in water balance components across the Brazilian Cerrado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Brazilian Cerrado (Savanna) is considered one of the most important biomes for Brazilian water resources; however, little is known about the components of the water balance in this biome. In this study, we reviewed the available literature on the water balance components in the Brazilian Cerrado...

  1. Sensible heat balance measurements of soil water evaporation beneath a maize canopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil water evaporation is an important component of the water budget in a cropped field. Few methods are available for continuous and independent measurement of soil water evaporation. A sensible heat balance (SHB) approach has recently been demonstrated for continuously determining soil water evapo...

  2. Energy balance of human locomotion in water.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, D; Zamparo, P; di Prampero, P E; Capelli, C; Cerretelli, P; Termin, A; Craig, A; Bushnell, D; Paschke, D; Mollendorf, J

    2003-10-01

    In this paper a complete energy balance for water locomotion is attempted with the aim of comparing different modes of transport in the aquatic environment (swimming underwater with SCUBA diving equipment, swimming at the surface: leg kicking and front crawl, kayaking and rowing). On the basis of the values of metabolic power (E), of the power needed to overcome water resistance (Wd) and of propelling efficiency (etaP=Wd/Wtot, where Wtot is the total mechanical power) as reported in the literature for each of these forms of locomotion, the energy cost per unit distance (C=E/v, where v is the velocity), the drag (performance) efficiency (etad=Wd/E) and the overall efficiency (etao=Wtot/E=etad/etaP) were calculated. As previously found for human locomotion on land, for a given metabolic power (e.g. 0.5 kW=1.43 l.min(-1) VO2) the decrease in C (from 0.88 kJ.m(-1) in SCUBA diving to 0.22 kJ.m(-1) in rowing) is associated with an increase in the speed of locomotion (from 0.6 m.s(-1) in SCUBA diving to 2.4 m.s(-1) in rowing). At variance with locomotion on land, however, the decrease in C is associated with an increase, rather than a decrease, of the total mechanical work per unit distance (Wtot, kJ.m(-1)). This is made possible by the increase of the overall efficiency of locomotion (etao=Wtot/E=Wtot/C) from the slow speeds (and loads) of swimming to the high speeds (and loads) attainable with hulls and boats (from 0.10 in SCUBA diving to 0.29 in rowing).

  3. Energy balance of human locomotion in water.

    PubMed

    Pendergast, D; Zamparo, P; di Prampero, P E; Capelli, C; Cerretelli, P; Termin, A; Craig, A; Bushnell, D; Paschke, D; Mollendorf, J

    2003-10-01

    In this paper a complete energy balance for water locomotion is attempted with the aim of comparing different modes of transport in the aquatic environment (swimming underwater with SCUBA diving equipment, swimming at the surface: leg kicking and front crawl, kayaking and rowing). On the basis of the values of metabolic power (E), of the power needed to overcome water resistance (Wd) and of propelling efficiency (etaP=Wd/Wtot, where Wtot is the total mechanical power) as reported in the literature for each of these forms of locomotion, the energy cost per unit distance (C=E/v, where v is the velocity), the drag (performance) efficiency (etad=Wd/E) and the overall efficiency (etao=Wtot/E=etad/etaP) were calculated. As previously found for human locomotion on land, for a given metabolic power (e.g. 0.5 kW=1.43 l.min(-1) VO2) the decrease in C (from 0.88 kJ.m(-1) in SCUBA diving to 0.22 kJ.m(-1) in rowing) is associated with an increase in the speed of locomotion (from 0.6 m.s(-1) in SCUBA diving to 2.4 m.s(-1) in rowing). At variance with locomotion on land, however, the decrease in C is associated with an increase, rather than a decrease, of the total mechanical work per unit distance (Wtot, kJ.m(-1)). This is made possible by the increase of the overall efficiency of locomotion (etao=Wtot/E=Wtot/C) from the slow speeds (and loads) of swimming to the high speeds (and loads) attainable with hulls and boats (from 0.10 in SCUBA diving to 0.29 in rowing). PMID:12955519

  4. Biodiversity effects on the water balance of an experimental grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leimer, Sophia; Kreutziger, Yvonne; Rosenkranz, Stephan; Beßler, Holger; Engels, Christof; Oelmann, Yvonne; Weisser, Wolfgang W.; Wirth, Christian; Wilcke, Wolfgang

    2013-04-01

    Plant species richness increases aboveground biomass production in biodiversity experiments. Biomass production depends on and feeds back to the water balance, but it remains unclear how plant species richness influences soil water contents and water fluxes (actual evapotranspiration (ETa), downward flux (DF), and upward flux (UF)). Our objective was to determine the effects of plant species and functional richness and functional identity on soil water contents and water fluxes for two soil depths (0-0.3 and 0.3.-0.7 m). To achieve this, we used a water balance model in connection with Bayesian hierarchical modeling. We monitored soil water contents on 86 plots of a grassland plant diversity experiment in Jena, Germany between July 2002 and January 2006. In the field experiment, plant species richness (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 60) and functional group composition (0-4 functional groups: legumes, grasses, non-leguminous tall herbs, non-leguminous small herbs) were manipulated in a factorial design. Climate data (air temperature, precipitation, wind velocity, relative humidity, global radiation, soil moisture) was measured at a central climate station between July 2002 and December 2007. Root biomass data from July 2006 was available per plot. Missing water contents per plot and depth were estimated in weekly resolution for the years 2003-2007 with a Bayesian hierarchical model using measured water contents per plot and centrally measured soil moisture. To obtain ETa, DF, and UF of the two different soil depths, we modified a soil water balance model which had been developed for our study site. The model is based on changes in soil water content between subsequent observation dates and modeled potential evapotranspiration which was partitioned between soil layers according to percentage of root biomass. The presence of specific functional groups significantly changed water contents and fluxes with partly opposing effects in the two soil depths. Presence of grasses

  5. Assessment of availability water at Boi Branco watershed through the water climate balance and growing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandre de Lima Sales, Mariana; Máximo Sanchez-Román, Rodrigo; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Ribeiro da Silva de Souza, Joao Victor; Nonato Farias Monteiro, Raimundo

    2015-04-01

    The water resources are fundamental to the development of several economic activities. Concerning the agriculture production, the water can represent close to 90% of the physical constitution of the plant. The low water supply during the growing stage of vegetables can make the agricultural production not viable and can even seriously affect the balance of the ecosystem. One way to calculate the amount of water in a determined system is by means of the water balance, that is an important tool for the assessment process of the water cycle in a specific region. The main goal of this work was to establish the water balance in the watershed Boi Branco-SP, so that it can be used as a tool for the hydro-agricultural and environmental planning of the region. For the water climate balance, it was used data of the historical series of the region (1971 - 1995). The data of evapotranspiration were estimated by the method Thornthwaite. The water climate balance showed low water supply total annual of 10.1 mm, and exceeding of 319.7 mm, wherein in month January an exceeding of 92.6 to the average monthly precipitation; given the effective monthly precipitation with probability of 75% low water supply in the soil it is 238.8 mm and the exceeding 56.8 mm. When these data are added to the ones of the crop, as a crop coefficient and availability factor of water in the soil, it is observed that all crops which are inserted in the watershed present low water supply in all the months they are in the field. As the water balance is an important assessment of a specific region, further studies are recommended, with data collected in the region, so that the update in the results is obtained. Thus, it is also recommended the establishment of a system for agrometerological collecting data to help the irrigation management and other agricultural activities. Keyword: Water agricultural planning, water capability available in the soil, evapotranspiration.

  6. Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box field test

    SciTech Connect

    Giangiacomo, L.A.

    1999-05-28

    The Hydro-Balanced Stuffing Box is a seal assembly for polished rod pumping installations commonly used in oil and gas pumping well installations to contain produced well fluids. The improved stuffing box was developed and patented by Harold H. Palmour of The Palmour Group of Livingston, TX. The stuffing box is designed to reduce the incidence of seal leakage and to utilize an environmentally safe fluid, so that if there is any leakage, environmental damage is reduced or eliminated. The unit was tested on two wells at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center. During the test period, the performance of the stuffing box was measured by monitoring the pressure on the tubing and the inner chamber with a Barton Two-pen recorder. The amount of safe fluid consumed, fluid leakage at the top of the stuffing box, pressure supplied from the nitrogen bottle, ambient temperature, and polish rod temperature was recorded. The stuffing box is capable of providing a better seal between well fluids an d the environment than conventional stuffing boxes. It allows the polished rod to operate cooler and with lubrication, extending the life of the packing elements, and reducing the amount of attention required to prevent leakage.

  7. Comparison of Dynamic Balance in Collegiate Field Hockey and Football Players Using Star Excursion Balance Test

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Rashi; Moiz, Jamal Ali

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The preliminary study aimed to compare dynamic balance between collegiate athletes competing or training in football and hockey using star excursion balance test. Methods A total thirty university level players, football (n = 15) and field hockey (n = 15) were participated in the study. Dynamic balance was assessed by using star excursion balance test. The testing grid consists of 8 lines each 120 cm in length extending from a common point at 45° increments. The subjects were instructed to maintain a stable single leg stance with the test leg with shoes off and to reach for maximal distance with the other leg in each of the 8 directions. A pencil was used to point and read the distance to which each subject's foot reached. The normalized leg reach distances in each direction were summed for both limbs and the total sum of the mean of summed normalized distances of both limbs were calculated. Results There was no significant difference in all the directions of star excursion balance test scores in both the groups. Additionally, composite reach distances of both groups also found non-significant (P=0.5). However, the posterior (P=0.05) and lateral (P=0.03) normalized reach distances were significantly more in field hockey players. Conclusion Field hockey players and football players did not differ in terms of dynamic balance. PMID:24427482

  8. Acid-based balance and blood gas changes in the fresh water field crab, Barytelphusa guerini, on exposure to organic and inorganic lead

    SciTech Connect

    Tulasi, S.J.; Rao, J.V.R.

    1988-02-01

    The acid-base status of crustacean haemolymph depends on various environmental and physiological factors. Acid base status of the haemolymph is known to be influenced by temperature, salinity, strenuous activity and moulting. The studies on the acid-base regulation of the fresh water crabs are meager. The acid-base changes in fishes during environmental stress conditions like acid stress and zinc toxicity had been reported. But the effect of environmental pollutants like the heavy metals on the acid-base regulation of the fresh water crabs have not been previously reported. The haemolymph of the fresh water crab was found to accumulate high amounts of lead on exposure to organic and inorganic lead. Hence the present investigation has been undertaken to study the haemolymph acid-base status on exposure to subtoxic levels of organic and inorganic lead.

  9. Management of the water balance and quality in mining areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanen, Antti; Krogerus, Kirsti; Mroueh, Ulla-Maija; Turunen, Kaisa; Backnäs, Soile; Vento, Tiia; Veijalainen, Noora; Hentinen, Kimmo; Korkealaakso, Juhani

    2015-04-01

    Although mining companies have long been conscious of water related risks they still face environmental management problems. These problems mainly emerge because mine sites' water balances have not been adequately assessed in the stage of the planning of mines. More consistent approach is required to help mining companies identify risks and opportunities related to the management of water resources in all stages of mining. This approach requires that the water cycle of a mine site is interconnected with the general hydrologic water cycle. In addition to knowledge on hydrological conditions, the control of the water balance in the mining processes require knowledge of mining processes, the ability to adjust process parameters to variable hydrological conditions, adaptation of suitable water management tools and systems, systematic monitoring of amounts and quality of water, adequate capacity in water management infrastructure to handle the variable water flows, best practices to assess the dispersion, mixing and dilution of mine water and pollutant loading to receiving water bodies, and dewatering and separation of water from tailing and precipitates. WaterSmart project aims to improve the awareness of actual quantities of water, and water balances in mine areas to improve the forecasting and the management of the water volumes. The study is executed through hydrogeological and hydrological surveys and online monitoring procedures. One of the aims is to exploit on-line water quantity and quality monitoring for the better management of the water balances. The target is to develop a practical and end-user-specific on-line input and output procedures. The second objective is to develop mathematical models to calculate combined water balances including the surface, ground and process waters. WSFS, the Hydrological Modeling and Forecasting System of SYKE is being modified for mining areas. New modelling tools are developed on spreadsheet and system dynamics platforms to

  10. The water balance questionnaire: design, reliability and validity of a questionnaire to evaluate water balance in the general population.

    PubMed

    Malisova, Olga; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B; Zampelas, Antonis; Kapsokefalou, Maria

    2012-03-01

    There is a need to develop a questionnaire as a research tool for the evaluation of water balance in the general population. The water balance questionnaire (WBQ) was designed to evaluate water intake from fluid and solid foods and drinking water, and water loss from urine, faeces and sweat at sedentary conditions and physical activity. For validation purposes, the WBQ was administrated in 40 apparently healthy participants aged 22-57 years (37.5% males). Hydration indices in urine (24 h volume, osmolality, specific gravity, pH, colour) were measured through established procedures. Furthermore, the questionnaire was administered twice to 175 subjects to evaluate its reliability. Kendall's τ-b and the Bland and Altman method were used to assess the questionnaire's validity and reliability. The proposed WBQ to assess water balance in healthy individuals was found to be valid and reliable, and it could thus be a useful tool in future projects that aim to evaluate water balance.

  11. Assessment of Cropland Water and Nitrogen Balance from Climate Change in Korea Peninsular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, C. H.; Song, C.; Kim, T.; Lee, W. K.; Jeon, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    If crop growth is based on cropland productivity, the changes are due to changes in water and nitrogen balance from climate. In this study, order to estimation the change in cropland water and nitrogen balance in Korea peninsular using meteorological data observed last 30 years(1984-2013y). And we used soil, topography and management data about cropland. So as to estimating water and nitrogen variables, we used to the GIS based EPIC model that is major crop model in agro-ecosystem modelling field. Among the much of water and nitrogen variables, we selected to evapotranspiration, runoff, precipitation, nitrification, N lost, N contents and denitrification for this analysis. This selected variables associate with cropland water and nitrogen balance.First result, we can found the water balance changes in Korea peninsular, especially South Korea better condition than North Korea. In North Korea, evapotranspiration and precipitation result were lower than South Korea, but runoff result was bigger than South Korea. And we got a result about nitrogen balance changes in Korea peninsular from climate. In spatially, South and North Korea showed to similar condition on nitrogen balance in whole period. But in temporally, showed negative trends as time goes on, it caused by climate change. Overall condition of water and nitrogen balance on last 30 years in Korea peninsular, South Korea showed better condition than North Korea. Water and nitrogen balance change means have to be changed on agriculture management action, such as irrigation and fertilizer. In future period, climate change will cause a large effect to cropland water and nitrogen balance in mid-latitude area, so we have to prepare the change of this field for wise adaptation by climate change.

  12. Fuzzy-probabilistic calculations of water-balance uncertainty

    SciTech Connect

    Faybishenko, B.

    2009-10-01

    Hydrogeological systems are often characterized by imprecise, vague, inconsistent, incomplete, or subjective information, which may limit the application of conventional stochastic methods in predicting hydrogeologic conditions and associated uncertainty. Instead, redictions and uncertainty analysis can be made using uncertain input parameters expressed as probability boxes, intervals, and fuzzy numbers. The objective of this paper is to present the theory for, and a case study as an application of, the fuzzyprobabilistic approach, ombining probability and possibility theory for simulating soil water balance and assessing associated uncertainty in the components of a simple waterbalance equation. The application of this approach is demonstrated using calculations with the RAMAS Risk Calc code, to ssess the propagation of uncertainty in calculating potential evapotranspiration, actual evapotranspiration, and infiltration-in a case study at the Hanford site, Washington, USA. Propagation of uncertainty into the results of water-balance calculations was evaluated by hanging he types of models of uncertainty incorporated into various input parameters. The results of these fuzzy-probabilistic calculations are compared to the conventional Monte Carlo simulation approach and estimates from field observations at the Hanford site.

  13. Evaluation of a distributed catchment scale water balance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Troch, Peter A.; Mancini, Marco; Paniconi, Claudio; Wood, Eric F.

    1993-01-01

    The validity of some of the simplifying assumptions in a conceptual water balance model is investigated by comparing simulation results from the conceptual model with simulation results from a three-dimensional physically based numerical model and with field observations. We examine, in particular, assumptions and simplifications related to water table dynamics, vertical soil moisture and pressure head distributions, and subsurface flow contributions to stream discharge. The conceptual model relies on a topographic index to predict saturation excess runoff and on Philip's infiltration equation to predict infiltration excess runoff. The numerical model solves the three-dimensional Richards equation describing flow in variably saturated porous media, and handles seepage face boundaries, infiltration excess and saturation excess runoff production, and soil driven and atmosphere driven surface fluxes. The study catchments (a 7.2 sq km catchment and a 0.64 sq km subcatchment) are located in the North Appalachian ridge and valley region of eastern Pennsylvania. Hydrologic data collected during the MACHYDRO 90 field experiment are used to calibrate the models and to evaluate simulation results. It is found that water table dynamics as predicted by the conceptual model are close to the observations in a shallow water well and therefore, that a linear relationship between a topographic index and the local water table depth is found to be a reasonable assumption for catchment scale modeling. However, the hydraulic equilibrium assumption is not valid for the upper 100 cm layer of the unsaturated zone and a conceptual model that incorporates a root zone is suggested. Furthermore, theoretical subsurface flow characteristics from the conceptual model are found to be different from field observations, numerical simulation results, and theoretical baseflow recession characteristics based on Boussinesq's groundwater equation.

  14. Water balance in rats exposed to chronic centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R M; Wade, C E

    2000-07-01

    Changes in gravitational load have been shown to alter renal function, which could potentially affect water balance. Therefore, the present study was conducted to determine the effects of chronic centrifugation on water balance. Eight Sprague-Dawley rats were centrifuged (12 days at 2 G), and eight rats were used as a control group. Water balance over the course of the study was determined by quantifying the percentage (%) of total body water [TBW; (TBW/body mass)] and water flux (water consumption - urine volume). TBW was estimated, by means of deuterium oxide dilution, before the study and after 3 days of centrifugation and by means of desiccation after 12 days of centrifugation. %TBW did not change in the centrifuged rats from initial levels or relative to controls over the course of the study. Differences between the sum of water consumption and sum of urine volume for the 12-day period were the same in both groups. Although an initial period of negative water balance was observed, the lack of a change in %TBW among the three measurement periods or in water flux over the 12 days of centrifugation suggests that water balance is not negatively affected as a result of centrifugation at 2 G.

  15. A catchment scale water balance model for FIFE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Famiglietti, J. S.; Wood, E. F.; Sivapalan, M.; Thongs, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    A catchment scale water balance model is presented and used to predict evaporation from the King's Creek catchment at the First ISLSCP Field Experiment site on the Konza Prairie, Kansas. The model incorporates spatial variability in topography, soils, and precipitation to compute the land surface hydrologic fluxes. A network of 20 rain gages was employed to measure rainfall across the catchment in the summer of 1987. These data were spatially interpolated and used to drive the model during storm periods. During interstorm periods the model was driven by the estimated potential evaporation, which was calculated using net radiation data collected at site 2. Model-computed evaporation is compared to that observed, both at site 2 (grid location 1916-BRS) and the catchment scale, for the simulation period from June 1 to October 9, 1987.

  16. Regulation of water balance in mangroves

    PubMed Central

    Reef, Ruth; Lovelock, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Mangroves are a group of highly salt-tolerant woody plants. The high water use efficiency of mangroves under saline conditions suggests that regulation of water transport is a crucial component of their salinity tolerance. Scope This review focuses on the processes that contribute to the ability of mangroves to maintain water uptake and limit water loss to the soil and the atmosphere under saline conditions, from micro to macro scales. These processes include: (1) efficient filtering of the incoming water to exclude salt; (2) maintenance of internal osmotic potentials lower than that of the rhizosphere; (3) water-saving properties; and (4) efficient exploitation of less-saline water sources when these become available. Conclusions Mangroves are inherently plastic and can change their structure at the root, leaf and stand levels in response to salinity in order to exclude salt from the xylem stream, maintain leaf hydraulic conductance, avoid cavitation and regulate water loss (e.g. suberization of roots and alterations of leaf size, succulence and angle, hydraulic anatomy and biomass partitioning). However, much is still unknown about the regulation of water uptake in mangroves, such as how they sense and respond to heterogeneity in root zone salinity, the extent to which they utilize non-stomatally derived CO2 as a water-saving measure and whether they can exploit atmospheric water sources. PMID:25157072

  17. Development of a 5-Component Balance for Water Tunnel Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.

    1999-01-01

    The principal objective of this research/development effort was to develop a multi-component strain gage balance to measure both static and dynamic forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. A balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The balance mounts internally in the model and is used in a manner typical of wind tunnel balances. The key differences between a water tunnel balance and a wind tunnel balance are the requirement for very high sensitivity since the loads are very low (typical normal force is 90 grams or 0.2 lbs), the need for water proofing the gage elements, and the small size required to fit into typical water tunnel models. The five-component balance was calibrated and demonstrated linearity in the responses of the primary components to applied loads, very low interactions between the sections and no hysteresis. Static experiments were conducted in the Eidetics water tunnel with delta wings and F/A-18 models. The data were compared to forces and moments from wind tunnel tests of the same or similar configurations. The comparison showed very good agreement, providing confidence that loads can be measured accurately in the water tunnel with a relatively simple multi-component internal balance. The success of the static experiments encouraged the use of the balance for dynamic experiments. Among the advantages of conducting dynamic tests in a water tunnel are less demanding motion and data acquisition rates than in a wind tunnel test (because of the low-speed flow) and the capability of performing flow visualization and force/moment (F/M) measurements simultaneously with relative simplicity. This capability of simultaneous flow visualization and for F/M measurements proved extremely useful to explain the results obtained during these dynamic tests. In general, the development of this balance should encourage the use of water tunnels for a

  18. Development of a simplified urban water balance model (WABILA).

    PubMed

    Henrichs, M; Langner, J; Uhl, M

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, water sensitive urban design (WSUD) has become more and more accepted. However, there is not any simple tool or option available to evaluate the influence of these measures on the local water balance. To counteract the impact of new settlements, planners focus on mitigating increases in runoff through installation of infiltration systems. This leads to an increasing non-natural groundwater recharge and decreased evapotranspiration. Simple software tools which evaluate or simulate the effect of WSUD on the local water balance are still needed. The authors developed a tool named WABILA (Wasserbilanz) that could support planners for optimal WSUD. WABILA is an easy-to-use planning tool that is based on simplified regression functions for established measures and land covers. Results show that WSUD has to be site-specific, based on climate conditions and the natural water balance. PMID:27120631

  19. Stochastic soil water balance under seasonal climates

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xue; Porporato, Amilcare; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of soil water partitioning in seasonally dry climates necessarily requires careful consideration of the periodic climatic forcing at the intra-annual timescale in addition to daily scale variabilities. Here, we introduce three new extensions to a stochastic soil moisture model which yields seasonal evolution of soil moisture and relevant hydrological fluxes. These approximations allow seasonal climatic forcings (e.g. rainfall and potential evapotranspiration) to be fully resolved, extending the analysis of soil water partitioning to account explicitly for the seasonal amplitude and the phase difference between the climatic forcings. The results provide accurate descriptions of probabilistic soil moisture dynamics under seasonal climates without requiring extensive numerical simulations. We also find that the transfer of soil moisture between the wet to the dry season is responsible for hysteresis in the hydrological response, showing asymmetrical trajectories in the mean soil moisture and in the transient Budyko's curves during the ‘dry-down‘ versus the ‘rewetting‘ phases of the year. Furthermore, in some dry climates where rainfall and potential evapotranspiration are in-phase, annual evapotranspiration can be shown to increase because of inter-seasonal soil moisture transfer, highlighting the importance of soil water storage in the seasonal context. PMID:25663808

  20. Mean surface water balance over Africa and its interannual variability

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, S.E.; Kim, J.; Ba, M.B.; Lare, A.R.

    1997-12-01

    This article presents calculations of surface water balance for the African continent using a revised version of the Lettau climatonomy. Calculations are based on approximately 1400 rainfall stations, with records generally covering 60 yr or longer. Continental maps of evapotranspiration. runoff, and soil moisture are derived for January, July, and the annual mean. The model is also used to provide a gross estimate of the interannual variability of these parameters over most of the continent and local water balance calculations for a variety of locations in Africa. The results are compared with four other comprehensive global water balance studies. The results of this study are being used to produce a gridded dataset for the continent, with potential applications for numerical modeling studies. 50 refs., 18 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Water balance of rice plots under three different water treatments: monitoring activity and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiaradia, Enrico Antonio; Romani, Marco; Facchi, Arianna; Gharsallah, Olfa; Cesari de Maria, Sandra; Ferrari, Daniele; Masseroni, Daniele; Rienzner, Michele; Battista Bischetti, Gian; Gandolfi, Claudio

    2014-05-01

    In the agricultural seasons 2012 and 2013, a broad monitoring activity was carried out at the Rice Research Centre of Ente Nazionale Risi (CRR-ENR) located in Castello d'Agogna (PV, Italy) with the purpose of comparing the water balance components of paddy rice (Gladio cv.) under different water regimes and assessing the possibility of reducing the high water inputs related to the conventional practice of continuous submergence. The experiments were laid out in six plots of about 20 m x 80 m each, with two replicates for each of the following water regimes: i) continuous flooding with wet-seeded rice (FLD), ii) continuous flooding from around the 3-leaf stage with dry-seeded rice (3L-FLD), and iii) surface irrigation every 7-10 days with dry-seeded rice (IRR). One out of the two replicates of each treatment was instrumented with: water inflow and outflow meters, set of piezometers, set of tensiometers and multi-sensor moisture probes. Moreover, an eddy covariance station was installed on the bund between the treatments FLD and IRR. Data were automatically recorded and sent by a wireless connection to a PC, so as to be remotely controlled thanks to the development of a Java interface. Furthermore, periodic measurements of crop biometric parameters (LAI, crop height and rooting depth) were performed in both 2012 and 2013 (11 and 14 campaigns respectively). Cumulative water balance components from dry-seeding (3L-FLD and IRR), or flooding (FLD), to harvest were calculated for each plot by either measurements (i.e. rainfall, irrigation and surface drainage) or estimations (i.e. difference in the field water storage, evaporation from both the soil and the water surface and transpiration), whereas the sum of percolation and capillary rise (i.e. the 'net percolation') was obtained as the residual term of the water balance. Incidentally, indices of water application efficiency (evapotranspiration over net water input) and water productivity (grain production over net water

  2. Water-Energy balance in pressure irrigation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sánchez, Raúl; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis; Laguna, Francisco V.; Castañón, Guillermo; Gil, María; Benitez, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Modernization of irrigation schemes, generally understood as transformation of surface irrigation systems into pressure -sprinkler and trickle- irrigation systems, aims at, among others, improving irrigation efficiency and reduction of operation and maintenance efforts made by the irrigators. Automation techniques become easier after modernization, and operation management plays an important role in energy efficiency issues. Modern systems use to include elevated water reservoirs with enough capacity to irrigate during peak water demand period about 16 to 48 h. However, pressure irrigation systems, in contrast, carry a serious energy cost. Energy requirements depend on decisions taken on management strategies during the operation phase, which are conditioned by previous decisions taken on the design project of the different elements which compose the irrigation system. Most of the countries where irrigation activity is significant bear in mind that modernization irrigation must play a key role in the agricultural infrastructure policies. The objective of this study is to characterize and estimate the mean and variation of the energy consumed by common types of irrigation systems according to their management possibilities. Also is an objective to estimate the fraction of the water reservoirs available along the irrigation campaign for storing the energy from renewable sources during their availability periods. Simulation taking into account all elements comprising the irrigation system has been used to estimate the energy requirements of typical irrigation systems of several crop production systems. The simulation of various types of irrigation systems and management strategies, in the framework imposed by particular cropping systems, would help to develop criteria for improving the energy balance in relation to the irrigation water supply productivity and new opportunities in the renewable energy field.

  3. Virtual water flows and Water Balance Impacts of the U.S. Great Lakes Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruddell, B. L.; Mayer, A. S.; Mubako, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    To assess the impacts of human water use and trade on water balances, we estimate virtual water flows for counties in the U.S. portion of the Great Lakes basin. This is a water-rich region, but one where ecohydrological 'hotspots' are created by water scarcity in certain locations (Mubako et al., 2012). Trade shifts water uses from one location to another, causing water scarcity in some locations but mitigating water scarcity in other locations. A database of water withdrawals was assembled to give point-wise withdrawals by location, source, and use category (commercial, thermoelectric power, industrial, agricultural, mining). Point-wise consumptive use is aggregated to the county level, giving direct, virtual water exports by county. A county-level trade database provides import and export data for the various use categories. We link the annual virtual water exported from a county for a given use category to corresponding annual trade exports. Virtual water balances for each county by use category are calculated, and then compared with the renewable annual freshwater supply. Preliminary findings are that overall virtual water balances (imports - exports) are positive for almost all counties, because urban areas import goods and services that are more water intensive than the exported goods and services. However, for some agriculturally-intensive counties, the overall impact of virtual water trade on the water balance is close to zero, and the balance for agricultural sector virtual water trade is negative, reflecting a net impact of economic trade on the water balance in these locations. We also compare the virtual water balance to available water resources, using annual precipitation less evapotranspiration as a crude estimate of net renewable water availability. In some counties virtual water exports approach 30% of the available water resources, indicating the potential for water scarcity, especially from an aquatic ecosystem standpoint.

  4. Mountain Pine Beetle Impact on Stand-level Water Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reilly, J. A.; Woods, S.

    2012-12-01

    The recent mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic has disturbed millions of hectares throughout the Rocky Mountain West. The most persistent effects of MPB infestation on the stand-level water balance are likely concomitant with the grey stage of the disturbance cycle. The grey stage occurs within 3 to 5 years of the initial infestation after the needles of an infected tree have turned red and fallen off due to tree death. Large numbers of grey-stage trees in a stand may remain on the landscape for up to 20 years, until windthrow or another disturbance sends them to the forest floor. The greater temporal persistence of the grey stage over antecedent stages suggested that an examination of the grey stage would best capture long-term effects of MPB disturbance on the forest water balance. In this study we hypothesized that changes to the forest canopy associated with MPB disturbance may affect the stand-level water balance. The needle loss and windthrow that follows MPB disturbance is expected to increase the amount of precipitation reaching the forest floor. Additionally, overstory evapotranspiration (ET) demand is expected to decrease as MPB-induced tree mortality increases within disturbed stands. The expected cumulative effect of MPB disturbance on the stand-level water balance is an increase in soil moisture due to increased precipitation inputs and reduced overstory ET. This study was conducted in Lubrecht Experimental Forest and adjacent Bureau of Land Management areas near Missoula, Montana. Sub-canopy measurements of soil moisture, precipitation (rain and snow water equivalent), overstory transpiration and micro-meteorological data (net radiation, temperature, wind speed, etc.) were collected in three 50 x 50 meter plots. The plots consisted of a uniform stand of grey-stage lodgepole pine, a uniform stand of non-infested lodgepole pine, and a recent clear-cut stand, which served as a control unit. Water balances for each stand were constructed using a mass-balance

  5. Seasonal Water Balance Forecasts for Drought Early Warning in Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spirig, Christoph; Bhend, Jonas; Liniger, Mark

    2016-04-01

    Droughts severely impact Ethiopian agricultural production. Successful early warning for drought conditions in the upcoming harvest season therefore contributes to better managing food shortages arising from adverse climatic conditions. So far, however, meteorological seasonal forecasts have not been used in Ethiopia's national food security early warning system (i.e. the LEAP platform). Here we analyse the forecast quality of seasonal forecasts of total rainfall and of the meteorological water balance as a proxy for plant available water. We analyse forecast skill of June to September rainfall and water balance from dynamical seasonal forecast systems, the ECMWF System4 and EC-EARTH global forecasting systems. Rainfall forecasts outperform forecasts assuming a stationary climate mainly in north-eastern Ethiopia - an area that is particularly vulnerable to droughts. Forecasts of the water balance index seem to be even more skilful and thus more useful than pure rainfall forecasts. The results vary though for different lead times and skill measures employed. We further explore the potential added value of dynamically downscaling the forecasts through several dynamical regional climate models made available through the EU FP7 project EUPORIAS. Preliminary results suggest that dynamically downscaled seasonal forecasts are not significantly better compared with seasonal forecasts from the global models. We conclude that seasonal forecasts of a simple climate index such as the water balance have the potential to benefit drought early warning in Ethiopia, both due to its positive predictive skill and higher usefulness than seasonal mean quantities.

  6. The climatic water balance in an ecological context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, N. L.

    2011-12-01

    Because the climatic water balance describes the seasonal interactions of energy (heat and solar radiation) and water in biologically meaningful ways, it provides a powerful tool for understanding and predicting the effects of climatic changes on the terrestrial biosphere. I begin with a brief overview of the definitions and interpretations of the biologically most important water balance parameters -- actual evapotranspiration (AET) and climatic water deficit (Deficit) -- and how the particular approach used to calculate these parameters depends both on the goals of the study and on the available climatic data. Some authors have attempted to represent aspects of the climatic water balance with indices based on annual potential evapotranspiration (PET) and precipitation (P), such at P/PET or PET - P. However, these and related indices do not reflect soil water dynamics, snow dynamics, or the seasonal interactions of energy and water, and therefore have no biological interpretation. Consequently, such indices are more poorly correlated with ecological patterns and processes than AET and Deficit. Of critical importance, the effects of changing energy and water supplies on the climatic water balance are nearly orthogonal. For example, a plant community growing on shallow soils on a shaded slope and one growing on deep soils on a sunward slope often may have the same amount of measured soil moisture available to them. However, the dynamics of energy and water that resulted in the identical soil moistures were fundamentally different (decreased evaporative demand on the shaded slope versus increased water supply on the deep soils); the associated differences in AET and Deficit will therefore result in different plant communities occupying the sites, in spite of identical soil moistures. In the context of climatic change, the orthogonal effects of energy and water mean that increasing precipitation cannot be expected to counteract the effects of increasing temperature

  7. The water balance estimation for catastrophic floods: groundwater contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelian, Sergey; Vinogradov, Alexey; Tulenev, Nikita; Trifonova, Tatiana

    2016-04-01

    1. We discuss the existing problems in the study of the mechanisms of formation of catastrophic floods taking into account the possible influence of groundwater. The difficulty in assessing the causes of the disastrous floods is linked to the lack of direct field measurements of precipitation and so, to estimate the water balance in the rain floods. The problems that arise when comparing the results of observations and measurements of rainfall floods are considered. 2. We rely on the concept, where groundwater and surface water are the two coupled factors resulting in catastrophic floods/debris, and they are not isolated systems. These two units are closely related to each other on the territory of a unified watershed under its functioning including the overall transport system, i.e. 3D-network of cracks in the rock (visible manifestation on the land surface of which is the rivershed itself). 3. We estimated the pressure in the aquifer taking the data obtained by the observable mudflow or flood as a base. According to our calculations in the case of a violent release, such pressure for the really observed events can reach tens of atmospheres. Such pressure enhancement may occur due to various external factors (including the nature climatic and seismic processes). 4. A more detailed analysis should be carried out in accordance with a real topology of multiple cracks taking into account the non-stationary process and levels of resistance for water flows in different sections of crack-net (hydrostatic/hydrodynamic pressures in underground aquifers).

  8. Remotely Sensed Terrestrial Water Balance of the Nile Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, T. T.; Zaitchik, B. F.; Anderson, M. C.; Yilmaz, M. T.; Alo, C. A.; Rodell, M.

    2011-12-01

    Satellite-derived estimates of precipitation, evapotranspiration (ET), and water storage have transformed our understanding of hydrological dynamics at the basin scale. At the same time, the profusion of satellite and model-generated hydrological estimates has demonstrated that there is still considerable uncertainty associated with the quantification of hydrologic states and fluxes at basin scale: the use of different combinations of data products can lead to dramatically different conclusions regarding water balance partitioning as well as variability and trends in water storage. Including multiple independent products in studies of basin-scale hydrology makes it possible to evaluate known uncertainties in satellite estimates of each component of the hydrological cycle, to assess the influence of these uncertainties on our ability to address hydrological questions of interest, and to identify critical data needs for future satellite missions. Here we present results of a basin-scale water balance analyses of the Nile River basin over the time period of 2007-2010. Multiple satellite-derived and model-based precipitation, ET, and terrestrial water storage products are included in order to characterize absolute and relative uncertainties for each variable of the terrestrial water balance equation. Monthly runoff values are estimated as the residual of the basin water balance. These runoff values are then compared with historical river gauge data to assess the utility of each data combination for estimating river flow and flow variability. Tested products include: the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Multisensor Precipitation Analysis and Climate Prediction Center operational Africa Rainfall Estimates (RFE 2) for precipitation; the Atmospheric-Land Exchange Inverse (ALEXI) model and offline Land Surface Models (LSMs) for ET; and Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) terrestrial water storage anomaly, merged thermal and microwave derived soil

  9. Water balance models in one-month-ahead streamflow forecasting.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, W.M.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques are tested that incorporate information from water balance models in making 1-month-ahead streamflow forecasts in New Jersey. The results are compared to those based on simple autoregressive time series models. The relative performance of the models is dependent on the month of the year in question. -from Author

  10. Calculation of available water supply in crop root zone and the water balance of crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, Jan; Svoboda, Pavel

    2015-12-01

    Determination of the water supply available in soils for crops is important for both the calculation of water balance and the prediction of water stress. An approach to calculations of available water content in layers of the root zone, depletion of water during growth, and water balance, with limited access to data on farms, is presented. Soil water retention was calculated with simple pedotransfer functions from the texture of soil layers, root depth, and depletion function were derived from observed data; and the potential evapotranspiration was calculated from the temperature. A comparison of the calculated and experimental soil water contents showed a reasonable fit.

  11. Water--Problems and Solutions. A Report Concerning the Problems and Solutions of Negative Water Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ewert, Alan

    Outdoor leaders constantly face problems created by water shortage and, to act effectively, must thoroughly understand the body's use of water and the ways to delay dehydration when water shortage occurs. Dehydration begins when there is a negative water balance, or more water lost than ingested, and progresses from the stage of dryness, to the…

  12. Rethinking the terrestrial water balance: Steps toward a comprehensive indicator framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiskel, P. K.; Wolock, D.; Zarriello, P. J.; Vogel, R. M.; Brandt, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Freshwater scarcity for humans and ecosystems is one of the most serious global challenges of the 21st century. Caused in part by human disturbance of the hydrologic cycle, patterns of water scarcity also reflect large, underlying variations in terrestrial water availability that precede human influence. In recent years, growing concerns about water scarcity have prompted the development and application of distributed, continental-to-global scale water balance models for water-resource assessment, fostering the important new sub-discipline of global hydrology. However, fundamental concepts of water availability have not kept pace with developments in modeling tools. To facilitate fundamental thinking and communication in this growing field, we introduce a new indicator framework based on a spatially distributed, time-dependent approach to the terrestrial water balance. The framework takes advantage of gridded climate, hydrology, and landscape data, is equally pertinent to dryland and humid regions of the world, and integrates traditional (runoff-based) and emerging perspectives on terrestrial water availability—including the blue/green water paradigm now gaining currency in the global water planning and management community. We derive the indicator framework from a general statement of the landscape water balance equation, and then illustrate the relevance of the framework to the extremely diverse hydroclimates of the conterminous United States.

  13. Large Scale Evapotranspiration Estimates: An Important Component in Regional Water Balances to Assess Water Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garatuza-Payan, J.; Yepez, E. A.; Watts, C.; Rodriguez, J. C.; Valdez-Torres, L. C.; Robles-Morua, A.

    2013-05-01

    used in a "kind of" crop factor manner for all vegetation types (including agricultural fields). Finally, the model uses air temperature and humidity, both extracted from the North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS) database. ET estimates were then compared to ground truth data from four sites where long-term Eddy Covariance (EC) measurements of ET were conducted. This approach was developed and applied in Northern Mexico. Emphasis was placed on trying to minimize the large uncertainties that still remained on the temporal evolution and the spatial repartition of ET. Results show good agreement with ground data (with r2 greater than 0.7 on daily ET estimates) from the four sites evaluated using different vegetation types hence reducing the spatial uncertainties. Estimates of total annual ET were used in a water balance, assessing ground water availability for eleven aquifers in the state of Chihuahua. Annual ET in a four-year analysis period, ranged from 200 to 280 mm/year, representing 63 to 83 % of total annual precipitation, which reflects the importance of this component in the water balance. A GIS tool kit is under development to support decision makers at CONAGUA.

  14. The Water Balance Portal in Saxony - An interactive web application concerning the impact of climate change on the water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauffe, Corina; Schwarze, Robert; Röhm, Patric; Müller, Ruben; Dröge, Werner; Gurova, Anastasia; Winkler, Peter; Baldy, Agnes

    2016-04-01

    Changes in weather and climate lead to increasing discussions about reasons and possible future impacts on the hydrological cycle. The question of a changed distribution of water also concerns the federal state of Saxony in the eastern part of Germany. Especially with a look at the different and increased requirements for water authorities, water economy and the public. To define and prepare these future requirements estimations of the future development of the natural water resources are necessary. Therefore data, information, and forecast concerning the development of the several components of the water balance are needed. And to make the obtained information easily available for experts and the public, tools like the internet have to be used. Under these frame conditions the water balance portal Saxony (www.wasserhaushaltsportal.sachsen.de) was developed within the project KliWES. The overall approach of the project was devided into the so-called „3 pillars".The first pillar focused on the evaluation of the status quo water balance from 1951-2005 by using a complex area-wide analysis of measured data. Also it contained the generating of a database and the development of a physically based parameter model. Furthermore an extensive model evaluation has been conducted with a number of objective assessment criteria, to select an appropriate model for the project. The second pillar included the calibration of the water balance model and the impact study of climate and land use change (1961-2100) on the water balance of Saxonian catchments. In this context 13 climate scenarios and three land use scenarios were simulated. The web presence of these two pillars represents a classical information service, which provides finalized results at the spatial resolution of sub-catchments using GIS-based webpages. The third pillar focused on the development of an interactive expert system. It allows the user (public, officials and consulting engineers) to simulate the water

  15. Water Quality Field Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soil Conservation Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Nonpoint source pollution is both a relatively recent concern and a complex phenomenon with many unknowns. Knowing the extent to which agricultural sources contribute to the total pollutant load, the extent to which various control practices decrease this load, and the effect of reducing the pollutants delivered to a water body are basic to the…

  16. Field Balancing in the Real World: Part 2

    SciTech Connect

    Bracher, R.K.; Surrett, C.L.

    1999-10-06

    This paper is a follow-up to an earlier paper, Field Balancing in the Real World, which was presented at CSI Reliability Week 1997 in Nashville. Case studies of excessive vibrations on fans at ORNL will be discussed. Except for a few small sections from the earlier paper, this paper is entirely new. The case studies are new. As in the first paper, all fans are rigid-rotor type fans. Normal operation, therefore, is at less than the shaft's first critical speed. The presentation of case studies with root cause problems other than unbalance is a major departure from the first paper. We believe they belong here, since unbalance is suspected most of the time when a fan is vibrating excessively, even when it is not the root cause. In reality, unbalance is the underlying cause of the excess vibration on fans we have fixed at ORNL only about half the time. Furthermore, the analyst's credibility could be called into question upon an unsuccessful attempt at field balancing when underlying causes are later discovered and fixed. A demonstration will follow the case study presentation. The additional tests described in this paper to confirm centrifugal force (probable unbalance) will be performed.

  17. [Diet and water-salt balance in rats].

    PubMed

    Marina, A S; Kutina, A V; Natochin, Iu V

    2012-03-01

    We compared parameters of water-salt balance in Wistar female rats fed normal chows during more than 2 weeks. Potassium content was 1.4-fold higher in diet I than in diet II, and sodium end water content was 3.3- and 7.5-fold higher in diet II than in diet I. Blood osmolality and concentration of Na+, K+, Mg2+ were equal in rats fed different chow. In water-loaded rats (5 ml of water/100 bw per os) fed different chow, urine flow rate did not differ, but solute-free water excretion was higher by 40.2% in the rats fed diet II vs. diet I. The sort of diet did not affect the renal sodium excretion during oral administration of 5 ml 0.9% NaCl per 100 g bw to rats. After vasopressin injection solute-free water reabsorption was 1.5-fold higher in rats fed diet II. Natriuretic and hydruretic effect of exenatide, glucagon-like peptide 1 mimetic, was weaker in rats fed diet I. The data obtained indicate that organism can effectively maintain blood parameters. The modulation of hormone regulatory effects on water and sodium balance was found to depend on the state of organism under diet consumed continuously.

  18. BALANCE

    DOEpatents

    Carmichael, H.

    1953-01-01

    A torsional-type analytical balance designed to arrive at its equilibrium point more quickly than previous balances is described. In order to prevent external heat sources creating air currents inside the balance casing that would reiard the attainment of equilibrium conditions, a relatively thick casing shaped as an inverted U is placed over the load support arms and the balance beam. This casing is of a metal of good thernnal conductivity characteristics, such as copper or aluminum, in order that heat applied to one portion of the balance is quickly conducted to all other sensitive areas, thus effectively preventing the fornnation of air currents caused by unequal heating of the balance.

  19. GlobWat - a global water balance model to assess water use in irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogeveen, J.; Faurès, J.-M.; Peiser, L.; Burke, J.; van de Giesen, N.

    2015-01-01

    GlobWat is a freely distributed, global soil water balance model that is used by FAO to assess water use in irrigated agriculture; the main factor behind scarcity of freshwater in an increasing number of regions. The model is based on spatially distributed high resolution datasets that are consistent at global level and calibrated against values for Internal Renewable Water Resources, as published in AQUASTAT, FAO's global information system on water and agriculture. Validation of the model is done against mean annual river basin outflows. The water balance is calculated in two steps: first a "vertical" water balance is calculated that includes evaporation from in situ rainfall ("green" water) and incremental evaporation from irrigated crops. In a second stage, a "horizontal" water balance is calculated to determine discharges from river (sub-)basins, taking into account incremental evaporation from irrigation, open water and wetlands ("blue" water). The paper describes methodology, input and output data, calibration and validation of the model. The model results are finally compared with other global water balance models.

  20. GlobWat - a global water balance model to assess water use in irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogeveen, J.; Faurès, J.-M.; Peiser, L.; Burke, J.; van de Giesen, N.

    2015-09-01

    GlobWat is a freely distributed, global soil water balance model that is used by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) to assess water use in irrigated agriculture, the main factor behind scarcity of freshwater in an increasing number of regions. The model is based on spatially distributed high-resolution data sets that are consistent at global level and calibrated against values for internal renewable water resources, as published in AQUASTAT, the FAO's global information system on water and agriculture. Validation of the model is done against mean annual river basin outflows. The water balance is calculated in two steps: first a "vertical" water balance is calculated that includes evaporation from in situ rainfall ("green" water) and incremental evaporation from irrigated crops. In a second stage, a "horizontal" water balance is calculated to determine discharges from river (sub-)basins, taking into account incremental evaporation from irrigation, open water and wetlands ("blue" water). The paper describes the methodology, input and output data, calibration and validation of the model. The model results are finally compared with other global water balance models to assess levels of accuracy and validity.

  1. Regionalization of the Turc-Mezentsev water balance formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebecherel, Laure; Andréassian, Vazken

    2013-04-01

    equation for annual evaporation using field observations and results from a biophysical model. Journal of Hydrology, 216(1-2): 99-110. Donohue, R., Roderick, M., McVicar, T., 2011. Assessing the differences in sensitivities of runoff to changes in climatic conditions across a large basin. J. Hydrol., 406(3-4): 234-244. Dooge, J.C.I., 1992. Sensitivty of runoff to climate change - A Hortonian approach. Bull. Amer. Meteorol. Soc., 73(12): 2013-2024. Mezentsev, V., 1955. More on the computation of actual evaporation (Yechio raz o rastchetie srednevo summarnovo ispareniia). Meteorologia i Gidrologia, 5: 24-26. Oudin, L., Andréassian, V., Lerat, J., Michel, C., 2008. Has land cover a significant impact on mean annual streamflow? An international assessment using 1508 catchments. Journal of Hydrology, 357(3-4): 303-316. Potter, N.J., Zhang, L., 2009. Interannual variability of catchment water balance in Australia. Journal of Hydrology, 369: 120-129. Roderick, M.L., Farquhar, G.D., 2011. A simple framework for relating variations in runoff to variations in climatic conditions and catchment properties. Water Resour. Res., 47. Turc, L., 1954. Le bilan d'eau des sols: relation entre les précipitations, l'évaporation et l'écoulement. Annales Agronomiques, Série A(5): 491-595.

  2. Water balance for Great Basin phreatophytes derived from eddy covariance, soil water, and water table measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinwand, A. L.; Harrington, R. F.; Or, D.

    2006-10-01

    SummaryThis study was conducted in the Owens Valley, California to determine the relative contribution of groundwater and soil water to evapotranspiration (ET) from phreatophytic meadow and scrub plant communities. Groundwater uptake during the growing season was estimated from the difference between ET measured using eddy covariance, and the sum of soil water depletion, precipitation, and evaporation from the water table. Total ET during the growing season (March 26 to October 15) ranged from 53 to 646 mm among all sites and years. ET during winter was small, averaging approximately 40 mm. Estimates of evaporation from the water table based on soil properties and ET measurements at night both suggested this flux was a small component of the water balance. For alkali meadows with water table depths of 1-3 m, groundwater uptake accounted for 60-81% of ET. Shrub-dominated sites had lower cover and transpiration, and relied less on groundwater than meadows. Groundwater uptake was correlated with water table depth and leaf area index ( r2 = 0.62 and 0.70, respectively) even though water table depth and vegetation cover were less correlated ( r2 = 0.44). A slightly higher correlation was observed between groundwater uptake per unit leaf area and water table depth ( r2 = 0.73). Annual ET results from this study could assist the management of groundwater pumping in areas of phreatophytic vegetation by improved accounting of the sources of ET as vegetation leaf area and water table depths vary.

  3. Snowpack energy balance analysis using field measurements in an Andean watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stehr, Alejandra

    2014-05-01

    Depending on the relative altitude and ambient temperature, Andean watersheds present important snow coverage during winter season. Snowpack stores significant amount of water which is released to surface runoff and groundwater when solar radiation increases, mainly during the spring and summer season, controlling the shape of the annual hydrograph and affecting the water balance at monthly and shorter scales. Field measurements of snow cover in those areas are difficult to perform due to adverse climatic and topographic conditions. Therefore, it is useful to support the hydrological characterization of watersheds located in the high mountains with models representing runoff from melting, for example, models based on the energy balance of the snowpack. The objective of this work is to characterize and quantify the energy flows that control the accumulation and melting of snow cover, using field measurements. The work was done on the upper Malleco watershed, which is located in the Andes Mountain Range (38°20' - 38°41' S and 71°13' - 71°35' W) and has an area of 27 km2, elevations vary between 900 to 1789 m a.m.s.l. For the calculation of the different the energy balance components, two weather stations were installed in the study area, which recorded data every 15 minutes. The variables measured were: global solar radiation, net radiation, shortwave and longwave radiation, air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, soil heat flux, precipitation and snow depth. Two analyzes were performed: 1) Energy Balance 2010. Two representative periods of accumulation (1st July to 31st July) and melting (10 September to 10 October) were selected in one of the stations. 2) Energy Balance 2011. Energy balance for a 15 days period of accumulation (July 19 to August 3, 2011) was with the aim of comparing both meteorological stations. In all cases hourly energy fluxes, snow water equivalent and daily snow depth were calculated. The latter was compared with the

  4. Water balance measurements and simulations of maize plants on lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinlein, Florian; Biernath, Christian; Klein, Christian; Thieme, Christoph; Priesack, Eckart

    2016-04-01

    In Central Europe expected major aspects of climate change are a shift of precipitation events and amounts towards winter months, and the general increase of extreme weather events like heat waves or summer droughts. This will lead to strongly changing regional water availability and will have an impact on future crop growth, water use efficiency and yields. Therefore, to estimate future crop yields by growth models accurate descriptions of transpiration as part of the water balance is important. In this study, maize was grown on weighing lysimeters (sowdate: 24 April 2013). Transpiration was determined by sap flow measurement devices (ICT International Pty Ltd, Australia) using the Heat-Ratio-Method: two temperature probes, 0.5 cm above and below a heater, detect a heat pulse and its speed which allows the calculation of sap flow. Water balance simulations were executed with different applications of the model framework Expert-N. The same pedotransfer and hydraulic functions and the same modules to simulate soil water flow, soil heat and nitrogen transport, nitrification, denitrification and mineralization were used. Differences occur in the chosen potential evapotranspiration ETpot (Penman-Monteith ASCE, Penman-Monteith FAO, Haude) and plant modules (SPASS, CERES). In all simulations ETpot is separated into a soil and a plant part using the leaf are index (LAI). In a next step, these parts are reduced by soil water availability. The sum of these parts is the actual evapotranspiration ETact which is compared to the lysimeter measurements. The results were analyzed from Mid-August to Mid-September 2013. The measured sap flow rates show clear diurnal cycles except on rainy days. The SPASS model is able to simulate these diurnal cycles, overestimates the measurements on rainy days and at the beginning of the analyzed period, and underestimates transpiration on the other days. The main reason is an overestimation of potential transpiration Tpot due to too high

  5. A Root Zone Water Balance Algorithm for Educational Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cahoon, Joel E.; Ferguson, Richard B.

    1995-01-01

    Describes a simple technique for monitoring root zone water status on demonstration project fields and incorporating the demonstration site results into workshop-type educational settings. Surveys indicate the presentation was well received by demonstration project cooperators and educators. (LZ)

  6. Modeling of Water balance in semiarid region of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Sosa, E.; Mastachi-Loza, C.; Medina-frutos, C.; Ramos-Salinas, N. M.

    2012-04-01

    Around the world water is becoming scarce, especially in the semiarid regions where there is a high inter-annual variability in the amount and distribution of the rainfall. Studies on this kind of environments would allow us to understand the mechanisms that determine the spatial and temporal distribution of the water balance components. The present study was carried out from October 2005 to October 2008 in three semiarid sites located in the south of the Mexican Plateau: El Carmen in Guanajuato State and Amazcala and Cadereyta in the State of Queretaro. The work aim was to provide a better understanding of the hydrological processes that occur in the semiarid ecosystems, specifically through two objectives (1) to quantify and to model the rainfall interception process (EI) employing an adequate sampling strategy and an evaluation of the models developed by Rutter et al. (1975) and Gash (1979) in two shrubs species: huisache (Acacia farnesisna) and mesquite (Prosopis laevigata) both, in situ and ex situ and (2) to quantify and model the water balance in order to define the distribution of the water and energy balance components in El Carmen and Cadereyta. For this purpose, the SiSPAT (Simple Soil Plant Atamosphere Transfer) model was used based on a parametrisation of the soil, plants and atmosphere components. It was found that EI represented between 20% and 22% of the total rainfall (PG). Gash's model reproduced EI with satisfactory efficiency (E>0.6), wind's speed and maximum intensity have a local effect on EI. It was also found that, using SiSPAT, the water balance components were particularly sensitive to parameters associated with the soil and the leaf area index. The model results showed that during the studied period, the annual evapotranspiration in Cadereyta was less than PG (-10 and -5%) and above PG for El Carmen (10 y 30%). Runoff and percolation at 5m were null. Finally in both sites there was a simulated loss of water stored in the soil. This, was

  7. Balancing water resource conservation and food security in China

    PubMed Central

    Dalin, Carole; Qiu, Huanguang; Hanasaki, Naota; Mauzerall, Denise L.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    China’s economic growth is expected to continue into the next decades, accompanied by sustained urbanization and industrialization. The associated increase in demand for land, water resources, and rich foods will deepen the challenge of sustainably feeding the population and balancing agricultural and environmental policies. We combine a hydrologic model with an economic model to project China’s future food trade patterns and embedded water resources by 2030 and to analyze the effects of targeted irrigation reductions on this system, notably on national agricultural water consumption and food self-sufficiency. We simulate interprovincial and international food trade with a general equilibrium welfare model and a linear programming optimization, and we obtain province-level estimates of commodities’ virtual water content with a hydrologic model. We find that reducing irrigated land in regions highly dependent on scarce river flow and nonrenewable groundwater resources, such as Inner Mongolia and the greater Beijing area, can improve the efficiency of agriculture and trade regarding water resources. It can also avoid significant consumption of irrigation water across China (up to 14.8 km3/y, reduction by 14%), while incurring relatively small decreases in national food self-sufficiency (e.g., by 3% for wheat). Other researchers found that a national, rather than local, water policy would have similar effects on food production but would only reduce irrigation water consumption by 5%. PMID:25825748

  8. Balancing water resource conservation and food security in China.

    PubMed

    Dalin, Carole; Qiu, Huanguang; Hanasaki, Naota; Mauzerall, Denise L; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2015-04-14

    China's economic growth is expected to continue into the next decades, accompanied by sustained urbanization and industrialization. The associated increase in demand for land, water resources, and rich foods will deepen the challenge of sustainably feeding the population and balancing agricultural and environmental policies. We combine a hydrologic model with an economic model to project China's future food trade patterns and embedded water resources by 2030 and to analyze the effects of targeted irrigation reductions on this system, notably on national agricultural water consumption and food self-sufficiency. We simulate interprovincial and international food trade with a general equilibrium welfare model and a linear programming optimization, and we obtain province-level estimates of commodities' virtual water content with a hydrologic model. We find that reducing irrigated land in regions highly dependent on scarce river flow and nonrenewable groundwater resources, such as Inner Mongolia and the greater Beijing area, can improve the efficiency of agriculture and trade regarding water resources. It can also avoid significant consumption of irrigation water across China (up to 14.8 km(3)/y, reduction by 14%), while incurring relatively small decreases in national food self-sufficiency (e.g., by 3% for wheat). Other researchers found that a national, rather than local, water policy would have similar effects on food production but would only reduce irrigation water consumption by 5%.

  9. Balancing water resource conservation and food security in China.

    PubMed

    Dalin, Carole; Qiu, Huanguang; Hanasaki, Naota; Mauzerall, Denise L; Rodriguez-Iturbe, Ignacio

    2015-04-14

    China's economic growth is expected to continue into the next decades, accompanied by sustained urbanization and industrialization. The associated increase in demand for land, water resources, and rich foods will deepen the challenge of sustainably feeding the population and balancing agricultural and environmental policies. We combine a hydrologic model with an economic model to project China's future food trade patterns and embedded water resources by 2030 and to analyze the effects of targeted irrigation reductions on this system, notably on national agricultural water consumption and food self-sufficiency. We simulate interprovincial and international food trade with a general equilibrium welfare model and a linear programming optimization, and we obtain province-level estimates of commodities' virtual water content with a hydrologic model. We find that reducing irrigated land in regions highly dependent on scarce river flow and nonrenewable groundwater resources, such as Inner Mongolia and the greater Beijing area, can improve the efficiency of agriculture and trade regarding water resources. It can also avoid significant consumption of irrigation water across China (up to 14.8 km(3)/y, reduction by 14%), while incurring relatively small decreases in national food self-sufficiency (e.g., by 3% for wheat). Other researchers found that a national, rather than local, water policy would have similar effects on food production but would only reduce irrigation water consumption by 5%. PMID:25825748

  10. Drinking and water balance during exercise and heat acclimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Brock, P. J.; Keil, L. C.; Morse, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    The interactions between fluid intake and balance, and plasma ion, osmotic, and endocrine responses during dehydration produced by exercise in cool and warm environments during acclimation are explored. Two groups of five male subjects performed 8 days of ergometer exercise in hot and thermoneutral conditions, respectively. The exercise trials lasted 2 hr each. Monitoring was carried out on the PV, osmotic, sodium, and endocrine concentrations, voluntary fluid intake, fluid balances, and fluid deficits. A negative correlation was observed between the plasma sodium and osmolality during acclimation. The presence of hypervolemia during acclimation is suggested as a cause of drinking, while the vasopressin concentration was not found to be a significant factor stimulating drinking. Finally, the predominant mechanism in fluid intake during exercise and heat exposure is concluded to be the renin-angiotensin II system in the presence of reductions in total body water and extracellular plasma volumes.

  11. A balanced water layer concept for subglacial hydrology in large scale ice sheet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goeller, S.; Thoma, M.; Grosfeld, K.; Miller, H.

    2012-12-01

    There is currently no doubt about the existence of a wide-spread hydrological network under the Antarctic ice sheet, which lubricates the ice base and thus leads to increased ice velocities. Consequently, ice models should incorporate basal hydrology to obtain meaningful results for future ice dynamics and their contribution to global sea level rise. Here, we introduce the balanced water layer concept, covering two prominent subglacial hydrological features for ice sheet modeling on a continental scale: the evolution of subglacial lakes and balance water fluxes. We couple it to the thermomechanical ice-flow model RIMBAY and apply it to a synthetic model domain inspired by the Gamburtsev Mountains, Antarctica. In our experiments we demonstrate the dynamic generation of subglacial lakes and their impact on the velocity field of the overlaying ice sheet, resulting in a negative ice mass balance. Furthermore, we introduce an elementary parametrization of the water flux-basal sliding coupling and reveal the predominance of the ice loss through the resulting ice streams against the stabilizing influence of less hydrologically active areas. We point out, that established balance flux schemes quantify these effects only partially as their ability to store subglacial water is lacking.

  12. A Monthly Water-Balance Model Driven By a Graphical User Interface

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    This report describes a monthly water-balance model driven by a graphical user interface, referred to as the Thornthwaite monthly water-balance program. Computations of monthly water-balance components of the hydrologic cycle are made for a specified location. The program can be used as a research tool, an assessment tool, and a tool for classroom instruction.

  13. Estimating Agricultural Water Use using the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance Evapotranspiration Estimation Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Due to the predominantly arid climate in Arizona, access to adequate water supply is vital to the economic development and livelihood of the State. Water supply has become increasingly important during periods of prolonged drought, which has strained reservoir water levels in the Desert Southwest over past years. Arizona's water use is dominated by agriculture, consuming about seventy-five percent of the total annual water demand. Tracking current agricultural water use is important for managers and policy makers so that current water demand can be assessed and current information can be used to forecast future demands. However, many croplands in Arizona are irrigated outside of areas where water use reporting is mandatory. To estimate irrigation withdrawals on these lands, we use a combination of field verification, evapotranspiration (ET) estimation, and irrigation system qualification. ET is typically estimated in Arizona using the Modified Blaney-Criddle method which uses meteorological data to estimate annual crop water requirements. The Modified Blaney-Criddle method assumes crops are irrigated to their full potential over the entire growing season, which may or may not be realistic. We now use the Operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) ET data in a remote-sensing and energy-balance framework to estimate cropland ET. SSEBop data are of sufficient resolution (30m by 30m) for estimation of field-scale cropland water use. We evaluate our SSEBop-based estimates using ground-truth information and irrigation system qualification obtained in the field. Our approach gives the end user an estimate of crop consumptive use as well as inefficiencies in irrigation system performance—both of which are needed by water managers for tracking irrigated water use in Arizona.

  14. Semi-arid vegetation response to antecedent climate and water balance windows

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thoma, David P.; Munson, Seth M.; Irvine, Kathryn M.; Witwicki, Dana L.; Bunting, Erin

    2016-01-01

    Questions Can we improve understanding of vegetation response to water availability on monthly time scales in semi-arid environments using remote sensing methods? What climatic or water balance variables and antecedent windows of time associated with these variables best relate to the condition of vegetation? Can we develop credible near-term forecasts from climate data that can be used to prepare for future climate change effects on vegetation? Location Semi-arid grasslands in Capitol Reef National Park, Utah, USA. Methods We built vegetation response models by relating the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from MODIS imagery in Mar–Nov 2000–2013 to antecedent climate and water balance variables preceding the monthly NDVI observations. We compared how climate and water balance variables explained vegetation greenness and then used a multi-model ensemble of climate and water balance models to forecast monthly NDVI for three holdout years. Results Water balance variables explained vegetation greenness to a greater degree than climate variables for most growing season months. Seasonally important variables included measures of antecedent water input and storage in spring, switching to indicators of drought, input or use in summer, followed by antecedent moisture availability in autumn. In spite of similar climates, there was evidence the grazed grassland showed a response to drying conditions 1 mo sooner than the ungrazed grassland. Lead times were generally short early in the growing season and antecedent window durations increased from 3 mo early in the growing season to 1 yr or more as the growing season progressed. Forecast accuracy for three holdout years using a multi-model ensemble of climate and water balance variables outperformed forecasts made with a naïve NDVI climatology. Conclusions We determined the influence of climate and water balance on vegetation at a fine temporal scale, which presents an opportunity to forecast vegetation

  15. Analysis of the water balance of Lake Victoria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossent, J.; de Brabanter, W.; Bauwens, W.

    2009-04-01

    Lake Victoria is situated within an elevated plateau in the western part of Africa's Great Rift Valley and lies within the territory of three countries: Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya. It is Africa's largest lake and the second widest fresh water lake in the world in terms of surface area. It is also the source of the longest branch of the River Nile, the White Nile. The lake's shallowness, limited river inflow, and large surface area relative to its volume make it vulnerable to climate changes and fluctuations of the water level. This affects the surrounding countries and their people a lot, especially in terms of their food supply and economy. The aim of this study was to get more information on the causes of these fluctuations by analysing the water balance of the lake for the period 1970-1974. It was based both on historical data and measurements and new calculations, and compared with previous studies (e.g. Suttcliffe and Parks, 1999). Precipitation and evaporation over the lake surface were calculated with the Thiessen Polygons method, using measurements from stations around the lake and on the islands. The total inflow of the lake is the sum of the contributions of twelve subbasins. One of these subcatchments, the Nzoia-catchment, was modeled with SWAT (Soil and Water Assessment Tool), a physically based, semi-distributed river basin simulator, as a contribution to the development of a water balance model for Lake Victoria. To calculate the outflow at the Owen Falls Dam in Jinja (Uganda), gauge heights of the lake were used in combination with the "Agreed Curve" (the relationship between water level and flow that was set by the policy makers). As the lake is assumed to be a system with a closed mass balance, the combination of the variations in the above mentioned components resulted in changes of the lake's storage, leading to fluctuations of the water level. For the period 1970-1974 the calculated mean monthly evaporation is 133 mm, with a standard deviation

  16. Water balance and irrigation water pumping of Lake Merdada for potato farming in Dieng Highland, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Fadlillah, Lintang N; Widyastuti, M

    2016-08-01

    Lakes provide water resources for domestic use, livestock, irrigational use, etc. Water availability of lakes can be estimated using lake water balance. Lake water balance is calculated from the water input and output of a lake. Dieng Highland has several volcanic lakes in its surroundings. Lake Merdada in Dieng Highland has been experiencing extensive water pumping for several years more than other lakes in the surrounding area. It provides irrigation water for potato farming in Dieng Highland. The hydrological model of this lake has not been studied. The modeled water balance in this research uses primary data, i.e., bathymetric data, soil texture, and outflow discharge, as well as secondary data, i.e., rainfall, temperature, Landsat 7 ETM+ band 8 image, and land use. Water balance input components consist of precipitation on the surface area, surface (direct) runoff from the catchment area, and groundwater inflow and outflow (G net), while the output components consist of evaporation, river outflow, and irrigation. It shows that groundwater is the dominant input and output of the lake. On the other hand, the actual irrigation water pumping plays the leading role as human-induced alteration of outflow discharge. The maximum irrigation pumping modeling shows that it will decrease lake storage up to 37.14 % per month and may affect the ecosystem inside the lake. PMID:27384226

  17. Water balance and irrigation water pumping of Lake Merdada for potato farming in Dieng Highland, Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Fadlillah, Lintang N; Widyastuti, M

    2016-08-01

    Lakes provide water resources for domestic use, livestock, irrigational use, etc. Water availability of lakes can be estimated using lake water balance. Lake water balance is calculated from the water input and output of a lake. Dieng Highland has several volcanic lakes in its surroundings. Lake Merdada in Dieng Highland has been experiencing extensive water pumping for several years more than other lakes in the surrounding area. It provides irrigation water for potato farming in Dieng Highland. The hydrological model of this lake has not been studied. The modeled water balance in this research uses primary data, i.e., bathymetric data, soil texture, and outflow discharge, as well as secondary data, i.e., rainfall, temperature, Landsat 7 ETM+ band 8 image, and land use. Water balance input components consist of precipitation on the surface area, surface (direct) runoff from the catchment area, and groundwater inflow and outflow (G net), while the output components consist of evaporation, river outflow, and irrigation. It shows that groundwater is the dominant input and output of the lake. On the other hand, the actual irrigation water pumping plays the leading role as human-induced alteration of outflow discharge. The maximum irrigation pumping modeling shows that it will decrease lake storage up to 37.14 % per month and may affect the ecosystem inside the lake.

  18. Observed and modeled multi-year evaporation from three field-scale experiments using water balance and Penman-Monteith methods: Profound effect of material type and wind exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, H. E.; Fretz, N.; Bay, D.; Mayer, K. U.; Smith, L.; Beckie, R. D.

    2013-12-01

    Three instrumented experimental waste-rock piles at the Cu-Zn-Mo Antamina Mine in Peru are composed of distinct types of waste rock but are otherwise almost identical in size and geometry and experience the same atmospheric conditions with the exception of wind exposure. Evaporation from the piles was calculated using the water balance method over three- and four-year periods to determine the effect of material type and meteorological variability on evaporation. Annual changes in water storage were low or negligible except as a result of unusually high annual precipitation. Observed evaporation was high (44% - 75% of precipitation) and was extremely variable annually in the coarsest-grained waste-rock pile 1, most likely as a result of greater wind exposure and air circulation in that pile. Observed evaporation was moderate (36% - 48% of precipitation) with moderate annual variability in the finer-grained, relatively homogeneous waste-rock pile 2. Observed evaporation was low (24% - 32% of precipitation) with low annual variability in the finer-grained, relatively heterogeneous waste-rock pile 3, most likely as a result of low air circulation coupled with complex flow regimes that include high-velocity preferential flow paths. Slightly higher evaporation was observed on the slopes than on the crowns of Pile 2, while much lower evaporation was observed on the slopes than on the crowns of Piles 1 and 3. Evidence suggests that Piles 1 and 3 slope water-balance evaporation estimates are skewed by non-vertical flow and that, in general, evaporation is higher on the slopes than on the crowns of the piles. Evaporation was also estimated using the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations modified Penman-Monteith method (FAO-PM; Allen et al., 1998) using base-case laboratory- and software- derived parameters. The base-case method underestimated observed evaporation calculated by the water balance method for Pile 1, overestimated observed evaporation for Pile

  19. The Great Lakes Water Balance: Data availability and annotated bibliography of selected references

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neff, Brian P.; Killian, Jason R.

    2003-01-01

    Water balance calculations for the Great Lakes have been made for several decades and are a key component of Great Lakes water management. Despite the importance of the water balance, little has been done to inventory and describe the data available for use in water balance calculations. This report provides a catalog and brief description of major datasets that are used to calculate the Great Lakes water balance. Several additional datasets are identified that could be used to calculate parts of the water balance but currently are not being used. Individual offices and web pages that are useful for attaining these datasets are included. Four specific data gaps are also identified. An annotated bibliography of important publications dealing with the Great Lakes water balance is included. The findings of this investigation permit resource managers and scientists to access data more easily, assess shortcomings of current datasets, and identify which data are not currently being utilized in water balance calculations.

  20. Monthly Water Balance Model Portal for the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, L.; Bock, A.; Markstrom, S. L.; McCabe, G. J., Jr.; Atkinson, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Monthly Water Balance Model (MWBM) portal delivers MWBM output generated for current and future climatic conditions for stream segments and hydrologic response units derived from the US Geological Survey's National Hydrologic Model Geospatial Fabric. The MWBM is a modular system that provides monthly estimates of components of the hydrologic cycle (e.g. streamflow, potential and actual evapotranspiration, snowpack, and storage) computed from mean monthly temperature, monthly total precipitation, latitude, and available soil water capacity. The MWBM portal can generate reports and graphics using simulations from more than 200 current and future climate scenarios at any location within the contiguous US. This presentation will introduce users to the MWBM portal and demonstrate how to access and download MWBM portal data.

  1. The water balance of the East African Great Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xungang

    The East African Great Lakes are important indicators of climatic and environmental change in an area where standard meteorological data are scarce. Three large lakes, Lakes Victoria, Tanganyika and Malawi are studied in order to build water balance relations between lake level and over-lake rainfall. By analyzing the satellite observations, the characteristics of the regional and mesoscale circulations are studied through analysis of convective activity and cloudiness over the lakes. Using a regression approach, the relationship between catchment rainfall and cold cloud frequency is found. Assuming the same convective mechanism operates for each lake and its catchment, the over-lake rainfall is calculated using the catchment rainfall, which has long records. Evaporation is estimated for each lake by energy-budget and Penman methods and a sensitivity study is also carried out. The available tributary inflow and lake outflow data of Lake Victoria are expressed by rainfall and lake level terms. For Lake Victoria, the water balance model is reformulated as a lake level model. The model is first used to predict the lake level changes as a validation. Then it is inverted so that the over-lake rainfall can be reconstructed from known lake levels in both modern times and historical times. In modern times, the precision is on the order of 1% for the calculated mean rainfall and a few percent for the calculated annual rainfall.

  2. Impact of microwave derived soil moisture on hydrologic simulations using a spatially distributed water balance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, D. S.; Wood, E. F.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Mancini, M.

    1994-01-01

    Spatial distributions of soil moisture over an agricultural watershed with a drainage area of 60 ha were derived from two NASA microwave remote sensors, and then used as a feedback to determine the initial condition for a distributed water balance model. Simulated hydrologic fluxes over a period of twelve days were compared with field observations and with model predictions based on a streamflow derived initial condition. The results indicated that even the low resolution remotely sensed data can improve the hydrologic model's performance in simulating the dynamics of unsaturated zone soil moisture. For the particular watershed under study, the simulated water budget was not sensitive to the resolutions of the microwave sensors.

  3. On the Capabilities of Using AIRSAR Data in Surface Energy/Water Balance Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Jose F.; Saatchi, Sasan S.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper an algorithm is described that allows derivation of three fundamental parameters from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data: soil moisture, soil roughness, and canopy water content, accounting for the effects of vegetation cover by using optical (Landsat) data as auxiliary. The capabilities and limitations of the data and algorithms are discussed, as well as possibilities to use these data in energy/water balance modeling studies. All of the data used in this study was acquired as part of the European Field Experiment in a Desertification Threatened Area.

  4. Water Balance Change in Xia Ying River Basin, Qinghai Province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuo, L.; Zhou, B.; Li, J.

    2010-12-01

    Yellow River, Yangtze River and Lan Cang River are major river systems supporting billions of people in South East Asia and China. Source region of Yellow River, Yangtze River and Lan Cang River (Three Rivers) is located in Qinghai Province, China. Recently, Chinese government started a conservation project in the source region of the Three Rivers called “Convert Agricultural Field to Forest and Grassland”. Xia Ying River Basin is a sub-basin located in the source region of the Three River Basin. The upper Xia Ying River Basin has experienced dramatic land cover change since 2006. Before 2006, upper Xia Ying River Basin hill slope was agricultural field. Coniferous trees and bush vegetation were planted on the slope greater than 70 degree in the upper Xia Ying River Basin in 2006. The objective of the study is to investigate the water balance term change in the Xia Ying River Basin because of the conservation project. This study will use Landsat and MODIS imagery to classify and quantify land cover classes before and after land cover conversion. Water balance terms including runoff and evaportranspiration will be simulated using a land surface model to investigate water balance term change due to land cover change. The study serves as a pilot study for the investigation of hydrological change in the entire source region of the Three River Basin during the past 50 years.

  5. Water balance dynamics of a boreal forest watershed: White Gull Creek basin, 1994-1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nijssen, Bart; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2002-11-01

    Field measurements from the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) were combined to calculate the water balance of the White Gull Creek basin for the three year period 1994-1996. Evapotranspiration was mapped from the observations made at the BOREAS flux towers to the basin using a simple evaporation model with a bulk canopy resistance based on tower observations. Runoff ratios were low, and evapotranspiration accounted for most of the precipitation over the area. The accumulated storage change, over the 3 year period, was 47 mm or 3.4% of the total precipitation, but precipitation exceeded the sum of discharge and evapotranspiration by 80 mm or 15% of the precipitation in 1994. Five possible explanations for the discrepancy in the water balance are identified, with the most likely cause an underestimation of the evapotranspiration in 1994, especially during periods when the basin is wet.

  6. Evaluating Water Conservation and Reuse Policies Using a Dynamic Water Balance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qaiser, Kamal; Ahmad, Sajjad; Johnson, Walter; Batista, Jacimaria R.

    2013-02-01

    A dynamic water balance model is created to examine the effects of different water conservation policies and recycled water use on water demand and supply in a region faced with water shortages and significant population growth, the Las Vegas Valley (LVV). The model, developed using system dynamics approach, includes an unusual component of the water system, return flow credits, where credits are accrued for returning treated wastewater to the water supply source. In LVV, Lake Mead serves as, both the drinking water source and the receiving body for treated wastewater. LVV has a consumptive use allocation from Lake Mead but return flow credits allow the water agency to pull out additional water equal to the amount returned as treated wastewater. This backdrop results in a scenario in which conservation may cause a decline in the available water supply. Current water use in LVV is 945 lpcd (250 gpcd), which the water agency aims to reduce to 752 lpcd (199 gpcd) by 2035, mainly through water conservation. Different conservation policies focused on indoor and outdoor water use, along with different population growth scenarios, are modeled for their effects on the water demand and supply. Major contribution of this study is in highlighting the importance of outdoor water conservation and the effectiveness of reducing population growth rate in addressing the future water shortages. The water agency target to decrease consumption, if met completely through outdoor conservation, coupled with lower population growth rate, can potentially satisfy the Valley's water demands through 2035.

  7. Biogeochemical mass balances in a turbid tropical reservoir. Field data and modelling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phuong Doan, Thuy Kim; Némery, Julien; Gratiot, Nicolas; Schmid, Martin

    2014-05-01

    The turbid tropical Cointzio reservoir, located in the Trans Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), behaves as a warm monomictic water body (area = 6 km2, capacity 66 Mm3, residence time ~ 1 year). It is strategic for the drinking water supply of the city of Morelia, capital of the state of Michoacán, and for downstream irrigation during the dry season. This reservoir is a perfect example of a human-impacted system since its watershed is mainly composed of degraded volcanic soils and is subjected to high erosion processes and agricultural loss. The reservoir is threatened by sediment accumulation and nutrients originating from untreated waters in the upstream watershed. The high content of very fine clay particles and the lack of water treatment plants lead to serious episodes of eutrophication (up to 70 μg chl. a L-1), high levels of turbidity (Secchi depth < 30 cm) and a long period of anoxia (from May to October). Based on intensive field measurements in 2009 (deposited sediment, benthic chamber, water vertical profiles, reservoir inflow and outflow) we determined suspended sediment (SS), carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) mass balances. Watershed SS yields were estimated at 35 t km2 y-1 of which 89-92 % were trapped in the Cointzio reservoir. As a consequence the reservoir has already lost 25 % of its initial storage capacity since its construction in 1940. Nutrient mass balances showed that 50 % and 46 % of incoming P and N were retained by sedimentation, and mainly eliminated through denitrification respectively. Removal of C by 30 % was also observed both by sedimentation and through gas emission. To complete field data analyses we examined the ability of vertical one dimensional (1DV) numerical models (Aquasim biogeochemical model coupled with k-ɛ mixing model) to reproduce the main biogeochemical cycles in the Cointzio reservoir. The model can describe all the mineralization processes both in the water column and in the sediment. The values of the

  8. Impact of Water Recovery from Wastes on the Lunar Surface Mission Water Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John W.; Hogan, John Andrew; Wignarajah, Kanapathipi; Pace, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Future extended lunar surface missions will require extensive recovery of resources to reduce mission costs and enable self-sufficiency. Water is of particular importance due to its potential use for human consumption and hygiene, general cleaning, clothes washing, radiation shielding, cooling for extravehicular activity suits, and oxygen and hydrogen production. Various water sources are inherently present or are generated in lunar surface missions, and subject to recovery. They include: initial water stores, water contained in food, human and other solid wastes, wastewaters and associated brines, ISRU water, and scavenging from residual propellant in landers. This paper presents the results of an analysis of the contribution of water recovery from life support wastes on the overall water balance for lunar surface missions. Water in human wastes, metabolic activity and survival needs are well characterized and dependable figures are available. A detailed life support waste model was developed that summarizes the composition of life support wastes and their water content. Waste processing technologies were reviewed for their potential to recover that water. The recoverable water in waste is a significant contribution to the overall water balance. The value of this contribution is discussed in the context of the other major sources and loses of water. Combined with other analyses these results provide guidance for research and technology development and down-selection.

  9. Differences in water balance for hydrological response units defined from mobile measurements of soil and crop parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasquez, Vicente; Thomsen, Anton; Schelde, Kirsten; Knadel, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Variability in vegetation indices like the ratio vegetation index (RVI) and leaf area index (LAI) for a uniformly managed agricultural field can be associated with differences in plant available water and thus, differences in evapotranspiration (ET) and deep percolation (D). This variability has important implications for field scale water balance and water and fertilizer use efficiencies of the vegetation. Characterizations of the water balance often do not account for field scale heterogeneity arising from the spatial variability of soils and vegetation. In this study we evaluated differences in modelled ET and D from six hydrological response units (HRU) defined for a 25 ha sandy soil agricultural field in Western Denmark. The HRUs were identified by clustering a high resolution soil and vegetation sensory data. Crop development and soil water content were monitored during one growing season for each HRU and a soil water balance model applied to infer ET and D. It was shown that the easily measured RVI could be used to estimate LAI by linear regression with local measurements for each HRU. The local RVI to LAI regression was further validated by measurements made on the entire field with the MobilLas mobile canopy sensor. Differences in modelled ET for the growing season ranged from 10-35 mm between HRUs and were attributed to differences in water content at field capacity (FC) and maximum LAI. Differences in modelled D ranged from 5-25 mm and were also associated with differences in FC attributed to variation in the silt and soil carbon contents of HRUs. In summary, the investigated HRUs revealed differences in ET and D supporting the use of this approach to understand the field scale variation of the water balance and possibly optimize water and fertilizer use efficiency.

  10. Global Energy and Water Balances in the Latest Reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Joong-Bae; Kang, Suchul; Park, Hye-Jin

    2016-04-01

    The recently released Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA-55) data are evaluated and compared with three other global reanalyses, namely Interim version of the next European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERRA-Interim), Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), in terms of global energy and water balances. All four reanalyses show an energy imbalance at TOA and surface. Especially, clouds in JRA-55 are optically weaker than those in the three other reanalyses, leading to excessive outgoing longwave radiation, which in turn causes negative net energy flux at TOA. Moreover, JRA-55 has a negative imbalance at surface and at TOA, which is attributed to systematic positive biases in latent heat flux over the ocean. As for the global water balance, all reanalyses present a similar spatial pattern of the difference between evaporation and precipitation (E-P). However, JRA-55 has a relatively strong negative (positive) E-P in the Intertropical Convergence Zone and South Pacific Convergence Zone (extratropical regions) due to overestimated precipitation (evaporation), in spite of the global net being close to zero. In time series analysis, especially in E-P, significant stepwise changes occur in MERRA, CFSR and ERA-Interim due to the changes occur in MERRA, CFRS and ERA-Interim due to the changes in the satellite observing system used in the data assimilation. Both MERRA and CFSR show a strong downward E-P shift in 1998, simultaneously with the start of the assimilation of AMSU-A sounding radiances. ERA-Interim exhibits an upward E-P shift in 1992 due to changes in observations from the SSM/I of new DMSP satellites. On the contrary, JRA-55 exhibits less trends and remains stable over time, which may be caused by newly available, homogenized observations and advances in data assimilation technique. Acknowledgements This work was funded by the Korea Meteorological

  11. Change in Peninsular Malaysia Water Balances with Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavvas, L. M.; Chen, Z. Q.; Ohara, N.; Binshaaban, A. J.; M. Amin, M. Z.

    2008-05-01

    The climate change simulations of Coupled Global Climate Model of the Canadian Center for Climate Modeling and Analysis were downscaled by a Regional Hydroclimate Model of Peninsular Malaysia to the scale of the subregions and watersheds of Peninsular Malaysia in order to assess the impact of future climate change on its water balances. Based on simulations of hydroclimatic conditions during a 10 year historical and 20 year future period it is concluded that the overall mean monthly streamflow is about the same during the future period and during the historical period for most of the watersheds except Kelantan and Pahang. Also, with the change in climate in the future the high flow conditions will be magnified in the largest watersheds in northeast and central regions during the wet months, while low monthly flows will be significantly lower in the west central coastal watersheds during the dry months.

  12. Global energy and water balances in the latest reanalyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Suchul; Ahn, Joong-Bae

    2015-11-01

    The recently released Japanese 55-year Reanalysis (JRA- 55) data are evaluated and compared with three other global reanalyses, namely Interim version of the next European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Re-Analysis (ERA-Interim), Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) and Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR), in terms of global energy and water balances. All four reanalyses show an energy imbalance at TOA and surface. Especially, clouds in JRA-55 are optically weaker than those in the three other reanalyses, leading to excessive outgoing longwave radiation, which in turn causes negative net energy flux at TOA. Moreover, JRA-55 has a negative imbalance at surface and at TOA, which is attributed to systematic positive biases in latent heat flux over the ocean. As for the global water balance, all reanalyses present a similar spatial pattern of the difference between evaporation and precipitation (E-P). However, JRA-55 has a relatively strong negative (positive) E-P in the Intertropical Convergence Zone and South Pacific Convergence Zone (extratropical regions) due to overestimated precipitation (evaporation), in spite of the global net being close to zero. In time series analysis, especially in E-P, significant stepwise changes occur in MERRA, CFSR and ERA-Interim due to the changes in the satellite observing system used in the data assimilation. Both MERRA and CFSR show a strong downward E-P shift in 1998, simultaneously with the start of the assimilation of AMSU-A sounding radiances. ERA-Interim exhibits an upward E-P shift in 1992 due to changes in observations from the SSM/I of new DMSP satellites. On the contrary, JRA-55 exhibits less trends and remains stable over time, which may be caused by newly available, homogenized observations and advances in data assimilation technique.

  13. Field Balancing of Magnetically Levitated Rotors without Trial Weights

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Jiancheng; Wang, Yingguang; Han, Bangcheng; Zheng, Shiqiang

    2013-01-01

    Unbalance in magnetically levitated rotor (MLR) can cause undesirable synchronous vibrations and lead to the saturation of the magnetic actuator. Dynamic balancing is an important way to solve these problems. However, the traditional balancing methods, using rotor displacement to estimate a rotor's unbalance, requiring several trial-runs, are neither precise nor efficient. This paper presents a new balancing method for an MLR without trial weights. In this method, the rotor is forced to rotate around its geometric axis. The coil currents of magnetic bearing, rather than rotor displacement, are employed to calculate the correction masses. This method provides two benefits when the MLR's rotation axis coincides with the geometric axis: one is that unbalanced centrifugal force/torque equals the synchronous magnetic force/torque, and the other is that the magnetic force is proportional to the control current. These make calculation of the correction masses by measuring coil current with only a single start-up precise. An unbalance compensation control (UCC) method, using a general band-pass filter (GPF) to make the MLR spin around its geometric axis is also discussed. Experimental results show that the novel balancing method can remove more than 92.7% of the rotor unbalance and a balancing accuracy of 0.024 g mm kg−1 is achieved.

  14. On the advantage of well-balanced schemes for moving-water equilibria of the shallow water equations

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yulong; Shu, Chi-wang; Noelle, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    This note aims at demonstrating the advantage of moving-water well-balanced schemes over still-water well-balanced schemes for the shallow water equations. We concentrate on numerical examples with solutions near a moving-water equilibrium. For such examples, still-water well-balanced methods are not capable of capturing the small perturbations of the moving-water equilibrium and may generate significant spurious oscillations, unless an extremely refined mesh is used. On the other hand, moving-water well-balanced methods perform well in these tests. The numerical examples in this note clearly demonstrate the importance of utilizing moving-water well-balanced methods for solutions near a moving-water equilibrium.

  15. Impact of climate forcing uncertainty and human water use on global and continental water balance components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller Schmied, Hannes; Adam, Linda; Eisner, Stephanie; Fink, Gabriel; Flörke, Martina; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan; Portmann, Felix Theodor; Reinecke, Robert; Riedel, Claudia; Song, Qi; Zhang, Jing; Döll, Petra

    2016-10-01

    The assessment of water balance components using global hydrological models is subject to climate forcing uncertainty as well as to an increasing intensity of human water use within the 20th century. The uncertainty of five state-of-the-art climate forcings and the resulting range of cell runoff that is simulated by the global hydrological model WaterGAP is presented. On the global land surface, about 62 % of precipitation evapotranspires, whereas 38 % discharges into oceans and inland sinks. During 1971-2000, evapotranspiration due to human water use amounted to almost 1 % of precipitation, while this anthropogenic water flow increased by a factor of approximately 5 between 1901 and 2010. Deviation of estimated global discharge from the ensemble mean due to climate forcing uncertainty is approximately 4 %. Precipitation uncertainty is the most important reason for the uncertainty of discharge and evapotranspiration, followed by shortwave downward radiation. At continental levels, deviations of water balance components due to uncertain climate forcing are higher, with the highest discharge deviations occurring for river discharge in Africa (-6 to 11 % from the ensemble mean). Uncertain climate forcings also affect the estimation of irrigation water use and thus the estimated human impact of river discharge. The uncertainty range of global irrigation water consumption amounts to approximately 50 % of the global sum of water consumption in the other water use sector.

  16. Using uncertainty analysis and groundwater measurements to improve the confidence of river water balance estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, R.; Costelloe, J. F.; Western, A. W.; George, B.

    2013-10-01

    An improved understanding of water balances of rivers is fundamental in water resource management. Effective use of a water balance approach requires thorough identification of sources of uncertainty around all terms in the analysis and can benefit from additional, independent information that can be used to interpret the accuracy of the residual term of a water balance. We use a Monte Carlo approach to estimate a longitudinal river channel water balance and to identify its sources of uncertainty for a regulated river in south-eastern Australia, assuming that the residual term of this water balance represents fluxes between groundwater and the river. Additional information from short term monitoring of ungauged tributaries and groundwater heads is used to further test our confidence in the estimates of error and variance for the major components of this water balance. We identify the following conclusions from the water balance analysis. First, improved identification of the major sources of error in consecutive reaches of a catchment can be used to support monitoring infrastructure design to best reduce the largest sources of error in a water balance. Second, estimation of ungauged inflow using rainfall-runoff modelling is sensitive to the representativeness of available gauged data in characterising the flow regime of sub-catchments along a perennial to intermittent continuum. Lastly, comparison of temporal variability of stream-groundwater head difference data and a residual water balance term provides an independent means of assessing the assumption that the residual term represents net stream-groundwater fluxes.

  17. Characterization of arid land water-balance processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flint, Alan L.; Flint, Lorraine E.; Hevesi, Joseph A.; Hudson, David B.

    Water-balance processes were characterized to estimate net infiltration at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to help determine the suitability of this site as a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Detailed water-content data were collected from 98 boreholes located in four topographic positions (ridgetops, sideslopes, albvial terraces, and active channels) representing four infiltration zones. These data include monthly volumetric water-content readings with depth for 1984 through 1995 and water potential measurements made at a soil-bedrock contact in 1995. These data, combined with measured evapotranspiration and precipitation data, piovide the seasonal and areal distribution of changes in volumetric water content needed to assess hydrologic processes contributing to net infiltration. The conceptual model of infiltration at Yucca Mountain describes the processes of precipitation, runoff, evapotranspiration, and vertical redistribution of water in the shallow unsaturated zone. Field observations and measurements and data analysis indicate that, in order for net infiltration to occur, water must reach and nearly saturate the soil-bedrock contact to initiate flow in the underlying fractured bedrock, and water must penetrate deep enough to escape the influences of evapotranspiration. The amount of net infiltration is a function of how long or how frequently the contact is saturated. Water must penetrate deep enough to escape the influences of evapotranspiration. The penetration of water through the soil is influenced primarily by the seasonal timing and areal distribution of precipitation, the storage capacity of soil, and the properties of the underlying bedrock.

  18. A TEN-YEAR WATER BALANCE OF A MOUNTAINOUS SEMI-ARID WATERSHED. (R824784)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantifying water balance components, which is particularly challenging in snow-fed, semi-arid regions, is crucial to understanding the basic hydrology of a watershed. In this study, a water balance was computed using 10 years of data collected at the Upper Sheep Creek Water...

  19. Mechanism for negative water balance during weightlessness An hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, J. E.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism for the apparent decrease in body fluid volume in astronauts during spaceflight remains obscure. The widespread postulate that the hypohydration is the result of the Henry-Gauer reflex, a diuresis caused by inhibition of vasopressin secretion resulting from increased left and perhaps right atrial (central) venous pressure, has not been established with direct measurements on astronauts. An hypothesis is proposed to account for fluid-electrolyte shifts during weightlessness. A moderate but transient increase in central venous pressure occurs when orbit is entered that is insufficient to activate the Henry-Gauer reflex but sufficient to stimulate the release of atrial natriuretic peptides. Increased sodium excretion would facilitate some increased urinary water loss. The resulting relatively dilute plasma and interstitial fluids would cause fluid to shift into the cellular space, resulting in edema in the head and trunk and inhibition of thirst and drinking. Thus, the negative water balance in astronauts would be caused by a gradual natriuresis and diuresis coupled with reduced fluid intake.

  20. A monthly water balance model for climate change analysis in Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herceg, András; Kalicz, Péter; Kisfaludi, Balázs; Gribovszki, Zoltán

    2015-04-01

    The currently ongoing climate changing progress can be typified with a global temperature rising. The most significant effect of the climate change will impact for the water cycle. The analysis of the effects of vegetation on the hydrological cycle in a climate change context is especially important. In Hungary the impact of vegetation on water balance was analyzed in the frame of small catchment research as well as paired plot analysis. The aim of this paper was to a model develop based on Thorntwaite-type monthly water balance estimations. The main goals were to calibrate the model parameters, using remote sensing based ET dataset. The calibrated model was used for prediction using 4 climate model datasets. The 3 main periods of prediction were: 2010-2040, 2040-2070, and 2070-2100. The advantage of this model is its robust build-up. It can be applied if temperature and precipitation time series are available. The parameter of the calibration is the water storage capacity of the soil (SOILmax), which can be calibrated using the available actual evapotranspiration data. If the soils physical properties are known, the maximal rooting depth is also predictable. The model can primarily be used at the catchment level or for areas without additional water amounts from below. For testing the model, a dataset of a corn field next to Mosonmagyaróvár, and a dataset of a small forest covered catchment next to Sopron was successfully used. The latter can be used for water balance validation too. This publication has been supported by AGRARKLIMA.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034 project.

  1. Water Balance of the San Simon Groundwater Basin, El Salvador, Central America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, M.; Lopez, D. L.; Matus, A.

    2008-05-01

    The Berlin hydrothermal field in El Salvador, Central America is located in the San Simon River Basin on the northwest slope of the Berlin-Tecapa volcanic complex, in the eastern portion of the country. This hydrothermal field, which has been exploited since 1992, is a liquid-dominated system governed by faults and caldera structures allowing infiltration and transport of meteoric fluids. San Simon River is a tributary of the Lempa River, the largest river in the country. Geophysical studies have found that the Berlin field is composed of three aquifers (Shallow, Intermediate, Deep). Exploitation involves the removal of hot fluids from the geothermal reservoir (deep aquifer) and re-injection of lower temperature fluids. This study analyzes the surficial hydrology and groundwater storage change (since exploitation) in the hydrothermal reservoir to produce a water budget. Field monitoring of springs, fumarolic activity, domestic wells, tributaries to the San Simon River, and meteorological data provide constraints on the hydrology. Springs occur in the system close to fault zones or at contacts between different lithologies. The water balance for the San Simon groundwater basin (July 2004 - June 2005) indicates that 2.51 - 3.46 E7 m3/yr of water are infiltrated to the ground, 1.30 - 1.45E7 m3/yr comprises the overland flow, 5.74 E6 m3/yr form the base flow of the San Simon River, and 1.54 E5 m3/yr is released thru the evaporation of Alegria Lake. The shallow aquifer is affected by pumping of 4.78 E6 m3/yr by the national water company. To complete the water balance of the San Simon Basin, a correlation between the composition of the fumarolic gases and the diffuse flux of soil CO2 was performed. The flux of water released from fumarolic areas was estimated at 1.48 E5 m3/yr. An analysis of the increase in chloride concentration with time in the deep aquifer and the net mass withdrawn from this aquifer allow an estimation of the decrease in storage in the hydrothermal

  2. Development of EOS-aided procedures for the determination of the water balance of hydrologic budget of a large watershed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congalton, Russell G.; Thomas, Randall W.; Zinke, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Work focused on the acquisition of remotely sensed data for the 1985 to 1986 hydrogolic year; continuation of the field measurement program; continued acquisition and construction of passive microwave remote sensing instruments; a compilation of data necessary for an initial water balance computation; and participation with the EOS Simulataneity Team in reviewing the Feather River watershed as a possible site for a simultaneity experiment.

  3. Analysis of Poyang Lake water balance and its indication of river-lake interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zengxin; Huang, Yuhan; Xu, Chong-Yu; Chen, Xi; Moss, Elica M; Jin, Qiu; Bailey, Alisha M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, water shortage is becoming one of the most serious problems in the Poyang Lake. In this paper, the long-term water balance items of the Poyang Lake have been analyzed to reveal the coupling effects of Three Gorges Dam (TGD) and droughts on the water balance of Poyang Lake. The results indicate that: (1) the water balance items of Poyang Lake vary greatly, e.g. lake precipitation and inflow decrease during the past several decades while evaporation and water consumption increase significantly; (2) the water balance of Poyang Lake has been affected by the operation of TGD. Negative lake water balance in recent years leads to a serious water shortage problem in the Poyang Lake. Moreover, the operation of TGD also changed the river-lake relationship in the lower Yangtze River basin; (3) the coupling effects of drought and TGD on the lake water balance has been analyzed by using composite analysis method and it can be found that the operation of TGD has significantly altered the lake water balance. But it is not the only factor that affects the lake water balance, and the droughts might cause their relations to be much more complicated. PMID:27652128

  4. Analysis of Poyang Lake water balance and its indication of river-lake interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zengxin; Huang, Yuhan; Xu, Chong-Yu; Chen, Xi; Moss, Elica M; Jin, Qiu; Bailey, Alisha M

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, water shortage is becoming one of the most serious problems in the Poyang Lake. In this paper, the long-term water balance items of the Poyang Lake have been analyzed to reveal the coupling effects of Three Gorges Dam (TGD) and droughts on the water balance of Poyang Lake. The results indicate that: (1) the water balance items of Poyang Lake vary greatly, e.g. lake precipitation and inflow decrease during the past several decades while evaporation and water consumption increase significantly; (2) the water balance of Poyang Lake has been affected by the operation of TGD. Negative lake water balance in recent years leads to a serious water shortage problem in the Poyang Lake. Moreover, the operation of TGD also changed the river-lake relationship in the lower Yangtze River basin; (3) the coupling effects of drought and TGD on the lake water balance has been analyzed by using composite analysis method and it can be found that the operation of TGD has significantly altered the lake water balance. But it is not the only factor that affects the lake water balance, and the droughts might cause their relations to be much more complicated.

  5. Soil Water Balance and Water Use Efficiency of Dryland Wheat in Different Precipitation Years in Response to Green Manure Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dabin; Yao, Pengwei; Na, Zhao; Cao, Weidong; Zhang, Suiqi; Li, Yangyang; Gao, Yajun

    2016-05-01

    Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) monoculture is conventionally cultivated followed by two to three months of summer fallow in the Loess Plateau. To develop a sustainable cropping system, we conducted a six-year field experiment to investigate the effect of leguminous green manure (LGM) instead of bare fallow on the yield and water use efficiency (WUE) of winter wheat and the soil water balance (SWB) in different precipitation years in a semi-arid region of northwest China. Results confirmed that planting LGM crop consumes soil water in the fallow season can bring varied effects to the subsequent wheat. The effect is positive or neutral when the annual precipitation is adequate, so that there is no significant reduction in the soil water supplied to wheat. If this is not the case, the effect is negative. On average, the LGM crop increased wheat yield and WUE by 13% and 28%, respectively, and had considerable potential for maintaining the SWB (0–200 cm) compared with fallow management. In conclusion, cultivation of the LGM crop is a better option than fallow to improve the productivity and WUE of the next crop and maintain the soil water balance in the normal and wet years in the Loess Plateau.

  6. Soil Water Balance and Water Use Efficiency of Dryland Wheat in Different Precipitation Years in Response to Green Manure Approach.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dabin; Yao, Pengwei; Na, Zhao; Cao, Weidong; Zhang, Suiqi; Li, Yangyang; Gao, Yajun

    2016-01-01

    Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) monoculture is conventionally cultivated followed by two to three months of summer fallow in the Loess Plateau. To develop a sustainable cropping system, we conducted a six-year field experiment to investigate the effect of leguminous green manure (LGM) instead of bare fallow on the yield and water use efficiency (WUE) of winter wheat and the soil water balance (SWB) in different precipitation years in a semi-arid region of northwest China. Results confirmed that planting LGM crop consumes soil water in the fallow season can bring varied effects to the subsequent wheat. The effect is positive or neutral when the annual precipitation is adequate, so that there is no significant reduction in the soil water supplied to wheat. If this is not the case, the effect is negative. On average, the LGM crop increased wheat yield and WUE by 13% and 28%, respectively, and had considerable potential for maintaining the SWB (0-200 cm) compared with fallow management. In conclusion, cultivation of the LGM crop is a better option than fallow to improve the productivity and WUE of the next crop and maintain the soil water balance in the normal and wet years in the Loess Plateau. PMID:27225842

  7. Soil Water Balance and Water Use Efficiency of Dryland Wheat in Different Precipitation Years in Response to Green Manure Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dabin; Yao, Pengwei; Na, Zhao; Cao, Weidong; Zhang, Suiqi; Li, Yangyang; Gao, Yajun

    2016-01-01

    Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) monoculture is conventionally cultivated followed by two to three months of summer fallow in the Loess Plateau. To develop a sustainable cropping system, we conducted a six-year field experiment to investigate the effect of leguminous green manure (LGM) instead of bare fallow on the yield and water use efficiency (WUE) of winter wheat and the soil water balance (SWB) in different precipitation years in a semi-arid region of northwest China. Results confirmed that planting LGM crop consumes soil water in the fallow season can bring varied effects to the subsequent wheat. The effect is positive or neutral when the annual precipitation is adequate, so that there is no significant reduction in the soil water supplied to wheat. If this is not the case, the effect is negative. On average, the LGM crop increased wheat yield and WUE by 13% and 28%, respectively, and had considerable potential for maintaining the SWB (0–200 cm) compared with fallow management. In conclusion, cultivation of the LGM crop is a better option than fallow to improve the productivity and WUE of the next crop and maintain the soil water balance in the normal and wet years in the Loess Plateau. PMID:27225842

  8. Botswana water and surface energy balance research program. Part 2: Large scale moisture and passive microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vandegriend, A. A.; Owe, M.; Chang, A. T. C.

    1992-01-01

    The Botswana water and surface energy balance research program was developed to study and evaluate the integrated use of multispectral satellite remote sensing for monitoring the hydrological status of the Earth's surface. The research program consisted of two major, mutually related components: a surface energy balance modeling component, built around an extensive field campaign; and a passive microwave research component which consisted of a retrospective study of large scale moisture conditions and Nimbus scanning multichannel microwave radiometer microwave signatures. The integrated approach of both components are explained in general and activities performed within the passive microwave research component are summarized. The microwave theory is discussed taking into account: soil dielectric constant, emissivity, soil roughness effects, vegetation effects, optical depth, single scattering albedo, and wavelength effects. The study site is described. The soil moisture data and its processing are considered. The relation between observed large scale soil moisture and normalized brightness temperatures is discussed. Vegetation characteristics and inverse modeling of soil emissivity is considered.

  9. Evaluating water conservation and reuse policies using a dynamic water balance model.

    PubMed

    Qaiser, Kamal; Ahmad, Sajjad; Johnson, Walter; Batista, Jacimaria R

    2013-02-01

    A dynamic water balance model is created to examine the effects of different water conservation policies and recycled water use on water demand and supply in a region faced with water shortages and significant population growth, the Las Vegas Valley (LVV). The model, developed using system dynamics approach, includes an unusual component of the water system, return flow credits, where credits are accrued for returning treated wastewater to the water supply source. In LVV, Lake Mead serves as, both the drinking water source and the receiving body for treated wastewater. LVV has a consumptive use allocation from Lake Mead but return flow credits allow the water agency to pull out additional water equal to the amount returned as treated wastewater. This backdrop results in a scenario in which conservation may cause a decline in the available water supply. Current water use in LVV is 945 lpcd (250 gpcd), which the water agency aims to reduce to 752 lpcd (199 gpcd) by 2035, mainly through water conservation. Different conservation policies focused on indoor and outdoor water use, along with different population growth scenarios, are modeled for their effects on the water demand and supply. Major contribution of this study is in highlighting the importance of outdoor water conservation and the effectiveness of reducing population growth rate in addressing the future water shortages. The water agency target to decrease consumption, if met completely through outdoor conservation, coupled with lower population growth rate, can potentially satisfy the Valley's water demands through 2035.

  10. Mapping the water balance over a wide range of European catchments.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannemans, B.; Laguardia, G.

    2009-04-01

    Getting the water balance correct is one of the major problems of hydrological modeling: inputs (precipitation) and outputs (evaporation and runoff) should be in reasonable balance before calibration can even start. Often errors on the water balance can have a bigger influence on results than model calibration. Lisflood is a distributed hydrological model used in the European Flood Alert System and in the European Droughts Observatory of the European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC). It comprises a module for calculating PET; moreover, a major effort in preparing the static input for the model, such as land use, vegetation, Leaf Area Index, river networks maps, has been carried out in the last years. The challenge to use the same model over a wide region, covering the entire Europe makes it a good tool to explore the impact of different hydrological settings (Van der Knijff et al, 2008). As part of a new calibration exercise, we reran the model over Europe with standard calibration parameters for the period 1990-2007. The meteorological input was retrieved from the MARS database at JRC (about 6000 stations). We compared mean annual simulated discharge with observed discharge for over 400 catchments. Preliminary results show that the water balance is offset in most regions. In lowlands there is an excess in simulated runoff production, probably attributable to underestimated drainage to deeper groundwater and to underestimation of actual evapotranspiration. In most mountainous regions and in the middle-european massifs there is a shortage in runoff production, which is probably related to precipitation underestimation. Calibrating on parameters that increase evapotranspiration or infiltration to deeper groundwater layers could improve the results in the lowlands. Using other high-resolution data sets or improved interpolation techniques can solve only partly the problems related to the mountainous areas: we compared three precipitation sources and found that

  11. Effects of evapotranspiration heterogeneity on catchment water balance in the Southern Sierra Nevada of California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerkez, B.; Kelly, A. E.; Lucas, R. G.; Son, K.; Glaser, S. D.; Bales, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Heterogeneity of Evapotranspiration (ET) is the result of poorly understood interactions between climate, topography, vegetation and soil. Accurate predictions of ET, and thus improved water balance estimates, hinge directly upon an improved understanding of the processes that drive ET across a wide spatio-temporal range. Recent warming trends in the Western US are shifting precipitation toward more rain-dominated patterns, significantly increasing vegetation water stress in historically snow-dominated regimes due to reduced soil moisture and increased vapor deficit during warm summer months. We investigate dominant controls that govern ET variability in a highly instrumented 1km2 mountain catchment at the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory, co-located in the Kings River Experimental Watershed. Various ET estimates are derived from a number of measurement approaches: an eddy flux covariance tower, ET chambers, stream flumes, groundwater monitoring wells, matric potential sensors, as well as data from a distributed wireless sensor network with over 300 sensors. Combined with precipitation data, and high-density distributed soil moisture and snowdepth readings, the ET estimates are utilized to reconstruct the overall catchment water balance. We also apply the Regional Hydro-Ecologic Simulation System (RHESSys), a physically based, spatially distributed hydrologic model, to estimate water balance components. The model predictions are compared with the water budget calculated from field data, and used to identify the key variables controlling spatial and temporal patterns of ET at multiple scales. Initial results show that ET estimates are scale-, and vegetation-dependent, with significant ET variability between vegetation types and physiographic parameters such as elevation, slope, and aspect. In mixed conifer forests terrain, ET is more dependent on soil moisture, while in the meadows, where the soil is generally saturated for the duration of the growing

  12. Energy and water balance response of a vegetated wetland to herbicide treatment of invasive Phragmites australis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykleby, Phillip M.; Lenters, John D.; Cutrell, Gregory J.; Herrman, Kyle S.; Istanbulluoglu, Erkan; Scott, Durelle T.; Twine, Tracy E.; Kucharik, Christopher J.; Awada, Tala; Soylu, Mehmet E.; Dong, Bo

    2016-08-01

    The energy and water balance of a Phragmites australis dominated wetland in south central Nebraska was analyzed to assess consumptive water use and the potential for "water savings" as a result of vegetation eradication via herbicide treatment. Energy balance measurements were made at the field site for two growing seasons (treated and untreated), including observations of net radiation, heat storage, and sensible heat flux, which was measured using a large-aperture scintillometer. Latent heat flux was calculated as a residual of the energy balance, and comparisons were made between the two growing seasons and with model simulations to examine the relative impacts of vegetation removal and climate variability. Observed ET rates dropped by roughly 32% between the two growing seasons, from a mean of 4.4 ± 0.7 mm day-1 in 2009 (with live vegetation) to 3.0 ± 0.8 mm day-1 in 2010 (with dead P. australis). These results are corroborated by the Agro-IBIS model simulations, and the reduction in ET implies a total "water savings" of 245 mm over the course of the growing season. The significant decreases in ET were accompanied by a more-than-doubling of sensible heat flux, as well as a ∼60% increase in heat storage due to decreased LAI. Removal of P. australis was also found to cause measurable changes in the local micrometeorology at the wetland. Consistent with the observed increase in sensible heat flux during 2010, warmer, drier, windier conditions were observed in the dead, P. australis section of the wetland, compared to an undisturbed section of live, native vegetation. Modeling results suggest that the elimination of transpiration in 2010 was partially offset by an increase in surface evaporation, thereby reducing the subsequent water savings by roughly 60%. Thus, the impact of vegetation removal depends on the local climate, depth to groundwater, and management decisions related to regrowth of vegetation.

  13. A coupled remote sensing and simplified surface energy balance approach to estimate actual evapotranspiration from irrigated fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, G.B.; Budde, M.; Verdin, J.P.; Melesse, Assefa M.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate crop performance monitoring and production estimation are critical for timely assessment of the food balance of several countries in the world. Since 2001, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) has been monitoring crop performance and relative production using satellite-derived data and simulation models in Africa, Central America, and Afghanistan where ground-based monitoring is limited because of a scarcity of weather stations. The commonly used crop monitoring models are based on a crop water-balance algorithm with inputs from satellite-derived rainfall estimates. These models are useful to monitor rainfed agriculture, but they are ineffective for irrigated areas. This study focused on Afghanistan, where over 80 percent of agricultural production comes from irrigated lands. We developed and implemented a Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to monitor and assess the performance of irrigated agriculture in Afghanistan using a combination of 1-km thermal data and 250m Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, both from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. We estimated seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETa) over a period of six years (2000-2005) for two major irrigated river basins in Afghanistan, the Kabul and the Helmand, by analyzing up to 19 cloud-free thermal and NDVI images from each year. These seasonal ETa estimates were used as relative indicators of year-to-year production magnitude differences. The temporal water-use pattern of the two irrigated basins was indicative of the cropping patterns specific to each region. Our results were comparable to field reports and to estimates based on watershed-wide crop water-balance model results. For example, both methods found that the 2003 seasonal ETa was the highest of all six years. The method also captured water management scenarios where a unique year-to-year variability was identified in addition to water-use differences between

  14. A Coupled Remote Sensing and Simplified Surface Energy Balance Approach to Estimate Actual Evapotranspiration from Irrigated Fields

    PubMed Central

    Senay, Gabriel B.; Budde, Michael; Verdin, James P.; Melesse, Assefa M.

    2007-01-01

    Accurate crop performance monitoring and production estimation are critical for timely assessment of the food balance of several countries in the world. Since 2001, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) has been monitoring crop performance and relative production using satellite-derived data and simulation models in Africa, Central America, and Afghanistan where ground-based monitoring is limited because of a scarcity of weather stations. The commonly used crop monitoring models are based on a crop water-balance algorithm with inputs from satellite-derived rainfall estimates. These models are useful to monitor rainfed agriculture, but they are ineffective for irrigated areas. This study focused on Afghanistan, where over 80 percent of agricultural production comes from irrigated lands. We developed and implemented a Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model to monitor and assess the performance of irrigated agriculture in Afghanistan using a combination of 1-km thermal data and 250-m Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data, both from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. We estimated seasonal actual evapotranspiration (ETa) over a period of six years (2000-2005) for two major irrigated river basins in Afghanistan, the Kabul and the Helmand, by analyzing up to 19 cloud-free thermal and NDVI images from each year. These seasonal ETa estimates were used as relative indicators of year-to-year production magnitude differences. The temporal water-use pattern of the two irrigated basins was indicative of the cropping patterns specific to each region. Our results were comparable to field reports and to estimates based on watershed-wide crop water-balance model results. For example, both methods found that the 2003 seasonal ETa was the highest of all six years. The method also captured water management scenarios where a unique year-to-year variability was identified in addition to water-use differences between

  15. Improving the performance of water balance equation using fuzzy logic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khazaei, Bahram; Hosseini, Seyed Mahmood

    2015-05-01

    It is a common practice to conduct the water budget or water balance analysis in a given area within a specified time in order to investigate the balance between the inputs and outputs of the water system. Such an analysis can be used for water management and water allocation in a designated study area. Due to appearance of an error in water balance equation because of difficulty in accurate estimation of its individual components, the main objective of the current paper was to apply a set of fuzzy coefficients to the components of the water balance equation in order to reduce this error. The fuzzy coefficients reflect the uncertainty and imprecision in evaluating each component, and minimize the overall error of the water balance equation. These coefficients are adjusted by an error minimization procedure, based on fuzzy regression concepts and using available recorded data for a given study area within a specified time scale. The adjusted coefficients can effectively estimate the water balance components in the future. In this study, four different models, representing different types of fuzzy coefficients, were considered and used for annual water balance of Azghand catchment in Khorasan Razavi Province, Iran as a case study. Analysis of results showed that all models were effective in reducing water balance error in Azghand catchment. The best model reduced the error up to 79% in terms of mean absolute error compared with error in water balance equation when conventional (with no correction coefficients) water balance analysis was conducted. Moreover, the results indicated that the performance of the proposed fuzzy models was not significantly sensitive to selection of confidence level in data (h) and improved slightly as h increased.

  16. Ultraendurance cycling in a hot environment: thirst, fluid consumption, and water balance.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Lawrence E; Johnson, Evan C; McKenzie, Amy L; Ellis, Lindsay A; Williamson, Keith H

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this field investigation was to identify and clarify factors that may be used by strength and conditioning professionals to help athletes drink adequately but not excessively during endurance exercise. A universal method to accomplish this goal does not exist because the components of water balance (i.e., sweat rate, fluid consumed) are different for each athlete and endurance events differ greatly. Twenty-six male cyclists (mean ± SD; age, 41 ± 8 years; height, 177 ± 7 cm; body mass, 81.85 ± 8.95 kg) completed a summer 164-km road cycling event in 7.0 ± 2.1 hours (range, 4.5-10.4 hours). Thirst ratings, fluid consumed, indices of hydration status, and body water balance (ingested fluid volume - [urine excreted + sweat loss]) were the primary outcome variables. Measurements were taken before the event, at designated aid stations on the course (52, 97, and 136 km), and at the finish line. Body water balance during exercise was not significantly correlated with exercise time on the course, height, body mass, or body mass index. Thirst ratings were not significantly correlated with any variable. We also observed a wide range of total sweat losses (4.9-12.7 L) and total fluid intakes (2.1-10.5 L) during this ultraendurance event. Therefore, we recommend that strength and conditioning professionals develop an individualized drinking plan for each athlete, by calculating sweat rate (milliliter per hour) on the basis of body mass change (in kilograms), during field simulations of competition. PMID:25559907

  17. Ultraendurance cycling in a hot environment: thirst, fluid consumption, and water balance.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Lawrence E; Johnson, Evan C; McKenzie, Amy L; Ellis, Lindsay A; Williamson, Keith H

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this field investigation was to identify and clarify factors that may be used by strength and conditioning professionals to help athletes drink adequately but not excessively during endurance exercise. A universal method to accomplish this goal does not exist because the components of water balance (i.e., sweat rate, fluid consumed) are different for each athlete and endurance events differ greatly. Twenty-six male cyclists (mean ± SD; age, 41 ± 8 years; height, 177 ± 7 cm; body mass, 81.85 ± 8.95 kg) completed a summer 164-km road cycling event in 7.0 ± 2.1 hours (range, 4.5-10.4 hours). Thirst ratings, fluid consumed, indices of hydration status, and body water balance (ingested fluid volume - [urine excreted + sweat loss]) were the primary outcome variables. Measurements were taken before the event, at designated aid stations on the course (52, 97, and 136 km), and at the finish line. Body water balance during exercise was not significantly correlated with exercise time on the course, height, body mass, or body mass index. Thirst ratings were not significantly correlated with any variable. We also observed a wide range of total sweat losses (4.9-12.7 L) and total fluid intakes (2.1-10.5 L) during this ultraendurance event. Therefore, we recommend that strength and conditioning professionals develop an individualized drinking plan for each athlete, by calculating sweat rate (milliliter per hour) on the basis of body mass change (in kilograms), during field simulations of competition.

  18. The springs of Lake Pátzcuaro: chemistry, salt-balance, and implications for the water balance of the lake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bischoff, James L.; Israde-Alcántara, Isabel; Garduno-Monroy, Victor H.; Shanks, Wayne C.

    2004-01-01

    Lake Pa??tzcuaro, the center of the ancient Tarascan civilization located in the Mexican altiplano west of the city of Morelia, has neither river input nor outflow. The relatively constant lake-salinity over the past centuries indicates the lake is in chemical steady state. Springs of the south shore constitute the primary visible input to the lake, so influx and discharge must be via sub-lacustrine ground water. The authors report on the chemistry and stable isotope composition of the springs, deeming them representative of ground-water input. The springs are dominated by Ca, Mg and Na, whereas the lake is dominated by Na. Combining these results with previously published precipitation/rainfall measurements on the lake, the authors calculate the chemical evolution from spring water to lake water, and also calculate a salt balance of the ground-water-lake system. Comparing Cl and ??18O compositions in the springs and lake water indicates that 75-80% of the spring water is lost evaporatively during evolution toward lake composition. During evaporation Ca and Mg are lost from the water by carbonate precipitation. Each liter of spring water discharging into the lake precipitates about 18.7 mg of CaCO3. Salt balance calculations indicate that ground water input to the lake is 85.9??106 m3/a and ground water discharge from the lake is 23.0??106 m3/a. Thus, the discharge is about 27% of the input, with the rest balanced by evaporation. A calculation of time to reach steady-state ab initio indicates that the Cl concentration of the present day lake would be reached in about 150 a. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Infiltration and water balance modeling along a toposequence in a rubber tree plantation of NE Thailand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammecker, Claude; Seltacho, Siwaporn; Suvanang, Nopmanee; Do, Frederic; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2015-04-01

    Northeast of Thailand, is a plateau at 200 m AMSL with a typical undulating landscape. Traditionally the lowlands were dedicated to paddy fields and the uplands covered by Dipterocarpus forest. However development of cash crops during the last decades has led to intensive land clearing in the uplands and to modifications at a regional scale of the water balance in the critical zone with increasing runoff and soil erosion. Recent international demand increase for natural rubber motivated many local farmers to shift from these cash crops towards rubber-tree (Heva Brasiliensis) plantations. However these land use changes have been undertaken without considering the climatic and edaphic specificity of the region, which are not well adapted to the growth of rubber tree (rainfall lower than recommended and sandy soils with low fertility). Therefore, in order to assess and try to predict the environmental consequences (water resources, water-table, ..) of the development of rubber tree plantations in this area, a small watershed in the region ok Khon Kaen has been selected to follow the infiltration and to monitor the different components of the water balance along a toposequence. A six years monitoring of the main components of water balance along a toposequence associated to numerical simulation were used to quantify and try to forecast the evolution of the water use and water resources. Unsaturated soil properties were determined at different depths, in various positions along the toposequence. Experimental results supported by modeling of 2D water flow with HYDRUS3D show clearly that infiltration is blocked by a clayey layer on top of the bedrock and conditioned the occurrence of a perched watertable during the rainy seasons. Most of the soil water flow was found to be directed laterally during the rainy season. The deep groundwater was found to be fed from the lower part of toposequence in the thalweg. The transpiration rate measured on the trees at this stage of

  20. 30 CFR 816.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... limitations for coal mining promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set forth in 40 CFR part... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and...

  1. 30 CFR 816.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... limitations for coal mining promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set forth in 40 CFR part... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and...

  2. 30 CFR 816.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... limitations for coal mining promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set forth in 40 CFR part... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and...

  3. 30 CFR 816.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... limitations for coal mining promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set forth in 40 CFR part... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and...

  4. 30 CFR 817.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... limitations for coal mining promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set forth in 40 CFR part... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and...

  5. 30 CFR 817.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... limitations for coal mining promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set forth in 40 CFR part... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and...

  6. 30 CFR 817.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... limitations for coal mining promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set forth in 40 CFR part... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and...

  7. 30 CFR 816.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... limitations for coal mining promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set forth in 40 CFR part... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-SURFACE MINING ACTIVITIES § 816.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and...

  8. 30 CFR 817.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... limitations for coal mining promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set forth in 40 CFR part... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and...

  9. 30 CFR 817.42 - Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and effluent limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... limitations for coal mining promulgated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency set forth in 40 CFR part... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and... STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND MINING ACTIVITIES § 817.42 Hydrologic balance: Water quality standards and...

  10. Simulating maize production, water and surface energy balance, and canopy temperature under full and deficit irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface energy balance is critical to the understanding of crop evapotranspiration (ET) requirement and crop water stresses. The objective of this study was to evaluate the simulation of crop growth, water and surface energy balance components, and canopy temperature under full and deficit irrigated...

  11. Student Misconceptions in Writing Balanced Equations for Dissolving Ionic Compounds in Water

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naah, Basil M.; Sanger, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify student misconceptions and difficulties in writing symbolic-level balanced equations for dissolving ionic compounds in water. A sample of 105 college students were asked to provide balanced equations for dissolving four ionic compounds in water. Another 37 college students participated in semi-structured…

  12. Climate, interseasonal storage of soil water, and the annual water balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milly, P.C.D.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of annual totals and seasonal variations of precipitation and potential evaporation on the annual water balance are explored. It is assumed that the only other factor of significance to annual water balance is a simple process of water storage, and that the relevant storage capacity is the plant-available water-holding capacity of the soil. Under the assumption that precipitation and potential evaporation vary sinusoidally through the year, it is possible to derive an analytic solution of the storage problem, and this yields an expression for the fraction of precipitation that evaporates (and the fraction that runs off) as a function of three dimensionless numbers: the ratio of annual potential evaporation to annual precipitation (index of dryness); an index of the seasonality of the difference between precipitation and potential evaporation; and the ratio of plant-available water-holding capacity to annual precipitation. The solution is applied to the area of the United States east of 105??W, using published information on precipitation, potential evaporation, and plant-available water-holding capacity as inputs, and using an independent analysis of observed river runoff for model evaluation. The model generates an areal mean annual runoff of only 187 mm, which is about 30% less than the observed runoff (263 mm). The discrepancy is suggestive of the importance of runoff-generating mechanisms neglected in the model. These include intraseasonal variability (storminess) of precipitation, spatial variability of storage capacity, and finite infiltration capacity of land. ?? 1994.

  13. Unbalance Identification and Field Balancing of Dual Rotors System with Slightly Different Rotating Speeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, S.; Wang, X.-X.

    1999-02-01

    The identification of unbalance is the crux of field balancing of dual rotors system with slightly different rotating speeds. On the basis of correlation theory, this paper explains a method called “Single Point Discrete Fourier Transformation (DFT)” to identify the unbalance. By theoretical analysis, the correlation integral time and its maximum possible error are determined. The field balancing experiment on WLZY-350 horizontal spiral centrifuge verifies its precision, reliability and applicability in practice.

  14. Impact of climatic noise on global estimates of terrestrial water balance components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasonova, Olga; Gusev, Yeugeniy; Semenov, Vladimir; Kovalev, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Estimates of water balance components performed by different authors in climate impact studies are characterized by a large scatter or uncertainty associated, in particular, with application of different meteorological forcing data (simulated by climate models), different estimates of model parameters, and different hydrological models. In the present work, the objective uncertainty, which cannot be reduced by means of better physical description of the processes under study or by means of improvement of the quality of input data for model simulations, and which is an internal feature of the atmosphere - hydrosphere - land surface system, is considered. This uncertainty is caused by a chaotic character of atmospheric processes (i.e. by so-called climatic noise), their instability with respect to small errors in determination of initial conditions for modeling the evolution of meteorological variables. Our study is devoted to investigating the impact of climatic noise on the estimates of terrestrial water balance components (precipitation, runoff and evapotranspiration) on a global scale. To achieve the effect of climatic noise 45 simulations were performed by the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM5 under identical lower boundary conditions (including sea surface temperatures and sea ice concentrations) and constant external forcing parameters. The only differences between the simulations were initial conditions of the atmosphere. Meteorological fields simulated by ECHAM5 for the period of 1979-2012 were used as forcing data (with 6-hour temporal resolution and one-degree spatial one) by the land surface model Soil Water - Atmosphere - Plants (SWAP) for hydrological simulations on a global scale. As a result, 45-member ensemble of the water balance components for the land surface of the Earth excluding Antarctica was obtained. Analysis of the obtained results allowed us to estimate the lowest level of uncertainty which can be achieved in climate impact

  15. Water, Ice, and Meteorological Measurements at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, Balance Years 2004 and 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, William R.; Josberger, Edward G.; Savoca, Mark E.

    2007-01-01

    Winter snow accumulation and summer snow and ice ablation were measured at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, to estimate glacier mass-balance quantities for balance years 2004 and 2005. The North Cascade Range in the vicinity of South Cascade Glacier accumulated smaller than normal winter snowpacks during water years 2004 and 2005. Correspondingly, the balance years 2004 and 2005 maximum winter snow balances of South Cascade Glacier, 2.08 and 1.97 meters water equivalent, respectively, were smaller than the average of such balances since 1959. The 2004 glacier summer balance (-3.73 meters water equivalent) was the eleventh most negative during 1959 to 2005 and the 2005 glacier summer balance (-4.42 meters water equivalent) was the third most negative. The relatively small winter snow balances and unusually negative summer balances of 2004 and 2005 led to an overall loss of glacier mass. The 2004 and 2005 glacier net balances, -1.65 and -2.45 meters water equivalent, respectively, were the seventh and second most negative during 1953 to 2005. For both balance years, the accumulation area ratio was less than 0.05 and the equilibrium line altitude was higher than the glacier. The unusually negative 2004 and 2005 glacier net balances, combined with a negative balance previously reported for 2003, resulted in a cumulative 3-year net balance of -6.20 meters water equivalent. No equal or greater 3-year mass loss has occurred previously during the more than 4 decades of U.S. Geological Survey mass-balance measurements at South Cascade Glacier. Accompanying the glacier mass losses were retreat of the terminus and reduction of total glacier area. The terminus retreated at a rate of about 17 meters per year during balance year 2004 and 15 meters per year during balance year 2005. Glacier area near the end of balance years 2004 and 2005 was 1.82 and 1.75 square kilometers, respectively. Runoff from the basin containing the glacier and from an adjacent nonglacierized basin was

  16. ANALYSIS OF WATER AND ENERGY FLUXES USING SATELLITE, ENERGY BALANCE MODELING AND OBSERVATIONS (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irmak, A.

    2009-12-01

    Surface energy fluxes, including net radiation (Rn), sensible heat (H), latent heat (LE), and soil heat flux (G) are critical in surface energy balance of any terrain or landscapes. Estimation or measurement of these energy fluxes is important for completing the water balance in terrestrial ecosystems, and therefore accurately predicting the effects of global climate and land use change. The objectives of this study were to (1) use METRICtm (Mapping Evapotranspiration at high Resolution using Internalized Calibration) model for estimating land surface energy fluxes in Nebraska (NE) by utilizing satellite remote sensing data, (2) identify model bias in energy balance components compared with measurements from Bowen Ratio Energy Balance System (BREBS) in a subsurface drip-irrigated maize field in South-central Nebraska, and (3) understand the partitioning of available energy into latent heat for corn and soybean cropping systems at large scale. A total of 15 Landsat images were processed to estimate instantaneous surface energy fluxes at Landsat overpasses with METRIC model. Results showed that the model predictions of the surface energy fluxes and daily evapotranspiration were correlated well with the BREBS measurements. There is a need, however, to test the performance of the model with in-situ observations in other locations with different dataset before utilizing it for crucial water regulatory and policy decisions. The METRICtm approach illustrated how an ‘off-the-shelf’ model can be applied operationally over a significant time period and how that model behaves. The findings makes considerable contribution to our understanding of estimating land surface energy fluxes using remote sensing approach and experimentally describes the operational characteristics of METRICtm and presents its limitations.

  17. The role of the vegetation on the water balance in Water-limited Mediterranean ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortis, C.; Montaldo, N.

    2010-12-01

    Mediterranean ecosystems are heterogeneous with contrasting plant functional types (PFTs, grass, shrubs and trees) that compete for the water use and are characterized by strong annual variability of rainfall that affects the dynamics of the PFTs. To develop an appropriate water management, it is necessary to measure and model accurately the energy flows on the surface, soil moisture and vegetation dynamics for a long period that includes years with different hydro-meteorological conditions. The complexity of the Mediterranean areas requires very detailed models able to explain the relationship between the evapotranspiration and the strategies that different species of plants develop under water stress conditions. To understand this issue we developed a model of soil water balance based on the Richard equations (MISR) coupled with two Vegetation dynamic models (VDMs) for each of the different species considered (shrubs and grass). In particular the water extraction (sink) term is considered as the root water uptake. Two VDMs predict vegetation dynamics, including spatial and temporal distribution/evolution of the root systems in the soil of two competing species (grass and woody vegetation). An innovative method for solving the unlinear system of predicting equations is proposed. The model is tested for the Orroli case study, situated in the mid-west of Sardinia within the Flumendosa river watershed. The site landscape is a mixture of Mediterranean patchy vegetation types, in particular two contrasting plant functional types (grass and woody vegetation) have been included. The model well predict the soil moisture and vegetation dynamics for the case study, and significantly different root potentials are predicted for the two PFTs, highlighting the root competition for the water use. A sensitivity analysis to the soil depth and soil type is performed for investigating their influences on the PFT dynamics and soil water balance. The results show an increase of the

  18. Meal consumption is ineffective at maintaining or correcting water balance in a desert lizard, Heloderma suspectum.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christian D; Jackson, Marin L; DeNardo, Dale F

    2013-04-15

    Many xeric organisms maintain water balance by relying on dietary and metabolic water rather than free water, even when free water may be available. For such organisms, hydric state may influence foraging decisions, since meal consumption is meeting both energy and water demands. To understand foraging decisions it is vital to understand the role of dietary water in maintaining water balance. We investigated whether meal consumption was sufficient to maintain water balance in captive Gila monsters (Heloderma suspectum) at varying levels of dehydration. Gila monsters could not maintain water balance over long time scales through meal consumption alone. Animals fed a single meal took no longer to dehydrate than controls when both groups were deprived of free water. Additionally, meal consumption imparts an acute short-term hydric cost regardless of hydration state. Meal consumption typically resulted in a significant elevation in osmolality at 6 h post-feeding, and plasma osmolality never fell below pre-feeding levels despite high water content (~70%) of meals. These results failed to support our hypothesis that dietary water is valuable to Gila monsters during seasonal drought. When considered in conjunction with previous research, these results demonstrate that Gila monsters, unlike many xeric species, are heavily reliant on seasonal rainfall and the resulting free-standing water to maintain water balance.

  19. Soil water samplers in ion balance studies on acidic forest soils

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, L.; Joergensen, P.; Kruse, S.

    1986-04-01

    During the last years an increasing consciousness has appeared of the injurious effects of acid rain on the forest ecosystems both in Europe and North America. At several localities ion balance studies have been implemented in order to evaluate the impact of the atmospheric deposition of acidic substances and heavy metals on the forest ecosystem. In many localities the leaching of material to the ground water or output from the ecosystem has to be determined by means of tensiometer measurements and soil water sampling. Many different soil water samplers are available on the market and they show useful applicability under the given circumstances. But in many cases soil water samples taken with different equipment give incommensurable results leading to differing explanations of the effects of acid precipitation on elements and their cycling in the ecosystem. The purpose of the present study is twofold. Firstly, the sorption characteristics of different types of soil water samplers are examined under acidic soil conditions both by installation in the field and by laboratory experiments. Secondly, a new method is introduced for current and constant soil water sampling under varying soil suctions in the unsaturated zone.

  20. Circadian rhythm of water balance and aldosterone excretion in the whitebellied sunbird Nectarinia talatala.

    PubMed

    Fleming, P A; Gray, D A; Nicolson, S W

    2004-05-01

    Nectarivorous whitebellied sunbirds, Nectarinia talatala, demonstrate distinct circadian patterns in osmoregulatory parameters. We recorded intake of a 1 mol/l sucrose solution which enabled calculation of total water gain, and collected cloacal fluid for measurements of volume, osmolality and aldosterone concentration. These variables were assessed hourly over 12 h of photophase, and averaged over the 12-h scotophase period. Overnight, when sunbirds were in negative water balance, aldosterone concentrations and outputs were significantly higher than diurnal levels, reflecting a shut-down of cloacal fluid production. Early morning was marked by a high rate of osmotic excretion, disproportionate to water gain or cloacal fluid output, followed by steady intake and cloacal fluid output during the morning and early afternoon. Reduced water flux (decreased feeding and cloacal fluid output) during mid-afternoon was accompanied by a paradoxical decline in osmotic excretion, whilst a significant increase in the discrepancy between water intake and output was recorded as the birds effectively stored water before the scotophase. These patterns of intake and excretion may be informative in explaining drinking and foraging behaviour in the field.

  1. Uncertainty of canal seepage losses estimated using flowing water balance with acoustic Doppler devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Chad A.; Gates, Timothy K.

    2014-09-01

    presented for conducting field water balance tests to recognize and reduce uncertainty in canal seepage estimates.

  2. A method for simulating transient ground-water recharge in deep water-table settings in central Florida by using a simple water-balance/transfer-function model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Reilly, Andrew M.

    2004-01-01

    A relatively simple method is needed that provides estimates of transient ground-water recharge in deep water-table settings that can be incorporated into other hydrologic models. Deep water-table settings are areas where the water table is below the reach of plant roots and virtually all water that is not lost to surface runoff, evaporation at land surface, or evapotranspiration in the root zone eventually becomes ground-water recharge. Areas in central Florida with a deep water table generally are high recharge areas; consequently, simulation of recharge in these areas is of particular interest to water-resource managers. Yet the complexities of meteorological variations and unsaturated flow processes make it difficult to estimate short-term recharge rates, thereby confounding calibration and predictive use of transient hydrologic models. A simple water-balance/transfer-function (WBTF) model was developed for simulating transient ground-water recharge in deep water-table settings. The WBTF model represents a one-dimensional column from the top of the vegetative canopy to the water table and consists of two components: (1) a water-balance module that simulates the water storage capacity of the vegetative canopy and root zone; and (2) a transfer-function module that simulates the traveltime of water as it percolates from the bottom of the root zone to the water table. Data requirements include two time series for the period of interest?precipitation (or precipitation minus surface runoff, if surface runoff is not negligible) and evapotranspiration?and values for five parameters that represent water storage capacity or soil-drainage characteristics. A limiting assumption of the WBTF model is that the percolation of water below the root zone is a linear process. That is, percolating water is assumed to have the same traveltime characteristics, experiencing the same delay and attenuation, as it moves through the unsaturated zone. This assumption is more accurate if

  3. SWB-A modified Thornthwaite-Mather Soil-Water-Balance code for estimating groundwater recharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westenbroek, S.M.; Kelson, V.A.; Dripps, W.R.; Hunt, R.J.; Bradbury, K.R.

    2010-01-01

    A Soil-Water-Balance (SWB) computer code has been developed to calculate spatial and temporal variations in groundwater recharge. The SWB model calculates recharge by use of commonly available geographic information system (GIS) data layers in combination with tabular climatological data. The code is based on a modified Thornthwaite-Mather soil-water-balance approach, with components of the soil-water balance calculated at a daily timestep. Recharge calculations are made on a rectangular grid of computational elements that may be easily imported into a regional groundwater-flow model. Recharge estimates calculated by the code may be output as daily, monthly, or annual values.

  4. Carbon Balance in an Irrigated Corn Field after Inorganic Fertilizer or Manure Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lentz, R. D.; Lehrsch, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    Little is known about inorganic fertilizer or manure effects on organic carbon (OC) and inorganic C (IC) losses from a furrow irrigated field, particularly in the context of other system C gains or losses. In 2003 and 2004, we measured dissolved organic and inorganic C (DOC, DIC), particulate OC and IC (POC, PIC) concentrations in irrigation inflow, runoff, and percolation waters (6-7 irrigations/y); C inputs from soil amendments and crop biomass; harvested C; and gaseous C emissions from field plots cropped to silage corn (Zea mays L.) in southern Idaho. Annual treatments included: (M) 13 (y 1) and 34 Mg/ha (y 2) stockpiled dairy manure; (F) 78 (yr 1) and 195 kg N/ha (y 2) inorganic N fertilizer; or (NA) no amendment--control. The mean annual total C input into M plots averaged 16.1 Mg/ha, 1.4-times greater than that for NA (11.5 Mg/ha) or F (11.1 Mg/ha), while total C outputs for the three treatments were similar, averaging 11.8 Mg/ha. Thus, the manure plots ended each growing season with an average net gain of 3.8 Mg C/ha (a positive net C flux), while the control (-0.5 Mg C/ha) and fertilizer (-0.4 Mg C/ha) treatments finished the season with a net C loss. Atmospheric CO2 incorporated into the crop biomass contributed 96% of the mean annual C input to NA and F plots but only 68% to M plots. We conclude that nutrient amendments substantially influence the short-term carbon balance of our furrow-irrigated system. Amendments had both direct and indirect influences on individual C components, such as the losses of DIC and POC in runoff and DOC in percolation water, producing temporally complex outcomes which may depend on environmental conditions external to the field.

  5. Estimation of land surface water and energy balance parameters using conditional sampling of surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Leila; Entekhabi, Dara; Salvucci, Guido; Sun, Jian

    2014-02-01

    Numerical models of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum are linked through the moisture flux from the surface to the atmosphere. This mass flux represents a heat exchange as latent heat flux, coupling water, and energy balance equations. In this paper, a new approach for estimating key parameters governing moisture and heat diffusion equation and the closure function which links these equations, is introduced. Parameters of the system are estimated by developing objective functions that link atmospheric forcing, surface states, and unknown parameters. This approach is based on conditional averaging of heat and moisture diffusion equations on land surface temperature and moisture states, respectively. A single objective function is expressed that measures moisture and temperature-dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings and surface states. This objective function is minimized with respect to the parameters to identify evaporation and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The approach is calibration free (surface flux observations are not required), it is not hampered by missing data and does not require continuous records. Uncertainty of parameter estimates is obtained from the inverse of Hessian of the objective function, which is an approximation of the error covariance matrix. Uncertainty analysis and analysis of the covariance approximation, guides the formulation of a well-posed estimation problem. Accuracy of this method is examined through its application over three different field sites. This approach can be applied to diverse climates and land surface conditions with different spatial scales, using remotely sensed measurements.

  6. Integration of vegetation indices into a water balance model to estimate evapotranspiration of wheat and corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, F. L. M.; González-Dugo, M. P.; Gavilán, P.; Domínguez, J.

    2010-10-01

    Vegetation indices (VIs) have been traditionally used for quantitative monitoring of vegetation. Remotely sensed radiometric measurements of visible and infrared solar energy, which is reflected or emitted by plant canopies, can be used to obtain rapid, non-destructive estimates of certain canopy attributes and parameters. One parameter of special interest for water management applications, is the crop coefficient employed by the FAO-56 model to derive actual crop evapotranspiration (ET). The aim of this study was to evaluate a methodology that combines the basal crop coefficient derived from VIs with a daily soil water balance in the root zone to estimate daily evapotranspiration rates for corn and wheat crops at field scale. The ability of the model to trace water stress in these crops was also assessed. Vegetation indices were first retrieved from field hand-held radiometer measurements and then from Landsat 5 and 7 satellite images. The results of the model were validated using two independent measurement systems for ET and regular soil moisture monitoring, in order to evaluate the behavior of the soil and atmosphere components of the model. ET estimates were compared with latent heat flux measured by an eddy covariance system and with weighing lysimeter measurements. Average overestimates of daily ET of 8 and 11% were obtained for corn and wheat, respectively, with good agreement between the estimated and measured root-zone water deficit for both crops when field radiometry was employed. Satellite remote-sensing inputs overestimated ET by 4 to 9%, showing a non-significant lost of accuracy when the satellite sensor data replaced the field radiometry data. The model was also used to monitor the water stress during the 2009 growing season, detecting several periods of water stress in both crops. Some of these stresses occurred during stages like grain filling, when the water stress is know to have a negative effect on yield. This fact could explain the lower

  7. Integration of vegetation indices into a water balance model to estimate evapotranspiration of wheat and corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, F. L. M.; González-Dugo, M. P.; Gavilán, P.; Domínguez, J.

    2011-04-01

    Vegetation indices (VIs) have been traditionally used for quantitative monitoring of vegetation. Remotely sensed radiometric measurements of visible and infrared solar energy, which is reflected or emitted by plant canopies, can be used to obtain rapid, non-destructive estimates of certain canopy attributes and parameters. One parameter of special interest for water management applications, is the crop coefficient employed by the FAO-56 model to derive actual crop evapotranspiration (ET). The aim of this study was to evaluate a methodology that combines the basal crop coefficient derived from VIs with a daily soil water balance in the root zone to estimate daily evapotranspiration rates for corn and wheat crops at field scale. The ability of the model to trace water stress in these crops was also assessed. Vegetation indices were first retrieved from field hand-held radiometer measurements and then from Landsat 5 and 7 satellite images. The results of the model were validated using two independent measurement systems for ET and regular soil moisture monitoring, in order to evaluate the behavior of the soil and atmosphere components of the model. ET estimates were compared with latent heat flux measured by an eddy covariance system and with weighing lysimeter measurements. Average overestimates of daily ET of 8 and 11% were obtained for corn and wheat, respectively, with good agreement between the estimated and measured root-zone water deficit for both crops when field radiometry was employed. When the satellite sensor data replaced the field radiometry data the overestimation figures slightly changed to 9 and 6% for the same two crops. The model was also used to monitor the water stress during the 2009 growing season, detecting several periods of water stress in both crops. Some of these stresses occurred during stages like grain filling, when the water stress is know to have a negative effect on yield. This fact could explain the lower yield reached compared to

  8. Ethical issues in field research: balancing competing values.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, P

    1990-04-01

    An ethical issue becomes a dilemma when the psychologist is pulled in different directions by competing values. This paper will focus on the conflict between experimental and ethical values inherent in field research. The problem has special significance in community psychology, which gives priority to studying, in natural settings, those affected by social problems. An example is given of research that required observation of family interaction in the homes of convicted child abusers. The case demonstrates that the value of ecological validity often conflicts with the need to protect privacy and obtain uncoerced consent. Other ethical constraints, including the duty to report lawbreaking and to protect the public from harm, may threaten research validity.

  9. Combining the soilwater balance and water-level fluctuation methods to estimate natural groundwater recharge: Practical aspects

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A relatively simple and practical approach for calculating groundwater recharge in semiarid plain environments with a relatively shallow water table, such as the Kansas Prairies, is outlined. Major uncertainties in the Darcian, water balance, and groundwater fluctuation analysis approaches are outlined, and a combination methodology for reducing some of the uncertainties is proposed. By combining a storm-based soilwater balance (lasting several days) with the resulting water table rise, effective storativity values of the region near the water table are obtained. This combination method is termed the 'hybrid water-fluctuation method'. Using a simple average of several such estimates results in a site-calibrated effective storativity value that can be used to translate each major water-table rise tied to a specific storm period into a corresponding amount of groundwater recharge. Examples of soilwater balance and water-level fluctuation analyses based on field-measured data from Kansas show that the proposed methodology gives better and more reliable results than either of the two well-established approaches used singly. ?? 1991.

  10. Modeling the water and energy balance of vegetated areas with snow accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to quantify soil–atmosphere water and energy exchange is important in understanding agricultural and natural ecosystems, as well as the earth’s climate. We developed a one-dimensional vertical model that calculates solar radiation, canopy energy balance, surface energy balance, snowpack ...

  11. Water, ice, and meteorological measurements at South Cascade glacier, Washington, balance year 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, William R.; Josberger, Edward G.; Savoca, Mark E.

    2005-01-01

    Winter snow accumulation and summer snow and ice ablation were measured at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, to estimate glacier mass-balance quantities for balance year 2003. The 2003 glacier-average maximum winter snow balance was 2.66 meters water equivalent, which was about equal to the average of such balances for the glacier since balance year 1959. The 2003 glacier summer balance (-4.76 meters water equivalent) was the most negative reported for the glacier, and the 2003 net balance (-2.10 meters water equivalent), was the second-most negative reported. The glacier 2003 annual (water year) balance was -1.89 meters water equivalent. The area of the glacier near the end of the balance year was 1.89 square kilometers, a decrease of 0.03 square kilometer from the previous year. The equilibrium-line altitude was higher than any part of the glacier; however, because snow remained along part of one side of the upper glacier, the accumulation-area ratio was 0.07. During September 13, 2002-September 13, 2003, the glacier terminus retreated at a rate of about 15 meters per year. Average speed of surface ice, computed using a series of vertical aerial photographs dating back to 2001, ranged from 2.2 to 21.8 meters per year. Runoff from the subbasin containing the glacier and from an adjacent non-glacierized basin was gaged during part of water year 2003. Air temperature, precipitation, atmospheric water-vapor pressure, wind speed, and incoming solar radiation were measured at selected locations on and near the glacier. Summer 2003 at the glacier was among the warmest for which data are available.

  12. A discussion of Bl conservation on a two dimensional magnetic field plane in watt balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shisong; Zhao, Wei; Huang, Songling

    2016-05-01

    The watt balance is an experiment being pursued in national metrology institutes for precision determination of the Planck constant h. In watt balances, the 1/r magnetic field, expected to generate a geometrical factor Bl independent to any coil horizontal displacement, can be created by a strict two dimensional, symmetric (horizontal r and vertical z) construction of the magnet system. In this paper, we present an analytical understanding of magnetic field distribution when the r symmetry of the magnet is broken and the establishment of the Bl conservation is shown. By using either Gauss’s law on magnetism with monopoles or conformal transformations, we extend the Bl conservation to arbitrary two dimensional magnetic planes where the vertical magnetic field component equals zero. The generalized Bl conservation allows a relaxed physical alignment criteria for watt balance magnet systems.

  13. Balance in Training for Latin American Water and Wastewater Utilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carefoot, Neil F.

    1977-01-01

    Using a Peru case study, this article examines the problem of training imbalance for water and wastewater operators. Guidelines towards achieving adequate training for all water and wastewater personnel are suggested. (Author/MA)

  14. Preservation of potassium balance is strongly associated with insect cold tolerance in the field: a seasonal study of Drosophila subobscura.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Heath A; Schou, Mads F; Kristensen, Torsten N; Overgaard, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    There is interest in pinpointing genes and physiological mechanisms explaining intra- and interspecific variations in cold tolerance, because thermal tolerance phenotypes strongly impact the distribution and abundance of wild animals. Laboratory studies have highlighted that the capacity to preserve water and ion homeostasis is linked to low temperature survival in insects. It remains unknown, however, whether adaptive seasonal acclimatization in free-ranging insects is governed by the same physiological mechanisms. Here, we test whether cold tolerance in field-caught Drosophila subobscura is high in early spring and lower during summer and whether this transition is associated with seasonal changes in the capacity of flies to preserve water and ion balance during cold stress. Indeed, flies caught during summer were less cold tolerant, and exposure of these flies to sub-zero temperatures caused a loss of haemolymph water and increased the concentration of K(+) in the haemolymph (as in laboratory-reared insects). This pattern of ion and water balance disruption was not observed in more cold-tolerant flies caught in early spring. Thus, we here provide a field verification of hypotheses based on laboratory studies and conclude that the ability to maintain ion homeostasis is important for the ability of free-ranging insects to cope with chilling. PMID:27165627

  15. Preservation of potassium balance is strongly associated with insect cold tolerance in the field: a seasonal study of Drosophila subobscura.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Heath A; Schou, Mads F; Kristensen, Torsten N; Overgaard, Johannes

    2016-05-01

    There is interest in pinpointing genes and physiological mechanisms explaining intra- and interspecific variations in cold tolerance, because thermal tolerance phenotypes strongly impact the distribution and abundance of wild animals. Laboratory studies have highlighted that the capacity to preserve water and ion homeostasis is linked to low temperature survival in insects. It remains unknown, however, whether adaptive seasonal acclimatization in free-ranging insects is governed by the same physiological mechanisms. Here, we test whether cold tolerance in field-caught Drosophila subobscura is high in early spring and lower during summer and whether this transition is associated with seasonal changes in the capacity of flies to preserve water and ion balance during cold stress. Indeed, flies caught during summer were less cold tolerant, and exposure of these flies to sub-zero temperatures caused a loss of haemolymph water and increased the concentration of K(+) in the haemolymph (as in laboratory-reared insects). This pattern of ion and water balance disruption was not observed in more cold-tolerant flies caught in early spring. Thus, we here provide a field verification of hypotheses based on laboratory studies and conclude that the ability to maintain ion homeostasis is important for the ability of free-ranging insects to cope with chilling.

  16. Eddy Covariance Measurements Over a Maize Field: The Contribution of Minor Flux Terms to the Energy Balance Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smidt, J.; Ingwersen, J.; Streck, T.

    2015-12-01

    The lack of energy balance closure is a long-standing problem in eddy covariance (EC) measurements. The energy balance equation is defined as Rn - G = H + λE, where Rn is net radiation, G is the ground heat flux, H is the sensible heat flux and λE is the latent heat flux. In most cases of energy imbalance, either Rn is overestimated or the ground heat and turbulent fluxes are underestimated. Multiple studies have shown that calculations, incorrect instrument installation/calibration and measurement errors alone do not entirely account for this imbalance. Rather, research is now focused on previously neglected sources of heat storage in the soil, biomass and air beneath the EC station. This project examined the potential of five "minor flux terms" - soil heat storage, biomass heat storage, energy consumption by photosynthesis, air heat storage and atmospheric moisture change, to further close the energy balance gap. Eddy covariance measurements were conducted at a maize (Zea mays) field in southwest Germany during summer 2014. Soil heat storage was measured for six weeks at 11 sites around the field footprint. Biomass and air heat storage were measured for six subsequent weeks at seven sites around the field footprint. Energy consumption by photosynthesis was calculated using the CO2 flux data. Evapotranspiration was calculated using the water balance method and then compared to the flux data processed with three post-closure methods: the sensible heat flux, the latent heat flux and the Bowen ratio post-closure methods. An energy balance closure of 66% was achieved by the EC station measurements over the entire investigation period. During the soil heat flux campaign, EC station closure was 74.1%, and the field footprint soil heat storage contributed 3.3% additional closure. During the second minor flux term measurement period, closure with the EC station data was 91%. Biomass heat storage resulted in 1.1% additional closure, the photosynthesis flux closed the gap

  17. Field investigation to assess nutrient emission from paddy field to surface water in river catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogure, Kanami; Aichi, Masaatsu; Zessner, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    TD water can be sampled for infiltrating water measurement. We installed monitoring wells to measure ground water level and water quality. Inflow, outflow, flooding water, infiltrating water, and ground water were measured and sampled. Regarding to parameters, temperature, pH, EC, DO and COD, main ions were measured to understand characteristic of water quality and transformation processes. Inorganic forms of nitrogen and phosphorus were also measured, as behavior and balance of nitrogen and phosphorus are focused on. We observed following points by taking data of water quality; seasonal trend, changes occurred according to agricultural events like irrigation and fertilization. Nitrogen in ground water tends to high in June due to fertilizer. It is thought because farmers fertilize the filed before transplanting at the beginning of flooding season. Regarding to dissolved inorganic nitrogen, higher concentrations were observed in inflow water than in flooding water and outflow water. Though it needs discussion in loads as well as flow measurement, this suggests that nutrients are absorbed in paddy field and less nutrients are emitted after irrigation water passing through paddy field. Based on this research we are planning continuous investigation to assess environmental impact from paddy field.

  18. [Comment on “GEWEX: The Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment”] More global water balance uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodda, John C.

    I concur strongly with Chahine's January 14, 1992, Eos article on GEWEX and support his response to Dincer's letter (Eos, June 16, 1992) emphasizing that “our quantitative knowledge of the hydrological cycle remains surprisingly poor.” This is despite the magnificent report on the world water balance to which Dincer refers and his allusion that the existence of a low residual in closing the water balance indicates low errors of measurement of the global budget components.

  19. Measuring Air-water Interfacial Area for Soils Using the Mass Balance Surfactant-tracer Method

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, Juliana B.; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention. PMID:25950136

  20. Measuring air-water interfacial area for soils using the mass balance surfactant-tracer method.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Juliana B; Mainhagu, Jon; Brusseau, Mark L

    2015-09-01

    There are several methods for conducting interfacial partitioning tracer tests to measure air-water interfacial area in porous media. One such approach is the mass balance surfactant tracer method. An advantage of the mass-balance method compared to other tracer-based methods is that a single test can produce multiple interfacial area measurements over a wide range of water saturations. The mass-balance method has been used to date only for glass beads or treated quartz sand. The purpose of this research is to investigate the effectiveness and implementability of the mass-balance method for application to more complex porous media. The results indicate that interfacial areas measured with the mass-balance method are consistent with values obtained with the miscible-displacement method. This includes results for a soil, for which solid-phase adsorption was a significant component of total tracer retention.

  1. Using expert elicitation to quantify catchment water balances and their uncertainties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebok, E.; Refsgaard, J. C.; Warmink, J. J.; Stisen, S.; Jensen, K. H.

    2016-07-01

    Expert elicitation with the participation of 35 experts was used to estimate a water balance for the nested Ahlergaarde and Holtum catchments in Western Denmark. Average annual values of precipitation, evapotranspiration, and surface runoff as well as subsurface outflow and recharge and their uncertainty were estimated in a multistep elicitation, where experts first gave their opinion on the probability distribution of their water balance component of interest, then the average annual values and uncertainty of water balance components and catchment-scale water balances were obtained by reaching consensus during group discussions. The obtained water balance errors for the 1055 km2 Ahlergaarde catchment and 120 km2 Holtum catchment were -5 and -62 mm/yr, respectively, with an uncertainty of 66 and 86 mm/yr, respectively. As an advantage of the expert elicitation, drawing on the intuitive experience and capabilities of experts to assess complex, site-specific problems, the contribution of independent sources of uncertainties to the total uncertainty was also evaluated similarly to the subsurface outflow component, which traditionally is estimated as the residual of the water balance.

  2. Calibration and Validation of The Soil Water Balance Model Wave For Forest Stands In Flanders: 1. Experimental Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; van Slycken, J.; Lust, N.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.

    Knowledge on hydrology and particularly on water use in forest ecosystems is rather scarce in Flanders. In order to assess the impact of forests in catchment hydrology, a model approach is required based on available or easily measurable parameters on me- teorology, forest patrimonium and soil cover. A pragmatic approach to calculate water use by forests is to implement a soil water balance model, which enables a reasonable estimate of the evapotranspiration (ET) despite of the fragmented forest, and therefore the strong boundary effects, typically for Flanders. The scientific objectives of this project are multiple: the calibration (i) and validation (ii) of the water balance model WAVE (Water and Agrochemicals in soil, crop and Vadose Environment) to calculate indirectly evapotranspiration of forests (for oak, beech, ash, poplar and pine) on 17 in- tensely and extensively sampled plots. Verification of the evapotranspiration from the WAVE-output with sap-flow measurements (iii). Comparison of evapotranspiration of forests to that of pasture and cropland will also be made (iv). Measurements of rainfall, throughfall, stemflow, capillary rise from the groundwater table (possibly recharge), percolation and changes in soil water content are conducted on weekly base, except for winter time (every two weeks). From these water balance terms the forest evapo- transpiration is derived. The Leaf-Area-Index was gained using hemispherical canopy images. This parameter is used for determining the soil evaporation and tree transpi- ration component from the simulated evaptranspiration. Sap-flow measurements are gathered using the Heat Field Deformation Method (Cermàk and Nadezhdina, 1998) in four plots (2 pine stands, popular, beech/oak). The preliminary results of the cal- ibration and validation of the soil water balance model WAVE for forest stands in Flanders are shown in part 2.

  3. Hydraulic conductance and the maintenance of water balance in flowers.

    PubMed

    Roddy, Adam B; Brodersen, Craig R; Dawson, Todd E

    2016-10-01

    Flowers face desiccating conditions, yet little is known about their ability to transport water. We quantified variability in floral hydraulic conductance (Kflower ) for 20 species from 10 families and related it to traits hypothesized to be associated with liquid and vapour phase water transport. Basal angiosperm flowers had trait values associated with higher water and carbon costs than monocot and eudicot flowers. Kflower was coordinated with water supply (vein length per area, VLA) and loss (minimum epidermal conductance, gmin ) traits among the magnoliids, but was insensitive to variation in these traits among the monocots and eudicots. Phylogenetic independent contrast (PIC) correlations revealed that few traits had undergone coordinated evolution. However, VLA and the desiccation time (Tdes ), the quotient of water content and gmin , had significant trait and PIC correlations. The near absence of stomata from monocot and eudicot flowers may have been critical in minimizing water loss rates among these clades. Early divergent, basal angiosperm flowers maintain higher Kflower because of traits associated with high rates water loss and water supply, while monocot and eudicot flowers employ a more conservative strategy of limiting water loss and may rely on stored water to maintain turgor and delay desiccation. PMID:27144996

  4. Resilience Through Disturbance: Effects of Wildfire on Vegetation and Water Balance in the Sierra Nevadas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisrame, G. F. S.; Thompson, S. E.; Stephens, S.; Collins, B.; Tague, N.

    2015-12-01

    A century of fire suppression in the Western United States has drastically altered the historically fire-adapated ecology in California's Sierra Nevada Mountains. Fire suppression is understood to have increased the forest cover, as well as the stem density, canopy cover and water demand of montane forests, reducing resilience of the forests to drought, and increasing the risk of catastrophic fire by drying the landscape and increasing fuel loads. The potential to reverse these trends by re-introducing fire into the Sierra Nevada is highly promising, but the likely effects on vegetation structure and water balance are poorly quantified. The Illilouette Creek Basin in Yosemite National Park represents a unique experiment in the Sierra Nevada, in which managers have moved from fire suppression to allowing a near-natural fire regime to prevail since 1972. Changes in vegetation structure in the Illilouette since the restoration of natural burning provides a unique opportunity to examine how frequent, mixed severity fires can reshape the Sierra Nevada landscape. We characterize these changes from 1969 to the present using a combination of Landsat products and high-resolution aerial imagery. We describe how the landscape structure has changed in terms of vegetation composition and its spatial organization, and explore the drivers of different post-fire vegetation type transitions (e.g. forest to shrubland vs. forest to meadow). By upscaling field data using vegetation maps and Landsat wetness indices, we explore how these vegetation transitions have impacted the water balance of the Illilouette Creek Basin, potentially increasing its resilience in the face of drought, climate change, and catastrophic fire. In a region that is adapted to frequent disturbance from fire, this work helps us understand how allowing such natural disturbances to take place can increase the sustainability of diverse landscapes in the long term.

  5. On the Capabilities of Using AIRSAR Data in Surface Energy/Water Balance Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Jose F.; Saatchi, Susan S.

    1996-01-01

    level, methods are still not fully well established, especially over vegetation-covered areas. In this paper, an algorithm is described which allows derivation of three fundamental parameters from SAR data: soil moisture, soil roughness and canopy water content, accounting for the effects of vegetation cover by using optical (Landsat) data as auxiliary. Capabilities and limitations of the data and algorithms are discussed, as well as possibilities to use these data in energy/water balance modeling studies. All the data used in this study were acquired as part of the Intensive Observation Period in June-July 1991 (European Multisensor Aircraft Campaign-91), as part of the European Field Experiment in a Desertification- threatened Area (EFEDA), a European contribution to the global-change research sponsored by the IGBP program (Bolle et al., 1993).

  6. Water balance of selected floodplain lake basins in the Middle Bug River valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidek, J.; Ferencz, B.

    2014-04-01

    This study is the first attempt in the literature on the subject of comparing water balance components for floodplain lake basins, depending on the type of a lake connection to the parent river. Research was carried out in the Bug River valley in 2007-2011 water years. Four types of connections were distinguished in the area under study. Simple water balance equation could only be used with regard to the lakes connected to the main river via the upstream crevasses. Detailed and individual water balance equations were developed with reference to the other types of lakes. Water gains and losses varied significantly in the lakes under study. Values of horizontal water balance components (inflow and outflow) of the floodplain lake in Wola Uhruska considerably prevailed over the vertical ones (precipitation and evaporation). Inflow of the Bug River waters was diverse during the time period under study and amounted from 600 000 to 2 200 000 m3 yr-1. Volumes of precipitation and evaporation were rather stable and amounted to approx. 30 000 m3 yr-1. The lowest disparity between horizontal and vertical water balance components was observed in the inter-levee lake. Both upstream inflow of rivers water and outflow from the lake (ranged from 0 in 2008 to 35 000 m3 yr-1 in 2009) were usually an order of magnitude higher than precipitation and evaporation from the lake surface (700-800 m3 yr-1). Study showed that the values and the proportion between aforementioned vertical and horizontal water balance elements were determined by the type of a lake connection to the Bug River. Storage volume showed no relationship to the type of connection, but resulted from individual features of the lakes (location within the valley, precipitation and evaporation volume, difference between water inflow and outflow).

  7. A water balance model to estimate flow through the Old and Middle River corridor

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, Stephen W.; Gross, Edward S.; Hutton, Paul H.

    2016-01-01

    We applied a water balance model to predict tidally averaged (subtidal) flows through the Old River and Middle River corridor in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta. We reviewed the dynamics that govern subtidal flows and water levels and adopted a simplified representation. In this water balance approach, we estimated ungaged flows as linear functions of known (or specified) flows. We assumed that subtidal storage within the control volume varies because of fortnightly variation in subtidal water level, Delta inflow, and barometric pressure. The water balance model effectively predicts subtidal flows and approaches the accuracy of a 1–D Delta hydrodynamic model. We explore the potential to improve the approach by representing more complex dynamics and identify possible future improvements.

  8. Physical Limitations of Empirical Field Models: Force Balance and Plasma Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Sorin Zaharia; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-06-18

    In this paper, we study whether the magnetic field of the T96 empirical model can be in force balance with an isotropic plasma pressure distribution. Using the field of T96, we obtain values for the pressure P by solving a Poisson-type equation {del}{sup 2}P = {del} {center_dot} (J x B) in the equatorial plane, and 1-D profiles on the Sun-Earth axis by integrating {del}P = J x B. We work in a flux coordinate system in which the magnetic field is expressed in terms of Euler potentials. Our results lead to the conclusion that the T96 model field cannot be in equilibrium with an isotropic pressure. We also analyze in detail the computation of Birkeland currents using the Vasyliunas relation and the T96 field, which yields unphysical results, again indicating the lack of force balance in the empirical model. The underlying reason for the force imbalance is likely the fact that the derivatives of the least-square fitted model B are not accurate predictions of the actual magnetospheric field derivatives. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to the problem of lack of force balance in empirical field models.

  9. IAEA Isotope-enabled coupled catchment-lake water balance model, IWBMIso: description and validation.

    PubMed

    Belachew, Dagnachew Legesse; Leavesley, George; David, Olaf; Patterson, Dave; Aggarwal, Pradeep; Araguas, Luis; Terzer, Stefan; Carlson, Jack

    2016-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Water Balance Model with Isotopes (IWBMIso) is a spatially distributed monthly water balance model that considers water fluxes and storages and their associated isotopic compositions. It is composed of a lake water balance model that is tightly coupled with a catchment water balance model. Measured isotope compositions of precipitation, rivers, lakes, and groundwater provide data that can be used to make an improved estimate of the magnitude of the fluxes among the model components. The model has been developed using the Object Modelling System (OMS). A variety of open source geographic information systems and web-based tools have been combined to provide user support for (1) basin delineation, characterization, and parameterization; (2) data pre-processing; (3) model calibration and application; and (4) visualization and analysis of model results. In regions where measured data are limited, the model can use freely available global data sets of climate, isotopic composition of precipitation, and soils and vegetation characteristics to create input data files and estimate spatially distributed model parameters. The OMS model engine and support functions, and the spatial and web-based tool set are integrated using the Colorado State University Environmental Risk Assessment and Management System (eRAMS) framework. The IWBMIso can be used to assess the spatial and temporal variability of annual and monthly water balance components for input to water planning and management. PMID:26962894

  10. Automated soil water balance sensing: From layers to control volumes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous sensing of soil water status has been possible in some ways since the advent of chart recorders, but the widespread adoption of soil water sensing systems did not occur until relatively inexpensive dataloggers became available in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Early systems relied on pre...

  11. Determining water and nitrogen balances for beneficial management practices using lysimeters at Wagna test site (Austria).

    PubMed

    Klammler, Gernot; Fank, Johann

    2014-11-15

    The shallow Murtal aquifer south of Graz, Austria, provides easily withdrawable groundwater, which is supplied as drinking water without any chemical treatment. The aquifer is also used intensively by agriculture. Common agricultural management practices are the main source for diffuse nitrogen leaching and high groundwater nitrate concentrations. To safeguard the coexisting use of these two important resources, lysimeters are operated at the agricultural test site Wagna, Austria, and the influence of two beneficial management practices--low nitrogen input and organic farming--on nitrogen leaching towards groundwater is investigated. The technical lysimeter design as presented here consists of: (1) high-resolution weighing cells, (2) a suction controlled lower boundary condition for sucking off seepage water, thus emulating undisturbed field conditions, (3) comparative soil temperature, water content and matrix potential measurements inside and outside the lysimeter at different depths, (4) an installation of the lysimeters directly into test plots and (5) a removable upper lysimeter ring enabling machinery soil tillage. Our results indicate that oasis effects or fringe effects of the lysimeter cylinder on unsaturated water flow did not occur. Another lysimeter cultivated with lawn is operated for observing grass-reference evapotranspiration, which resulted in good agreement with calculated grass-reference evapotranspiration according to the FAO-Penman-Monteith method. We conclude that lysimeters installed at Wagna test site did not show any fringe effects and, thus, are appropriate tools for measuring water balance elements and nitrogen leaching of arable and grass land at point scale. Furthermore, our results for the period of 2005 to 2011 show that beneficial management practices reduced nitrate leaching and, hence, may allow for a sustainable coexistence of drinking water supply and agriculture in the Murtal aquifer.

  12. Determining water and nitrogen balances for beneficial management practices using lysimeters at Wagna test site (Austria).

    PubMed

    Klammler, Gernot; Fank, Johann

    2014-11-15

    The shallow Murtal aquifer south of Graz, Austria, provides easily withdrawable groundwater, which is supplied as drinking water without any chemical treatment. The aquifer is also used intensively by agriculture. Common agricultural management practices are the main source for diffuse nitrogen leaching and high groundwater nitrate concentrations. To safeguard the coexisting use of these two important resources, lysimeters are operated at the agricultural test site Wagna, Austria, and the influence of two beneficial management practices--low nitrogen input and organic farming--on nitrogen leaching towards groundwater is investigated. The technical lysimeter design as presented here consists of: (1) high-resolution weighing cells, (2) a suction controlled lower boundary condition for sucking off seepage water, thus emulating undisturbed field conditions, (3) comparative soil temperature, water content and matrix potential measurements inside and outside the lysimeter at different depths, (4) an installation of the lysimeters directly into test plots and (5) a removable upper lysimeter ring enabling machinery soil tillage. Our results indicate that oasis effects or fringe effects of the lysimeter cylinder on unsaturated water flow did not occur. Another lysimeter cultivated with lawn is operated for observing grass-reference evapotranspiration, which resulted in good agreement with calculated grass-reference evapotranspiration according to the FAO-Penman-Monteith method. We conclude that lysimeters installed at Wagna test site did not show any fringe effects and, thus, are appropriate tools for measuring water balance elements and nitrogen leaching of arable and grass land at point scale. Furthermore, our results for the period of 2005 to 2011 show that beneficial management practices reduced nitrate leaching and, hence, may allow for a sustainable coexistence of drinking water supply and agriculture in the Murtal aquifer. PMID:24982000

  13. Water balance, hydration status, and fat-free mass hydration in younger and older adults2

    PubMed Central

    Bossingham, Mandi J; Carnell, Nadine S; Campbell, Wayne W

    2008-01-01

    Background Older adults are at increased risk of dehydration, yet water balance is understudied in this population. Objective This controlled diet study assessed the effect of age on water input, output, and balance in healthy adults. Hydration status (plasma osmolality and urine specific gravity) and body composition were also measured. Design Eleven men and 14 women aged 23–46 y and 10 men and 11 women aged 63–81 y were subjects. Water balance was assessed during days 7–10 of three 18-d controlled feeding trials with protein intakes of 0.50, 0.75, and 1.00 g · kg−1 · d−1. Total water input included water from the provided foods and beverages, ad libitum intake, and metabolic production. Water output included the losses in urine and stool and the insensible losses from respiration and nonsweating perspiration. Results Ad libitum water consumption, total water intake, water output through urine, total water output, and net water balance were not different in the older subjects than in the younger subjects. Markers of hydration status were within the range of clinical normalcy for all groups. Total body water (TBW) was not significantly different, fat-free mass (FFM) was significantly lower (P < 0.05), and FFM hydration (TBW:FFM) was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in the older subjects than in the younger subjects. Dietary protein intake did not influence any of these results. Conclusions These results show that healthy older adults maintain water input, output, and balance comparable to those of younger adults and have no apparent changes in hydration status. The results support that the hydration of FFM is increased in older men and women. PMID:15941885

  14. 40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065.295 Section 1065.295 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Pm Measurements § 1065.295...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065.295 Section 1065.295 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Pm Measurements § 1065.295...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065.295 Section 1065.295 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Pm Measurements § 1065.295...

  17. 40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065.295 Section 1065.295 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Pm Measurements § 1065.295...

  18. 40 CFR 1065.295 - PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false PM inertial balance for field-testing analysis. 1065.295 Section 1065.295 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Measurement Instruments Pm Measurements § 1065.295...

  19. Hemolymph acid-base balance of the crayfish Astacus leptodactylus as a function of the oxygenation and the acid-base balance of the ambient water.

    PubMed

    Dejours, P; Armand, J

    1980-07-01

    The acid-base balance of the prebranchial hemolymph of the crayfish Astacus leptodactylus was studied at various acid-base balances and levels of oxygenation of the ambient water at 13 degrees C. The water acid-base balance was controlled automatically by a pH-CO2-stat. Into water of constant titration alkalinity, TA, this device intermittenly injects carbon dioxide to maintain the pH at a preset value. Water pH was reduced to the same value either by hypercapnia (at constant TA) or by adding HCl or H2SO4 to decrease the TA (at constant CO2 tension). Decrease of hemolymph pH and increase of hemolymph PCO2 were similar for the three acidic waters. Water oxygenation changes strongly affected hemolymph ABB. In crayfish living in hyperoxic water (PO2 congruent to 600 Torr) compared to those in hypoxic water (PO2 congruent to 40 Torr), hemolymph pH was 0.3 to 0.4 unit lower and hemolymph PCO2 several times higher, the exact values of pH and PCO2 depending on the controlled ambient acid-base balance. In any study of the hemolymph acid-base balance of the crayfish, it is an important to control ambient water's acid-base balance and oxygenation as it is to control its temperature, a conclusion which probably holds true for studies on all water breathers.

  20. Insight into glacier climate interaction: reconstruction of the mass balance field using ice extent data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visnjevic, Vjeran; Herman, Frédéric; Licul, Aleksandar

    2016-04-01

    With the end of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), about 20 000 years ago, ended the most recent long-lasting cold phase in Earth's history. We recently developed a model that describes large-scale erosion and its response to climate and dynamical changes with the application to the Alps for the LGM period. Here we will present an inverse approach we have recently developed to infer the LGM mass balance from known ice extent data, focusing on a glacier or ice cap. The ice flow model is developed using the shallow ice approximation and the developed codes are accelerated using GPUs capabilities. The mass balance field is the constrained variable defined by the balance rate β and the equilibrium line altitude (ELA), where c is the cutoff value: b = max(βṡ(S(z) - ELA), c) We show that such a mass balance can be constrained from the observed past ice extent and ice thickness. We are also investigating several different geostatistical methods to constrain spatially variable mass balance, and derive uncertainties on each of the mass balance parameters.

  1. Evaporation estimates from the Dead Sea and their implications on its water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oroud, Ibrahim M.

    2011-12-01

    The Dead Sea (DS) is a terminal hypersaline water body situated in the deepest part of the Jordan Valley. There is a growing interest in linking the DS to the open seas due to severe water shortages in the area and the serious geological and environmental hazards to its vicinity caused by the rapid level drop of the DS. A key issue in linking the DS with the open seas would be an accurate determination of evaporation rates. There exist large uncertainties of evaporation estimates from the DS due to the complex feedback mechanisms between meteorological forcings and thermophysical properties of hypersaline solutions. Numerous methods have been used to estimate current and historical (pre-1960) evaporation rates, with estimates differing by ˜100%. Evaporation from the DS is usually deduced indirectly using energy, water balance, or pan methods with uncertainty in many parameters. Accumulated errors resulting from these uncertainties are usually pooled into the estimates of evaporation rates. In this paper, a physically based method with minimum empirical parameters is used to evaluate historical and current evaporation estimates from the DS. The more likely figures for historical and current evaporation rates from the DS were 1,500-1,600 and 1,200-1,250 mm per annum, respectively. Results obtained are congruent with field observations and with more elaborate procedures.

  2. Water-balance characteristics respond to changes in body size in subantarctic weevils.

    PubMed

    Chown, Steven L; Klok, C Jaco

    2003-01-01

    Several environmental factors leading to size-dependent mortality influence insect body size. Few investigations have been concerned with the ways in which the mechanisms underlying variation in water-balance characteristics evolve in response to changes in body size that occur independently of water-balance requirements. Using an explicitly phylogenetic analysis, we show how body size has changed over time in the Ectemnorhinus group of weevils and how water-balance characteristics have evolved in response to this change and changes in habitat use. The basal species in the group are all large bodied and from moist environments. In response to a change in resource availability, there was a marked decline in size within the group. Despite the reduction in water content and dehydration tolerance that this meant, evolution of low whole-animal water-loss rates and high tolerance of dehydration resulted in conservation of desiccation resistance. The return to moist habitats in the group resulted in a reduction in dehydration tolerance and an increase in water-loss rate. Thus, dehydration tolerance and water-loss rate respond rapidly both when there is selection for water conservation and when this requirement is relaxed. Future laboratory selection experiments might usefully explore both directions of water-balance evolution.

  3. Maintaining Atmospheric Mass and Water Balance Within Reanalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takacs, Lawrence L.; Suarez, Max; Todling, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the modifications implemented into the Goddard Earth Observing System Version-5 (GEOS-5) Atmospheric Data Assimilation System (ADAS) to maintain global conservation of dry atmospheric mass as well as to preserve the model balance of globally integrated precipitation and surface evaporation during reanalysis. Section 1 begins with a review of these global quantities from four current reanalysis efforts. Section 2 introduces the modifications necessary to preserve these constraints within the atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM), the Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) analysis procedure, and the Incremental Analysis Update (IAU) algorithm. Section 3 presents experiments quantifying the impact of the new procedure. Section 4 shows preliminary results from its use within the GMAO MERRA-2 Reanalysis project. Section 5 concludes with a summary.

  4. Sustainable Hydro Assessment and Groundwater Recharge Projects (SHARP) in Germany - Water Balance Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemand, C.; Kuhn, K.; Schwarze, R.

    2010-12-01

    SHARP is a European INTERREG IVc Program. It focuses on the exchange of innovative technologies to protect groundwater resources for future generations by considering the climate change and the different geological and geographical conditions. Regions involved are Austria, United Kingdom, Poland, Italy, Macedonia, Malta, Greece and Germany. They will exchange practical know-how and also determine know-how demands concerning SHARP’s key contents: general groundwater management tools, artificial groundwater recharge technologies, groundwater monitoring systems, strategic use of groundwater resources for drinking water, irrigation and industry, techniques to save water quality and quantity, drinking water safety plans, risk management tools and water balance models. SHARP Outputs & results will influence the regional policy in the frame of sustainable groundwater management to save and improve the quality and quantity of groundwater reservoirs for future generations. The main focus of the Saxon State Office for Environment, Agriculture and Landscape in this project is the enhancement and purposive use of water balance models. Already since 1992 scientists compare different existing water balance models on different scales and coupled with groundwater models. For example in the KLIWEP (Assessment of Impacts of Climate Change Projections on Water and Matter Balance for the Catchment of River Parthe in Saxony) project the coupled model WaSiM-ETH - PCGEOFIM® has been used to study the impact of climate change on water balance and water supplies. The project KliWES (Assessment of the Impacts of Climate Change Projections on Water and Matter Balance for Catchment Areas in Saxony) still running, comprises studies of fundamental effects of climate change on catchments in Saxony. Project objective is to assess Saxon catchments according to the vulnerability of their water resources towards climate change projections in order to derive region-specific recommendations for

  5. Coherent Structure Patterns Affect Energy Balance Closure: Evidence from Virtual Measurements for a Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; De Roo, F.; Heinze, R.; Eder, F.; Huq, S.; Schmidt, M.; Kalthoff, N.; Mauder, M.

    2015-12-01

    The energy balance closure problem is a well-known issue of eddy-covariance measurements. However, the underlying mechanisms are still under debate. Recent evidence suggests that organized low-frequency motion contributes significantly to the energy balance residual, because the associated transport cannot be captured by a point measurement. In this study, we carry out virtual measurements using a PArallelized Large-Eddy Simulation Model (PALM). In order to represent specific measurement days of the field campaign "High definition clouds and precipitation for advancing climate prediction" (HD(CP)²), which was part of the project "High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for Advancing Climate Prediction"(HOPE) in 2013, the simulations were driven by synoptic-scale COSMO-DE reanalysis data. Planet boundary layer height, the vertical profiles of variance and skewness of vertical wind were analyzed and a comparison with Doppler-lidar observations shows good agreement. Furthermore, simulated energy imbalances were compared with real-world imbalances from two eddy-covariance stations in the model domain. Particularly poor energy balance closure was found for a day with cellular organized structures in the surface layer, while the energy balance closure was better on other days with roll-like structures. This finding might be one explanation why the energy balance closure generally tends to improve with increasing friction velocity, since roll-like structures are typically associated with higher wind speeds. In order to gain insight into the partitioning of the energy balance residual between the sensible and latent heat fluxes, we further employed a control volume method within the numerical simulation. Hence, advection and storage terms were identified as the most important causes for the lack of energy balance closure by the eddy-covariance method. The results of the virtual measurements indicate that the "missing" part of the surface energy mainly comes from the

  6. Finding Balance Between Biological Groundwater Treatment and Treated Injection Water

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Mark A.; Nielsen, Kellin R.; Byrnes, Mark E.; Simmons, Sally A.; Morse, John J.; Geiger, James B.; Watkins, Louis E.; McFee, Phillip M.; Martins, K.

    2015-01-14

    At the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company operates the 200 West Pump and Treat which was engineered to treat radiological and chemical contaminants in groundwater as a result of the site’s former plutonium production years. Fluidized bed bioreactors (FBRs) are used to remove nitrate, metals, and volatile organic compounds. Increasing nitrate concentrations in the treatment plant effluent and the presence of a slimy biomass (a typical microorganism response to stress) in the FBRs triggered an investigation of nutrient levels in the system. Little, if any, micronutrient feed was coming into the bioreactors. Additionally, carbon substrate (used to promote biological growth) was passing through to the injection wells, causing biological fouling of the wells and reduced specific injectivity. Adjustments to the micronutrient feed improved microorganism health, but the micronutrients were being overfed (particularly manganese) plugging the injection wells further. Injection well rehabilitation to restore specific injectivity required repeated treatments to remove the biological fouling and precipitated metal oxides. A combination of sulfamic and citric acids worked well to dissolve metal oxides and sodium hypochlorite effectively removed the biological growth. Intensive surging and development techniques successfully removed clogging material from the injection wells. Ultimately, the investigation and nutrient adjustments took months to restore proper balance to the microbial system and over a year to stabilize injection well capacities. Carefully tracking and managing the FBRs and well performance monitoring are critical to balancing the needs of the treatment system while reducing fouling mechanisms in the injection wells.

  7. Water balance of the Drini i Bardh River Basin, Kosova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdullahi, Sabri; Fejza, Isalm

    2010-05-01

    Republic of Kosova lines on the highlands (500-600 m above sea level) surrounded by the mountains reaching the altitude of more than 2000m. Lower mountains divide the highland plain into four watershed areas, from where waters flow to there different seas, namely to the Adriatic Sea, the Aegean Sea and the Black Sea. In the present day world, the problems of too much, too little or too polluted water are increasing at a rapid rate. These problems have become particularly severe for the developing countries, adversely affecting their agriculture, drinking water supply and sanitation. Water recourse management is no more just a challenger it is a declared crises. Water resources in Kosova are relatively small, total amount of water in our country is small around 1600 m3/inhabitant /year Drini i Bardhë river basin is in the western part of Kosova, it is the biggest river basin with surface of 4.289 km2. Drini i Bardhë discharges its water to Albania and finally to the Adriatic Sea. The area consist of several small stream from the mountains, water flows into tributaries and Drini i Bardhë River. In this river basin are based 12 hydrometric stations, 27 manual and 5 automatic rainfall measurements Drini i Bardhe River main basin contain a big number of sub basins from which the most important are: Lumëbardhi i Pejës (503.5km2), Lumëbardhi i Deçanit (278.3km2), Erenikut (515.5km2), Burimi (446.7km2), Klinës (439.0km2), Mirushes (334.5km2), Toplluges (498.2km2), Bistrica e Prizrenit (266.0 km2) and Plava (309 km2) fig 2. For evapotranspiration measurement we have applied four methods: the method of BLANEY - CRIDDLE, radiation, SCHENDELE and Turk. Protecting from pollution is a very important issue having in consideration that this river discharges its water and outside the territory. Hydrometeorology Institute of Kosova is in charge for monitoring of water quality. Key works: rainfall, flow, evaporation, river, evaporation coefficient (Ke) and feeding coefficient

  8. Field evaluation of polymer capacitive humidity sensors for Bowen ratio energy balance flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Savage, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of reliable, reasonably accurate and relatively inexpensive estimates of sensible heat and latent energy fluxes was investigated using a commercial combination thin-film polymer capacitive relative humidity and adjacent temperature sensor instrument. Long-term and unattended water vapour pressure profile difference measurements using low-power combination instruments were compared with those from a cooled dewpoint mirror hygrometer, the latter often used with Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) systems. An error analysis, based on instrument relative humidity and temperature errors, was applied for various capacitive humidity instrument models. The main disadvantage of a combination capacitive humidity instrument is that two measurements, relative humidity and temperature, are required for estimation of water vapour pressure as opposed to one for a dewpoint hygrometer. In a laboratory experiment using an automated procedure, water vapour pressure differences generated using a reference dewpoint generator were measured using a commercial model (Dew-10) dewpoint hygrometer and a combination capacitive humidity instrument. The laboratory measurement comparisons showed that, potentially, an inexpensive model combination capacitive humidity instrument (CS500 or HMP50), or for improved results a slightly more expensive model (HMP35C or HMP45C), could substitute for the more expensive dewpoint hygrometer. In a field study, in a mesic grassland, the water vapour pressure measurement noise for the combination capacitive humidity instruments was greater than that for the dewpoint hygrometer. The average water vapour pressure profile difference measured using a HMP45C was highly correlated with that from a dewpoint hygrometer with a slope less than unity. Water vapour pressure measurements using the capacitive humidity instruments were not as accurate, compared to those obtained using a dewpoint hygrometer, but the resolution magnitudes for the profile

  9. Field evaluation of polymer capacitive humidity sensors for Bowen ratio energy balance flux measurements.

    PubMed

    Savage, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    The possibility of reliable, reasonably accurate and relatively inexpensive estimates of sensible heat and latent energy fluxes was investigated using a commercial combination thin-film polymer capacitive relative humidity and adjacent temperature sensor instrument. Long-term and unattended water vapour pressure profile difference measurements using low-power combination instruments were compared with those from a cooled dewpoint mirror hygrometer, the latter often used with Bowen ratio energy balance (BREB) systems. An error analysis, based on instrument relative humidity and temperature errors, was applied for various capacitive humidity instrument models. The main disadvantage of a combination capacitive humidity instrument is that two measurements, relative humidity and temperature, are required for estimation of water vapour pressure as opposed to one for a dewpoint hygrometer. In a laboratory experiment using an automated procedure, water vapour pressure differences generated using a reference dewpoint generator were measured using a commercial model (Dew-10) dewpoint hygrometer and a combination capacitive humidity instrument. The laboratory measurement comparisons showed that, potentially, an inexpensive model combination capacitive humidity instrument (CS500 or HMP50), or for improved results a slightly more expensive model (HMP35C or HMP45C), could substitute for the more expensive dewpoint hygrometer. In a field study, in a mesic grassland, the water vapour pressure measurement noise for the combination capacitive humidity instruments was greater than that for the dewpoint hygrometer. The average water vapour pressure profile difference measured using a HMP45C was highly correlated with that from a dewpoint hygrometer with a slope less than unity. Water vapour pressure measurements using the capacitive humidity instruments were not as accurate, compared to those obtained using a dewpoint hygrometer, but the resolution magnitudes for the profile

  10. Mass Balance Estimates of Louth Crater Water Ice and Climatic Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bapst, J.; Byrne, S.

    2016-09-01

    We estimate the mass balance of the most-equatorward water ice mound on Mars, located in Louth crater (70N). It is expected to be ablating in the current climate. Our estimates include a wide range of atmospheric water abundances.

  11. Water balance and humidity requirements of house dust mites.

    PubMed

    Arlian, L G

    1992-11-01

    The house dust mites, Dermatophagoides farinae, D. pteronyssinus and Euroglyphus maynei, are prevalent in homes in humid geographical areas throughout the world. These mites thrive in humid environments in human dwellings where there is no liquid water to drink. However, their bodies contain 70-75% water by weight, which must be maintained in order to reproduce. Their primary source of water is water vapor which is actively extracted from unsaturated air. At relative humidities above 65-70%, adequate amounts of water can be extracted from unsaturated air to compensate for that lost by all avenues. Active uptake is associated with ingestion of a hyperosmotic solution which is secreted by the supracoxal glands. Active mites do not survive longer than 6-11 days at RHs < or = 50%. They survive extended dry periods by forming a desiccation-resistant protonymphal stage which can survive for months at RHs below the critical humidity for active stages. Feeding rate and allergen production is directly influenced by RH. Mites feed, multiply, and produce more fecal matter at higher RHs than at lower ones.

  12. Uncertainties due to soil data in Flood Risk Forecasts with the Water Balance Model LARSIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitterer, Johannes

    2016-04-01

    Reliable flood forecasts with quantitative statements about contained uncertainties are essential for far reaching decisions in disaster management. In this paper uncertainties resulting from soil data are analysed for the in the German-speaking world widely used water balance model LARSIM and quantified as far as possible. At the beginning a structural and statistical analysis about the wittingly simple designed soil module is performed. It consists of a storage volume with four separate runoff components only defined by the storage size. Additionally, the model structure is examined with regard to effects of uncertain soil data using a soil map from the Bavarian State Institute for Forestry which already contains estimated minimum and maximum values for important soil parameters. For further analysis, two German catchments in Upper Franconia located at the White Main with a size of 250 km² each, covering a huge variety of soil types are used as case examples. Skeleton is identified as an important source of uncertainty in soil data comparing the quantifiable information of available soil maps and using field and laboratory analysis. Furthermore, surface runoff and fast interflow fluxes show up to be sensitive for peaks of flood events, whereas slow interflow and base flow fluxes have smaller and more long term effects on discharges and the water balance. A reduction of the soil storage basically leads to a more intensified reaction of discharges than an enlargement. The calculation of two extreme scenarios within the statistical analysis result in simulated gage measurements varying from -42 % till +218 % compared to the scenario with the main value of the map. A percental variation of the soil storage shows a doubling of the flood discharges, if the storage size is halved and a reduction up to 20% using a doubled one. Finally, a Monte Carlo Simulation is performed using the statistical data of the soil map combined with a normal distribution, whereby the

  13. Condensing Hybrid Water Heater Monitoring Field Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Maguire, J.; Earle, L.; Booten, C.; Hancock, C. E.

    2011-10-01

    This paper summarizes the Mascot home, an abandoned property that was extensively renovated. Several efficiency upgrades were integrated into this home, of particular interest, a unique water heater (a Navien CR240-A). Field monitoring was performed to determine the in-use efficiency of the hybrid condensing water heater. The results were compared to the unit's rated efficiency. This unit is Energy Star qualified and one of the most efficient gas water heaters currently available on the market.

  14. Balancing water scarcity and quality for sustainable irrigated agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assouline, Shmuel; Russo, David; Silber, Avner; Or, Dani

    2015-05-01

    The challenge of meeting the projected doubling of global demand for food by 2050 is monumental. It is further exacerbated by the limited prospects for land expansion and rapidly dwindling water resources. A promising strategy for increasing crop yields per unit land requires the expansion of irrigated agriculture and the harnessing of water sources previously considered "marginal" (saline, treated effluent, and desalinated water). Such an expansion, however, must carefully consider potential long-term risks on soil hydroecological functioning. The study provides critical analyses of use of marginal water and management approaches to map out potential risks. Long-term application of treated effluent (TE) for irrigation has shown adverse impacts on soil transport properties, and introduces certain health risks due to the persistent exposure of soil biota to anthropogenic compounds (e.g., promoting antibiotic resistance). The availability of desalinated water (DS) for irrigation expands management options and improves yields while reducing irrigation amounts and salt loading into the soil. Quantitative models are used to delineate trends associated with long-term use of TE and DS considering agricultural, hydrological, and environmental aspects. The primary challenges to the sustainability of agroecosystems lies with the hazards of saline and sodic conditions, and the unintended consequences on soil hydroecological functioning. Multidisciplinary approaches that combine new scientific knowhow with legislative, economic, and societal tools are required to ensure safe and sustainable use of water resources of different qualities. The new scientific knowhow should provide quantitative models for integrating key biophysical processes with ecological interactions at appropriate spatial and temporal scales.

  15. Water balance of a lake with floodplain buffering: Lake Tana, Blue Nile Basin, Ethiopia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dessie, Mekete; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Adgo, Enyew; Deckers, Jozef; Poesen, Jean; Nyssen, Jan

    2015-03-01

    Lakes are very important components of the earth's hydrological cycle, providing a variety of services for humans and ecosystem functioning. For a sustainable use of lakes, a substantial body of knowledge on their water balance is vital. We present here a detailed daily water balance analysis for Lake Tana, the largest lake in Ethiopia and the source of the Blue Nile. Rainfall on the lake is determined by Thiessen polygon procedure, open water evaporation is estimated by the Penman-combination equation and observed inflows for the gauged catchments as well as outflow data at the two lake outlets are directly used. Runoff from ungauged catchments is estimated using a simple rainfall-runoff model and runoff coefficients. Hillslope catchments and floodplains are treated separately, which makes this study unique compared to previous water balance studies. Impact of the floodplain on the lake water balance is analyzed by conducting scenario-based studies. We found an average yearly abstraction of 420 × 106 m3 or 6% of river inflows to the lake by the floodplain in 2012 and 2013. Nearly 60% of the inflow to the lake is from the Gilgel Abay River. Simulated lake levels compare well with the observed lake levels (R2 = 0.95) and the water balance can be closed with a closure error of 82 mm/year (3.5% of the total lake inflow). This study demonstrates the importance of floodplains and their influence on the water balance of the lake and the need of incorporating the effects of floodplains and water abstraction for irrigation to improve predictions.

  16. Effect of exposure on the water balance of two identical lysimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagenau, J.; Meissner, R.; Borg, H.

    2015-01-01

    This study looks at the water balance of two identical weighable lysimeters located right next to each other. They contain the same soil and are managed in the same way. Both were planted with maize. The area around them was planted with maize, too, to ensure that the lysimeters were located inside a crop. The only difference between them was that one side of lysimeter 2 was exposed due to a footpath. At first both yielded similar results. However, as the maize became taller lysimeter 2 began to show consistently more precipitation and drainage. After harvest the differences disappeared again. Since precipitation often falls at an angle, a crop with an exposed side receives more than a crop without one, if the precipitation falls towards the exposed side. The additional precipitation a crop with an exposed side may capture increases with the height of the crop. After harvest this exposure effect therefore disappears completely. Compared to lysimeter 1, lysimeter 2 accumulated >100 mm of additional precipitation during the growth of the maize. After the maize was removed, both crops recorded the same amount of precipitation again. Lysimeter 2 showed more drainage, too, because the additional precipitation led to higher water contents, which in turn caused the water holding capacity of the soil to be exceeded on more days than in the case of lysimeter 1. The difference in actual evapotranspiration was small, because lysimeter 2 was exposed towards west-northwest and therefore received only little more radiation, and because the distribution of the rainfall pattern was such that the additional precipitation led to a similar amount of additional drainage rather than to an increase in the volume of stored water, which could have been consumed by evapotranspiration later. The data clearly illustrate that exposure can significantly alter the water balance of a lysimeter, which makes it inadvisable to extrapolate data obtained under such circumstances to the field. This

  17. Recharge Estimation Using Water, Chloride and Isotope Mass Balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogramaci, S.; Firmani, G.; Hedley, P.; Skrzypek, G.; Grierson, P. F.

    2014-12-01

    Discharge of surplus mine water into ephemeral streams may elevate groundwater levels and alter the exchange rate between streams and underlying aquifers but it is unclear whether volumes and recharge processes are within the range of natural variability. Here, we present a case study of an ephemeral creek in the semi-arid subtropical Hamersley Basin that has received continuous mine discharge for more than five years. We used a numerical model coupled with repeated measurements of water levels, chloride concentrations and the hydrogen and oxygen stable isotope composition (δ2H and δ18O) to estimate longitudinal evapotranspiration and recharge rates along a 27 km length of Weeli Wolli Creek. We found that chloride increased from 74 to 120 mg/L across this length, while δ18O increased from -8.24‰ to -7.00‰. Groundwater is directly connected to the creek for the first 13 km and recharge rates are negligible. Below this point, the creek flows over a highly permeable aquifer and water loss by recharge increases to a maximum rate of 4.4 mm/d, which accounts for ~ 65% of the total water discharged to the creek. Evapotranspiration losses account for the remaining ~35%. The calculated recharge from continuous flow due to surplus water discharge is similar to that measured for rainfall-driven flood events along the creek. Groundwater under the disconnected section of the creek is characterised by a much lower Cl concentration and more depleted δ18O value than mining discharge water but is similar to flood water generated by large episodic rainfall events. Our results suggest that the impact of recharge from continuous flow on the creek has not extended beyond 27 km from the discharge point. Our approach using a combination of hydrochemical and isotope methods coupled with classical surface flow hydraulic modelling allowed evaluation of components of water budget otherwise not possible in a highly dynamic system that is mainly driven by infrequent but large episodic

  18. Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Sparn, B.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.; Wilson, E.; Hancock, E.

    2013-02-01

    This document provides a standard field monitoring protocol for evaluating the installed performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in residential buildings. The report is organized to be consistent with the chronology of field test planning and execution. Research questions are identified first, followed by a discussion of analysis methods, and then the details of measuring the required information are laid out. A field validation of the protocol at a house near the NREL campus is included for reference.

  19. Field Monitoring Protocol. Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Sparn, B.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.; Wilson, E.; Hancock, C. E.

    2013-02-01

    This document provides a standard field monitoring protocol for evaluating the installed performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in residential buildings. The report is organized to be consistent with the chronology of field test planning and execution. Research questions are identified first, followed by a discussion of analysis methods, and then the details of measuring the required information are laid out. A field validation of the protocol at a house near the NREL campus is included for reference.

  20. Atmospheric water balance over oceanic regions as estimated from satellite, merged, and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyo-Jin; Shin, Dong-Bin; Yoo, Jung-Moon

    2013-05-01

    The column integrated atmospheric water balance over the ocean was examined using satellite-based and merged data sets for the period from 2000 to 2005. The data sets for the components of the atmospheric water balance include evaporation from the HOAPS, GSSTF, and OAFlux and precipitation from the HOAPS, CMAP, and GPCP. The water vapor tendency was derived from water vapor data of HOAPS. The product for water vapor flux convergence estimated using satellite observation data was used. The atmospheric balance components from the MERRA reanalysis data were also examined. Residuals of the atmospheric water balance equation were estimated using nine possible combinations of the data sets over the ocean between 60°N and 60°S. The results showed that there was considerable disagreement in the residual intensities and distributions from the different combinations of the data sets. In particular, the residuals in the estimations of the satellite-based atmospheric budget appear to be large over the oceanic areas with heavy precipitation such as the intertropical convergence zone, South Pacific convergence zone, and monsoon regions. The lack of closure of the atmospheric water cycle may be attributed to the uncertainties in the data sets and approximations in the atmospheric water balance equation. Meanwhile, the anomalies of the residuals from the nine combinations of the data sets are in good agreement with their variability patterns. These results suggest that significant consideration is needed when applying the data sets of water budget components to quantitative water budget studies, while climate variability analysis based on the residuals may produce similar results.

  1. Water balance of global aquifers revealed by groundwater footprint.

    PubMed

    Gleeson, Tom; Wada, Yoshihide; Bierkens, Marc F P; van Beek, Ludovicus P H

    2012-08-01

    Groundwater is a life-sustaining resource that supplies water to billions of people, plays a central part in irrigated agriculture and influences the health of many ecosystems. Most assessments of global water resources have focused on surface water, but unsustainable depletion of groundwater has recently been documented on both regional and global scales. It remains unclear how the rate of global groundwater depletion compares to the rate of natural renewal and the supply needed to support ecosystems. Here we define the groundwater footprint (the area required to sustain groundwater use and groundwater-dependent ecosystem services) and show that humans are overexploiting groundwater in many large aquifers that are critical to agriculture, especially in Asia and North America. We estimate that the size of the global groundwater footprint is currently about 3.5 times the actual area of aquifers and that about 1.7 billion people live in areas where groundwater resources and/or groundwater-dependent ecosystems are under threat. That said, 80 per cent of aquifers have a groundwater footprint that is less than their area, meaning that the net global value is driven by a few heavily overexploited aquifers. The groundwater footprint is the first tool suitable for consistently evaluating the use, renewal and ecosystem requirements of groundwater at an aquifer scale. It can be combined with the water footprint and virtual water calculations, and be used to assess the potential for increasing agricultural yields with renewable groundwaterref. The method could be modified to evaluate other resources with renewal rates that are slow and spatially heterogeneous, such as fisheries, forestry or soil.

  2. Balancing Ground-Water Withdrawals and Streamflow in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt Basin, Rhode Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barlow, Paul M.; Dickerman, David C.

    2001-01-01

    Ground water withdrawn for water supply reduces streamflow in the Hunt-Annaquatucket-Pettaquamscutt Basin in Rhode Island. These reductions may adversely affect aquatic habitats. A hydrologic model was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Rhode Island Water Resources Board, Town of North Kingstown, Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management, and Rhode Island Economic Development Corporation to aid water-resource planning in the basin. Results of the model provide information that helps water suppliers and natural-resource managers evaluate strategies for balancing ground-water development and streamflow reductions in the basin.

  3. Future Landsat Thermal Data for Energy Balance Modeling and Water Resource Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, J. R.; Richardson, C. M.; Reuter, D. C.

    2009-12-01

    Surface energy balance models driven by thermal infrared remote sensing data are now being used to estimate evapotranspiration rates to monitor water consumption over the landscape at various scales. In particular, thermal images from the Thematic Mapper and Enhanced Thematic Mapper - Plus sensors aboard the Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 satellites, respectively, are being applied to water resource management for irrigated agriculture at the management scale; that is, at the scale of individual irrigated fields. The continuation of this application has been uncertain due to the age of the current satellites and a lack of commitment to set thermal imaging requirements for the follow-on satellite, the Landsat Data Continuity Mission (LDCM). The inclusion of a Thermal InfraRed Sensor (TIRS) on the LDCM payload at last seems likely. TIRS is under development at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the design has undergone successful system requirements and preliminary design reviews. Additionally, TIRS was included as a component of the baseline LDCM system in the mission-level preliminary design review. The TIRS baseline design employs cryo-cooled quantum well infrared photodiode arrays to collect data for two thermal spectral bands with a spatial resolution of 100 m across a 185-km field-of-view. TIRS will be operated in concert with the other LDCM sensor, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) to provide spatially and temporally coincident images for both the TIRS thermal bands and the OLI reflective spectral bands. This presentation will discuss TIRS requirements, the baseline design, and the suitability of the sensor for water resource management relative to the thermal data from the earlier Landsat satellites. Final approval for the flight of TIRS aboard the LDCM is awaiting a final NASA decision expected in the timeframe of the Fall Meeting.

  4. Linking water balance of mountain grasslands along altitudinal transects to climate and land-use change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitinger, Georg; Obojes, Nikolaus; Tasser, Erich; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2010-05-01

    Changes of the water balance of mountain grasslands with regard to climate and land-use changes are a popular research field since years. Measuring evapotranspiration (EVT) for different land-use types and plant communities at varying sea level helps us to understand the change of water availability in a future environment. Linked with transplantation experiments, this method is promising to cover most forecasted scenarios. Although the mentioned approach is well established, our study is innovative in so far as the field work as well as data analyses was supported by more than 50 pupils from a secondary school for agriculture and food industry. Hence, a huge number of field measurements could be conducted at the same time distributed over a whole alpine valley. In our study site Stubai Valley (300km²), Tyrol, Austria, 13 sites on 4 different altitudinal transects (valley bottom, hillside, and sub-alpine/alpine) ranging from 900m a.s.l. up to 2400m a.s.l. were selected and equipped with weather stations recording air temperature, air humidity, precipitation, solar radiation, and soil water content in different soil depths at 15-minute interval. Additionally, more than 300 small lysimeters have been installed and data on EVT, infiltration, leaf conductivity, and soil wetness was collected on 7 measuring days. The measurements spanned an entire daylight period from sunrise to sunset. Moreover, soil and vegetation analyses on all selected plots complete the enormous data pool. The lysimeters on each plot contained samples of long-stemmed local vegetation (1 cut / 1 uncut), short-stemmed local vegetation (1 cut / 1 uncut), alpine standard vegetation (1), intensive standard vegetation (1 cut / 1 uncut), and water for potential transpiration (1). Each type was replicated three times resulting in a total number of 24 lysimeters per study plot. Results revealed a little increase in EVT rates for the Alpine Standard Vegetation transplanted to lower altitudes and slight

  5. Two strategies by epiphytic orchids for maintaining water balance: thick cuticles in leaves and water storage in pseudobulbs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shi-Jian; Sun, Mei; Yang, Qiu-Yun; Ma, Ren-Yi; Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytes are an important component of tropical and subtropical flora, and serve vital ecological functions in forest hydrology and nutrient fluxes. However, they often encounter water deficits because there is no direct contact between their roots and the soil. The strategies employed by epiphytes for maintaining water balance in relatively water-limited habitats are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the anatomical traits, water loss rates, and physiology of leaves and pseudobulbs of four Dendrobium species with different pseudobulb morphologies to understand the roles of leaf and pseudobulb in maintaining water balance of epiphytic orchids. Our results showed that two species (D. chrysotoxum and D. officinale), with lower rates of water loss, have thicker leaves and upper cuticles, but lower epidermal thickness and leaf dry mass per area. In contrast, the other two species (D. chrysanthum and D. crystallinum) with thinner cuticles and higher rates of water loss, have less tissue density and greater saturated water contents in their pseudobulbs. Therefore, our results indicate that these latter two species may resist drought by storing water in the pseudobulbs to compensate for their thin cuticles and rapid water loss through the leaves. Under the same laboratory conditions, excised pseudobulbs with attached leaves had lower rates of water loss when compared with samples comprising only excised leaves. This implies that epiphytic orchids utilize two different strategies for sustaining water balance: thick cuticles to conserve water in leaves and water storage in pseudobulbs. Our results also show that Dendrobium species with thin cuticles tend to have pseudobulbs with high water storage capacity that compensates for their faster rates of water loss. These outcomes contribute to our understanding of the adaptive water-use strategies in Dendrobium species, which is beneficial for the conservation and cultivation of epiphytic orchids

  6. Two strategies by epiphytic orchids for maintaining water balance: thick cuticles in leaves and water storage in pseudobulbs.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shi-Jian; Sun, Mei; Yang, Qiu-Yun; Ma, Ren-Yi; Zhang, Jiao-Lin; Zhang, Shi-Bao

    2016-01-01

    Epiphytes are an important component of tropical and subtropical flora, and serve vital ecological functions in forest hydrology and nutrient fluxes. However, they often encounter water deficits because there is no direct contact between their roots and the soil. The strategies employed by epiphytes for maintaining water balance in relatively water-limited habitats are not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the anatomical traits, water loss rates, and physiology of leaves and pseudobulbs of four Dendrobium species with different pseudobulb morphologies to understand the roles of leaf and pseudobulb in maintaining water balance of epiphytic orchids. Our results showed that two species (D. chrysotoxum and D. officinale), with lower rates of water loss, have thicker leaves and upper cuticles, but lower epidermal thickness and leaf dry mass per area. In contrast, the other two species (D. chrysanthum and D. crystallinum) with thinner cuticles and higher rates of water loss, have less tissue density and greater saturated water contents in their pseudobulbs. Therefore, our results indicate that these latter two species may resist drought by storing water in the pseudobulbs to compensate for their thin cuticles and rapid water loss through the leaves. Under the same laboratory conditions, excised pseudobulbs with attached leaves had lower rates of water loss when compared with samples comprising only excised leaves. This implies that epiphytic orchids utilize two different strategies for sustaining water balance: thick cuticles to conserve water in leaves and water storage in pseudobulbs. Our results also show that Dendrobium species with thin cuticles tend to have pseudobulbs with high water storage capacity that compensates for their faster rates of water loss. These outcomes contribute to our understanding of the adaptive water-use strategies in Dendrobium species, which is beneficial for the conservation and cultivation of epiphytic orchids

  7. Daily water and electrolyte balance in chronically hyperprolactinaemic rats.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, S; Mackay, B J; Scott, J Z

    1981-12-01

    1. Chronic hyperprolactinaemia was induced in eight male rats by implantation of anterior pituitary glands from inbred female rats. The ten control rats underwent sham operations. 2. The spontaneous 24 hr water intake of hyperprolactinaemic rats was greater than that of the controls. Intake was increased only at night. 3. The increased water intake was independent of food intake and was not secondary to increased salt intake. 4. When prolactin secretion was inhibited with bromocriptine, there was a parallel fall in water intake and plasma prolactin levels in the experimental animals to the levels observed in the controls. 5. Urine volume was greater and urine osmolality lower in the hyperprolactinaemic rats than in the controls during both day and night. 6. In the evening, plasma osmolality was lower in the hyperprolactinaemic animals than in the controls. No such difference was observed in the morning. 7. Blood volume was greater in the hyperprolactinaemic rats than in the controls, but the haematocrits were the same. 8. These findings indicate prolactin may have a primary dipsogenic activity.

  8. Water and energy balance in a Mediterranean snowpack: the importance of evaposublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrero, Javier; Pimentel, Rafael; María José, Pérez-Palazón; María José, Polo

    2016-04-01

    In low-latitude snowpacks or those located in semiarid regions, snow dynamics becomes an essential driver of the hydrological cycle, as well as an important support for a number of ecosystem services with an influence over the economy and the ecology of the whole region. Therefore, it is crucial to understand the processes that are taking place in the snowpack and the relative importance and timing of the different mass and energy fluxes. Sierra Nevada is a linear mountain range parallel to the Mediterranean coastline of southern Spain at 37°N. It reaches up to 3479 m.a.s.l. in approximately 40 km from the sea. Despite the semiarid climatic conditions that surround the high mountain area, it presents a regular snow cover above 2500 m.a.s.l. during the winter season. Previous studies have shown at this site that this snowpack is very exposed to high insolation rates and strong winds, and, like in other low-latitude areas, the radiative and evaposublimation (combination of the sublimation of ice and the evaporation of the water drops melted on the surface of the snow) fluxes may have a significant and prominent value in the coupled balance. In this work, we study the evaposublimation fraction in the annual water and energy balance over the snowpack in Sierra Nevada. For this, we apply a one-layer mass and energy balance snow model developed in previous works, which has proven to adequately simulate the shallow snowpacks of Sierra Nevada during the year. High evaposublimation rates were simulated and subsequently measured during several field campaigns. Evaposublimation fractions were found to range from 24 to 33% of the total annual ablation at this site. This ratio is very changeable between years, like the local meteorology itself, even though there was not a direct relationship between this rate and the dry or humid nature of each particular year. In fact, it is the particular distribution of the rainfall throughout the year what defines the dynamics of the

  9. A Water Balance Approach to Characterizing the Hydroclimatology of a Mountainous Semi-arid Catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, G.; Flerchinger, G.; Marks, D.; Link, T.

    2004-12-01

    A long-term water balance is needed to understand the hydrology of mountainous semi-arid catchments, which exhibit considerable interannual variability in precipitation and temperature as well as spatial variation in snow accumulation, soils, and vegetation. Long-term data sets reduce the uncertainty associated with estimating water balance quantities that are difficult to measure in practice. In this study, the data required to compute a long-term water balance are assembled from on-site and nearby locations to create a continuous 21-year hourly record of precipitation, meteorological parameters, and streamflow for the Upper Sheep Creek (USC) catchment, a 26 ha, snow-fed, semi-arid rangeland headwater drainage within the Reynolds Creek Experimental Watershed in southwestern Idaho, USA. This study will allow us to extend a previous 10-year water balance (water years 1985-1994) computed for the USC catchment, enabling a more thorough consideration of climate variability including periods of drought and flood. It also sets the stage for analyzing the hydrologic response of the USC catchment to a prescribed fire planned for 2006. Statistical correlations between on-site and nearby meteorological stations were used to develop a complete 21-year hourly data set (water years 1984-2004) of climate and precipitation records. These data will be used to drive the Simultaneous Heat and Water (SHAW) model to simulate evaporation and transpiration, precipitation, storage, and stream discharge. Water balance quantities will be computed for separate landscape units and then aggregated for the overall watershed. This research will improve our ability to manage water resources in semi-arid mountain regions.

  10. Comparative Modeling Studies of Boreal Water and Carbon Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coughlan, J.; Peterson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The coordination of the modeling and field efforts for an Intensive Field Campaign (IFC) may resemble the chicken and egg dilemma. This session's theme advocates that early and proactive involvement by modeling teams can produce a scientific and operational benefit for the IFC and Experiment. This talk will provide some examples and suggestions originating from the NASA funded IFC's of the FIFE First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) Field Experiment, Oregon Transect Ecosystem Research (OTTER) and predominately Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Experiments. In February 1994 and prior to the final selection of the BOREAS study sites, a group of funded BOREAS investigators agreed to run their models with data for five community types representing the proposed tower flux sites. All participating models were given identical initial values and boundary conditions and driven with identical climate data. The objectives of the intercomparison exercise were: 1) compare simulation results of participating terrestrial, hydrological, and atmospheric models over selected time frames; 2) learn about model behavior and sensitivity to estimated boreal site and vegetation definitions; 3) prioritize BOREAS field data collection efforts supporting modeling studies; 4) identify individual model deficiencies as early as possible. Out of these objectives evolved some important coordination and science issues for the BOREAS Experiment that can be generalized to IFCs and long term archiving of the data. Some problems are acceptable because they are endemic to maintaining fair and open competition prior to the peer review process. Others are logistical and addressable through application of planning, management, and information sciences. This investigator has identified one source of measurement and model incompatibility that is manifest in the IFC scaling approach. Although intuitively obvious, scaling problems are already more formally defined in

  11. Cyber-physical system for a water reclamation plant: Balancing aeration, energy, and water quality to maintain process resilience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Junjie

    Aeration accounts for a large fraction of energy consumption in conventional water reclamation plants (WRPs). Although process operations at older WRPs can satisfy effluent permit requirements, they typically operate with excess aeration. More effective process controls at older WRPs can be challenging as operators work to balance higher energy costs and more stringent effluent limitations while managing fluctuating loads. Therefore, understandings of process resilience or ability to quickly return to original operation conditions at a WRP are important. A state-of-art WRP should maintain process resilience to deal with different kinds of perturbations even after optimization of energy demands. This work was to evaluate the applicability and feasibility of cyber-physical system (CPS) for improving operation at Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC) Calumet WRP. In this work, a process model was developed and used to better understand the conditions of current Calumet WRP, with additional valuable information from two dissolved oxygen field measurements. Meanwhile, a classification system was developed to reveal the pattern of historical influent scenario based on cluster analysis and cross-tabulation analysis. Based on the results from the classification, typical process control options were investigated. To ensure the feasibility of information acquisition, the reliability and flexibility of soft sensors were assessed to typical influent conditions. Finally, the process resilience was investigated to better balance influent perturbations, energy demands, and effluent quality for long-term operations. These investigations and evaluations show that although the energy demands change as the influent conditions and process controls. In general, aeration savings could be up to 50% from the level of current consumption; with a more complex process controls, the saving could be up to 70% in relatively steady-state conditions and at least 40

  12. Quantifying the response of riparian water balance and groundwater quality to alterations of land management practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.; Bronstert, A.; Morgner, M.; Zehe, E.; Voss, A.

    2009-04-01

    Floodplains and wetlands in Central Europe have been affected by intensively changing landuse and management conditions within the last century. Formerly intensively agricultural used areas are often more extensively used today and nature conservation issues became more important. Nevertheless, a majority of floodplain water bodies are still under different pressures and alternative landuse targets of different stakeholders produce conflicts in management policies. The European Water Framework Directive (WFD) demands the evaluation of the status and, if necessary, the improvement of the surface and groundwater quality of water bodies. Therefore the current status of water bodies, as well as pressures on them, the risks and potential strategies for improvement need to be characterised. As detailed knowledge about impacts of landuse management changes on the the hydrology of floodplains and wetlands is often insufficient, impact assessment and the resulting argumentations are not always adequate. Exemplary for lowland floodplains in Central Europe a set of reasonable land use and management scenarios was developed for the Lower Havel river basin in North-eastern Germany. The scenarios were analysed for their ability to gain a sustainable improvement of the floodplain water balance as well as of the surface water and groundwater quality. The coupled groundwater - water balance model IWAN was used for the quantification of potential changes of the floodplain water balance and of the interactions between the groundwater and surface waters. It was possible to prove that the assumed land use changes effect the floodplain water balance only insignificantly although lateral processes as infiltration and evapotranspiration were modified. However, these alterations of vertical fluxes are widely compensated by the lateral impact of groundwater - surface water interactions within the intensively drained parts of the floodplain. The analysis of a further scenario assuming the

  13. Estimating basin scale evapotranspiration (ET) by water balance and remote sensing methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, G.B.; Leake, S.; Nagler, P.L.; Artan, G.; Dickinson, J.; Cordova, J.T.; Glenn, E.P.

    2011-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important hydrological process that can be studied and estimated at multiple spatial scales ranging from a leaf to a river basin. We present a review of methods in estimating basin scale ET and its applications in understanding basin water balance dynamics. The review focuses on two aspects of ET: (i) how the basin scale water balance approach is used to estimate ET; and (ii) how ‘direct’ measurement and modelling approaches are used to estimate basin scale ET. Obviously, the basin water balance-based ET requires the availability of good precipitation and discharge data to calculate ET as a residual on longer time scales (annual) where net storage changes are assumed to be negligible. ET estimated from such a basin water balance principle is generally used for validating the performance of ET models. On the other hand, many of the direct estimation methods involve the use of remotely sensed data to estimate spatially explicit ET and use basin-wide averaging to estimate basin scale ET. The direct methods can be grouped into soil moisture balance modelling, satellite-based vegetation index methods, and methods based on satellite land surface temperature measurements that convert potential ET into actual ET using a proportionality relationship. The review also includes the use of complementary ET estimation principles for large area applications. The review identifies the need to compare and evaluate the different ET approaches using standard data sets in basins covering different hydro-climatic regions of the world.

  14. Water balance at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Healy, R.W.; Gray, J.R.; De Vries, G. M.; Mills, P.C.

    1989-01-01

    The water balance at a low-level radioactive-waste disposal site in northwestern Illinois was studied from July 1982 through June 1984. Continuous data collection allowed estimates to be made for each component of the water-balance equation independent of other components. The average annual precipitation was 948 millimeters. Average annual evapotranspiration was estimated at 637 millimeters, runoff was 160 millimeters, change in water storage in a waste-trench cover was 24 millimeters, and deep percolation was 208 millimeters. The magnitude of the difference between precipitation and all other components (81 millimeters per year) indicates that, in a similar environment, the water-budget method would be useful in estimating evapotranspiration, but questionable for estimation of other components. Precipitation depth and temporal distribution had a very strong effect on all other components of the water-balance equation. Due to the variability of precipitation from year to year, it appears that two years of data are inadequate for characterization of the long-term average water balance at the site.

  15. Impact of spatial data resolution on simulated catchment water balances and model performance of the multi-scale TOPLATS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, H.

    2006-03-01

    This paper analyses the effect of spatial input data resolution on the simulated water balances and flow components using the multi-scale hydrological model TOPLATS. A data set of 25m resolution of the central German Dill catchment (693 km2) is used for investigation. After an aggregation of digital elevation model, soil map and land use classification to 50 m, 75 m, 100 m, 150 m, 200 m, 300 m, 500 m, 1000 m and 2000 m, water balances and water flow components are calculated for the entire Dill catchment as well as for 3 subcatchments without any recalibration. The study shows that model performance measures and simulated water balances almost remain constant for most of the aggregation steps for all investigated catchments. Slight differences in the simulated water balances and statistical quality measures occur for single catchments at the resolution of 50 m to 500 m (e.g. 0-3% for annual stream flow), significant differences at the resolution of 1000 m and 2000 m (e.g. 2-12% for annual stream flow). These differences can be explained by the fact that the statistics of certain input data (land use data in particular as well as soil physical characteristics) changes significantly at these spatial resolutions. The impact of smoothing the relief by aggregation occurs continuously but is barely reflected by the simulation results. To study the effect of aggregation of land use data in detail, in addition to current land use the effect of aggregation on the water balance calculations based on three different land use scenarios is investigated. Land use scenarios were available aiming on economic optimisation of agricultural and forestry practices at different field sizes (0.5 ha, 1.5 ha and 5.0 ha). The changes in water balance terms, induced by aggregation of the land use scenarios, are comparable with respect to catchment water balances compared to the current land use. A correlation analysis between statistics of input data and simulated annual water fluxes only in

  16. Life in the Treetops: Drought Tolerance and Water Balance of Canopy Epiphytes in a Tropical Montane Cloud Forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotsch, S. G.; Nadkarni, N.; Darby, A.; Dix, M.; Glunk, A.; Davidson, K.; Dawson, T. E.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical montane cloud forests (TMCFs) inhabit regions rich in biodiversity that play an important role in the local and regional water cycle. Canopy plants such as epiphytes and hemiepiphytes are an important component of the biodiversity in the TMCF and therefore play a significant role in the carbon, nutrient and water cycles. With only partial or no access to resources on the ground, canopy plants may be vulnerable to changes in climate that increase canopy temperatures and decrease atmospheric humidity or precipitation inputs. Despite their importance in the TMCF, there is little information regarding drought tolerance and water balance in this community. In this study we quantified variation in functional traits and water relations in 12 species of epiphytes and hemiepiphytes in a Costa Rican TMCF. We also generated pressure-volume curves and xylem vulnerability curves that we used as indicators of drought tolerance. Lastly, we determined the capacity for foliar water uptake in the laboratory and measured whole-plant transpiration in the field. We found that all species had a high turgor loss point (ψTLP), high vulnerability to cavitation (P50), and low bulk elastic modulus (ɛmax, i.e. high cell wall elasticity). These results indicate that capacitance may be high in canopy plants and that stored water may help to maintain high leaf water potentials during dry periods. We also found that all species had the capacity for foliar uptake and that this process contributed substantially to their water status and water balance. On average, foliar uptake contributed to the reabsorption of 70% of the water transpired over a 34-day period at the beginning of the dry season. Our results indicate that canopy plants can mitigate water loss substantially, but they may be vulnerable to changes in the overall precipitation patterns or increases in cloud base heights.

  17. Increased fat catabolism sustains water balance during fasting in zebra finches.

    PubMed

    Rutkowska, Joanna; Sadowska, Edyta T; Cichoń, Mariusz; Bauchinger, Ulf

    2016-09-01

    Patterns of physiological flexibility in response to fasting are well established, but much less is known about the contribution of water deprivation to the observed effects. We investigated body composition and energy and water budget in three groups of zebra finches: birds with access to food and water, food-deprived birds having access to drinking water and food-and-water-deprived birds. Animals were not stimulated by elevated energy expenditure and they were in thermoneutral conditions; thus, based on previous studies, water balance of fasting birds was expected to be maintained by increased catabolism of proteins. In contrast to this expectation, we found that access to water did not prevent reduction of proteinaceous tissue, but it saved fat reserves of the fasting birds. Thus, water balance of birds fasting without access to water seemed to be maintained by elevated fat catabolism, which generated 6 times more metabolic water compared with that in birds that had access to water. Therefore, we revise currently established views and propose fat to serve as the primary source for metabolic water production. Previously assumed increased protein breakdown for maintenance of water budget would occur if fat stores were depleted or if fat catabolism reached its upper limits due to high energy demands. PMID:27582561

  18. Energy requirements for a swimming pool through a water-atmosphere energy balance

    SciTech Connect

    Almanza, F.; Lara, J. )

    1994-07-01

    The methodology displayed here is to calculate the energy requirements for heating a swimming pool to a desired temperature. This methodology consists of an energy balance between water-atmosphere as is used in the temperature evaluation of cooling ponds in power plants. Different mathematical expressions are given to calculate such a balance. It is necessary to know the month of the year, the ambient temperature, relative humidity, wind velocity, and solar radiation. With these parameters it is possible to know the natural temperature of the water, natural evaporation, energy needed to reach a determined swimming pool temperature and the evaporation of the heated pool.

  19. Balancing water, religion and tourism on Redang Island, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Joshua B.; Nawaz, Rizwan; Fauzi, Rosmadi; Nawaz, Faiza; Sadek, Eran Sadek Said Md; Abd Latif, Zulkiflee; Blackett, Matthew

    2008-04-01

    Redang Island (Pulau Redang) is an island off of Peninsular Malaysia that is part of a Marine Park archipelago of corals and thousands of fish and invertebrates. The relatively isolated local community is generally centered on fishing, and Islam guides daily life. Recently, the tourism industry has expanded on the island. New hotels and resorts provide jobs, but also expose the locals to western culture and touristic behavior, which may clash with deeply traditional community values. Further, the tourism industry may be putting a strain on the natural resources, especially the quantity and quality of freshwater. The island village may become divided between those who support the tourism industry and those who do not. Here we present an exploratory investigation into the development environment culture dynamics of tourism, water and religion on Redang Island while building collaborations between universities of this Muslim state and the West.

  20. Norway's historical and projected water balance in TWh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddeland, Ingjerd; Holmqvist, Erik

    2015-04-01

    Hydroelectric power production is closely linked to the water cycle, and variations in power production numbers reflect variations in weather. The expected climate changes will influence electricity supply through changes in annual and seasonal inflow of water to hydropower reservoirs. In Norway, more than 95 percent of the electricity production is from hydroelectric plants, and industry linked to hydropower has been an important part of the society for more than a century. Reliable information on historical and future available water resources is hence of crucial importance both for short and long-term planning and adaptation purposes in the hydropower sector. Traditionally, the Multi-area Power-market Simulator (EMPS) is used for modelling hydropower production in Norway. However, due to the models' high level of details and computational demand, this model is only used for historical analyses and a limited number of climate projections. A method has been developed that transfers water fluxes (mm day-1) and states (mm) into energy units (GWh mm-1), based on hydrological modelling of a limited number of catchments representing reservoir inflow to more than 700 hydropower plants in Norway. The advantages of using the conversion factor method, compared to EMPS, are its simplicity and low computational requirements. The main disadvantages are that it does not take into account flood losses and the time lag between inflow and power production. The method is used operationally for weekly and seasonal energy forecasts, and has proven successful at the range of results obtained for reproducing historical hydropower production numbers. In hydropower energy units, mean annual precipitation for the period 1981-2010 is estimated at 154 TWh year-1. On average, 24 TWh year-1 is lost through evapotranspiration, meaning runoff equals 130 TWh year-1. There are large interannual variations, and runoff available for power production ranges from 91 to 165 TWh year-1. The snow pack

  1. Effects of rainfall seasonality and soil moisture capacity on mean annual water balance for Australian catchments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Potter, N.J.; Zhang, L.; Milly, P.C.D.; McMahon, T.A.; Jakeman, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    An important factor controlling catchment-scale water balance is the seasonal variation of climate. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of the seasonal distributions of water and energy, and their interactions with the soil moisture store, on mean annual water balance in Australia at catchment scales using a stochastic model of soil moisture balance with seasonally varying forcing. The rainfall regime at 262 catchments around Australia was modeled as a Poisson process with the mean storm arrival rate and the mean storm depth varying throughout the year as cosine curves with annual periods. The soil moisture dynamics were represented by use of a single, finite water store having infinite infiltration capacity, and the potential evapotranspiration rate was modeled as an annual cosine curve. The mean annual water budget was calculated numerically using a Monte Carlo simulation. The model predicted that for a given level of climatic aridity the ratio of mean annual evapotranspiration to rainfall was larger where the potential evapotranspiration and rainfall were in phase, that is, in summer-dominant rainfall catchments, than where they were out of phase. The observed mean annual evapotranspiration ratios have opposite results. As a result, estimates of mean annual evapotranspiration from the model compared poorly with observational data. Because the inclusion of seasonally varying forcing alone was not sufficient to explain variability in the mean annual water balance, other catchment properties may play a role. Further analysis showed that the water balance was highly sensitive to the catchment-scale soil moisture capacity. Calibrations of this parameter indicated that infiltration-excess runoff might be an important process, especially for the summer-dominant rainfall catchments; most similar studies have shown that modeling of infiltration-excess runoff is not required at the mean annual timescale. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. The efficacy of combining satellite water storage and soil moisture observations as constraints on water balance estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Siyuan; van Dijk, Albert; Renzullo, Luigi; Tregoning, Paul; Walker, Jeffrey; Pauwels, Valentijn

    2016-04-01

    The ability to accurately estimate terrestrial water storage (TWS) and its components (e.g. soil moisture, groundwater, surface water and snow) is of considerable value to water resources assessment. Due to the imperfection of both model predictions and observations, data assimilation methods have been widely applied to hydrological problems for optimal combination of model and observations. Recent studies on the assimilation of TWS data have shown its capability to improve simulated groundwater storages, but the assimilation of TWS only does not guarantee accurate estimation of surface soil moisture (SSM). We investigated the efficiency of data assimilation combining TWS change estimates, derived from temporal changes in Earth's gravity field measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE), with SSM, retrieved from emitted microwave radiation at L-band observed by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite. The global World Wide Water (W3) water balance model was used. The specific satellite data products used were the SMOS CATDS level 3 daily SSM product and the JPL mascon monthly GRACE product. Both the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) and smoother (EnKS) were implemented to determine the best option for the assimilation of SSM observations only and the joint assimilation of SSM and TWS. The observation models, which map model states into observation space, are the top-layer soil relative wetness and monthly average TWS (i.e. aggregated daily top-, shallow-, deep-layer soil water storage, ground- and surface water storages). Three assimilation experiments were conducted with each method: a) assimilation of SSM data only; b) assimilation of TWS data only; c) joint assimilation of SSM and TWS data. Results were compared against in-situ soil moisture and groundwater observations, and the performance assessed with respect to open-loop results. Results for the Murray-Darling Basin in Australia demonstrate that the assimilation of SSM data only

  3. Impact of spatial data resolution on simulated catchment water balances and model performance of the multi-scale TOPLATS model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormann, H.

    2005-10-01

    This paper analyses the effect of spatial input data resolution on the simulated water balances and flow components using the multi-scale hydrological model TOPLATS. A data set of 25m resolution of the central German Dill catchment (693 km2 is used for investigation. After an aggregation of digital elevation model, soil map and land use classification to 50 m, 75 m, 100 m, 150 m, 200 m, 300 m, 500 m, 1000 m and 2000 m, water balances and water flow components are calculated for the entire Dill catchment as well as for 3 subcatchments without any recalibration. The study shows that both model performance measures as well as simulated water balances almost remain constant for most of the aggregation steps for all investigated catchments. Slight differences occur for single catchments at the resolution of 50-500 m (e.g. 0-3% for annual stream flow), significant differences at the resolution of 1000 m and 2000 m (e.g. 2-12% for annual stream flow). These differences can be explained by the fact that the statistics of certain input data (land use data in particular as well as soil physical characteristics) changes significantly at these spatial resolutions, too. The impact of smoothing the relief by aggregation occurs continuously but is not reflected by the simulation results. To study the effect of aggregation of land use data in detail, three different land use scenarios are aggregated which were generated aiming on economic optimisation at different field sizes (0.5 ha, 1.5 ha and 5.0 ha). The changes induced by aggregation of these land use scenarios are comparable with respect to catchment water balances compared to the current land use. A correlation analysis only in some cases reveals high correlation between changes in both input data and in simulation results for all catchments and land use scenarios combinations (e.g. evapotranspiration is correlated to land use, runoff generation is correlated to soil properties). Predominantly the correlation between

  4. Water, ice, and meteorological measurements at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, balance year 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, William R.; Josberger, Edward G.; Savoca, Mark E.

    2004-01-01

    Winter snow accumulation and summer snow and ice ablation were measured at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, to estimate glacier mass balance quantities for balance year 2002. The 2002 glacier-average maximum winter snow balance was 4.02 meters, the second largest since 1959. The 2002 glacier summer, net, and annual (water year) balances were -3.47, 0.55, and 0.54 meters, respectively. The area of the glacier near the end of the balance year was 1.92 square kilometers, and the equilibrium-line altitude and the accumulation area ratio were 1,820 meters and 0.84, respectively. During September 20, 2001 to September 13, 2002, the terminus retreated 4 meters, and computed average ice speeds in the ablation area ranged from 7.8 to 20.7 meters per year. Runoff from the subbasin containing the glacier and from an adjacent non-glacierized basin were measured during part of the 2002 water year. Air temperature, precipitation, atmospheric water-vapor pressure, wind speed and incoming solar radiation were measured at selected locations near the glacier.

  5. Vascular functioning and the water balance of ripening kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) berries

    PubMed Central

    Clearwater, Michael J.; Luo, Zhiwei; Ong, Sam Eng Chye; Blattmann, Peter; Thorp, T. Grant

    2012-01-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that water supply to fleshy fruits during the final stages of development occurs through the phloem, with the xylem providing little water, or acting as a pathway for water loss back to the plant. This inference was tested by examining the water balance and vascular functioning of ripening kiwifruit berries (Actinidia chinensis var. chinensis ‘Hort16A’) exhibiting a pre-harvest ‘shrivel’ disorder in California, and normal development in New Zealand. Dye labelling and mass balance experiments indicated that the xylem and phloem were both functional and contributed approximately equally to the fruit water supply during this stage of development. The modelled fruit water balance was dominated by transpiration, with net water loss under high vapour pressure deficit (Da) conditions in California, but a net gain under cooler New Zealand conditions. Direct measurement of pedicel sap flow under controlled conditions confirmed inward flows in both the phloem and xylem under conditions of both low and high Da. Phloem flows were required for growth, with gradual recovery after a step increase in Da. Xylem flows alone were unable to support growth, but did supply transpiration and were responsive to Da-induced pressure fluctuations. The results suggest that the shrivel disorder was a consequence of a high fruit transpiration rate, and that the perception of complete loss or reversal of inward xylem flows in ripening fruits should be re-examined. PMID:22155631

  6. Vascular functioning and the water balance of ripening kiwifruit (Actinidia chinensis) berries.

    PubMed

    Clearwater, Michael J; Luo, Zhiwei; Ong, Sam Eng Chye; Blattmann, Peter; Thorp, T Grant

    2012-03-01

    Indirect evidence suggests that water supply to fleshy fruits during the final stages of development occurs through the phloem, with the xylem providing little water, or acting as a pathway for water loss back to the plant. This inference was tested by examining the water balance and vascular functioning of ripening kiwifruit berries (Actinidia chinensis var. chinensis 'Hort16A') exhibiting a pre-harvest 'shrivel' disorder in California, and normal development in New Zealand. Dye labelling and mass balance experiments indicated that the xylem and phloem were both functional and contributed approximately equally to the fruit water supply during this stage of development. The modelled fruit water balance was dominated by transpiration, with net water loss under high vapour pressure deficit (D(a)) conditions in California, but a net gain under cooler New Zealand conditions. Direct measurement of pedicel sap flow under controlled conditions confirmed inward flows in both the phloem and xylem under conditions of both low and high D(a). Phloem flows were required for growth, with gradual recovery after a step increase in D(a). Xylem flows alone were unable to support growth, but did supply transpiration and were responsive to D(a)-induced pressure fluctuations. The results suggest that the shrivel disorder was a consequence of a high fruit transpiration rate, and that the perception of complete loss or reversal of inward xylem flows in ripening fruits should be re-examined.

  7. The observed evapotranspiration combining the energy and water balance for different land use under semiarid Mediterranean catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zitouna Chebbi, Rim; Mekki, Insaf; Jacob, Frédéric; Masmoudi, Moncef; Prévot, Laurent; Ben Mechlia, Netij; Voltz, Marc; Albergel, Jean

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean semiarid cultivated catchments are affected by global and climate change and are characterized by very complex hydrological systems. The improvement of their management requires a best understanding of the hydrological processes and developing reliable means for characterizing the temporal dynamics of soil water balance in a spatially distributed manner. The main objective of this study is: i) to analyze the observed evapotranspiration in relation to natural drivers (i.e. rainfall and soil properties) and anthropogenic forcing (i.e. land use and crop successions), and ) ii to assess the differences in both energy and water balances. We focus on a hilly semiarid Mediterranean catchment devoted to rainfed agriculture, so-called the Kamech catchment, which is located in the Cap Bon Peninsula, north-eastern Tunisia. The site belongs to the OMERE observatory for environmental research and it is monitored for the different hydrological cycle components under influence of anthropogenic forcing. The analysis is based on in-situ data measured under the common cereals/legumes/pasture cropping systems within the Kamech catchment. Energy and water balance components and vegetation parameters were collected in different fields and during various crop growth cycles. The results showed the highly variable response of energy and water balances depending on soil types, land use, and climatic conditions. The annual rainfall is mainly converted into evapotranspiration during the growing cycle for different land uses. The runoff amounts, for most of the sites, correspond to less than 10% of the rainfall amount. The evapotransipration ratios differed significantly across site and season in relation to soil properties and cumulated rainfall. We observe large differences in soil water dynamics among the legumes (fababean and chickpea) and cereals (wheat, oat, and triticale). Soil water is larger for legume crops, despite substantial plant growth during winter

  8. Water balance indicators from MODIS images and agrometeorological data in Minas Gerais state, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de C. Teixeira, Antônio H.; Leivas, Janice F.; Andrade, Ricardo G.; de C. Victoria, Daniel; Bolfe, Edson L.; da Silva, Gustavo B. S.

    2015-10-01

    Minas Gerais state, Brazil, has experienced severe water scarcity in some areas, demanding large-scale water balance studies to subsidize water policies. The reflectance bands from the MOD13Q1 MODIS product were used together with gridded agrometeorological data in the state, during the year 2014, later extracting the main agriculture growing regions, North, Northwest and Minas Triangle, for analyzes. Precipitation (Prec) and reference evapotranspiration (ET0) data from 36 weather stations were interpolated, while for actual evapotranspiration (ET), the SAFER (Simple Algorithm for Evapotranspiration Retrieving) algorithm was used. Two climatic water balance indicators were applied, the Water Balance Ratio (WBr = Prec/ET) and the Water Balance Difference (WDd = Prec - ET). The daily net radiation (Rn) was retrieved from surface albedo (α0), air temperature (Ta) and shortwave atmospheric transmissivity (τsw), while the ground heat flux (G) was estimated as a fraction of Rn. For surface moisture, the evapotranspiration ratio (ETr = ET/ET0) and the evaporative fraction [Ef = λE/(Rn - G)] were used, with the latent heat flux (λE) obtained by transforming ET into energy units. Analyzing WDr and WDd, the most water scarcity critical MODIS 16-day periods, reaching to minimum values lower than 1.0 and -10 mm, respectively, were from the end of April to the middle of October. Higher water availability, detected by these indicators larger than 1.5 and 10 mm, respectively, were from the middle of October to the end of December. The maximums WDr and WDd of 7.0 and 158 mm happened from the middle of November to the start of December in the Northwest agricultural growing region. However, according to the ETr and Ef values, after this period, the soil moisture storage showed a gap, increasing only in the second half of December, when they reached to averages of 0.63. The largest values of these last soil moisture indicators, above 0.70 in May, did not coincided with the period

  9. Occurrence and simulation of trihalomethanes in swimming pool water: A simple prediction method based on DOC and mass balance.

    PubMed

    Peng, Di; Saravia, Florencia; Abbt-Braun, Gudrun; Horn, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Trihalomethanes (THM) are the most typical disinfection by-products (DBPs) found in public swimming pool water. DBPs are produced when organic and inorganic matter in water reacts with chemical disinfectants. The irregular contribution of substances from pool visitors and long contact time with disinfectant make the forecast of THM in pool water a challenge. In this work occurrence of THM in a public indoor swimming pool was investigated and correlated with the dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Daily sampling of pool water for 26 days showed a positive correlation between DOC and THM with a time delay of about two days, while THM and DOC didn't directly correlate with the number of visitors. Based on the results and mass-balance in the pool water, a simple simulation model for estimating THM concentration in indoor swimming pool water was proposed. Formation of THM from DOC, volatilization into air and elimination by pool water treatment were included in the simulation. Formation ratio of THM gained from laboratory analysis using native pool water and information from field study in an indoor swimming pool reduced the uncertainty of the simulation. The simulation was validated by measurements in the swimming pool for 50 days. The simulated results were in good compliance with measured results. This work provides a useful and simple method for predicting THM concentration and its accumulation trend for long term in indoor swimming pool water.

  10. Soil moisture assimilation using a modified ensemble transform Kalman filter with water balance constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Guocan; Zheng, Xiaogu; Dan, Bo

    2016-04-01

    The shallow soil moisture observations are assimilated into Common Land Model (CoLM) to estimate the soil moisture in different layers. The forecast error is inflated to improve the analysis state accuracy and the water balance constraint is adopted to reduce the water budget residual in the assimilation procedure. The experiment results illustrate that the adaptive forecast error inflation can reduce the analysis error, while the proper inflation layer can be selected based on the -2log-likelihood function of the innovation statistic. The water balance constraint can result in reducing water budget residual substantially, at a low cost of assimilation accuracy loss. The assimilation scheme can be potentially applied to assimilate the remote sensing data.

  11. Near surface water balance in the Northern Murray-Darling Basin.

    PubMed

    Vervoort, R W; Silburn, M; Kirby, M

    2003-01-01

    The water balance allows the calculation of deep drainage from other components of the hydrological cycle. Deep drainage has been linked to outbreaks of dryland and irrigated salinity. Until recently, deep drainage was not considered to be an issue on the alluvial plains of the Northern Murray-Darling Basin. Recent simulation studies and calculations using the water balance suggest that substantial deep drainage occurs under irrigated agriculture. However, these estimates have large uncertainties due to possible errors in measurement, calculation and due to spatial variability. On a catchment scale the relative area under a certain land use as well as the connection to local groundwater and the influence of anomalies such as prior streams needs to be considered. This paper discusses the current state of knowledge on the water balance in the Northern Murray-Darling Basin and highlights the need for a concentrated effort to measure all the components of the water balance in this area, as well as the effect on shallow groundwater quality and levels.

  12. The water balance components of undisturbed tropical woodlands in the Brazilian cerrado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Deforestation of the Brazilian cerrado region has caused major changes in hydrological processes. These changes in water balance components are still poorly understood but are important for making land management decisions in this region. To better understand pre-deforestation conditions, we determi...

  13. Evaluation of a spatially-distributed Thornthwaite water-balance model

    SciTech Connect

    Lough, J.A. . Complex Systems Research Center)

    1993-03-01

    A small watershed of low relief in coastal New Hampshire was divided into hydrologic sub-areas in a geographic information system on the basis of soils, sub-basins and remotely-sensed landcover. Three variables were spatially modeled for input to 49 individual water-balances: available water content of the root zone, water input and potential evapotranspiration (PET). The individual balances were weight-summed to generate the aggregate watershed-balance, which saw 9% (48--50 mm) less annual actual-evapotranspiration (AET) compared to a lumped approach. Analysis of streamflow coefficients suggests that the spatially-distributed approach is more representative of the basin dynamics. Variation of PET by landcover accounted for the majority of the 9% AET reduction. Variation of soils played a near-negligible role. As a consequence of the above points, estimates of landcover proportions and annual PET by landcover are sufficient to correct a lumped water-balance in the Northeast. If remote sensing is used to estimate the landcover area, a sensor with a high spatial resolution is required. Finally, while the lower Thornthwaite model has conceptual limitations for distributed application, the upper Thornthwaite model is highly adaptable to distributed problems and may prove useful in many earth-system models.

  14. Well-balanced Component-wise Scheme for Shallow Water System

    SciTech Connect

    Louaked, M.; Tounsi, H.

    2010-11-25

    This paper presents a well-balanced numerical scheme for solving free surface flows involving wetting and drying. The proposed algorithm combines a component-wise approach with hydrostatic reconstruction strategy to compute flows over wet or dry surfaces and to satisfy the steady state condition of still water. The robustness of the proposed scheme is verified under several benchmark hydraulic tests.

  15. THE WATER BALANCE OF THE SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN AND ITS RESPONSE TO CLIMATE CHANGE. (R824995)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Historical precipitation, temperature and streamflow data for the Susquehanna River Basin (SRB) are analyzed with the objective of developing simple statistical and water balance models of streamflow at the watershed's outlet. Annual streamflow is highly corre...

  16. REACTION PATHWAY OF THE DIKETONITRILE DEGRADATE OF ISOXAFLUTOLE (BALANCE(TM)) WITH HYPOCHLORITE IN WATER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isoxaflutole (IXF; Balance(TM)) belongs to the new class of isoxazole herbicides. Isoxaflutole has a very short half-life in soil and rapidly degrades to a stable and phytotoxic degradate, diketonitrile (DKN). DKN was previously discovered to rapidly react with hypochlorite (OCl-) in tap water, yie...

  17. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Enid J.

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  18. Water balance and soil losses in an irrigated catchment under conservation tillage in Southern Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, Patricio; Mateos, Luciano; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Gómez-Macpherson, Helena

    2013-04-01

    Conservation tillage based on permanent beds with crop-residue retention and controlled traffic has been recently introduced in irrigated annual crops in Southern Spain as one way to improve water infiltration, reduce soil losses, and save energy. The water balance and soil losses in water runoff have been monitored during 4 years in a 28-ha catchment within a production farm where this kind of soil conservation practice was established in 2004 for a maize-cotton-wheat rotation. The catchment average slope is 6 %. Soils are Typic Calcixerept and Typic Haploxerert. The water balance components that were measured include: applied irrigation water, rainfall, and runoff. Runoff was measured at the outlet of the catchment by means of a hydrological station that consisted of long-throated flume, ultrasonic water level sensor, automatic water sampler, data logger and transmission system, weather station, and ancillary equipment. We present here results from three hydrological seasons (October to September): 2009-10, 2010-11, and 2011-12. The first season the catchment was grown with wheat, thus the irrigation depth was small (25 mm); rainfall above average, 1103 mm; and the runoff coefficient was 26 %. In the season 2010-11, the catchment was grown with cotton, the irrigation depth was 503 mm, rainfall was 999 mm, and the seasonal runoff coefficient was 7 %. The last season, the crop was maize, rainfall was below average (368 mm), irrigation 590 mm, and the runoff coefficient as the previous year, 7 %. Soil losses were very small: 0.05, 1.26, and 1.33 t per ha and year, the first, second, and third monitored seasons, respectively. A simple water balance model allowed simulating evapotranspiration, deep percolation and runoff. The Curve Number for the catchment was calibrated using the balance model.

  19. Impact of electromagnetic fields on human vestibular system and standing balance: pilot results and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, A.; Villard, S.; Corbacio, M.; Goulet, D.; Plante, M.; Souques, M.; Deschamps, F.; Ostiguy, G.; Lambrozo, J.; Thomas, A. W.; Legros, A.

    2016-03-01

    Although studies have found that extremely low-frequency (ELF, < 300 Hz) magnetic fields (MF) can modulate human standing balance, the acute effects of electromagnetic fields on standing balance have not been systematically investigated. This work aims to establish the threshold for acute standing balance modulation during ELFMF exposure. One hundred volunteers will be exposed to transcranial electric stimulations (Direct Current - DC and Alternating Current - AC, 1 mA) and ELFMF (0 to 160 Hz, 0 to 100 mT). The displacement of their center of pressure will be collected and analyzed as an indicator of vestibular performance. During pilot testing (n=6), we found increased lateral sway with DC, and to a lesser extent, AC exposure. The ELFMF exposure system still needs to be adapted to allow meaningful results. Future protocol design will test for possible effects due to exposures in the radiofrequency range (i.e. above 3 kHz). These results will contribute to the literature documenting exposure guidelines aiming to protect workers and the general public.

  20. Water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake, Utah, and simulation of water and salt movement through the causeway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wold, Steven R.; Thomas, Blakemore E.; Waddell, K.M.

    1997-01-01

    The water and salt balance of Great Salt Lake primarily depends on the amount of inflow from tributary streams and the conveyance properties of a causeway constructed during 1957-59 that divides the lake into the south and north parts. The conveyance properties of the causeway originally included two culverts, each 15 feet wide, and the permeable rock-fill material.

  1. NIDWat: A Water Balance Model for the Niger Inland Delta (NID) Floodplain in Mali

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moussa, I.; Wisser, D.; Ali, A.; Seidou, O.; Mariko, A.; Afouda, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Niger river basin is characterized by hydro-climatic changes induced by land use and climate change that have significant impacts on local populations. The Niger Inland Delta (NID) is the single most important wetland conditioning the water availability downstream. A significant fraction of the river flow is lost through evaporation and water use in the NID and the conditions are likely to change with increasing population and changing inflow conditions. A comprehensive understanding of the NID's hydro-climatological functioning is therefore crucial for assessing the water resources in the basin under changing conditions in the future. Despite this significance, the components of the water balance in the NID are poorly quantified. We use optical and microwave remote sensing data to characterize the temporal flooding, and observations of river flow and spatially explicit information on water abstractions to develop NIDWat, a water balance model for the NID. Simulated evapotranspiration losses varied by ~ 50%, depending on flooded area map or climatic data. The combined effect of irrigation abstraction and climatic data generated a global water losses range of 16 to 33.04 km3 a-1. The model was validated against observed river discharge and water abstractions and shows a good performance. We then implemented the model as a module in a hydrological model to assess the water balance in the NID and the downstream water availability under changing conditions. We use a multi model approach using regional climate data from the CORDEX initiative. Results suggest, despite increasing runoff an increase in ET losses and changes in the temporal dynamics of flooding that impact water resources availability downstream.

  2. Evaluation of different field methods for measuring soil water infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pla-Sentís, Ildefonso; Fonseca, Francisco

    2010-05-01

    Soil infiltrability, together with rainfall characteristics, is the most important hydrological parameter for the evaluation and diagnosis of the soil water balance and soil moisture regime. Those balances and regimes are the main regulating factors of the on site water supply to plants and other soil organisms and of other important processes like runoff, surface and mass erosion, drainage, etc, affecting sedimentation, flooding, soil and water pollution, water supply for different purposes (population, agriculture, industries, hydroelectricity), etc. Therefore the direct measurement of water infiltration rates or its indirect deduction from other soil characteristics or properties has become indispensable for the evaluation and modelling of the previously mentioned processes. Indirect deductions from other soil characteristics measured under laboratory conditions in the same soils, or in other soils, through the so called "pedo-transfer" functions, have demonstrated to be of limited value in most of the cases. Direct "in situ" field evaluations have to be preferred in any case. In this contribution we present the results of past experiences in the measurement of soil water infiltration rates in many different soils and land conditions, and their use for deducing soil water balances under variable climates. There are also presented and discussed recent results obtained in comparing different methods, using double and single ring infiltrometers, rainfall simulators, and disc permeameters, of different sizes, in soils with very contrasting surface and profile characteristics and conditions, including stony soils and very sloping lands. It is concluded that there are not methods universally applicable to any soil and land condition, and that in many cases the results are significantly influenced by the way we use a particular method or instrument, and by the alterations in the soil conditions by the land management, but also due to the manipulation of the surface

  3. Simulated water balance of Scots pine stands in Sweden for different climate change scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärdenäs, Annemieke I.; Jansson, Per-Erik

    1995-03-01

    The effects of climate change on the water balance of Scots pine were studied with a coupled water and heat flow model called 'SOIL'. Two forest soil types (a silty-sand and a sand) at five locations in Sweden were chosen to represent sites with different air temperature, growing season length and precipitation excess. The simulated water balance for the period 1961-1987 was compared with those simulated with two climate change scenario schemes: one is based on increased temperature and the other on both increased temperature and increased precipitation. Different assumptions regarding the effects of changes in leaf area index and minimum canopy resistance on transpiration were studied. Water stress increased substantially in the scenarios based on increased temperature only, which prevented transpiration from increasing. But with scenarios based on simultaneous changes in temperature and precipitation, water stress increased mainly during spring and transpiration increased by 50 mm and 100 mm in northern and southern Sweden, respectively, i.e. by 30-50%. When simultaneous changes in climate and stand characteristics were assumed, transpiration increased by 30-70% with the relative change being greatest for northern Sweden. Differences in water balance between the locations and soil types were less pronounced in the climate change scenarios than in the present climate scenario.

  4. Balanced Central Schemes for the Shallow Water Equations on Unstructured Grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryson, Steve; Levy, Doron

    2004-01-01

    We present a two-dimensional, well-balanced, central-upwind scheme for approximating solutions of the shallow water equations in the presence of a stationary bottom topography on triangular meshes. Our starting point is the recent central scheme of Kurganov and Petrova (KP) for approximating solutions of conservation laws on triangular meshes. In order to extend this scheme from systems of conservation laws to systems of balance laws one has to find an appropriate discretization of the source terms. We first show that for general triangulations there is no discretization of the source terms that corresponds to a well-balanced form of the KP scheme. We then derive a new variant of a central scheme that can be balanced on triangular meshes. We note in passing that it is straightforward to extend the KP scheme to general unstructured conformal meshes. This extension allows us to recover our previous well-balanced scheme on Cartesian grids. We conclude with several simulations, verifying the second-order accuracy of our scheme as well as its well-balanced properties.

  5. Load-balanced parallel streamline generation on large scale vector fields.

    PubMed

    Nouanesengsy, Boonthanome; Lee, Teng-Yok; Shen, Han-Wei

    2011-12-01

    Because of the ever increasing size of output data from scientific simulations, supercomputers are increasingly relied upon to generate visualizations. One use of supercomputers is to generate field lines from large scale flow fields. When generating field lines in parallel, the vector field is generally decomposed into blocks, which are then assigned to processors. Since various regions of the vector field can have different flow complexity, processors will require varying amounts of computation time to trace their particles, causing load imbalance, and thus limiting the performance speedup. To achieve load-balanced streamline generation, we propose a workload-aware partitioning algorithm to decompose the vector field into partitions with near equal workloads. Since actual workloads are unknown beforehand, we propose a workload estimation algorithm to predict the workload in the local vector field. A graph-based representation of the vector field is employed to generate these estimates. Once the workloads have been estimated, our partitioning algorithm is hierarchically applied to distribute the workload to all partitions. We examine the performance of our workload estimation and workload-aware partitioning algorithm in several timings studies, which demonstrates that by employing these methods, better scalability can be achieved with little overhead. PMID:22034295

  6. Consequences of declining snow accumulation for water balance of mid-latitude dry regions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Lauenroth, William K.; Bradford, John B.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread documentation of positive winter temperature anomalies, declining snowpack and earlier snow melt in the Northern Hemisphere have raised concerns about the consequences for regional water resources as well as wildfire. A topic that has not been addressed with respect to declining snowpack is effects on ecosystem water balance. Changes in water balance dynamics will be particularly pronounced at low elevations of mid-latitude dry regions because these areas will be the first to be affected by declining snow as a result of rising temperatures. As a model system, we used simulation experiments to investigate big sagebrush ecosystems that dominate a large fraction of the semiarid western United States. Our results suggest that effects on future ecosystem water balance will increase along a climatic gradient from dry, warm and snow-poor to wet, cold and snow-rich. Beyond a threshold within this climatic gradient, predicted consequences for vegetation switched from no change to increasing transpiration. Responses were sensitive to uncertainties in climatic prediction; particularly, a shift of precipitation to the colder season could reduce impacts of a warmer and snow-poorer future, depending on the degree to which ecosystem phenology tracks precipitation changes. Our results suggest that big sagebrush and other similar semiarid ecosystems could decrease in viability or disappear in dry to medium areas and likely increase only in the snow-richest areas, i.e. higher elevations and higher latitudes. Unlike cold locations at high elevations or in the arctic, ecosystems at low elevations respond in a different and complex way to future conditions because of opposing effects of increasing water-limitation and a longer snow-free season. Outcomes of such nonlinear interactions for future ecosystems will likely include changes in plant composition and productivity, dynamics of water balance, and availability of water resources.

  7. Water balance of selected floodplain lake basins in the Middle Bug River valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidek, J.; Ferencz, B.

    2013-08-01

    This study is the first attempt in the literature on the subject of comparing water balance equations for floodplain lake basins depending on the type of connection the lake has to its parent river. Where confluent lakes (upstream connections) were concerned, it was only possible to apply a classic water balance equation. When dealing with contrafluent lakes (downstream connections) as well as lakes with a complex recharge type (contrafluent-confluent) modified equations were created. The hydrological type of a lake is decided by high water flow conditions and, consequently, the duration of potamophase (connection with a river) and limnophase (the isolation of the lake), which determine the values of particular components and the proportion of the vertical to horizontal water exchange rate. Confluent lakes are characterised by the highest proportion of horizontal components (the inflow and runoff of river water) to the vertical ones (precipitation and evaporation). The smallest differences occur with respect to a contrafluent lake. In the case of confluent lakes, the relationship between water balance components resulted from the consequent water flow through the basin, consistent with the slope of the river channel and valley. The supplying channels of contrafluent lakes had an obsequent character, which is why the flow rate was lower. Lakes with a complex, contrafluent-confluent recharge type showed intermediate features. After a period of slow contrafluent recharge, the inflow of water through a downstream crevasse from the area of the headwater of the river was activated; this caused a radical change of flow conditions into confluent ones. The conditions of water retention in lake basins were also varied. Apart from hydrological recharge, also the orographic features of the catchment areas of the lakes played an important role here, for example, the distance from the river channel, the altitude at which a given catchment was located within the floodplain and

  8. Transpiration, water absorption, and internal water balance of cotton plants as affected by light and changes in saturation deficit.

    PubMed

    Ehrler, W L; van Bavel, C H; Nakayama, F S

    1966-01-01

    In controlled environment studies of cotton plants (Gossypium barbadense L.) a light-induced acceleration of transpiration upset the water balance established in the dark because of a lag in water absorption. A plant-water deficit could be generated either by sudden illumination at a given saturation deficit (sd) of the air, or by raising the sd in conjunction with illumination, without different effects.Direct water balance measurements were confirmed in every experiment by beta ray gauge detection of changes in leaf-water content resulting from unequal gain and loss of water by the whole plant.Recovery from the initial loss of turgidity always was faster and more complete at the higher than at the lower values of sd. Recovery occurred even in the light at the higher values of sd, but was enhanced by return to darkness and a lower sd, which at times resulted in superhydration.Rehydration in the light could be attributed to at least 2 processes: A) a diminished transpiration rate if earlier water loss was sufficient to induce stomatal closure, and B) an increased rate of water absorption. The data suggest that a water deficit, temporary or persisting, does not cause a significantly lowered transpiration rate; thus, recovery must depend on increased absorption. The communicative link between the 2 processes appears weak, transmitting strong signals only.

  9. The uncertainty of assessments of the water balance components of river basins due to the climate noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Yeugeniy; Semenov, Vladimir; Nasonova, Olga; Kovalev, Evgeny

    2016-04-01

    Assessments of hydrological consequences resulted from climate change impact performed by different authors are characterized by a large scatter or uncertainty caused by a number of reasons. Some reasons are subjective, while others are objective. In the present work, the objective uncertainty, which cannot be reduced by means of better physical description of the processes under study or by means of improvement of the quality of input data for atmospheric and hydrological models, and which is an internal feature of the atmosphere - hydrosphere - land surface system, is considered. This uncertainty is caused by a chaotic character of atmospheric processes (i.e. by so-called climatic noise), their instability with respect to small errors in determination of initial conditions for modeling the evolution of meteorological variables. Here, the impact of climatic noise on the uncertainty of hydrological variables (river runoff and evapotranspiration) is studied for two northern river basins located in the Russian Federation: the Lena and Indigirka basins. Such a selection was motivated by the fact, that northern high-latitude land areas are the major source of fresh water resources of our planet, at the same time these areas will be subjected to the earliest and most significant changes, caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. The methodology of solving the problem is based on application of the global climate model (GCM) ECHAM5 and the land surface model (LSM) SWAP that allows an estimation of monthly and annual uncertainties in the simulated water balance components (precipitation, river runoff and evapotranspiration) of the selected river basins, resulted from the climatic noise. The ensemble simulations (45 versions) of meteorological fields were performed by ECHAM5. Since meteorological fields modelled by any GCM differ from observations, the post-processing bias-correction was carried out. Then for each river basin and computational experiment

  10. Development of a multicomponent force and moment balance for water tunnel applications, volume 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-12-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multicomponent strain gauge balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. An internal balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The five-components to applied loads, low interactions between the sections and no hysteresis. Static experiments (which are discussed in this Volume) were conducted in the Eidetics water tunnel with delta wings and a model of the F/A-18. Experiments with the F/A-18 model included a thorough baseline study and investigations of the effect of control surface deflections and of several Forebody Vortex Control (FVC) techniques. Results were compared to wind tunnel data and, in general, the agreement is very satisfactory. The results of the static tests provide confidence that loads can be measured accurately in the water tunnel with a relatively simple multicomponent internal balance. Dynamic experiments were also performed using the balance, and the results are discussed in detail in Volume 2 of this report.

  11. A dynamic model of the Aral Sea water and salt balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benduhn, François; Renard, Philippe

    2004-06-01

    The Aral Sea is shrinking rapidly since the 1960s mainly because of the diversion of the Amu Darya and Syr Darya rivers for irrigation purposes. Since then, the evaporation became the most important component of the water balance of the Sea and led to a concentration of the remaining salts. In this article, we investigate through a coupled mathematical model of water and salt balance of the Aral Sea, the dynamic evolution of the sea. The water balance considers river inflow, groundwater inflow, atmospheric precipitation and evaporation. The salt balance considers the dominant ions and the chemical precipitation of gypsum, epsomite and mirabilite. The evaporation rates are calculated with a modified Penman equation accounting for the salinity of the lake and using statistical climatic data. With this model, we obtain an estimate of the evaporation flux (between 1100 and more than 1200 mm/year depending on the salinity) larger than earlier estimates. The estimated groundwater discharge into the sea is also larger than earlier estimates and is highly variable from year to year. The last point is that the model is able to simulate rather well the evolution of the salinity until the 1980s, but it does not reproduce accurately the chemical evolution of the lake during the most recent period and needs further improvements.

  12. Development of a multicomponent force and moment balance for water tunnel applications, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-01-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multicomponent strain gauge balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. An internal balance was designed that allows measuring normal and side forces, and pitching, yawing and rolling moments (no axial force). The five-components to applied loads, low interactions between the sections and no hysteresis. Static experiments (which are discussed in this Volume) were conducted in the Eidetics water tunnel with delta wings and a model of the F/A-18. Experiments with the F/A-18 model included a thorough baseline study and investigations of the effect of control surface deflections and of several Forebody Vortex Control (FVC) techniques. Results were compared to wind tunnel data and, in general, the agreement is very satisfactory. The results of the static tests provide confidence that loads can be measured accurately in the water tunnel with a relatively simple multicomponent internal balance. Dynamic experiments were also performed using the balance, and the results are discussed in detail in Volume 2 of this report.

  13. Monitoring the water balance of Lake Victoria, East Africa, from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, Sean; Wahr, John

    2009-05-01

    SummaryUsing satellite gravimetric and altimetric data, we examine trends in water storage and lake levels of multiple lakes in the Great Rift Valley region of East Africa for the years 2003-2008. GRACE total water storage estimates reveal that water storage declined in much of East Africa, by as much as 60 {mm}/{year}, while altimetric data show that lake levels in some large lakes dropped by as much as 1-2 m. The largest declines occurred in Lake Victoria, the Earth's second largest freshwater body. Because the discharge from the outlet of Lake Victoria is used to generate hydroelectric power, the role of human management in the lake's decline has been questioned. By comparing catchment water storage trends to lake level trends, we confirm that climatic forcing explains only about 50decline. This analysis provides an independent means of assessing the relative impacts of climate and human management on the water balance of Lake Victoria that does not depend on observations of dam discharge, which may not be publically available. In the second part of the study, the individual components of the lake water balance are estimated. Satellite estimates of changes in lake level, precipitation, and evaporation are used with observed lake discharge to develop a parameterization for estimating subsurface inflows due to changes in groundwater storage estimated from satellite gravimetry. At seasonal timescales, this approach provides closure to Lake Victoria's water balance to within 17 {mm}/{month}. The third part of this study uses the water balance of a downstream water body, Lake Kyoga, to estimate the outflow from Lake Victoria remotely. Because Lake Kyoga is roughly 20 times smaller in area than Lake Victoria, its water balance is strongly influenced by inflow from Lake Victoria. Lake Kyoga has been shown to act as a linear reservoir, where its outflow is proportional to the height of the lake. This model can be used with satellite altimetric lake levels to estimate a

  14. Atmospheric water balance and trend over ocean estimated from satellite, merged and reanalysis data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, D. B.; Park, H. J.

    2014-12-01

    The column integrated atmospheric water balance over the ocean was examined using satellite-based and merged datasets for the period from 2000 to 2007. The datasets for the components of the atmospheric water balance include evaporation from the Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite data (HOAPS), the Japanese Ocean Flux Data sets with Use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO2) and the Objectively Analyzed Air-Sea Heat Fluxes (OAFlux) and precipitation from the HOAPS, the Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) and the Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP). The water vapor tendency was derived from water vapor data of HOAPS. The product for water vapor flux convergence estimated using satellite observation data was used. The atmospheric balance components from the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis data were also examined. Residuals of the atmospheric water balance equation were estimated using nine possible combinations of the datasets over the ocean between 60°N and 60°S. The results showed that there was considerable disagreement in the residual intensities and distributions from the different combinations of the datasets. In particular, the residuals in the estimations of the satellite-based atmospheric budget appear to be large over the oceanic areas with heavy precipitation such as the intertropical convergence zone, South Pacific convergence zone, and monsoon regions. The lack of closure of the atmospheric water cycle may be attributed to the uncertainties in the datasets and approximations in the atmospheric water balance equation. Meanwhile, the anomalies of the residuals from the nine combinations of the datasets are in good agreement with their variability patterns. These results suggest that significant consideration is needed when applying the datasets of water budget components to quantitative water budget studies, while climate

  15. Energy Crops and their Implications on Soil Carbon Sequestration, Surface Energy and Water Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.; Barman, R.; Jain, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    The quest to meet growing energy demand with low greenhouse gas emissions has increased attention on the potential of existing and advanced biomass energy crops. Potential energy crops include row crops such as corn, and perennial grasses such as switchgrass. However, a massive expansion of bioenergy crops raises many questions such as: how and where to grow energy crops; and what will be the impacts of growing large scale biofuel crops on the terrestrial hydrological cycle, the surface energy budget, soil carbon sequestration and the concurrent effects on the climate system. An integrated modeling system is being developed with in the framework of a land surface model, the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM), and being applied to address these questions.This framework accounts for the biophysical, physiological and biogeochemical systems governing important processes that regulate crop growth including water, energy and nutrient cycles within the soil-plant-atmosphere system. One row crop (Corn) and two energy crops (Switchgrass and Miscanthus) are studied in current framework. Dynamic phenology processes and parameters for simulating each crop have been developed using observed data from a north to south gradient of field trial sites. This study will specifically focus on the agricultural regions in the US and in Europe. The potential productivity of these three crops will be assessed in terms of carbon sequestration, surface energy and water balance and their spatial variability. This study will help to quantify the importance of various environmental aspects towards modeling bioenergy crops and to better understand the spatial and temporal dynamics of bioenergy crop yields.

  16. Effects of subfornical organ extracts on salt-water balance in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Summy-Long, J. Y.; Crawford, I. L.; Severs, W. B.

    1976-01-01

    The subfornical organ (SFO) is a circumventricular structure located at the junction of the lamina terminalis and the tela choroidea of the third cerebral ventricle. SFO is histologically regarded as a neurosecretory structure, although the physiological effects or biochemical nature of such secretions are not yet ascertained. Results are presented for an experimental study designed to determine whether SFO extracts alter parameters associated with salt-water balance in the rat. The data obtained support the conclusion that SFO contains some water-soluble substance(s), easily released by incubation, dialyzable and heat stable, which influences the salt-water balance after injection into ventricular cerebrospinal fluid. Whether other brain tissues or plasma contains the same or similar material is not yet convincingly established. The observation that one or more active constituents are easily released from SFO upon incubation in potassium-enriched medium may be of value.

  17. Effects of urbanisation on the water balance - A long-term trajectory

    SciTech Connect

    Haase, Dagmar

    2009-07-15

    The amount of land consumption required for housing and transport severely conflicts with both the necessity and the legal obligation to maintain the ecological potential afforded by open spaces to meet the needs of current and future generations with regards to the protection of resources and climate change. Owing to an increasing intensity of soil use, soil conditions appear to have deteriorated in most city regions around the world, namely their filter and runoff regulating functions are impaired by land surfacing. As such soil functions depend on the soil's biophysical properties and the degree of imperviousness, the impact on the water balance caused by urban growth varies considerably. In response to the demand for sustainably secure urban water resources, it needs to be assessed exactly how land surfacing affects the functions concerned. Analysing and evaluating urban land use change on the long-term water balance should improve our understanding of the impact of urbanisation on the water household. Therefore, this paper analyses the impact of urban land use change and land surfacing on the long-term urban water balance over a 130-year trajectory by using simple model approaches that are based on data available to the public. The test site is the city of Leipzig. In particular, attention is to be paid to estimating changes of evapotranspiration, direct runoff and groundwater recharge.

  18. Shift of annual water balance in the Budyko space for catchments with groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xu-Sheng; Zhou, Yangxiao

    2016-09-01

    The Budyko framework represents the general relationship between the evapotranspiration ratio (F) and the aridity index (φ) for the mean annual steady-state water balance at the catchment scale. It is interesting to investigate whether this standard F - φ space can also be applied to capture the shift of annual water balance in catchments with varying dryness. Previous studies have made significant progress in incorporating the storage effect into the Budyko framework for the non-steady conditions, whereas the role of groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration was not investigated. This study investigates how groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration causes the shift of the annual water balance in the standard Budyko space. A widely used monthly hydrological model, the ABCD model, is modified to incorporate groundwater-dependent evapotranspiration into the zone with a shallow water table and delayed groundwater recharge into the zone with a deep water table. This model is applied in six catchments in the Erdos Plateau, China, to estimate the actual annual evapotranspiration. Results show that the variations in the annual F value with the aridity index do not satisfy the standard Budyko formulas. The shift of the annual water balance in the standard Budyko space is a combination of the Budyko-type response in the deep groundwater zone and the quasi-energy limited condition in the shallow groundwater zone. Excess evapotranspiration (F > 1) could occur in dry years, which is contributed by the significant supply of groundwater for evapotranspiration. Use of groundwater for irrigation can increase the frequency of the F > 1 cases.

  19. Torque-consistent 3D force balance and optimization of non-resonant fields in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Kyu

    2015-11-01

    A non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbation in tokamaks breaks the toroidal symmetry and produces toroidal torque, which is well known as neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) effects. Although NTV torque is second order, it is the first-order change in the pressure anisotropy that drives currents associated with local torques and thereby modifies the field penetration in force balance. The force operator becomes non-Hermitian, but can be directly solved using parallel, toroidal, and radial force balance, leading to a modified Euler-Lagrange equation. The general perturbed equilibrium code (GPEC), which has been successfully developed to solve the modified Euler-Lagrange equation, gives the torque-consistent 3D force balance as well as self-consistent NTV torque. The self-shielding of the torque becomes apparent in the solutions in high β, which was implied in recent MARS-K applications. Furthermore, the full response matrix including the torque in GPEC provides a new and systematic way of optimizing torque and non-resonant fields. Recently the optimization of 3D fields for torque has been actively studied using the stellarator optimizing tools, but the efficiency and accuracy can be greatly improved by directly incorporating the torque response matrix. There are salient features uncovered by response with the torque, as the response can become invisible in amplitudes but only significant in toroidal phase shift. A perturbation in backward helicity is an example, in which NTV can be induced substantially but quietly without measurable response in amplitudes. A number of other GPEC applications will also be discussed, including the multi-mode responses in high- β tokamak plasmas and the new non-axisymmetric control coil (NCC) design in NSTX-U. This work was supported by DOE Contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  20. Entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakatsanis, Georgios; Bierbach, Sandra

    2016-04-01

    The study investigates the entropy of Egypt's virtual water trade gravity distribution, in order to provide a chart of Egypt's embodied water balance in agricultural trade, in relation to distances with its major counterparties. Moreover, our calculations on the amount of the embodied water traded between Egypt and each of its partners take place according to a combination of available data on the blue, green and grey water footprints as well as the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) database of traded amounts per crop type. A study on the virtual water trade gravity, enables us to enrich former related studies (Fracasso 2014; Fracasso, Sartori and Schiavo 2014) via examining Egypt's water supply dependence on the Nile River and if comparative advantages -purely from the side of water quantities- can be identified via recognizing which water footprint categories are particularly high. Additionally, this methodology can comprise -from a fundamental level- a guide for revealing the importance of water footprint types for Egypt's agricultural sector; hence, Egypt's potential comparative advantages, as far as quantitative water endowments are exclusively concerned (without consideration of water or crop prices). Although it is pointed out very correctly by various authors (Antonelli and Sartori 2014) that the virtual water trade concept does not incorporate many important aspects of water supply -such as heavy water price subsidizing- to be used accurately for the identification of comparative advantages, we consider that the purely quantitative examination can provide strong fundamental indications -especially for green and grey water footprints, which are hypothesized to be less sensitive to subsidizing. In overall, this effect can very well provide a primary indication on the organization of the global alimentation trade network (Yang et al. 2006). The gravity equation used contains water footprint data for the 15 top traded crops and the distances for Egypt

  1. Coupled Sensing of Hunger and Thirst Signals Balances Sugar and Water Consumption.

    PubMed

    Jourjine, Nicholas; Mullaney, Brendan C; Mann, Kevin; Scott, Kristin

    2016-08-11

    Hunger and thirst are ancient homeostatic drives for food and water consumption. Although molecular and neural mechanisms underlying these drives are currently being uncovered, less is known about how hunger and thirst interact. Here, we use molecular genetic, behavioral, and anatomical studies in Drosophila to identify four neurons that modulate food and water consumption. Activation of these neurons promotes sugar consumption and restricts water consumption, whereas inactivation promotes water consumption and restricts sugar consumption. By calcium imaging studies, we show that these neurons are directly regulated by a hormone signal of nutrient levels and by osmolality. Finally, we identify a hormone receptor and an osmolality-sensitive ion channel that underlie this regulation. Thus, a small population of neurons senses internal signals of nutrient and water availability to balance sugar and water consumption. Our results suggest an elegant mechanism by which interoceptive neurons oppositely regulate homeostatic drives to eat and drink.

  2. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON WATER BALANCE IN A NEGATIVE PRESSURE DIFFERENCE IRRIGATION SYSTEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniruzzaman, S. M.; Fukuhara, Teruyuki; Terasaki, Hiroaki

    Negative pressure difference irrigation (NPDI) is considered to be an attractive mode of irrigation because water use efficiency in this case is higher than that in conventional irrigation methods such as basin irrigation, furrow irrigation and sprinkler irrigation. In order to investigate the water balance in a NPDI system, experiments involving the use of a soil column, porous pipe and water reservoir were carried out in a temperature and humidity controlled room. The evaporation (Meva), supplied water (Msup), soil water storage (Msoil), wetted soil surface area and configuration of the wetted soil around the porous pipe were determined for three different negative pressures. Empirical equations were proposed for the calculation of Meva and Msoil. The proposed simple model could well reproduce the temporal variations in Meva and Msoil. With a decrease in the negative pressure, the water use efficiency increased and was in the range of 0.92 to 0.97.

  3. Coupled Sensing of Hunger and Thirst Signals Balances Sugar and Water Consumption.

    PubMed

    Jourjine, Nicholas; Mullaney, Brendan C; Mann, Kevin; Scott, Kristin

    2016-08-11

    Hunger and thirst are ancient homeostatic drives for food and water consumption. Although molecular and neural mechanisms underlying these drives are currently being uncovered, less is known about how hunger and thirst interact. Here, we use molecular genetic, behavioral, and anatomical studies in Drosophila to identify four neurons that modulate food and water consumption. Activation of these neurons promotes sugar consumption and restricts water consumption, whereas inactivation promotes water consumption and restricts sugar consumption. By calcium imaging studies, we show that these neurons are directly regulated by a hormone signal of nutrient levels and by osmolality. Finally, we identify a hormone receptor and an osmolality-sensitive ion channel that underlie this regulation. Thus, a small population of neurons senses internal signals of nutrient and water availability to balance sugar and water consumption. Our results suggest an elegant mechanism by which interoceptive neurons oppositely regulate homeostatic drives to eat and drink. PMID:27477513

  4. Variations of global and continental water balance components as impacted by climate forcing uncertainty and human water use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller Schmied, Hannes; Adam, Linda; Eisner, Stephanie; Fink, Gabriel; Flörke, Martina; Kim, Hyungjun; Oki, Taikan; Portmann, Felix Theodor; Reinecke, Robert; Riedel, Claudia; Song, Qi; Zhang, Jing; Döll, Petra

    2016-07-01

    When assessing global water resources with hydrological models, it is essential to know about methodological uncertainties. The values of simulated water balance components may vary due to different spatial and temporal aggregations, reference periods, and applied climate forcings, as well as due to the consideration of human water use, or the lack thereof. We analyzed these variations over the period 1901-2010 by forcing the global hydrological model WaterGAP 2.2 (ISIMIP2a) with five state-of-the-art climate data sets, including a homogenized version of the concatenated WFD/WFDEI data set. Absolute values and temporal variations of global water balance components are strongly affected by the uncertainty in the climate forcing, and no temporal trends of the global water balance components are detected for the four homogeneous climate forcings considered (except for human water abstractions). The calibration of WaterGAP against observed long-term average river discharge Q significantly reduces the impact of climate forcing uncertainty on estimated Q and renewable water resources. For the homogeneous forcings, Q of the calibrated and non-calibrated regions of the globe varies by 1.6 and 18.5 %, respectively, for 1971-2000. On the continental scale, most differences for long-term average precipitation P and Q estimates occur in Africa and, due to snow undercatch of rain gauges, also in the data-rich continents Europe and North America. Variations of Q at the grid-cell scale are large, except in a few grid cells upstream and downstream of calibration stations, with an average variation of 37 and 74 % among the four homogeneous forcings in calibrated and non-calibrated regions, respectively. Considering only the forcings GSWP3 and WFDEI_hom, i.e., excluding the forcing without undercatch correction (PGFv2.1) and the one with a much lower shortwave downward radiation SWD than the others (WFD), Q variations are reduced to 16 and 31 % in calibrated and non

  5. Water Temperature, Voluntary Drinking and Fluid Balance in Dehydrated Taekwondo Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Khamnei, Saeed; Hosseinlou, Abdollah; Zamanlu, Masumeh

    2011-01-01

    Voluntary drinking is one of the major determiners of rehydration, especially as regards exercise or workout in the heat. The present study undertakes to search for the effect of voluntary intake of water with different temperatures on fluid balance in Taekwondo athletes. Six young healthy male Taekwondo athletes were dehydrated by moderate exercise in a chamber with ambient temperature at 38-40°C and relative humidity between 20-30%. On four separate days they were allowed to drink ad libitum plane water with the four temperatures of 5, 16, 26, and 58°C, after dehydration. The volume of voluntary drinking and weight change was measured; then the primary percentage of dehydration, sweat loss, fluid deficit and involuntary dehydration were calculated. Voluntary drinking of water proved to be statistically different in the presented temperatures. Water at 16°C involved the greatest intake, while fluid deficit and involuntary dehydration were the lowest. Intake of water in the 5°C trial significantly correlated with the subject’s plasma osmolality change after dehydration, yet it showed no significant correlation with weight loss. In conclusion, by way of achieving more voluntary intake of water and better fluid state, recommending cool water (~16°C) for athletes is in order. Unlike the publicly held view, drinking cold water (~5°C) does not improve voluntary drinking and hydration status. Key points For athletes dehydrated in hot environments, maximum voluntary drinking and best hydration state occurs with 16°C water. Provision of fluid needs and thermal needs could be balanced using 16°C water. Drinking 16°C water (nearly the temperature of cool tap water) could be recommended for exercise in the heat. PMID:24149564

  6. Proposed water balance equation for municipal solid waste landfills in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Aljaradin, Mohammad; Persson, Kenneth M

    2013-10-01

    This article presents a water balance equation for predicting leachate generation in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills located in semi-arid areas, using the Akaider landfill in Jordan as an example. HYDRUS-2D/3D software was used to model the effect of co-disposal of wastewater into the landfill on the leachate production rates and for comparison with the results of the simulation of the proposed water balance equation parameters. A series of simulations was carried out for a 30-year period. The suggested water balance equation predicted that leachate will percolate to a depth of 50 m in the simulated period. The result indicates that the co-disposed wastewater plays a major role in controlling the rate and magnitude of the contaminants that percolate from the MSW leachate. As the initial water content of the waste increases, there is greater mobilisation of salts. The concentration of chloride at a given location increased and the time required for the chloride to reach this location decreased as a consequence. However, eliminating the co-disposed wastewater will significantly minimise leachate generation and decrease possible groundwater contamination. This equation is applicable to areas that have geological and hydrological properties similar to Jordan. PMID:23797298

  7. A water balance approach for reconstructing streamflow using tree-ring proxy records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Laurel; Biondi, Franco; Devkota, Rajan; Vittori, Jasmine; Salas, Jose D.

    2015-10-01

    Tree-ring data have been used to augment limited instrumental records of climate and provide a longer view of past variability, thus improving assessments of future scenarios. For streamflow reconstructions, traditional regression-based approaches cannot examine factors that may alter streamflow independently of climate, such as changes in land use or land cover. In this study, seasonal water balance models were used as a mechanistic approach to reconstruct streamflow with proxy inputs of precipitation and air temperature. We examined a Thornthwaite water balance model modified to have seasonal components and a simple water balance model with a snow component. These two models were calibrated with a shuffled complex evolution approach using PRISM and proxy seasonal temperature and precipitation to reconstruct streamflow for the upper reaches of the West Walker River basin at Coleville, CA. Overall, the modified Thornthwaite model performed best during calibration, with R2 values of 0.96 and 0.80 using PRISM and proxy inputs, respectively. The modified Thornthwaite model was then used to reconstruct streamflow during AD 1500-1980 for the West Walker River basin. The reconstruction included similar wet and dry episodes as other regression-based records for the Great Basin, and provided estimates of actual evapotranspiration and of April 1 snow water equivalence. Given its limited input requirements, this approach is suitable in areas where sparse instrumental data are available to improve proxy-based streamflow reconstructions and to explore non-climatic reasons for streamflow variability during the reconstruction period.

  8. Investigating groundwater-lake interactions by hydraulic heads and a water balance.

    PubMed

    Rudnick, Sebastian; Lewandowski, Jörg; Nützmann, Gunnar

    2015-01-01

    Discharge of groundwater into lakes (lacustrine groundwater discharge, LGD) can play a major role in water balances of lakes. Unfortunately, studies often neglect this input path because of methodological difficulties in its determination. Direct measurements of LGD are labor-consuming and prone to error. The present study uses both spatially variable hydraulic-head data and meteorological data to estimate groundwater input by LGD and lake water output through infiltration. The study sites are two shallow, groundwater-fed lakes without any surface inflows or outflows. Horizontally interpolated groundwater heads were combined with lake water levels to obtain vertical hydraulic gradients between the aquifer and the lake, which are separated by a thick layer of lake bed sediment which has a much lower hydraulic conductivity than the underlying aquifer. By fitting the hydraulic gradient to the results of a simple mass balance and considering the process of clogging, we were able to estimate the hydraulic conductivity of the lake bed sediments. We calculated groundwater inputs by LGD and lake water outputs by infiltration on an annual basis. Although our method requires several assumptions, the results are reasonable and provide useful information about the exchange between the aquifer and the lake, which can, for example, be used for the calculation of nutrient mass balances.

  9. Proposed water balance equation for municipal solid waste landfills in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Aljaradin, Mohammad; Persson, Kenneth M

    2013-10-01

    This article presents a water balance equation for predicting leachate generation in municipal solid waste (MSW) landfills located in semi-arid areas, using the Akaider landfill in Jordan as an example. HYDRUS-2D/3D software was used to model the effect of co-disposal of wastewater into the landfill on the leachate production rates and for comparison with the results of the simulation of the proposed water balance equation parameters. A series of simulations was carried out for a 30-year period. The suggested water balance equation predicted that leachate will percolate to a depth of 50 m in the simulated period. The result indicates that the co-disposed wastewater plays a major role in controlling the rate and magnitude of the contaminants that percolate from the MSW leachate. As the initial water content of the waste increases, there is greater mobilisation of salts. The concentration of chloride at a given location increased and the time required for the chloride to reach this location decreased as a consequence. However, eliminating the co-disposed wastewater will significantly minimise leachate generation and decrease possible groundwater contamination. This equation is applicable to areas that have geological and hydrological properties similar to Jordan.

  10. Links Between Flood Frequency and Annual Water Balance Behaviors: A Basis for Similarity and Regionalization

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiali; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Guo, Shenglian; Liu, Pan; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-03-28

    This paper presents the results of a data based comparative study of several hundred catchments across continental United States belonging to the MOPEX dataset, which systematically explored the connection between the flood frequency curve and measures of mean annual water balance. Two different measures of mean annual water balance are used: (i) a climatic aridity index, AI, which is a measure of the competition between water and energy availability at the annual scale; and, (ii) baseflow index, BFI, the ratio of slow runoff to total runoff also at the annual time scale, reflecting the role of geology, soils, topography and vegetation. The data analyses showed that the aridity index, AI, has a first order control on both the mean and Cv of annual maximum floods. While mean annual flood decreases with increasing aridity, Cv increases with increasing aridity. BFI appeared to be a second order control on the magnitude and shape of the flood frequency curve. Higher BFI, meaning more subsurface flow and less surface flow leads to a decrease of mean annual flood whereas lower BFI leads to accumulation of soil moisture and increased flood magnitudes that arise from many events acting together. The results presented in this paper provide innovative means to delineate homogeneous regions within which the flood frequency curves can be assumed to be functionally similar. At another level, understanding the connection between annual water balance and flood frequency will be another building block towards developing comprehensive understanding of catchment runoff behavior in a holistic way.

  11. Ground- and surface water mass balances to ensure protection of St. Lawrence river ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, J. A. C.; Veizer, J.

    2003-04-01

    Knowledge of water fluxes to ecologically important ecosystems in rivers helps to protect them in case of pollution incidents. A mass balance study of this nature was carried out on Hoople Bay in the St. Lawrence River, about 150 km upstream of Montréal. Due to increased net primary production this ecosystem is an important spawning ground for fish and therefore environmentally fragile. Its three main water sources are (a) a small stream (Hoople Creek), (b) local ground water and (c) Main Channel water. The latter was enriched in 18O as a result of evaporation from the Great Lakes surface and also had different dissolved chloride (Cl-) concentrations when compared to the other sources. Its average values were -6.9 permil VSMOW and 0.56 mmol/L for isotopic composition and Cl-, respectively. The Hoople Creek and Hoople Bay waters ranged between -4.3 and -12.2 permil VSMOW for oxygen isotopic composition and 0.25 and 1.20 mmol/L for dissolved Cl-. The average oxygen isotopic composition of the ground water was -11.1 permil VSMOW, while its Cl- concentration was 2.81 mmol/L. These parameters led to an equation system that was solved with matrix operations to yield the contributions of the different water masses to Hoople Bay. Results show that the Main Channel contributed more than 50 percent during summer and fall and that ground water influx was below 10 percent throughout the year. The flux was reversed only after snowmelts and subsequent higher discharges from Hoople Creek. A spill scenario from ship traffic on the Main Channel would therefore strongly affect Hoople Bay at most times of the year. Only during spring is the ecosystem threatened by pollution of local inland waters. The above technique is useful for investigating seasonal water flux variations to marginal ecosystems in rivers. It may also apply to mass balances of other water bodies.

  12. Balancing ballistic protection against physiological strain: evidence from laboratory and field trials.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nigel A S; Burdon, Catriona A; van den Heuvel, Anne M J; Fogarty, Alison L; Notley, Sean R; Hunt, Andrew P; Billing, Daniel C; Drain, Jace R; Silk, Aaron J; Patterson, Mark J; Peoples, Gregory E

    2016-02-01

    This project was based on the premise that decisions concerning the ballistic protection provided to defence personnel should derive from an evaluation of the balance between protection level and its impact on physiological function, mobility, and operational capability. Civilians and soldiers participated in laboratory- and field-based studies in which ensembles providing five levels of ballistic protection were evaluated, each with progressive increases in protection, mass (3.4-11.0 kg), and surface-area coverage (0.25-0.52 m(2)). Physiological trials were conducted on volunteers (N = 8) in a laboratory, under hot-dry conditions simulating an urban patrol: walking at 4 km·h(-1) (90 min) and 6 km·h(-1) (30 min or to fatigue). Field-based trials were used to evaluate tactical battlefield movements (mobility) of soldiers (N = 31) under tropical conditions, and across functional tests of power, speed, agility, endurance, and balance. Finally, trials were conducted at a jungle training centre, with soldiers (N = 32) patrolling under tropical conditions (averaging 5 h). In the laboratory, work tolerance was reduced as protection increased, with deep-body temperature climbing relentlessly. However, the protective ensembles could be grouped into two equally stressful categories, each providing a different level of ballistic protection. This outcome was supported during the mobility trials, with the greatest performance decrement evident during fire and movement simulations, as the ensemble mass was increased (-2.12%·kg(-1)). The jungle patrol trials similarly supported this outcome. Therefore, although ballistic protection does increase physiological strain, this research has provided a basis on which to determine how that strain can be balanced against the mission-specific level of required personal protection.

  13. Evaporative isotope enrichment as a constraint on reach water balance along a dryland river.

    PubMed

    Gibson, John J; Sadek, Mostafa A; Stone, D J M; Hughes, Catherine E; Hankin, S; Cendon, Dioni I; Hollins, Suzanne E

    2008-03-01

    Deuterium and oxygen-18 enrichment in river water during its transit across dryland region is found to occur systematically along evaporation lines with slopes of close to 4 in (2)H-(18)O space, largely consistent with trends predicted by the Craig-Gordon model for an open-water dominated evaporating system. This, in combination with reach balance assessments and derived runoff ratios, strongly suggests that the enrichment signal and its variability in the Barwon-Darling river, Southeastern Australia is acquired during the process of evaporation from the river channel itself, as enhanced by the presence of abundant weirs, dams and other storages, rather than reflecting inherited enrichment signals from soil water evaporation in the watershed. Using a steady-state isotope mass balance analysis based on monthly (18)O and (2)H, we use the isotopic evolution of river water to re-construct a perspective of net exchange between the river and its contributing area along eight reaches of the river during a drought period from July 2002 to December 2003, including the duration of a minor flow event. The resulting scenario, which uses a combination of climatological averages and available real-time meteorological data, should be viewed as a preliminary test of the application rather than as a definitive inventory of reach water balance. As expected for a flood-driven dryland system, considerable temporal variability in exchange is predicted. While requiring additional real-time isotopic data for operational use, the method demonstrates potential as a non-invasive tool for detecting and quantifying water diversions, one that can be easily incorporated within existing water quality monitoring activities.

  14. The Agony of Choice: How Plants Balance Growth and Survival under Water-Limiting Conditions1

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Hannes; Inzé, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    When confronted with water limitation, plants actively reprogram their metabolism and growth. Recently, it has become clear that growing tissues show specific and highly dynamic responses to drought, which differ from the well-studied responses in mature tissues. Here, we provide an overview of recent advances in understanding shoot growth regulation in water-limiting conditions. Of special interest is the balance between maintained growth and competitiveness on the one hand and ensured survival on the other hand. A number of master regulators controlling this balance have been identified, such as DELLAs and APETALA2/ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR-type transcription factors. The possibilities of engineering or breeding crops that maintain growth in periods of mild drought, while still being able to activate protective tolerance mechanisms, are discussed. PMID:23766368

  15. Modeling landscape evapotranspiration by integrating land surface phenology and a water balance algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, Gabriel B.

    2008-01-01

    The main objective of this study is to present an improved modeling technique called Vegetation ET (VegET) that integrates commonly used water balance algorithms with remotely sensed Land Surface Phenology (LSP) parameter to conduct operational vegetation water balance modeling of rainfed systems at the LSP’s spatial scale using readily available global data sets. Evaluation of the VegET model was conducted using Flux Tower data and two-year simulation for the conterminous US. The VegET model is capable of estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa) of rainfed crops and other vegetation types at the spatial resolution of the LSP on a daily basis, replacing the need to estimate crop- and region-specific crop coefficients.

  16. Temperature index modeling of the Kahiltna Glacier: Comparison to multiple field and geodetic mass balance datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Joanna C.

    Glaciers of Alaska, USA, and Northwestern Canada are shedding mass at one of the highest rates of any mountain glacier system, with significant impact at the global and local scales. Despite advances in satellite and airborne technologies, fully characterizing the temporal evolution of glacier mass change in individual watersheds remains a challenge. Temperature index modeling is an approach that can be used to expand on sparse ground observations, and that can help bridge the gap between regional and individual watershed estimates of the time series of glacier mass change. Here we present a study on temperature index modeling of glacier-wide mass balance for the large Kahiltna Glacier (502 km2, 270 to 6100 m in elevation) in the Central Alaska Range, using a combination of ground observations and past climate data products. We reproduce mass changes from 1991 to 2011, and assess model performance by comparing our results to several field and remote sensing datasets. First, we compare our results to a 20-year record of mass balance measurements at a National Park Service index site at the glacier's equilibrium line altitude. We find low correlation between index site measurements and modeled glacier-wide balances (R2 = 0.24), indicating that the index site may not be representative of the glacier-wide mass balance regime. We compare next to glacier-wide mass balances derived from airborne laser altimetry, to assess the model's long-term mass change estimates. We find disagreement between the mean annual balances for 1995 to 2010 (-0.95 +/-0.49 m w.e. yr --1 from the model versus -0.69 +0.07/-0.08 m w.e. yr --1 from laser altimetry). To validate the laser altimetry methods, we then compare estimates from 1951 to 2011 from laser altimetry and digital elevation model differencing, finding close agreement (-0.48 +0.08/-0.09 m w.e. yr--1 and -0.41 +/-0.26 m w.e. yr--1 , respectively), and lending strength to the laser altimetry centerline extrapolation techniques. We

  17. BALANCE : a computer program for calculating mass transfer for geochemical reactions in ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parkhurst, David L.; Plummer, L. Niel; Thorstenson, Donald C.

    1982-01-01

    BALANCE is a Fortran computer designed to define and quantify chemical reactions between ground water and minerals. Using (1) the chemical compositions of two waters along a flow path and (2) a set of mineral phases hypothesized to be the reactive constituents in the system, the program calculates the mass transfer (amounts of the phases entering or leaving the aqueous phase) necessary to account for the observed changes in composition between the two waters. Additional constraints can be included in the problem formulation to account for mixing of two end-member waters, redox reactions, and, in a simplified form, isotopic composition. The computer code and a description of the input necessary to run the program are presented. Three examples typical of ground-water systems are described. (USGS)

  18. Relation between Water Balance and Climatic Variables Associated with the Geographical Distribution of Anurans

    PubMed Central

    Titon, Braz; Gomes, Fernando Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Amphibian species richness increases toward the equator, particularly in humid tropical forests. This relation between amphibian species richness and environmental water availability has been proposed to be a consequence of their high rates of evaporative water loss. In this way, traits that estimate water balance are expected to covary with climate and constrain a species’ geographic distribution. Furthermore, we predicted that coexisting species of anurans would have traits that are adapted to local hydric conditions. We compared the traits that describe water balance in 17 species of anurans that occur in the mesic Atlantic Forest and xeric Cerrado (savannah) habitats of Brazil. We predicted that species found in the warmer and dryer areas would show a lower sensitivity of locomotor performance to dehydration (SLPD), increased resistance to evaporative water loss (REWL) and higher rates of water uptake (RWU) than species restricted to the more mesic areas. We estimated the allometric relations between the hydric traits and body mass using phylogenetic generalized least squares. These regressions showed that REWL scaled negatively with body mass, whereas RWU scaled positively with body mass. Additionally, species inhabiting areas characterized by higher and more seasonally uniform temperatures, and lower and more seasonally concentrated precipitation, such as the Cerrado, had higher RWU and SLPD than species with geographical distributions more restricted to mesic environments, such as the Atlantic Forest. These results support the hypothesis that the interspecific variation of physiological traits shows an adaptation pattern to abiotic environmental traits. PMID:26469787

  19. [Water balance of different density artificial Caragana microphylla shrubs in Horqin sand land].

    PubMed

    Lamusa, A; Longjun, C I; Yang, Xiaohui; Jiang, Deming

    2006-01-01

    Employing water balance equation, this paper estimated the evapotranspiration of different density Caragana microphylla shrubs during their growing season. The results showed that during this season, the soil water content under artificial C. microphylla shrubs decreased with their increasing planting density. The average soil water content of 0.5 m x 1 m and 1 m x 2 m density artificial C. microphylla shrubs was below wilting humidity (1.55%), while that of 2 m x 2 m density and natural shrubs was kept above 1.60% which could meet the demand of shrubs growth. The evapotranspiration increased with increasing planting densities, being the highest (297.81 mm) in 0.5 m x 1 m density artificial C. microphylla shrubs, which accounted for 97.90% of the total rainfall during growing season, and the lowest (279.71 mm) in 2 m x 2 m density shrubs. By the end of growth phase, soil water content had a surplus of 24.49 mm. According to the soil water status and water balance theory, the appropriate planting density of C. microphylla shrubs in Horqin sand land should be 2 m x 2 m.

  20. Logs and completion data for water and mass balance wells in Mortandad and Ten Site Canyons

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.; Purtymun, W.D.; Swanton, A.S.; Koch, R.J.

    1997-10-01

    Twenty-four monitoring wells were drilled and completed in December 1994 as part of a water and mass balance study for the shallow perched aquifer in the Mortandad Canyon alluvium and in the lower part of Ten-Site Canyon. The wells penetrated the alluvium containing the aquifer and were completed into the top of the weathered tuff. Twelve of these wells encountered the Tshirege Member (Cooing Unit 1 g) of the Bandelier Tuff below the canyon alluvium, while ten wells made contact with the Cerro Toledo interval, which lies between the Tshirege and Otowi Members of the Bandelier Tuff. The remaining two wells were completed into the alluvium above the weathered tuff contact. These wells provide access for continuous water level measurement and water sampling. Data from these new wells will be used to determine changes in alluvial aquifer water storage, water quality sampling, and estimation of seepage into the unsaturated Bandelier Tuff below the alluvium. This report documents drilling activities and well completion logs for the water and mass balance study. These wells also provide critical new data for fourteen north-south vertical cross-sections constructed for the canyon alluvium.

  1. Estimating salivary flow and ruminal water balance of intake, diet, feeding pattern, and slaframine.

    PubMed

    Jacques, K; Harmon, D L; Croom, W J; Hagler, W M

    1989-02-01

    Three experiments with ruminally fistulated cattle fed 12 times daily were conducted to study the role of saliva secretion in ruminal water balance when intake, diet, and feeding pattern were altered. Water balance data were determined from continuously infused Co-EDTA and pulse-dosed Cr-EDTA with saliva flow estimated by difference between water intake and ruminal outflow. Any net transruminal water flux would be included in the estimate of salivary flow. When the concentration of bluestem hay in the diet was increased from 50 to 90%, ruminal fluid volume, saliva secretion, water intake, dilution rate, and total ruminal outflow increased. At equal intake, the higher forage diet increased ruminal liquid volume, outflow, and saliva secretion but had no effect on dilution rate. Intake, but not forage concentration, affected ruminal pH when 50 and 90% hay diets were fed. Increasing feeding frequency of forage in a 65% bluestem hay diet from 4 to 12 times daily (the grain portion was fed 12 times daily) increased dilution and ruminal outflow; however, the latter was only significant with data from Cr-EDTA. Ruminal volatile fatty acids were not altered by feeding frequency of forage. Nycterohemeral patterns were seen in water intake, ruminal dilution rate, outflow, and salivary flow in both studies. Slaframine increased saliva flow by 29% and was accompanied by increased ruminal liquid volume, dilution rate, and outflow.

  2. Soil Water Balance and Recharge Monitoring at the Hanford Site - FY09 Status Report

    SciTech Connect

    Rockhold, Mark L.; Saunders, Danielle L.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Waichler, Scott R.; Clayton, Ray E.

    2009-09-28

    Recharge provides the primary driving force for transporting contaminants from the vadose zone to underlying aquifer systems. Quantification of recharge rates is important for assessing contaminant transport and fate and for evaluating remediation alternatives. This report describes the status of soil water balance and recharge monitoring performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at the Hanford Site for Fiscal Year 2009. Previously reported data for Fiscal Years 2004 - 2008 are updated with data collected in Fiscal Year 2009 and summarized.

  3. Carbon dioxide and the stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants

    SciTech Connect

    Taiz, L.; Zeiger, E.; Mawson, B. T.; Cornish, K.; Radin, J. W.; Turcotte, E. L.; Hercovitz, S.; Tallman, G.; Karlsson, P. E.; Bogomolni, R. A.; Talbott, L. D.; Srivastava, A.

    1992-01-01

    Research continued into the investigation of the effects of carbon dioxide on stomatal control of water balance and photosynthesis in higher plants. Topics discussed this period include a method of isolating a sufficient number of guard cell chloroplasts for biochemical studies by mechanical isolation of epidermal peels; the measurement of stomatal apertures with a digital image analysis system; development of a high performance liquid chromatography method for quantification of metabolites in guard cells; and genetic control of stomatal movements in Pima cotton. (CBS)

  4. Balanced scorecard investment appraisal in the water industry of England and Wales.

    PubMed

    Tebbutt, P J; Gochin, R J; Lester, J N

    2003-07-01

    Previous work has shown that while most conventional investment appraisal techniques appear ill-suited for use in the water industry of England and Wales, the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) offers considerable potential as an investment decision making tool. This study accounts for much of the criticism of the BSC technique, proposing methodological changes to overcome these difficulties. A more comprehensive treatment of the modified methodology, illustrated by BSC development and application flowcharts, demonstrates how this technique might operate in practice. PMID:12926403

  5. Using Water Isotope Tracers to Investigate Past and Present Water Balance Conditions in the Old Crow Flats, Yukon Territory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, K.; Wolfe, B. B.; Edwards, T. W.

    2010-12-01

    The Old Crow Flats (OCF), Yukon Territory, is a wetland of international significance that comprises approximately 2700 shallow thermokarst lakes. Located near the northern limit of the boreal forest, the OCF provides vital habitat for abundant wildlife including waterfowl, moose, muskrat, and the Porcupine Caribou Herd, which support the traditional lifestyle of the Vuntut Gwitchin First Nation. Thermokarst lakes, which occupy vast northern regions, are greatly influenced by climate conditions. In the OCF and other regions there have been observations of decreasing water levels and an increase in frequency of lake drainage events over recent decades. Though there is widespread concern that thermokarst landscape changes are accelerating as a result of ongoing climate change, there are few studies that have investigated current and past variability of lake water balances and climate interactions at the landscape scale. As part of a Government of Canada International Polar Year multidisciplinary project, the present and past hydrology of lakes spanning the OCF are being investigated using water isotope tracers and paleolimnological approaches. Water samples were obtained from 57 lakes three times over three ice-free seasons (2007-09) and analyzed for oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition in order to capture seasonal and interannual changes in water balance conditions. Results highlight strong diversity in the hydrology of lakes throughout the OCF. Based on patterns of isotopic evolution and calculations of input source compositions and evaporation-to-inflow ratios, we identified snowmelt-dominated, rainfall-dominated, groundwater-influenced, evaporation-dominated and drained lake types, which represent the dominant hydrological processes influencing lake water balances. Lake physical and catchment land cover characteristics influence dominant input type (rain or snow). Snowmelt-dominated catchments are large relative to lake surface areas and typically contain

  6. Assessment of the water balance over France using regionalized Turc-Pike formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Lay, Matthieu; Garçon, Rémy; Gailhard, Joël; Garavaglia, Federico

    2016-04-01

    With extensive use of hydrological models over a wide range of hydro-climatic contexts, bias in hydro-climatic data may lead to unreliable models and thus hydrological forecasts and projections. This issue is particularly pregnant when considering mountainous areas with great uncertainties on precipitations, or when considering complex unconservative catchments (e.g. karstic systems). The Turc-Pike water balance formula, analogous to the classical Budyko formula, is a simple and efficient mathematical formulation relating long-term average streamflow to long-term average precipitation and potential evaporation. In this study, we propose to apply this framework to assess and eventually adjust the water-balance before calibrating an operational hydrologic model (MORDOR model). Considering a large set of 350 french catchments, the Turc-Pike formula is regionalized based on ecohydrologic criterions to handle various hydro-climatic contexts. This interannual regional model is then applied to assess the water-balance over numerous catchments and various conditions, such as karstic, snow-driven or glaciarized and even anthropized catchments. Results show that it is possible to obtain pretty realistic corrections of meteorological inputs (precipitations, temperature or potential evaporation) or hydrologic surface (or runoff). These corrections can often be confirmed a posteriori by exogenous information. Positive impacts on hydrologic model's calibration are also demonstrated. This methodology is now operational for hydrologic applications at EDF (Electricité de France, French electric utility company), and therefore applied on hundreds of catchments.

  7. Assessment of the Water Balance Over France Using Regionalized Turc-Pike Formula for Operational Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LE Lay, M.; Garcon, R.; Gailhard, J.; Garavaglia, F.

    2015-12-01

    With extensive use of hydrological models over a wide range of hydro-climatic contexts, bias in hydro-climatic data may lead to unreliable models and thus hydrological forecasts and projections. This issue is particularly pregnant when considering mountainous areas with great uncertainties on precipitations, or when considering complex unconservative catchments (e.g. karstic systems). The Turc-Pike water balance formula, analogous to the classical Budyko formula, is a simple and efficient mathematical formulation relating long-term average streamflow to long-term average precipitation and potential evaporation. In this study, we propose to apply this framework to assess and eventually adjust the water-balance before calibrating an operational hydrologic model (MORDOR model). Considering a large set of 350 french catchments, the Turc-Pike formula is regionalized based on ecohydrologic criterions to handle various hydro-climatic contexts. This interannual regional model is then applied to assess the water-balance over numerous catchments and various conditions, such as karstic, snow-driven or glaciarized and even anthropized catchments. Results show that it is possible to obtain pretty realistic corrections of meteorological inputs (precipitations, temperature or potential evaporation) or hydrologic surface (or runoff). These corrections can often be confirmed a posteriori by exogenous information. Positive impacts on hydrologic model's calibration are also demonstrated. This methodology is now operational for hydrologic applications at EDF (Electricité de France, French electric utility company), and therefore applied on hundreds of catchments.

  8. Development of a multicomponent force and moment balance for water tunnel applications, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suarez, Carlos J.; Malcolm, Gerald N.; Kramer, Brian R.; Smith, Brooke C.; Ayers, Bert F.

    1994-01-01

    The principal objective of this research effort was to develop a multicomponent strain gauge balance to measure forces and moments on models tested in flow visualization water tunnels. Static experiments (which are discussed in Volume 1 of this report) were conducted, and the results showed good agreement with wind tunnel data on similar configurations. Dynamic experiments, which are the main topic of this Volume, were also performed using the balance. Delta wing models and two F/A-18 models were utilized in a variety of dynamic tests. This investigation showed that, as expected, the values of the inertial tares are very small due to the low rotating rates required in a low-speed water tunnel and can, therefore, be ignored. Oscillations in pitch, yaw and roll showed hysteresis loops that compared favorably to data from dynamic wind tunnel experiments. Pitch-up and hold maneuvers revealed the long persistence, or time-lags, of some of the force components in response to the motion. Rotary-balance experiments were also successfully performed. The good results obtained in these dynamic experiments bring a whole new dimension to water tunnel testing and emphasize the importance of having the capability to perform simultaneous flow visualization and force/moment measurements during dynamic situations.

  9. U.S. Biofuel Policies and Domestic Shifts in Agricultural Land Use and Water Balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teter, J.; Yeh, S.; Mishra, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Policies promoting domestic biofuels production could lead to significant changes in cropping patterns. Types of direct and indirect land use change include: switching among crops (displacement), expanding cropped area (extensification), and altering water/soil management practices (e.g. irrigation, tillage) (intensification). Most studies of biofuels water use impacts calculate the water intensity of biofuels in liters of irrigated/total evapotranspired water per unit energy of biofuels. But estimates based on this approach are sensitive to assumptions (e.g. co-product allocation, system boundaries), and do not convey policy-relevant information, as highlighted by the issue of land use change. We address these shortcomings by adopting a scenario-based approach that combines economic modeling with crop-water modeling of major crops and biofuel feedstocks. This allows us to holistically compare differences in water balances across policy scenarios in an integrated economic/agricultural system. We compare high spatial resolution water balance estimates under three hypothetical policy scenarios: 1) a counterfactual no-policy scenario, 2) modified Renewable Fuels Standard mandates (M-RFS2), & 3) a national Low Carbon Fuel Standard plus a modified RFS2 scenario (LCFS+RFS2). Differences between scenarios in crop water balances (i.e. transpiration, evaporation, runoff, groundwater infiltration, & irrigation) are regional and are a function of changes in land use patterns (i.e. displacement, intensification, & extensification), plus variation in crop water-use characteristics. Cropped land area increases 6.2% and 1.6% under M-RFS2 and LCFS+RFS2 scenarios, respectively, by 2030. Both policy scenarios lead to reductions in net irrigation volumes nationally compared to the no-policy scenario, though more irrigation occurs in regions of the Midwest and West. The LCFS+RFS2 reduces net irrigation water use by 3.5 times more than M-RFS2. However, both policies drive

  10. Estimating rainfall and water balance over the Okavango River Basin for hydrological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilk, Julie; Kniveton, Dominic; Andersson, Lotta; Layberry, Russell; Todd, Martin C.; Hughes, Denis; Ringrose, Susan; Vanderpost, Cornelis

    2006-11-01

    SummaryA historical database for use in rainfall-runoff modeling of the Okavango River Basin in Southwest Africa is presented. The work has relevance for similar data-sparse regions. The parameters of main concern are rainfall and catchment water balance, which are key variables for subsequent studies of the hydrological impacts of development and climate change. Rainfall estimates are based on a combination of in situ gauges and satellite sources. Rain gauge measurements are most extensive from 1955 to 1972, after which they are drastically reduced due to the Angolan civil war. The sensitivity of the rainfall fields to spatial interpolation techniques and the density of gauges were evaluated. Satellite based rainfall estimates for the basin are developed for the period from 1991 onwards, based on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) datasets. The consistency between the gauges and satellite estimates was considered. A methodology was developed to allow calibration of the rainfall-runoff hydrological model against rain gauge data from 1960 to 1972, with the prerequisite that the model should be driven by satellite derived rainfall products from 1990 onwards. With the rain gauge data, addition of a single rainfall station (Longa) in regions where stations earlier were lacking was more important than the chosen interpolation method. Comparison of satellite and gauge rainfall outside the basin indicated that the satellite overestimates rainfall by 20%. A non-linear correction was derived by fitting the rainfall frequency characteristics to those of the historical rainfall data. This satellite rainfall dataset was found satisfactory when using the Pitman rainfall-runoff model (Hughes, D., Andersson, L., Wilk, J., Savenije, H.H.G., this issue. Regional calibration of the Pitman model for the Okavango River. Journal of Hydrology). Intensive monitoring in the region is recommended to increase accuracy of the

  11. Critical thermal limits, temperature tolerance and water balance of a sub-Antarctic caterpillar, Pringleophaga marioni (Lepidoptera: Tineidae).

    PubMed

    Chown, S L.; Jaco Klok, C

    1997-07-01

    Thermal tolerance, supercooling point, water balance and osmoregulatory ability of Pringleophaga marioni Viette (Lepidoptera: Tineidae) are investigated in this study. Field-fresh larvae had a mean CT(Min) (cold stupor) of -0.6 degrees C and a mean CT(Max) (heat coma) of 38.7 degrees C. The mean supercooling point of field-fresh individuals was -5.0 degrees C. Caterpillars showed 100% survival of freezing to -6.5 degrees C, but at -12 degrees C mortality rose to 100%. Survival of a 30h exposure to -6.0 degrees C was 80%, but declined to 30% in the 6-12h interval at -7.5 degrees C. No caterpillars survived for longer than 12h at -9.0 degrees C. Survival of high temperatures (35 degrees C and above) was poor. Tolerance of water loss (46% of fresh mass) and rates of water loss (1% fresh massh(-1)) were similar to those found in other mesic insects. P. marioni larvae were incapable of metabolizing lipids to replenish lost water and showed no haemolymph osmoregulatory ability. It is suggested that the preponderance of freeze tolerance in high-latitude southern hemisphere species may be associated with their occurrence in moist habitats, and that the "freeze tolerance" category be re-examined in the light of the range of strategies adopted by such arthropods.

  12. Balancing Public Trust Resources of Mono Lake and Los Angeles' Water Right: An Economic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loomis, John B.

    1987-08-01

    The contingent valuation method (CVM) is used to quantify the Public Trust values of Mono Lake at alternative lake levels. The dichotomous choice approach to contingent valuation is employed using a logit model. The economic benefit to California residents of preserving Mono Lake is estimated to be 1.5 billion. Purchase of replacement water and power would cost 26.2 million annually. On efficiency grounds, reallocation of water for maintenance of Public Trust values at Mono Lake is warranted. The CVM appears to be a useful methodology to evaluate the balancing and feasibility tests of the expanded Public Trust doctrine suggested by the California Supreme Court.

  13. Geochemical mass-balance relationships for selected ions in precipitation and stream water, Catoctin Mountains, Maryland.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, B.G.; Bricker, O.P.; Kennedy, M.M.

    1985-01-01

    Results of a study of input/output mass balances for major ions based on the chemical composition of precipitation and stream-water, geochemical reactions with different loading rates of hydrogen ion, and watershed processes influencing the chemical character of stream-waters in two small watershed areas are reported with a view to predicting the effect of additions of acidic rain to the watershed systems. Geochemical weathering processes account for the observed changes in the chemistry of stream flow. Although present in bedrock in extremely small quantities, calcite plays an important role in neutralization of the total hydrogen-ion input.-M.S.

  14. Strike a balance: optimization of backbone torsion parameters of AMBER polarizable force field for simulations of proteins and peptides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Xiang; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Chun; Lei, Hongxing; Cieplak, Piotr; Duan, Yong

    2006-04-30

    Based on the AMBER polarizable model (ff02), we have re-optimized the parameters related to the main-chain (Phi, Psi) torsion angles by fitting to the Boltzmann-weighted average quantum mechanical (QM) energies of the important regions (i.e., beta, P(II), alpha(R), and alpha(L) regions). Following the naming convention of the AMBER force field series, this release will be called ff02pol.rl The force field has been assessed both by energetic comparison against the QM data and by the replica exchange molecular dynamics simulations of short alanine peptides in water. For Ace-Ala-Nme, the simulated populations in the beta, P(II) and alpha(R) regions were approximately 30, 43, and 26%, respectively. For Ace-(Ala)(7)-Nme, the populations in these three regions were approximately 24, 49, and 26%. Both were in qualitative agreement with the NMR and CD experimental conclusions. In comparison with the previous force field, ff02pol.rl demonstrated good balance among these three important regions. The optimized torsion parameters, together with those in ff02, allow us to carry out simulations on proteins and peptides with the consideration of polarization.

  15. Potential foraging decisions by a desert ungulate to balance water and nutrient intake in a water-stressed environment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gedir, Jay V.; Cain, James W.; Krausman, Paul R.; Allen, Jamison D.; Duff, Glenn C.; Morgart, John R.

    2016-01-01

    Arid climates have unpredictable precipitation patterns, and wildlife managers often provide supplemental water to help desert ungulates endure the hottest, driest periods. When surface water is unavailable, the only source of water for ungulates comes from the forage they consume, and they must make resourceful foraging decisions to meet their requirements. We compared two desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) populations in Arizona, USA: a treatment population with supplemental water removed during treatment, and a control population. We examined whether sheep altered their seasonal diets without supplemental water. We calculated water and nutrient intake and metabolic water production from dry matter intake and forage moisture and nitrogen content, to determine whether sheep could meet their seasonal daily water and nutrient requirements solely from forage. Diets of sheep were higher in protein (all seasons) and moisture (autumn and winter) during treatment compared to pretreatment. During treatment, sheep diet composition was similar between the treatment and control populations, which suggests, under the climatic conditions of this study, water removal did not influence sheep diets. We estimated that under drought conditions, without any surface water available (although small ephemeral potholes would contain water after rains), female and male sheep would be unable to meet their daily water requirements in all seasons, except winter, when reproductive females had a nitrogen deficit. We determined that sheep could achieve water and nutrient balances in all seasons by shifting their total diet proportions by 8–55% from lower to higher moisture and nitrogen forage species. We elucidate how seasonal forage quality and foraging decisions by desert ungulates allow them to cope with their xeric and uncertain environment, and suggest that, with the forage conditions observed in our study area during this study period, providing supplemental water during

  16. Potential Foraging Decisions by a Desert Ungulate to Balance Water and Nutrient Intake in a Water-Stressed Environment.

    PubMed

    Gedir, Jay V; Cain, James W; Krausman, Paul R; Allen, Jamison D; Duff, Glenn C; Morgart, John R

    2016-01-01

    Arid climates have unpredictable precipitation patterns, and wildlife managers often provide supplemental water to help desert ungulates endure the hottest, driest periods. When surface water is unavailable, the only source of water for ungulates comes from the forage they consume, and they must make resourceful foraging decisions to meet their requirements. We compared two desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) populations in Arizona, USA: a treatment population with supplemental water removed during treatment, and a control population. We examined whether sheep altered their seasonal diets without supplemental water. We calculated water and nutrient intake and metabolic water production from dry matter intake and forage moisture and nitrogen content, to determine whether sheep could meet their seasonal daily water and nutrient requirements solely from forage. Diets of sheep were higher in protein (all seasons) and moisture (autumn and winter) during treatment compared to pretreatment. During treatment, sheep diet composition was similar between the treatment and control populations, which suggests, under the climatic conditions of this study, water removal did not influence sheep diets. We estimated that under drought conditions, without any surface water available (although small ephemeral potholes would contain water after rains), female and male sheep would be unable to meet their daily water requirements in all seasons, except winter, when reproductive females had a nitrogen deficit. We determined that sheep could achieve water and nutrient balances in all seasons by shifting their total diet proportions by 8-55% from lower to higher moisture and nitrogen forage species. We elucidate how seasonal forage quality and foraging decisions by desert ungulates allow them to cope with their xeric and uncertain environment, and suggest that, with the forage conditions observed in our study area during this study period, providing supplemental water during

  17. Potential Foraging Decisions by a Desert Ungulate to Balance Water and Nutrient Intake in a Water-Stressed Environment

    PubMed Central

    Gedir, Jay V.; Cain, James W.; Krausman, Paul R.; Allen, Jamison D.; Duff, Glenn C.

    2016-01-01

    Arid climates have unpredictable precipitation patterns, and wildlife managers often provide supplemental water to help desert ungulates endure the hottest, driest periods. When surface water is unavailable, the only source of water for ungulates comes from the forage they consume, and they must make resourceful foraging decisions to meet their requirements. We compared two desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis nelsoni) populations in Arizona, USA: a treatment population with supplemental water removed during treatment, and a control population. We examined whether sheep altered their seasonal diets without supplemental water. We calculated water and nutrient intake and metabolic water production from dry matter intake and forage moisture and nitrogen content, to determine whether sheep could meet their seasonal daily water and nutrient requirements solely from forage. Diets of sheep were higher in protein (all seasons) and moisture (autumn and winter) during treatment compared to pretreatment. During treatment, sheep diet composition was similar between the treatment and control populations, which suggests, under the climatic conditions of this study, water removal did not influence sheep diets. We estimated that under drought conditions, without any surface water available (although small ephemeral potholes would contain water after rains), female and male sheep would be unable to meet their daily water requirements in all seasons, except winter, when reproductive females had a nitrogen deficit. We determined that sheep could achieve water and nutrient balances in all seasons by shifting their total diet proportions by 8–55% from lower to higher moisture and nitrogen forage species. We elucidate how seasonal forage quality and foraging decisions by desert ungulates allow them to cope with their xeric and uncertain environment, and suggest that, with the forage conditions observed in our study area during this study period, providing supplemental water during

  18. Simulating the fate of water in field soil crop environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameira, M. R.; Fernando, R. M.; Ahuja, L.; Pereira, L.

    2005-12-01

    grain and forage corn, respectively. Soil water was predicted with an efficiency ranging from 50 to 95% for the silty loam soil and between 56 and 72% for the sandy soil. The purposed calibration procedure allowed the model to predict crop development, yield and the water balance terms, with accuracy that is acceptable in practical applications for complex and spatially variable field conditions. An iterative method was required to account for the strong interaction between the different model components, based upon detailed experimental data on soils and crops.

  19. Evaluation of military field-water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Selleck, R.E.; Ungun, Z.; Chesler, G.; Diyamandoglu, V.; Marinas, B. . Sanitary Engineering and Environmental Health Research Lab.); Daniels, J.I. )

    1990-05-01

    A comparison is made between the performances of the 600-gph Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Unit (ROWPU) operated in the bypass mode and the Mobile Water Purification Unit (MWPU, frequently referred to as an ERDLATOR because the equipment was developed at the Engineer Research and Development Laboratory at Fort Belvoir, VA.) Generally, the performance of the MWPU is significantly better than the pretreatment units of the ROWPU in terms of removing both turbidity and pathogenic organisms. It is recommended that the practice of bypassing the reverse osmosis (RO) components of the ROWPU be avoided unless it can be demonstrated clearly that the cartridge filters will remove the cysts of infectious organisms effectively and reliably. If the ROWPU must be operated in the bypass mode, it is recommended that the dose of disinfectant used be made equal to that currently employed in the field for untreated raw water. The analytical methods used to determine total dissolved solids (TDS) and residual free chlorine with the new Water-Quality Monitor (WQM) are also reviewed briefly. The limitations of the methods used to calibrate the TDS and free-chlorine probes of the new WQM are discussed. 98 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  20. Modelling the water balance of a mesoscale catchment basin using remotely sensed land cover data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montzka, Carsten; Canty, Morton; Kunkel, Ralf; Menz, Gunter; Vereecken, Harry; Wendland, Frank

    2008-05-01

    SummaryHydrological modelling of mesoscale catchments is often adversely affected by a lack of adequate information about specific site conditions. In particular, digital land cover data are available from data sets which were acquired on a European or a national scale. These data sets do not only exhibit a restricted spatial resolution but also a differentiation of crops and impervious areas which is not appropriate to the needs of mesoscale hydrological models. In this paper, the impact of remote sensing data on the reliability of a water balance model is investigated and compared to model results determined on the basis of CORINE (Coordination of Information on the Environment) Land Cover as a reference. The aim is to quantify the improved model performance achieved by an enhanced land cover representation and corresponding model modifications. Making use of medium resolution satellite imagery from SPOT, LANDSAT ETM+ and ASTER, detailed information on land cover, especially agricultural crops and impervious surfaces, was extracted over a 5-year period (2000-2004). Crop-specific evapotranspiration coefficients were derived by using remote sensing data to replace grass reference evapotranspiration necessitated by the use of CORINE land cover for rural areas. For regions classified as settlement or industrial areas, degrees of imperviousness were derived. The data were incorporated into the hydrological model GROWA (large-scale water balance model), which uses an empirical approach combining distributed meteorological data with distributed site parameters to calculate the annual runoff components. Using satellite imagery in combination with runoff data from gauging stations for the years 2000-2004, the actual evapotranspiration calculation in GROWA was methodologically extended by including empirical crop coefficients for actual evapotranspiration calculations. While GROWA originally treated agricultural areas as homogeneous, now a consideration and differentiation

  1. Estimating Evapotrnspiration in a Rice Field Using a Remote-Sensing Based Two Source Energy Balance Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, K.; Kustas, W. P.; Anderson, M. C.; Gao, F.; Lee, K.; Hong, S.; Zhang, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Evapotranspiration monitoring of rice, a main cereal and food source of Monsoon Asia, is important not only for sustaining stable grain production and for effective water use through precise water management, but also provides a means for early warning of and response to drought. The remote-sensing based two source energy balance model (TSEB) estimates of evapotranspiration (ET) over a wide variety of land cover types using ground, airborne and satellite imagery and meteorological data without time-consuming and/or expensive field measurements such as measurements of daily decrease of flooding water depth and eddy covariance-based flux tower observations. We, therefore, evaluated the TSEB model at local sites, Icheon and Kimje, with energy flux tower and ground-based thermal-infrared temperature measurement collected over cultivated rice fields and applied the model for estimating ET over rice cropping region encompassing an area 16km x 16km scale in South Korea using Landsat imagery. The TSEB model required modification to the soil heat flux algorithm because rice typically grows in saturated soils and/or standing water for about 75% of the rice growing season. Half-hourly energy flux data, including net radiation, sensible heat, latent heat (corresponding to ET), and soil heat, at two field sites were acquired using eddy-covariance method. The root mean square difference values between predicted and observed latent heat flux ranged between 10% and 25% of the average observed latent heat flux. This is comparable to the measurement uncertainty, suggesting that the TSEB model can provide reliable ET estimation for rice fields. Applying the TSEB model with Landsat imagery over a 16km x 16km domain encompassing the Kimje flux tower site was also performed. Leaf area index for the study area at the Landsat resolution was estimated using MODIS leaf area index products as a reference. Atmospheric correction of the land surface temperature was carried out using MODTRAN

  2. Balancing the source terms in a SPH model for solving the shallow water equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xilin; Liang, Qiuhua; Pastor, Manuel; Zou, Weilie; Zhuang, Yan-Feng

    2013-09-01

    A shallow flow generally features complex hydrodynamics induced by complicated domain topography and geometry. A numerical scheme with well-balanced flux and source term gradients is therefore essential before a shallow flow model can be applied to simulate real-world problems. The issue of source term balancing has been exhaustively investigated in grid-based numerical approaches, e.g. discontinuous Galerkin finite element methods and finite volume Godunov-type methods. In recent years, a relatively new computational method, smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), has started to gain popularity in solving the shallow water equations (SWEs). However, the well-balanced problem has not been fully investigated and resolved in the context of SPH. This work aims to discuss the well-balanced problem caused by a standard SPH discretization to the SWEs with slope source terms and derive a corrected SPH algorithm that is able to preserve the solution of lake at rest. In order to enhance the shock capturing capability of the resulting SPH model, the Monotone Upwind-centered Scheme for Conservation Laws (MUSCL) is also explored and applied to enable Riemann solver based artificial viscosity. The new SPH model is validated against several idealized benchmark tests and a real-world dam-break case and promising results are obtained.

  3. Water and Heat Balance Model for Predicting Drainage Below the Plant Root Zone

    1989-11-01

    UNSAT-H Version 2.0 is a one-dimensional model that simulates the dynamic processes of infiltration, drainage, redistribution, surface evaporation, and the uptake of water from soil by plants. The model was developed for assessing the water dynamics of arid sites used or proposed for near-surface waste disposal. In particular, the model is used for simulating the water balance of cover systems over buried waste and for estimating the recharge rate (i.e., the drainage rate beneath themore » plant root zone when a sizable vadose zone is present). The mathematical base of the model are Richards'' equation for water flow, Ficks'' law for vapor diffusion, and Fouriers law for heat flow. The simulated profile can be homogeneous or layered. The boundary conditions can be controlled as either constant (potential or temperature) or flux conditions to reflect actual conditions at a given site.« less

  4. Water balance-based estimation of groundwater recharge in the Lake Chad Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babamaaji, R. A.; Lee, J.

    2012-12-01

    Lake Chad Basin (LCB) has experienced drastic changes of land cover and poor water management practices during the last 50 years. The successive droughts in the 1970s and 1980s resulted in the shortage of surface water and groundwater resources. This problem of drought and shortage of water has a devastating implication on the natural resources of the Basin with great consequence on food security, poverty reduction and quality of life of the inhabitants in the LCB. Therefore, understanding the change of land use and its characteristics must be a first step to find how such changes disturb the water cycle especially the groundwater in the LCB. The abundance of groundwater is affected by the climate change through the interaction with surface water, such as lakes and rivers, and vertical recharge through an infiltration process. Quantifying the impact of climate change on the groundwater resource requires not only reliable forecasting of changes in the major climatic variables, but also accurate estimation of groundwater recharge. Spatial variations in the land use/land cover, soil texture, topographic slope, and meteorological conditions should be accounted for in the recharge estimation. In this study, we employed a spatially distributed water balance model WetSpass to simulate a long-term average change of groundwater recharge in the LCB of Africa. WetSpass is a water balance-based model to estimate seasonal average spatial distribution of surface runoff, evapotranspiration, and groundwater recharge. The model is especially suitable for studying the effect of land use/land cover change on the water regime in the LCB. The present study describes the concept of the model and its application to the development of recharge map of the LCB.

  5. [Effects of reduced nitrogen application and soybean intercropping on nitrogen balance of sugarcane field].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Wen-ting; Li, Zhi-xian; Guan, Ao-mei

    2015-03-01

    A four-year (2010-2013) field experiment was carried out to explore the effects of three planting patterns (sugarcane, soybean monoculture and sugarcane-soybean 1:2 intercropping) with two nitrogen input levels (300 and 525 kg . hm-2) on soybean nitrogen fixation, sugarcane and soybean nitrogen accumulation, and ammonia volatilization and nitrogen leaching in sugarcane field. The results showed that the soybean nitrogen fixation efficiency (NFE) of sugarcane-soybean inter-cropping was lower than that of soybean monoculture. There was no significant difference in NFE among the treatments with the two nitrogen application rates. The nitrogen application rate and inter-cropping did not remarkably affect nitrogen accumulation of sugarcane and soybean. The ammonia volatilization of the reduced nitrogen input treatment was significantly lower than that of the conventional nitrogen input treatment. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in nitrogen leaching at different nitrogen input levels and among different planting patterns. The sugarcane field nitrogen balance analysis indicated that the nitrogen application rate dominated the nitrogen budget of sugarcane field. During the four-year experiment, all treatments leaved a nitrogen surplus (from 73.10 to 400.03 kg . hm-2) , except a nitrogen deficit of 66.22 kg . hm-2 in 2011 in the treatment of sugarcane monoculture with the reduced nitrogen application. The excessive nitrogen surplus might increase the risk of nitrogen pollution in the field. In conclusion, sugarcane-soybean intercropping with reduced nitrogen application is feasible to practice in consideration of enriching the soil fertility, reducing nitrogen pollution and saving production cost in sugarcane field.

  6. Mapping land water and energy balance relations through conditional sampling of remote sensing estimates of atmospheric forcing and surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadi, Leila; Entekhabi, Dara; Salvucci, Guido

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we develop and apply a mapping estimation capability for key unknown parameters that link the surface water and energy balance equations. The method is applied to the Gourma region in West Africa. The accuracy of the estimation method at point scale was previously examined using flux tower data. In this study, the capability is scaled to be applicable with remotely sensed data products and hence allow mapping. Parameters of the system are estimated through a process that links atmospheric forcing (precipitation and incident radiation), surface states, and unknown parameters. Based on conditional averaging of land surface temperature and moisture states, respectively, a single objective function is posed that measures moisture and temperature-dependent errors solely in terms of observed forcings and surface states. This objective function is minimized with respect to parameters to identify evapotranspiration and drainage models and estimate water and energy balance flux components. The uncertainty of the estimated parameters (and associated statistical confidence limits) is obtained through the inverse of Hessian of the objective function, which is an approximation of the covariance matrix. This calibration-free method is applied to the mesoscale region of Gourma in West Africa using multiplatform remote sensing data. The retrievals are verified against tower-flux field site data and physiographic characteristics of the region. The focus is to find the functional form of the evaporative fraction dependence on soil moisture, a key closure function for surface and subsurface heat and moisture dynamics, using remote sensing data.

  7. A Multifunctional Surface That Simultaneously Balances Hydrophilic Enzyme Catalysis and Hydrophobic Water Repellency.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Timothy J; Uzarski, Joshua R; Filocamo, Shaun F

    2016-08-16

    The compatibility of multiple functions at a single interface is difficult to achieve, but is even more challenging when the functions directly counteract one another. This study provides insight into the creation of a simultaneously multifunctional surface formed by balancing two orthogonal functions; water repellency and enzyme catalysis. A partially fluorinated thiol is used to impart bulk hydrophobicity on the surface, and an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester-terminated thiol provides a specific anchoring sites for the covalent enzyme attachment. Different ratios of the two thiols are mixed together to form amphiphilic self-assembled monolayers, which are characterized with polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and contact angle goniometry. The enzyme activity is measured by a fluorescence assay. With the results collected here, specific surface compositions are identified at which the orthogonal functions of water repellency and enzyme catalysis are balanced and exist simultaneously. An understanding of how to effectively balance orthogonal functions at surfaces can be extended to a number of higher-scale applications.

  8. A Multifunctional Surface That Simultaneously Balances Hydrophilic Enzyme Catalysis and Hydrophobic Water Repellency.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Timothy J; Uzarski, Joshua R; Filocamo, Shaun F

    2016-08-16

    The compatibility of multiple functions at a single interface is difficult to achieve, but is even more challenging when the functions directly counteract one another. This study provides insight into the creation of a simultaneously multifunctional surface formed by balancing two orthogonal functions; water repellency and enzyme catalysis. A partially fluorinated thiol is used to impart bulk hydrophobicity on the surface, and an N-hydroxysuccinimide ester-terminated thiol provides a specific anchoring sites for the covalent enzyme attachment. Different ratios of the two thiols are mixed together to form amphiphilic self-assembled monolayers, which are characterized with polarization-modulation infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and contact angle goniometry. The enzyme activity is measured by a fluorescence assay. With the results collected here, specific surface compositions are identified at which the orthogonal functions of water repellency and enzyme catalysis are balanced and exist simultaneously. An understanding of how to effectively balance orthogonal functions at surfaces can be extended to a number of higher-scale applications. PMID:27406598

  9. Testing the hydrological water balance model criteria using TDR measurements and micrometeorological data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Licciardello, Feliciana; Villani, Giulia; Pasotti, Luigi; Consoli, Simona

    2014-05-01

    In arid and semi-arid regions, the availability of water is a major limitation on crop production due to insufficient rainfall to compensate the evaporative losses by crops. Improvements in water management in irrigated areas and adequate irrigation scheduling are essential also to increase the sustainability of irrigated agriculture. In particular, reliable estimates of soil moisture changes in agricultural soils may help the available water management under scarce conditions. In the last two decades this issue has induced the development of physically based models for simulating the different components of the water balance. These models, often developed in specific environmental or agronomic conditions, needs to be further validated. The study aims at assessing the performance of the physically based CRITERIA model to simulate the hydrological water balance of agricultural soils. The model, developed by the ARPA-SIMC (Hydro-meteorological service of the Emilia-Romagna region, Italy), includes procedures and conceptual models for the simulation of infiltration, evapotranspiration, runoff, deep drainage, capillary rise, canopy expansion and root deepening. The model consists of (i) an algorithm for coupling the surface flow components (i.e. Richards equation), with simultaneous solution of the conservation equation, (ii) various modules which may it applicable to various topographical and environmental conditions (i.e. Penman-Monteith equation for crop evapotranspiration fluxes among others). In the model, the soil water retention data are described by the van Genuchten equation, with the hydraulic conductivity calculated by the Mualem model. CRITERIA, that includes a database with several crops, was already tested in north Italy and in USA but never in typical Mediterranean semi-arid environments where citrus orchards growth. In order to verify the performance of CRITERIA, data from an experimental citrus orchard located in Eastern Sicily, Italy, were used to

  10. A modeling framework to assess water and nitrate balances in the Western Bug river basin, Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares Wahren, F.; Helm, B.; Schumacher, F.; Pluntke, T.; Feger, K.-H.; Schwärzel, K.

    2012-12-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the utility of the eco-hydrological SWAT model (Soil and Water Assessment Tool, Arnold et al., 1998) for representing water balance and nitrate fluxes given limited input and calibration data. The investigated catchment is located in Western Ukraine with an area of approximately 2616 km2. Land use is currently dominated by agriculture with significant areas of pasture, and has undergone a high degree of changes in land-use and agricultural practice since the end of the Soviet Union. Model application produced a fitted water balance (calibration: R2 = 0.52, NS = 0.46; validation: R2 = 0.47, NS = 0.51) and plausible ranges and dynamics of nitrate in stream loadings. Groundwater parameters were found to be highly sensitive. The results indicate that SWAT is an appropriate tool for water resource investigations in the Western Bug catchment, and can provide a useful tool for further eco-hydrologic research in the region (i.e. diffuse pollution impacts).

  11. Global estimation of evapotranspiration using a leaf area index-based surface energy and water balance model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies of global hydrologic cycles, carbon cycles and climate change are greatly facilitated when global estimates of evapotranspiration (E) are available. We have developed an air-relative-humidity-based two-source (ARTS) E model that simulates the surface energy balance, soil water balance, and e...

  12. The Thermal Circulation on Kilimanjaro, Tanzania and its Relevance to Summit Ice-Field Mass Balance.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, N. C.; Duane, W. J.

    2008-12-01

    It is well known that mountains create their own climates. On Kilimanjaro, which is the tallest free standing mountain in Africa, the intense tropical sunlight generates a strong diurnal mountain circulation which transports moisture up the mountain during the day and back downslope at night. This process has strong consequences for development of cloud cover, precipitation, and hence ice-field mass balance on the summit crater. We compare surface climate (temperature, moisture and wind) measured at ten elevations on Kilimanjaro, with equivalent observations in the free atmosphere from NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data for September 2004 to July 2008. There are no simple temporal trends over this period in either surface of free- air data. Correlations between daily surface and free air temperatures are greatest below 2500 metres, meaning that synoptic (inter-diurnal) variability is the major control here. In contrast, temperatures and moisture on the higher slopes above treeline (about 3000 m) are strongly decoupled from the free atmosphere, showing intense heating/cooling by day/night (more than 5°C). The sparsely vegetated upper slopes are the focus for the most intense heating and upslope winds develop by mid-morning. The forest on the lower slopes acts as a moisture source, with large vapour pressure excesses reported (5 mb) which move upslope reaching the crater in the afternoon before subsiding downslope at night. The montane thermal circulation is more effective at upslope moisture transport during January as compared with July. Fluctuations in upper air flow strength and direction (at 500 mb) surprisingly have limited influence on the strength of surface heating and upslope moisture advection. This finding suggests that local changes in surface characteristics such as deforestation could have a strong influence on the mountain climate and the summit ice fields on Kilimanjaro, and make mass-balance somewhat divorced from larger-scale advective changes associated

  13. Spacebased Observations of Oceanic Influence on the Annual Variation of South American Water Balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, W. Timothy; Xie, Xiaosu; Tang, Wenqing; Zlotnicki, Victor

    2006-01-01

    The mass change of South America (SA) continent measured by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) imposes a constraint on the uncertainties in estimating the annual variation of rainfall measured by Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) and ocean moisture influx derived from QuikSCAT data. The approximate balance of the mass change rate with the moisture influx less climatological river discharge, in agreement with the conservation principle, bolsters not only the credibility of the spacebased measurements, but supports the characterization of ocean's influence on the annual variation of continental water balance. The annual variation of rainfall is found to be in phase with the mass change rate in the Amazon and the La Plata basins, and the moisture advection across relevant segments of the Pacific and Atlantic coasts agrees with the annual cycle of rainfall in the two basins and the Andes mountains.

  14. Changes in nutrient structure of river-dominated coastal waters: stoichiometric nutrient balance and its consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Justić, Dubravko; Rabalais, Nancy N.; Turner, R. Eugene; Dortch, Quay

    We present an analysis of extensive nutrient data sets from two river-dominated coastal ecosystems, the northern Adriatic Sea and the northern Gulf of Mexico, demonstrating significant changes in surface nutrient ratios over a period of 30 years. The silicon:nitrogen ratios have decreased, indicating increased potential for silicon limitation. The nitrogen:phosphorus and the silicon:phosphorus ratios have also changed substantially, and the coastal nutrient structures have become more balanced and potentially less limiting for phytoplankton growth. It is likely that net phytoplankton productivity increased under these conditions and was accompanied by increasing bottom water hypoxia and major changes in community species composition. These findings support the hypothesis that increasing coastal eutrophication to date may be associated with stoichiometric nutrient balance, due to increasing potential for silicon limitation and decreasing potential for nitrogen and phosphorus limitation. On a worldwide basis, coastal ecosystems adjacent to rivers influenced by anthropogenic nutrient loads may experience similar alterations.

  15. Deforestation offsets water balance changes due to climate variability in the Xingu River in eastern Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, Prajjwal K.; Coe, Michael T.; Macedo, Marcia N.; Lefebvre, Paul; Castanho, Andrea D. de Almeida

    2015-04-01

    Deforestation reduced forest cover in Brazil's Xingu River Basin (XB; area: 510,000 km2) from 90% of the basin in the 1970s to 75% in the 2000s. Such large-scale land cover changes can substantially alter regional water budgets, but their influence can be difficult to isolate from that of natural climate variability. In this study, we estimate changes to the XB water balance from the 1970s to the 2000s due to climate variations and deforestation, using a combination of long-term observations of rainfall and discharge; satellite-based estimates of evapotranspiration (MODIS) and surface water storage (GRACE); and numerical modeling estimates (IBIS) of water budget components (evapotranspiration, soil moisture, and discharge). Model simulations over this period suggest that climate variations alone accounted for a -82 mm decrease (mean per unit area) in annual discharge (-14%, from 8190 m3 s-1 to 7806 m3 s-1), due to a -2% decrease in precipitation and +3% increase in evapotranspiration. Deforestation alone caused a +34 mm increase in annual discharge (+6%), as a result of a -3% decrease in evapotranspiration and +1% increase in soil moisture across the XB. Climate variability and land cover change thus had opposite effects on the XB water balance, with climate effects masking deforestation-induced changes to the water budget. Protected areas, which cover 55% of the basin, have helped to mitigate the effects of past deforestation on water recycling in the Xingu. However, our results suggest that continued deforestation outside protected areas could trigger changes of sufficient magnitude to offset climate variability.

  16. A continental scale water balance model: a GIS-approach for Southern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alemaw, B. F.; Chaoka, T. R.

    A distributed GIS-based hydrological model is developed using GIS and computational hydrology techniques. The model is based on water balance consideration of the surface and subsurface processes. The surface water balance processes include precipitation infiltration, overland runoff, evapo-transpiration and canopy surface interception losses on daily time steps; The subsurface process considers soil moisture accounting on a monthly basis. The model was used to estimate generated runoff from matrix of specific geo-referenced grids representing Southern Africa. All regional and seasonal dispensation of water balances have been based on standard GIS formats for storage, spatial display and interpretation of results. Considering the 1961-1990 climatic period, we have mapped the regional variation of the mean annual soil moisture (SM), actual evapo-transpiration (AET), and generated runoff (ROF) across Southern Africa or known as the SADC region. The model estimates the mean SM of the region to be about 148 mm/year. There is a wide spatial range in the distribution of SM over the region due to the fact that the absolute soil moisture is dependent on the water retention properties of the soils considered across the region. The model prediction of the mean annual AET in the region reaches a maximum of 1500 mm, with mean 420 mm. The mean annual generated runoff from the land catchment in the region is about 151 mm/year although there is a significant inter-regional variation among the SADC countries, which is a function of the variation in the vegetation cover, soil and climate variation. Lower runoff regimes are dominant in arid areas in Botswana, Namibia and south-western part of the Republic of South Africa. Higher runoff regimes are the Northern and Western Tanzania, along the east coastal portions of Mozambique, central Mozambique, western Zambia and Malawi.

  17. Electropumping of water with rotating electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Luca, Sergio; Todd, B. D.; Hansen, J. S.; Daivis, Peter J.

    2013-04-01

    Pumping of fluids confined to nanometer dimension spaces is a technically challenging yet vitally important technological application with far reaching consequences for lab-on-a-chip devices, biomimetic nanoscale reactors, nanoscale filtration devices and the like. All current pumping mechanisms require some sort of direct intrusion into the nanofluidic system, and involve mechanical or electronic components. In this paper, we present the first nonequilibrium molecular dynamics results to demonstrate that non-intrusive electropumping of liquid water on the nanoscale can be performed by subtly exploiting the coupling of spin angular momentum to linear streaming momentum. A spatially uniform rotating electric field is applied to water molecules, which couples to their permanent electric dipole moments. The resulting molecular rotational momentum is converted into linear streaming momentum of the fluid. By selectively tuning the degree of hydrophobicity of the solid walls one can generate a net unidirectional flow. Our results for the linear streaming and angular velocities of the confined water are in general agreement with the extended hydrodynamical theory for this process, though also suggest refinements to the theory are required. These numerical experiments confirm that this new concept for pumping of polar nanofluids can be employed under laboratory conditions, opening up significant new technological possibilities.

  18. The isotopic composition of water vapor as a tracer of water balance in the TTL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolot, Maximilien; Moyer, Elisabeth; Legras, Bernard; Walker, Kaley; Boone, Chris; Bernath, Peter

    2015-04-01

    The relatively small amount of water vapor in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) region is of disproportionate radiative importance, and projections of changes in TTL water are hampered by poor understanding of its sources and controls. We show here that the profile of the isotopic composition of water vapor can be used to quantify the contribution of various processes to the water budget of the region: convective sources of water, dehydration via in situ cirrus formation and sedimentation, and moistening from mixing with extratropical air. We combine these processes into a simple model for the isotopic ratio of TTL water vapor. By fitting the model parameters to reproduce an averaged tropical profile of water vapor isotopic ratio in the TTL, we can retrieve the convective contribution to TTL water vapor. Using isotopic measurements from the ACE-FTS solar-occultation instrument, we show that convective injection of water vapor must provide a significant contribution to TTL water vapor. That contribution in turn has large radiative effects, because it increases the production of in-situ cirrus over what would be inferred from large-scale uplift alone, by a factor 2-10 over the TTL (15-17.5 km).

  19. Major water balance variables Estimation, soil moisture and evaporation time series, using X-band SAR moisture products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorrab, Azza; Simonneaux, Vincent; Zribi, Mehrez; Saadi, Sameh; Lili-Chabaane, Zohra

    2016-04-01

    continuous Thetaprobe measurements) and plot scale (calibration based on SAR moisture products with very high resolution). Two principal approaches were considered in this research. Firstly, the MHYSAN model was calibrated using a network of seven continous thetaprobe measurements to estimate surface water balance at regional scale. Results gave after calibration an average Nash efficiency which indicates that the MHYSAN model could reproduce correctly SM profiles observed by the major permanent probes at two depths. On the second approach, the MHYSAN model was calibrated for a short period using seven SAR (TerraSAR-X) SM outputs with very high resolution. After considering only three similar texture classes between permanent probes and reference fields (fine, intermediate and coarse groups), validation of the proposed approach was carried out for a long temporal resolution using continuous thetaprobe measurements. These results reveal a good model performance and show that high accurate SM estimations can be achieved after calibrating a bare soil hydrological balance model from SAR moisture products. Overall, the two different approaches reproduce the soil moisture temporal variations well and are in good agreement with modeled MHYSAN SM outputs.

  20. Evaluating the impact of SWOT observations§ on the water balance of lakes and wetlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreadis, K.; Moller, D.; Rodriguez, E.; Alsdorf, D.

    2012-04-01

    Lakes and wetlands can exert controls on the water and energy fluxes, playing an important role in the local and regional climate. The spatial extent and storage volume of water bodies globally is poorly known, due to lack of measurements over large areas. The planned Surface Water Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite mission will provide observations of water surface elevation and inundated area globally at an unprecedented spatial resolution. Apart from being used directly, these observations can be used to constrain the water balance simulated hydrologic model over large-scale basins. In this study, the Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) macroscale hydrologic model is implemented over the Great Lakes region within an identical twin synthetic experiment. VIC solves an energy and water balance over a gridded domain, and represents lakes and wetlands dynamically as fractional areas of each model grid cell. A baseline simulation of the water and energy balance is designated as "truth", and errors in precipitation, temperature and model parameters are added to simulate a "first-guess" of hydrologic variables of interest. Synthetic SWOT observations are generated from the instrument simulator (developed at JPL) with the anticipated orbital and error characteristics. These "virtual" observations are then assimilated into the "first-guess" model to estimate runoff, evapotranspiration and sensible/latent heat fluxes. The assimilation technique used is the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), which solves the optimal estimation problem by approximating model and observation errors through a Monte Carlo ensemble approach. The "first-guess" simulation consists of an ensemble of model states that is propagated temporally until a SWOT observation becomes available. The impact of merging the SWOT observations is examined in terms of water and energy fluxes, and the sensitivity of the results to the different observation errors is assessed. The latter can include errors in lake

  1. Balancing Water Uptake and Loss through the Coordinated Regulation of Stomatal and Root Development.

    PubMed

    Hepworth, Christopher; Turner, Carla; Landim, Marcela Guimaraes; Cameron, Duncan; Gray, Julie E

    2016-01-01

    Root development is influenced by nutrient and water availabilities. Plants are able to adjust many attributes of their root in response to environmental signals including the size and shape of the primary root, lateral roots and root hairs. Here we investigated the response of roots to changes in the levels of leaf transpiration associated with altered stomatal frequency. We found that plants with high stomatal density and conductance produce a larger rooting area and as a result have enhanced phosphate uptake capacity whereas plants with low stomatal conductance produce a smaller root. Manipulating the growth environment of plants indicated that enhanced root growth is most likely a result of an increased demand for water rather than phosphate. Plants manipulated to have an increase or reduction in root hair growth show a reduction or increase respectively, in stomatal conductance and density. Our results demonstrate that plants can balance their water uptake and loss through coordinated regulation of both stomatal and root development. PMID:27275842

  2. Characterization of yield reduction in Ethiopia using a GIS-based crop water balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senay, G.B.; Verdin, J.

    2003-01-01

    In many parts of sub-Saharan Africa, subsistence agriculture is characterized by significant fluctuations in yield and production due to variations in moisture availability to staple crops. Widespread drought can lead to crop failures, with associated deterioration in food security. Ground data collection networks are sparse, so methods using geospatial rainfall estimates derived from satellite and gauge observations, where available, have been developed to calculate seasonal crop water balances. Using conventional crop production data for 4 years in Ethiopia (1996-1999), it was found that water-limited and water-unlimited growing regions can be distinguished. Furthermore, maize growing conditions are also indicative of conditions for sorghum. However, another major staple, teff, was found to behave sufficiently differently from maize to warrant studies of its own.

  3. Status of FY 1988 soil-water balance studies on the Hanford site

    SciTech Connect

    Gee, G.W.; Rockhold, M.L.; Downs, J.L.

    1989-02-01

    Natural recharge (i.e., the amount of water from meteorological sources, such as rainfall or snowmelt, that infiltrates through the vadose zone to the groundwater table) at the Hanford Site is a variable quantity because it depends on soil, plant, and climatic factors that vary in time and space over the Site. Water balance data have been collected at selected locations at the Hanford Site for the past 10 years in an attempt to measure or estimate natural recharge for known soil, plant, and climatic conditions. The data collected include precipitation, neutron probe measured water content (storage), and drainage measurements from lysimeters. The lysimeter studies provided the first quantitative estimates of natural recharge at the Hanford Site. 12 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Balancing Water Uptake and Loss through the Coordinated Regulation of Stomatal and Root Development

    PubMed Central

    Hepworth, Christopher; Turner, Carla; Landim, Marcela Guimaraes; Cameron, Duncan; Gray, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    Root development is influenced by nutrient and water availabilities. Plants are able to adjust many attributes of their root in response to environmental signals including the size and shape of the primary root, lateral roots and root hairs. Here we investigated the response of roots to changes in the levels of leaf transpiration associated with altered stomatal frequency. We found that plants with high stomatal density and conductance produce a larger rooting area and as a result have enhanced phosphate uptake capacity whereas plants with low stomatal conductance produce a smaller root. Manipulating the growth environment of plants indicated that enhanced root growth is most likely a result of an increased demand for water rather than phosphate. Plants manipulated to have an increase or reduction in root hair growth show a reduction or increase respectively, in stomatal conductance and density. Our results demonstrate that plants can balance their water uptake and loss through coordinated regulation of both stomatal and root development. PMID:27275842

  5. Holding Water in the Landscape; striking a balance between food production and healthy catchment function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, Paul; Wilkinson, Mark; Stutter, Marc; Adams, Russell

    2015-04-01

    Here it is proposed that ~5 % of the rural landscape could be modified to hold water during storm events. Hence ~95% of land remains for food production, commercial forestry and amenity. This is a catchment scale commitment to sustainably reducing flood and drought risk, improving water quality, biodiversity and thereby climate proofing our catchments. The farmed landscape has intensified and as a result, runoff rates are no longer in balance with the catchment needs, which in turn contributes to floods, droughts and water pollution problems. The loss of infiltration rates, soil water holding capacity and the increase in ditches and drains through intense farming has resulted in a reduction of the overall water holding capacity of the landscape, therefore deeper soil and aquifer recharge rates are lower. However, adequate raw water supply and food production is also vital. Here we consider how ~5% of productive land could be used to physically hold water during and after storms. This is a simple philosophy for water stewardship that could be delivered by farmers and land managers themselves. In this poster we consider a 'treatment train' of mitigation in headwaters by the construction of:- Rural SuDs - by creating swales, bunds and grassy filters; Buffer Strips - (designed to hold water); The Ditch of The Future - by creating the prime location for holding water and recovering lost top soil and finally the better use of Small Headwater Floodplains - by storing flood water, creating wetlands, planting new forest, installing woody debris and new habitats. We present examples of where and how these measures have been installed and show the cost-effectiveness of temporarily holding storm runoff in several case study catchments taken from the UK.

  6. Evaluating the potential of improving residential water balance at building scale.

    PubMed

    Agudelo-Vera, Claudia M; Keesman, Karel J; Mels, Adriaan R; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2013-12-15

    Earlier results indicated that, for an average household, self-sufficiency in water supply can be achieved by following the Urban harvest Approach (UHA), in a combination of demand minimization, cascading and multi-sourcing. To achieve these results, it was assumed that all available local resources can be harvested. In reality, however, temporal, spatial and location-bound factors pose limitations to this harvest and, thus, to self-sufficiency. This article investigates potential spatial and temporal limitations to harvest local water resources at building level for the Netherlands, with a focus on indoor demand. Two building types were studied, a free standing house (one four-people household) and a mid-rise apartment flat (28 two-person households). To be able to model yearly water balances, daily patterns considering household occupancy and presence of water using appliances were defined per building type. Three strategies were defined. The strategies include demand minimization, light grey water (LGW) recycling, and rainwater harvesting (multi-sourcing). Recycling and multi-sourcing cater for toilet flushing and laundry machine. Results showed that water saving devices may reduce 30% of the conventional demand. Recycling of LGW can supply 100% of second quality water (DQ2) which represents 36% of the conventional demand or up to 20% of the minimized demand. Rainwater harvesting may supply approximately 80% of the minimized demand in case of the apartment flat and 60% in case of the free standing house. To harvest these potentials, different system specifications, related to the household type, are required. Two constraints to recycle and multi-source were identified, namely i) limitations in the grey water production and available rainfall; and ii) the potential to harvest water as determined by the temporal pattern in water availability, water use, and storage and treatment capacities.

  7. Characterizing the role of hydrological processes on lake water balances in the Old Crow Flats, Yukon Territory, Canada, using water isotope tracers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Kevin W.; Wolfe, Brent B.; Edwards, Thomas W. D.

    2010-05-01

    SummaryWe employ water isotope tracers to assess hydrological processes controlling lake water balances in the Old Crow Flats (OCF) landscape, northern Yukon Territory, Canada. Fifty-six lakes were sampled in June and July 2007 and 26 of these were re-sampled in September 2007. Based on patterns of isotopic evolution in δ18O- δ2H space, calculations of input water compositions ( δI) and evaporation-to-inflow ( E/ I) ratios, and field observations we identify snowmelt-dominated, rainfall-dominated, groundwater-influenced, evaporation-dominated and drained lake types, which represent the dominant hydrological process influencing the lake water balance. These results highlight the diversity in lake water balance conditions in the OCF, which are strongly associated with landscape characteristics. Snowmelt-dominated lakes are located where more dense vegetation cover entraps snow transported by prevailing northeasterly winds. Rainfall-dominated lakes occupy areas of sparse tundra vegetation cover where less snow accumulates. Groundwater-influenced oxbow lakes are located along the floodplain of higher-order river and creek channels and receive input throughout the ice-free season from snowmelt-recharged channel fens and sub-surface flow. Only one basin became evaporation-dominated during the 2007 open-water season probably because extremely high precipitation during the preceding late summer, late winter and early spring offset vapour loss. However, rainfall-dominated lakes appear to be more susceptible to evaporative drawdown than snowmelt-dominated and groundwater-influenced lakes, and many would likely evolve to evaporation-dominated during drier summers. Drained lakes are commonly observed throughout the landscape and in most cases likely result from elevated water levels and channel erosion between waterbodies. Unusually high amounts of snowmelt and/or rainfall triggered the drainage of two lakes in early June 2007 in which overflow led to rapid erosion of

  8. Comparison of the Effects on Dynamic Balance Ability of Warming up in Water Versus on the Ground.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyoung Il; Hwnagbo, Gak; Nam, Hyung Chun; Cho, Yong Ho

    2014-04-01

    [Purpose] This research was designed to find out how the so-called "dynamic balance" is affected by doing different types of warm up exercises. In particular, the research is focused on the difference in the effect on dynamic Balance of warming up in water versus on the ground. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty healthy adults were the subjects of this study, with 10 people assigned each to two groups, one warming up in water and another warming up on the ground. The dynamic balance was measured for all subjects before the warming up. The group warming up on the ground conducted active stretching on the ground, and the group warming up in water conducted stretching in water by using water as resistance. [Results] The results indicate that warming up in water has a more powerful effect on a subject's dynamic balance than warming up on the ground. [Conclusion] The group warming up in water, who made use of the viscosity and flow of the water, showed better balance than the group warming up on the ground. Warming up in water, which entails an element of resistance, should be implemented in warm-up routines in the future.

  9. Evaluating options for balancing the water-electricity nexus in California: part 1--securing water availability.

    PubMed

    Tarroja, Brian; AghaKouchak, Amir; Sobhani, Reza; Feldman, David; Jiang, Sunny; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-11-01

    The technical potential and effectiveness of different water supply options for securing water availability in a large-scale, interconnected water supply system under historical and climate-change augmented inflow and demand conditions were compared. Part 1 of the study focused on determining the scale of the options required to secure water availability and compared the effectiveness of different options. A spatially and temporally resolved model of California's major surface reservoirs was developed, and its sensitivity to urban water conservation, desalination, and water reuse was examined. Potential capacities of the different options were determined. Under historical (baseline) hydrology conditions, many individual options were found to be capable of securing water availability alone. Under climate change augment conditions, a portfolio approach was necessary. The water savings from many individual options other than desalination were insufficient in the latter, however, relying on seawater desalination alone requires extreme capacity installations which have energy, brine disposal, management, and cost implications. The importance of identifying and utilizing points of leverage in the system for choosing where to deploy different options is also demonstrated.

  10. Water Reserves Program. An adaptation strategy to balance water in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Perez, M.; Barrios, E.; Salinas-Rodriguez, S.; Wickel, B.; Villon, R. A.

    2013-05-01

    Freshwater ecosystems occupy approximately 1% of the earth's surface yet possess about 12% of all known animal species. By virtue of their position in the landscape they connect terrestrial and coastal marine biomes and provide and sustain ecosystem services vital to the health and persistence of human communities. These services include the supply of water for food production, urban and ind ustrial consumption, among others. Over the past century many freshwater ecosystems around the world have been heavily modified or lost due to the alteration of flow regimes (e.g. due to damming, canalization, diversion, over-abstraction). The synergistic impacts of land use change, changes in flows, chemical deterioration, and climate change have left many systems and their species very little room to adjust to change, while future projections indicate a steady increase in water demand for food and energy production and water supply to suit the needs of a growing world population. In Mexico, the focus has been to secure water for human development and maximize economic growth, which has resulted in allocation of water beyond available amounts. As a consequence episodic water scarcity severely constrains freshwater ecosystems and the services they provide. Climatic change and variability are presenting serious challenges to a country that already is experiencing serious strain on its water resources. However, freshwater ecosystems are recognized by law as legitimate user of water, and mandate a flow allocation for the environment ("water reserve" or "environmental flows"). Based on this legal provision the Mexican government through the National Water Commission (Conagua), with support of the Alliance WWF - Fundación Gonzalo Río Arronte, and the Interamerican Development Bank, has launched a national program to identify and implement "water reserves": basins where environmental flows will be secured and allocated and where the flow regime is then protected before over

  11. New data on the bottom topography, recent sedimentation and water balance of Cerro Prieto dam, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yutsis, Vsevolod; Levchenko, Oleg; Lowag, Jens; Krivosheya, Konstantin; de León Gómez, Héctor; Kotsarenko, Anatolyi

    2010-05-01

    Cerro Prieto Dam, a small water reservoir in the NE Mexico, is characterized by very high velocity of recent sedimentation, high sub-bottom seepage and erosion, and as a result, nonlinear water balance. These phenomenons never were studied since construction of the dam in the beginning of 1980th. So the goal of our work was to investigate the bottom topography and also sub-bottom near surface structure using the parametric acoustical effect. High-resolution sub-bottom profiling, using the Innomar SES-2000 compact echosounder, was carried out in Cerro Prieto Dam during February-April of 2008. The survey was conducted onboard of a small motor boat. The SES transducer was mounted on the front side of the boat using light metal pipe, and all electronic equipment was installed on the deck. Accurate positioning of the boat was reached by GPS. Average speed was 8-10 km/h. Innomar's software tool ISE was provides near real-time post-processing of the collected SES data and operation procedure could be corrected on-line. Acoustic signal ensured vertical resolution of 10-15 cm at acceptable penetration up to 15 m. Bathymetry map was compiled assuming average sound velocity of 1450 m/s. The irregular bottom topography of Cerro Prieto dam was discovered. The present elevation of the water surface is about 181 m above see level, and the lake depth varies from 1-2 to 28 m. The SES records show a distinct bottom layer of recent sediments by 0.5 - 4 m thickness which follows reservoir floor topography. Very specific acoustic anomalies, which seem to be related with gas sediments, are observed. The integrated SES, gravity, magnetic and geoelectrical data interpretation allows assuming a series of the superficial fractures focused in a NW direction, perpendicular (NE-SW) to the general deep fault zone. Hydrological balance for the Cerro Prieto water reservoir has been analyzed for last two decades. There are three types of water level fluctuations on the Cerro Prieto dam: long

  12. Experimental and numerical investigations of soil water balance at the hinterland of the Badain Jaran Desert for groundwater recharge estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Lizhu; Wang, Xu-Sheng; Hu, Bill X.; Shang, Jie; Wan, Li

    2016-09-01

    Quantification of groundwater recharge from precipitation in the huge sand dunes is an issue in accounting for regional water balance in the Badain Jaran Desert (BJD) where about 100 lakes exist between dunes. In this study, field observations were conducted on a sand dune near a large saline lake in the BJD to investigate soil water movement through a thick vadose zone for groundwater estimation. The hydraulic properties of the soils at the site were determined using in situ experiments and laboratory measurements. A HYDRUS-1D model was built up for simulating the coupling processes of vertical water-vapor movement and heat transport in the desert soil. The model was well calibrated and validated using the site measurements of the soil water and temperature at various depths. Then, the model was applied to simulate the vertical flow across a 3-m-depth soil during a 53-year period under variable climate conditions. The simulated flow rate at the depth is an approximate estimation of groundwater recharge from the precipitation in the desert. It was found that the annual groundwater recharge would be 11-30 mm during 1983-2012, while the annual precipitation varied from 68 to 172 mm in the same period. The recharge rates are significantly higher than those estimated from the previous studies using chemical information. The modeling results highlight the role of the local precipitation as an essential source of groundwater in the BJD.

  13. Modifying a dynamic global vegetation model for simulating large spatial scale land surface water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, G.; Bartlein, P. J.

    2012-01-01

    Water balance models of simple structure are easier to grasp and more clearly connect cause and effect than models of complex structure. Such models are essential for studying large spatial scale land surface water balance in the context of climate and land cover change, both natural and anthropogenic. This study aims to (i) develop a large spatial scale water balance model by modifying a dynamic global vegetation model (DGVM), and (ii) test the model's performance in simulating actual evapotranspiration (ET), soil moisture and surface runoff for the coterminous United States (US). Toward these ends, we first introduced development of the "LPJ-Hydrology" (LH) model by incorporating satellite-based land covers into the Lund-Potsdam-Jena (LPJ) DGVM instead of dynamically simulating them. We then ran LH using historical (1982-2006) climate data and satellite-based land covers at 2.5 arc-min grid cells. The simulated ET, soil moisture and surface runoff were compared to existing sets of observed or simulated data for the US. The results indicated that LH captures well the variation of monthly actual ET (R2 = 0.61, p < 0.01) in the Everglades of Florida over the years 1996-2001. The modeled monthly soil moisture for Illinois of the US agrees well (R2 = 0.79, p < 0.01) with the observed over the years 1984-2001. The modeled monthly stream flow for most 12 major rivers in the US is consistent R2 > 0.46, p < 0.01; Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficients >0.52) with observed values over the years 1982-2006, respectively. The modeled spatial patterns of annual ET and surface runoff are in accordance with previously published data. Compared to its predecessor, LH simulates better monthly stream flow in winter and early spring by incorporating effects of solar radiation on snowmelt. Overall, this study proves the feasibility of incorporating satellite-based land-covers into a DGVM for simulating large spatial scale land surface water balance. LH developed in this study should be a useful

  14. Century-scale variability in global annual runoff examined using a water balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCabe, G.J.; Wolock, D.M.

    2011-01-01

    A monthly water balance model (WB model) is used with CRUTS2.1 monthly temperature and precipitation data to generate time series of monthly runoff for all land areas of the globe for the period 1905 through 2002. Even though annual precipitation accounts for most of the temporal and spatial variability in annual runoff, increases in temperature have had an increasingly negative effect on annual runoff after 1980. Although the effects of increasing temperature on runoff became more apparent after 1980, the relative magnitude of these effects are small compared to the effects of precipitation on global runoff. ?? 2010 Royal Meteorological Society.

  15. On the treatment of evapotranspiration, soil moisture accounting, and aquifer recharge in monthly water balance models.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, W.M.

    1984-01-01

    Several two- to six-parameter regional water balance models are examined by using 50-year records of monthly streamflow at 10 sites in New Jersey. These models include variants of the Thornthwaite-Mather model, the Palmer model, and the more recent Thomas abcd model. Prediction errors are relatively similar among the models. However, simulated values of state variables such as soil moisture storage differ substantially among the models, and fitted parameter values for different models sometimes indicated an entirely different type of basin response to precipitation.-from Author

  16. Investigating onychophoran gas exchange and water balance as a means to inform current controversies in arthropod physiology.

    PubMed

    Clusella-Trullas, Susana; Chown, Steven L

    2008-10-01

    Several controversies currently dominate the fields of arthropod metabolic rate, gas exchange and water balance, including the extent to which modulation of gas exchange reduces water loss, the origins of discontinuous gas exchange, the relationship between metabolic rate and life-history strategies, and the causes of Palaeozoic gigantism. In all of these areas, repeated calls have been made for the investigation of groups that might most inform the debates, especially of taxa in key phylogenetic positions. Here we respond to this call by investigating metabolic rate, respiratory water loss and critical oxygen partial pressure (Pc) in the onychophoran Peripatopsis capensis, a member of a group basal to the arthropods, and by synthesizing the available data on the Onychophora. The rate of carbon dioxide release (VCO2) at 20 degrees C in P. capensis is 0.043 ml CO2 h(-1), in keeping with other onychophoran species; suggesting that low metabolic rates in some arthropod groups are derived. Continuous gas exchange suggests that more complex gas exchange patterns are also derived. Total water loss in P. capensis is 57 mg H2O h(-1) at 20 degrees C, similar to modern estimates for another onychophoran species. High relative respiratory water loss rates ( approximately 34%; estimated using a regression technique) suggest that the basal condition in arthropods may be a high respiratory water loss rate. Relatively high Pc values (5-10% O2) suggest that substantial safety margins in insects are also a derived condition. Curling behaviour in P. capensis appears to be a strategy to lower energetic costs when resting, and the concomitant depression of water loss is a proximate consequence of this behaviour.

  17. Investigating onychophoran gas exchange and water balance as a means to inform current controversies in arthropod physiology.

    PubMed

    Clusella-Trullas, Susana; Chown, Steven L

    2008-10-01

    Several controversies currently dominate the fields of arthropod metabolic rate, gas exchange and water balance, including the extent to which modulation of gas exchange reduces water loss, the origins of discontinuous gas exchange, the relationship between metabolic rate and life-history strategies, and the causes of Palaeozoic gigantism. In all of these areas, repeated calls have been made for the investigation of groups that might most inform the debates, especially of taxa in key phylogenetic positions. Here we respond to this call by investigating metabolic rate, respiratory water loss and critical oxygen partial pressure (Pc) in the onychophoran Peripatopsis capensis, a member of a group basal to the arthropods, and by synthesizing the available data on the Onychophora. The rate of carbon dioxide release (VCO2) at 20 degrees C in P. capensis is 0.043 ml CO2 h(-1), in keeping with other onychophoran species; suggesting that low metabolic rates in some arthropod groups are derived. Continuous gas exchange suggests that more complex gas exchange patterns are also derived. Total water loss in P. capensis is 57 mg H2O h(-1) at 20 degrees C, similar to modern estimates for another onychophoran species. High relative respiratory water loss rates ( approximately 34%; estimated using a regression technique) suggest that the basal condition in arthropods may be a high respiratory water loss rate. Relatively high Pc values (5-10% O2) suggest that substantial safety margins in insects are also a derived condition. Curling behaviour in P. capensis appears to be a strategy to lower energetic costs when resting, and the concomitant depression of water loss is a proximate consequence of this behaviour. PMID:18805813

  18. Impact of soil vertical water movement on the energy balance of different land surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhiqiu; Chen, George Tai-Jen; Hu, Yanbing

    2007-08-01

    The soil heat flux determination method proposed by Gao (Boundary-Layer Meteorol 114:165-178, 2005) is discussed for (1) dry surfaces, (2) bare soil or sparse short-grass lands, and (3) dense-grass surfaces or forest. Our analysis shows that, when neglecting the contribution of soil vertical water movement to soil heat flux, the energy components measured independently will (1) still achieve balance over dry surfaces, and (2) be significantly in imbalance over bare soil or sparse short-grass lands. The mean of bare ground evaporation modeled by SiB2 is 1.58 x 10(-5) m(3) s(-1) m(-2), and the mean of soil water flux obtained by the method of Gao is 1.22 x 10(-5) m(3) s(-1) m(-2) for the Naqu site in the summer of 1998. Comparison of the bare ground evaporation with the mean of soil water flux shows a difference, the causes of which are investigated. Physically, the bare ground evaporation is equal to the sum of soil water flux and water content change in the soil surface layer. Because the bare ground evaporation is very limited for the dense-grass surfaces or forest, our analysis implies that the energy imbalance encountered over the dense-grass or forest is not caused by the fact that previous researchers neglected soil water movements in their energy budget analyses. PMID:17429698

  19. Climate change impact on the annual water balance in the northwest Florida coastal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alizad, K.; Wang, D.; Alimohammadi, N.; Hagen, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    As the largest tributary to the Apalachicola River, the Chipola River originates in southern Alabama, flows through Florida Panhandle and ended to Gulf of Mexico. The Chipola watershed is located in an intermediate climate environment with aridity index around one. Watershed provides habitat for a number of threatened and endangered animal and plant species. However, climate change affects hydrologic cycle of Chipola River watershed at various temporal and spatial scales. Studying the effects of climate variations is of great importance for water and environmental management purposes in this catchment. This research is mainly focuses on assessing climate change impact on the partitioning pattern of rainfall from mean annual to inter-annual and to seasonal scales. At the mean annual scale, rainfall is partitioned into runoff and evaporation assuming negligible water storage changes. Mean annual runoff is controlled by both mean annual precipitation and potential evaporation. Changes in long term mean runoff caused by variations of long term mean precipitation and potential evaporation will be evaluated based on Budyko hypothesis. At the annual scale, rainfall is partitioned into runoff, evaporation, and storage change. Inter-annual variability of runoff and evaporation are mainly affected by the changes of mean annual climate variables as well as their inter-annual variability. In order to model and evaluate each component of water balance at the annual scale, parsimonious but reliable models, are developed. Budyko hypothesis on the existing balance between available water and energy supply is reconsidered and redefined for the sub-annual time scale and reconstructed accordingly in order to accurately model seasonal hydrologic balance of the catchment. Models are built in the seasonal time frame with a focus on the role of storage change in water cycle. Then for Chipola catchment, models are parameterized based on a sufficient time span of historical data and the

  20. Water use efficiency and crop water balance of rainfed wheat in a semi-arid environment: sensitivity of future changes to projected climate changes and soil type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yanmin; Liu, De Li; Anwar, Muhuddin Rajin; O'Leary, Garry; Macadam, Ian; Yang, Yonghui

    2016-02-01

    Wheat production is expected to be affected by climate change through changing components of the crop water balance such as rainfall, evapotranspiration (ET), runoff and drainage. We used the Agricultural Production Systems Simulator (APSIM)-wheat model to simulate the potential impact of climate change on field water balance, ET and water use efficiency (WUE) under the SRES A2 emissions scenario. We ran APSIM with daily climate data statistically downscaled from 18 Global Circulation Models (GCMs). Twelve soil types of varying plant available water holding capacity (PAWC) at six sites across semi-arid southeastern Australia were considered. Biases in the GCM-simulated climate data were bias-corrected against observations for the 1961-1999 baseline period. However, biases in the APSIM output data relative to APSIM simulations forced with climate observations remained. A secondary bias correction was therefore performed on the APSIM outputs. Bias-corrected APSIM outputs for a future period (2021-2040) were compared with APSIM outputs generated using observations for the baseline period to obtain future changes. The results show that effective rainfall was decreased over all sites due to decreased growing season rainfall. ET was decreased through reduced soil evaporation and crop transpiration. There were no significant changes in runoff at any site. The variation in deep drainage between sites was much greater than for runoff, ranging from less than a few millimetres at the drier sites to over 100 mm at the wetter. However, in general, the averaged drainage over different soil types were not significantly different between the baseline (1961-1999) and future period of 2021-2040 ( P > 0.05). For the wetter sites, the variations in the future changes in drainage and runoff between the 18 GCMs were larger than those of the drier sites. At the dry sites, the variation in drainage decreased as PAWC increased. Overall, water use efficiency based on transpiration (WUE

  1. Analysis of plant available water in the context of climate change using Thornthwaite type monthly water balance model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herceg, Andras; Gribovszki, Zoltan; Kalicz, Peter

    2016-04-01

    The hydrological impact of climate change can be dramatic. The primary objective of this paper was to analyze plant available water in the context of climate change using Thornthwaite type monthly water balance calibrated by remote sensing based ET maps. The calibrated model was used for projection on the basis of 4 climate model datasets. The 3 periods of projection were: 2010-2040, 2040-2070, and 2070-2100. The benefit of this method is its robust build up, which can be applied if temperature and precipitation time series are accessible. The key parameter is the water storage capacity of the soil (SOILMAX), which can be calibrated using the actual available evapotranspiration data. If the soil's physical properties are available, the maximal rooting depth is also projectable. Plant available water was evaluated for future scenarios focusing water stress periods. For testing the model, a dataset of an agricultural parcel next to Mosonmagyaróvár and a dataset of a small forest covered catchment next to Sopron were successfully used. Each of the models projected slightly ascending evapotranspiration values (+7 percent), but strongly decreasing soil moisture values (-15 percent) for the 21st century. The soil moisture minimum values (generally appeared at the end of the summer) reduced more than 50 percent which indicate almost critical water stress for vegetation. This research has been supported by Agroclimate.2 VKSZ_12-1-2013-0034 project.

  2. Regional estimation of base recharge to ground water using water balance and a base-flow index.

    PubMed

    Szilagyi, Jozsef; Harvey, F Edwin; Ayers, Jerry F

    2003-01-01

    Naturally occurring long-term mean annual base recharge to ground water in Nebraska was estimated with the help of a water-balance approach and an objective automated technique for base-flow separation involving minimal parameter-optimization requirements. Base recharge is equal to total recharge minus the amount of evapotranspiration coming directly from ground water. The estimation of evapotranspiration in the water-balance equation avoids the need to specify a contributing drainage area for ground water, which in certain cases may be considerably different from the drainage area for surface runoff. Evapotranspiration was calculated by the WREVAP model at the Solar and Meteorological Surface Observation Network (SAMSON) sites. Long-term mean annual base recharge was derived by determining the product of estimated long-term mean annual runoff (the difference between precipitation and evapotranspiration) and the base-flow index (BFI). The BFI was calculated from discharge data obtained from the U.S. Geological Survey's gauging stations in Nebraska. Mapping was achieved by using geographic information systems (GIS) and geostatistics. This approach is best suited for regional-scale applications. It does not require complex hydrogeologic modeling nor detailed knowledge of soil characteristics, vegetation cover, or land-use practices. Long-term mean annual base recharge rates in excess of 110 mm/year resulted in the extreme eastern part of Nebraska. The western portion of the state expressed rates of only 15 to 20 mm annually, while the Sandhills region of north-central Nebraska was estimated to receive twice as much base recharge (40 to 50 mm/year) as areas south of it.

  3. Influence of the Aral Sea negative water balance on its seasonal circulation and ventilation patterns: use of a 3d hydrodynamic model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirjacobs, D.; Grégoire, M.; Delhez, E.; Nihoul, J.

    2003-04-01

    Within the context of the EU INCO-COPERNICUS program "Desertification in the Aral Sea Region: A study of the Natural and Anthropogenic Impacts" (Contract IAC2-CT-2000-10023), a large-scale 3D hydrodynamic model was adapted to address specifically the macroscale processes affecting the Aral Sea water circulation and ventilation. The particular goal of this research is to simulate the effect of lasting negative water balance on the 3D seasonal circulation, temperature, salinity and water-mixing fields of the Aral Sea. The original Aral Sea seasonal hydrodynamism is simulated with the average seasonal forcings corresponding to the period from 1956 to 1960. This first investigation concerns a period of relative stability of the water balance, before the beginning of the drying process. The consequences of the drying process on the hydrodynamic of the Sea will be studied by comparing this first results with the simulation representing the average situation for the years 1981 to 1985, a very low river flow period. For both simulation periods, the forcing considered are the seasonal fluctuations of wind fields, precipitation, evaporation, river discharge and salinity, cloud cover, air temperature and humidity. The meteorological forcings were adapted to the common optimum one-month temporal resolution of the available data sets. Monthly mean kinetic energy flux and surface tensions were calculated from daily ECMWF wind data. Monthly in situ precipitation, surface air temperature and humidity fields were interpolated from data obtained from the Russian Hydrological and Meteorological Institute. Monthly water discharge and average salinity of the river water were considered for both Amu Darya and Syr Darya river over each simulation periods. The water mass conservation routines allowed the simulation of a changing coastline by taking into account local drying and flooding events of particular grid points. Preliminary barotropic runs were realised (for the 1951

  4. Water-Balance Model of a Wetland on the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vining, Kevin C.

    2007-01-01

    A numerical water-balance model was developed to simulate the responses of a wetland on the Fort Berthold Reservation, North Dakota, to historical and possible extreme hydrological inputs and to changes in hydrological inputs that might occur if a proposed refinery is built on the reservation. Results from model simulations indicated that the study wetland would likely contain water during most historical and extreme-precipitation events with the addition of maximum potential discharges of 0.6 acre-foot per day from proposed refinery holding ponds. Extended periods with little precipitation and above-normal temperatures may result in the wetland becoming nearly dry, especially if potential holding-pond discharges are near zero. Daily simulations based on the historical-enhanced climate data set for May and June 2005, which included holding-pond discharges of 0.6 acre-foot per day, indicated that the study-wetland maximum simulated water volume was about 16.2 acre-feet and the maximum simulated water level was about 1.2 feet at the outlet culvert. Daily simulations based on the extreme summer data set, created to represent an extreme event with excessive June precipitation and holding-pond discharges of 0.6 acre-foot per day, indicated that the study-wetland maximum simulated water volume was about 38.6 acre-feet and the maximum simulated water level was about 2.6 feet at the outlet culvert. A simulation performed using the extreme winter climate data set and an outlet culvert blocked with snow and ice resulted in the greatest simulated wetland water volume of about 132 acre-feet and the greatest simulated water level, which would have been about 6.2 feet at the outlet culvert, but water was not likely to overflow an adjacent highway.

  5. Evapotranspiration and water balance of an anthropogenic coastal desert wetland: responses to fire, inflows and salinities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glenn, Edward P.; Mexicano, Lourdes; Garcia-Hernandez, Jaqueline; Nagler, Pamela L.; Gomez-Sapiens, Martha M.; Tang, Dawei; Lomeli, Marcelo A.; Ramírez-Hernández, Jorge; Zamora-Arroyo, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) and other water balance components were estimated for Cienega de Santa Clara, an anthropogenic brackish wetland in the delta of the Colorado River in Mexico. The marsh is in the Biosphere Reserve of the Upper Gulf of California and Delta of the Colorado River, and supports a high abundance and diversity of wildlife. Over 95% of its water supply originates as agricultural drain water from the USA, sent for disposal in Mexico. This study was conducted from 2009 to 2011, before, during and after a trial run of the Yuma Desalting Plant in the USA, which will divert water from the wetland and replace it with brine from the desalting operation. The goal was to estimate the main components in the water budget to be used in creating management scenarios for this marsh. We used a remote sensing algorithm to estimate ET from meteorological data and Enhanced Vegetation Index values from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensors on the Terra satellite. ET estimates from the MODIS method were then compared to results from a mass balance of water and salt inflows and outflows over the study period. By both methods, mean annual ET estimates ranged from 2.6 to 3.0 mm d−1, or 50 to 60% of reference ET (ETo). Water entered at a mean salinity of 2.6 g L−1 TDS and mean salinity in the wetland was 3.73 g L−1 TDS over the 33 month study period. Over an annual cycle, 54% of inflows supported ET while the rest exited the marsh as outflows; however, in winter when ET was low, up to 90% of the inflows exited the marsh. An analysis of ET estimates over the years 2000–2011 showed that annual ET was proportional to the volume of inflows, but was also markedly stimulated by fires. Spring fires in 2006 and 2011 burned off accumulated thatch, resulting in vigorous growth of new leaves and a 30% increase in peak summer ET compared to non-fire years. Following fires, peak summer ET estimates were equal to ETo, while in non-fire years peak ET was

  6. Healthy Water Healthy People Field Monitoring Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Project WET Foundation, 2003

    2003-01-01

    This 100-page manual serves as a technical reference for the "Healthy Water, Healthy People Water Quality Educators Guide" and the "Healthy Water Healthy People Testing Kits". Yielding in-depth information about ten water quality parameters, it answers questions about water quality testing using technical overviews, data interpretation guidelines,…

  7. Soil nitrogen balance under wastewater management: Field measurements and simulation results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sophocleous, M.; Townsend, M.A.; Vocasek, F.; Ma, L.; KC, A.

    2009-01-01

    The use of treated wastewater for irrigation of crops could result in high nitrate-nitrogen (NO3-N) concentrations in the vadose zone and ground water. The goal of this 2-yr field-monitoring study in the deep silty clay loam soils south of Dodge City, Kansas, was to assess how and under what circumstances N from the secondary-treated, wastewater-irrigated corn reached the deep (20-45 m) water table of the underlying High Plains aquifer and what could be done to minimize this problem. We collected 15.2-m-deep soil cores for characterization of physical and chemical properties; installed neutron probe access tubes to measure soil-water content and suction lysimeters to sample soil water periodically; sampled monitoring, irrigation, and domestic wells in the area; and obtained climatic, crop, irrigation, and N application rate records for two wastewater-irrigated study sites. These data and additional information were used to run the Root Zone Water Quality Model to identify key parameters and processes that influence N losses in the study area. We demonstrated that NO3-N transport processes result in significant accumulations of N in the vadose zone and that NO3-N in the underlying ground water is increasing with time. Root Zone Water Quality Model simulations for two wastewater-irrigated study sites indicated that reducing levels of corn N fertilization by more than half to 170 kg ha-1 substantially increases N-use efficiency and achieves near-maximum crop yield. Combining such measures with a crop rotation that includes alfalfa should further reduce the accumulation and downward movement of NO3-N in the soil profile. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

  8. Identifying streamgage networks for maximizing the effectiveness of regional water balance modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, L. M.; Hunter, T. S.; Phanikumar, M. S.; Fortin, V.; Gronewold, A. D.

    2013-05-01

    One approach to regional water balance modeling is to constrain rainfall-runoff models with a synthetic regionalized hydrologic response. For example, the Large Basin Runoff Model (LBRM), a cornerstone of hydrologic forecasting in the Laurentian Great Lakes basin, was calibrated to a synthetic discharge record resulting from a drainage area ratio method (ARM) for extrapolating beyond gaged areas. A challenge of such approaches is the declining availability of observations for development of synthetic records. To advance efficient use of the declining gage network in the context of regional water balance modeling, we present results from an assessment of ARM. All possible combinations of "most-downstream" gages were used to simulate runoff at the gaged outlet of Michigan's Clinton River watershed in order to determine the influence of gages' drainage area and other physical characteristics on model skill. For nearly all gage combinations, ARM simulations resulted in good model skill. However, the gages' catchment area relative to that of the outlet's catchment is not an unquestionable predictor of model performance. Results indicate that combinations representing less than 30% of the total catchment area (less than 10% in some cases) can provide very good discharge simulations, but that similarity of the gaged catchments' developed and cultivated area, stream density, and permeability relative to the outlet's catchment is also important for successful simulations. Recognition of thresholds on the relationship between the number of gages and their relative value in simulating flow over large area provides an opportunity for improving historical records for regional hydrologic modeling.

  9. Magnetic hydrophilic-lipophilic balance sorbent for efficient extraction of chemical warfare agents from water samples.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varoon; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Goud D, Raghavender; Tak, Vijay; Pardasani, Deepak; Shrivastava, Anchal Roy; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2016-02-19

    Magnetic hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (MHLB) hybrid resin was prepared by precipitation polymerization using N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and divinylbenzene (DVB) as monomers and Fe2O3 nanoparticles as magnetic material. These resins were successfully applied for the extraction of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and their markers from water samples through magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction (MDSPE). By varying the ratios of monomers, resin with desired hydrophilic-lipophilic balance was prepared for the extraction of CWAs and related esters of varying polarities. Amongst different composites Fe2O3 nanoparticles coated with 10% PVP+90% DVB exhibited the best recoveries varying between 70.32 and 97.67%. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiencies, such as extraction time, desorption time, nature and volume of desorption solvent, amount of extraction sorbent and the effect of salts on extraction were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, linearity was obtained in the range of 0.5-500 ng mL(-1) with correlation ranging from 0.9911-0.9980. Limits of detection and limits of quantification were 0.5-1.0 and 3.0-5.0 ng mL(-1) respectively with RSDs varying from 4.88-11.32% for markers of CWAs. Finally, the developed MDSPE method was employed for extraction of analytes from water samples of various sources and the OPCW proficiency test samples.

  10. Magnetic hydrophilic-lipophilic balance sorbent for efficient extraction of chemical warfare agents from water samples.

    PubMed

    Singh, Varoon; Purohit, Ajay Kumar; Chinthakindi, Sridhar; Goud D, Raghavender; Tak, Vijay; Pardasani, Deepak; Shrivastava, Anchal Roy; Dubey, Devendra Kumar

    2016-02-19

    Magnetic hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (MHLB) hybrid resin was prepared by precipitation polymerization using N-vinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and divinylbenzene (DVB) as monomers and Fe2O3 nanoparticles as magnetic material. These resins were successfully applied for the extraction of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and their markers from water samples through magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction (MDSPE). By varying the ratios of monomers, resin with desired hydrophilic-lipophilic balance was prepared for the extraction of CWAs and related esters of varying polarities. Amongst different composites Fe2O3 nanoparticles coated with 10% PVP+90% DVB exhibited the best recoveries varying between 70.32 and 97.67%. Parameters affecting the extraction efficiencies, such as extraction time, desorption time, nature and volume of desorption solvent, amount of extraction sorbent and the effect of salts on extraction were investigated. Under the optimized conditions, linearity was obtained in the range of 0.5-500 ng mL(-1) with correlation ranging from 0.9911-0.9980. Limits of detection and limits of quantification were 0.5-1.0 and 3.0-5.0 ng mL(-1) respectively with RSDs varying from 4.88-11.32% for markers of CWAs. Finally, the developed MDSPE method was employed for extraction of analytes from water samples of various sources and the OPCW proficiency test samples. PMID:26814366

  11. Wind speed effects on leaf energy balance, transpiration and water use efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schymanski, S. J.; Or, D.

    2014-12-01

    Transpiration and heat exchange rates by plant leaves involve coupled physiological processes of significant ecohydrological importance. Prediction of the effects of changing environmental conditions such as irradiance, temperature, humidity and wind speed requires a thorough understanding of these processes. The common assumption that leaf temperature equals air temperature may introduce significant bias into estimates of transpiration rates and water use efficiency (WUE, the amount of carbon gained by photosynthesis per unit of water lost by transpiration). Theoretical considerations and observations suggest that leaf temperatures may deviate substantially from air temperature under typical environmental conditions, leading to greatly modified transpiration rates compared to isothermal conditions. In particular, effects of wind on gas exchange must consider feedbacks with leaf temperature. Systematic quantification of the effects of wind speed on leaf heat and gas exchange rates yield some surprising insights. We found a range of conditions where increased wind speed can suppress transpiration rates. The result reflects unintuitive feedbacks between sensible heat flux, leaf temperature, leaf-to-air vapour pressure deficit and latent heat flux. Modelling results suggest that with high wind speeds the same leaf conductance (for water vapour and carbon dioxide) can be maintained with less evaporative losses. This leads to positive relation between water use efficiency and wind speed across a wide range of conditions. The presentation will report results from a lab experiment allowing separation of the different leaf energy balance components under fully controlled conditions (wind speed, temperature, humidity, irradiance) and put them into perspective with a detailed leaf energy balance model and the commonly used Penman-Monteith equation.

  12. Continental freshwater discharge estimates from satellite observations and terrestrial water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munier, S.; Cazenave, A. A.; Maisongrande, P.

    2011-12-01

    Freshwater discharge is a key component of the global water cycle. During the last few decades, remotely sensed hydro-climatic data has given the opportunity to overcome the numerous technical, political and economical challenges raised by ground-based observation networks. In the present study, we used satellite observations combined with atmospheric reanalysis in a coupled ocean-land-atmosphere water mass balance to estimate freshwater discharge over the last few years at basin, continental and global scales. Variations in terrestrial water storage (TWS) are provided by the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) mission, whereas precipitation minus evapotranspiration (P-E) is computed from atmospheric reanalyses (NCEP-NCAR and ECMWF datasets). In order to assess the accuracy of freshwater discharge estimates, uncertainties in each terms of the water balance are explored. GRACE-derived TWS is compared to outputs of Land Surface Models (GLDAS, WGHM and ISBA), keeping in mind that LSMs generally do not account for human-induced effects on the hydrological cycle. Independently, reanalysis-based P-E is compared to remotely sensed and/or in situ observations of precipitation (GPCC, GPCP, CMAP), evaporation over oceans (OAFlux, HOAPS) and modeled evapotranspiration over land (Penman-Monteith and Priestley-Taylor). Finally, freshwater discharge estimates are compared to in situ discharge observations from GRDC and to estimates from previous global studies. Discrepancies between the different datasets, in terms of annual mean as well as seasonal and inter-annual variability, allowed us to draw uncertainty maps, then highlighting regions where freshwater discharge estimates are the most uncertain. Such results may help to focus future developments on hydrological modeling for further improvement in freshwater discharge estimates.

  13. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-05-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of a forest stand in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The approach tested for calculating the water consumption by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time-series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results show that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  14. Comparative analysis of the actual evapotranspiration of Flemish forest and cropland, using the soil water balance model WAVE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verstraeten, W. W.; Muys, B.; Feyen, J.; Veroustraete, F.; Minnaert, M.; Meiresonne, L.; de Schrijver, A.

    2005-09-01

    This paper focuses on the quantification of the green - vegetation related - water flux of forest stands in the temperate lowland of Flanders. The underlying reason of the research was to develop a methodology for assessing the impact of forests on the hydrologic cycle in comparison to agriculture. The tested approach for calculating the water use by forests was based on the application of the soil water balance model WAVE. The study involved the collection of data from 14 forest stands, the calibration and validation of the WAVE model, and the comparison of the water use (WU) components - transpiration, soil and interception evaporation - between forest and cropland. For model calibration purposes simulated and measured time series of soil water content at different soil depths, period March 2000-August 2001, were compared. A multiple-site validation was conducted as well. Actual tree transpiration calculated with sap flow measurements in three forest stands gave similar results for two of the three stands of pine (Pinus sylvestris L.), but WAVE overestimated the actual measured transpiration for a stand of poplar (Populus sp.). A useful approach to compare the WU components of forest versus cropland is scenario analysis based on the validated WAVE model. The statistical Profile Analysis method was implemented to explore and analyse the simulated WU time series. With an average annual rainfall of 819 mm, the results reveal that forests in Flanders consume more water than agricultural crops. A 30 years average of 491 mm for 10 forests stands versus 398 mm for 10 cropped agricultural fields was derived. The WU components, on yearly basis, also differ between the two land use types (transpiration: 315 mm for forest and 261 mm for agricultural land use; soil evaporation: 47 mm and 131 mm, for forest and cropland, respectively). Forest canopy interception evaporation was estimated at 126 mm, while it was negligible for cropland.

  15. Aedes aegypti Global Suitability Maps Using a Water Container Energy Balance Model for Dengue Risk Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhoff, D.

    2015-12-01

    Dengue infections are estimated to total nearly 400 million per year worldwide, with both the geographic range and the magnitude of infections having increased in the past 50 years. The primary dengue vector mosquito Aedes aegypti is closely associated with humans. It lives exclusively in urban and semi-urban areas, preferentially bites humans, and spends its developmental stages in artificial water containers. Climate regulates the development of Ae. aegypti immature mosquitoes in artificial containers. Potential containers for Ae. aegypti immature development include, but are not limited to, small sundry items (e.g., bottles, cans, plastic containers), buckets, tires, barrels, tanks, and cisterns. Successful development of immature mosquitoes from eggs to larvae, pupae, and eventually adults is largely dependent on the availability of water and the thermal properties of the water in the containers. Recent work has shown that physics-based approaches toward modeling container water properties are promising for resolving the complexities of container water dynamics and the effects on immature mosquito development. An energy balance container model developed by the author, termed the Water Height And Temperature in Container Habitats Energy Model (WHATCH'EM), solves for water temperature and height for user-specified containers with readily available weather data. Here we use WHATCH'EM with NASA Earth Science products used as input to construct global suitability maps based on established water temperature ranges for immature Ae. aegypti mosquitoes. A proxy for dengue risk is provided from habitat suitability, but also population estimates, as Ae. aegypti is closely associated with human activity. NASA gridded Global Population of the World data is used to mask out rural areas with low dengue risk. Suitability maps are illustrated for a variety of containers (size, material, color) and shading scenarios.

  16. A Scalable Water Balance Model Within the Russian River, California, Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, J. R.

    2007-12-01

    The availability of long term hydrologic data sets provides opportunities for quantifying hydrologic variability and examining evidence for changing conditions following land surface alterations and climate change. The Russian River basin in California is typical of many watersheds on the fringe of expanding metropolitan regions with competing demands for water from municipal, agricultural, recreational, and environmental constituencies. The Russian River basin is convenient for analysis because there is limited water imported and exported. One of the major challenges faced by water resources engineers within this basin is to understand the conditions necessary for the restoration of salmon and steelhead trout that have life cycles dependent upon migrations between the upper reaches of the watershed and the Pacific Ocean. The amount, timing and duration of surface water flows are frequently cited as some of the key factors controlling fishery health and recovery. The Russian River basin has numerous long-term data sets on flow, precipitation and water quality measures that have been gathered into a data cube for analysis and synthesis. Results to date have focused on comparing annual water balances for sub-watersheds that span over an order of magnitude in area. The data reveal a simple scalable relationship that annual runoff depth equals annual precipitation minus approximately 450 mm of water. This 450 mm of annual water demand represents a basin-wide integration of soil and groundwater dynamics and transpiration by vegetation. There is little evidence of human alteration of this relationship over a 60 year record. This scalable relationship is used to investigate how runoff from the basin would respond to changes in annual precipitation.

  17. Glacier modeling in support of field observations of mass balance at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Josberger, Edward G.; Bidlake, William R.

    2010-01-01

    The long-term USGS measurement and reporting of mass balance at South Cascade Glacier was assisted in balance years 2006 and 2007 by a new mass balance model. The model incorporates a temperature-index melt computation and accumulation is modeled from glacier air temperature and gaged precipitation at a remote site. Mass balance modeling was used with glaciological measurements to estimate dates and magnitudes of critical mass balance phenomena. In support of the modeling, a detailed analysis was made of the "glacier cooling effect" that reduces summer air temperature near the ice surface as compared to that predicted on the basis of a spatially uniform temperature lapse rate. The analysis was based on several years of data from measurements of near-surface air temperature on the glacier. The 2006 and 2007 winter balances of South Cascade Glacier, computed with this new, model-augmented methodology, were 2.61 and 3.41 mWE, respectively. The 2006 and 2007 summer balances were -4.20 and -3.63 mWE, respectively, and the 2006 and 2007 net balances were -1.59 and -0.22 mWE. PDF version of a presentation on the mass balance of South Cascade Glacier in Washington state. Presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting 2010.

  18. Animal water balance drives top-down effects in a riparian forest-implications for terrestrial trophic cascades.

    PubMed

    McCluney, Kevin E; Sabo, John L

    2016-08-17

    Despite the clear importance of water balance to the evolution of terrestrial life, much remains unknown about the effects of animal water balance on food webs. Based on recent research suggesting animal water imbalance can increase trophic interaction strengths in cages, we hypothesized that water availability could drive top-down effects in open environments, influencing the occurrence of trophic cascades. We manipulated large spider abundance and water availability in 20 × 20 m open-air plots in a streamside forest in Arizona, USA, and measured changes in cricket and small spider abundance and leaf damage. As expected, large spiders reduced both cricket abundance and herbivory under ambient, dry conditions, but not where free water was added. When water was added (free or within moist leaves), cricket abundance was unaffected by large spiders, but spiders still altered herbivory, suggesting behavioural effects. Moreover, we found threshold-type increases in herbivory at moderately low soil moisture (between 5.5% and 7% by volume), suggesting the possibility that water balance may commonly influence top-down effects. Overall, our results point towards animal water balance as an important driver of direct and indirect species interactions and food web dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems. PMID:27534953

  19. Animal water balance drives top-down effects in a riparian forest-implications for terrestrial trophic cascades.

    PubMed

    McCluney, Kevin E; Sabo, John L

    2016-08-17

    Despite the clear importance of water balance to the evolution of terrestrial life, much remains unknown about the effects of animal water balance on food webs. Based on recent research suggesting animal water imbalance can increase trophic interaction strengths in cages, we hypothesized that water availability could drive top-down effects in open environments, influencing the occurrence of trophic cascades. We manipulated large spider abundance and water availability in 20 × 20 m open-air plots in a streamside forest in Arizona, USA, and measured changes in cricket and small spider abundance and leaf damage. As expected, large spiders reduced both cricket abundance and herbivory under ambient, dry conditions, but not where free water was added. When water was added (free or within moist leaves), cricket abundance was unaffected by large spiders, but spiders still altered herbivory, suggesting behavioural effects. Moreover, we found threshold-type increases in herbivory at moderately low soil moisture (between 5.5% and 7% by volume), suggesting the possibility that water balance may commonly influence top-down effects. Overall, our results point towards animal water balance as an important driver of direct and indirect species interactions and food web dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems.

  20. Water balance and nitrate leaching losses under intensive crop production with Ochric Aquic Cambosols in North China Plain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Anning; Zhang, Jiabao; Zhao, Bingzi; Cheng, Zhuhua; Li, Liping

    2005-08-01

    A 2-year field experiment was conducted in an Ochric Aquic Cambosols on a 1-ha field with rotation of winter wheat-summer corn located in Fengqiu County in North China Plain from 1 October 1998 to 30 September 2000 to quantify water balance and evaluate soil water loss by deep drainage and nitrate loss by leaching out of the root zone under the current agricultural practices. Considerable deep drainage was found especially in 1999-2000, during which period up to 273.9 mm of water, accounting for 60.6% of total amount of irrigation and 24.7% of total surface input (rainfall+irrigation), was lost by deep drainage. Even in both wheat cropping seasons when total amount of surface input was less than total actual evapotranspiration, 84.0 and 121.3 mm water was lost by drainage in 1999 and 2000, respectively. Soil NO3(-)-N was transported to deeper soil layers during the growing seasons and considerable amount of NO3(-)-N accumulated at 170 cm soil layer (the bottom of root zone) during the September-October period (the harvest time of summer corn) every year. About 28.6 kg N ha-1 was lost by leaching out of the root zone in 1998-1999 and 81.8 kg N ha-1 in 1999-2000, accounting for 5.9% and 15.7% of total nitrogen (N) inputs, respectively. The significant deep drainage and nitrate leaching loss were attributed to excessive and inappropriate irrigation and nitrogen (N) fertilization, which may result in severe groundwater pollution if current agricultural managements are not changed.

  1. Magnetic Field Structure of Pressure Balanced Structures from Ulysses High Latitudes Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamauchi, Y.; Suess, S. T.; Sakurai, T.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Ulysses observations showed that pressure balance structures (PBSs) are a common feature in the high-latitude solar winds near the solar minimum. On the other hand, coronal plumes are common in polar coronal holes near the solar minimum. It is therefore considered that the PBSs would be remnants of plumes. Several detailed studies of the PBSs have been made from Ulysses/SWOOPS observations, but study of their magnetic structures has not yet been done. The study of the magnetic structure is important because previous observations and theoretical models of plumes indicate that they are related to the network activity such as magnetic reconnection on the photosphere. We have investigated the magnetic structures of the PBSs with Ulysses magnetometer and SWOOPS data. We have found that magnetic reversals in radial magnetic field take place while the spacecraft passes through most of the PBSs These magnetic reversals have been interpreted as large amplitude Alfv/'enic fluctuations but our results suggest that Ulysses is also traversing current sheets of plasmoids associated with network activity at the base of plumes.

  2. An Approach to Modeling the Water Balance Sensitivity to Landscape Vegetation Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, I. N.; Tarboton, D. G.

    2008-12-01

    Watershed development and management require an understanding of how hydrological processes affect water balance components. The study of water resources management, especially in Western United States, is currently motivated by climate change, the impact of vegetation cover change on water production, and the need to manage water supplies. Vegetation management and its relation to runoff has been well documented, as reduction of forest cover, reducing evapotranspiration, increases water yield and in contrast the establishment of forest cover on sparsely vegetated land, increasing evapotranspiration, deceases water yield. This paper presents a water balance model developed to quantify the sensitivity of runoff production to changes in vegetation based on differences in evapotranspiration from different land cover types. The model is intended to provide a simple framework for estimating long term yield changes due to managed vegetation change. The model assumes that relative potential evapotranspiration from specific land cover can be quantified by a set of potential evapotranspiration coefficients for each land cover type. The model uses the Budyko curve to partition precipitation into evapotranspiration and runoff over the long term. Potential evapotranspiration is estimated from the Budyko curve for present conditions, then adjusted for land cover changes using the relative potential evapotranspiration coefficients for each land cover type. The adjusted potential evapotranspiration is then partitioned using the Budyko curve to provide estimates of long term runoff and evapotranspiration for the changed conditions. We found that the changes in runoff were in general close to being linearly proportional to the changes in land cover. In Utah study watersheds, reducing 50% of the present coniferous forests resulted in runoff increase that ranged from 0.5 to 38 mm/year, while the transition of 50% of area present as range/shrub/other to forest resulted in runoff

  3. Actual evapotranspiration (water use) assessment of the Colorado River Basin at the Landsat resolution using the operational simplified surface energy balance model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singh, Ramesh K.; Senay, Gabriel B.; Velpuri, Naga Manohar; Bohms, Stefanie; Russell L, Scott; Verdin, James P.

    2014-01-01

    Accurately estimating consumptive water use in the Colorado River Basin (CRB) is important for assessing and managing limited water resources in the basin. Increasing water demand from various sectors may threaten long-term sustainability of the water supply in the arid southwestern United States. We have developed a first-ever basin-wide actual evapotranspiration (ETa) map of the CRB at the Landsat scale for water use assessment at the field level. We used the operational Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEBop) model for estimating ETa using 328 cloud-free Landsat images acquired during 2010. Our results show that cropland had the highest ETa among all land cover classes except for water. Validation using eddy covariance measured ETa showed that the SSEBop model nicely captured the variability in annual ETa with an overall R2 of 0.78 and a mean bias error of about 10%. Comparison with water balance-based ETa showed good agreement (R2 = 0.85) at the sub-basin level. Though there was good correlation (R2 = 0.79) between Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-based ETa (1 km spatial resolution) and Landsat-based ETa (30 m spatial resolution), the spatial distribution of MODIS-based ETa was not suitable for water use assessment at the field level. In contrast, Landsat-based ETa has good potential to be used at the field level for water management. With further validation using multiple years and sites, our methodology can be applied for regular production of ETa maps of larger areas such as the conterminous United States.

  4. Hydroclimatic regimes: a distributed water-balance framework for hydrologic assessment, classification, and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiskel, P. K.; Wolock, D. M.; Zarriello, P. J.; Vogel, R. M.; Levin, S. B.; Lent, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Runoff-based indicators of terrestrial water availability are appropriate for humid regions, but have tended to limit our basic hydrologic understanding of drylands - the dry-subhumid, semiarid, and arid regions which presently cover nearly half of the global land surface. In response, we introduce an indicator framework that gives equal weight to humid and dryland regions, accounting fully for both vertical (precipitation + evapotranspiration) and horizontal (groundwater + surface-water) components of the hydrologic cycle in any given location - as well as fluxes into and out of landscape storage. We apply the framework to a diverse hydroclimatic region (the conterminous USA) using a distributed water-balance model consisting of 53 400 networked landscape hydrologic units. Our model simulations indicate that about 21% of the conterminous USA either generated no runoff or consumed runoff from upgradient sources on a mean-annual basis during the 20th century. Vertical fluxes exceeded horizontal fluxes across 76% of the conterminous area. Long-term-average total water availability (TWA) during the 20th century, defined here as the total influx to a landscape hydrologic unit from precipitation, groundwater, and surface water, varied spatially by about 400 000-fold, a range of variation ~100 times larger than that for mean-annual runoff across the same area. The framework includes but is not limited to classical, runoff-based approaches to water-resource assessment. It also incorporates and reinterprets the green- and blue-water perspective now gaining international acceptance. Implications of the new framework for several areas of contemporary hydrology are explored, and the data requirements of the approach are discussed in relation to the increasing availability of gridded global climate, land-surface, and hydrologic data sets.

  5. Extraterrestrial Virtual Field Experience: Water at Meridiani

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggan-Haas, D.; Million, C.; Sullivan, R. J., Jr.; Hayes, A. G., Jr.; Ross, R. M.; St Clair, M.

    2014-12-01

    The Spacecraft Planetary Imaging Facility (SPIF) at Cornell University, in collaboration with Million Concepts and the Paleontological Research Institute (PRI), has developed the Extraterrestrial Virtual Field Experience (EVFE), a web-based, game-like and inquiry-driven classroom activity targeted to middle school through undergraduate introductory Earth science classrooms. Students play the role of mission scientists for a NASA rover mission, tasked with targeting the rover's scientific instruments to investigate a specific scientific question about the landing site. As with the real mission, the student operators must optimize the efficient use of limited resources and time against the need to make observations to address working hypotheses. The activity uses only real--not artificial or simulated--mission data, and students are guided throughout by a "Mission Manager" who provides hints and advice about the scientific meaning of observations within the broader context of the mission objectives. The MER Opportunity EVFE is a pilot effort, the first of five EVFE modules planned a rate of one per year that will feature different NASA missions and scientific topics. The MER Opportunity EVFE has already been developed and focuses on the investigation of the history of water on Mars at the Meridiani landing site of the Opportunity rover. The module includes a teacher guide and is currently available to educators through the SPIF website.

  6. A eco-hydrological model of malaria incidence depending on soil water balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montosi, E.; Manzoni, S.; Montanari, A.; Porporato, A.

    2009-04-01

    The occurrence of malaria cases is particularly difficult to model and predict because malaria depends on both climatic and non-climatic factors. We propose a original model to simulate the dependence of malaria occurrence on meteorological variables, which have an effect on mosquitoes' habitat, mosquitoes' life cycle and malaria agents. It is well known that temperature, rainfall, wind and vegetation density are capable of explaining part of malaria incidence. However, previous studies did not explore the dependence of malaria on soil water content. The model herein proposed establishes a direct link between malaria variability and the dynamics of the regional water balance. Regional and monthly-aggregated malaria data for three areas of South Africa are analysed and modelled depending on soil moisture which is in turn expressed as a function of rainfall and temperature. We set up a ordinary differential equation model at monthly time scale, using a simplified equation for the soil water content and a dynamic equation for malaria variability. After introducing mild hypothesis, we obtain a parsimonious formulation in term of number of fitting parameters. The results show that soil moisture and surface water storage are key elements to explain malaria dynamics. In fact, the seasonal behaviour of malaria incidence is well reproduced in all regions.

  7. Acoustic spreading of thin films of water: balancing capillary, viscous, and vibrational mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manor, Ofer; Altshuler, Gennady; Small Scale Trasport laboratory Team

    2014-11-01

    Substrate vibrations at frequencies comparable to HF radio frequencies and in contact with liquid generate flow at submicron length scales that may result in spreading of liquid films. This spreading mechanism is thought as a way of manipulating liquids on microfluidic platforms. In previous studies we used silicon oil as a model liquid; silicon oil spread easily and smoothly as long as the oil and substrate vibrations are in contact. Water films under similar conditions, however, were observed to spread to a minute extent and only under high power levels that further render intense capillary instabilities. In this presentation we use theory and experimental evidence to discuss the physical mechanisms associated with acoustic spreading of water films. We highlight mechanisms associated with acoustic spreading of arbitrary liquids, and we show the various influences of these mechanisms on liquid spreading is encapsulated within one dimensionless number whose value determines whether spreading is to take place. We further elucidate the discrepancy, observed in earlier literature, between the response of oil and water to acoustic excitation and highlight an intermediate parametric region, where precise manipulation of water spreading is achieved by carefully balancing the governing mechanisms.

  8. Well-balanced shallow water flow simulation on quadtree cut cell grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Hyunuk; Yu, Soonyoung

    2012-04-01

    A well-balanced shallow water flow model on quadtree cut cell grids is presented. The Cartesian cut cell method is applied due to its flexibility in treating curvilinear boundaries. In order to preserve a lake-at-rest and the positivity of water depths in drying/wetting zones, the hydrostatic reconstruction proposed by Audusse et al. [1] is implemented on cut cell grids. In addition, the gradient construction method on cut cells proposed by Causon et al. [8] is modified due to the spurious calculation when a solid boundary is nearly parallel to grids. The numerical schemes mentioned above are employed in Gerris which is open source free software and provides a shallow water solver on adaptive quadtree grids. The applied numerical schemes are validated using four test simulations: still water in an inclined domain; oscillation in a parabolic container; shock reflection by a circular cylinder; flash flood experiment in a model city. The simulation results are compared with analytical solutions, experiment data and the results simulated by other researchers.

  9. Modelling field scale water partitioning using on-site observations in sub-Saharan rainfed agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makurira, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2009-08-01

    Smallholder rainfed farming systems generally realise sub-optimal crop yields which are largely attributed to dry spell occurrences during crop growth stages. However, with improved farming practices, it seems possible to significantly increase yield levels even with little and highly variable rainfall. The presented results follow research conducted in the Makanya catchment in northern Tanzania where gross rainfall amounts to less than 400 mm/season which is insufficient to support staple food crops (e.g. maize). Alternative cultivation techniques such as runoff harvesting and in-field micro-storage structures are compared. These techniques aim to reduce soil and nutrient loss from the field but, more importantly, promote in-field infiltration and water retention. Water balance components have been observed in order to study water partitioning processes under different cultivation techniques. Based on rainfall, soil evaporation, transpiration, runoff and soil moisture measurements, a water balance model has been developed to simulate soil moisture variations over the growing season. It appears that about 50% of the diverted water leaves the root zone through deep percolation. Modelling shows that during the field trials the average productive transpiration flow ranged between 1.1-1.4 mm d-1 in the trial plots compared to 0.7-1.0 mm d-1 under traditional tillage practice. Productive transpiration processes accounted for 23-29% while losses to deep percolation accounted for 33-48% of the available water. Conclusions from the research are that the innovations tested are effective in enhancing soil moisture retention at field scale and that diversions allow crop growth moisture conditions to be attained with early rains. It is also concluded that there is more scope for efficient utilisation of the diverted runoff water if storage structures could be installed to regulate water flow to the root zone when required.

  10. Investigating the terrestrial-atmospheric water balance for the Tana River basin, East Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerandi, Noah; Laux, Patrick; Arnault, Joel; Kunstmann, Harald

    2016-04-01

    The fully coupled atmospheric-hydrological WRF-Hydro modeling system is applied to the Tana River basin (TRB) in East Africa for the period 2011-2014 in order to analyze the terrestrial-atmospheric water balance components and their feedback mechanisms. The outputs from the fully coupled modeling system are compared to those of the WRF stand-alone model. The study area encompasses the Mathioya-Sagana subcatchment (3279 km²) in the upper TRB. Our model set up consists of two domains at 25 km and 5 km horizontal resolution covering East Africa and the study area, respectively. The WRF-Hydro inner domain is enhanced with hydrological routing at a 500 m horizontal grid resolution. The simulated monthly precipitation over the subcatchment compared with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite data gives an overall correlation coefficient of 0.8/0.7 for fully coupled/stand-alone model and a mean absolute error (MAE) of 1.5 mm/day for both models for the entire simulation period. Overall the models yield more annual total precipitation compared to TRMM. The two models are drier during the March, April, May (MAM) season and wetter during the October, November, December (OND) season. Compared to observation stations, both modeling systems provide a correlation coefficient of 0.6 for precipitation. The simulated and observed discharges at the Tana Rukanga gauge, located in the subcatchment, exhibit a correlation coefficient of 0.5 at daily resolution. The WRF-Hydro also overestimates the cumulated discharge (2011-2014) by about 50 %. The analysis of the atmospheric water balance in both WRF and WRF-Hydro simulation reveals a positive moisture divergence during the MAM and OND rainy seasons. Precipitation recycling and efficiency measures derived from the atmospheric water budget are also investigated.

  11. Shifts in plant functional types have time-dependent and regionally variable impacts on dryland ecosystem water balance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradford, John B.; Schlaepfer, Daniel R.; Lauenroth, William K.; Burke, Ingrid C.

    2014-01-01

    5. Synthesis. This study provides a novel, regional-scale assessment of how plant functional type transitions may impact ecosystem water balance in sagebrush-dominated ecosystems of North America. Results illustrate that the ecohydrological consequences of changing vegetation depend strongly on climate and suggest that decreasing woody plant abundance may have only limited impact on evapotranspiration and water yield.

  12. Water, ice, and meteorological measurements at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, 2000-01 balance years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krimmel, Robert M.

    2002-01-01

    Winter snow accumulation and summer snow, firn, and ice melt were measured at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, to determine the winter and net balances for the 2000 and 2001 balance years. In 2000, the winter balance, averaged over the glacier, was 3.32 meters, and the net balance was 0.38 meters. The winter balance was the ninth highest since the record began in 1959. The net balance was greater than 33 of the 41 years since 1959. In 2001, the winter balance was 1.90 meters, and net balance was -1.57 meters. The winter balance was lower than all but 4 years since 1959, and the net balance was more negative than all but 5 other years. Runoff was measured from the glacier basin and an adjacent non-glacierized basin. Air temperature, precipitation, humidity, wind speed and solar radiation were measured nearby. Ice displacements were measured for the 1998-2001 period.

  13. Linking soil water balance and water age with leaching of nitrate to groundwater in an agricultural setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigler, W.; Ewing, S. A.; Payn, R. A.; Jones, C. A.; Weissmann, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of land management on groundwater chemistry are often poorly understood due to uncertainties about residence times of water and solutes in the unsaturated and the saturated zones. In central Montana, a strath terrace mantled with 20-100 cm of loess-derived clay loam is composed of 5-10 meters of gravel hosting a shallow aquifer overlying shale. The landform is isolated from mountain front stream recharge and drained by springs at the gravel/shale interface surrounding the terrace. Ninety three percent of the terrace surface is cultivated, predominantly for production of small grains. A typical cropping system on the terrace is a three year rotation of winter wheat, spring wheat or barley, and fallow, where each phase represents a different regime of evapotranspiration, recharge, fertilizer application, mineralization and nitrate leaching to groundwater. Age of water in discharge from the perched aquifer in the gravel can potentially be characterized by monitoring springs and streams that are ultimately sourced by infiltration and recharge across the terrace. Work presented here couples a simple daily soil water balance model with ground and surface water chemistry to infer travel times through the unsaturated and saturated zones. These results are evaluated against estimates of groundwater age derived from pool turnover time calculations, finite difference groundwater flow modeling, and use of chemical age tracers.

  14. Balancing the Budget: Accounting for Glucocorticoid Bioactivity and Fate during Water Treatment.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ai; Wu, Shimin; Daniels, Kevin D; Snyder, Shane A

    2016-03-15

    Numerous studies have identified the presence and bioactivity of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) active substances in water; however, the identification and activity-balance of GR compounds remained elusive. This study determined the occurrence and attenuation of GR bioactivity and closed the balance by determining those substances responsible. The observed in vitro GR activity ranged from 39 to 155 ng dexamethasone-equivalent/L (ng Dex-EQ/L) in the secondary effluents of four wastewater treatment plants. Monochromatic ultraviolet light of 80 mJ/cm(2) disinfection dose was efficient for GR activity photolysis, whereas chlorination could not appreciably attenuate the observed GR activity. Ozonation was effective only at relatively high dose (ozone/TOC 1:1). Microfiltration membranes were not efficient for GR activity attenuation; however, reverse osmosis removed GR activity to levels below the limits of detection. A high-sensitivity liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was then developed to screen 27 GR agonists. Twelve were identified and quantified in effluents at summed concentrations of 9.6-21.2 ng/L. The summed Dex-EQ of individual compounds based on their measured concentrations was in excellent agreement with the Dex-EQ obtained from bioassay, which demonstrated that the detected glucocorticoids can entirely explain the observed GR bioactivity. Four synthetic glucocorticoids (triamcinolone acetonide, fluocinolone acetonide, clobetasol propionate, and fluticasone propionate) predominantly accounted for GR activity. These data represent the first known publication where a complete activity balance has been determined for GR agonists in an aquatic environment. PMID:26840181

  15. Water Balance Defines a Threshold in Soil Chemistry at a Global Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slessarev, E.; Bingham, N.; Lin, Y.; Schimel, J.; Chadwick, O.

    2015-12-01

    Carefully constrained studies in model landscapes demonstrate the existence of pedogenic thresholds, where small changes in external forcing lead to large changes in soil properties. One important threshold defines the relationship between water balance, the availability of nutrient cations, and soil pH. Across rainfall gradients, the loss of alkali and alkaline earth cations occurs abruptly at a critical water-balance. At this threshold, the removal of exchangeable base cations by leaching outstrips their production from weathering, causing a drop in soil pH. This leaching threshold has never been characterized at a global scale, in part because of the tremendous sampling effort required to overcome the confounding effects of rock chemistry, soil age, and topography outside of carefully constrained environmental gradients. We compile an extensive database of soil pH measurements to show that there is a mean global leaching threshold near an annual water balance of zero. Where evaporative demand exceeds precipitation, soil pH is buffered near values of 8.1, but where precipitation exceeds evaporative demand, soil pH rapidly collapses to values near 5.0. Deviations from the threshold can be explained in terms of climatic variability, soil age, and rock chemistry. Regions with arid climates and acid soil pH correspond to zones of intense, periodic leaching (e.g. strongly monsoonal climates), or to highly weathered continental surfaces that have permanently lost their stock of cations (e.g. Australia). Regions with humid climates and neutral soil pH correspond to young landscapes, or to soils derived from base-rich rock (e.g. the Pacific Rim volcanic belt). These results demonstrate that the leaching threshold is a dominant feature of the Earth's surface, with the potential to affect both natural and human-dominated ecosystems. For instance: the leaching threshold might impose a step-function on the terrestrial response to CO2 fertilization, the capacity of soils to

  16. Quantification of non-stormwater flow entries into storm drains using a water balance approach.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zuxin; Yin, Hailong; Li, Huaizheng

    2014-07-15

    To make decisions about correcting illicit or inappropriate connections to storm drains, quantification of non-stormwater entries into storm drains was performed using a water flow balance approach, based on data analysis from 2008 to 2011 in a separate storm drainage system in a Shanghai downtown area of 374 ha. The study revealed severe sewage connections to storm drains; meanwhile, misconnections between surface water and storm drains were found to drive frequent non-stormwater pumping discharges at the outfall, producing a much larger volume of outfall flows in a short period. This paper presented a methodology to estimate quantities of inappropriate sewage flow, groundwater infiltration and river water backflow into the storm drains. It was concluded that inappropriate sewage discharge and groundwater seepage into storm drains were approximately 17,860 m(3)/d (i.e., up to 51% of the total sewage flow in the catchment) and 3,624 m(3)/d, respectively, and surface water backflow was up to an average 28,593 m(3)/d. On the basis of this work, end-of-storm pipe interceptor sewers of 0.25 m(3)/s (i.e., 21,600 m(3)/d) would be effective to tackle the problem of sewage connections and groundwater seepage to storm drains. Under this circumstance, the follow-up non-stormwater outfall pumping events indicate misconnections between surface water and storm drains, featuring pumping discharge equivalent to surface water backflow; hence the misconnections should be repaired. The information provided here is helpful in estimating the magnitude of non-stormwater flow entries into storm drains and designing the necessary pollution control activities, as well as combating city floods in storm events.

  17. Modeling efficiency and water balance in PEM fuel cell systems with liquid fuel processing and hydrogen membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearlman, Joshua B.; Bhargav, Atul; Shields, Eric B.; Jackson, Gregory S.; Hearn, Patrick L.

    Integrating PEM fuel cells effectively with liquid hydrocarbon reforming requires careful system analysis to assess trade-offs associated with H 2 production, purification, and overall water balance. To this end, a model of a PEM fuel cell system integrated with an autothermal reformer for liquid hydrocarbon fuels (modeled as C 12H 23) and with H 2 purification in a water-gas-shift/membrane reactor is developed to do iterative calculations for mass, species, and energy balances at a component and system level. The model evaluates system efficiency with parasitic loads (from compressors, pumps, and cooling fans), system water balance, and component operating temperatures/pressures. Model results for a 5-kW fuel cell generator show that with state-of-the-art PEM fuel cell polarization curves, thermal efficiencies >30% can be achieved when power densities are low enough for operating voltages >0.72 V per cell. Efficiency can be increased by operating the reformer at steam-to-carbon ratios as high as constraints related to stable reactor temperatures allow. Decreasing ambient temperature improves system water balance and increases efficiency through parasitic load reduction. The baseline configuration studied herein sustained water balance for ambient temperatures ≤35 °C at full power and ≤44 °C at half power with efficiencies approaching ∼27 and ∼30%, respectively.

  18. Multireservoir real-time operations for flood control using balanced water level index method.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chih-Chiang; Hsu, Nien-Sheng

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents a real-time simulation-optimization operation procedure for determining the reservoir releases at each time step during a flood. The proposed procedure involves two models, i.e., a hydrological forecasting model and a reservoir operation model. In the reservoir operation model, this paper compares two flood-control operation strategies for a multipurpose multireservoir system. While Strategy 1 is the real-time joint reservoir operations without using the balanced water level index (BWLI) method, Strategy 2 involves real-time joint reservoir operations using the BWLI method. The two strategies presented are formulated as mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) problems. The idea of using the BWLI method is derived from the HEC-5 program developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The proposed procedure has been applied to the Tanshui River Basin system in Taiwan using the 6h ahead forecast data of six typhoons. A comparison of the results obtained from the two strategies reveals that Strategy 2 performs much better than Strategy 1 in determining the reservoir real-time releases throughout the system during flood emergencies in order to minimize flooding, while maintaining all reservoirs in the system in balance if possible. Consequently, the proposed model using the BWLI method demonstrates its effectiveness in estimating real-time releases.

  19. Multireservoir real-time operations for flood control using balanced water level index method.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chih-Chiang; Hsu, Nien-Sheng

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents a real-time simulation-optimization operation procedure for determining the reservoir releases at each time step during a flood. The proposed procedure involves two models, i.e., a hydrological forecasting model and a reservoir operation model. In the reservoir operation model, this paper compares two flood-control operation strategies for a multipurpose multireservoir system. While Strategy 1 is the real-time joint reservoir operations without using the balanced water level index (BWLI) method, Strategy 2 involves real-time joint reservoir operations using the BWLI method. The two strategies presented are formulated as mixed-integer linear programming (MILP) problems. The idea of using the BWLI method is derived from the HEC-5 program developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers. The proposed procedure has been applied to the Tanshui River Basin system in Taiwan using the 6h ahead forecast data of six typhoons. A comparison of the results obtained from the two strategies reveals that Strategy 2 performs much better than Strategy 1 in determining the reservoir real-time releases throughout the system during flood emergencies in order to minimize flooding, while maintaining all reservoirs in the system in balance if possible. Consequently, the proposed model using the BWLI method demonstrates its effectiveness in estimating real-time releases. PMID:17923249

  20. Effects of changing salt and water balance on renal kallikrein, kininogen and kinin.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, M; Belknap, S; Trebbin, W; Solomon, R J

    1987-03-01

    The kallikrein-kininogen-kinin system (KKK) has been implicated in the renal sodium excretion response to changes in dietary sodium. However, both increases and decreases in the activity of this system have been observed when urinary sodium excretion is augmented by a variety of maneuvers. To further evaluate the potential physiologic role of this system, we measured three components of the KKK system in urine. Total kallikrein, intact kininogen, and kinin were measured twice in normal individuals during balance on both a high (250 mEq/day) or low (10 mEq/day) sodium intake. A consistent and significant reduction in the activity of all three components of the KKK system was noted during the high salt intake. Furthermore, during the high sodium intake, further acute reductions in components of this system were observed when an acute saline but not water load was administered. The consistent response of the various components of the KKK system to both acute and chronic sodium loading suggests that the system is physiologically linked to the regulation of sodium balance. However, the directional changes argue against a primary natriuretic effect of this system.

  1. The Water, Energy and Food Nexus: Finding the Balance in Infrastructure Investment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber-lee, A. T.; Wickel, B.; Kemp-Benedict, E.; Purkey, D. R.; Hoff, H.; Heaps, C.

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that single-sector infrastructure planning is leading to severely stressed human and ecological systems. There are a number of cross-sectoral impacts in these highly inter-linked systems. Examples include: - Promotion of biofuels that leads to conversion from food crops, reducing both food and water security. - Promotion of dams solely built for hydropower rather than multi-purpose uses, that deplete fisheries and affect saltwater intrusion dynamics in downstream deltas - Historical use of water for cooling thermal power plants, with increasing pressure from other water uses, as well as problems of increased water temperatures that affect the ability to cool plants efficiently. This list can easily be expanded, as these inter-linkages are increasing over time. As developing countries see a need to invest in new infrastructure to improve the livelihoods of the poor, developed countries face conditions of deteriorating infrastructure with an opportunity for new investment. It is crucial, especially in the face of uncertainty of climate change and socio-political realities, that infrastructure planning factors in the influence of multiple sectors and the potential impacts from the perspectives of different stakeholders. There is a need for stronger linkages between science and policy as well. The Stockholm Environment Institute is developing and implementing practical and innovative nexus planning approaches in Latin America, Africa and Asia that brings together stakeholders and ways of integrating uncertainty in a cross-sectoral quantitative framework using the tools WEAP (Water Evaluation and Planning) and LEAP (Long-range Energy Alternatives Planning). The steps used include: 1. Identify key actors and stakeholders via social network analysis 2. Work with these actors to scope out priority issues and decision criteria in both the short and long term 3. Develop quantitative models to clarify options and balances between the needs and

  2. Water balance monitoring for two bioretention gardens in Omaha, Nebraska, 2011–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strauch, Kellan R.; Rus, David L.; Holm, Kent E.

    2016-01-01

    Bioretention gardens are used to help mitigate stormwater runoff in urban settings in an attempt to restore the hydrologic response of the developed land to a natural predevelopment response in which more water is infiltrated rather than routed directly to urban drainage networks. To better understand the performance of bioretention gardens in facilitating infiltration of stormwater in eastern Nebraska, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Douglas County Environmental Services and the Nebraska Environmental Trust, assessed the water balance of two bioretention gardens located in Omaha, Nebraska by monitoring the amount of stormwater entering and leaving the gardens. One garden is on the Douglas County Health Center campus, and the other garden is on the property of the Eastern Nebraska Office on Aging.For the Douglas County Health Center, bioretention garden performance was evaluated on the basis of volume reduction by comparing total inflow volume to total outflow volume. The bioretention garden reduced inflow volumes from a minimum of 33 percent to 100 percent (a complete reduction in inflow volume) depending on the size of the event. Although variable, the percent reduction of the inflow volume tended to decrease with increasing total event rainfall. To assess how well the garden reduces stormwater peak inflow rates, peak inflows were plotted against peak outflows measured at the bioretention garden. Only 39 of the 255 events had any overflow, indicating 100 percent peak reduction in the other events. Of those 39 events having overflow, the mean peak reduction was 63 percent.No overflow events were recorded at the bioretention garden at the Eastern Nebraska Office on Aging; therefore, data were not available for an event-based overflow analysis.Monitoring period summary of the water balance at both bio-retention gardens indicates that most of the stormwater in the bioretention gardens is stored in the subsurface.Evapotranspiration was attributed

  3. A worldwide evaluation of basin-scale evapotranspiration estimates against the water balance method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenbin; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Jing; Li, Yanzhong; Sun, Fubao; Fu, Guobin; Li, Xiuping; Sang, Yan-Fang

    2016-07-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) plays a critical role in linking the water and energy cycles but is difficult to estimate at regional and basin scales. In this study, we present a worldwide evaluation of nine ET products (three diagnostic products, three land surface model (LSM) simulations and three reanalysis-based products) against reference ET (ETwb) calculated using the water balance method corrected for the water storage change at an annual time scale over the period 1983-2006 for 35 global river basins. The results indicated that there was no significant intra-category discrepancy in the annual ET estimates for the 35 basins calculated using the different products in 35 basins, but some products performed better than others, such as the Global Land surface Evaporation estimated using the Amsterdam Methodology (GLEAM_E) in the diagnostic products, ET obtained from the Global Land Data Assimilation System version 1 (GLDAS 1) with the Community Land Model scheme (GCLM_E) in LSM simulations, and ET from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications reanalysis dataset (MERRA_E) in the reanalysis-based products. Almost all ET products (except MERRA_E) reasonably estimated the annual means (especially in the dry basins) but systematically underestimated the inter-annual variability (except for MERRA_E, GCLM_E and ET simulation from the GLDAS 1 with the MOSAIC scheme - GMOS_E) and could not adequately estimate the trends (e.g. GCLM_E and MERRA_E) of ETwb (especially in the energy-limited wet basins). The uncertainties in nine ET products may be primarily attributed to the discrepancies in the forcing datasets and model structural limitations. The enhancements of global forcing data (meteorological data, solar radiation, soil moisture stress and water storage changes) and model physics (reasonable consideration of the water and energy balance and vegetation processes such as canopy interception loss

  4. Energy, water and carbon balance of managed forests: comparing the future to the past

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loustau, Denis; Moreaux, Virginie; Moisy, Christophe; Picart, Delphine; Lafont, Sébastien; Benest, Fabienne; Lagouarde, Jean-PIerre; Bosc, Alexandre

    2014-05-01

    Intensification of forest management concerns a growing fraction of temperate and tropical forests. It is thought to affect wider areas in the near future for facing biomass, fiber and wood demands. Intensively managed forests are submitted to increased soil preparation, fertilization, drainage, thinning, clear-cutting, whole tree - harvesting and rotation shortening. They are composed of fast growing stands commonly planted with enhanced tree varieties or clones of eucalypts, pines, poplars, willows among others. Altogether these practices have substantial effects on forest exchanges with atmosphere and groundwater and therefore on local and regional climates and water resources. Using data collected from flux tower sites, MODIS products and forest and soil inventories together with our process based model of forest growth, GO+, we analysed the impacts of intensified management on forest canopy exchanges of heat, short and longwave radiations, water and CO2 and its interaction with soil and climate. Results obtained under present climate conditions evidenced interactions between intensification effects and soil and climate conditions. We show that biophysical impacts on radiative forcing potential, through albedo increase and convective fluxes of heat and water, are in the same order of magnitude than changes in the biogeochemical cycle of carbon. Drought affects dramatically the net carbon and water balances of forest stands independent of management and age. However, the effects of successive management operations (ploughing, vegetation burial, thinning) overtook climate impacts and make the young stands and intensive alternatives more independent and resilient to climate change impacts. The model applications to the analysis of future climate scenarios allowed to attributing the role of management alternatives, soil conditions and climate and their interactions. For intensively managed forests, the frequency of soil preparation operations, the management

  5. Water balance monitoring for two bioretention gardens in Omaha, Nebraska, 2011–14

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strauch, Kellan R.; Rus, David L.; Holm, Kent E.

    2016-01-29

    Bioretention gardens are used to help mitigate stormwater runoff in urban settings in an attempt to restore the hydrologic response of the developed land to a natural predevelopment response in which more water is infiltrated rather than routed directly to urban drainage networks. To better understand the performance of bioretention gardens in facilitating infiltration of stormwater in eastern Nebraska, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Douglas County Environmental Services and the Nebraska Environmental Trust, assessed the water balance of two bioretention gardens located in Omaha, Nebraska by monitoring the amount of stormwater entering and leaving the gardens. One garden is on the Douglas County Health Center campus, and the other garden is on the property of the Eastern Nebraska Office on Aging.For the Douglas County Health Center, bioretention garden performance was evaluated on the basis of volume reduction by comparing total inflow volume to total outflow volume. The bioretention garden reduced inflow volumes from a minimum of 33 percent to 100 percent (a complete reduction in inflow volume) depending on the size of the event. Although variable, the percent reduction of the inflow volume tended to decrease with increasing total event rainfall. To assess how well the garden reduces stormwater peak inflow rates, peak inflows were plotted against peak outflows measured at the bioretention garden. Only 39 of the 255 events had any overflow, indicating 100 percent peak reduction in the other events. Of those 39 events having overflow, the mean peak reduction was 63 percent.No overflow events were recorded at the bioretention garden at the Eastern Nebraska Office on Aging; therefore, data were not available for an event-based overflow analysis.Monitoring period summary of the water balance at both bio-retention gardens indicates that most of the stormwater in the bioretention gardens is stored in the subsurface.Evapotranspiration was attributed

  6. Water balance of two earthen landfill caps in a semi-arid climate

    SciTech Connect

    Khire, M.V.; Benson, C.H.; Bosscher, P.J.

    1997-12-31

    Water balance data are presented that were obtained from two earthen cap test sections located in a semi-arid region. The test sections were constructed on a municipal solid waste landfill in East Wenatchee, Washington, USA. One test section represents a traditional resistive barrier, and is constructed with a compacted silty clay barrier 60 cm thick and a vegetated silty clay surface layer 15 cm thick. The other test section represents a capillary barrier and has a sand layer 75 cm thick overlain by a 15-cm-thick vegetated surface layer of silt. Extensive hydrological and meteorological data have been collected since November 1992. Unsaturated hydraulic properties of soils, hydrologic parameters, and vegetation have been extensively characterized. Results of the study show that capillary barriers can be effective caps in semi-arid and arid regions. They are also cheaper to construct and can perform better than traditional resistive barriers.

  7. Effects of chronic exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields on energy balance in developing rats.

    PubMed

    Pelletier, Amandine; Delanaud, Stéphane; Décima, Pauline; Thuroczy, Gyorgy; de Seze, René; Cerri, Matteo; Bach, Véronique; Libert, Jean-Pierre; Loos, Nathalie

    2013-05-01

    The effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) on the control of body energy balance in developing organisms have not been studied, despite the involvement of energy status in vital physiological functions. We examined the effects of chronic RF-EMF exposure (900 MHz, 1 V m(-1)) on the main functions involved in body energy homeostasis (feeding behaviour, sleep and thermoregulatory processes). Thirteen juvenile male Wistar rats were exposed to continuous RF-EMF for 5 weeks at 24 °C of air temperature (T a) and compared with 11 non-exposed animals. Hence, at the beginning of the 6th week of exposure, the functions were recorded at T a of 24 °C and then at 31 °C. We showed that the frequency of rapid eye movement sleep episodes was greater in the RF-EMF-exposed group, independently of T a (+42.1 % at 24 °C and +31.6 % at 31 °C). The other effects of RF-EMF exposure on several sleep parameters were dependent on T a. At 31 °C, RF-EMF-exposed animals had a significantly lower subcutaneous tail temperature (-1.21 °C) than controls at all sleep stages; this suggested peripheral vasoconstriction, which was confirmed in an experiment with the vasodilatator prazosin. Exposure to RF-EMF also increased daytime food intake (+0.22 g h(-1)). Most of the observed effects of RF-EMF exposure were dependent on T a. Exposure to RF-EMF appears to modify the functioning of vasomotor tone by acting peripherally through α-adrenoceptors. The elicited vasoconstriction may restrict body cooling, whereas energy intake increases. Our results show that RF-EMF exposure can induce energy-saving processes without strongly disturbing the overall sleep pattern. PMID:23143821

  8. Modelling the water balance of a precise weighable lysimeter for short time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fank, Johann; Klammler, Gernot; Rock, Gerhard

    2015-04-01

    Precise knowledge of the water fluxes between the atmosphere and the soil-plant system and the percolation to the groundwater system is of great importance for understanding and modeling water, solute and energy transfer in the atmosphere-plant-soil-groundwater system. Weighable lysimeters yield the most precise and realistic measures for the change of stored water volume (ΔS), Precipitation (P) which can be rain, irrigation, snow and dewfall and evapotranspiration (ET) as the sum of soil evaporation, evaporation of intercepted water and transpiration. They avoid systematic errors of standard gauges and class-A pans. Lysimeters with controlled suction at the lower boundary allow estimation of capillary rise (C) and leachate (L) on short time scales. Precise weighable large scale (surface >= 1 m2) monolithic lysimeters avoiding oasis effects allow to solve the water balance equation (P - ET - L + C ± ΔS = 0) for a 3D-section of a natural atmosphere-plant-soil-system for a certain time period. Precision and accuracy of the lysimeter measurements depend not only on the precision of the weighing device but also on external conditions, which cannot be controlled or turned off. To separate the noise in measured data sets from signals the adaptive window and adaptive threshold (AWAT) filter (Peters et al., 2014) is used. The data set for the years 2010 and 2011 from the HYDRO-lysimeter (surface = 1 m2, depth = 1 m) in Wagna, Austria (Klammler and Fank, 2014) with a resolution of 0,01 mm for the lysimeter scale and of 0,001 mm for the leachate tank scale is used to evaluate the water balance. The mass of the lysimeter and the mass of the leachate tank is measured every two seconds. The measurements are stored as one minute arithmetic means. Based on calculations in a calibration period from January to May 2010 with different widths of moving window the wmax - Parameter for the AWAT filter was set to 41 minutes. A time series for the system mass ('upper boundary') of the

  9. Cold-water immersion alters muscle recruitment and balance of basketball players during vertical jump landing.

    PubMed

    Macedo, Christiane de Souza Guerino; Vicente, Rafael Chagas; Cesário, Mauricio Donini; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of cold-water immersion on the electromyographic (EMG) response of the lower limb and balance during unipodal jump landing. The evaluation comprised 40 individuals (20 basketball players and 20 non-athletes). The EMG response in the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibular longus, rectus femoris, hamstring and gluteus medius; amplitude and mean speed of the centre of pressure, flight time and ground reaction force (GRF) were analysed. All volunteers remained for 20 min with their ankle immersed in cold-water, and were re-evaluated immediately post and after 10, 20 and 30 min of reheating. The Shapiro-Wilk test, Friedman test and Dunn's post test (P < 0.05) were used. The EMG response values decreased for the lateral gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, fibular longus and rectus femoris of both athletes and non-athletes (P < 0.05). The comparison between the groups showed that the EMG response was lower for the athletes. Lower jump flight time and GRF, greater amplitude and mean speed of centre of pressure were predominant in the athletes. Cold-water immersion decreased the EMG activity of the lower limb, flight time and GRF and increased the amplitude and mean speed of centre of pressure.

  10. Liquid water on Mars - An energy balance climate model for CO2/H2O atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffert, M. I.; Callegari, A. J.; Hsieh, C. T.; Ziegler, W.

    1981-01-01

    A simple climatic model is developed for a Mars atmosphere containing CO2 and sufficient liquid water to account for the observed hydrologic surface features by the existence of a CO2/H2O greenhouse effect. A latitude-resolved climate model originally devised for terrestrial climate studies is applied to Martian conditions, with the difference between absorbed solar flux and emitted long-wave flux to space per unit area attributed to the divergence of the meridional heat flux and the poleward heat flux assumed to equal the atmospheric eddy heat flux. The global mean energy balance is calculated as a function of atmospheric pressure to assess the CO2/H2O greenhouse liquid water hypothesis, and some latitude-resolved cases are examined in detail in order to clarify the role of atmospheric transport and temperature-albedo feedback. It is shown that the combined CO2/H2O greenhouse at plausible early surface pressures may account for climates hot enough to support a hydrological cycle and running water at present-day insolation and visible albedo levels.

  11. Assessing variability of evapotranspiration over the Ganga river basin using water balance computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, Tajdarul H.; Webster, Peter J.; Famiglietti, James S.

    2014-03-01

    A thorough assessment of evapotranspiration (ET) pervades several important issues of the 21st century including climate change, food-security, land-management, flood and drought prediction, and water resources assessment and management. Such a proper assessment is of particular importance in the Ganga river basin (GRB) with its backdrop of a rapidly increasing population pressure and unregulated use of water resources. Spatially averaged ET over the GRB is computed as the residual of atmospheric and terrestrial water budget computations using a combination of model simulations and satellite and ground-based observations. The best estimate of monthly ET is obtained as the monthly mean of atmospheric and terrestrial water balance computations for the period 1980-2007. The mean monthly average of ET from these various estimates is 72.3 ± 18.8 mm month-1. Monthly variations of ET peak between July and August and reach a minimum in February. For the entire study period, the rate of change of ET across the GRB is -11 mm yr-2 (i.e., mm/yr/yr). Alongside a notable influence of the 1997-1998 El Niño, results allude to the existence of interim periods during which ET trends varied significantly. More specifically, during the period of 1998-2002, the rate of decline increased to -55.8 mm yr-2, which is almost 5 times the overall trend. Based on the correlation between ET and independent estimates of near-surface temperature and soil moisture, we can infer that the ET over the GRB is primarily limited by moisture availability. The analysis has important potential for use in large-scale water budget assessments and intercomparison studies. The analysis also emphasizes the importance of synergistic use of mutliplatform hydrologic information.

  12. Rainfall-Runoff and Water-Balance Models for Management of the Fena Valley Reservoir, Guam

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yeung, Chiu W.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) and a generalized water-balance model were calibrated and verified for use in estimating future availability of water in the Fena Valley Reservoir in response to various combinations of water withdrawal rates and rainfall conditions. Application of PRMS provides a physically based method for estimating runoff from the Fena Valley Watershed during the annual dry season, which extends from January through May. Runoff estimates from the PRMS are used as input to the water-balance model to estimate change in water levels and storage in the reservoir. A previously published model was calibrated for the Maulap and Imong River watersheds using rainfall data collected outside of the watershed. That model was applied to the Almagosa River watershed by transferring calibrated parameters and coefficients because information on daily diversions at the Almagosa Springs upstream of the gaging station was not available at the time. Runoff from the ungaged land area was not modeled. For this study, the availability of Almagosa Springs diversion data allowed the calibration of PRMS for the Almagosa River watershed. Rainfall data collected at the Almagosa rain gage since 1992 also provided better estimates of rainfall distribution in the watershed. In addition, the discontinuation of pan-evaporation data collection in 1998 required a change in the evapotranspiration estimation method used in the PRMS model. These reasons prompted the update of the PRMS for the Fena Valley Watershed. Simulated runoff volume from the PRMS compared reasonably with measured values for gaging stations on Maulap, Almagosa, and Imong Rivers, tributaries to the Fena Valley Reservoir. On the basis of monthly runoff simulation for the dry seasons included in the entire simulation period (1992-2001), the total volume of runoff can be predicted within -3.66 percent at Maulap River, within 5.37 percent at Almagosa River, and within 10

  13. Assessment of the soil water balance by the combination of cosmic ray neutron sensing and eddy covariance technique in an irrigated citrus orchard (Marrakesh, Morocco)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mroos, Katja; Baroni, Gabriele; Er-Raki, Salah; Francke, Till; Khabba, Said; Jarlan, Lionel; Hanich, Lahoucine; Oswald, Sascha E.

    2014-05-01

    Irrigation water requirement plays a crucial role in many agricultural areas and especially in arid and semi-arid landscapes. Improvements in the water management and the performance of the irrigation systems require a correct evaluation of the hydrological processes involved. However, some difficulties can arise due to the heterogeneity of the soil-plant system and of the irrigation scheme. To overcome these limitations, in this study, the soil water balance is analyzed by the combination of the Eddy Covariance technique (EC) and Cosmic Ray neutron Sensing (CRS). EC provides the measurement of the actual evapotranspiration over the area as it was presented in many field conditions. Moreover CRS showed to be a valuable approach to measure the root zone soil moisture integrated in a footprint of ~30 ha. In this way, the combination of the two methodologies should provide a better analysis of the soil water balance at field scale, as opposed to point observations, e.g. by TDR, evaporimeter and fluxmeter. Then, this could increase the capability to assess the irrigation efficiency and the agricultural water management. The study is conducted in a citrus orchard situated in a semi-arid region, 30 km southwest of Marrakesh (Morocco). The site is flat and planted with trees of same age growing in parallel rows with drip irrigation lines and application of fertilizer and pesticides. The original soil seems modified on the surface by the agricultural use, creating differences between trees, rows and lines. In addition, the drip irrigation creates also a spatial variability of the water flux distribution in the field, making this site an interesting area to test the methodology. Particular attention is given to the adaptation of the standard soil sampling campaign used for the calibration of the CRS and the introduction of a weighing function. Data were collected from June to December 2013, which corresponds to the high plant transpiration. Despite the intention of the

  14. Energy balance in urban Mexico City: observation and parameterization during the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Erik; Pressley, Shelley; Grivicke, Rasa; Allwine, Eugene; Molina, Luisa T.; Lamb, Brian

    2011-03-01

    The parameterization of the energy balance from a residential and commercial neighborhood of Mexico City was investigated using direct measurements of radiative and heat fluxes carried out during the MILAGRO/MCMA-2006 field campaign as a reference. The measured fluxes were used to evaluate different models of the energy balance based on parameterizations that require standard meteorological observations: ambient temperature, relative humidity, atmospheric pressure and cloudiness. It was found that these models reproduce with reasonable accuracy the diurnal features of the radiative and heat fluxes. The largest differences between modeled and observed fluxes correspond to the incoming longwave radiation, mainly due to errors in the cloudiness data. This paper contributes to the understanding of the energy partitioning in (sub)tropical urban environments, particularly in the developing world, where energy balance models have not been evaluated.

  15. Water balance analysis of a watershed dominated by Eucalyptus grandis hybrid plantations in Felixlandia (MG, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surian-Gamba, Otávio; Cristina-Tonello, Kelly; Garcia-Leite, Hélio; Taguas, Encarnación V.; Texeira-Dias, Herly C.

    2015-04-01

    Commercial eucalyptus plantations are commonly associated to excessive water use despite the fact that numerous studies have demonstrated significant differences among species and environmental systems. In fact, the analysis of its impact on water balance depending on specific environmental conditions is essential to guarantee its sustainability. The water balance of Eucalyptus grandis hybrid plantations in the Basin Creek of Riacho Fundo in Felixlândia, Minas Gerais (Brazil) is presented through a study of 2.6 years of measurements in a catchment of 719.9 ha. The objective of this study was to analyze the relationships among precipitation, interception and evapotranspiration of eucalyptus plantations, for evaluating the weight on flow and effective precipitation. A triangular weir with a set of level- and baro-logger were used for measuring flow. Rainfall was measured with 2 pluviometers and evaporation using two evapotranspirometers Soil Control, Model JR-200mm. For througfall, eight plots of 136.5 m² each were installed with twelve pluviometers. To estimate the stemflow, the empirical equation Et = - 0.060 + 0.053 (P) was used, where P is the precipitation. The effective precipitation was calculated by summing of the througfall value plus the stemflow. The losses by interception were obtained by the difference between precipitation and effective precipitation. The analysis was carried out on the monthly and annual scales. The results showed that the measured rainfall was close to the average for the region, reaching values close to 1200 mm. The interception of the eucalyptus plantation for the period was approximately 12% of the external precipitation. There were neither significant relationships between flow and evapotranspiration nor between flow and effective precipitation, which shows the complexity of water components at the catchment scale. This is likely associated to the delay effect of the subsurface flow. The average flow for the period of study was

  16. Effects of recurrent drought on the water balance and biomass production of irrigated mountain grassland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obojes, Nikolaus; Leitinger, Georg; Niedrist, Georg; Tasser, Erich; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2014-05-01

    Besides rising temperatures, climate change is also expected to change precipitation patterns, especially increasing the probability of extreme events like droughts and thunderstorms. In the North Italian region of Trentino/South Tirol, a reduction of rainfalls in spring has been observed in the last decades. A joint project by the European Academy Bozen/Bolzano and the University of Innsbruck analyzed the effects of repeated spring and summer droughts on the water balance, carbon flux and productivity of an irrigated mountain grassland site at 1500 m a.s.l. in the inner-alpine dry area of the Matsch Valley/Vinschgau during the years 2012 and 2013. We anticipated a decrease of soil moisture, evapotranspiration, carbon uptake, and plant growth during drought periods. Soil memory effects, delayed plant development, and changes of vegetation composition were expected long-term effects of periodic water shortage. Water balance was measured continuously with weighing lysimeters (diameter and depth 0.3 m) which were installed in 2011; in addition to lysimeter weight, soil moisture and water potential in 2 depths and the volume of seepage was recorded every ten minutes for each lysimeter. Carbon flux was measured regularly with a canopy chamber eduring the growing season, above-ground biomass and vegetation composition were analyzed after cutting the vegetation twice per year in accordance to local management. To simulate severe droughts, a group of three lysimeters was sheltered from any rainfall and irrigation with a foil tunnel for four to six weeks during the early growth period in spring and again during the regrowth period after the first cut in summer in 2012 and 2013. A control group of three lysimeters remained unsheltered and exposed to rainfall and irrigation. Preliminary results show a clear reduction of soil moisture, evapotranspiration, carbon uptake and biomass in sheltered lysimeters during the drought periods, but a quick recovery afterwards. However

  17. Channel water balance and exchange with subsurface flow along a mountain headwater stream in Montana, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Payn, R.A.; Gooseff, M.N.; McGlynn, B.L.; Bencala, K.E.; Wondzell, S.M.

    2009-01-01

    Channel water balances of contiguous reaches along streams represent a poorly understood scale of stream-subsurface interaction. We measured reach water balances along a headwater stream in Montana, United States, during summer base flow recessions. Reach water balances were estimated from series of tracer tests in 13 consecutive reaches delineated evenly along a 2.6 km valley segment. For each reach, we estimated net change in discharge, gross hydrologic loss, and gross hydrologic gain from tracer dilution and mass recovery. Four series of tracer tests were performed during relatively high, intermediate, and low base flow conditions. The relative distribution of channel water along the stream was strongly related to a transition in valley structure, with a general increase in gross losses through the recession. During tracer tests at intermediate and low flows, there were frequent substantial losses of tracer mass (>10%) that could not be explained by net loss in flow over the reach, indicating that many of the study reaches were concurrently losing and gaining water. For example, one reach with little net change in discharge exchanged nearly 20% of upstream flow with gains and losses along the reach. These substantial bidirectional exchanges suggest that some channel interactions with subsurface flow paths were not measurable by net change in flow or transient storage of recovered tracer. Understanding bidirectional channel water balances in stream reaches along valleys is critical to an accurate assessment of stream solute fate and transport and to a full assessment of exchanges between the stream channel and surrounding subsurface.

  18. Suitability of Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model of the US Environmental Protection Agency for the simulation of the water balance of landfill cover systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, K.; Melchior, S.; Miehlich, G.

    1996-12-01

    Cover systems are widely used to safeguard landfills and contaminated sites. The evaluation of the water balance is crucial for the design of landfill covers. The Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model of the US Environmental Protection Agency was developed for this purpose. This paper discusses some limitations of version 2 of this model and some operational difficulties for the use of this model in Germany, which has been developed for the United States. The model results are tested against field data of the water balance, measured on test fields on the Georgswerder landfill in Hamburg. Theoretically, HELP considers gravitational forces as driving forces of water flow only. Therefore capillary barriers cannot be simulated. Furthermore, the formation of and the flow through macropores are not considered, a main critical process that the diminishes the effectiveness of compacted soil liners. In the output comparison, the matching of measured and simulated data is quite good for lateral drainage, but failed for surface runoff and liner leakage through compacted soil liners. A further validation study is planned for HELP version 3 using a broader range of test field data.

  19. Simulations of soil water balance in an irrigated district of Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventrella, D.; Castellini, M.; Giglio, L.; di Giacomo, E.; Lopez, R.

    2009-04-01

    The available approaches for predicting the soil hydraulic functions include direct methods, using laboratory and field experiments, and indirect methods, such as the application of pedo-transfer functions or inverse methods. This last approach consists of a non-linear estimation of the soil hydraulic parameters by minimising the residuals between observed and simulated values of variables, such as the volumetric water content (theta) and the soil water pressure head (h). Numerical models are increasingly being used to simulate water and solute movement in the vadose zone for a variety of applications in research and soil/water management. While a large number of models of various complexity have been developed over the years, relatively few have been tested under field conditions. Soil water flow in physically-based models is described by Richards' equation. Application of this equation requires knowledge of the two functions: the soil water retention, theta(h), and the hydraulic conductivity, K(h). Inverse procedures have been successfully applied to analyse laboratory results using multistep or evaporation methods. During the last years, the application of inverse method is increasing by being applied to field experiments. Recently, several Authors have estimated the effective soil hydraulic function parameters with the inverse method by using evapotranspiration (ET) and soil water content data collected from a lysimeter experiment for a soil cropped with wheat. The objective of this paper is to test different strategies to optimize the simulation of soil water content dynamics for a typical cultivation of water melon (Cuccumis citrullus) for the area of "Arco Jonico Metapontino" located in Basilicata and Puglia regions (Southern Italy). The strategies utilized in the comparison are based on: (i) direct measurements of the theta(h) and the K(h); (ii) utilization of pedotransfer functions starting from textural information and (iii) inverse procedures including

  20. Investigation of the Relative Roles of Climate Seasonality and Landscape Properties on Mean Annual and Monthly Water Balances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoo, Y.; Sivapalan, M.

    2005-12-01

    This paper explores the effects of climate seasonality, soil characteristics, and topography on annual and monthly water balances with conservation equations governing hillslope responses derived by Reggiani et al. (2000). Numerical simulations for 4,500 different hypothetical basins helped to understand the controls on annual and monthly water balances from multiple viewpoints. The results on annual water balance showed that climate seasonality decreased annual evapotranspiration and this tendency becomes stronger if the basin is mildly sloped and covered by silty loam type soil in a climate that is dominated by storms. The summary of results on monthly water balance is as follows: (1) seasonality becomes more significant for monthly water balance when precipitation and potential evapotranspiration are of opposite phase; (2) surface and subsurface runoff respond quickly and become more seasonal under humid climate; (3) soil saturation degree and evapotranspiration experience strong seasonality and longer delay time against precipitation, if precipitation and potential evapotranspiration are of opposite phase under arid climate; (4) soil saturation degree and surface runoff show strong seasonality and longer delay time against precipitation, when basin_fs soil has higher storage capacity (higher porosity and deep soil); (5) soils with lower storage capacity cause strong seasonality and short delay time against precipitation to soil saturation degree and surface runoff; (6) groundwater level and subsurface runoff show strong seasonality and long delay time against precipitation when soil has high drainability (higher hydraulic conductivity and steep topography); and (7) soil with lower drainability causes strong seasonality and short delay time against precipitation to soil saturation degree and surface runoff. We verified the adequacy and reality of our simulation based results through comparisons with observed data oriented results in previous research. We can

  1. Evapotranspiration from Upper Klamath Lake: Reducing Uncertainty in the Water Balance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stannard, D. I.; Gannett, M. W.; Polette, D.; Cameron, J. M.; Spears, J. M.

    2009-12-01

    The Klamath River basin is a large (~40,600 km2) watershed that straddles the border between southern Oregon and northern California, USA, and drains into the Pacific Ocean. A wide variety of interests has led to intense competition over water allocation in the upper, semi-arid parts of the basin in recent decades. Myriad water impoundments and diversions, wetland drainage, and recent wetland restoration, have complicated the development of resource-management and restoration strategies. An overarching question is how to provide enough water for irrigated agriculture and still preserve adequate stream-flow and wetland habitat for threatened (e.g. coho salmon) and endangered (e.g. Lost River and shortnose suckers) species. In the Upper Klamath Lake region, this hotly debated topic has raised questions about evaporative losses from Upper Klamath Lake, and its wetland marshes. Currently, surface-water outflow from the lake is gauged, but not all of the surface-water inflows are gauged, and net ground-water inflow is estimated. Lake-level management is based on a simplified water budget: NETin - SWout = ΔS, where NETin = SWin + GWnet - ET (called “net inflow”), SWout is measured surface-water outflow, ΔS is measured change in lake storage, SWin is surface-water inflow, GWnet is net ground-water inflow, and ET is evapotranspiration from the lake. Partitioning of NETin is not done routinely, so little is known about magnitudes of the un-gauged inflows, or ET (GWnet is a small term). To help partition NETin into its components, ET has been measured at three locations in Upper Klamath Lake since April, 2008. Two eddy covariance (EC) sites are located in Upper Klamath National Wildlife Refuge, an extensive wetland marsh in the northwest corner of the lake, and one Bowen-ratio energy-balance site is in open water. One EC station is situated in bulrush and the other is in a mixed bulrush, wocus, cattail community. Wetland marsh area is about 1/3 that of open water. The

  2. Meeting the challenges of on-host and off-host water balance in blood-feeding arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Joshua B.; Denlinger, David L.

    2010-01-01

    In this review, we describe water balance requirements of blood-feeding arthropods, particularly contrasting dehydration tolerance during the unfed, off-host state and the challenges of excess water that accompany receipt of the bloodmeal. Most basic water balance characteristics during the off-host stage are applicable to other terrestrial arthropods, as well. A well-coordinated suite of responses enable arthropods to conserve water resources, enhance their desiccation tolerance, and increase their water supplies by employing a diverse array of molecular, structural and behavioral responses. Water loss rates during the off-host phase are particularly useful for generating a scheme to classify vectors according to their habitat requirements for water, thus providing a convenient tool with potential predictive power for defining suitable current and future vector habitats. Blood feeding elicits an entirely different set of challenges as the vector responds to overhydration by quickly increasing its rate of cuticular water loss and elevating the rate of diuresis to void excess water and condense the bloodmeal. Immature stages that feed on blood normally have a net increase in water content at the end of a blood-feeding cycle, but in adults the water content reverts to the prefeeding level when the cycle is completed. Common themes are evident in diverse arthropods that feed on blood, particularly the physiological mechanisms used to respond to the sudden influx of water as well as the mechanisms used to counter water shortfalls that are encountered during the nonfeeding, off-host state. PMID:20206630

  3. Soil Water Balance and Vegetation Dynamics in two Contrasting Water-limited Mediterranean Ecosystems on Sardinia, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaldo, N.; Albertson, J. D.; Corona, R.

    2011-12-01

    eddy correlation technique based micrometeorological towers. Soil moisture profiles were also continuously estimated using water content reflectometers and gravimetric method, and periodically leaf area index PFTs are estimated during the Spring-Summer 2005. The following objectives are addressed:1) pointing out the dynamics of land surface fluxes, soil moisture, CO2 and vegetation cover for two contrasting water-limited ecosystems; 2) assess the impact of the soil depth and type on the CO2 and water balance dynamics. For reaching the objectives an ecohydrologic model is also successfully used and applied to the case studies. It couples a vegetation dynamic model, which computes the change in biomass over time for the PFTs, and a 3-component (bare soil, grass and woody vegetation) land surface model.

  4. Evaluation of hydrological balance in the eastern Amazon using a terrestrial ecosystem model, and satellite-based evapotranspiration (MODIS) and terrestrial water storage (GRACE)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panday, P. K.; Coe, M. T.; Macedo, M.; Beck, P.

    2013-12-01

    High historical deforestation rates and a rapidly changing agricultural landscape may dramatically alter the energy and water balance of the eastern Amazon basin. Understanding the surface water dynamics and hydrological balance of the region is critical for accurately assessing the historical and potential future impacts of deforestation, land-use change, and land management practices. We examine the water balance of the Xingu river basin by combining the IBIS (Integrated Biosphere Simulator) terrestrial ecosystem model with satellite-based models of evapotranspiration (MOD16) and terrestrial water storage (GRACE). IBIS simulations were forced with prescribed climate to produce modeled evapotranspiration and runoff, which were then compared with MODIS evapotranspiration and observed discharge at Altamira (PA, Brazil). Results from both satellite observations and model simulations support earlier studies demonstrating that dry-season evapotranspiration is higher than wet-season evapotranspiration in the wetter forests of the northern Xingu basin, while the contrary is true in the seasonally dry forests of the southern Xingu. Seasonal variation in modeled soil water storage agrees with the GRACE measurements in both timing and magnitude. Soil moisture anomalies averaged over the Xingu basin suggest that annual changes in soil water storage account for a large part of the interannual variation in observed discharge. Field measurements of discharge and soil moisture in the southern Xingu also support the findings that changes in soil water storage drive inter-annual variations in river discharge. Figure 1. Comparison of observed discharge at Altamira (Pará, Brazil) against MODIS- derived P-E (PCRU-MODISET), IBIS simulated discharge, IBIS (PCRU-ETIBIS), and IBIS (PCRU-ETIBIS- Δ Soil moisture IBIS). The bottom panel shows annual basin precipitation from Climatic Research Unit (CRU) climatological data for the 2000-2008 period

  5. Computation of the velocity field and mass balance in the finite-element modeling of groundwater flow

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G. T.

    1980-01-01

    Darcian velocity has been conventionally calculated in the finite-element modeling of groundwater flow by taking the derivatives of the computed pressure field. This results in discontinuities in the velocity field at nodal points and element boundaries. Discontinuities become enormous when the computed pressure field is far from a linear distribution. It is proposed in this paper that the finite element procedure that is used to simulate the pressure field or the moisture content field also be applied to Darcy's law with the derivatives of the computed pressure field as the load function. The problem of discontinuity is then eliminated, and the error of mass balance over the region of interest is much reduced. The reduction is from 23.8 to 2.2% by one numerical scheme and from 29.7 to -3.6% by another for a transient problem.

  6. Water, ice, and meteorological measurements at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, 1996 balance year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krimmel, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    Winter snow accumulation and summer snow, firn, and ice melt were measured at South Cascade Glacier, Washington to determine the winter and net balances for the 1996 balance year. The 1996 winter balance, averaged over the glacier, was 2.94 meters, and the net balance was 0.10meter. The winter balance was approximately 0.6 meter greater than the 1977-95 average winter balance (2.30 meters). The net balance, which was positive for the first time since 1984, was more than a meter greater than the 1977-95 average net balance (-0.96 meter). The glacier retreated about 15 meters from its 1995 position. Runoff was measured from the glacier and an adjacent non-glacierized basin. Air temperature, precipitation, and barometric pressure were measured nearby. This report makes these data available to the glaciological and climatological community

  7. Water, ice, and meteorological measurements at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, 1995 balance year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krimmel, R.M.

    1996-01-01

    Winter snow accumulation and summer snow, firn, and ice melt were measured at South Cascade Glacier, Washington to determine the winter and net balances for the 1995 balance year. The 1995 winter balance, averaged over the glacier, was 2.86 meters, and the net balance was -0.69 meter. The winter balance was approximately 0.5 meter greater than the 1977-94 average winter balance. The net balance was approximately 0.3 meter less negative than the 1977-94 average net balance. Runoff was measured from the glacier and an adjacent non-glacierized basin. Air temperature, precipitation, barometric pressure, solar radiation, and wind speed were measured adjacent to the glacier. This report makes these data available to the glaciological and climatological community.

  8. Water, ice, and meteorological measurements at South Cascade Glacier, Washington, 1994 balance year

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krimmel, R.M.

    1995-01-01

    Winter snow accumulation and summer snow, firn, and ice melt were measured at South Cascade Glacier, Washington to determine the winter and net balances for the 1994 balance year. The 1994 winter balance, averaged over the glacier, was 2.39 meters, and the net balance was -1.60 meters. The winter balance was approximately that of the 1977-94 average winter balance. The net balance was more negative than the 1977-94 average net balance of -1.02 meters. Runoff was measured from the glacier and an adjacent non- glacierized basin. Air temperature, precipitation, barometric pressure, solar radiation, and wind speed were measured nearby. This report makes these data available to the glaciological and climatological community.

  9. Variations in surface water-ground water interactions along a headwater mountain stream : comparisons between transient storage and water balance analyses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, Adam S.; Payn, Robert A.; Gooseff, Michael N.; McGlynn, Brian L.; Bencala, Kenneth E.; Kelleher, Christa A.; Wondzell, Steven M.; Wagener, Thorsten

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of discharge along a stream valley is frequently assumed to be the primary control on solute transport processes. Relationships of both increasing and decreasing transient storage, and decreased gross losses of stream water have been reported with increasing discharge; however, we have yet to validate these relationships with extensive field study. We conducted transient storage and mass recovery analyses of artificial tracer studies completed for 28 contiguous 100 m reaches along a stream valley, repeated under four base-flow conditions. We calculated net and gross gains and losses, temporal moments of tracer breakthrough curves, and best fit transient storage model parameters (with uncertainty estimates) for 106 individual tracer injections. Results supported predictions that gross loss of channel water would decrease with increased discharge. However, results showed no clear relationship between discharge and transient storage, and further analysis of solute tracer methods demonstrated that the lack of this relation may be explained by uncertainty and equifinality in the transient storage model framework. Furthermore, comparison of water balance and transient storage approaches reveals complications in clear interpretation of either method due to changes in advective transport time, which sets a the temporal boundary separating transient storage and channel water balance. We have little ability to parse this limitation of solute tracer methods from the physical processes we seek to study. We suggest the combined analysis of both transient storage and channel water balance more completely characterizes transport of solutes in stream networks than can be inferred from either method alone.

  10. Mechanical balance laws for fully nonlinear and weakly dispersive water waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalisch, Henrik; Khorsand, Zahra; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

    2016-10-01

    The Serre-Green-Naghdi system is a coupled, fully nonlinear system of dispersive evolution equations which approximates the full water wave problem. The system is known to describe accurately the wave motion at the surface of an incompressible inviscid fluid in the case when the fluid flow is irrotational and two-dimensional. The system is an extension of the well known shallow-water system to the situation where the waves are long, but not so long that dispersive effects can be neglected. In the current work, the focus is on deriving mass, momentum and energy densities and fluxes associated with the Serre-Green-Naghdi system. These quantities arise from imposing balance equations of the same asymptotic order as the evolution equations. In the case of an even bed, the conservation equations are satisfied exactly by the solutions of the Serre-Green-Naghdi system. The case of variable bathymetry is more complicated, with mass and momentum conservation satisfied exactly, and energy conservation satisfied only in a global sense. In all cases, the quantities found here reduce correctly to the corresponding counterparts in both the Boussinesq and the shallow-water scaling. One consequence of the present analysis is that the energy loss appearing in the shallow-water theory of undular bores is fully compensated by the emergence of oscillations behind the bore front. The situation is analyzed numerically by approximating solutions of the Serre-Green-Naghdi equations using a finite-element discretization coupled with an adaptive Runge-Kutta time integration scheme, and it is found that the energy is indeed conserved nearly to machine precision. As a second application, the shoaling of solitary waves on a plane beach is analyzed. It appears that the Serre-Green-Naghdi equations are capable of predicting both the shape of the free surface and the evolution of kinetic and potential energy with good accuracy in the early stages of shoaling.

  11. Modelling field scale water partitioning using on-site observations in sub-Saharan rainfed agriculture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makurira, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Uhlenbrook, S.

    2010-04-01

    Smallholder rainfed farming systems generally realise sub-optimal crop yields which are largely attributed to dry spell occurrences during crop growth stages. However, through the introduction of appropriate farming practices, it is possible to substantially increase yield levels even with little and highly variable rainfall. The presented results follow research conducted in the Makanya catchment in northern Tanzania where gross rainfall amounts to less than 400 mm/season which is insufficient to support staple food crops (e.g. maize). The yields from farming system innovations (SIs), which are basically alternative cultivation techniques, are compared against traditional farming practices. The SIs tested in this research are runoff harvesting used in combination with in-field trenches and soil bunds (fanya juus). These SIs aim to reduce soil and nutrient loss from the field and, more importantly, promote in-field infiltration and water retention. Water balance components have been observed in order to study water partitioning processes for the "with" and "without" SI scenarios. Based on rainfall, soil evaporation, transpiration, runoff and soil moisture measurements, a water balance model has been developed to simulate soil moisture variations over the growing season. Simulation results show that, during the field trials, the average productive transpiration flow ranged between 1.1-1.4 mm d-1 in the trial plots compared to 0.7-1.0 mm d-1 under traditional tillage practice. Productive transpiration processes accounted for 23-29% while losses to deep percolation accounted for 33-48% of the available water. The field system has been successfully modelled using the spreadsheet-based water balance 1-D model. Conclusions from the research are that the SIs that were tested are effective in enhancing soil moisture retention at field scale and that diversions allow crop growth moisture conditions to be attained with early rains. From the partitioning analysis, it is also

  12. Canopy water balance of windward and leeward Hawaiian cloud forests on Haleakalā, Maui, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giambelluca, Thomas W.; DeLay, John K.; Nullet, Michael A.; Scholl, Martha A.; Gingerich, Stephen B.

    2011-01-01

    The contribution of intercepted cloud water to precipitation at windward and leeward cloud forest sites on the slopes of Haleakalā, Maui was assessed using two approaches. Canopy water balance estimates based on meteorological monitoring were compared with interpretations of fog screen measurements collected over a 2-year period at each location. The annual incident rainfall was 973 mm at the leeward site (Auwahi) and 2550 mm at the windward site (Waikamoi). At the leeward, dry forest site, throughfall was less than rainfall (87%), and, at the windward, wet forest site, throughfall exceeded rainfall (122%). Cloud water interception estimated from canopy water balance was 166 mm year−1 at Auwahi and 1212 mm year−1 at Waikamoi. Annual fog screen measurements of cloud water flux, corrected for wind-blown rainfall, were 132 and 3017 mm for the dry and wet sites respectively. Event totals of cloud water flux based on fog screen measurements were poorly correlated with event cloud water interception totals derived from the canopy water balance. Hence, the use of fixed planar fog screens to estimate cloud water interception is not recommended. At the wet windward site, cloud water interception made up 32% of the total precipitation, adding to the already substantial amount of rainfall. At the leeward dry site, cloud water interception was 15% of the total precipitation. Vegetation at the dry site, where trees are more exposed and isolated, was more efficient at intercepting the available cloud water than at the rainy site, but events were less frequent, shorter in duration and lower in intensity. A large proportion of intercepted cloud water, 74% and 83%, respectively for the two sites, was estimated to become throughfall, thus adding significantly to soil water at both sites

  13. Sensitivity of water balance and water use efficiency to climate and crop type at an agricultural site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brümmer, C.; Kutsch, W. L.

    2012-04-01

    The effects of climatic factors and crop type on evapotranspiration (E) and water use efficiency (WUE) were analyzed using tower-based eddy-covariance data for an agricultural site in Thuringia, Germany. During ten years of observation, winter wheat (five times) and winter barley (once) were alternately planted with potato (twice), rapeseed (once) and sugar beet (once). The seasonal pattern of E was closely linked to growing-season length and rainfall distribution. Although annual precipitation (P) was highly variable (380-700 mm), minimum annual E was not less than 250 mm and was limited to 380 mm. However, a positive correlation between annual P and annual E with E plateauing at high P as was usually found at forest, grassland and peatland sites could not be observed. Winter wheat tended to limit annual E and was found to be relatively insensitive with changing annual P and solar irradiance. A hysteretic relationship between monthly mean values of E and net radiation (Rn) indicated that E lagged behind the typical seasonal progression of Rn. Annual means of daytime dry-foliage Priestley-Taylor α much less than the theoretical maximum of 1.26 for extensive well-watered vegetation showed that E on an annual basis was either water limited and/or stomatal control of transpiration must have been prevalent. In all years, a strong linear correlation between monthly mean values of gross primary production and E resulted in WUE being relatively constant between 2.5 and 3.5 g C kg-1 H2O. Our study shows that crop selection has a major impact on the water balance of an agricultural site with the influence of climatic factors being significantly different than usually found for natural ecosystems.

  14. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-03-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects,1,2 researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields,3-5 which was given the name "The Moses Effect."5 Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary were produced by superconducting magnets.

  15. Deformation of Water by a Magnetic Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Zijun; Dahlberg, E. Dan

    2011-01-01

    After the discovery that superconducting magnets could levitate diamagnetic objects, researchers became interested in measuring the repulsion of diamagnetic fluids in strong magnetic fields, which was given the name "The Moses Effect." Both for the levitation experiments and the quantitative studies on liquids, the large magnetic fields necessary…

  16. Evaluating the impact of groundwater on cotton growth and root zone water balance using Hydrus-ID coupled with a crop growth model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Groundwater is an important factor that needs to be considered when evaluating the water balance of the soil-plant-atmosphere system and the sustainable water management. However, the impact of shallow groundwater on the root zone water balance and cotton growth is not fully understood. In this stud...

  17. Climate change impacts on water balance in the Romanian Carpathians: more droughts but fewer floods?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perju, Elena-Ruth; Balin, Daniela; Lane, Stuart; Zaharia, Liliana

    2013-04-01

    The understanding of the impacts of climate change upon hydrological systems and water balance remains a fundamental challenge for research in the environmental sciences not least because of the need to forecast the propagation of possible climate change and variability into the domains of critical importance for both ecosystems and human society (e.g. water supply, flood risk). This is particularly important in temperate mountainous regions where climate scenarios suggest significant possible changes in temperature. Even given the relatively high uncertainties regarding precipitation changes, warming effects can significantly change mountain hydrology such as through the partition of rainfall between liquid and snow and evapotranspiration. Further, strong orographic forcing and poorly-developed soil-vegetation systems can lead to the strong amplification of the impacts of climatic variability on the hydrological system. This paper is set within this context and has as a general objective the analysis of the temporal variability of the main climatic parameters and their coupling to hydrological response and water balance in the Romanian Carpathians, specifically focusing on the Bucegi Mountains (maximum altitude: 2505 m a.s.l.; c. 400 sq.km), a region that has been much less studied as compared with other European temperate mountain environments. The project uses two approaches: (1) detailed analysis of climatic and hydrological records for 1961 to 2007 (e.g. temperature, precipitation, wind, sunshine duration, air moisture, thickness of the snow layer, river discharge); and (2) mathematical modelling using WaSIM-ETH to provide higher temporal and spatial resolution predictions of river flow but also the parameters responsible for driving changes in river flow. The analysis of data shows a strong coupling between temperature and precipitation variability and river flow response, superimposed upon both rising temperatures and declining precipitation. However, the

  18. Ponds' water balance and runoff of endorheic watersheds in the Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Laetitia; Grippa, Manuela; Kergoat, Laurent; Hiernaux, Pierre; Mougin, Eric; Peugeot, Christophe

    2015-04-01

    The Sahel has been characterized by a severe rainfall deficit since the mid-twentieth century, with extreme droughts in the early seventies and again in the early eighties. These droughts have strongly impacted ecosystems, water availability, fodder resources, and populations living in these areas. However, an increase of surface runoff has been observed during the same period, such as higher "summer discharge" of Sahelian's rivers generating local floods, and a general increase in pond's surface in pastoral areas of central and northern Sahel. This behavior, less rain but more surface runoff is generally referred to as the "Sahelian paradox". Various hypotheses have been put forward to explain this paradoxical situation. The leading role of increase in cropped areas, often cited for cultivated Sahel, does not hold for pastoral areas in central and northern Sahel. Processes such as degradation of vegetation subsequent to the most severe drought events, soils erosion and runoff concentration on shallow soils, which generate most of the water ending up in ponds, seem to play an important role. This still needs to be fully understood and quantified. Our study focuses on a model-based approach to better understand the hydrological changes that affected the Agoufou watershed (Gourma, Mali), typical of the central, non-cultivated Sahel. Like most of the Sahelian basins, the Agoufou watershed is ungauged. Therefore we used indirect data to provide the information required to validate a rainfall-runoff model approach. The pond volume was calculated by combining in-situ water level measurements with pond's surface estimations derived by remote sensing. Using the pond's water balance equation, the variations of pond volume combined to estimates of open water bodies' evaporation and infiltration determined an estimation for the runoff supplying the pond. This estimation highlights a spectacular runoff increase over the last sixty years on the Agoufou watershed. The runoff

  19. Quantifying groundwater-surface water interactions using a stream energy balance model and dye tracing in a proglacial valley of the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somers, L. D.; Gordon, R.; McKenzie, J. M.; Lautz, L.; Wigmore, O.; Baraer, M.; Mark, B. G.

    2015-12-01

    Streams in many Andean regions provide downstream communities and industries with water sourced from both groundwater and glacier melt, such as the streams of the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, which has the highest density of glaciers in the tropics. From May to September, when precipitation is minimal, approximately half the discharge in the region's proglacial streams comes from groundwater. However, due to the remote nature of the region, there are few effective field methods to identify the spatial distribution of groundwater discharge at the reach scale. An energy balance model, Rhodamine WT dye tracing, and high-definition kite-borne imagery were used to determine gross and net groundwater inputs to a 4 km reach of the Quilcay River within Huascaran National Park, Peru. The HFLUX computer program (http://hydrology.syr.edu/hflux.html) was used to simulate the Quilcay River's energy balance using stream temperature observations, meteorological measurements, and kite-borne areal photography. Model results indicate 29% of stream discharge at the reach outlet was contributed by groundwater discharge over the study section. A constant rate Rhodamine-WT dye tracing experiment, coupled with the energy-balance model, shows that approximately 49% of stream water is exchanged (ie. no net gain) with the subsurface as gross gains and losses. The energy balance simulations suggest the largest net groundwater gains in streamflow occur in reaches situated in low gradient meadows, likely a product of the abundant springs that flow into the main channel. Dye tracing results indicate significant groundwater-surface water exchange occurs in stream sections that traverse cross-valley moraines, where connectivity between the subsurface and the stream is highest. These insights into pathways of groundwater-surface water interaction can be applied to improve hydrological modeling in proglacial catchments throughout South America.

  20. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests.

    PubMed

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19(th) century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected. PMID:25943276

  1. Parameter regionalization of a monthly water balance model for the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bock, Andrew R.; Hay, Lauren E.; McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Atkinson, R.Dwight

    2016-01-01

    A parameter regionalization scheme to transfer parameter values from gaged to ungaged areas for a monthly water balance model (MWBM) was developed and tested for the conterminous United States (CONUS). The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test, a global-sensitivity algorithm, was implemented on a MWBM to generate parameter sensitivities on a set of 109 951 hydrologic response units (HRUs) across the CONUS. The HRUs were grouped into 110 calibration regions based on similar parameter sensitivities. Subsequently, measured runoff from 1575 streamgages within the calibration regions were used to calibrate the MWBM parameters to produce parameter sets for each calibration region. Measured and simulated runoff at the 1575 streamgages showed good correspondence for the majority of the CONUS, with a median computed Nash–Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient of 0.76 over all streamgages. These methods maximize the use of available runoff information, resulting in a calibrated CONUS-wide application of the MWBM suitable for providing estimates of water availability at the HRU resolution for both gaged and ungaged areas of the CONUS.

  2. Parameter regionalization of a monthly water balance model for the conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, Andrew R.; Hay, Lauren E.; McCabe, Gregory J.; Markstrom, Steven L.; Atkinson, R. Dwight

    2016-07-01

    A parameter regionalization scheme to transfer parameter values from gaged to ungaged areas for a monthly water balance model (MWBM) was developed and tested for the conterminous United States (CONUS). The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test, a global-sensitivity algorithm, was implemented on a MWBM to generate parameter sensitivities on a set of 109 951 hydrologic response units (HRUs) across the CONUS. The HRUs were grouped into 110 calibration regions based on similar parameter sensitivities. Subsequently, measured runoff from 1575 streamgages within the calibration regions were used to calibrate the MWBM parameters to produce parameter sets for each calibration region. Measured and simulated runoff at the 1575 streamgages showed good correspondence for the majority of the CONUS, with a median computed Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency coefficient of 0.76 over all streamgages. These methods maximize the use of available runoff information, resulting in a calibrated CONUS-wide application of the MWBM suitable for providing estimates of water availability at the HRU resolution for both gaged and ungaged areas of the CONUS.

  3. Parameter regionalization of a monthly water balance model for the conterminous United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bock, A. R.; Hay, L. E.; McCabe, G. J.; Markstrom, S. L.; Atkinson, R. D.

    2015-09-01

    A parameter regionalization scheme to transfer parameter values and model uncertainty information from gaged to ungaged areas for a monthly water balance model (MWBM) was developed and tested for the conterminous United States (CONUS). The Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test, a global-sensitivity algorithm, was implemented on a MWBM to generate parameter sensitivities on a set of 109 951 hydrologic response units (HRUs) across the CONUS. The HRUs were grouped into 110 calibration regions based on similar parameter sensitivities. Subsequently, measured runoff from 1575 streamgages within the calibration regions were used to calibrate the MWBM parameters to produce parameter sets for each calibration region. Measured and simulated runoff at the 1575 streamgages showed good correspondence for the majority of the CONUS, with a median computed Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency coefficient of 0.76 over all streamgages. These methods maximize the use of available runoff information, resulting in a calibrated CONUS-wide application of the MWBM suitable for providing estimates of water availability at the HRU resolution for both gaged and ungaged areas of the CONUS.

  4. Water flow and energy balance for a tropical dry semideciduous forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, J. L.; Garruña-Hernandez, R.; Leon-Palomo, M.; Us-Santamaria, R.; Sima, J. L.

    2013-05-01

    Tropical forests cool down locally because increase water evaporation from the soil to the atmosphere, reduce albedo and help forming clouds that reflect solar radiation back to the atmosphere; this, aligned to the carbon catchment, increase forests value. We will present an estimation of the sap flow and energy balance for the tropical dry semideciduous forest at Kiuic, Yucatan, Mexico during a year. We use a meteorological tower equipped with a rain gauge, temperature and relative humidity, heat flow plates, thermocouples and volumetric soil water content. We recorded net radiation and soil heat flux and estimated sensible heat and latent heat. Besides, we estimated latent heat by measuring sap flow directly in tres using disispation constant heat probes during the rainy season. Results show the influence of the seasonality on net radiation, air temperatura and vapor pressure deficit, because during the dry season his variables were higher and with more duation than during the rainy and early dry season. Sap flow was different for trees belonging to the family Fabaceae compared to trees from other families.

  5. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water balance of temperate deciduous forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshika, Yasutomo; Katata, Genki; Deushi, Makoto; Watanabe, Makoto; Koike, Takayoshi; Paoletti, Elena

    2015-05-01

    Tropospheric ozone concentrations have increased by 60-100% in the Northern Hemisphere since the 19th century. The phytotoxic nature of ozone can impair forest productivity. In addition, ozone affects stomatal functions, by both favoring stomatal closure and impairing stomatal control. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness, i.e., a delay in stomatal responses to fluctuating stimuli, has the potential to change the carbon and water balance of forests. This effect has to be included in models for ozone risk assessment. Here we examine the effects of ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness on carbon assimilation and transpiration of temperate deciduous forests in the Northern Hemisphere in 2006-2009 by combining a detailed multi-layer land surface model and a global atmospheric chemistry model. An analysis of results by ozone FACE (Free-Air Controlled Exposure) experiments suggested that ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness can be incorporated into modelling based on a simple parameter (gmin, minimum stomatal conductance) which is used in the coupled photosynthesis-stomatal model. Our simulation showed that ozone can decrease water use efficiency, i.e., the ratio of net CO2 assimilation to transpiration, of temperate deciduous forests up to 20% when ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness is considered, and up to only 5% when the stomatal sluggishness is neglected.

  6. Ozone-induced stomatal sluggishness changes carbon and water