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  1. Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on catalase, cytochrome P450 and nitric oxide synthase in erythro-leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Patruno, Antonia; Tabrez, Shams; Pesce, Mirko; Shakil, Shazi; Kamal, Mohammad A; Reale, Marcella

    2015-01-15

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) are widely employed in electrical appliances and different equipment such as television sets, mobile phones, computers and microwaves. The molecular mechanism through which ELF-EMFs can influence cellular behavior is still unclear. A hypothesis is that ELF-EMFs could interfere with chemical reactions involving free radical production. Under physiologic conditions, cells maintain redox balance through production of ROS/RNS and antioxidant molecules. The altered balance between ROS generation and elimination plays a critical role in a variety of pathologic conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, aging and cancer. Actually, there is a disagreement as to whether there is a causal or coincidental relationship between ELF-EMF exposure and leukemia development. Increased ROS levels have been observed in several hematopoietic malignancies including acute and chronic myeloid leukemias. In our study, the effect of ELF-EMF exposure on catalase, cytochrome P450 and inducible nitric oxide synthase activity and their expression by Western blot analysis in myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 was evaluated. A significant modulation of iNOS, CAT and Cyt P450 protein expression was recorded as a result of ELF-EMF exposure in both phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated and non-stimulated cell lines. Modulation in kinetic parameters of CAT, CYP-450 and iNOS enzymes in response to ELF-EMF indicates an interaction between the ELF-EMF and the enzymological system. These new insights might be important in establishing a mechanistic framework at the molecular level within which the possible effects of ELF-EMF on health can be understood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of the neurotoxic potential of exposure to 50Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) in naïve and chemically stressed PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Martje W G D M; Kock, Marjolijn D M; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-09-01

    Increasing exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF), generated by power lines and electric appliances, raises concern about potential adverse health effects of ELF-EMF. The central nervous system is expected to be particularly vulnerable to ELF-EMF as its function strongly depends on electrical excitability. We therefore investigated effects of acute (30min) and sub-chronic (48h) exposure to 50Hz ELF-EMF on naïve and chemically stressed pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. The latter have higher levels of iron and/or reactive oxygen species (ROS) and display increased vulnerability to environmental insults. Effects of ELF-EMF on Ca(2+)-homeostasis, ROS production and membrane integrity were assessed using Fura-2 single cell fluorescence microscopy, H2-DCFDA and CFDA assays, respectively. Our data demonstrate that acute exposure of naïve PC12 cells to 50Hz ELF-EMF up to 1000μT fails to affect basal or depolarization-evoked [Ca(2+)]i. Moreover, sub-chronic ELF-EMF exposure up to 1000μT has no consistent effects on Ca(2+)-homeostasis in naïve PC12 cells and does not affect ROS production and membrane integrity. Notably, in chemically stressed PC12 cells both acute and sub-chronic ELF-EMF exposure also failed to exert consistent effects on Ca(2+)-homeostasis, ROS production and membrane integrity. Our combined findings thus indicate that exposure to 50Hz ELF-EMF up to 1000μT, i.e. 10,000 times above background exposure, does not induce neurotoxic effects in vitro, neither in naïve nor in chemically stressed PC12 cells. Though our data require confirmation, e.g. in developing neuronal cells in vitro or (developing) animals, it appears that the neurotoxic risk of ELF-EMF exposure is limited.

  3. Epinephrine, DNA integrity and oxidative stress in workers exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) at 132 kV substations.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Ravindra; Lakshmi, N K; Bhargava, S C; Ahuja, Y R

    2015-03-01

    There is apprehension about widespread use of electrical and electromagnetic gadgets which are supposed to emit electromagnetic radiations. Reports are controversy. These electromagnetic fields (EMFs) have considerable effect on endocrine system of exposed subjects. This study was focused to assess the possible bioeffects of extremely low-frequency (ELF)-EMFs on epinephrine level, DNA damage and oxidative stress in subjects occupationally exposed to 132 kV high-voltage substations. The blood sample of 142 exposed subjects and 151 non-exposed individuals was analyzed. Plasma epinephrine was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, DNA damage was studied by alkaline comet assay along with oxidative stress. Epinephrine levels of sub-groups showed mean concentration of 75.22  ±  1.46, 64.43  ±  8.26 and 48.47  ±  4.97 for high, medium and low exposed groups, respectively. DNA damage ranged between 1.69 µm and 9.91 µm. The oxidative stress levels showed significant increase. The individuals employed in the live-line procedures were found to be vulnerable for EM stress with altered epinephrine concentrations, DNA damage and increased oxidative stress.

  4. Enhanced cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of gadolinium following ELF-EMF irradiation in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seunghyun; Lee, Younghyun; Lee, Sunyeong; Choi, Young Joo; Chung, Hai Won

    2014-10-01

    There are many studies of Gd nephrotoxicity and neurotoxicity, whereas research on cyto- and genotoxicity in normal human lymphocytes is scarce. It is important to investigate the effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on Gd toxicity, as patients are co-exposed to Gd and ELF-EMF generated by MRI scanners. We investigated the cytotoxicity and genotoixcity of Gd and the possible enhancing effect of ELF-EMF on Gd toxicity in cultured human lymphocytes by performing a micronuclei (MN) assay, trypan blue dye exclusion, single cell gel electrophoresis, and apoptosis analyses using flow cytometry. Isolated lymphocytes were exposed to 0.2-1.2 mM of Gd only or in combination with a 60-Hz ELF-EMF of 0.8-mT field strength. Exposing human lymphocytes to Gd resulted in a concentration- and time-dependent decrease in cell viability and an increase in MN frequency, single strand DNA breakage, apoptotic cell death, and ROS production. ELF-EMF (0.8 mT) exposure also increased cell death, MN frequency, olive tail moment, and apoptosis induced by Gd treatment alone. These results suggest that Gd induces DNA damage and apoptotic cell death in human lymphocytes and that ELF-EMF enhances the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Gd.

  5. Gene expression and reproductive abilities of male Drosophila melanogaster subjected to ELF-EMF exposure.

    PubMed

    Li, Si-Si; Zhang, Zi-Yan; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Cai, Peng

    2013-12-12

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) exposure is attracting increased attention as a possible disease-inducing factor. The in vivo effects of short-term and long-term ELF-EMF exposure on male Drosophila melanogaster were studied using transcriptomic analysis for preliminary screening and QRT-PCR for further verification. Transcriptomic analysis indicated that 439 genes were up-regulated and 874 genes were down-regulated following short-term exposures and that 514 genes were up-regulated and 1206 genes were down-regulated following long-term exposures (expression >2- or <0.5-fold, respectively). In addition, there are 238 up-regulated genes and 598 down-regulated genes in the intersection of short-term and long-term exposure (expression >2- or <0.5-fold). The DEGs (differentially expressed genes) in D. melanogaster following short-term exposures were involved in metabolic processes, cytoskeletal organization, mitotic spindle organization, cell death, protein modification and proteolysis. Long-term exposure let to changes in expression of genes involved in metabolic processes, response to stress, mitotic spindle organization, aging, cell death and cellular respiration. In the intersection of short-term and long-term exposure, a series of DEGs were related to apoptosis, aging, immunological stress and reproduction. To check the ELF-EMF effects on reproduction, some experiments on male reproduction ability were performed. Their results indicated that short-term ELF-EMF exposure may decrease the reproductive ability of males, but long-term exposures had no effect on reproductive ability. Down-regulation of ark gene in the exposed males suggests that the decrease in reproductive capacity may be induced by the effects of ELF-EMF exposure on spermatogenesis through the caspase pathway. QRT-PCR analysis confirmed that jra, ark and decay genes were down regulated in males exposed for 1 Generation (1G) and 72 h, which suggests that apoptosis may be

  6. Use of C. Elegans as a model organism for sensing the effects of ELF-EMFs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacchini, A. H.; Everington, M. L.; Augousti, A. T.; Walker, A. J.

    2007-07-01

    For the past two decades, there have been concerns and controversy about the effects on human health of the increased exposure to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) resulting from electrification, in both residential and industrial settings. Several epidemiological studies have implicated ELF-EMFs averaging 0.4 μmUTesla (T) or more in increased risk of cancer, especially childhood leukaemia [1,2]; there have also been many reports demonstrating effects of power-frequency EMFs on cells [outlined in 1,3]. Unfortunately, however, the precise mechanisms by which ELF-EMFs exert biological effects have proven difficult to define and results of various studies have often been hard to reproduce [1]. We believe that C. elegans offers an exciting opportunity to elucidate the effects of power-frequency EMFs on cell signalling pathways within the whole organism and are therefore investigating the effects of ELF-EMF exposure on MAPK signalling in intact worms and fertilized embryos. Through taking a targeted approach to studying the effects of ELF-EMF's on MAPK signalling in C. elegans we aim to gather data that is physiologically relevant. Presently, this research is at a preliminary stage of preparation, and more detailed results on the exposure of Caenorhabditis elegans to ELF-EMF radiation will be presented at the conference itself.

  7. Short-term exposure to 50 Hz ELF-EMF alters the cisplatin-induced oxidative response in AT478 murine squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Bułdak, Rafał Jakub; Polaniak, Renata; Bułdak, Lukasz; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna; Skonieczna, Magdalena; Monsiol, Aleksandra; Kukla, Michał; Duława-Bułdak, Anna; Birkner, Ewa

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the influence of cisplatin and an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on antioxidant enzyme activity and the lipid peroxidation ratio, as well as the level of DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in AT478 carcinoma cells. Cells were cultured for 24 and 72 h in culture medium with cisplatin. Additionally, the cells were irradiated with 50 Hz/1 mT ELF-EMF for 16 min using a solenoid as a source of the ELF-EMF. The amount of ROS, superoxide dismutase (SOD) isoenzyme activity, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) activity, DNA damage, and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were assessed. Cells that were exposed to cisplatin exhibited a significant increase in ROS and antioxidant enzyme activity. The addition of ELF-EMF exposure to cisplatin treatment resulted in decreased ROS levels and antioxidant enzyme activity. A significant reduction in MDA concentrations was observed in all of the study groups, with the greatest decrease associated with treatment by both cisplatin and ELF-EMF. Cisplatin induced the most severe DNA damage; however, when cells were also irradiated with ELF-EMF, less DNA damage occurred. Exposure to ELF-EMF alone resulted in an increase in DNA damage compared to control cells. ELF-EMF lessened the effects of oxidative stress and DNA damage that were induced by cisplatin; however, ELF-EMF alone was a mild oxidative stressor and DNA damage inducer. We speculate that ELF-EMF exerts differential effects depending on the exogenous conditions. This information may be of value for appraising the pathophysiologic consequences of exposure to ELF-EMF.

  8. Involvement of mitochondrial activity in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Roberto; Delle Monache, Simona; Bennato, Francesca; Di Bartolomeo, Claudia; Scrimaglio, Renato; Cinque, Benedetta; Colonna, Rosella Cardigno

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been reported that the exposure of human spermatozoa to an extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) with a square waveform of 5 mT amplitude and frequency of 50 Hz improves sperm motility. The functional relationship between the energy metabolism and the enhancement of human sperm motility induced by ELF-EMF was investigated. Sperm exposure to ELF-EMF resulted in a progressive and significant increase of mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of ATP, ADP and NAD(+) that was associated with a progressive and significant increase in the sperm kinematic parameters. No significant effects were detected on other parameters such as ATP/ADP ratio and energy charge. When carbamoyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CICCP) was applied to inhibit the oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria, the values of energy parameters and motility in the sperm incubated in the presence of glucose and exposed to ELF-EMF did not change, thus indicating that the glycolysis was not involved in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on motility. By contrast, when pyruvate and lactate were provided instead of glucose, the energy status and motility increased significantly in ELF-EMF-treated sperm. Under these culture conditions, the inhibition of glycolitic metabolism by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DOG) again resulted in increased values of energy and kinematic parameters, indicating that gluconeogenesis was not involved in producing glucose for use in glycolysis. We concluded that the key role in mediating the stimulatory effects exerted by ELF-EMF on human sperm motility is played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation rather than glycolysis.

  9. Effect of ELF-EMF on number of apoptotic cells; correlation with reactive oxygen species and HSP.

    PubMed

    Garip, Ayse Inhan; Akan, Z

    2010-06-01

    It is by now accepted that extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields ELF-EMF (0-300 Hz) affect biological systems although the mechanism has not been elucidated yet. In this study the effect of ELFEMF on the number of apoptotic cells of K562 human leukemia cell line induced or not with oxidative stress and the correlation with heat-shock protein 70 (hsp70) levels was investigated. One sample was treated with H 2 O 2 while the other was left untreated. ELF-EMF (1 mT, 50 Hz) was applied for 3 hours. ELF-EMF alone caused a decrease in the number of apoptotic cells and a slight increase in viability. However, it increased the number of apoptotic cells. In cells treated with H 2 O 2 . hsp70 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased by ELF-EMF. These results show that the effect of ELF-EMF on biological systems depends on the status of the cell: while in cells not exposed to oxidative stress it is able to decrease the number of apoptotic cells by inducing an increase in hsp levels, it increases the number of apoptotic cells in oxidative stress-induced cells.

  10. Proteomics of human primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMFs) and to therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic fields (TAMMEF).

    PubMed

    Corallo, Claudio; Battisti, Emilio; Albanese, Antonietta; Vannoni, Daniela; Leoncini, Roberto; Landi, Giacomo; Gagliardi, Assunta; Landi, Claudia; Carta, Serafino; Nuti, Ranuccio; Giordano, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most frequent joint disease, characterized by degradation of extracellular matrix and alterations in chondrocyte metabolism. Some authors reported that electromagnetic fields (EMFs) can positively interfere with patients affected by OA, even though the nature of the interaction is still debated. Human primary osteoarthritic chondrocytes isolated from the femoral heads of OA-patients undergoing to total hip replacement, were cultured in vitro and exposed 30 min/day for two weeks to extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF) with fixed frequency (100 Hz) and to therapeutic application of musically modulated electromagnetic fields (TAMMEF) with variable frequencies, intensities and waveforms. Sham-exposed (S.E.) cells served as control group. Cell viability was measured at days 2, 7 and 14. After two weeks, cell lysates were processed using a proteomic approach. Chondrocyte exposed to ELF and TAMMEF system demonstrated different viability compared to untreated chondrocytes (S.E.). Proteome analysis of 2D-Electrophoresis and protein identification by mass spectrometry showed different expression of proteins derived from nucleus, cytoplasm and organelles. Function analysis of the identified proteins showed changes in related-proteins metabolism (glyceraldeyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase), stress response (Mn-superoxide-dismutase, heat-shock proteins), cytoskeletal regulation (actin), proteinase inhibition (cystatin-B) and inflammation regulatory functions (S100-A10, S100-A11) among the experimental groups (ELF, TAMMEF and S.E.). In conclusion, EMFs do not cause damage to chondrocytes, besides stimulate safely OA-chondrocytes and are responsible of different protein expression among the three groups. Furthermore, protein analysis of OA-chondrocytes treated with ELF and the new TAMMEF systems could be useful to clarify the pathogenetic mechanisms of OA by identifying biomarkers of the disease.

  11. Resveratrol may reverse the effects of long-term occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields on workers of a power plant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Zhang, Yang; Zhu, Baoyu; Zhang, He; Sun, Ye; Sun, Chengxun

    2017-07-18

    High-voltage electricity lines are known to generate extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs). With the process of urbanization, increasing concerns has been focused on the potentially hazardous impacts of ELF-EMF on human health, and the conclusions are controversial. Little is known about the method of prevention against ELF-EMF induced healthy problems. A total of 186 male workers with occupational exposure to high-voltage electricity lines, and 154 male subjects with insignificant exposure as reference control were enrolled in this study. Resveratrol or placebo was given as dietary supplements (500 mg twice daily), and several inflammatory biomarkers and biomarkers of oxidative stress were assessed. Workers who had long-term exposure to high-voltage electricity lines exhibited elevated urinary levels of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG) and F2-isoprostane, compared to the reference group. Lower plasma nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) and interleukin (IL)-6 were observed in exposed workers compared to the reference group. Resveratrol significantly reversed the adverse impacts of ELF-EMF. Stimulated cytokine production by resveratrol was found in exposed workers but not in the reference group. This study supported that occupational and long-term exposure to high-voltage electricity lines has an adverse effect on homeostasis of human body, and resveratrol supplement could be an effective protection strategy against the adverse effects induced by ELF-EMFs.

  12. Modulation of radical pairs dynamics immersed in an ELF-EMF: The effect on hepatocarcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Riquelme, G. O.; López-Sandoval, E.; Vera-Aguilar, E.; Godina-Nava, J. J.

    2015-01-01

    The most suitable mechanism of action of electromagnetic fields (EMF) on biological systems is the effect on the radical pair (RP) recombination through the Zeeman effect and hyperfine interaction, which changes the rate of reactions or the product distribution. Enzyme reactions with RP intermediates can be altered by EMF, like those catalyzed by cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYP450), a heme-thiolate family protein that detoxifies xenobiotics and involved in chemical carcinogenesis. CYP450 activate chemical carcinogens producing an enormous amount of free radicals, which damage the DNA resulting in the malignant transformation of cells. During the activation, CYP450 produce spin-correlated RP intermediates that can either go to recombination or to continue the catalytic process. As CYP450 are electron carrier proteins, it is possible that RP intermediates may be affected by EMF. It was previously found that periodic treatment with extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) inhibits more than 50% the number and area of preneoplastic lesions in rats with chemically induced hepatocarcinogenesis through reduction of cell proliferation. In this work, we developed a quantum mechanical model based on RP mechanism in order to explain the experimental effects of ELF-EMF on the free radicals produced in the early stages of chemical carcinogenesis.

  13. Vitamin C and Vitamin E Protected B95-8 and Balb/c-3T3 Cells from Apoptosis Induced by Intermittent 50Hz ELF-EMF Radiation

    PubMed Central

    DING, Zhen; LI, Jintao; LI, Fan; MEPHRYAR, Mohammadreza Mohammadzad; WU, Shuicai; ZHANG, Chen; ZENG, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Background: The extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), mainly emitted by electric transmission lines and household electronic appliances, is becoming a worldwide health risk. It is imperative to investigate the biological impacts of ELF-EMF and to identify products that are resistant to the radiation from 50 Hz ELF-EMF. In this study, we investigated the biological impacts of apoptosis caused by 50 Hz Power line ELF-EMF and the protective effects of Vit C and Vit E. Methods: We conducted this study in Beijing, China in 2013. B95-8 and Balb/c-3T3 cells were divided into a sham group, an expo group and 3 expo groups in which the cells were preincubated with various concentrations of Vit C and Vit E. Then, all of the cells were exposed to 50 Hz Power line ELF-EMF and examined for apoptosis. The cells were collected for apoptosis detection after exposure. Results: The percent of cells that undergoing apoptosis and preincubated with various concentrations of Vit C and Vit E were significantly lower than in the Expo group. Conclusion: Vit C and Vit E exert significant protective effects from 50 Hz ELF-EMF radiation. The optimal protective concentrations of Vit C and Vit E are 10 μmol/L and 25 μmol/L, respectively. The protective effect of vitamins was more apparent for Balb/c-3T3 cells than B95-8 cells. PMID:28451526

  14. Exposure of ELF-EMF and RF-EMF Increase the Rate of Glucose Transport and TCA Cycle in Budding Yeast.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kang-Wei; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the transcriptional response to 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and 2.0 GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure by Illumina sequencing technology using budding yeast as the model organism. The transcription levels of 28 genes were upregulated and those of four genes were downregulated under ELF-EMF exposure, while the transcription levels of 29 genes were upregulated and those of 24 genes were downregulated under RF-EMF exposure. After validation by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), a concordant direction of change both in differential gene expression (DGE) and RT-qPCR was demonstrated for nine genes under ELF-EMF exposure and for 10 genes under RF-EMF exposure. The RT-qPCR results revealed that ELF-EMF and RF-EMF exposure can upregulate the expression of genes involved in glucose transportation and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, but not the glycolysis pathway. Energy metabolism is closely related with the cell response to environmental stress including EMF exposure. Our findings may throw light on the mechanism underlying the biological effects of EMF.

  15. Exposure of ELF-EMF and RF-EMF Increase the Rate of Glucose Transport and TCA Cycle in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kang-Wei; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the transcriptional response to 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and 2.0 GHz radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure by Illumina sequencing technology using budding yeast as the model organism. The transcription levels of 28 genes were upregulated and those of four genes were downregulated under ELF-EMF exposure, while the transcription levels of 29 genes were upregulated and those of 24 genes were downregulated under RF-EMF exposure. After validation by reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), a concordant direction of change both in differential gene expression (DGE) and RT-qPCR was demonstrated for nine genes under ELF-EMF exposure and for 10 genes under RF-EMF exposure. The RT-qPCR results revealed that ELF-EMF and RF-EMF exposure can upregulate the expression of genes involved in glucose transportation and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, but not the glycolysis pathway. Energy metabolism is closely related with the cell response to environmental stress including EMF exposure. Our findings may throw light on the mechanism underlying the biological effects of EMF. PMID:27630630

  16. Experimental model for ELF-EMF exposure: Concern for human health

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, C.; Costantini, E.; Kamal, M.A.; Reale, M.

    2014-01-01

    Low frequency (LF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are abundantly present in modern society and in the last 20 years the interest about the possible effect of extremely low frequency (ELF) EMFs on human health has increased progressively. Epidemiological studies, designed to verify whether EMF exposure may be a potential risk factor for health, have led to controversial results. The possible association between EMFs and an increased incidence of childhood leukemia, brain tumors or neurodegenerative diseases was not fully elucidated. On the other hand, EMFs are widely used, in neurology, psychiatry, rheumatology, orthopedics and dermatology, both in diagnosis and in therapy. In vitro studies may help to evaluate the mechanism by which LF-EMFs affect biological systems. Invitro model of wound healing used keratinocytes (HaCaT), neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) as a model for analysis of differentiation, metabolism and functions related to neurodegenerative processes, and monocytic cell line (THP-1) was used as a model for inflammation and cytokines production, while leukemic cell line (K562) was used as a model for hematopoietic differentiation. MCP-1, a chemokine that regulates the migration and infiltration of memory T cells, natural killer (NK), monocytes and epithelial cells, has been demonstrated to be induced and involved in various diseases. Since, varying the parameters of EMFs different effects may be observed, we have studied MCP-1 expression in HaCaT, SH-SY5Y, THP-1 and K562 exposed to a sinusoidal EMF at 50 Hz frequency with a flux density of 1 mT (rms). Our preliminary results showed that EMF-exposure differently modifies the expression of MCP-1 in different cell types. Thus, the MCP-1 expression needs to be better determined, with additional studies, with different parameters and times of exposure to ELF-EMF. PMID:25561888

  17. Experimental model for ELF-EMF exposure: Concern for human health.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, C; Costantini, E; Kamal, M A; Reale, M

    2015-01-01

    Low frequency (LF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are abundantly present in modern society and in the last 20 years the interest about the possible effect of extremely low frequency (ELF) EMFs on human health has increased progressively. Epidemiological studies, designed to verify whether EMF exposure may be a potential risk factor for health, have led to controversial results. The possible association between EMFs and an increased incidence of childhood leukemia, brain tumors or neurodegenerative diseases was not fully elucidated. On the other hand, EMFs are widely used, in neurology, psychiatry, rheumatology, orthopedics and dermatology, both in diagnosis and in therapy. In vitro studies may help to evaluate the mechanism by which LF-EMFs affect biological systems. In vitro model of wound healing used keratinocytes (HaCaT), neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) as a model for analysis of differentiation, metabolism and functions related to neurodegenerative processes, and monocytic cell line (THP-1) was used as a model for inflammation and cytokines production, while leukemic cell line (K562) was used as a model for hematopoietic differentiation. MCP-1, a chemokine that regulates the migration and infiltration of memory T cells, natural killer (NK), monocytes and epithelial cells, has been demonstrated to be induced and involved in various diseases. Since, varying the parameters of EMFs different effects may be observed, we have studied MCP-1 expression in HaCaT, SH-SY5Y, THP-1 and K562 exposed to a sinusoidal EMF at 50 Hz frequency with a flux density of 1 mT (rms). Our preliminary results showed that EMF-exposure differently modifies the expression of MCP-1 in different cell types. Thus, the MCP-1 expression needs to be better determined, with additional studies, with different parameters and times of exposure to ELF-EMF.

  18. Quantification of lifetime accumulated ELF-EMF exposure from household appliances in the context of a retrospective epidemiological case-control study.

    PubMed

    Behrens, Thomas; Terschüren, Claudia; Kaune, William T; Hoffmann, Wolfgang

    2004-03-01

    In Europe household appliances are a major source of indoor 50 Hz magnetic field exposure. A number of epidemiological studies have reported associations between leukemia risk and personal use of household appliances. In the "Norddeutsche Leukämie und Lymphomstudie" (NLL), which was conducted in Northern Germany (Schleswig-Holstein and Lower Saxony) between 1997 and 2001, lifetime use of a preselected array of electric appliances (microwave ovens, hair-dryers, motorized electrical alarm clocks (i.e. that use a motor to move their hands or digits), electric blankets and pillows, heated waterbeds, computers with conventional screens, TVs, and electric sewing machines) was recorded in a standardized, personal, computerized interview. Exposure was assessed on three different levels of precision: ever use, cumulative appliance-years, and average time of daily use. Additional questions referred to exposure modifying factors, including distance from screen while watching TV, position of an alarm clock at the bed etc.). Exposure to ELF-EMF from household appliances was quantified as ever vs. never use, gross and net appliance-years of lifetime use and cumulative microT-hours. Flux densities were based on measurements of appliances from the published literature. These were used as weighting factors to account for the different device-specific contributions to overall ELF-EMF exposure. Resulting distributions (as quartiles) for exposure scores revealed systematic differences for different levels of precision. Our analysis indicates that valid assessment of ELF-EMF exposure from household appliances should be based on the highest possible degree of precision and hence provides a considerable challenge in analytic epidemiology.

  19. Design and fabrication of a microplatform for the proximity effect study of localized ELF-EMF on the growth of in vitro HeLa and PC-12 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. C.; Chen, C. C.; Tu, W.; Cheng, Y. T.; Tseng, F. G.

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents a platform technology with experimental results that show the scientists and biologists a way to rapidly investigate and analyze the biological effects of localized extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) on living cells. The proximity effect of the localized ELF-EMF on living cells is revealed using the bio-compatible microplatform on which an on-glass inductive coil array, the source of the localized ELF-EMF in micro scale, is designed, fabricated and operated with a field strength of 1.2 ± 0.1 mT at 60 Hz for cell culturing study. After a 72 h ELF-EMF exposure, HeLa (human cervical cancer) and PC-12 (rat pheochromocytoma) cells exhibit about 18.4% and 12.9% cell proliferation rate reduction, respectively. Furthermore, according to the presented dynamic model, the reduction of the proliferation can be attributed to the interference of signal transduction processes due to the tangential currents induced around the cells.

  20. mTOR Activation by PI3K/Akt and ERK Signaling in Short ELF-EMF Exposed Human Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Patruno, Antonia; Pesce, Mirko; Grilli, Alfredo; Speranza, Lorenza; Franceschelli, Sara; De Lutiis, Maria Anna; Vianale, Giovina; Costantini, Erica; Amerio, Paolo; Muraro, Raffaella; Felaco, Mario; Reale, Marcella

    2015-01-01

    Several reports suggest that ELF-EMF exposures interact with biological processes including promotion of cell proliferation. However, the molecular mechanisms by which ELF-EMF controls cell growth are not completely understood. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of ELF-EMF on keratinocytes proliferation and molecular mechanisms involved. Effect of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 1 mT) on HaCaT cell cycle and cells growth and viability was monitored by FACS analysis and BrdU assay. Gene expression profile by microarray and qRT-PCR validation was performed in HaCaT cells exposed or not to ELF-EMF. mTOR, Akt and MAPKs expressions were evaluated by Western blot analysis. In HaCaT cells, short ELF-EMF exposure modulates distinct patterns of gene expression involved in cell proliferation and in the cell cycle. mTOR activation resulted the main molecular target of ELF-EMF on HaCaT cells. Our data showed the increase of the canonical pathway of mTOR regulation (PI3K/Akt) and activation of ERK signaling pathways. Our results indicate that ELF-EMF selectively modulated the expression of multiple genes related to pivotal biological processes and functions that play a key role in physio-pathological mechanisms such as wound healing. PMID:26431550

  1. Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields inhibits T-type calcium channels via AA/LTE4 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yujie; Liu, Xiaoyu; Yang, Tingting; Mei, Yan-Ai; Hu, Changlong

    2014-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) causes various biological effects through altering intracellular calcium homeostasis. The role of high voltage-gated (HVA) calcium channels in ELF-EMF induced effects has been extensively studied. However, the effect of ELF-EMF on low-voltage-gated (LVA) T-type calcium channels has not been reported. In this study, we test the effect of ELF-EMF (50Hz) on human T-type calcium channels transfected in HEK293 cells. Conversely to its stimulant effects on HVA channels, ELF-EMF exposure inhibited all T-type (Cav3.1, Cav3.2 and Cav3.3) channels. Neither the protein expression nor the steady-state activation and inactivation kinetics of Cav3.2 channels were altered by ELF-EMF (50Hz, 0.2mT) exposure. Exposure to ELF-EMF increased both arachidonic acid (AA) and leukotriene E4 (LTE4) levels in HEK293 cells. CAY10502 and bestatin, which block the increase of AA and LTE4 respectively, abrogated the ELF-EMF inhibitory effect on Cav3.2 channels. Exogenous LTE4 mimicked the ELF-EMF inhibition of T-type calcium channels. ELF-EMF (50Hz) inhibits native T-type calcium channels in primary cultured mouse cortical neurons via LTE4. We conclude that 50Hz ELF-EMF inhibits T-type calcium channels through AA/LTE4 signaling pathway.

  2. Extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields and cancer: A literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Creasey, W.A.; Goldberg, R.B. )

    1989-12-01

    Epidemiologic studies suggest a weak link between occupational or residential exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields and cancer, especially tumors of the central nervous and hematopoietic systems. This report discusses these studies with reference to basic research on ELF EMF bioeffects relevant to cancer-promoting mechanisms. Many of the studies suggest a possible interaction of ELF EMF with the immune system, endocrine system, or growth-regulatory signals and morphogenic movements that involve calcium flux through cell membranes. Many bioeffects have been reported only with certain specific combinations of frequency, amplitude, and orientation of the EMF signal with respect to the geomagnetic field. The possibility of signal-specific effects raises a complication in dosimetry for both epidemiologic and experimental studies since ELF EMF effects may not be directly related to field strength. The report concludes with a discussion of design considerations for ELF EMF exposure systems to be used in animal experiments. Original abstracts of selected references are included in an appendix. 260 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  3. Distinct Epidermal Keratinocytes Respond to Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Differently

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chao-Ying; Chuang, Chun-Yu; Shu, Wun-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Chen, Chaang-Ray; Fan, Tai-Ching; Hsu, Ian C.

    2014-01-01

    Following an increase in the use of electric appliances that can generate 50 or 60 Hz electromagnetic fields, concerns have intensified regarding the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) on human health. Previous epidemiological studies have suggested the carcinogenic potential of environmental exposure to ELF-EMFs, specifically at 50 or 60 Hz. However, the biological mechanism facilitating the effects of ELF-EMFs remains unclear. Cellular studies have yielded inconsistent results regarding the biological effects of ELF-EMFs. The inconsistent results might have been due to diverse cell types. In our previous study, we indicated that 1.5 mT, 60 Hz ELF-EMFs will cause G1 arrest through the activation of the ATM-Chk2-p21 pathway in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether ELF-EMFs cause similar effects in a distinct epidermal keratinocyte, primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), by using the same ELF-EMF exposure system and experimental design. We observed that ELF-EMFs exerted no effects on cell growth, cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, and the activation of ATM signaling pathway in NHEK cells. We demonstrated that the 2 epidermal keratinocytes responded to ELF-EMFs differently. To further validate this finding, we simultaneously exposed the NHEK and HaCaT cells to ELF-EMFs in the same incubator for 168 h and observed the cell growths. The simultaneous exposure of the two cell types results showed that the NHEK and HaCaT cells exhibited distinct responses to ELF-EMFs. Thus, we confirmed that the biological effects of ELF-EMFs in epidermal keratinocytes are cell type specific. Our findings may partially explain the inconsistent results of previous studies when comparing results across various experimental models. PMID:25409520

  4. Distinct epidermal keratinocytes respond to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields differently.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Ying; Chuang, Chun-Yu; Shu, Wun-Yi; Chang, Cheng-Wei; Chen, Chaang-Ray; Fan, Tai-Ching; Hsu, Ian C

    2014-01-01

    Following an increase in the use of electric appliances that can generate 50 or 60 Hz electromagnetic fields, concerns have intensified regarding the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) on human health. Previous epidemiological studies have suggested the carcinogenic potential of environmental exposure to ELF-EMFs, specifically at 50 or 60 Hz. However, the biological mechanism facilitating the effects of ELF-EMFs remains unclear. Cellular studies have yielded inconsistent results regarding the biological effects of ELF-EMFs. The inconsistent results might have been due to diverse cell types. In our previous study, we indicated that 1.5 mT, 60 Hz ELF-EMFs will cause G1 arrest through the activation of the ATM-Chk2-p21 pathway in human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether ELF-EMFs cause similar effects in a distinct epidermal keratinocyte, primary normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK), by using the same ELF-EMF exposure system and experimental design. We observed that ELF-EMFs exerted no effects on cell growth, cell proliferation, cell cycle distribution, and the activation of ATM signaling pathway in NHEK cells. We demonstrated that the 2 epidermal keratinocytes responded to ELF-EMFs differently. To further validate this finding, we simultaneously exposed the NHEK and HaCaT cells to ELF-EMFs in the same incubator for 168 h and observed the cell growths. The simultaneous exposure of the two cell types results showed that the NHEK and HaCaT cells exhibited distinct responses to ELF-EMFs. Thus, we confirmed that the biological effects of ELF-EMFs in epidermal keratinocytes are cell type specific. Our findings may partially explain the inconsistent results of previous studies when comparing results across various experimental models.

  5. Effects of 100-μT extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields exposure on hematograms and blood chemistry in rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jinsheng; Zhang, Yemao; Zhang, Jiangong; Liu, Xingfa; Ruan, Guoran; Chaugai, Sandip; Tang, Jiarong; Wang, Hong; Chen, Chen; Wang, Dao Wen

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMFs) affect health or not. Here, we constructed a 100-μT/50 Hz electromagnetic field atmosphere. A total of 128 rats were randomly assigned into two groups: the ELF EMF group and the sham group. The ELF EMF group was exposed to 100-μT/50-Hz ELF EMF for 20 h per day for three months; at the same time the other group was exposed to a sham device without ELF EMF. During the three months, the weight was recorded every 2 weeks, and the water intake and food intake of the animals were recorded weekly. The hematologic parameters were detected before and after the exposure, whereas blood chemistry analysis was performed every 4 weeks. The general condition of the exposed rats was not affected by ELF EMF. Compared with the sham group, the hematograms were not significantly altered in the ELF EMF group. Similarly, the blood chemistry (including lipid profile, blood glucose, liver function and renal function of rats) from the ELF EMF group showed no difference compared with rats from the control group during the three months exposure. The present study indicated that short-term exposure of 100-μT/50-Hz ELF EMF may not affect hematograms and blood chemistry in rats. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  6. Effects of exposure to an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field on hippocampal long-term potentiation in rat.

    PubMed

    Komaki, Alireza; Khalili, Afshin; Salehi, Iraj; Shahidi, Siamak; Sarihi, Abdolrahman

    2014-05-20

    Modern lifestyle exposes nearly all humans to electromagnetic fields, particularly to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs). Prolonged exposure to ELF-EMFs induces persistent changes in neuronal activity. However, the modulation of synaptic efficiency by ELF-EMFs in vivo is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether ELF-EMFs can change induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) and paired-pulse ratio (PPR) in the rat hippocampal area. Twenty-nine adult male Wistar rats were divided into 3 groups (ELF-EMF exposed, sham and control groups). The ELF-EMF group was exposed to a magnetic field for 90 consecutive days (2h/day). ELF-EMFs were produced by a circular coil (50Hz, 100 micro Tesla). The sham-exposed controls were placed in an identical chamber with no electromagnetic field. After this period, rats were deeply anesthetized with urethane (2.0mg/kg) and then a bipolar stimulating and recording electrode was implanted into the perforant pathway (PP) and dentate gyrus (DG), respectively. LTP in hippocampal area was induced by high-frequency stimulation (HFS). Prolonged exposure to ELF-EMFs increased LTP induction. There was a significant difference in the slope of EPSP and amplitude of PS between the ELF-EMF group and other groups. In conclusion, our data suggest that exposure to ELF-EMFs produces a marked change in the synaptic plasticity generated in synapses of the PP-DG. No significant difference in PPR of ELF-EMF group before and after HFS suggests a postsynaptic expression site of LTP.

  7. The preventive effect of lotus seedpod procyanidins on cognitive impairment and oxidative damage induced by extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yuqing; Wang, Zhigao; Zhang, Haihui; He, Yuanqing; Lu, Rongzhu; Zhang, Rui; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2013-08-01

    The present study investigated the effects of lotus seedpod procyanidins (LSPCs) administered by oral gavage on the cognitive deficits and oxidative damage of mice at extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) exposure (50 Hz, 8 mT, 28 days). The results showed that 90 mg kg⁻¹ LSPCs treatment significantly increased body weight compared with the ELF-EMF group at ELF-EMF exposure and effectively maintained liver index, thymus index, kidney index and spleen index close to normal. A water maze test indicated that learning and memory abilities of the ELF-EMF group deteriorated significantly with ELF-EMF exposure when compared with the control group, but the ELF-EMF + LSPCs90 group had remarkably improved learning and memory abilities compared with the ELF-EMF group. Malondialdehyde (MDA), reactive oxygen species (ROS), nitric oxide (NO) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) mostly exhibited significant increases, while the activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) decreased significantly under ELF-EMF exposure in the ELF-EMF group. LSPCs (especially 60, 90 mg kg⁻¹) administration decreased MDA, ROS, NO content and lowered NOS activity in LSPCs treatment groups. Furthermore, LSPCs (60, 90 mg kg⁻¹) treatment significantly augmented GPx, CAT, SOD activity in the hippocampus and serum. Pathological observation showed that number of pyramidal cells of the CA1 and CA3 regions of the hippocampus of the LSPCs treatment groups was significantly greater than the ELF-EMF group. All the data suggested that the LSPCs can effectively prevent learning and memory damage and oxidative damage caused by the ELF-EMF, most likely through the ability of LSPCs to scavenge oxygen free radicals and to stimulate antioxidant enzyme activity.

  8. Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Promote In Vitro Neuronal Differentiation and Neurite Outgrowth of Embryonic Neural Stem Cells via Up-Regulating TRPC1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qinlong; Chen, Chunhai; Deng, Ping; Zhu, Gang; Lin, Min; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Shangcheng; He, Mindi; Lu, Yonghui; Duan, Weixia; Pi, Huifeng; Cao, Zhengwang; Pei, Liping; Li, Min; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhong, Min; Zhou, Zhou; Yu, Zhengping

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) can enhance hippocampal neurogenesis in adult mice. However, little is focused on the effects of ELF-EMFs on embryonic neurogenesis. Here, we studied the potential effects of ELF-EMFs on embryonic neural stem cells (eNSCs). We exposed eNSCs to ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 1 mT) for 1, 2, and 3 days with 4 hours per day. We found that eNSC proliferation and maintenance were significantly enhanced after ELF-EMF exposure in proliferation medium. ELF-EMF exposure increased the ratio of differentiated neurons and promoted the neurite outgrowth of eNSC-derived neurons without influencing astrocyes differentiation and the cell apoptosis. In addition, the expression of the proneural genes, NeuroD and Ngn1, which are crucial for neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth, was increased after ELF-EMF exposure. Moreover, the expression of transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1) was significantly up-regulated accompanied by increased the peak amplitude of intracellular calcium level induced by ELF-EMF. Furthermore, silencing TRPC1 expression eliminated the up-regulation of the proneural genes and the promotion of neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth induced by ELF-EMF. These results suggest that ELF-EMF exposure promotes the neuronal differentiation and neurite outgrowth of eNSCs via up-regulation the expression of TRPC1 and proneural genes (NeuroD and Ngn1). These findings also provide new insights in understanding the effects of ELF-EMF exposure on embryonic brain development. PMID:26950212

  9. Quantum Mechanics Action of ELF Electromagnetic Fields on Living Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina-Nava, J. J.

    2010-10-01

    There is presently an intense discussion if extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) exposure has consequences for human health. This include exposure to structures and appliances from this range of frequency in the electromagnetic (EM) spectrum. Biological effects of such exposures have been noted frequently, although the implications for specific health effects is not that clear. The basic interactions mechanisms between such fields and living matter is unknown. Numerous hypotheses have been suggested, although none is convincingly supported by experimental data. Various cellular components, processes, and systems can be affected by EMF exposure. Since it is unlikely that EMF can induce DNA damage directly, most studies have examined EMF effects on the cell membrane level, general and specific gene expression, and signal transduction pathways. Even more, a large number of studies have been performed regarding cell proliferation, cell cycle regulation, cell differentiation, metabolism, and various physiological characteristics of cells. The aim of this letter is present the hypothesis of a possible quantum mechanic effect generated by the exposure of ELF EMF, an event which is compatible with the multitude of effects observed after exposure. Based on an extensive literature review, we suggest that ELF EMF exposure is able to perform such activation restructuring the electronic level of occupancy of free radicals in molecules interacting with DNA structures.

  10. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields enhance the proliferation and differentiation of neural progenitor cells cultured from ischemic brains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yannan; Dai, Yiqin; Zhu, Ximin; Xu, Haochen; Cai, Ping; Xia, Ruohong; Mao, Lizhen; Zhao, Bing-Qiao; Fan, Wenying

    2015-10-21

    In the mammalian brain, neurogenesis persists throughout the embryonic period and adulthood in the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle and the granular zone (dentate gyrus) of the hippocampus. Newborn neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in the two regions play a critical role in structural and functional plasticity and neural regeneration after brain injury. Previous studies have reported that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) could promote osteogenesis, angiogenesis, and cardiac stem cells' differentiation, which indicates that ELF-EMF might be an effective tool for regenerative therapy. The present studies were carried out to examine the effects of ELF-EMF on hippocampal NPCs cultured from embryonic and adult ischemic brains. We found that exposure to ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 0.4 mT) significantly enhanced the proliferation capability both in embryonic NPCs and in ischemic NPCs. Neuronal differentiation was also enhanced after 7 days of cumulative ELF-EMF exposure, whereas glial differentiation was not influenced markedly. The expression of phosphorylated Akt increased during the proliferation process when ischemic NPCs were exposed to ELF-EMF. However, blockage of the Akt pathway abolished the ELF-EMF-induced proliferation of ischemic NPCs. These data show that ELF-EMF promotes neurogenesis of ischemic NPCs and suggest that this effect may occur through the Akt pathway.Video abstract, Supplemental Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/WNR/A347.

  11. Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field on the health of workers in automotive industry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhao, Longyu; Yu, Duo; Ma, Shumei; Liu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-01

    To observe the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) in automotive industry on occupational workers. A total of 704 workers were investigated, and 374 workers were chosen and divided into two groups (control group and exposure group) according to the inclusive criteria, namely male with age 20-40 years old and ≥ 2 years of exposure. The intensities of ELF-EMFs and noise were detected with EFA-300 Field Analyzer (Narda company, Pfullingen, Germany) and AWA5610D integrating sound level meter (Hangzhou Aihua Instruments Co., Ltd, Hangzhou, China), respectively. Survey data were collected by questionnaire, and the physical check-up was done in hospital. All the data were input into SPSS17.0 software (SPSS Inc, Chicago, USA), and the appropriate statistic analyses were carried out. The intensity of EMFs in exposure group was significantly higher than that in control group (p < 0.05), while the noise in two workplaces showed no difference (p>0.05). The survey data collected by questionnaires showed that the symptoms of loss of hair in exposure group were significantly different as compared with that in control group (p < 0.05). The check-up parameters of cardiovascular, liver and hematology system showed significant differences between the two groups (p < 0.05). Survey and check-up data suggest that exposure to ELF-EMFs might have effects on the nervous, cardiovascular, liver, and hematology system of workers.

  12. Melatonin protects rat cerebellar granule cells against electromagnetic field-induced increases in Na+ currents through intracellular Ca2+ release

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dong-Dong; Ren, Zhen; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Qian-Ru; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2014-01-01

    Although melatonin (MT) has been reported to protect cells against oxidative damage induced by electromagnetic radiation, few reports have addressed whether there are other protective mechanisms. Here, we investigated the effects of MT on extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF)-induced Nav activity in rat cerebellar granule cells (GCs). Exposing cerebellar GCs to ELF-EMF for 60 min. significantly increased the Nav current (INa) densities by 62.5%. MT (5 μM) inhibited the ELF-EMF-induced INa increase. This inhibitory effect of MT is mimicked by an MT2 receptor agonist and was eliminated by an MT2 receptor antagonist. The Nav channel steady-state activation curve was significantly shifted towards hyperpolarization by ELF-EMF stimulation but remained unchanged by MT in cerebellar GC that were either exposed or not exposed to ELF-EMF. ELF-EMF exposure significantly increased the intracellular levels of phosphorylated PKA in cerebellar GCs, and both MT and IIK-7 did not reduce the ELF-EMF-induced increase in phosphorylated PKA. The inhibitory effects of MT on ELF-EMF-induced Nav activity was greatly reduced by the calmodulin inhibitor KN93. Calcium imaging showed that MT did not increase the basal intracellular Ca2+ level, but it significantly elevated the intracellular Ca2+ level evoked by the high K+ stimulation in cerebellar GC that were either exposed or not exposed to ELF-EMF. In the presence of ruthenium red, a ryanodine-sensitive receptor blocker, the MT-induced increase in intracellular calcium levels was reduced. Our data show for the first time that MT protects against neuronal INa that result from ELF-EMF exposure through Ca2+ influx-induced Ca2+ release. PMID:24548607

  13. Melatonin protects rat cerebellar granule cells against electromagnetic field-induced increases in Na(+) currents through intracellular Ca(2+) release.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dong-Dong; Ren, Zhen; Yang, Guang; Zhao, Qian-Ru; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2014-06-01

    Although melatonin (MT) has been reported to protect cells against oxidative damage induced by electromagnetic radiation, few reports have addressed whether there are other protective mechanisms. Here, we investigated the effects of MT on extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF)-induced Nav activity in rat cerebellar granule cells (GCs). Exposing cerebellar GCs to ELF-EMF for 60 min. significantly increased the Nav current (INa ) densities by 62.5%. MT (5 μM) inhibited the ELF-EMF-induced INa increase. This inhibitory effect of MT is mimicked by an MT2 receptor agonist and was eliminated by an MT2 receptor antagonist. The Nav channel steady-state activation curve was significantly shifted towards hyperpolarization by ELF-EMF stimulation but remained unchanged by MT in cerebellar GC that were either exposed or not exposed to ELF-EMF. ELF-EMF exposure significantly increased the intracellular levels of phosphorylated PKA in cerebellar GCs, and both MT and IIK-7 did not reduce the ELF-EMF-induced increase in phosphorylated PKA. The inhibitory effects of MT on ELF-EMF-induced Nav activity was greatly reduced by the calmodulin inhibitor KN93. Calcium imaging showed that MT did not increase the basal intracellular Ca(2+) level, but it significantly elevated the intracellular Ca(2+) level evoked by the high K(+) stimulation in cerebellar GC that were either exposed or not exposed to ELF-EMF. In the presence of ruthenium red, a ryanodine-sensitive receptor blocker, the MT-induced increase in intracellular calcium levels was reduced. Our data show for the first time that MT protects against neuronal INa that result from ELF-EMF exposure through Ca(2+) influx-induced Ca(2+) release. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  14. Rat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells aging reduction by zinc sulfate under extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure is associated with increased telomerase reverse transcriptase gene expression.

    PubMed

    Fathi, Ezzatollah; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Yolmeh, Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Zinc as an essential trace element was reported to be involved in regulation of the growth and aging of cells. In this study, rat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) of 50 Hz and 20 mT to evaluate whether exposure to ELF-EMF in the presence of zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) affects the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene expression and aging in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The cell plates were divided into four groups including group I (control without ZnSO4 and ELF-EMF exposure); group II (ELF-EMF-exposure without ZnSO4); group III (ZnSO4 treatment without ELF-EMF exposure) and group ІV (ELF-EMF exposure with ZnSO4). In the presence of different concentrations of ZnSO4, cells viability, TERT gene expression and percentage of senescent cells were evaluated using colorimetric assay, real-time PCR and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity assay, respectively. In this experiment, cells were exposed to ELF-EMF for 30 min per day for 21 days in the presence and absence of ZnSO4. The results revealed that ELF-EMF leads to a decrease in the expression of TERT gene and increase in the percentage of senescent cells. However, the ZnSO4 could significantly increase the TERT gene expression and decrease the aging of ELF-EMF-exposed MSCs. It seems that ZnSO4 may be a beneficial agent to delay aging of ELF-EMF-exposed MSCs due to the induction of TERT gene expression.

  15. Rat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells aging reduction by zinc sulfate under extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure is associated with increased telomerase reverse transcriptase gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Ezzatollah; Farahzadi, Raheleh; Rahbarghazi, Reza; Samadi Kafil, Hossein; Yolmeh, Rahman

    2017-01-01

    Zinc as an essential trace element was reported to be involved in regulation of the growth and aging of cells. In this study, rat adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells were exposed to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) of 50 Hz and 20 mT to evaluate whether exposure to ELF-EMF in the presence of zinc sulfate (ZnSO4) affects the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) gene expression and aging in mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). The cell plates were divided into four groups including group I (control without ZnSO4 and ELF-EMF exposure); group II (ELF-EMF-exposure without ZnSO4); group III (ZnSO4 treatment without ELF-EMF exposure) and group ІV (ELF-EMF exposure with ZnSO4). In the presence of different concentrations of ZnSO4, cells viability, TERT gene expression and percentage of senescent cells were evaluated using colorimetric assay, real-time PCR and senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity assay, respectively. In this experiment, cells were exposed to ELF-EMF for 30 min per day for 21 days in the presence and absence of ZnSO4. The results revealed that ELF-EMF leads to a decrease in the expression of TERT gene and increase in the percentage of senescent cells. However, the ZnSO4 could significantly increase the TERT gene expression and decrease the aging of ELF-EMF-exposed MSCs. It seems that ZnSO4 may be a beneficial agent to delay aging of ELF-EMF-exposed MSCs due to the induction of TERT gene expression. PMID:28785382

  16. Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field from Convective Air Warming System on Temperature Selection and Distance.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kwang Rae; Kim, Myoung-Hun; Ko, Myoung Jin; Jung, Jae Wook; Lee, Ki Hwa; Park, Yei-Heum; Kim, Yong Han; Kim, Ki Hoon; Kim, Jin Soo

    2014-12-01

    Hypothermia generates potentially severe complications in operating or recovery room. Forced air warmer is effective to maintain body temperature. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) is harmful to human body and mainly produced by electronic equipment including convective air warming system. We investigated ELF-EMF from convective air warming device on various temperature selection and distance for guideline to protect medical personnel and patients. The intensity of ELF-EMF was measured as two-second interval for five minutes on various distance (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5 and 1meter) and temperature selection (high, medium, low and ambient). All of electrical devices were off including lamp, computer and air conditioner. Groups were compared using one-way ANOVA. P<0.05 was considered significant. Mean values of ELF-EMF on the distance of 30 cm were 18.63, 18.44, 18.23 and 17.92 milligauss (mG) respectively (high, medium, low and ambient temperature set). ELF-EMF of high temperature set was higher than data of medium, low and ambient set in all the distances. ELF-EMF from convective air warming system is higher in condition of more close location and higher temperature. ELF-EMF within thirty centimeters exceeds 2mG recommended by Swedish TCO guideline.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of lotus seedpod procyanidins on extremely low frequency electromagnetic field-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Yin, Chunchun; Luo, Xiaoping; Duan, Yuqing; Duan, Wenyi; Zhang, Haihui; He, Yuanqing; Sun, Guibo; Sun, Xiaobo

    2016-08-01

    The present study investigated the protective effects of lotus seedpod procyanidins (LSPCs) on extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF)-induced neurotoxicity in primary cultured rat hippocampal neurons and the underlying molecular mechanism. The results of MTT, morphological observation, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) assays showed that compared with control, incubating neurons under ELF-EMF exposure significantly decreased cell viability and increased the number of apoptotic cells, whereas LSPCs evidently protected the hippocampal neurons against ELF-EMF-induced cell damage. Moreover, a certain concentration of LSPCs inhibited the elevation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and Ca(2+) level, as well as prevented the disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential induced by ELF-EMF exposure. In addition, supplementation with LSPCs could alleviate DNA damage, block cell cycle arrest at S phase, and inhibit apoptosis and necrosis of hippocampal neurons under ELF-EMF exposure. Further study demonstrated that LSPCs up-regulated the activations of Bcl-2, Bcl-xl proteins and suppressed the expressions of Bad, Bax proteins caused by ELF-EMF exposure. In conclusion, these findings revealed that LSPCs protected against ELF-EMF-induced neurotoxicity through inhibiting oxidative stress and mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  18. Effect of 50 Hz Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on the DNA Methylation and DNA Methyltransferases in Mouse Spermatocyte-Derived Cell Line GC-2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Liu, Wen-bin; Liu, Kai-jun; Ao, Lin; Zhong, Julia Li; Cao, Jia; Liu, Jin-yi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the male reproductive system is one of the most sensitive organs to electromagnetic radiation. However, the biological effects and molecular mechanism are largely unclear. Our study was designed to elucidate the epigenetic effects of 50 Hz ELF-EMF in vitro. Mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF (5 min on and 10 min off) at magnetic field intensity of 1 mT, 2 mT, and 3 mT with an intermittent exposure for 72 h. We found that 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure decreased genome-wide methylation at 1 mT, but global methylation was higher at 3 mT compared with the controls. The expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3b was decreased at 1 mT, and 50 Hz ELF-EMF can increase the expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3b of GC-2 cells at 3 mT. However, 50 Hz ELF-EMF had little influence on the expression of DNMT3a. Then, we established DNA methylation and gene expression profiling and validated some genes with aberrant DNA methylation and expression at different intensity of 50 Hz ELF-EMF. These results suggest that the alterations of genome-wide methylation and DNMTs expression may play an important role in the biological effects of 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure.

  19. Protective effect of procyanidins extracted from the lotus seedpod on immune function injury induced by extremely low frequency electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haihui; Cheng, Yanxiang; Luo, Xiaoping; Duan, Yuqing

    2016-08-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the protective effect of Lotus seedpod procyanidins (LSPCs) from extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) exposure (50Hz, 8mT, 28 days) and their protective mechanism against radiation damage. The results showed that LSPCs increased the organ index of mice and made the damaged blood-producing function and cytokine(INF-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, IL-6 and IL-10 in spleen) levels by ELF-EMF-irradiation recovered to normal appearance. And experimental results proved that dosing LSPCs inhibit more stagnation of splenocytes in G0/G1 phase caused by ELF-EMF, thus the spleen cells from G0/G1 phase to S phase shift, restore normal cell metabolism, promote the splenocytes proliferation, reduced the apoptosis of spleen cells, effective protect the damage induced by the ELF-EMF radiation. In addition, LSPCs prevented the decline of DNA content caused by ELF-EMF. Western blot determinated the levels of apoptosis genes including Bcl-2, Bax, Bcl-cl, Caspase-3 and Caspase-9. The results revealed that a significant suppression in Bcl-2 expression and increase in Bax, Caspase-3 and Caspase-9 expression in splenic cells in ELF-EMF group. However, LSPCs restored these changes. Taking these results together, it may be summarized that LSPCs could protect hematopoietic tissues and the immune system from ELF-EMF. And it may be hypothesized that ELF-EMF-induced apoptosis in splenocytes might occur via triggers the trans-activation of Bax and activates caspases-3 and -9, which then cleaves the death substrates, leading to apoptosis in splenocytes of mice treated with ELF-EMF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Vascular Permeability of Circumventricular Organs in the Adult Rat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutiérrez-Mercado, Y. K.; Cañedo-Dorantes, L.; Bañuelos-Pineda, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Feria-Velasco, A.

    2008-08-01

    The present work deals with the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on blood vessels permeability to non liposoluble substances of the circumventricular organs (CVO) of adult rats. Male Wistar adult rats were exposed to ELF-EMF and vascular permeability to colloidal carbon was investigated with the use of histological techniques. Results were compared to corresponding data from sham-exposed and control groups of animals. Exposure to ELF-EMF increased the CVO vascular permeability to colloidal carbon intravascularly injected, particularly in the subfornical organ, the median eminence, the pineal gland and the area postrema.

  1. Phospholipase C-dependent phosphoinositide breakdown induced by ELF-EMF in Peganum harmala calli.

    PubMed

    Piacentini, Maria Piera; Piatti, Elena; Fraternale, Daniele; Ricci, Donata; Albertini, Maria Cristina; Accorsi, Augusto

    2004-01-01

    With the aim of examining the response of plant cells to extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF), we investigated the behaviour of the phosphatidylinositol 4,5 bisphosphate (PtdIns 4,5-P(2)) molecule (the precursor of the phosphoinositide signal transduction cascade) by exposing callus cells from Peganum harmala to 50 Hz, 1 gauss EMF for 10 min and by examining the level and the fatty acid composition of PtdIns 4,5-P(2) after the exposure. Our results evidenced a statistically significant decrease in PtdIns 4,5-P(2) concentrations and a different involvement of the constituting fatty acids in the induced breakdown. The manipulation of the lipid-based signalling pathway by phosphoinositide-phospholipase C (PI-PLC) inhibitors (i.e., neomycin, U-73122 and ET-18-OCH(3)) seems to support the hypothesis that, as in animals, also in plants, the cell membrane is the primary impact site of ELF electromagnetic stimulus and that this interaction could probably involve the activation of PI signal transduction pathway including a heterotrimeric G protein.

  2. Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields modulates Na+ currents in rat cerebellar granule cells through increase of AA/PGE2 and EP receptor-mediated cAMP/PKA pathway.

    PubMed

    He, Yan-Lin; Liu, Dong-Dong; Fang, Yan-Jia; Zhan, Xiao-Qin; Yao, Jin-Jing; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2013-01-01

    Although the modulation of Ca(2+) channel activity by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) has been studied previously, few reports have addressed the effects of such fields on the activity of voltage-activated Na(+) channels (Na(v)). Here, we investigated the effects of ELF-EMF on Na(v) activity in rat cerebellar granule cells (GCs). Our results reveal that exposing cerebellar GCs to ELF-EMF for 10-60 min significantly increased Na(v) currents (I(Na)) by 30-125% in a time- and intensity-dependent manner. The Na(v) channel steady-state activation curve, but not the steady-state inactivation curve, was significantly shifted (by 5.2 mV) towards hyperpolarization by ELF-EMF stimulation. This phenomenon is similar to the effect of intracellular application of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) on I(Na) in cerebellar GCs. Increases in intracellular AA, PGE(2) and phosphorylated PKA levels in cerebellar GCs were observed following ELF-EMF exposure. Western blottings indicated that the Na(V) 1.2 protein on the cerebellar GCs membrane was increased, the total expression levels of Na(V) 1.2 protein were not affected after exposure to ELF-EMF. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors and PGE(2) receptor (EP) antagonists were able to eliminate this ELF-EMF-induced increase in phosphorylated PKA and I(Na). In addition, ELF-EMF exposure significantly enhanced the activity of PLA(2) in cerebellar GCs but did not affect COX-1 or COX-2 activity. Together, these data demonstrate for the first time that neuronal I(Na) is significantly increased by ELF-EMF exposure via a cPLA2 AA PGE(2) EP receptors PKA signaling pathway.

  3. Exposure to Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Modulates Na+ Currents in Rat Cerebellar Granule Cells through Increase of AA/PGE2 and EP Receptor-Mediated cAMP/PKA Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yan-Jia; Zhan, Xiao-Qin; Yao, Jin-Jing; Mei, Yan-Ai

    2013-01-01

    Although the modulation of Ca2+ channel activity by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) has been studied previously, few reports have addressed the effects of such fields on the activity of voltage-activated Na+ channels (Nav). Here, we investigated the effects of ELF-EMF on Nav activity in rat cerebellar granule cells (GCs). Our results reveal that exposing cerebellar GCs to ELF-EMF for 10–60 min significantly increased Nav currents (INa) by 30–125% in a time- and intensity-dependent manner. The Nav channel steady-state activation curve, but not the steady-state inactivation curve, was significantly shifted (by 5.2 mV) towards hyperpolarization by ELF-EMF stimulation. This phenomenon is similar to the effect of intracellular application of arachidonic acid (AA) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) on INa in cerebellar GCs. Increases in intracellular AA, PGE2 and phosphorylated PKA levels in cerebellar GCs were observed following ELF-EMF exposure. Western blottings indicated that the NaV 1.2 protein on the cerebellar GCs membrane was increased, the total expression levels of NaV 1.2 protein were not affected after exposure to ELF-EMF. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors and PGE2 receptor (EP) antagonists were able to eliminate this ELF-EMF-induced increase in phosphorylated PKA and INa. In addition, ELF-EMF exposure significantly enhanced the activity of PLA2 in cerebellar GCs but did not affect COX-1 or COX-2 activity. Together, these data demonstrate for the first time that neuronal INa is significantly increased by ELF-EMF exposure via a cPLA2 AA PGE2 EP receptors PKA signaling pathway. PMID:23349866

  4. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields of uninterruptible power supply industry workers.

    PubMed

    Teşneli, N Berna; Teşneli, Ahmet Y

    2014-12-01

    There is an increasing concern that exposure to extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) may cause or contribute to adverse health effects. To assess exposure to ELF EMFs, electric and magnetic field spot measurements were performed extensively at the workplace of a worldwide uninterruptible power supply (UPS) factory. The measurements were carried out in order to get the electric and magnetic field exposure results in real working situations in test areas, production lines and power substations. The electric and magnetic fields reached up to 992.0 V m(-1) and 215.6 μT in the test areas, respectively. The fields existed up to 26.7 V m(-1) and 7.6 μT in the production lines. The field levels in the vicinity of the power substations did not exceed 165.5 V m(-1) and 65 μT. The data presented are useful in determining the occupational exposure levels of UPS industry workers. The measurements are below the reference levels recommended by the guideline published in 2010 by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and action levels of the directive adopted in 2013 by European Parliament and Council.

  5. Coupling Mechanism of Electromagnetic Field and Thermal Stress on Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zi-Yan; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Yu, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is an important factor in research on the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), but interactions between ELF-EMF and temperature remain unknown. The effects of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 3 mT) on the lifespan, locomotion, heat shock response (HSR), and oxidative stress (OS) of Canton-Special (CS) and mutant w1118 flies were investigated at 25°C and 35°C (thermal stress). Results showed that thermal stress accelerated the death rates of CS and w1118 flies, shortened their lifespan, and influenced their locomotion rhythm and activity. The upregulated expression levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 22, HSP26, and HSP70 indicated that HSR was enhanced. Thermal stress-induced OS response increased malondialdehyde content, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity, and decreased reactive oxygen species level. The effects of thermal stress on the death rates, lifespan, locomotion, and HSP gene expression of flies, especially w1118 line, were also enhanced by ELF-EMF. In conclusion, thermal stress weakened the physiological function and promoted the HSR and OS of flies. ELF-EMF aggravated damages and enhanced thermal stress-induced HSP and OS response. Therefore, thermal stress and ELF-EMF elicited a synergistic effect.

  6. Coupling Mechanism of Electromagnetic Field and Thermal Stress on Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chuan-Jun; Lian, Hui-Yong; Yu, Hui; Huang, Xiao-Mei; Cai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Temperature is an important factor in research on the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF), but interactions between ELF-EMF and temperature remain unknown. The effects of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 3 mT) on the lifespan, locomotion, heat shock response (HSR), and oxidative stress (OS) of Canton-Special (CS) and mutant w1118 flies were investigated at 25°C and 35°C (thermal stress). Results showed that thermal stress accelerated the death rates of CS and w1118 flies, shortened their lifespan, and influenced their locomotion rhythm and activity. The upregulated expression levels of heat shock protein (HSP) 22, HSP26, and HSP70 indicated that HSR was enhanced. Thermal stress-induced OS response increased malondialdehyde content, enhanced superoxide dismutase activity, and decreased reactive oxygen species level. The effects of thermal stress on the death rates, lifespan, locomotion, and HSP gene expression of flies, especially w1118 line, were also enhanced by ELF-EMF. In conclusion, thermal stress weakened the physiological function and promoted the HSR and OS of flies. ELF-EMF aggravated damages and enhanced thermal stress-induced HSP and OS response. Therefore, thermal stress and ELF-EMF elicited a synergistic effect. PMID:27611438

  7. The Energy Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans under The Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yang, Chuanjun; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2015-01-01

    A literal mountain of documentation generated in the past five decades showing unmistakable health hazards associated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure. However, the relation between energy mechanism and ELF-EMF exposure is poorly understood. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at intensities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mT, respectively. Their metabolite variations were analyzed by GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics. Although minimal metabolic variations and no regular pattern were observed, the contents of energy metabolism-related metabolites such as pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, and L-malic acid were elevated in all the treatments. The expressions of nineteen related genes that encode glycolytic enzymes were analyzed by using quantitative real-time PCR. Only genes encoding GAPDH were significantly upregulated (P < 0.01), and this result was further confirmed by western blot analysis. The enzyme activity of GAPDH was increased (P < 0.01), whereas the total intracellular ATP level was decreased. While no significant difference in lifespan, hatching rate and reproduction, worms exposed to ELF-EMF exhibited less food consumption compared with that of the control (P < 0.01). In conclusion, C. elegans exposed to ELF-EMF have enhanced energy metabolism and restricted dietary, which might contribute to the resistance against exogenous ELF-EMF stress. PMID:25683579

  8. The Energy Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans under The Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yang, Chuanjun; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2015-02-01

    A literal mountain of documentation generated in the past five decades showing unmistakable health hazards associated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure. However, the relation between energy mechanism and ELF-EMF exposure is poorly understood. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at intensities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mT, respectively. Their metabolite variations were analyzed by GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics. Although minimal metabolic variations and no regular pattern were observed, the contents of energy metabolism-related metabolites such as pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, and L-malic acid were elevated in all the treatments. The expressions of nineteen related genes that encode glycolytic enzymes were analyzed by using quantitative real-time PCR. Only genes encoding GAPDH were significantly upregulated (P < 0.01), and this result was further confirmed by western blot analysis. The enzyme activity of GAPDH was increased (P < 0.01), whereas the total intracellular ATP level was decreased. While no significant difference in lifespan, hatching rate and reproduction, worms exposed to ELF-EMF exhibited less food consumption compared with that of the control (P < 0.01). In conclusion, C. elegans exposed to ELF-EMF have enhanced energy metabolism and restricted dietary, which might contribute to the resistance against exogenous ELF-EMF stress.

  9. Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields alters the calcium dynamics of cultured entorhinal cortex neurons.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fen-Lan; Yang, Nian; He, Chao; Li, Hong-Li; Li, Chao; Chen, Fang; Xiong, Jia-Xiang; Hu, Zhi-An; Zhang, Jun

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have revealed that extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) exposure affects neuronal dendritic spine density and NMDAR and AMPAR subunit expressions in the entorhinal cortex (EC). Although calcium signaling has a critical role in control of EC neuronal functions, however, it is still unclear whether the ELF-EMF exposure affects the EC neuronal calcium homeostasis. In the present study, using whole-cell recording and calcium imaging, we record the whole-cell inward currents that contain the voltage-gated calcium currents and show that ELF-EMF (50Hz, 1mT or 3mT, lasting 24h) exposure does not influence these currents. Next, we specifically isolate the high-voltage activated (HVA) and low-voltage activated (LVA) calcium channels-induced currents. Similarly, the activation and inactivation characteristics of these membrane calcium channels are also not influenced by ELF-EMF. Importantly, ELF-EMF exposure reduces the maximum amplitude of the high-K(+)-evoked calcium elevation in EC neurons, which is abolished by thapsigargin, a Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor, to empty the intracellular calcium stores of EC neurons. Together, these findings indicate that ELF-EMF exposure specifically influences the intracellular calcium dynamics of cultural EC neurons via a calcium channel-independent mechanism.

  10. The Energy Metabolism in Caenorhabditis elegans under The Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhenhua; Yu, Hui; Sun, Yongyan; Yang, Chuanjun; Lian, Huiyong; Cai, Peng

    2015-02-16

    A literal mountain of documentation generated in the past five decades showing unmistakable health hazards associated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure. However, the relation between energy mechanism and ELF-EMF exposure is poorly understood. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at intensities of 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 mT, respectively. Their metabolite variations were analyzed by GC-TOF/MS-based metabolomics. Although minimal metabolic variations and no regular pattern were observed, the contents of energy metabolism-related metabolites such as pyruvic acid, fumaric acid, and L-malic acid were elevated in all the treatments. The expressions of nineteen related genes that encode glycolytic enzymes were analyzed by using quantitative real-time PCR. Only genes encoding GAPDH were significantly upregulated (P < 0.01), and this result was further confirmed by western blot analysis. The enzyme activity of GAPDH was increased (P < 0.01), whereas the total intracellular ATP level was decreased. While no significant difference in lifespan, hatching rate and reproduction, worms exposed to ELF-EMF exhibited less food consumption compared with that of the control (P < 0.01). In conclusion, C. elegans exposed to ELF-EMF have enhanced energy metabolism and restricted dietary, which might contribute to the resistance against exogenous ELF-EMF stress.

  11. Effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on antioxidant activity in the human keratinocyte cell line NCTC 2544.

    PubMed

    Calcabrini, Cinzia; Mancini, Umberto; De Bellis, Roberta; Diaz, Anna Rita; Martinelli, Maddalena; Cucchiarini, Luigi; Sestili, Piero; Stocchi, Vilberto; Potenza, Lucia

    2016-03-22

    Some epidemiological studies have suggested possible associations between exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) and various diseases. Recently, ELF-EMF has been considered as a therapeutic agent. To support ELF-EMF use in regenerative medicine, in particular in the treatment of skin injuries, we investigated whether significant cell damage occurs after ELF-EMF exposure. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was evaluated in the human keratinocyte exposed for 1 H to 50 Hz ELF-EMF in a range of field strengths from 0.25 to 2 G. Significant ROS increases resulted at 0.5 and 1 G and under these flux densities ROS production, glutathione content, antioxidant defense activity, and lipid peroxidation markers were assessed for different lengths of time. Analyzed parameters of antioxidant defense and membrane integrity showed a different trend at two selected magnetic fluxes, with a greater sensitivity of the cells exposed to 0.5 G, especially after 1 H. All significant alterations observed in the first 4 H of exposure reverted to controls 24 H after suggesting that under these conditions, ELF-EMF induces a slight oxidative stress that does not overwhelm the metabolic capacity of the cells or have a cytotoxic effect.

  12. Overexpression of miR-26b-5p regulates the cell cycle by targeting CCND2 in GC-2 cells under exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Liu, Wen-Bin; Liu, Kai-Jun; Ao, Lin; Cao, Jia; Zhong, Julia Li; Liu, Jin-Yi

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure has raised considerable public concern regarding the potential hazardous effects of ELF-EMFs on male reproductive function. Increasing evidence indicates that miRNAs are necessary for spermatogenesis and male fertility. However, the regulation of miRNA expression and the roles of miRNAs in response to ELF-EMFs remain unclear. In our study, mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cells were intermittently exposed to a 50 Hz ELF-EMF for 72 h (5 min on/10 min off) at magnetic field intensities of 1 mT, 2 mT and 3 mT. MiR-26b-5p was differentially expressed in response to different magnetic field intensities of ELF-EMFs. The host gene CTDSP1 showed an unmethylation status in GC-2 cells at different magnetic field intensities of ELF-EMF exposure. MiR-26b-5p had no significant, obvious influence on the cell viability, apoptosis or cell cycle of GC-2 cells. However, the overexpression of miR-26b-5p significantly decreased the percentage of G0/G1 phase cells and slightly increased the percentage of S phase cells compared to the sham group that was exposed to a 50 Hz ELF-EMF. Computational algorithms identified Cyclin D2 (CCND2) as a direct target of miR-26b-5p. MiR-26b-5p and a 50 Hz ELF-EMF altered the expression of CCND2 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Overexpressed miR-26b-5p in GC-2 cells can change the mRNA expression of CCND2 following 50 Hz ELF-EMF at 3 mT. These findings demonstrate that miR-26b-5p could serve as a potential biomarker following 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure, and miR-26b-5p-CCND2-mediated cell cycle regulation might play a pivotal role in the biological effects of ELF-EMFs.

  13. Overexpression of miR-26b-5p regulates the cell cycle by targeting CCND2 in GC-2 cells under exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Liu, Wen-bin; Liu, Kai-jun; Ao, Lin; Cao, Jia; Zhong, Julia Li; Liu, Jin-yi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The increasing prevalence of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) exposure has raised considerable public concern regarding the potential hazardous effects of ELF-EMFs on male reproductive function. Increasing evidence indicates that miRNAs are necessary for spermatogenesis and male fertility. However, the regulation of miRNA expression and the roles of miRNAs in response to ELF-EMFs remain unclear. In our study, mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cells were intermittently exposed to a 50 Hz ELF-EMF for 72 h (5 min on/10 min off) at magnetic field intensities of 1 mT, 2 mT and 3 mT. MiR-26b-5p was differentially expressed in response to different magnetic field intensities of ELF-EMFs. The host gene CTDSP1 showed an unmethylation status in GC-2 cells at different magnetic field intensities of ELF-EMF exposure. MiR-26b-5p had no significant, obvious influence on the cell viability, apoptosis or cell cycle of GC-2 cells. However, the overexpression of miR-26b-5p significantly decreased the percentage of G0/G1 phase cells and slightly increased the percentage of S phase cells compared to the sham group that was exposed to a 50 Hz ELF-EMF. Computational algorithms identified Cyclin D2 (CCND2) as a direct target of miR-26b-5p. MiR-26b-5p and a 50 Hz ELF-EMF altered the expression of CCND2 at both the mRNA and protein levels. Overexpressed miR-26b-5p in GC-2 cells can change the mRNA expression of CCND2 following 50 Hz ELF-EMF at 3 mT. These findings demonstrate that miR-26b-5p could serve as a potential biomarker following 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure, and miR-26b-5p-CCND2-mediated cell cycle regulation might play a pivotal role in the biological effects of ELF-EMFs. PMID:26637059

  14. In Vitro Developmental Neurotoxicity Following Chronic Exposure to 50 Hz Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields in Primary Rat Cortical Cultures.

    PubMed

    de Groot, Martje W G D M; van Kleef, Regina G D M; de Groot, Aart; Westerink, Remco H S

    2016-02-01

    Exposure to 50-60 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) has increased considerably over the last decades. Several epidemiological studies suggested that ELF-EMF exposure is associated with adverse health effects, including neurotoxicity. However, these studies are debated as results are often contradictory and the possible underlying mechanisms are unknown. Since the developing nervous system is particularly vulnerable to insults, we investigate effects of chronic, developmental ELF-EMF exposure in vitro. Primary rat cortical neurons received 7 days developmental exposure to 50 Hz block-pulsed ELF-EMF (0-1000 μT) to assess effects on cell viability (Alamar Blue/CFDA assay), calcium homeostasis (single cell fluorescence microscopy), neurite outgrowth (β(III)-Tubulin immunofluorescent staining), and spontaneous neuronal activity (multi-electrode arrays). Our data demonstrate that cell viability is not affected by developmental ELF-EMF (0-1000 μT) exposure. Depolarization- and glutamate-evoked increases in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) are slightly increased at 1 μT, whereas both basal and stimulation-evoked [Ca(2+)]i show a modest inhibition at 1000 μT. Subsequent morphological analysis indicated that neurite length is unaffected up to 100 μT, but increased at 1000 μT. However, neuronal activity appeared largely unaltered following chronic ELF-EMF exposure up to 1000 μT. The effects of ELF-EMF exposure were small and largely restricted to the highest field strength (1000 μT), ie, 10 000 times above background exposure and well above current residential exposure limits. Our combined data therefore indicate that chronic ELF-EMF exposure has only limited (developmental) neurotoxic potential in vitro.

  15. Bidirectional frequency-dependent effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field on E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Martirosyan, Varsik; Baghdasaryan, Naira; Ayrapetyan, Sinerik

    2013-09-01

    In the present work, the frequency-dependent effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) on Escherichia coli K-12 growth have been studied. The frequency-dependent effects of ELF EMF have shown that it can either stimulate or inhibit the growth of microbes. However, the mechanism by which the ELF EMF affects the bacterial cells is not clear yet. It was suggested that the aqua medium can serve as a target through which the biological effect of ELF EMF on microbes may be realized. To check this hypothesis, the frequency-dependent effects (2, 4, 6, 8, 10 Hz, B = 0.4 mT, 30 min) of ELF EMF on the bacterial growth were studied in both cases where the microbes were in the culture media during the exposure and where culture media was preliminarily exposed to the ELF EMF before the addition of bacteria. For investigating the cell proliferation, the radioactive [(3)H]-thymidine assay was carried out. It has been shown that EMF at 4 Hz exposure has pronounced stimulation while at 8 Hz it has inhibited cell proliferation.

  16. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field influences the survival and proliferation effect of human adipose derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Razavi, Shahnaz; Salimi, Marzieh; Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Karbasi, Saeed; Kermani, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) can effect on biological systems and alters some cell functions like proliferation rate. Therefore, we aimed to attempt the evaluation effect of ELF-EMF on the growth of human adipose derived stem cells (hADSCs). Materials and Methods: ELF-EMF was generated by a system including autotransformer, multi-meter, solenoid coils, teslameter and its probe. We assessed the effect of ELF-EMF with intensity of 0.5 and 1 mT and power line frequency 50 Hz on the survival of hADSCs for 20 and 40 min/day for 7 days by MTT assay. One-way analysis of variance was used to assessment the significant differences in groups. Results: ELF-EMF has maximum effect with intensity of 1 mT for 20 min/day on proliferation of hADSCs. The survival and proliferation effect (PE) in all exposure groups were significantly higher than that in sham groups (P < 0.05) except in group of 1 mT and 40 min/day. Conclusion: Our results show that between 0.5 m and 1 mT ELF-EMF could be enhances survival and PE of hADSCs conserving the duration of exposure. PMID:24592372

  17. Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Facilitate Vesicle Endocytosis by Increasing Presynaptic Calcium Channel Expression at a Central Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhi-cheng; Ge, Jian-long; Guo, Bin; Guo, Jun; Hao, Mei; Wu, Yi-chen; Lin, Yi-an; La, Ting; Yao, Pan-tong; Mei, Yan-ai; Feng, Yi; Xue, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests significant biological effects caused by extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF). Although exo-endocytosis plays crucial physical and biological roles in neuronal communication, studies on how ELF-EMF regulates this process are scarce. By directly measuring calcium currents and membrane capacitance at a large mammalian central nervous synapse, the calyx of Held, we report for the first time that ELF-EMF critically affects synaptic transmission and plasticity. Exposure to ELF-EMF for 8 to 10 days dramatically increases the calcium influx upon stimulation and facilitates all forms of vesicle endocytosis, including slow and rapid endocytosis, endocytosis overshoot and bulk endocytosis, but does not affect the RRP size and exocytosis. Exposure to ELF-EMF also potentiates PTP, a form of short-term plasticity, increasing its peak amplitude without impacting its time course. We further investigated the underlying mechanisms and found that calcium channel expression, including the P/Q, N, and R subtypes, at the presynaptic nerve terminal was enhanced, accounting for the increased calcium influx upon stimulation. Thus, we conclude that exposure to ELF-EMF facilitates vesicle endocytosis and synaptic plasticity in a calcium-dependent manner by increasing calcium channel expression at the nerve terminal. PMID:26887777

  18. Anti-proliferative effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field on preneoplastic lesions formation in the rat liver

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Recently, extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) have been studied with great interest due to their possible effects on human health. In this study, we evaluated the effect of 4.5 mT - 120 Hz ELF-EMF on the development of preneoplastic lesions in experimental hepatocarcinogenesis. Methods Male Fischer-344 rats were subjected to the modified resistant hepatocyte model and were exposed to 4.5 mT - 120 Hz ELF-EMF. The effects of the ELF-EMF on hepatocarcinogenesis, apoptosis, proliferation and cell cycle progression were evaluated by histochemical, TUNEL assay, caspase 3 levels, immunohistochemical and western blot analyses. Results The application of the ELF-EMF resulted in a decrease of more than 50% of the number and the area of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase-positive preneoplastic lesions (P = 0.01 and P = 0.03, respectively) and glutathione S-transferase placental expression (P = 0.01). The number of TUNEL-positive cells and the cleaved caspase 3 levels were unaffected; however, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen, Ki-67, and cyclin D1 expression decreased significantly (P ≤ 0.03), as compared to the sham-exposure group. Conclusion The application of 4.5 mT - 120 Hz ELF-EMF inhibits preneoplastic lesions chemically induced in the rat liver through the reduction of cell proliferation, without altering the apoptosis process. PMID:20416104

  19. Effect of Environmental Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Exposure on Inflammatory Mediators and Serotonin Metabolism in a Human Neuroblastoma Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Reale, Marcella; D'Angelo, Chiara; Costantini, Erica; Tata, Ada Maria; Regen, Francesca; Hellmann-Regen, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to environmental extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) in everyday life is increasing and it is a matter of great debate whether exposure to ELF-EMF can be harmful to human health. The neuropathology and symptoms of neurodegenerative disease depends on factors other than genetic predispositions, such as environmental exposure to disease-related risk factors. Research focusing on a possible contribution of ELF-EMF to cell injury and to the development of neurodegenerative disorders is characterized by conflicting data from epidemiological and animal studies. Due to lack of a direct link between neurodegenerative processes and ELF-EMF exposure, our goal was to investigate if ELF-EMF exposure may represent a possible risk factor. In the present study, using neuronal-like SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, we show that the balance between generation and elimination of reactive oxygen species, as well as the balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines linked to oxidative stress, was maintained ensuring that cells respond properly to ELF-EMF (50Hz /1mT). In SH-SY5Y-exposed cells we observed increased intracellular 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid/5-hydroxytryptamine ratio reflecting the rate of transmitter synthesis, catabolism and release, while matrix metalloproteinases that play critical roles in neuronal cell death were not significantly altered. The results presented here indicate that changes caused by short (1h-3h) and sub-chronic (48 h) exposure to 50Hz/1mT ELF-EMF in SH-SY5Y cells are minor in comparison to the neuronal cell damage expected to underlie neurodegeneration or cognitive impairment. Thus, these results are in accord with epidemiological studies that have provided little support for a link between ELF-EMFs and neurodegeneration.

  20. Effects of 17 b-estradiol and extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on social recognition memory in female rats: a possible interaction?

    PubMed

    Reyes-Guerrero, Gloria; Vázquez-García, Mario; Elias-Viñas, David; Donatti-Albarrán, Olga A; Guevara-Guzmán, Rosalinda

    2006-06-20

    We have investigated a potential memory-enhancing effect of exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMF) in female rats and its dependence on estrogen, using a social recognition task. A juvenile social recognition paradigm was used and memory retention tested at 30 and 300 min after an adult was exposed to a juvenile during two 4-min trials. Results showed that an intact social recognition memory was present at 30 min in both gonadally intact and ovariectomized rats with, or without, ELF-EMF. However, whereas gonadally intact control females failed to show retention of the recognition memory at 300 min, those additionally exposed to ELF EMF did. This shows that the enhanced duration effect of ELF EMF on social recognition memory occurs in gonadally intact females as well as in males. In addition, results showed that the ELF EMF facilitation of memory retention was prevented by ovariectomy but restored by exogenous treatment with estrogen. This suggests that this ELF EMF effect on social recognition memory is estrogen-dependent.

  1. The effects of different intensities, frequencies and exposure times of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Bayır, Ece; Bilgi, Eyüp; Şendemir-Ürkmez, Aylin; Hameş-Kocabaş, E Esin

    2015-03-01

    The impact of different types of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on the growth of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli O157:H7 was investigated. The cultures of bacteria in broth media were exposed to sinusoidal homogenous ELF-EMF with 2 and 4 mT magnetic intensities. Each intensity for each bacteria was combined with three different frequencies (20, 40 and 50 Hz), and four different exposure times (1, 2, 4 and 6 h). A cell suspension of each experiment was diluted for the appropriate range and inoculated to Mueller-Hinton Agar (MHA) plates after exposure to ELF-EMF. The number of colony forming units (CFU) of both strains was obtained after incubation at 37 °C for 24 h. Data were statistically evaluated by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), statistical significance was described at p < 0.05 and data were compared with their non-exposed controls. Magnetic intensity, frequency and exposure time of ELF-EMFs changed the characteristic responses for both microorganisms. Samples exposed to ELF-EMF showed a statistically significant decrease compared to their controls in colony forming capability, especially at long exposure times. An exposure to 4 mT-20 Hz ELF-EMF of 6 h produced maximum inhibition of CFU compared to their controls for both microorganisms (95.2% for S. aureus and 85% for E. coli).

  2. Comparison of the genotoxic effects induced by 50 Hz extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields and 1800 MHz radiofrequency electromagnetic fields in GC-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Duan, Weixia; Liu, Chuan; Zhang, Lei; He, Mindi; Xu, Shangcheng; Chen, Chunhai; Pi, Huifeng; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Yanwen; Zhong, Min; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2015-03-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) and radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) have been considered to be possibly carcinogenic to humans. However, their genotoxic effects remain controversial. To make experiments controllable and results comparable, we standardized exposure conditions and explored the potential genotoxicity of 50 Hz ELF-EMF and 1800 MHz RF-EMF. A mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line was intermittently (5 min on and 10 min off) exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF at an intensity of 1, 2 or 3 mT or to RF-EMF in GSM-Talk mode at the specific absorption rates (SAR) of 1, 2 or 4 W/kg. After exposure for 24 h, we found that neither ELF-EMF nor RF-EMF affected cell viability using Cell Counting Kit-8. Through the use of an alkaline comet assay and immunofluorescence against γ-H2AX foci, we found that ELF-EMF exposure resulted in a significant increase of DNA strand breaks at 3 mT, whereas RF-EMF exposure had insufficient energy to induce such effects. Using a formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG)-modified alkaline comet assay, we observed that RF-EMF exposure significantly induced oxidative DNA base damage at a SAR value of 4 W/kg, whereas ELF-EMF exposure did not. Our results suggest that both ELF-EMF and RF-EMF under the same experimental conditions may produce genotoxicity at relative high intensities, but they create different patterns of DNA damage. Therefore, the potential mechanisms underlying the genotoxicity of different frequency electromagnetic fields may be different.

  3. 50-Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields enhance cell proliferation and DNA damage: possible involvement of a redox mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Federica I; Torsello, Angela; Tedesco, Beatrice; Fasanella, Silvia; Boninsegna, Alma; D'Ascenzo, Marcello; Grassi, Claudio; Azzena, Gian Battista; Cittadini, Achille

    2005-03-22

    HL-60 leukemia cells, Rat-1 fibroblasts and WI-38 diploid fibroblasts were exposed for 24-72 h to 0.5-1.0-mT 50-Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF). This treatment induced a dose-dependent increase in the proliferation rate of all cell types, namely about 30% increase of cell proliferation after 72-h exposure to 1.0 mT. This was accompanied by increased percentage of cells in the S-phase after 12- and 48-h exposure. The ability of ELF-EMF to induce DNA damage was also investigated by measuring DNA strand breaks. A dose-dependent increase in DNA damage was observed in all cell lines, with two peaks occurring at 24 and 72 h. A similar pattern of DNA damage was observed by measuring formation of 8-OHdG adducts. The effects of ELF-EMF on cell proliferation and DNA damage were prevented by pretreatment of cells with an antioxidant like alpha-tocopherol, suggesting that redox reactions were involved. Accordingly, Rat-1 fibroblasts that had been exposed to ELF-EMF for 3 or 24 h exhibited a significant increase in dichlorofluorescein-detectable reactive oxygen species, which was blunted by alpha-tocopherol pretreatment. Cells exposed to ELF-EMF and examined as early as 6 h after treatment initiation also exhibited modifications of NF kappa B-related proteins (p65-p50 and I kappa B alpha), which were suggestive of increased formation of p65-p50 or p65-p65 active forms, a process usually attributed to redox reactions. These results suggest that ELF-EMF influence proliferation and DNA damage in both normal and tumor cells through the action of free radical species. This information may be of value for appraising the pathophysiologic consequences of an exposure to ELF-EMF.

  4. Effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on bacterial membrane.

    PubMed

    Oncul, Sule; Cuce, Esra M; Aksu, Burak; Inhan Garip, Ayse

    2016-01-01

    The effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on bacteria has attracted attention due to its potential for beneficial uses. This research aimed to determine the effect of ELF-EMF on bacterial membrane namely the membrane potential, surface potential, hydrophobicity, respiratory activity and growth. Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus and Gram-negative Escherichia coli were subjected to ELF-EMF, 50 Hz, 1 mT for 2 h. Membrane potential was determined by fluorescence spectroscopy with or without EDTA (Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid) with DisC3(5) (3,3-dipropylthiacarbocyanine iodide), zeta potential measurements were performed by electrophoretic mobility, hydrophobicity of the membrane was measured with MATH (Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons) test, respiratory activity was determined with CTC (5-Cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride), colony forming unit (CFU) and DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, dihydrochloride) was used for growth determinations. ELF-EMF caused changes in physicochemical properties of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Hyperpolarization was seen in S. aureus and EDTA-treated E. coli. Surface potential showed a positive shift in S. aureus contrariwise to the negative shift seen in EDTA-untreated E. coli. Respiratory activity increased in both bacteria. A slight decrease in growth was observed. These results show that ELF-EMF affects the crucial physicochemical processes in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria which need further research.

  5. Effect of 50 Hz Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on the DNA Methylation and DNA Methyltransferases in Mouse Spermatocyte-Derived Cell Line GC-2

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yong; Liu, Wen-bin; Liu, Kai-jun; Ao, Lin; Zhong, Julia Li; Cao, Jia; Liu, Jin-yi

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the male reproductive system is one of the most sensitive organs to electromagnetic radiation. However, the biological effects and molecular mechanism are largely unclear. Our study was designed to elucidate the epigenetic effects of 50 Hz ELF-EMF in vitro. Mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cell line was exposed to 50 Hz ELF-EMF (5 min on and 10 min off) at magnetic field intensity of 1 mT, 2 mT, and 3 mT with an intermittent exposure for 72 h. We found that 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure decreased genome-wide methylation at 1 mT, but global methylation was higher at 3 mT compared with the controls. The expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3b was decreased at 1 mT, and 50 Hz ELF-EMF can increase the expression of DNMT1 and DNMT3b of GC-2 cells at 3 mT. However, 50 Hz ELF-EMF had little influence on the expression of DNMT3a. Then, we established DNA methylation and gene expression profiling and validated some genes with aberrant DNA methylation and expression at different intensity of 50 Hz ELF-EMF. These results suggest that the alterations of genome-wide methylation and DNMTs expression may play an important role in the biological effects of 50 Hz ELF-EMF exposure. PMID:26339596

  6. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields affect proliferation and mitochondrial activity of human cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Destefanis, Michele; Viano, Marta; Leo, Christian; Gervino, Gianpiero; Ponzetto, Antonio; Silvagno, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    To date, the effects of electromagnetic fields on cell metabolism have been overlooked. The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) over mitochondrial metabolism and the consequent impact on cancer cell growth. The effects of ELF-EMF on cancer growth were investigated in several human cancer cell lines by crystal violet assay. The modulation of mitochondrial activity was assessed by cytofluorimetric evaluation of membrane potential and by real-time quantification of mitochondrial transcription. Moreover the expression of several mitochondrial proteins and their levels in the organelle were evaluated. The long-term exposure to ELF-EMF reduced the proliferation of several cancer cell lines and the effect was associated to an increased mitochondrial activity without evident changes in ATP levels. The results of our experiments excluded a transcriptional modulation of mitochondrial respiratory complexes, rather suggesting that ELF-EMF increased the energy demand. The altered mitochondrial metabolism led to changes in mitochondrial protein profile. In fact we found a downregulated expression of mitochondrial phospho-ERK, p53 and cytochrome c. The results of the present study indicate that ELF-EMF can negatively modulate cancer cell growth increasing respiratory activity of cells and altering mitochondrial protein expression.

  7. Effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field on MAP2 and Nestin gene expression of hair follicle dermal papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Moraveji, Marzie; Haghighipour, Nooshin; Keshvari, Hamid; Nourizadeh Abbariki, Tannaz; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Amanzadeh, Amir

    2016-08-19

    In recent years, the extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) has attracted a great deal of scientific interest. The ELF-EMF signal is able to control ion transport across ion channels and therefore induce cell differentiation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of ELF-EMF (50 Hz, 1 mT) on MAP2 and Nestin gene expression of dermal papilla mesenchymal cells (DPCs). In order to examine the effect of chemical and electromagnetic factors on gene expression, 4 experimental groups, namely chemical (cell exposure to chemical signals), EMF (exposing cells to ELF-EMF), chemical-EMF (subjecting cells to chemical signals and ELF-EMF) and control (with no treatment) groups, were prepared, treated for 5 days, and studied. To assess the effect of extended test time on the expression of neural differentiation markers (Nestin and MAP2), an EMF group was prepared and treated for a period of 14 consecutive days. The beneficial role of EMF in inducing neural differentiation was shown by real-time PCR analysis. The higher expression of MAP2 after 14 days compared to that after 5 days and decrease of cell proliferation on days 5 to 20 were indicative of the positive effect of extending treatment time on neural differentiation by evaluation of gene expression in EMF group.

  8. The effects of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields on melatonin and cortisol, two marker rhythms of the circadian system

    PubMed Central

    Touitou, Yvan; Selmaoui, Brahim

    2012-01-01

    In the past 30 years the concern that daily exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-EMF) (1 to 300 Hz) might be harmful to human health (cancer, neurobehavioral disturbances, etc) has been the object of debate, and has become a public health concern. This has resulted in the classification of ELF-EMF into category 2B, ie, agents that are “possibly carcinogenic to humans” by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Since melatonin, a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland, has been shown to possess oncostatic properties, a “melatonin hypothesis” has been raised, stating that exposure to EMF might decrease melatonin production and therefore might promote the development of breast cancer in humans. Data from the literature reviewed here are contradictory. In addition, we have demonstrated a lack of effect of ELF-EMF on melatonin secretion in humans exposed to EMF (up to 20 years' exposure) which rebuts the melatonin hypothesis. Currently, the debate concerns the effects of ELF-EMF on the risk of childhood leukemia in children chronically exposed to more than 0.4 μT. Further research is thus needed to obtain more definite answers regarding the potential deleterious effects of ELF-EMF. PMID:23393415

  9. The effects of extremely low-frequency magnetic fields on melatonin and cortisol, two marker rhythms of the circadian system.

    PubMed

    Touitou, Yvan; Selmaoui, Brahim

    2012-12-01

    In the past 30 years the concern that daily exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-EMF) (1 to 300 Hz) might be harmful to human health (cancer, neurobehavioral disturbances, etc) has been the object of debate, and has become a public health concern. This has resulted in the classification of ELF-EMF into category 2B, ie, agents that are "possibly carcinogenic to humans" by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. Since melatonin, a neurohormone secreted by the pineal gland, has been shown to possess oncostatic properties, a "melatonin hypothesis" has been raised, stating that exposure to EMF might decrease melatonin production and therefore might promote the development of breast cancer in humans. Data from the literature reviewed here are contradictory. In addition, we have demonstrated a lack of effect of ELF-EMF on melatonin secretion in humans exposed to EMF (up to 20 years' exposure) which rebuts the melatonin hypothesis. Currently, the debate concerns the effects of ELF-EMF on the risk of childhood leukemia in children chronically exposed to more than 0.4 μT. Further research is thus needed to obtain more definite answers regarding the potential deleterious effects of ELF-EMF.

  10. Improvement of spatial memory disorder and hippocampal damage by exposure to electromagnetic fields in an Alzheimer's disease rat model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao; Zuo, Hongyan; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Song, Tao; Wang, Shuiming; Xu, Xinping; Gao, Yabing; Li, Yang; Wang, Shaoxia; Wang, Lifeng; Zhao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Although some epidemiological investigations showed a potential association between long-term exposure of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), no reasonable mechanism can explain this association, and the related animal experiments are rare. In this study, ELF-EMF exposure (50 Hz 400 µT 60 d) combined with D-galactose intraperitoneal (50 mg/kg, q.d., 42 d) and Aβ25-35 hippocampal (5 μl/unilateral, bilateral, single-dose) injection was implemented to establish a complex rat model. Then the effects of ELF-EMF exposure on AD development was studied by using the Morris water maze, pathological analysis, and comparative proteomics. The results showed that ELF-EMF exposure delayed the weight gain of rats, and partially improved cognitive and clinicopathologic symptoms of AD rats. The differential proteomic analysis results suggest that synaptic transmission, oxidative stress, protein degradation, energy metabolism, Tau aggregation, and inflammation involved in the effects mentioned above. Therefore, our findings indicate that certain conditions of ELF-EMF exposure could delay the development of AD in rats.

  11. Improvement of Spatial Memory Disorder and Hippocampal Damage by Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields in an Alzheimer’s Disease Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Zuo, Hongyan; Wang, Dewen; Peng, Ruiyun; Song, Tao; Wang, Shuiming; Xu, Xinping; Gao, Yabing; Li, Yang; Wang, Shaoxia; Wang, Lifeng; Zhao, Li

    2015-01-01

    Although some epidemiological investigations showed a potential association between long-term exposure of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD), no reasonable mechanism can explain this association, and the related animal experiments are rare. In this study, ELF-EMF exposure (50Hz 400µT 60d) combined with D-galactose intraperitoneal (50mg/kg, q.d., 42d) and Aβ25–35 hippocampal (5μl/unilateral, bilateral, single-dose) injection was implemented to establish a complex rat model. Then the effects of ELF-EMF exposure on AD development was studied by using the Morris water maze, pathological analysis, and comparative proteomics. The results showed that ELF-EMF exposure delayed the weight gain of rats, and partially improved cognitive and clinicopathologic symptoms of AD rats. The differential proteomic analysis results suggest that synaptic transmission, oxidative stress, protein degradation, energy metabolism, Tau aggregation, and inflammation involved in the effects mentioned above. Therefore, our findings indicate that certain conditions of ELF-EMF exposure could delay the development of AD in rats. PMID:25978363

  12. Suppression of type I collagen in human scleral fibroblasts treated with extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jie; Cui, Jiefeng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the expression differences of type I collagen (COL1A1) and its underlying mechanisms in human fetal scleral fibroblasts (HFSFs) that were treated with conditioned medium from retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells under extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs). Methods The ELF-EMFs used in this study were established by slidac and artificial coils. Growth of the treated HFSFs was evaluated by a cell-counting kit-8 assay. The expression of COL1A1 and matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2) in the treated HFSFs was detected by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot, and the expression of transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2) and basic fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2) in RPE cells exposed to EMFs was detected by RT-PCR. The expression of COL1A1 and MMP-2 in HFSFs was further confirmed by immunofluorescence staining. Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2 also called p44/p42 mitogen-activated protein kinases [MAPK]) and p38 in HFSFs was measured by western blot. Results We found that exposure to ELF-EMFs resulted in a decreased proliferation rate of HFSFs and that addition of RPE supernatant medium could enhance this effect. Compared with that of the control cells, a significant decrease in collagen synthesis was detected in HFSFs under ELF-EMFs. However, the expression of MMP-2 was upregulated, which could be further enhanced via an RPE supernatant additive. The activities of ERK1/2 and p38 were significantly increased in HFSFs exposed to ELF-EMFs, and this effect could be enhanced by RPE supernatant medium additive. Conclusions Our results suggested that ELF-EMFs can inhibit the expression of type I collagen in HFSFs and contribute to the remodeling of the sclera. PMID:23592926

  13. Alterations of Immune Parameters on Trichoplusia ni (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) Larvae Exposed to Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Valadez-Lira, Jose A; Medina-Chavez, Nahui O; Orozco-Flores, Alonso A; Heredia-Rojas, J Antonio; Rodriguez-de la Fuente, Abraham O; Gomez-Flores, Ricardo; Alcocer-Gonzalez, Juan M; Tamez-Guerra, Patricia

    2017-04-01

    Worldwide mobile telephone and microwave use have resulted in an increasing presence of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field radiations (ELF-EMFs) in ecosystems. ELF-EMFs have been associated with altered physiological processes that can adversely affect exposed organisms. In this study, Trichoplusia ni Hübner larvae were exposed for 24, 48, or 72 h to ELF-EMFs (60 Hz and 2.0 mT) to assess effects on immune response parameters and fertility. Trichoplusia ni life cycle and fertility were not affected by 24-h exposure. However, the number of apoptotic-like cells and cellular immune response significantly increased (P < 0.01) after 72-h exposure (2- and 1.1-fold, respectively), whereas hemolymph total protein and hemocyte cells were reduced (P < 0.01; 16 and 50%, respectively) after 48-h exposure. Hemocyte cell type analysis resulted in significantly (P < 0.01) higher granulocytes number in the unexposed (2-fold increase) and oenocytoids in the 72-h-exposed larvae (28.6-fold increase). Quantitative retrotranscription (RT-qPCR) showed that after 72-h ELF-EMF exposure, the antimicrobial peptides cecropin, lysozyme, gallerimycin, and pgrp were downregulated by 24,866.0, 2.69-, 119.1-, and 1.45-fold, respectively, whereas attacin and defensin were upregulated by 1.59- and 1.85-fold, respectively. The effect of ELF-EMFs on the T. ni larvae immune response and their potential impact on its physiology and susceptibility to pathogens are discussed. This information may provide new insight of ELF-EMFs on other pest species, as well as for the preservation of ecologically important species. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields stimulation modulates autoimmunity and immune responses: a possible immuno-modulatory therapeutic effect in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guerriero, Fabio; Ricevuti, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) stimulation is able to exert a certain action on autoimmunity and immune cells. In the past, the efficacy of pulsed ELF-EMFs in alleviating the symptoms and the progression of multiple sclerosis has been supported through their action on neurotransmission and on the autoimmune mechanisms responsible for demyelination. Regarding the immune system, ELF-EMF exposure contributes to a general activation of macrophages, resulting in changes of autoimmunity and several immunological reactions, such as increased reactive oxygen species-formation, enhanced phagocytic activity and increased production of chemokines. Transcranial electromagnetic brain stimulation is a non-invasive novel technique used recently to treat different neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease. Despite its proven value, the mechanisms through which EMF brain-stimulation exerts its beneficial action on neuronal function remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that its beneficial effects may be due to a neuroprotective effect on oxidative cell damage. On the basis of in vitro and clinical studies on brain activity, modulation by ELF-EMFs could possibly counteract the aberrant pro-inflammatory responses present in neurodegenerative disorders reducing their severity and their onset. The objective of this review is to provide a systematic overview of the published literature on EMFs and outline the most promising effects of ELF-EMFs in developing treatments of neurodegenerative disorders. In this regard, we review data supporting the role of ELF-EMF in generating immune-modulatory responses, neuromodulation, and potential neuroprotective benefits. Nonetheless, we reckon that the underlying mechanisms of interaction between EMF and the immune system are still to be completely understood and need further studies at a molecular level. PMID:28197174

  15. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields stimulation modulates autoimmunity and immune responses: a possible immuno-modulatory therapeutic effect in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Guerriero, Fabio; Ricevuti, Giovanni

    2016-12-01

    Increasing evidence shows that extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) stimulation is able to exert a certain action on autoimmunity and immune cells. In the past, the efficacy of pulsed ELF-EMFs in alleviating the symptoms and the progression of multiple sclerosis has been supported through their action on neurotransmission and on the autoimmune mechanisms responsible for demyelination. Regarding the immune system, ELF-EMF exposure contributes to a general activation of macrophages, resulting in changes of autoimmunity and several immunological reactions, such as increased reactive oxygen species-formation, enhanced phagocytic activity and increased production of chemokines. Transcranial electromagnetic brain stimulation is a non-invasive novel technique used recently to treat different neurodegenerative disorders, in particular Alzheimer's disease. Despite its proven value, the mechanisms through which EMF brain-stimulation exerts its beneficial action on neuronal function remains unclear. Recent studies have shown that its beneficial effects may be due to a neuroprotective effect on oxidative cell damage. On the basis of in vitro and clinical studies on brain activity, modulation by ELF-EMFs could possibly counteract the aberrant pro-inflammatory responses present in neurodegenerative disorders reducing their severity and their onset. The objective of this review is to provide a systematic overview of the published literature on EMFs and outline the most promising effects of ELF-EMFs in developing treatments of neurodegenerative disorders. In this regard, we review data supporting the role of ELF-EMF in generating immune-modulatory responses, neuromodulation, and potential neuroprotective benefits. Nonetheless, we reckon that the underlying mechanisms of interaction between EMF and the immune system are still to be completely understood and need further studies at a molecular level.

  16. What Message Should Health Educators Give regarding Electromagnetic Fields?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khamees, Nedaa A.

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMF) causing a number of medical conditions and common symptoms remains a concern and presents somewhat of a quandary to health educators in view of conflicting results. This study investigated the relationship of a number of EMF sources to reported symptoms in an attempt to,…

  17. What Message Should Health Educators Give regarding Electromagnetic Fields?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Khamees, Nedaa A.

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMF) causing a number of medical conditions and common symptoms remains a concern and presents somewhat of a quandary to health educators in view of conflicting results. This study investigated the relationship of a number of EMF sources to reported symptoms in an attempt to,…

  18. Exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic field changes the efficiency of the scorpion alpha toxin.

    PubMed

    Jankowska, Milena; Pawlowska-Mainville, Agnieszka; Stankiewicz, Maria; Rogalska, Justyna; Wyszkowska, Joanna

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) is produced by electric power transmission lines and electronic devices of everyday use. Some phenomena are proposed as "first effects" of ELF-EMF: the discrete changes in the membrane potential and the increase of the calcium channel activity as well as the intracellular concentration of Ca(2+). Interaction of the scorpion alpha toxin with the sodium channel depends on the orientation of the charges and may be perturbed by changes in the membrane polarization. The toxin induces overexcitability in the nervous system and an increase in the neurotransmitters released with different consequences, mainly the paralysis of muscles. We assumed that the exposure to ELF-EMF 0.7 mT will change the effects of the insect selective scorpion alpha toxin (recombinant LqhαIT from Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus) at the level of the cercal nerve function, the synaptic transmission and on the level of entire insect organism. Taking into account the compensatory mechanisms in organisms, we tested in addition ten times higher ELF-EMF on whole insects. Experiments were performed in vivo on cockroaches (Periplaneta americana) and in vitro - on isolated cockroach abdominal nerve cord with cerci. In biotests, the effects of LqhαIT (10(-8) M) were estimated on the basis of the insect ability to turn back from dorsal to ventral side. Three groups were compared: the control one and the two exposed to ELF-EMF - 0.7 and 7 mT. Bioelectrical activity of the cercal nerve and of the connective nerve that leaves the terminal abdominal ganglion was recorded using extracellular electrodes. LqhαIT (5 × 10(-8) M) induced modifications of neuronal activity that were observed in the control cockroach preparations and in the ones exposed to ELF-EMF (0.7 mT). The exposure to ELF-EMF was carried out using coils with a size appropriate to the examined objects. The exposure to ELF-EMF (0.7 mT) modified the effects of LqhαIT (5

  19. [Evaluation of genotoxic and/or co-genotoxic effects in cells exposed in vitro to extremely-low frequency electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Scassellati Sforzolini, G; Moretti, M; Villarini, M; Fatigoni, C; Pasquini, R

    2004-01-01

    During the last two decades, concerns have arisen regarding a possible association between extremely-low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) exposure and cancer incidence (e.g. childhood acute leukaemia, cancer of the nervous system, and lymphomas). In 1979, Wertheimer and Leeper firstly reported an excess of cancer mortality among children living in homes located near power lines and presumably exposed to elevated magnetic fields. Subsequently, a large number of epidemiological studies investigated the possible association between residential or occupational exposure to ELF-EMF and cancer. Several in vivo and in vitro models have been investigated with the effort to determine a link, if any, between such fields and mutagenesis and to determine the possible mechanism of cancer risk. However, a causal relationship between exposure to ELF-EMF and cancer has been suggested but has not been unequivocally demonstrated. In 1998, following an analysis of the results retrieved in the literature, the U.S. National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences proposed to apply a "possible human carcinogen" category (Group 2B) to ELF-EMF. More recently, in 2002, the same classification for ELF-MF was proposed by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. In this in vitro approach, to test the genotoxic and/or co-genotoxic potency of ELF-MF, we used the alkaline single-cell microgel-electrophoresis (comet) assay and the cytokinesis block micronucleus test. Co-exposure assays were performed in the presence of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), 4-nitroquinoline N-oxide (4NQO), benzene, 1,4-benzenediol (1,4-BD), or 1,2,4-benzenetriol (1,2,4-BT). An ELF-MF (50 Hz, 5 mT) was obtained by a system composed of capsulated induction coils. ELF-MF alone was unable to cause direct primary DNA damage. Whereas, an increased extent of DNA damage was observed in cells co-exposed to ELF-MF and MNNG, 1,4-BD, or 1,2,4-BT. An opposite trend was observed in cells treated

  20. Assessment of biological changes of continuous whole body exposure to static magnetic field and extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields in mice.

    PubMed

    Hashish, A H; El-Missiry, M A; Abdelkader, H I; Abou-Saleh, R H

    2008-11-01

    The question whether static magnetic fields (SMFs) and extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) cause biological effects is of special interest. We investigated the effects of continuous whole body exposure to both fields for 30 days on some liver and blood parameters in mice. Two exposure systems were designed; the first produced a gradient SMF while the second generated uniform 50 Hz ELF-EMF. The results showed a gradual body weight loss when mice were exposed to either field. This is coupled with a significant decrease (P<0.05) in the levels of glucose, total protein and the activity of alkaline phosphatase in serum. A significant increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity was demonstrated in serum and liver paralleled with a significant elevation in hepatic γ-glutamyl transferase activity. The glutathione-S-transferase activity and lipid peroxidation level in the liver were significantly increased while a significant decrease in hepatic gluthathione content was recorded. A significant decrease in the counts of monocytes, platelets, peripheral lymphocytes as well as splenic total, T and B lymphocytes levels was observed for SMF and ELF-EMF exposed groups. The granulocytes percentage was significantly increased. The results indicate that there is a relation between the exposure to SMF or ELF-EMF and the oxidative stress through distressing redox balance leading to physiological disturbances.

  1. Effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on human fetal scleral fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huang; Wang, Jie; Cui, Jiefeng; Fan, Xianqun

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) on human fetal scleral fibroblasts (HFSFs). HFSFs were subjected to 50 Hz artificial ELF-EMFs generated by Helmholtz coils with 0.1, 0.2, 0.5, and 1.0 mT field intensities for 6 to 48 h. The viability and factors involved in scleral structuring of HFSFs were determined. The growth rate of HFSFs significantly decreased after only 24 h of exposure to ELF-EMFs (0.2 mT). The messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of collagen type I (COL1A1) decreased and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) increased significantly. There was a decrease in tissue inhibitor of MMP-2 mRNA levels between treated and control cells only at the 1.0 mT intensity level. Transforming growth factor beta-2 mRNA increased in exposed cells, and, simultaneously, fibroblast growth factor-2 mRNA levels decreased. The protein expressions of COL1A1 and MMP-2 were also significantly altered subsequent to exposure (p < 0.05). This study shows that ELF-EMFs had biological effects on HFSFs and could cause abnormality in scleral collagen. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Microsatellite analysis for determination of the mutagenicity of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields and ionising radiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Mairs, Robert J; Hughes, Kate; Fitzsimmons, Sara; Prise, Kevin M; Livingstone, Anne; Wilson, Lesley; Baig, Nazia; Clark, Anne Marie; Timpson, Alan; Patel, Gaurang; Folkard, M; Angerson, Wilson J; Boyd, Marie

    2007-01-10

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) have been reported to induce lesions in DNA and to enhance the mutagenicity of ionising radiation. However, the significance of these findings is uncertain because the determination of the carcinogenic potential of EMFs has largely been based on investigations of large chromosomal aberrations. Using a more sensitive method of detecting DNA damage involving microsatellite sequences, we observed that exposure of UVW human glioma cells to ELF-EMF alone at a field strength of 1 mT (50 Hz) for 12 h gave rise to 0.011 mutations/locus/cell. This was equivalent to a 3.75-fold increase in mutation induction compared with unexposed controls. Furthermore, ELF-EMF increased the mutagenic capacity of 0.3 and 3 Gy gamma-irradiation by factors of 2.6 and 2.75, respectively. These results suggest not only that ELF-EMF is mutagenic as a single agent but also that it can potentiate the mutagenicity of ionising radiation. Treatment with 0.3 Gy induced more than 10 times more mutations per unit dose than irradiation with 3 Gy, indicating hypermutability at low dose.

  3. Treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcers through Systemic Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejo-Núñez, A. D.; Pérez-Chávez, F.; García-Sánchez, C.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Cañendo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-01

    This study was designed to, investigate the healing effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on diabetic foot ulcers and test two different exposure systems aimed at reducing the ELF-EMF exposure time of patients. In the first system the ELF-EMF were applied to the arm where only 3% of the total blood volume/min circulates at any given time. In the second system the ELF-EMF were applied to the thorax where more than 100% of the total blood volume/minute circulates at any given time. Twenty-six diabetic patients, with superficial neuropathic ulcers unresponsive to medical treatment were included in this preliminary report. In the first group (17 patients), the arm was exposed two hours twice a week to a extremely low frequency electromagnetic field of 0.45-0.9 mTrms, 120 Hz generated inside a solenoid coil of 10.1 cm by 20.5 cm long. In the second group the thorax of 7 patients was exposed 25 minutes twice a week to an electromagnetic field of 0.4-0.85 mTrms, 120 Hz generated in the center of a squared quasi-Helmholtz coil 52 cm by side. One patient was assigned to a placebo configuration of each exposure system with identical appearance as the active equipment but without magnetic field. Patients with deep ulcers, infected ulcers, cancer, or auto-immune disease were excluded. These preliminary results showed that the two exposure systems accelerate the healing process of neuropathic ulcers. Complete healing of the ulcer had a median duration of 90 days in both exposure systems. Therefore thorax exposure where more blood is exposed to ELF-EMF per unit of time was able to reduce 4.8 times the patient treatment time. In those patients assigned to the placebo equipment no healing effects were observed. This study will continue with a parallel, double blind placebo controlled protocol.

  4. Neuronal cellular responses to extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure: implications regarding oxidative stress and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Reale, Marcella; Kamal, Mohammad A; Patruno, Antonia; Costantini, Erica; D'Angelo, Chiara; Pesce, Miko; Greig, Nigel H

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1 mT; frequency, 50-Hz) on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2(-), which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT) activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a decline in CAT

  5. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure affects fertilization outcome in swine animal model.

    PubMed

    Bernabò, N; Tettamanti, E; Russo, V; Martelli, A; Turriani, M; Mattoli, M; Barboni, B

    2010-06-01

    Modern society continuously exposes the population to electromagnetic radiation, the effects of which on human health, in particular reproduction, are still unknown. The aim of this research was to assess the effect of acute (1h) exposure of boar spermatozoa to a 50 Hz extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on early fertility outcome. The effect of intensities ranging from 0 to 2 mT on morpho-functional integrity of capacitated spermatozoa was examined in vitro. The oviducts containing or without spermatozoa were then exposed to the minimum in vivo, TD(50,) and maximum intensities determined in vitro, 4h before ovulation. The effects of ELF-EMF on spermatozoa in terms of early embryo development were evaluated after 12h and 6 days. It was found that in vitro ELF-EMF > 0.5 mT induced a progressive acrosome damage, thus compromising the ability of spermatozoa to undergo acrosomal reaction after zona pellucida stimulation and reducing the in vitro fertilization outcome. These effects became evident at 0.75 mT and reached the plateau at 1 mT. Under in vivo conditions, the ELF-EMF intensity of 1 mT was able to compromise sperm function, significantly reducing the fertilization rate. In addition, the exposure of oviducts to fields > or = 0.75 mT in the absence of spermatozoa was able to negatively affect early embryo development. In fact, it was found to cause a slowdown in the embryo cleavage. In conclusion, it was demonstrated how and at which intensities ELF-EMF negatively affect early fertility outcome in a highly predictive animal model.

  6. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields exposure and female breast cancer risk: a meta-analysis based on 24,338 cases and 60,628 controls.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chunhai; Ma, Xiangyu; Zhong, Min; Yu, Zhengping

    2010-09-01

    Exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) has been suggested to increase female breast cancer risk; however, the data have been inconclusive. In order to derive a more precise estimation of the relationship, a meta-analysis was performed. Medline, PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Library and Web of Science were searched. Crude ORs with 95% CIs were used to assess the strength of association between ELF-EMF exposure and female breast cancer risk. A total of 15 studies published over the period 2000 to 2009 including 24,338 cases and 60,628 controls were involved in this meta-analysis. The results showed no significant association between ELF-EMF exposure and female breast cancer risk in total analysis (OR = 0.988, 95% CI = 0.898-1.088) and in all the subgroup analyses by exposure modes, menopausal status, and estrogen receptor status. This result is in accordance with the previous meta-analysis carried out by Erren in 2000. In conclusion, this meta-analysis suggests that ELF-EMF exposure has no association with the susceptibility of female breast cancer.

  7. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field exposure during chronic morphine treatment strengthens downregulation of dopamine D2 receptors in rat dorsal hippocampus after morphine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiusong; Liu, Yadong; Lei, Yanlin; Zhou, Dongming; Fu, Yu; Che, Yi; Xu, Ruchang; Yu, Hualin; Hu, Xintian; Ma, Yuanye

    2008-03-15

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) exposure during morphine treatment on dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) density in the rat dorsal hippocampus following withdrawal. Rats were exposed to ELF-EMF (20 Hz, 14 mT) or sham exposed for 1h per day before injection of morphine (10mg/kg, i.p.) once daily for 12 days. The saline control group was sham exposed for the same period. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the density of D2Rs on the 1st, 3rd and 5th morphine withdrawal days. The results showed that the density of D2Rs in sham-exposed morphine-treated rats on the 1st and 3rd days of morphine withdrawal was significantly lower than that of the saline control group. The ELF-EMF-exposed morphine group also exhibited a significantly lower density of D2Rs on the 1st and 3rd withdrawal days relative to the sham-exposed morphine group. However, the D2R density in both groups tended to recover as morphine withdrawal days increased. The results suggest that dorsal hippocampal D2Rs are sensitive to morphine withdrawal and that this is potentiated by ELF-EMF pre-exposure during morphine treatment.

  8. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields activate the ERK cascade, increase hsp70 protein levels and promote regeneration in Planaria.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Reba; Lin-Ye, Avary; Geddis, Matthew S; Wickramaratne, Priya J; Hodge, Susan E; Pantazatos, Spiro P; Blank, Martin; Ambron, Richard T

    2009-01-01

    To use regenerating Planaria Dugesia dorotocethala as a model to determine whether an intermittent modulated extremely low frequency electro-magnetic field (ELF-EMF) produces elevated levels of the heat shock protein hsp70 and stimulates intracellular pathways known to be involved in injury and repair. We focused on serum response element (SRE) binding through the extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Planaria were transected equidistant between the tip of the head and the tip of the tail. Individual head and tail portions from the same worm were exposed to a 60 Hertz 80 milliGauss ELF-EMF for 1 h twice daily for 15 days post-transection under carefully controlled exposure conditions. The regenerating heads and tails were photographed and the lengths measured at three-day intervals. In other experiments, the timing of the appearance of pigmented eyes was monitored in the tail portion at 12-h intervals following transection in both ELF-EMF exposed and sham control. In some experiments protein lysates were analysed for hsp70 levels, doubly phosphorylated (pp)-ERK, Elk-1 kinase activity and serum response factor (SRF)-SRE binding. ELF-EMF exposure during the initial 3-days post-surgery caused a significant increase in regeneration for both heads and tails, but especially tails. The first appearance of eyes occurred at day seven post-transection in tail portions exposed to ELF-EMF. In the sham control tail samples the initial appearance of eyes occurred 48 h later. Concurrently, ELF-EMF-exposed heads and tails exhibited an elevation in the level of hsp70 protein, an activation of an ERK cascade, and an increase in SRF-SRE binding. Exposures to a modulated sinusoidal ELF-EMF were delivered by a Helmholtz configuration at a frequency of 60 Hz and 80 mG twice a day for one hour. This is accompanied by an increase in hsp70 protein levels, activation of specific kinases and upregulation of transcription factors that are generally associated with repair

  9. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields activate the ERK cascade, increase hsp70 protein levels and promote regeneration in Planaria

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, Reba; Lin-Ye, Avary; Geddis, Matthew S.; Wickramaratne, Priya J.; Hodge, Susan E.; Pantazatos, Spiro; Blank, Martin; Ambron, Richard T.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To use regenerating Planaria Dugesia dorotocethala as a model to determine whether an intermittent modulated extremely low frequency electro-magnetic field (ELF-EMF) produces elevated levels of the heat shock protein hsp70 and stimulates intracellular pathways known to be involved in injury and repair. We focused on serum response element (SRE) binding through the extra-cellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) cascade. Materials and methods Planaria were transected equidistant between the tip of the head and the tip of the tail. Individual head and tail portions from the same worm were exposed to a 60 Hertz 80 milliGauss ELF- EMF for one hour twice daily for 15 days post transection under carefully controlled exposure conditions. The regenerating heads and tails were photographed and the lengths measured at 3-day intervals. In other experiments, the timing of the appearance of pigmented eyes was monitored in the tail portion at 12 hour intervals following transection in both ELF-EMF exposed and sham control. In some experiments protein lysates were analyzed for hsp70 levels, doubly phosphorylated (pp)-ERK, Elk-1 kinase activity and serum response factor (SRF) -SRE binding. Results ELF-EMF exposure during the initial 3-days post surgery caused a significant increase in regeneration for both heads and tails, but especially tails. The first appearance of eyes occurred at day seven post-transection in tail portions exposed to ELF-EMF. In the sham control tail samples the initial appearance of eyes occurred 48 hours later. Concurrently, ELF-EMF-exposed heads and tails exhibited an elevation in the level of hsp70 protein, an activation of an ERK cascade, and an increase in SRF-SRE binding. Conclusion Exposures to a modulated sinusoidal ELF-EMF were delivered by a Helmholtz configuration at a frequency of 60Hz and 80mG twice a day for one hour. This is accompanied by an increase in hsp70 protein levels, activation of specific kinases and up-regulation of

  10. Residential proximity to electromagnetic field sources and birth weight: Minimizing residual confounding using multiple imputation and propensity score matching.

    PubMed

    de Vocht, Frank; Lee, Brian

    2014-08-01

    Studies have suggested that residential exposure to extremely low frequency (50 Hz) electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) from high voltage cables, overhead power lines, electricity substations or towers are associated with reduced birth weight and may be associated with adverse birth outcomes or even miscarriages. We previously conducted a study of 140,356 singleton live births between 2004 and 2008 in Northwest England, which suggested that close residential proximity (≤ 50 m) to ELF-EMF sources was associated with reduced average birth weight of 212 g (95%CI: -395 to -29 g) but not with statistically significant increased risks for other adverse perinatal outcomes. However, the cohort was limited by missing data for most potentially confounding variables including maternal smoking during pregnancy, which was only available for a small subgroup, while also residual confounding could not be excluded. This study, using the same cohort, was conducted to minimize the effects of these problems using multiple imputation to address missing data and propensity score matching to minimize residual confounding. Missing data were imputed using multiple imputation using chained equations to generate five datasets. For each dataset 115 exposed women (residing ≤ 50 m from a residential ELF-EMF source) were propensity score matched to 1150 unexposed women. After doubly robust confounder adjustment, close proximity to a residential ELF-EMF source remained associated with a reduction in birth weight of -116 g (95% confidence interval: -224:-7 g). No effect was found for proximity ≤ 100 m compared to women living further away. These results indicate that although the effect size was about half of the effect previously reported, close maternal residential proximity to sources of ELF-EMF remained associated with suboptimal fetal growth. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Affect the miRNA-Mediated Regulation of Signaling Pathways in the GC-2 Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong; Liu, Wen-Bin; Liu, Kai-Jun; Ao, Lin; Cao, Jia; Zhong, Julia Li; Liu, Jin-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) can affect male reproductive function, but the underlying mechanism of this effect remains unknown. miRNA-mediated regulation has been implicated as an important epigenetic mechanism for regulatory pathways. Herein, we profiled miRNA expression in response to ELF-EMFs in vitro. Mouse spermatocyte-derived GC-2 cells were intermittently exposed to a 50 Hz ELF-EMF for 72 h (5 min on/10 min off) at magnetic field intensities of 1 mT, 2 mT and 3 mT. Cell viability was assessed using the CCK-8 assay. Apoptosis and the cell cycle were analyzed with flow cytometry. miRNA expression was profiled using Affymetrix Mouse Genechip miRNA 3.0 arrays. Our data showed that the growth, apoptosis or cell cycle arrest of GC-2 cells exposed to the 50 Hz ELF-EMF did not significantly change. However, we identified a total of 55 miRNAs whose expression significantly changed compared with the sham group, including 19 differentially expressed miRNAs (7 miRNAs were upregulated, and 12 were downregulated) in the 1 mT exposure group and 36 (9 miRNAs were upregulated, and 27 were downregulated) in the 3 mT exposure group. The changes in the expression of 15 selected miRNAs measured by real-time PCR were consistent with the microarray results. A network analysis was used to predict core miRNAs and target genes, including miR-30e-5p, miR-210-5p, miR-196b-5p, miR-504-3p, miR-669c-5p and miR-455-3p. We found that these miRNAs were differentially expressed in response to different magnetic field intensities of ELF-EMFs. GO term and KEGG pathway annotation based on the miRNA expression profiling results showed that miRNAs may regulate circadian rhythms, cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions and the p53 signaling pathway. These results suggested that miRNAs could serve as potential biomarkers, and the miRNA-mediated regulation of signaling pathways might play significant roles in the biological effects of ELF-EMFs.

  12. Extremely Low-Frequency Electromagnetic Fields Affect the miRNA-Mediated Regulation of Signaling Pathways in the GC-2 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kai-jun; Ao, Lin; Cao, Jia; Zhong, Julia Li; Liu, Jin-yi

    2015-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) can affect male reproductive function, but the underlying mechanism of this effect remains unknown. miRNA-mediated regulation has been implicated as an important epigenetic mechanism for regulatory pathways. Herein, we profiled miRNA expression in response to ELF-EMFs in vitro. Mouse spermatocyte-derived GC–2 cells were intermittently exposed to a 50 Hz ELF-EMF for 72 h (5 min on/10 min off) at magnetic field intensities of 1 mT, 2 mT and 3 mT. Cell viability was assessed using the CCK–8 assay. Apoptosis and the cell cycle were analyzed with flow cytometry. miRNA expression was profiled using Affymetrix Mouse Genechip miRNA 3.0 arrays. Our data showed that the growth, apoptosis or cell cycle arrest of GC–2 cells exposed to the 50 Hz ELF-EMF did not significantly change. However, we identified a total of 55 miRNAs whose expression significantly changed compared with the sham group, including 19 differentially expressed miRNAs (7 miRNAs were upregulated, and 12 were downregulated) in the 1 mT exposure group and 36 (9 miRNAs were upregulated, and 27 were downregulated) in the 3 mT exposure group. The changes in the expression of 15 selected miRNAs measured by real-time PCR were consistent with the microarray results. A network analysis was used to predict core miRNAs and target genes, including miR-30e-5p, miR-210-5p, miR-196b-5p, miR-504-3p, miR-669c-5p and miR-455-3p. We found that these miRNAs were differentially expressed in response to different magnetic field intensities of ELF-EMFs. GO term and KEGG pathway annotation based on the miRNA expression profiling results showed that miRNAs may regulate circadian rhythms, cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions and the p53 signaling pathway. These results suggested that miRNAs could serve as potential biomarkers, and the miRNA-mediated regulation of signaling pathways might play significant roles in the biological effects of ELF-EMFs. PMID:26439850

  13. Influence of exposure to electromagnetic field on the cardiovascular system.

    PubMed

    Jeong, J H; Kim, J S; Lee, B C; Min, Y S; Kim, D S; Ryu, J S; Soh, K S; Seo, K M; Sohn, U D

    2005-01-01

    1 We examined whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) affect the basal level of cardiovascular parameters and influence of drugs acting on the sympathetic nervous system. 2 Male rats were exposed to sham control and EMF (60 Hz, 20 G) for 1 (MF-1) or 5 days (MF-5). We evaluated the alterations of blood pressure (BP), pulse pressure (PP), heart rate (HR), and the PR interval, QRS interval and QT interval on the electrocardiogram and dysrhythmic ratio in basal level and dysrhythmia induced by beta-adrenoceptor agonists. 3 In terms of the basal levels, there were no statistically significant differences among control, MF-1 and MF-5 in PR interval, QRS interval, mean BP, HR and PP. However, the QT interval, representing ventricular repolarization, was significantly reduced by MF-1 (P < 0.05). 4 (-)-Dobutamine (beta1-adrenoceptor-selective agonist)-induced tachycardia was significantly suppressed by ELF-EMF exposure in MF-1 for the increase in HR (DeltaHR), the decrease in QRS interval (DeltaQRS) and the decrease in QT (DeltaQT) interval. Adrenaline (nonselective beta-receptor agonist)-induced dysrhythmia was also significantly suppressed by ELF-EMF in MF-1 for the number of missing beats, the dysrhythmic ratio, and the increase in BP and PP. 5 These results indicated that 1-day exposure to ELF-EMF (60 Hz, 20 G) could suppress the increase in HR by affecting ventricular repolarization and may have a down-regulatory effect on responses of the cardiovascular system induced by sympathetic agonists.

  14. Chromosomal damage in human diploid fibroblasts by intermittent exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Winker, Robert; Ivancsits, Sabine; Pilger, Alexander; Adlkofer, Franz; Rüdiger, H W

    2005-08-01

    Environmental exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) has been implicated in the development of cancer in humans. An important basis for assessing a potential cancer risk due to ELF-EMF exposure is knowledge of biological effects on human cells at the chromosomal level. Therefore, we investigated in the present study the effect of intermittent ELF electromagnetic fields (50 Hz, sinusoidal, 5'field-on/10'field-off, 2-24 h, 1 mT) on the induction of micronuclei (MN) and chromosomal aberrations in cultured human fibroblasts. ELF-EMF radiation resulted in a time-dependent increase of micronuclei, which became significant after 10 h of intermittent exposure at a flux density of 1 mT. After approximately 15 h a constant level of micronuclei of about three times the basal level was reached. In addition, chromosomal aberrations were increased up to 10-fold above basal levels. Our data strongly indicate a clastogenic potential of intermittent low-frequency electromagnetic fields, which may lead to considerable chromosomal damage in dividing cells.

  15. Exposure to an extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field only slightly modifies the proteome of Chromobacterium violaceumATCC 12472.

    PubMed

    Baraúna, Rafael A; Santos, Agenor V; Graças, Diego A; Santos, Daniel M; Ghilardi, Rubens; Pimenta, Adriano M C; Carepo, Marta S P; Schneider, Maria P C; Silva, Artur

    2015-05-01

    Several studies of the physiological responses of different organisms exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) have been described. In this work, we report the minimal effects of in situ exposure to ELF-EMF on the global protein expression of Chromobacterium violaceum using a gel-based proteomic approach. The protein expression profile was only slightly altered, with five differentially expressed proteins detected in the exposed cultures; two of these proteins (DNA-binding stress protein, Dps, and alcohol dehydrogenase) were identified by MS/MS. The enhanced expression of Dps possibly helped to prevent physical damage to DNA. Although small, the changes in protein expression observed here were probably beneficial in helping the bacteria to adapt to the stress generated by the electromagnetic field.

  16. Exposure to an extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field only slightly modifies the proteome of Chromobacterium violaceumATCC 12472

    PubMed Central

    Baraúna, Rafael A.; Santos, Agenor V.; Graças, Diego A.; Santos, Daniel M.; Ghilardi, Rubens; Pimenta, Adriano M. C.; Carepo, Marta S. P.; Schneider, Maria P.C.; Silva, Artur

    2015-01-01

    Several studies of the physiological responses of different organisms exposed to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) have been described. In this work, we report the minimal effects of in situ exposure to ELF-EMF on the global protein expression of Chromobacterium violaceum using a gel-based proteomic approach. The protein expression profile was only slightly altered, with five differentially expressed proteins detected in the exposed cultures; two of these proteins (DNA-binding stress protein, Dps, and alcohol dehydrogenase) were identified by MS/MS. The enhanced expression of Dps possibly helped to prevent physical damage to DNA. Although small, the changes in protein expression observed here were probably beneficial in helping the bacteria to adapt to the stress generated by the electromagnetic field. PMID:26273227

  17. Short-term Exposure to 50-Hz Electromagnetic Field and Alterations in NQO1 and NQO2 Expression in MCF-7 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudinasab, Hamideh; Saadat, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    AIM: Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) have some genotoxic effects and it may alter the mRNA levels of antioxidant genes. The NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase-1 (NQO1) and NQO2 are ubiquitously expressed. Considering that there is no published data on the effect(s) of ELF-EMF (50-Hz) exposure and expression levels of NQO1 and NQO2 in the human MCF-7 cells, the present study was carried out. METHODS: The ELF-EMF (0.25 and 0.50 mT) exposure patterns were: 5 min field-on/5 min filed-off, 15 min field-on/15 min field-off, and 30 min field-on continuously. In all exposure conditions, total exposure time were 30 minutes. The RNA extraction was done at two times; immediately post exposure and two hours post exposure. The effect of ELF-EMF on gene expression was assessed by real-time PCR. RESULTS: The NQO1 mRNA level (at 0h) decreased in the cells exposed to 5 min field-on/5 min filed-off condition at 0.25 mT EMF when compared with the unexposed cells. The NQO2 mRNA level (at 0h and 2h) increased in the cells exposed to 5 min field-on/5 min filed-off condition at 0.50 mT EMF when compared with the unexposed cells. CONCLUSIONS: Alterations in the NQO1 and NQO2 mRNA levels seem at the “5 min field-on/5 min field-off” condition. PMID:28028389

  18. Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields alters the behaviour, physiology and stress protein levels of desert locusts

    PubMed Central

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Shepherd, Sebastian; Sharkh, Suleiman; Jackson, Christopher W.; Newland, Philip L.

    2016-01-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are present throughout the modern world and are derived from many man-made sources including overhead transmission lines. The risks of extremely-low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields are particularly poorly understood especially at high field strengths as they are rarely encountered at ground level. Flying insects, however, can approach close to high field strength transmission lines prompting the question as to how these high levels of exposure affect behaviour and physiology. Here we utilise the accessible nervous system of the locust to ask how exposure to high levels of ELF EMF impact at multiple levels. We show that exposure to ELF EMFs above 4 mT leads to reduced walking. Moreover, intracellular recordings from an identified motor neuron, the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron, show increased spike latency and a broadening of its spike in exposed animals. In addition, hind leg kick force, produced by stimulating the extensor tibiae muscle, was reduced following exposure, while stress-protein levels (Hsp70) increased. Together these results suggest that ELF EMF exposure has the capacity to cause dramatic effects from behaviour to physiology and protein expression, and this study lays the foundation to explore the ecological significance of these effects in other flying insects. PMID:27808167

  19. Exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields alters the behaviour, physiology and stress protein levels of desert locusts.

    PubMed

    Wyszkowska, Joanna; Shepherd, Sebastian; Sharkh, Suleiman; Jackson, Christopher W; Newland, Philip L

    2016-11-03

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) are present throughout the modern world and are derived from many man-made sources including overhead transmission lines. The risks of extremely-low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields are particularly poorly understood especially at high field strengths as they are rarely encountered at ground level. Flying insects, however, can approach close to high field strength transmission lines prompting the question as to how these high levels of exposure affect behaviour and physiology. Here we utilise the accessible nervous system of the locust to ask how exposure to high levels of ELF EMF impact at multiple levels. We show that exposure to ELF EMFs above 4 mT leads to reduced walking. Moreover, intracellular recordings from an identified motor neuron, the fast extensor tibiae motor neuron, show increased spike latency and a broadening of its spike in exposed animals. In addition, hind leg kick force, produced by stimulating the extensor tibiae muscle, was reduced following exposure, while stress-protein levels (Hsp70) increased. Together these results suggest that ELF EMF exposure has the capacity to cause dramatic effects from behaviour to physiology and protein expression, and this study lays the foundation to explore the ecological significance of these effects in other flying insects.

  20. No effect of 60 Hz electromagnetic fields on MYC or {beta}-actin expression in human leukemic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lacy-Hulbert, A.; Wilkins, R.C.; Hesketh, T.R.

    1995-10-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown weak correlations between exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMFs) and the incidence of several cancers, particularly childhood leukemias, although negative studies have also been reported. These observations have prompted a broad range of in vitro cellular studies in which effects of ELF EMFs have been observed. However, no reported response has been replicated widely in independent laboratories. One potentially important response is the rapid activation of proto-oncogenes and other genes in human leukemic (HL60) cells and a wide variety of other eukaryotic cells, because of the role of these genes in cell proliferation. We describe quantitative Northern analysis of MYC and {beta}actin mRNAs from HL60 cells exposed to fields under conditions very similar to those reported previously to activate these genes, namely 60 Hz sinusoidal magnetic fields of 0.57, 5.7 or 57 {mu}T for 20 min. In addition we have used a new design of field-exposure system and introduced a number of other modifications to the protocol to optimize any response. We have also developed a novel method providing enhanced accuracy for the quantitative measurement of mRNA. No significant effect of ELF EMFs on gene expression was observed using any of these systems and analytical methods. 70 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. DNA fragmentation in human fibroblasts under extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure.

    PubMed

    Focke, Frauke; Schuermann, David; Kuster, Niels; Schär, Primo

    2010-01-05

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) were reported to affect DNA integrity in human cells with evidence based on the Comet assay. These findings were heavily debated for two main reasons; the lack of reproducibility, and the absence of a plausible scientific rationale for how EMFs could damage DNA. Starting out from a replication of the relevant experiments, we performed this study to clarify the existence and explore origin and nature of ELF-EMF induced DNA effects. Our data confirm that intermittent (but not continuous) exposure of human primary fibroblasts to a 50 Hz EMF at a flux density of 1 mT induces a slight but significant increase of DNA fragmentation in the Comet assay, and we provide first evidence for this to be caused by the magnetic rather than the electric field. Moreover, we show that EMF-induced responses in the Comet assay are dependent on cell proliferation, suggesting that processes of DNA replication rather than the DNA itself may be affected. Consistently, the Comet effects correlated with a reduction of actively replicating cells and a concomitant increase of apoptotic cells in exposed cultures, whereas a combined Fpg-Comet test failed to produce evidence for a notable contribution of oxidative DNA base damage. Hence, ELF-EMF induced effects in the Comet assay are reproducible under specific conditions and can be explained by minor disturbances in S-phase processes and occasional triggering of apoptosis rather than by the generation of DNA damage.

  2. Synaptosomal acetylcholinesterase activity variation pattern in the presence of electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Afrasiabi, Ali; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Abbasi, Shayan; Dadras, Ali; Ghalandari, Behafarid; Seidkhani, Hossein; Modaresi, Seyed Mohamad Sadegh; Masoudian, Neda; Amani, Amir; Ahmadian, Shahin

    2014-04-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) is the enzyme that controls the acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations in cholinergic synaptic clefts by hydrolyzing ACh to choline and acetate. Cholinergic synapses are involved in important functions such as learning, memory and cognition. In this study, we investigated the effects of a wide range of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) on synaptic ACh concentrations through AChE enzyme activity assay. Synaptosome suspensions were prepared as a neural terminus from cerebral cortex of sheep brain. Prepared synaptosomes were exposed to ELF-EMFs with frequency ranging from 50 Hz to 230 Hz for duration between 15 and 120 min and flux intensity between 0.1 mT and 1.7 mT. Consequently, AChE activity was measured by Ellman method. Raw data were analyzed by neural network based software, Inform 4.02, to predict AChE activity pattern through nine 3D curves. These curves showed that AChE activity decreases when exposed to ELF-EMFs of 1.2 mT to 1.7 mT intensity and 50 Hz to 90 Hz frequency. Thus, it is proposed that exposure to fields of in this range of frequency-intensity would be effective in clinical treatments of cholinergic disorders to increase synaptic ACh concentration. However, more in vivo experiments are needed to develop this suggested treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Common behaviors alterations after extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field exposure in rat animal model.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Najafi Abedi, Akram

    2016-01-01

    Naturally, the presence of electromagnetic waves in our living environment affects all components of organisms, particularly humans and animals, as the large part of their body consists of water. In the present study, we tried to investigate the relation between exposure to the extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) and common behaviors such as body weight, food and water intake, anorexia (poor appetite), plasma glucose concentration, movement, rearing and sniffing in rats. For this purpose, rats were exposed to 40  Hz ELF-EMF once a day for 21 days, then at days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 after exposure, any changes in the above-mentioned items were assessed in the exposed rats and compared to the non-exposed group as control. Body weight of irradiated rats significantly increased only a week after exposure and decreased after that. No significant change was observed in food and water intake of irradiated rats compared to the control, and the anorexia parameter in the group exposed to ELF-EMF was significantly decreased at one and two weeks after irradiation. A week after exposure, the level of glucose was significantly increased but at other days these changes were not significant. Movements, rearing and sniffing of rats at day 1 after exposure were significantly decreased and other days these changes did not follow any particular pattern. However, the result of this study demonstrated that exposure to ELF-EMF can alter the normal condition of animals and may represent a harmful impact on behavior.

  4. Autism-relevant social abnormalities in mice exposed perinatally to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Alsaeed, Ibrahim; Al-Somali, Faisal; Sakhnini, Lama; Aljarallah, Omar S; Hamdan, Rayan M M; Bubishate, Saleh A; Sarfaraz, Ziyab Khan; Kamal, Amer

    2014-10-01

    The incidence of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been rising, but the causes of ASD remain largely unidentified. Collective data have implicated the increased human exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMF) in the increasing incidence of ASD. There are established biological effects of extremely low-frequency (ELF) EMF, but the relation to ASD is not investigated enough. In this study we examined the effects of perinatal exposure to ELF EMF on some ASD-relevant behavioral parameters in mice. The EMF was delivered via a Helmholtz coil pair. Male BALB/C mice were used and divided into exposed and control groups (n=8 and n=9, respectively). Tests were used to assess sociability, preference for social novelty, locomotion, anxiety, exploratory behavior, motor coordination, and olfaction. The examined mice were all males and exposed to EMF during the last week of gestation and for 7 days after delivery. The exposed mice demonstrated a lack of normal sociability and preference for social novelty while maintaining normal anxiety-like behavior, locomotion, motor coordination, and olfaction. Exposed mice also demonstrated decreased exploratory activity. We concluded that these results are supportive of the hypothesis of a causal link between exposure to ELF-EMF and ASD; however, replications of the study with further tests are recommended.

  5. The effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields on pregnancy and fetal growth, and development.

    PubMed

    Mahram, Manoochehr; Ghazavi, Mohammad

    2013-04-01

    Exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) and its effects at different frequencies on living beings has been investigated for decades. However, there are fewer studies that have been conducted on humans, thus this study aims to determine the effect of extremely low frequency (ELF) -EMFs on pregnancy, fetal growth and development in humans. In this epidemiologic analytical cohort study, cases included pregnant women and their newborns. There were 222 women exposed to ELF-EMFs from high voltage electricity towers and cables during pregnancy and 158 women who had no exposure during pregnancy. Data that included pregnancy duration, neonatal birth weight, length, head circumference, gender and congenital malformations were collected through direct questions, measurements and referral to the registered data of related hospital or health center documents. Collected data was analyzed by SPSS-16. P < 0.05 was considered significant. No significant difference was found in pregnancy duration and preterm labor, neonatal birth weight, length, head circumference and congenital malformations in the two studied groups. Although the results of this study have shown no significant effects of ELF-EMFs on human pregnancy, fetal growth and development, taking precautionary measures to reduce exposure to EMFs by pregnant women seems logical. Conducting similar studies is strongly recommended.

  6. Quantum mechanical model for the anticarcinogenic effect of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic fields on early chemical hepatocarcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godina-Nava, Juan José; Torres-Vega, Gabino; López-Riquelme, Germán Octavio; López-Sandoval, Eduardo; Samana, Arturo Rodolfo; García Velasco, Fermín; Hernández-Aguilar, Claudia; Domínguez-Pacheco, Arturo

    2017-02-01

    Using the conventional Haberkorn approach, it is evaluated the recombination of the radical pair (RP) singlet spin state to study theoretically the cytoprotective effect of an extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on early stages of hepatic cancer chemically induced in rats. The proposal is that ELF-EMF modulates the interconversion rate of singlet and triplet spin states of the RP populations modifying the products from the metabolization of carcinogens. Previously, we found that the daily treatment with ELF-EMF 120 Hz inhibited the number and area of preneoplastic lesions in chemical carcinogenesis. The singlet spin population is evaluated diagonalizing the spin density matrix through the Lanczos method in a radical pair mechanism (RPM). Using four values of the interchange energy, we have studied the variations over the singlet population. The low magnetic field effect as a test of the influence over the enzymatic chemical reaction is evaluated calculating the quantum yield. Through a bootstrap technique the range is found for the singlet decay rate for the process. Applying the quantum measurements concept, we addressed the impact toward hepatic cells. The result contributes to improving our understanding of the chemical carcinogenesis process affected by charged particles that damage the DNA.

  7. A short-term extremely low frequency electromagnetic field exposure increases circulating leukocyte numbers and affects HPA-axis signaling in mice.

    PubMed

    de Kleijn, Stan; Ferwerda, Gerben; Wiese, Michelle; Trentelman, Jos; Cuppen, Jan; Kozicz, Tamas; de Jager, Linda; Hermans, Peter W M; Verburg-van Kemenade, B M Lidy

    2016-10-01

    There is still uncertainty whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) can induce health effects like immunomodulation. Despite evidence obtained in vitro, an unambiguous association has not yet been established in vivo. Here, mice were exposed to ELF-EMF for 1, 4, and 24 h/day in a short-term (1 week) and long-term (15 weeks) set-up to investigate whole body effects on the level of stress regulation and immune response. ELF-EMF signal contained multiple frequencies (20-5000 Hz) and a magnetic flux density of 10 μT. After exposure, blood was analyzed for leukocyte numbers (short-term and long-term) and adrenocorticotropic hormone concentration (short-term only). Furthermore, in the short-term experiment, stress-related parameters, corticotropin-releasing hormone, proopiomelanocortin (POMC) and CYP11A1 gene-expression, respectively, were determined in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus, pituitary, and adrenal glands. In the short-term but not long-term experiment, leukocyte counts were significantly higher in the 24 h-exposed group compared with controls, mainly represented by increased neutrophils and CD4 ± lymphocytes. POMC expression and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone were significantly lower compared with unexposed control mice. In conclusion, short-term ELF-EMF exposure may affect hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activation in mice. Changes in stress hormone release may explain changes in circulating leukocyte numbers and composition. Bioelectromagnetics. 37:433-443, 2016. © 2016 The Authors. Bioelectromagnetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Neuronal Cellular Responses to Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Field Exposure: Implications Regarding Oxidative Stress and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Reale, Marcella; Kamal, Mohammad A.; Patruno, Antonia; Costantini, Erica; D'Angelo, Chiara; Pesce, Miko; Greig, Nigel H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases comprise both hereditary and sporadic conditions characterized by an identifying progressive nervous system dysfunction and distinctive neuopathophysiology. The majority are of non-familial etiology and hence environmental factors and lifestyle play key roles in their pathogenesis. The extensive use of and ever increasing worldwide demand for electricity has stimulated societal and scientific interest on the environmental exposure to low frequency electromagnetic fields (EMFs) on human health. Epidemiological studies suggest a positive association between 50/60-Hz power transmission fields and leukemia or lymphoma development. Consequent to the association between EMFs and induction of oxidative stress, concerns relating to development of neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer disease (AD), have been voiced as the brain consumes the greatest fraction of oxygen and is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF)-EMFs are reported to alter animal behavior and modulate biological variables, including gene expression, regulation of cell survival, promotion of cellular differentiation, and changes in cerebral blood flow in aged AD transgenic mice. Alterations in inflammatory responses have also been reported, but how these actions impact human health remains unknown. We hence evaluated the effects of an electromagnetic wave (magnetic field intensity 1mT; frequency, 50-Hz) on a well-characterized immortalized neuronal cell model, human SH-SY5Y cells. ELF-EMF exposure elevated the expession of NOS and O2−, which were countered by compensatory changes in antioxidant catylase (CAT) activity and enzymatic kinetic parameters related to CYP-450 and CAT activity. Actions of ELF-EMFs on cytokine gene expression were additionally evaluated and found rapidly modified. Confronted with co-exposure to H2O2-induced oxidative stress, ELF-EMF proved not as well counteracted and resulted in a decline in CAT

  9. Safety Problems of Electric and Magnetic Fields and Experimental Magnetic Fusion Facilities 5.Electromagnetic Fields in the Workplace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonai, Hiroshi; Villanueva, Maria Beatriz G.

    The review addresses the concerns related to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF/EMF) in workplaces. The exposure levels and epidemiological studies on cancer, the health effects of working with VDTs (visual display terminals), and the malfunction of cardiac pacemakers are described. The association of EMF exposure and cancer or disorders from VDT work cannot be considered conclusive. The information on the exposure level and effect of EMF on cardiac pacemakers should be disseminated in workplaces. Risk communication program on EMF is urgent for countermeasures against worker anxiety.

  10. Extremely low frequency electromagnetic field enhances human keratinocyte cell growth and decreases proinflammatory chemokine production.

    PubMed

    Vianale, G; Reale, M; Amerio, P; Stefanachi, M; Di Luzio, S; Muraro, R

    2008-06-01

    Proliferation and differentiation of keratinocytes are central processes in tissue regeneration after injury. Chemokines, produced by a wide range of cell types including keratinocytes, play a regulatory role in inflammatory skin diseases. Several studies have shown that an electromagnetic field (EMF) can influence both inflammatory processes and repair mechanisms including wound healing on different tissue models. To elucidate the effect of extremely low frequency EMF (ELF-EMF) on keratinocyte proliferation and production of chemokines [RANTES, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1 alpha and interleukin (IL)-8] in order to evaluate a potential therapeutic use of magnetic fields. The human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT was exposed at 1 mT, 50 Hz for different lengths of time and compared with unexposed control cells. Cell growth and viability were evaluated at different exposure times by cell count and trypan blue exclusion. Chemokine production and expression were analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Total NF-kappaB p65 was quantified by ELISA. Significantly increased growth rates were observed after 48 h of EMF exposure as compared with control cells, while no difference in cell viabilities were detected. Gene expression and release of RANTES, MCP-1, MIP-1 alpha and IL-8 were significantly reduced after 72 h of exposure. NF-kappaB levels became almost undetectable after only 1 h of EMF exposure, and were inversely correlated with cell density. Our results show that ELF-EMF modulates chemokine production and keratinocyte growth through inhibition of the NF-kappaB signalling pathway and thus may inhibit inflammatory processes. ELF-EMF could represent an additional therapeutic approach in the treatment of skin injury.

  11. Effects of time-variant extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) on cholinesterase activity in Dictyostelium discoideum (Protista).

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Trielli, Francesca; Bianco, Bruno; Giordano, Stefano; Moggia, Elsa; Corrado, Maria U Delmonte

    2005-12-15

    Recently, we detected propionylcholinesterase (PrChE) activity in single-cell amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum using cytochemical, electrophoretic, and spectrophotometric methods. The involvement of this enzyme activity in cell-cell and cell-environment interactions was suggested. In this work, we found that exposure of single-cell amoebae to an extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) of 300 microT, 50 Hz, from 1 h up to 48 h at 21 +/- 1 degrees C affected PrChE activity.

  12. Effects of 3 Hz and 60 Hz Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Anxiety-Like Behaviors, Memory Retention of Passive Avoidance and Electrophysiological Properties of Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Amin; Shahani, Minoo; Zarrindast, Mohammad Reza; Semnanian, Saeed; Rahmati Roudsari, Mohammad; Rezaei Tavirani, Mostafa; Hasanzadeh, Hadi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The effects of electromagnetic fields on biological organisms have been a controversial and also interesting debate over the past few decades, despite the wide range of investigations, many aspects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF/EMFs) effects including mechanism of their interaction with live organisms and also their possible biological applications still remain ambiguous. In the present study, we investigated whether the exposures of ELF/EMF with frequencies of 3 Hz and 60 Hz can affect the memory, anxiety like behaviors, electrophysiological properties and brain’s proteome in rats. Methods: Male rats were exposed to 3 Hz and 60 Hz ELF/EMFs in a protocol consisting of 2 cycles of 2 h/day exposure for 4 days separated with a 2-day interval. Short term memory and anxiety like behaviors were assessed immediately, 1 and 2 weeks after the exposures. Effects of short term exposure were also assessed using electrophysiological approach immediately after 2 hours exposure. Results: Behavioral test revealed that immediately after the end of exposures, locomotor activity of both 3 Hz and 60 Hz exposed groups significantly decreased compared to sham group. This exposure protocol had no effect on anxiety like behavior during the 2 weeks after the treatment and also on short term memory. A significant reduction in firing rate of locus coeruleus (LC) was found after 2 hours of both 3 Hz and 60 Hz exposures. Proteome analysis also revealed global changes in whole brain proteome after treatment. Conclusion: Here, some evidence regarding the fact that such exposures can alter locomotor activity and neurons firing rate in male rats were presented. PMID:27330708

  13. Bacterial growth rates are influenced by cellular characteristics of individual species when immersed in electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Tessaro, Lucas W E; Murugan, Nirosha J; Persinger, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) have negative effects on the rate of growth of bacteria. In the present study, two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative species were exposed to six magnetic field conditions in broth cultures. Three variations of the 'Thomas' pulsed frequency-modulated pattern; a strong-static "puck" magnet upwards of 5000G in intensity; a pair of these magnets rotating opposite one another at ∼30rpm; and finally a strong dynamic magnetic field generator termed the 'Resonator' with an average intensity of 250μT were used. Growth rate was discerned by optical density (OD) measurements every hour at 600nm. ELF-EMF conditions significantly affected the rates of growth of the bacterial cultures, while the two static magnetic field conditions were not statistically significant. Most interestingly, the 'Resonator' dynamic magnetic field increased the rates of growth of three species (Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Escherichia coli), while slowing the growth of one (Serratia marcescens). We suggest that these effects are due to individual biophysical characteristics of the bacterial species. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field on brain histopathology of Caspian Sea Cyprinus carpio.

    PubMed

    Samiee, Farzaneh; Samiee, Keivandokht

    2017-01-01

    There is limited research on the effect of electromagnetic field on aquatic organisms, especially freshwater fish species. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) (50 Hz) exposure on brain histopathology of Cyprinus carpio, one of the important species of Caspian Sea with significant economic value. A total of 200 healthy fish were used in this study. They were classified randomly in two groups: sham-exposed group and experimental group, which were exposed to five different magnetic field intensities (0.1, 1, 3, 5, and 7 mT) at two different exposure times (0.5 and 1 h). Histologic results indicate that exposure of C. carpio to artificial ELF-EMF caused severe histopathological changes in the brain at field intensities ≥3 mT leading to brain necrosis. Field intensity and duration of exposure were key parameters in induction of lesion in the brain. Further studies are needed to elucidate exact mechanism of EMF exposure on the brain.

  15. Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Fields Induce Spermatogenic Germ Cell Apoptosis: Possible Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Kon; Park, Sungman; Gimm, Yoon-Myoung; Kim, Yoon-Won

    2014-01-01

    The energy generated by an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) is too weak to directly induce genotoxicity. However, it is reported that an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) is related to DNA strand breakage and apoptosis. The testes that conduct spermatogenesis through a dynamic cellular process involving meiosis and mitosis seem vulnerable to external stress such as heat, MF exposure, and chemical or physical agents. Nevertheless the results regarding adverse effects of ELF-EMF on human or animal reproductive functions are inconclusive. According to the guideline of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP; 2010) for limiting exposure to time-varying MF (1 Hz to 100 kHz), overall conclusion of epidemiologic studies has not consistently shown an association between human adverse reproductive outcomes and maternal or paternal exposure to low frequency fields. In animal studies there is no compelling evidence of causal relationship between prenatal development and ELF-MF exposure. However there is increasing evidence that EL-EMF exposure is involved with germ cell apoptosis in testes. Biophysical mechanism by which ELF-MF induces germ cell apoptosis has not been established. This review proposes the possible mechanism of germ cell apoptosis in testes induced by ELF-MF. PMID:25025060

  16. Extremely low frequency magnetic fields induce spermatogenic germ cell apoptosis: possible mechanism.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Kon; Park, Sungman; Gimm, Yoon-Myoung; Kim, Yoon-Won

    2014-01-01

    The energy generated by an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) is too weak to directly induce genotoxicity. However, it is reported that an extremely low frequency magnetic field (ELF-MF) is related to DNA strand breakage and apoptosis. The testes that conduct spermatogenesis through a dynamic cellular process involving meiosis and mitosis seem vulnerable to external stress such as heat, MF exposure, and chemical or physical agents. Nevertheless the results regarding adverse effects of ELF-EMF on human or animal reproductive functions are inconclusive. According to the guideline of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP; 2010) for limiting exposure to time-varying MF (1 Hz to 100 kHz), overall conclusion of epidemiologic studies has not consistently shown an association between human adverse reproductive outcomes and maternal or paternal exposure to low frequency fields. In animal studies there is no compelling evidence of causal relationship between prenatal development and ELF-MF exposure. However there is increasing evidence that EL-EMF exposure is involved with germ cell apoptosis in testes. Biophysical mechanism by which ELF-MF induces germ cell apoptosis has not been established. This review proposes the possible mechanism of germ cell apoptosis in testes induced by ELF-MF.

  17. Exposure of human cells to electromagnetic fields. Final report, 1 January 1988-31 December 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1990-02-27

    This study addressed the following basic question: How does extremely low-level non-ionizing radiation affect human cells, and if there are cellular responses that can be directly related to signal parameters such as frequency, amplitude and time of exposure. The focus of these studies was to identify transcriptional changes in human cultured cells, HL60, which result from exposure of these cells to defined extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (elf EMFS). Our experiments show a pronounced measurable response observed as transcript increase, with associated changes in protein synthesis. The major findings relative to transcriptional changes are fourfold: (1) transcript changes in human cells correlate with previous findings of transcriptional and translational changes in Drosophila salivary gland cells; (2) the frequency of the signal in the amplitude (with resulting changes in E- and B-fields) in log increments from 0.5 to 500 uV at 60 Hz gives both amplitude and time-dependent windows, and (4) genes not usually expressed in HL-60 are unaffected by exposure to elf EMFs. Changes in the overall protein synthetic pattern have also been observed following exposure of HL60 cells to 60 Hz signals.

  18. Proteomic response of Schizosaccharomyces pombe to static and oscillating extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, John; Weeks, Mark; Butt, Amna; Worthington, Jessica L; Akpan, Akunna; Jones, Nic; Waterfield, Mike; Allanand, Donald; Timms, John F

    2006-09-01

    There is considerable public concern regarding the health effects of exposure to low-frequency electromagnetic fields. In addition, the association between exposure and disease incidence or the possible biological effects of exposure are unclear. Using 2D-DIGE and MS in a blind study, we have investigated the effects of static and oscillating extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF EMFs) on the proteomes of wild type Schizosaccharomyces pombe and a Sty1p deletion mutant which displays increased sensitivity to a variety of cellular stresses. Whilst this study identifies a number of protein isoforms that display significant differential expression across experimental conditions, there was no correlation between their patterns of expression and the ELF EMF exposure regimen. We conclude that there are no significant effects of either static or oscillating EMF on the yeast proteome at the sensitivity afforded by 2D-DIGE. We hypothesise that the proteins identified must be sensitive to subtle changes in culture and/or handling conditions, and that the identification of these proteins in other proteomic studies should be treated with some caution when the results of such studies are interpreted in a biological context.

  19. Distributions of Personalities Within Occupations and Fields of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, John L.; Holland, Joan E.

    1977-01-01

    Self Directed Search (SDS) and Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI) results occupations and fields of study were organized to show the distributions of personalities within an occupation or field of study. The results show that single fields tolerate several types, but some types occur only infrequently. (Author)

  20. Distributions of Personalities Within Occupations and Fields of Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, John L.; Holland, Joan E.

    1977-01-01

    Self Directed Search (SDS) and Vocational Preference Inventory (VPI) results occupations and fields of study were organized to show the distributions of personalities within an occupation or field of study. The results show that single fields tolerate several types, but some types occur only infrequently. (Author)

  1. Assessment of the Effects of Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields on Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    OZLEM-CALISKAN, Sercin; ERTABAKLAR, Hatice; BILGIN, Mehmet Dincer; ERTUG, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Background: The effects of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) on Toxoplasma gondii have not been explained yet. The aim of this study was to assess the possible effects of ELF-EMF on growth, survival time and viability of Toxoplasma gondii. In addition, the life span of Toxoplasma infected animals was investigated. Methods: Sixty adult male BALB/c mice were used for in vivo and in vivo experiments in Laboratory of Biopyhsics and Parasitology of Medical Faculty, Adnan Menderes University, Turkey, in 2010. During in vivo experiments, pulsed and continuous EMFs were applied for 5 d to the infected mice. During in vivo experiments, pulsed and continuous EMF was applied to the tachyzoites within peritoneal exudates for 8 h/d at 4 °C and the tachyzoites were then injected to mice. In both experiments, the number of T. gondii in peritoneal exudates was counted and T. gondii protein bands patterns were investigated with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western Blotting. Results: Pulsed and continuous EMF exposure reduced the number of T. gondii tachyzoites in comparison to controls. However, no statistically significant differences were observed at the patterns of protein bands among the samples. Conclusion: EMF exposure induces a decrease in the number of T. gondii. Further studies are required to understand the mechanism of EMF on intracellular parasites. PMID:28096849

  2. Effects of an extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field on stress factors: a study in Dictyostelium discoideum cells.

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Chessa, Maria Giovanna; Bavestrello, Giorgio; Bianco, Bruno

    2013-08-01

    The development of technologies that generate environmental electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has led public opinion and the scientific community to debate upon the existence of possible effects caused by man-made EMFs on the human population and, more generally, on terrestrial ecosystems. Protozoa are known to be excellent bioassay systems in bioelectromagnetic studies because of their features that combine the reliability of in vivo results with the practicality of in vitro ones. For this reason, we examined the possible stressful effects of a 50-Hz, 300-μT extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on the protozoan Dictyostelium discoideum, which was used as it is included in the eight bioassay alternatives to vertebrate models for the study of human disease by the U.S. National Institutes of Health. Our results show how a 24-h exposure of D. discoideum cells to ELF-EMF can affect the net fission rate, the activity and presence of the pseudocholinesterase as well as the presence of the heat shock protein-70, while no change in the catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities was observed. However, this effect seems to be transient and all the altered parameters returned to their respective control value after a 24-h stay under dummy exposure conditions.

  3. Symptom reporting after the introduction of a new high-voltage power line: a prospective field study.

    PubMed

    Porsius, Jarry T; Claassen, Liesbeth; Smid, Tjabe; Woudenberg, Fred; Petrie, Keith J; Timmermans, Danielle R M

    2015-04-01

    There is public concern about the potential health effects of exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) of high-voltage power lines (HVPLs). Some residents living near HVPLs believe ELF-EMF might cause non-specific health complaints. The present study is the first to prospectively investigate whether self-reported health complaints and causal beliefs increase after the construction of a new power line. We used a quasi-experimental design with two pretests before and two posttests after a new HVPL was put into operation. Residents living near (0-300m, n=229; 300-500m, n=489) and farther away (500-2000m, n=536) participated in the study. Linear mixed models were fitted to test whether symptom reports and beliefs that power lines caused health complaints increased more in residents living close to the new line compared to residents living farther away. A significantly (p<.05) larger increase from baseline in symptom reports and causal beliefs was found in residents living within 300m from the new power line when compared to residents living farther away. While symptom reports did not differ at baseline, the belief that a power line could cause these symptoms was at baseline already stronger for residents living close compared to residents living farther away. We found a negative impact of a new HVPL on health perceptions of nearby residents, even before the line was put into operation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. X-ray-induced apoptosis of BEL-7402 cell line enhanced by extremely low frequency electromagnetic field in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jian, Wen; Wei, Zhao; Zhiqiang, Cheng; Zheng, Fang

    2009-02-01

    This study was designed to test whether extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) could enhance the apoptosis-induction effect of X-ray radiotherapy on liver cancer cell line BEL-7402 in vitro. EMF exposure was performed inside an energized solenoid coil. X-ray irradiation was performed using a linear accelerator. Apoptosis rates of BEL-7402 cells were analyzed using Annexin V-Fit Apoptosis Detection kit. Apoptosis rates of EMF group and sham EMF group were compared when combined with X-ray irradiation. Our results suggested that the apoptosis rate of BEL-7402 cells exposed to low doses of X-ray irradiation could be significantly increased by EMF. More EMF exposures obtain significantly higher apoptosis rates than fewer EMF exposures when combined with 2 Gy X-ray irradiation. These findings suggested that ELF-EMF could augment the cell apoptosis effects of low doses of X-ray irradiation on BEL-7402 cells in a synergistic and cumulative way.

  5. Postmodernism and its application to the field of occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Weinblatt, N; Avrech-Bar, M

    2001-06-01

    This article presents both the general concept of postmodernism and its reflection in a wide array of fields of interest. In particular, the paper reviews the postmodernist perspective as it appears in healthcare and medicine. This leads to a postmodernist analysis of the profession of occupational therapy, the main conclusion being that occupational therapy combines elements of modernism and postmodernism. This gives occupational therapy clinicians the luxury of enjoying the best of both worlds.

  6. The Use of Signal-Transduction and Metabolic Pathways to Predict Human Disease Targets from Electric and Magnetic Fields Using in vitro Data in Human Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Parham, Fred; Portier, Christopher J.; Chang, Xiaoqing; Mevissen, Meike

    2016-01-01

    Using in vitro data in human cell lines, several research groups have investigated changes in gene expression in cellular systems following exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) and radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF). For ELF EMF, we obtained five studies with complete microarray data and three studies with only lists of significantly altered genes. Likewise, for RF EMF, we obtained 13 complete microarray datasets and 5 limited datasets. Plausible linkages between exposure to ELF and RF EMF and human diseases were identified using a three-step process: (a) linking genes associated with classes of human diseases to molecular pathways, (b) linking pathways to ELF and RF EMF microarray data, and (c) identifying associations between human disease and EMF exposures where the pathways are significantly similar. A total of 60 pathways were associated with human diseases, mostly focused on basic cellular functions like JAK–STAT signaling or metabolic functions like xenobiotic metabolism by cytochrome P450 enzymes. ELF EMF datasets were sporadically linked to human diseases, but no clear pattern emerged. Individual datasets showed some linkage to cancer, chemical dependency, metabolic disorders, and neurological disorders. RF EMF datasets were not strongly linked to any disorders but strongly linked to changes in several pathways. Based on these analyses, the most promising area for further research would be to focus on EMF and neurological function and disorders. PMID:27656641

  7. Assessment of exposure to magnetic fields in occupational settings.

    PubMed

    Sakurazawa, Hirofumi; Iwasaki, Akio; Higashi, Toshiaki; Nakayama, Takeo; Kusaka, Yukinori

    2003-03-01

    It is important to have data about occupational magnetic field intensity to consider the contribution of occupational magnetic field exposure on the human body. We conducted research on exposure to occupational magnetic fields and tried to qualify data on the distribution of magnetic field' intensity in certain general working environments with individual measurements. We performed sample research on the exposure to low-frequency magnetic fields of workers in certain occupations and in the working environment. We also assessed the relationship between working environmental magnetic field distribution and individual exposure. Some occupations were found to be exposed to high magnetic fields. We observed that some workspaces, such as the transformer substation, generally had a uniform and high magnetic field measurement but employees were exposed to a lower intensity. We also found that welders were exposed to high magnetic fields at about 600 microT in a very short time but with a geometrical value of 0.08 microT. The determination of administrative levels and control levels, not only of the time weighted average of threshold limits or short term exposure limits, but also ceiling limits should be considered. More systematic research is necessary to determine variables such as operating conditions, measuring position, and frequency bands. Also, further studies will be needed to make a job-exposure matrix for the magnetic fields for each occupation type and to combine it with exposure in non-occupational settings such as commuting and ordinary life situations to explore the causal relationship between exposure to magnetic fields and disease.

  8. Impact of high electromagnetic field levels on childhood leukemia incidence.

    PubMed

    Teepen, Jop C; van Dijck, Jos A A M

    2012-08-15

    The increasing exposure to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) has raised concern, as increased exposure may result in an increased risk of childhood leukemia (CL). Besides a short introduction of CL and EMF, our article gives an evaluation of the evidence of a causal relation between EMF and CL by critically appraising the epidemiological and biological evidence. The potential impact is also estimated by the population attributable risk. The etiology of CL is largely unknown, but is probably multifactorial. EMF may be one of the environmental exposures involved. Three pooled analyses of case-control studies showed a 1.4- to 1.7-fold increased CL risk for extremely low-frequency EMF (ELF-EMF) exposure levels above 0.3 μT. Several biases may have played a role in these studies, but are unlikely to fully explain the increased risk. For effects of radiofrequency ELF evidence is lacking. None of the proposed biological mechanisms by which ELF-EMF might cause CL have been confirmed. The estimated overall population attributable risk was 1.9%, with the highest estimates in Northern America and Brazil (4.2% and 4.1%, respectively). The potential impact of EMF exposure on public health is probably limited, although in some countries exposure might be relatively high and thus might have a more substantial impact. We recommend nationwide surveys to gain more insight into the contemporary exposure levels among children. Reducing exposure from power lines near densely populated areas and schools is advised. Future epidemiological studies should focus on limiting bias. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  9. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Davanipour, Z.; Sobel, E.; Bowman, J.D.; Qian, Z.; Will, A.D.

    1997-03-01

    In an hypothesis-generating case-control study of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, lifetime occupational histories were obtained. The patients (n = 28) were clinic based. The occupational exposure of interest in this report is electromagnetic fields (EMFs). This is the first and so far the only exposure analyzed in this study. Occupational exposure up to 2 years prior to estimated disease symptom onset was used for construction of exposure indices for cases. Controls (n = 32) were blood and nonblood relatives of cases. Occupational exposure for controls was through the same age as exposure for the corresponding cases. Twenty (71%) cases and 28 (88%) controls had at least 20 years of work experience covering the exposure period. The occupational history and task data were used to classify blindly each occupation for each subject as having high, medium/high, medium, medium/low, or low EMF exposure, based primarily on data from an earlier and unrelated study designed to obtain occupational EMF exposure information on workers in ``electrical`` and ``nonelectrical`` jobs. By using the length of time each subject spent in each occupation through the exposure period, two indices of exposure were constructed: total occupational exposure (E{sub 1}) and average occupational exposure (E{sub 2}). For cases and controls with at least 20 years of work experience, the odds ratio (OR) for exposure at the 75th percentile of the E{sub 1} case exposure data relative to minimum exposure was 7.5 (P < 0.02; 95% CI, 1.4--38.1) and the corresponding OR for E{sub 2} was 5.5 (P < 0.02; 95% CI, 1.3--22.5). For all cases and controls, the ORs were 2.5 (P < 0.1; 95% CI, 0.9--8.1) for E{sub 1} and 2.3 (P = 0.12; 95% CI, 0.8--6.6) for E{sub 2}. This study should be considered an hypothesis-generating study. Larger studies, using incident cases and improved exposure assessment, should be undertaken.

  10. Sleep quality and general health status of employees exposed to extremely low frequency magnetic fields in a petrochemical complex

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Advances in science and technology of electrical equipment, despite increasing human welfare in everyday life, have increased the number of people exposed to Electro-Magnetic Fields (EMFs). Because of possible adverse effects on the health of exposed individuals, the EMFs have being the center of attention. This study was performed to determine possible correlation between Extremely Low Frequency Electro-Magnetic Fields (ELF EMFs) and sleep quality and public health of those working in substation units of a petrochemical complex in southern Iran. Materials and method To begin with, magnetic flux density was measured at different parts of a Control Building and two substations in accordance with IEEE std 644–1994. Subsequently, the questionnaires “Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index” (PSQI) and “General Health Quality (GHQ)” were used to investigate relationship between ELF exposure level and sleep quality and public health, respectively. Both questionnaires were placed at disposal of a total number of 40 workers at the complex. The filled out questionnaires were analyzed by T-test, Duncan and the Chi-square tests. Results The obtained results revealed that 28% of those in case group suffered from poor health status and 61% were diagnosed with a sleep disorder. However, all members in control group were in good health condition and only 4.5% of them had undesirable sleep quality. Conclusion In spite of a significant difference between the case and control groups in terms of sleep quality and general health, no significant relationship was found between the exposure level and sleep quality and general health. It is worth noting that the measured EMF values were lower than the standard limits recommended by American Conference of Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). However, given the uncertainties about the pathogenic effects caused by exposure to ELF EMFs, further epidemiological studies and periodic testing of personnel working in high voltage substations

  11. Sleep quality and general health status of employees exposed to extremely low frequency magnetic fields in a petrochemical complex.

    PubMed

    Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Hosseini, Monireh; Matin, Laleh Farhang; Aghaei, Habib Allah; Khosroabadi, Hossein; Hesami, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Advances in science and technology of electrical equipment, despite increasing human welfare in everyday life, have increased the number of people exposed to Electro-Magnetic Fields (EMFs). Because of possible adverse effects on the health of exposed individuals, the EMFs have being the center of attention. This study was performed to determine possible correlation between Extremely Low Frequency Electro-Magnetic Fields (ELF EMFs) and sleep quality and public health of those working in substation units of a petrochemical complex in southern Iran. To begin with, magnetic flux density was measured at different parts of a Control Building and two substations in accordance with IEEE std 644-1994. Subsequently, the questionnaires "Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index" (PSQI) and "General Health Quality (GHQ)" were used to investigate relationship between ELF exposure level and sleep quality and public health, respectively. Both questionnaires were placed at disposal of a total number of 40 workers at the complex. The filled out questionnaires were analyzed by T-test, Duncan and the Chi-square tests. The obtained results revealed that 28% of those in case group suffered from poor health status and 61% were diagnosed with a sleep disorder. However, all members in control group were in good health condition and only 4.5% of them had undesirable sleep quality. In spite of a significant difference between the case and control groups in terms of sleep quality and general health, no significant relationship was found between the exposure level and sleep quality and general health. It is worth noting that the measured EMF values were lower than the standard limits recommended by American Conference of Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). However, given the uncertainties about the pathogenic effects caused by exposure to ELF EMFs, further epidemiological studies and periodic testing of personnel working in high voltage substations are of utmost importance.

  12. Evaluation of hormonal change, biochemical parameters, and histopathological status of uterus in rats exposed to 50-Hz electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Aydin, M; Cevik, A; Kandemir, F M; Yuksel, M; Apaydin, A M

    2009-04-01

    This study investigates the effects of the electromagnetic field (EMF) resulting from the 170 kV high-voltage power lines on hormonal status, on progesterone and 17-beta estradiol levels, and on morphology of the uterus and ovaries associated with biochemical parameters of adult Wistar female rats. The rats were assigned to experimental (21) and control groups (7). The rats in the experimental group were housed in a wooden barn with 7.5 m vertical distance to the power line. Groups 1, 2, and 3 were exposed continuously (24 h) to electric-electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) (48.21 +/- 1.58 mG) for 1, 2, and 3 months, respectively. The rats of group 4 served as the control and were placed in laboratory conditions (The average value of the ELF was 0.75 +/- 0.05 V/m. The value of the EMF was calculated to be 0.48 +/- 0.05 mG.). Significant (P < 0.05) decreases were determined among the groups in terms of reproductive organ weights (uterus and ovaries) and progesterone and estrogen levels in relation to the varying periods of the estrous cycle. Although marked reductions (P < 0.05) were observed among the groups in relation to plasma catalase activity, depending on exposure time, no significant differences were found in terms of glutathione and malondialdehyde levels. It is concluded that exposure to the ELF-EMFs for different time periods produced significant decreases in plasma catalase activities in the 3-month exposure groups but no effects on progesterone level, on 17-beta estradiol level, or on the morphology and weight of uterus and ovaries.

  13. Micronucleus induction in cells co-exposed in vitro to 50 Hz magnetic field and benzene, 1,4-benzenediol (hydroquinone) or 1,2,4-benzenetriol.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, R; Villarini, M; Scassellati Sforzolini, G; Fatigoni, C; Moretti, M

    2003-01-01

    The generation, transmission (e.g. power lines, transformers, service wires, and electrical panels), and use (e.g. home appliances, such as electric blankets, shavers, and televisions) of electrical energy is associated with the production of weak electric and magnetic fields (EMF) which oscillate 50 (Europe) or 60 (USA) times per second (power-line frequency), falling in the extremely-low frequency (ELF) region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Epidemiological reports suggest a possible association between exposure to ELF-EMF and an increased risk of cancer (e.g. childhood acute leukaemia). Benzene is an established human leukomogen. This xenobiotic, which is unlikely to be the ultimate carcinogen, is metabolized in the liver to its primary metabolite phenol, which is hydroxylated to hydroquinone (1,4-benzenediol) and 1,2,4-benzenetriol. In this in vitro approach, to test the genotoxic and / or co-genotoxic potency of ELF-EMF, the cytokinesis block micronucleus (MN) method with Jurkat cells has been used. A 50 Hz magnetic field (MF) of 5 mT field strength was applied for different length of time (from 1 to 24 h), either alone or with benzene, 1,4-benzenediol, or 1,2,4-benzenetriol. Our preliminary results show that, after 24 h exposure, the frequency of micronucleated cells in MF-exposed cultures is 1.9 fold higher than in sham-exposed (control) cultures. Benzene exposure does not show any cytogenetic activity, whereas 1,4-benzenediol or 1,2,4-benzenetriol alone significantly affect the number of MN in Jurkat cells, as compared to untreated cultures. Moreover, co-exposure to ELF-MF does not seem to affect the frequency of micronuclei induced by benzene, 1,4-benzenediol, or 1,2,4-benzenetriol.

  14. Possible Health Benefits From Reducing Occupational Magnetic Fields

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Joseph D.; Ray, Tapas K.; Park, Robert M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnetic fields (MF) from AC electricity are a Possible Human Carcinogen, based on limited epidemiologic evidence from exposures far below occupational health limits. Methods To help formulate government guidance on occupational MF, the cancer cases prevented and the monetary benefits accruing to society by reducing workplace exposures were determined. Life-table methods produced Disability Adjusted Life Years, which were converted to monetary values. Results Adjusted for probabilities of causality, the expected increase in a worker’s disability-free life are 0.04 year (2 weeks) from a 1 microtesla (μT) MF reduction in average worklife exposure, which is equivalent to $5,100/worker/μT in year 2010 U.S. dollars (95% confidence interval $1,000–$9,000/worker/μT). Where nine electrosteel workers had 13.8 μT exposures, for example, moving them to ambient MFs would provide $600,000 in benefits to society (uncertainty interval $0–$1,000,000). Conclusions When combined with the costs of controls, this analysis provides guidance for precautionary recommendations for managing occupational MF exposures. PMID:23129537

  15. Evaluation of Occupational Cold Environments: Field Measurements and Subjective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    OLIVEIRA, A. Virgílio M.; GASPAR, Adélio R.; RAIMUNDO, António M.; QUINTELA, Divo A.

    2014-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to the study of occupational cold environments in food distribution industrial units. Field measurements and a subjective assessment based on an individual questionnaire were considered. The survey was carried out in 5 Portuguese companies. The field measurements include 26 workplaces, while a sample of 160 responses was considered for the subjective assessment. In order to characterize the level of cold exposure, the Required Clothing Insulation Index (IREQ) was adopted. The IREQ index highlights that in the majority of the workplaces the clothing ensembles worn are inadequate, namely in the freezing chambers where the protection provided by clothing is always insufficient. The questionnaires results show that the food distribution sector is characterized by a female population (70.6%), by a young work force (60.7% are less than 35 yr old) and by a population with a medium-length professional career (80.1% in this occupation for less than 10 yr). The incidence of health effects which is higher among women, the distribution of protective clothing (50.0% of the workers indicate one garment) and the significant percentage of workers (>75%) that has more difficulties in performing the activity during the winter represent other important results of the present study. PMID:24583510

  16. Evaluation of occupational cold environments: field measurements and subjective analysis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, A Virgílio M; Gaspar, Adélio R; Raimundo, António M; Quintela, Divo A

    2014-01-01

    The present work is dedicated to the study of occupational cold environments in food distribution industrial units. Field measurements and a subjective assessment based on an individual questionnaire were considered. The survey was carried out in 5 Portuguese companies. The field measurements include 26 workplaces, while a sample of 160 responses was considered for the subjective assessment. In order to characterize the level of cold exposure, the Required Clothing Insulation Index (IREQ) was adopted. The IREQ index highlights that in the majority of the workplaces the clothing ensembles worn are inadequate, namely in the freezing chambers where the protection provided by clothing is always insufficient. The questionnaires results show that the food distribution sector is characterized by a female population (70.6%), by a young work force (60.7% are less than 35 yr old) and by a population with a medium-length professional career (80.1% in this occupation for less than 10 yr). The incidence of health effects which is higher among women, the distribution of protective clothing (50.0% of the workers indicate one garment) and the significant percentage of workers (>75%) that has more difficulties in performing the activity during the winter represent other important results of the present study.

  17. Electric and magnetic field exposure, chemical exposure, and leukemia risk in electrical'' occupations

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Thomas, D.C.; Garabrant, D.H.; Pearce, N.; Peters, J.M. . Dept. of Preventive Medicine)

    1992-12-01

    This project was conducted to address what are the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric field exposures of workers in electrical'' occupations and do they exceed exposures encountered in non-electrical'' occupations and what are the chemical and physical exposures in the electrical'' occupations and do they exceed exposures encountered in non-electrical'' occupations Two subsidiary issues were does characterization and quantification of ELF magnetic field exposure in the electrical'' occupations provide data to support a dose response relationship between leukemia risk and electric or magnetic field exposure and do dffferences in chemical exposure between the occupations help explain the previously observed leukemia risk associated with these electrical'' occupations Data were collected in 3 regions in which electrical workers had been reported to have an excess of leukemia - New Zealand, Los Angeles and Seattle Measurements of magnetic fields were made on 493 electrical workers and 163 non-electrical workers.

  18. Electric and magnetic field exposure, chemical exposure, and leukemia risk in ``electrical`` occupations. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.D.; Sobel, E.; London, S.J.; Thomas, D.C.; Garabrant, D.H.; Pearce, N.; Peters, J.M.

    1992-12-01

    This project was conducted to address what are the extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic and electric field exposures of workers in ``electrical`` occupations and do they exceed exposures encountered in ``non-electrical`` occupations? and what are the chemical and physical exposures in the ``electrical`` occupations and do they exceed exposures encountered in ``non-electrical`` occupations? Two subsidiary issues were does characterization and quantification of ELF magnetic field exposure in the ``electrical`` occupations provide data to support a dose response relationship between leukemia risk and electric or magnetic field exposure? and do dffferences in chemical exposure between the occupations help explain the previously observed leukemia risk associated with these ``electrical`` occupations? Data were collected in 3 regions in which electrical workers had been reported to have an excess of leukemia - New Zealand, Los Angeles and Seattle Measurements of magnetic fields were made on 493 electrical workers and 163 non-electrical workers.

  19. OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE OF NMR SPECTROMETRISTS TO STATIC AND RADIOFREQUENCY FIELDS.

    PubMed

    Berlana, Tania; Úbeda, Alejandro

    2017-05-04

    Occupational exposure to static and radiofrequency fields emitted by nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers was assessed through systematic field metering during operation of 19 devices in nine research centers. Whereas no measurable levels of radiofrequency radiation were registered outside the spectrometers, significant exposure to static field was detected, with maximum values recorded at the user's hand (B = 683.00 mT) and head-thorax (B = 135.70 mT) during spectrometer manipulation. All values were well below the exposure limits set by the European standard for workers protection against the effects of acute field exposure only. As for potential effects of chronic exposure, waiting for more complete knowledge, adoption of technical and operational strategies for exposure minimizing is advisable. In this respect, the data revealed that compared with standard magnetic shielding, ultrashield technology allows a 20-65-fold reduction of the field strength received by the operator. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Paternal occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and neuroblastoma in offspring

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, J.R. 3d.; Hundley, V.D. )

    1990-06-01

    Investigators in Texas have reported an association between paternal employment in jobs linked with exposure to electromagnetic fields and risk of neuroblastoma in offspring. In an attempt to replicate this finding, the authors conducted a case-control study in Ohio. A total of 101 incident cases of neuroblastoma were identified through the Columbus (Ohio) Children's Hospital Tumor Registry. All cases were born sometime during the period 1942-1967. From a statewide roster of birth certificates, four controls were selected for each case, with individual matching on the case's year of birth, race, and sex, and the mother's county of residence at the time of the (index) child's birth. Multiple definitions were employed to infer the potential for paternal occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from the industry/occupation statements on the birth certificates. Case-control comparisons revealed adjusted odds ratios ranging in magnitude from 0.5 to 1.9. For two of the exposure definitions employed--both of which are similar to one used by the Texas investigators--the corresponding odds ratios were modestly elevated (odds ratios = 1.6 and 1.9). Notably, the magnitude of these odds ratios is not inconsistent with the Texas findings, where the exposure definition referred to yielded an odds ratio of 2.1. Because the point estimates in this study are imprecise, and because the biologic plausibility of the association is uncertain, the results reported here must be interpreted cautiously. However, the apparent consistency between two independent studies suggests that future evaluation of the association is warranted.

  1. [Investigation research of occupational stress and job burnout for oil field workers in Xinjiang].

    PubMed

    Ning, Li; Li, Fuye; Yang, Xiaoyan; Ge, Hua; Liu, Jiwen

    2014-03-01

    To provide scientific basis for further intervention, the association between occupational stress and job burnout among oil field workers of Xinjiang was discussed. A random sample and research on Xinjiang oil-field outdoor workers who will finish occupation Stress Inventory-Revised questionnaire and Maslash Burnout Survey. The scoring of each OSI-R dimension and each MBI dimension varied significantly between different individual characterizations (age, gender and education). Multiple linear regression analysis showed: occupation task, physical strain, work environment, subjective support, self health care are the main factors influencing occupation burnout. Different individual characteristics effect the occurrence of occupation stresses and job burnout, reduce the occupation task, strengthen social support and self health care consciousness, strive to build and improve the enterprise culture atmosphere can prevent occupation burnout.

  2. Electromagnetic field occupational exposure: non-thermal vs. thermal effects.

    PubMed

    Israel, M; Zaryabova, V; Ivanova, M

    2013-06-01

    There are a variety of definitions for "non-thermal effects" included in different international standards. They start by the simple description that they are "effects of electromagnetic energy on a body that are not heat-related effects", passing through the very general definition related to low-level effects: "biological effects ascribed to exposure to low-level electric, magnetic and electromagnetic fields, i.e. at or below the corresponding dosimetric reference levels in the frequency range covered in this standard (0 Hz-300 GHz)", and going to the concrete definition of "the stimulation of muscles, nerves, or sensory organs, vertigo or phosfenes". Here, we discuss what kind of effect does the non-thermal one has on human body and give data of measurements in different occupations with low-frequency sources of electromagnetic field such as electric power distribution systems, transformers, MRI systems and : video display units (VDUs), whereas thermal effects should not be expected. In some of these workplaces, values above the exposure limits could be found, nevertheless that they are in the term "non-thermal effects" on human body. Examples are workplaces in MRI, also in some power plants. Here, we will not comment on non-thermal effects as a result of RF or microwave exposure because there are not proven evidence about the existance of such effects and mechanisms for them are not clear.

  3. [ASSESSMENT OF OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE TO RADIO FREQUENCY ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS].

    PubMed

    Aniołczyk, Halina; Mariańska, Magda; Mamrot, Paweł

    2015-01-01

    European Union Directive 2013/35/UE provides for the implementation of EU regulations into national legislation. Our aim is to assess actual health hazards from radiofrequency eldctromagnetic field (RF EMF) (range: 100 kHz - 300 GHz) and indicate workplaces with the highest risk to employee health. Data from measurements of RF EMF performed by the Laboratory of Electromagnetic Hazards in Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine (Łódź, Poland) were analyzed. The analysis covered the results of electric field intensity (E) for over 450 selected items. The ranges of protection zones and the extent to which maximum admissible intensity (MAI) values were also analyzed. The determinations and'measurements of EMF in the work environment met the requirements of Polish Standard, while Polish regulations on the MAI values were used as the criterion for the assessment of the exposure. The highest values of E field intensity at workplaces were measured for: electrosurgery, to 400 V/m, and short-wave diathermy units, to 220 V/m, dielectric welders to 240 V/m, within the FM radio antenna systems, to 180 V/m. The widest protection zones were noted for prototype research instruments, short-wave diathermy units, and dielectric welders. The most excessive (up to 12-fold MAI) values were recorded for dielectric welders, short-wave diathermy units (up to 11-fold) and microwave diathermy units (up to 8-fold). Our results have confirmed the high RF EMF values for physiotherapists, operators of dielectric welders, and mast maintenance workers in radio com munication facilities (especially radio and TV broadcasting stations).

  4. Stress and the Workplace: A Comparison of Occupational Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Doris B.; Casteel, Jim Frank

    Stress in various occupations is of interest to managers, counselors, and personnel workers. A study was undertaken to examine, through the use of self-report scales, stress-related characteristics of workers in occupations which require many and varied human interactions. Subjects were 244 full-time employees in six professions: health services,…

  5. Genetic counseling: the development of a new interdisciplinary occupational field.

    PubMed

    Kenen, R H

    1984-01-01

    A power approach to the study of occupations is used to understand the development of a new occupation--the Masters level genetic counselor. The internal dimension of the power perspective is utilized in analyzing this new health care provider's efforts to gain a place alongside practitioners who possess medical or doctoral degrees. The external dimension is used to focus on the relationship between occupational control and other institutional bases of power in the society. The status of genetic counselor is compared to that of the nurse-practitioner and nurse-midwife. Claims of expertise regarding control over indetermination and uncertainty are discussed as well as society's willingness to accept these assertions.

  6. Double occupancy in dynamical mean-field theory and the dual boson approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Erik G. C. P.; Krien, Friedrich; Hafermann, Hartmut; Stepanov, Evgeny A.; Lichtenstein, Alexander I.; Katsnelson, Mikhail I.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the calculation of the double occupancy using dynamical mean-field theory in finite dimensions. The double occupancy can be determined from the susceptibility of the auxiliary impurity model or from the lattice susceptibility. The former method typically overestimates, whereas the latter underestimates the double occupancy. We illustrate this for the square-lattice Hubbard model. We propose an approach for which both methods lead to identical results by construction and which resolves this ambiguity. This self-consistent dual boson scheme results in a double occupancy that is numerically close to benchmarks available in the literature.

  7. Occupational exposures to radiofrequency fields: results of an Israeli national survey.

    PubMed

    Hareuveny, R; Kavet, R; Shachar, A; Margaliot, M; Kheifets, L

    2015-06-01

    Relatively high exposures to radiofrequency (RF) fields can occur in the broadcast, medical, and communications industries, as well in occupations that use RF emitting equipment (e.g. law enforcement). Information on exposure to workers employed in these industries and occupations is limited. We present results of an Israeli National Survey of occupational RF field levels at frequencies between ~100 kHz and 40 GHz, representing Industrial Heating, Communications, Radar, Research, and Medicine. Almost 4300 measurements from 900 sources across 25 occupations were recorded and categorised as 'routine', 'incidental', or 'unintended'. The occupation-specific geometric means (GMs) of the percentage of the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit values (TLVs) for each of the three exposure scenarios are presented together with the geometric standard deviation (GSD). Additionally, we present estimates of occupation-specific annual personal exposures and collective exposures. The vast majority of the GM of routine exposures ranged from a fraction to less than 1% of ACGIH TLVs, except for Walkie-Talkie (GM 94% of ACGIH), Induction Heating (17%), Plastic Welding (11%), Industrial Heating (6%) and Diathermy (6%). The GM of incidental and unintended exposures exceeded the TLV for one and 14 occupations, respectively. In many cases, the within-occupation GSD was very large, and though the medians remained below TLV, variable fractions of these occupations were projected to exceed the TLV. In rank order, Walkie-Talkie, Plastic Welding, and Induction Heating workers had the highest annual cumulative personal exposure. For cumulative collective exposures within an occupation, Walkie-Talkie dominated with 96.3% of the total, reflecting both large population and high personal exposure. A brief exceedance of the TLV does not automatically translate to hazard as RF exposure limits (issued by various bodies, including ACGIH) include a 10

  8. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and acute leukaemia: analysis of a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Willett, E; McKinney, P; Fear, N; Cartwright, R; Roman, E

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To investigate whether the risk of acute leukaemia among adults is associated with occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields. Methods: Probable occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields at higher than typical residential levels was investigated among 764 patients diagnosed with acute leukaemia during 1991–96 and 1510 sex and age matched controls. A job exposure matrix was applied to the self reported employment histories to determine whether or not a subject was exposed to electromagnetic fields. Risks were assessed using conditional logistic regression for a matched analysis. Results: Study subjects considered probably ever exposed to electromagnetic fields at work were not at increased risk of acute leukaemia compared to those considered never exposed. Generally, no associations were observed on stratification by sex, leukaemia subtype, number of years since exposure stopped, or occupation; there was no evidence of a dose-response effect using increasing number of years exposed. However, relative to women considered never exposed, a significant excess of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was observed among women probably exposed to electromagnetic fields at work that remained increased irrespective of time prior to diagnosis or job ever held. Conclusion: This large population based case-control study found little evidence to support an association between occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and acute leukaemia. While an excess of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia among women was observed, it is unlikely that occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields was responsible, given that increased risks remained during periods when exposure above background levels was improbable. PMID:12883018

  9. [Field investigation of occupational disease diagnosis in Guangdong Provincial Hospital for Occupational Disease Prevention and Treatment from 2009 to 2014: an analysis of 136 cases].

    PubMed

    Fan, C Y; Li, X D; Wen, W; Wang, Y Y; Zhang, Y; Lang, L

    2016-04-20

    To investigate the characteristics of 136 patients with occupational diseases, to summarize key techniques used in field investigation, and to provide a scientific basis for the development of standard operating procedures for field investigation of occupational disease diagnosis. Field investigation and routine data analysis were performed to analyze the cases diagnosed by Guangdong Provincial Hospital for Occupational Disease Prevention and Treatment from January 2009 to December 2014. A total of 136 cases of occupational diseases were diagnosed by Guangdong Provincial Hospital for Occupational Disease Prevention and Treatment from 2009 to 2014, and there were 66 cases of leukemia, 18 cases of suspected occupational benzene poisoning, 12 cases of suspected occupational handarm vibration disease, and 11 cases of suspected pneumoconiosis. Of all these patients, 41.91% were engaged in at least three types of work, 70.59% were exposed to at least three types of chemicals, 25.74% experienced changes in technical processes and chemicals, and 47.06% had disputes on the chemicals they were exposed to during verification by both parties. Occupational hazard factors were detected. Most samples (358)were used to measure benzene concentration in workplace air, among which 11.7% had a benzene concentration of >6.00 mg/m(3)(exceeding standard), 13.41% had a benzene concentration of 3.26~6.00 mg/m(3), 75.42% had a benzene concentration of<0.03 to <3.25 mg/m(3). The samples of suspected occupational hand-arm vibration disease, suspected pneumoconiosis, and suspected occupational noiseinduced hearing loss had high overstandard rates (100%, 93.8%, and 83.3%, respectively). Field investigation of occupational disease diagnosis reveals large numbers of cases of leukemia, suspected occupational benzene poisoning, suspected occupational hand-arm vibration disease, and suspected pneumoconiosis. The key aspects of field investigation include confirmation of the history of occupational

  10. Overview of occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields and cancer: Advancements in exposure assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Savitz, D.A.

    1995-03-01

    For over ten years, there has been concern with the potential for increased risk of cancer among {open_quotes}electrical workers.{close_quotes} In contrast to studies of residential exposure to magnetic fields, occupational studies include electric and magnetic field exposures and have much greater variability in field intensity, frequency, and temporal patterns. Studies of leukemia in electrical workers show a moderate consistency, with elevated risk ratios of 1.2 to 2.0 commonly observed. Brain tumors are similarly elevated with some consistency, and three recent studies have suggested increased risk of male breast cancer. Retrospective exposure assessment methods were advanced in recent studies of diverse occupations in a study in central Sweden, which yielded evidence of increased risk of chronic lymphocytic leukemia among men in more highly exposed occupations. A study of telephone workers in New York State incorporated measurements and found some indication of increased leukemia risk only when exposures were based on historical technology. Utility workers in southern California were studied and found not to have increased risks of leukemia and brain cancer based on exposures estimated with measurements. An ongoing study of electric utility workers at five companies in the United States incorporates an extensive measurement protocol. Randomly selected workers within occupational categories wore a time integrating magnetic-field meter to provide estimates of exposure for the occupational category. We were able to estimate and partition the variance into between-day (the largest contributor), within occupational categories, and between occupational categories. Principal research needs concern optimal levels of worker aggregation for exposure assignment, historical extrapolation, study of diverse work environments, and integration of residential and occupational exposure in the same study. 19 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Chemical dependency: an occupational hazard in the field of anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Samina

    2010-10-01

    The medical personnel are vulnerable to substance abuse and dependence due to ready access to substance of abuse. Addiction is considered as an occupational hazard for those involved in the practice of anaesthesia for the same reason. Substance abuse is defined as a psychosocial biogenetic disease, which results from dynamic interplay between a susceptible host and favourable environment. According to the 5th and the last National Survey on Drug Abuse (NSDA) in 1993 by Pakistan Narcotic Control, there are nearly three million drug dependants in Pakistan, but no data is available to determine the prevalence among medical or anaesthesia personnel. In order to handle the rising trend of chemical abuse, we need to have more surveys and studies on this subject, written policy and educational programme in postgraduate training with proper control and frequent checking of narcotic dispensing. Reporting of drug abuse and rehabilitation of affected doctors are areas which need to be worked upon.

  12. Autism spectrum disorders in relation to parental occupation in technical fields.

    PubMed

    Windham, Gayle C; Fessel, Karen; Grether, Judith K

    2009-08-01

    A previous study reported that fathers of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) were more likely to work as engineers, requiring "systemizing skills," and suggesting a distinct phenotype, but alternatively this may have been related to selection biases. We conducted a population-based study to explore whether fathers, or mothers, of children with ASD are over-represented in fields requiring highly technical skills. Subjects included 284 children with ASD and 659 gender-matched controls, born in 1994 in the San Francisco Bay Area. Parental occupation and industry were abstracted verbatim from birth certificates. Engineering, computer programming, and science were examined as highly technical occupations. To limit bias by parental socio-economic status, we selected a referent group of occupations that seemed professionally similar but of a less technical nature. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated by logistic regression, adjusting for parental age, education, and child race. Mothers of cases were somewhat more likely to work in hi-tech occupations (6.7%) than mothers of controls (4.0%, P=0.07), but little difference was observed among fathers, nor for engineering separately. Compared to parents in other "white collar" occupations, the adjusted OR for highly technical occupations among mothers was 2.5 (95% CI: 1.2-5.3) and among fathers was 1.3 (95% CI: 0.79-2.1), with no evidence of a joint effect observed. Our results regarding maternal occupation in technical fields being associated with ASD in offspring suggest further study to distinguish parental occupation as a phenotypic marker of genetic loading vs. other social or exposure factors.

  13. Extremely low frequency (ELF) stray magnetic fields of laboratory equipment: a possible co-exposure conducting experiments on cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gresits, Iván; Necz, Péter Pál; Jánossy, Gábor; Thuróczy, György

    2015-09-01

    Measurements of extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields were conducted in the environment of commercial laboratory equipment in order to evaluate the possible co-exposure during the experimental processes on cell cultures. Three types of device were evaluated: a cell culture CO2 incubator, a thermostatic water bath and a laboratory shaker table. These devices usually have electric motors, heating wires and electronic control systems, therefore may expose the cell cultures to undesirable ELF stray magnetic fields. Spatial distributions of magnetic field time domain signal waveform and frequency spectral analysis (FFT) were processed. Long- and short-term variation of stray magnetic field was also evaluated under normal use of investigated laboratory devices. The results show that the equipment under test may add a considerable ELF magnetic field to the ambient environmental magnetic field or to the intentional exposure to ELF, RF or other physical/chemical agents. The maximum stray magnetic fields were higher than 3 µT, 20 µT and 75 µT in the CO2 incubator, in water bath and on the laboratory shaker table, respectively, with high variation of spatial distribution and time domain. Our investigation emphasizes possible confounding factors conducting cell culture studies related to low-level ELF-EMF exposure due to the existing stray magnetic fields in the ambient environment of laboratory equipment.

  14. Occupational exposure to low frequency magnetic fields and dementia: a case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, Andreas; Geller, Petra; Nienhaus, Albert; Bernhardt, Tanja; Ruppe, Ingeburg; Eggert, Siegfried; Hietanen, Maila; Kauppinen, Timo; Frölich, Lutz

    2007-01-01

    Background Several studies point to a potential aetiological relevance to dementia of exposure to low‐frequency magnetic fields, but the evidence is inconclusive. Objective To further examine the relationship between low frequency magnetic fields and dementia. Methods From 23 general practices, 195 patients with dementia were recruited. Of these, 108 had possible Alzheimer's disease, 59 had possible vascular dementia and 28 had secondary or unclassified dementia. A total of 229 controls were recruited: 122 population controls and 107 ambulatory patients free from dementia. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview; in cases, the interview was administered to the next of kin. Exposure to low‐frequency electromagnetic fields was assessed by expert rating. To identify occupations suspected to be associated with dementia, major occupations were a priori formed. Odds ratios were calculated using logistic regression, to control for age, region, sex, dementia in parents and smoking. Results Exposure to magnetic fields was not significantly associated with dementia; restriction of the analysis to cases with possible Alzheimer's disease or possible vascular dementia did not lead to statistically significant results. We found an increased risk of dementia in blue‐collar occupations (electrical and electronics workers, metal workers, construction workers, food and beverage processors and labourers). Conclusions Our study does not support a strong association between occupational exposure to low‐frequency magnetic fields and dementia. Further studies should consider the relationship between blue‐collar work and the late development of dementia. PMID:17043077

  15. [Remote effects of occupational and non-occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields of power-line frequency. Epidemiological studies].

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, G I; Rubtsova, N B; Novokhatskaia, E A; Tikhonov, A V

    2003-01-01

    A retrospective cohort study of mortality in the personnel of power-supply plants in the European regions of Russia was carried out. The exposure of the personnel to electromagnetic fields of power-line frequency (PF) was taken into account. Statistically non-significant raise of mortality from leukemia was found, compared to low mortality rates due to all other causes including cancer of any type. Standardized mortality ratio (SMR) was equal to 2.03 (95% CI = 0.23-7.31). In the retrospective case-control study the haemoblastosis development risk under occupational PF EMF exposure was evaluated. The data of 571 "cases" and 1208 "controls" interview showed that odd ratio (OR) was 1.64 (95% CI = 0.8-3.1). In another retrospective case-control study the risk of the haemoblastosis development in children due to parents PF EMF occupational exposure was evaluated. The data of 208 "cases" and 319 "controls" interview showed that the odd ratio (OR) was 1.69 (95% CI = 0.7-3.3). A retrospective cohort study of mortality in a settlement situated near a high-voltage (500 kV) substation, which took into account PF EMF levels in residential areas, revealed low mortality rates, except leukemia mortality (SMR 1.3; 95% CI = 0.2-7.0). The obtained data do not allow excluding a possibility of PF EMF leukogenic effect.

  16. Assessment of foetal exposure to the homogeneous magnetic field harmonic spectrum generated by electricity transmission and distribution networks.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, Serena; Liorni, Ilaria; Parazzini, Marta; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    During the last decades studies addressing the effects of exposure to Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields (ELF-EMF) have pointed out a possible link between those fields emitted by power lines and childhood leukaemia. They have also stressed the importance of also including in the assessment the contribution of frequency components, namely harmonics, other than the fundamental one. Based on the spectrum of supply voltage networks allowed by the European standard for electricity quality assessment, in this study the exposure of high-resolution three-dimensional models of foetuses to the whole harmonic content of a uniform magnetic field with a fundamental frequency of 50 Hz, was assessed. The results show that the main contribution in terms of induced electric fields to the foetal exposure is given by the fundamental frequency component. The harmonic components add some contributions to the overall level of electric fields, however, due to the extremely low permitted amplitude of the harmonic components with respect to the fundamental, their amplitudes are low. The level of the induced electric field is also much lower than the limits suggested by the guidelines for general public exposure, when the amplitude of the incident magnetic field is set at the maximum permitted level.

  17. Assessment of Foetal Exposure to the Homogeneous Magnetic Field Harmonic Spectrum Generated by Electricity Transmission and Distribution Networks

    PubMed Central

    Fiocchi, Serena; Liorni, Ilaria; Parazzini, Marta; Ravazzani, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    During the last decades studies addressing the effects of exposure to Extremely Low Frequency Electromagnetic Fields (ELF-EMF) have pointed out a possible link between those fields emitted by power lines and childhood leukaemia. They have also stressed the importance of also including in the assessment the contribution of frequency components, namely harmonics, other than the fundamental one. Based on the spectrum of supply voltage networks allowed by the European standard for electricity quality assessment, in this study the exposure of high-resolution three-dimensional models of foetuses to the whole harmonic content of a uniform magnetic field with a fundamental frequency of 50 Hz, was assessed. The results show that the main contribution in terms of induced electric fields to the foetal exposure is given by the fundamental frequency component. The harmonic components add some contributions to the overall level of electric fields, however, due to the extremely low permitted amplitude of the harmonic components with respect to the fundamental, their amplitudes are low. The level of the induced electric field is also much lower than the limits suggested by the guidelines for general public exposure, when the amplitude of the incident magnetic field is set at the maximum permitted level. PMID:25837346

  18. [Effect of electromagnetic field of extremely low frequency on ATPase activity of actomyosin].

    PubMed

    Tseĭslier, Iu V; Sheliuk, O V; Martyniuk, V S; Nuryshchenko, N Ie

    2012-01-01

    The Mg2+/Ca2+ and K(+)-ATPase actomyosin activity of rabbit skeletal muscle was evaluated by the Fiske-Subbarow method during a five-hour exposition of protein solutions in electromagnetic field of extremely low frequency of 8 Hz and 25 microT induction. The results of the study of the ATPase activity of actomyosin upon electromagnetic exposure have shown statistically significant changes that are characterized by a rather complex time dynamics. After 1, 2 and 4 hours of exposure of protein solutions the effect of ELF EMF exposure inhibits the ATPase activity compared to control samples, which are not exposed to the magnetic field. By the third and fifth hours of exposure to the electromagnetic field, there is a significant increase in the ATPase activity of actomyosin. It should be noted that a similar pattern of change in enzyme activity was universal, both for the environment by Mg2+ and Ca2+, and in the absence of these ions in the buffer. This can evidence for Ca(2+)-independent ways of the infuence of electromagnetic field (EMP) on biologic objects. In our opinion, the above effects are explained by EMP influence on the dynamic properties of actomyosin solutions, which are based on the processes of spontaneous dynamic formation of structure.

  19. Magnetic-field Exposures in the Workplace: Reference Distribution and Exposures in Occupational Groups.

    PubMed

    Floderus; Persson; Stenlund

    1996-07-01

    Exposures to extremely-low-frequency magnetic fields were assessed by taking personal measurements with a dosimeter calibrated at 50 Hz with a bandwidth of 40-400 Hz. The study group was a population-based random sample of 1,098 Swedish men. Exposures were determined as workday mean, median, maximum, and standard deviation, and the time fraction of the day when exposures exceeded 0.20 µT. For workday means, the 50th percentile was 0.17 µT, and the 75th percentile was 0.27 µT. For median values, the 50th percentile was 0.11 µT and the 75th percentile was 0.16 µT. The strongest correlation (Spearman rank correlation = r&infs;) found was between the workday mean and the fraction of time above 0.20 µT (r&infs; = 0.89). The authors used the same data to estimate exposures for the 100 most common occupations according to the 1990 Swedish census. A minimum of four independent measurements for each occupation was required. Among occupations with low workday mean values were earth-moving machine operator, health care worker, and concrete worker. Among occupations with high workday mean exposures were welder and electrical or electronics engineer or technician. High exposure levels were also found in occupations outside the study base, such as train engine driver and glass, ceramic, or brick worker. Exposures to magnetic fields vary widely, since levels of exposure are strongly affected by factors such as duration of exposure and distance from the source. Large variations often found between individuals within occupations could reflect variations in tasks across different workdays for the particular occupations and/or local conditions such as tools and installations, and/or how the work is organized and performed.

  20. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Agricultural Laboratory and Field Technician Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    These Illinois skill standards for the agricultural laboratory and field technician cluster are intended to serve as a guide to workforce preparation program providers as they define content for their programs and to employers as they establish the skills and standards necessary for job acquisition. They could also serve as a mechanism for…

  1. Exploring the Needs for Competency Measures in Eight Occupational Fields: Position Reports of Task Forces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergquist, William H.; And Others

    These position reports describe the findings of task forces which focused on the need to translate work-related experience into degree or certificate credit at postsecondary institutions. The eight occupational fields examined included Accounting, Agribusiness, Data Processing, Day Care, Electronics Technology, Management, Police Science and…

  2. Measuring Occupational Exposure to Extremely Low-Frequency Electric Fields at 220 kV Substations.

    PubMed

    Pirkkalainen, Herkko; Heiskanen, Timo; Tonteri, Juhani; Elovaara, Jarmo; Mika, Penttilä; Korpinen, Leena

    2017-03-03

    Earlier studies conducted at 400 and 110 kV substations in Finland have shown that the occupational exposure to electric fields can exceed the action levels (ALs) set by Directive 2013/35/EU. This is a case study investigating the level of occupational exposure experienced by workers at 220 kV substations in order to determine if the actions levels are being exceeded. The measurements were conducted at two old 220 kV substations in Finland. The higher AL of 20 kV m-1 was exceeded at both substations.

  3. Occupational magnetic field exposure and cardiovascular mortality in a cohort of electric utility workers.

    PubMed

    Sahl, Jack; Mezei, Gabor; Kavet, Robert; McMillan, Alex; Silvers, Abe; Sastre, Antonio; Kheifets, Leeka

    2002-11-15

    In electric utility workers, occupational exposure to magnetic fields has previously been associated with mortality from acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and arrhythmia but not from chronic coronary heart disease (CCHD) or atherosclerosis. To investigate these health endpoints further, the authors examined mortality from AMI (n = 407) and CCHD (n = 369) in a cohort of 35,391 male workers at the Southern California Edison Company between 1960 and 1992. Exposure was estimated according to duration of employment in occupations associated with high levels of magnetic field exposure and was calculated as cumulative exposure to magnetic fields expressed in micro-Tesla-years. Adjustment was made for age, calendar time, socioeconomic status, race, and worker status (active or inactive). The authors found that men working longer in high-exposure occupations or working as electricians, linemen, or power plant operators had no increased risk of dying from either AMI or CCHD compared with men who never worked in high-exposure occupations. For cumulative exposure, no association was observed with mortality from AMI (rate ratio per 1 micro T-year = 1.01, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.02) or CCHD (rate ratio per 1 micro T-year = 1.00, 95% confidence interval: 0.99, 1.02). These results, indicating no exposure-related risk increase for AMI mortality, do not confirm previous results.

  4. Risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia following parental occupational exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Reid, A; Glass, D C; Bailey, H D; Milne, E; de Klerk, N H; Downie, P; Fritschi, L

    2011-01-01

    Background: Earlier studies have reported moderate increases in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) among children whose mothers have been occupationally exposed to extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields. Other studies examining parental occupational exposure to ELF and ALL have reported mixed results. Methods: In an Australian case–control study of ALL in children aged <15 years, parents were asked about tasks they undertook in each job. Exposure variables were created for any occupational exposure before the birth of the child, in jobs 2 years before birth, in jobs 1 year before birth and up to 1 year after birth. Results: In all, 379 case and 854 control mothers and 328 case and 748 control fathers completed an occupational history. Exposure to ELF in all time periods was similar in case and control mothers. There was no difference in exposure between case and control fathers. There was no association between maternal (odds ratio (OR)=0.96; 95% CI=0.74–1.25) or paternal (OR=0.78; 95% CI=0.56–1.09) exposure to ELF any time before the birth and risk of childhood ALL. Conclusion: We did not find an increased risk of ALL in offspring of parents with occupational exposure to ELF. PMID:21915123

  5. Risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia following parental occupational exposure to extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Reid, A; Glass, D C; Bailey, H D; Milne, E; de Klerk, N H; Downie, P; Fritschi, L

    2011-10-25

    Earlier studies have reported moderate increases in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) among children whose mothers have been occupationally exposed to extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields. Other studies examining parental occupational exposure to ELF and ALL have reported mixed results. In an Australian case-control study of ALL in children aged < 15 years, parents were asked about tasks they undertook in each job. Exposure variables were created for any occupational exposure before the birth of the child, in jobs 2 years before birth, in jobs 1 year before birth and up to 1 year after birth. In all, 379 case and 854 control mothers and 328 case and 748 control fathers completed an occupational history. Exposure to ELF in all time periods was similar in case and control mothers. There was no difference in exposure between case and control fathers. There was no association between maternal (odds ratio (OR)=0.96; 95% CI=0.74-1.25) or paternal (OR=0.78; 95% CI=0.56-1.09) exposure to ELF any time before the birth and risk of childhood ALL. We did not find an increased risk of ALL in offspring of parents with occupational exposure to ELF.

  6. Effect of incubating egg exposure to magnetic field on the biophysical blood properties of newly-hatched chicks.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Ghannam Magdy; Mohamed, Shafey Tarek; Abd-Alaah, Aly Amany; Kassem, Abdelhalim Mohamed Anwar; Suliman, Al-Ayed Mohammed

    2015-09-01

    Due to widespread of human exposure to electromagnetic fields, there has been increasing public concern about the potential health risks from low-frequency electromagnetic fields; ELF-EMF. The magnetic fields (MFs) affects functions of the living organisms, such as DNA synthesis and ion transportation through the cell membranes. In the present work, the effects of short-term exposure to magnetic fields (MFs) prior to incubation were investigated on the biophysical blood properties of chicks hatched from layer-type breeder eggs. The eggs were exposed to a MF of 0.75 mT at 50 Hz for 20, 40 and 60 min before incubation. This study was performed by measuring the dielectric relaxation of hemoglobin (Hb) molecules and the membrane solubility of red blood cells (RBCs) using the non-ionic detergent octylglucoside. Exposure of the eggs to a MF increased the conductivity of the Hb molecules. The pronounced increase in the conductivity of the exposed eggs might be attributed to an increase in the surface charge of the Hb macromolecules, resulted from the formation of highly active molecular species. This speculation can be supported by the increase in the relaxation time of the exposed groups. The solubilization process of the RBC membrane indicates a loss in the mobility of RBCs in the blood of hatching chicks.

  7. Variability and consistency of electric and magnetic field occupational exposure measurements.

    PubMed

    Bracken, T D; Patterson, R M

    1996-01-01

    There is widespread scientific and public interest in possible health effects from exposure to electric and magnetic fields at frequencies associated with electricity use. Electric and magnetic field exposure assessment presents specific problems, among which are the inherent variability in exposure, the lack of robust statistical summary measures, and the lack of an accepted metric based on biological response. These pose challenges in defining distinct exposure groups, a basic goal for exposure assessments used in epidemiological studies. This paper explores the extent to which distinct electric and magnetic field exposure groups can be defined, by examining the variability and consistency of occupational electric and magnetic field exposure measurements among studies and within individual studies. Principal analyses are made by job titles because they are the most frequently used descriptors for stratifying occupational exposures to electric and magnetic fields. Methodological issues affecting the degree of consistency in measured electric and magnetic field exposures among occupational environments are also examined. Exposures by job title reported from electric and magnetic field measurement studies are summarized by general job category and industry. Analyses are performed both within and between job categories. Distributions of daily measured exposures for job categories taken from three large studies in the U.S. electric utility industry are compared to investigate consistency of exposures at a more detailed level. Analyses of reported personal exposure measurements from many studies and countries are consistent with less rigorous observations made heretofore on the basis of individual studies. In these studies, significantly elevated electric and magnetic field exposures are found in the electrician, lineworker, and substation worker categories; significantly elevated magnetic field exposures are also noted in the generation worker category; and magnetic

  8. Occupational Electromagnetic Field Exposures Associated with Sleep Quality: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hui; Chen, Guangdi; Pan, Yifeng; Chen, Zexin; Jin, Wen; Sun, Chuan; Chen, Chunjing; Dong, Xuanjun; Chen, Kun; Xu, Zhengping; Zhang, Shanchun; Yu, Yunxian

    2014-01-01

    Background Exposure to electromagnetic field (EMF) emitted by mobile phone and other machineries concerns half the world’s population and raises the problem of their impact on human health. The present study aims to explore the effects of electromagnetic field exposures on sleep quality and sleep duration among workers from electric power plant. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in an electric power plant of Zhejiang Province, China. A total of 854 participants were included in the final analysis. The detailed information of participants was obtained by trained investigators using a structured questionnaire, which including socio-demographic characteristics, lifestyle variables, sleep variables and electromagnetic exposures. Physical examination and venous blood collection were also carried out for every study subject. Results After grouping daily occupational electromagnetic exposure into three categories, subjects with long daily exposure time had a significantly higher risk of poor sleep quality in comparison to those with short daily exposure time. The adjusted odds ratios were 1.68 (95%CI: 1.18, 2.39) and 1.57 (95%CI: 1.10, 2.24) across tertiles. Additionally, among the subjects with long-term occupational exposure, the longer daily occupational exposure time apparently increased the risk of poor sleep quality (OR (95%CI): 2.12 (1.23∼3.66) in the second tertile; 1.83 (1.07∼3.15) in the third tertile). There was no significant association of long-term occupational exposure duration, monthly electric fee or years of mobile-phone use with sleep quality or sleep duration. Conclusions The findings showed that daily occupational EMF exposure was positively associated with poor sleep quality. It implies EMF exposure may damage human sleep quality rather than sleep duration. PMID:25340654

  9. Effects of a 50 Hz magnetic field on Dictyostelium discoideum (Protista).

    PubMed

    Amaroli, Andrea; Trielli, Francesca; Bianco, Bruno; Giordano, Stefano; Moggia, Elsa; Corrado, Maria Umberta Delmonte

    2006-10-01

    Some studies have demonstrated that a few biological systems are affected by weak, extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs), lower than 10 mT. However, to date there is scanty evidence of this effect on Protists in the literature. Due to their peculiarity as single-cell eukaryotic organisms, Protists respond directly to environmental stimuli, thus appearing as very suitable experimental systems. Recently, we showed the presence of propionylcholinesterase (PrChE) activity in single-cell amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum. This enzyme activity was assumed to be involved in cell-cell and cell-environment interactions, as its inhibition affects cell aggregation and differentiation. In this work, we have exposed single-cell amoebae of D. discoideum to an ELF-EMF of about 200 microT, 50 Hz, for 3 h or 24 h at 21 degrees C. A delay in the early phase of the differentiation was observed in 3 h exposed cells, and a significant decrease in the fission rate appeared in 24 h exposed cells. The PrChE activity was significantly lower in 3 h exposed cells than in the controls, whereas 24 h exposed cells exhibited an increase in this enzyme activity. However, such effects appeared to be transient, as the fission rate and PrChE activity values returned to the respective control values after a 24 h stay under standard conditions.

  10. Occupational 50 Hz magnetic field exposure measurements among female sewing machine operators in Hungary.

    PubMed

    Szabó, J; Mezei, K; Thuróczy, G; Mezei, G

    2006-09-01

    Occupational magnetic field (MF) exposure is less thoroughly characterized in occupations typically held by women. Our objective was to characterize occupational 50 Hz MF personal exposure (PE) among female sewing machine operators. We measured the full shift PE of 51 seamstresses, who worked in two shifts (6-14 and 14-22 h) according to their normal work routine. Measurements were conducted using EMDEX PAL meters at chest level. The average duration of the measurement periods was 449 min (range 420-470). The average arithmetic mean exposure for all women was 0.76 microT (range 0.06-4.27). The average of maximum values was 4.30 microT (range 0.55-14.80). Women working with older sewing machines experienced higher exposure than women working on newer sewing machines. For women (n = 10) who operated sewing machines produced in 1990 or earlier, the average arithmetic mean exposure was 2.09 microT, and for women (n = 41) who operated sewing machines produced after 1990, the average arithmetic mean was 0.43 microT. We conclude that women working as sewing machine operators experience higher than average occupational MF exposure compared to other working women. Most important determinant of the women's personal MF exposure was the age of the sewing machine the women operated.

  11. Effects of short-term exposure to powerline-frequency electromagnetic field on the electrical activity of the heart.

    PubMed

    Elmas, Onur; Comlekci, Selcuk; Koylu, Halis

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The heart is a contractile organ that can generate its own rhythm. The contraction, or the rhythm, of the heart may be influenced by electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure, because of the heart's excitability characteristic. In previous studies, different methods have been used to study the possible effects of an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on the heart. But the studies' designs were not similar, and the results were also different. Recent studies have shown some evidence that short-term EMF exposure can influence the heart more than long-term exposure. This study investigated how the heart is affected in the first EMF exposure. In a simulation of the daily exposure of humans to a power frequency, Wistar albino rats were used. By utilizing the Helmholtz-coil set, we obtained a 50-Hz, 1-μT EMF and examined rat heart activity during short-term EMF exposure. No effect was observed under this exposure condition. The results obtained do not confirm a possible mechanism in the electrical activity of the rat heart model.

  12. A system linking occupation history questionnaire data and magnetic field monitoring data.

    PubMed

    Burau, K D; Huang, B; Whitehead, L W; Delclos, G M; Downs, T D

    1998-01-01

    A method is presented which links on-site electromagnetic field monitoring data with pre-existing work history data. The linkage is used to estimate cumulative and average annualized magnetic field exposure for a case-control study. On-site electromagnetic field monitoring data for 1,966 volunteer utility employees, at 59 sites in the United States and three other countries, were obtained from a large project (the EMDEX project) designed to collect, analyze, and document 60-Hz electric and magnetic field exposures for a diverse population. These data represent 9 primary work environments, and 16 job classification categories, amounting to 144 unique job categories which were consolidated using the job-exposure matrix presented into 282 three-digit Dictionary of Occupational Title (DOT) codes. The DOT code categories were then linked to lifetime occupational histories from a case-control study of leukemia. The method may be extended to link additional job titles with monitoring information. Job titles linked with electromagnetic field monitoring information provide more specific estimates of exposure intensity than previous ordinal estimates of exposure. Therefore, estimates of cumulative electromagnetic field exposure are achievable, as well as high and low level exposure estimates.

  13. [Investigation of occupational exposure to power frequency electromagnetic fields in workers of power grid].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-song; Yang, Xiao-ying; Li, Run-qin; Zhu, Bao-yu; Zhang, Xiao; Gao, Yang; Huang, Han-lin; Li, Tao

    2012-08-01

    To measure and assess the levels of occupational exposure to power frequency electromagnetic fields in workers of power grid. PMM8053 electromagnetic fields measuring system with EHP-50 probe was used to measure the levels of electromagnetic fields at working place. Personal dosimeters (EMDEX LITE) were utilized to measure the individual exposure levels of power frequency magnetic field. The results were evaluated with the limitation criteria of GBZ2.2 and ICNIRP. In the 500 kV ultra high voltage substation, the intensity at 90% measure points of power electric field was more than 5 kV/m. The magnetic field intensity in the areas nearby reactors and capacitors was often higher than 100 µT, even several hundreds µT. The mean daily exposure levels of workers in power grid were between 0.04 and 5.0 µT, and the exposure levels of 70% workers were higher than 0.4 µT. In the areas of ultra high voltage and nearby the reactors and capacitors are the key control points for occupational health in power grid. There is acute health risk of workers exposed to high accumulative exposure levels.

  14. Feasibility of a cohort study on health risks caused by occupational exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of performing a cohort study on health risks from occupational exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF) in Germany. Methods A set of criteria was developed to evaluate the feasibility of such a cohort study. The criteria aimed at conditions of exposure and exposure assessment (level, duration, preferably on an individual basis), the possibility to assemble a cohort and the feasibility of ascertaining various disease endpoints. Results Twenty occupational settings with workers potentially exposed to RF-EMF and, in addition, a cohort of amateur radio operators were considered. Based on expert ratings, literature reviews and our set of predefined criteria, three of the cohorts were identified as promising for further evaluation: the personnel (technicians) of medium/short wave broadcasting stations, amateur radio operators, and workers on dielectric heat sealers. After further analyses, the cohort of workers on dielectric heat sealers seems not to be feasible due to the small number of exposed workers available and to the difficulty of assessing exposure (exposure depends heavily on the respective working process and mixture of exposures, e.g. plastic vapours), although exposure was highest in this occupational setting. The advantage of the cohort of amateur radio operators was the large number of persons it includes, while the advantage of the cohort of personnel working at broadcasting stations was the quality of retrospective exposure assessment. However, in the cohort of amateur radio operators the exposure assessment was limited, and the cohort of technicians was hampered by the small number of persons working in this profession. Conclusion The majority of occupational groups exposed to RF-EMF are not practicable for setting up an occupational cohort study due to the small numbers of exposed subjects or due to exposure levels being only marginally higher than those of the general

  15. Occupational exposure measurements of static and pulsed gradient magnetic fields in the vicinity of MRI scanners.

    PubMed

    Kännälä, Sami; Toivo, Tim; Alanko, Tommi; Jokela, Kari

    2009-04-07

    Recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have increased occupational exposure to magnetic fields. In this study, we examined the assessment of occupational exposure to gradient magnetic fields and time-varying magnetic fields generated by motion in non-homogeneous static magnetic fields of MRI scanners. These magnetic field components can be measured simultaneously with an induction coil setup that detects the time rate of change of magnetic flux density (dB/dt). The setup developed was used to measure the field components around two MRI units (1 T open and 3 T conventional). The measured values can be compared with dB/dt reference levels derived from magnetic flux density reference levels given by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). The measured motion-induced dB/dt values were above the dB/dt reference levels for both MRI units. The measured values for the gradient fields (echo planar imaging (EPI) and fast field echo (FFE) sequences) also exceeded the dB/dt reference levels in positions where the medical staff may have access during interventional procedures. The highest motion-induced dB/dt values were 0.7 T s(-1) for the 1 T scanner and 3 T s(-1) for the 3 T scanner when only the static field was present. Even higher values (6.5 T s(-1)) were measured for simultaneous exposure to motion-induced and gradient fields in the vicinity of the 3 T scanner.

  16. Health and Wellbeing of Occupants in Highly Energy Efficient Buildings: A Field Study.

    PubMed

    Wallner, Peter; Tappler, Peter; Munoz, Ute; Damberger, Bernhard; Wanka, Anna; Kundi, Michael; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2017-03-19

    Passive houses and other highly energy-efficient buildings need mechanical ventilation. However, ventilation systems in such houses are regarded with a certain degree of skepticism by parts of the public due to alleged negative health effects. Within a quasi-experimental field study, we investigated if occupants of two types of buildings (mechanical vs. natural ventilation) experience different health, wellbeing and housing satisfaction outcomes and if associations with indoor air quality exist. We investigated 123 modern homes (test group: with mechanical ventilation; control group: naturally ventilated) built in the years 2010 to 2012 in the same geographic area and price range. Interviews of occupants based on standardized questionnaires and measurements of indoor air quality parameters were conducted twice (three months after moving in and one year later). In total, 575 interviews were performed (respondents' mean age 37.9 ± 9 years in the test group, 37.7 ± 9 years in the control group). Occupants of the test group rated their overall health status and that of their children not significantly higher than occupants of the control group at both time points. Adult occupants of the test group reported dry eyes statistically significantly more frequently compared to the control group (19.4% vs. 12.5%). Inhabitants of energy-efficient, mechanically ventilated homes rated the quality of indoor air and climate significantly higher. Self-reported health improved more frequently in the mechanically ventilated new homes (p = 0.005). Almost no other significant differences between housing types and measuring time points were observed concerning health and wellbeing or housing satisfaction. Associations between vegetative symptoms (dizziness, nausea, headaches) and formaldehyde concentrations as well as between CO₂ levels and perceived stale air were observed. However, both associations were independent of the type of ventilation. In summary, occupants of the

  17. Health and Wellbeing of Occupants in Highly Energy Efficient Buildings: A Field Study

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Peter; Tappler, Peter; Munoz, Ute; Damberger, Bernhard; Wanka, Anna; Kundi, Michael; Hutter, Hans-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Passive houses and other highly energy-efficient buildings need mechanical ventilation. However, ventilation systems in such houses are regarded with a certain degree of skepticism by parts of the public due to alleged negative health effects. Within a quasi-experimental field study, we investigated if occupants of two types of buildings (mechanical vs. natural ventilation) experience different health, wellbeing and housing satisfaction outcomes and if associations with indoor air quality exist. We investigated 123 modern homes (test group: with mechanical ventilation; control group: naturally ventilated) built in the years 2010 to 2012 in the same geographic area and price range. Interviews of occupants based on standardized questionnaires and measurements of indoor air quality parameters were conducted twice (three months after moving in and one year later). In total, 575 interviews were performed (respondents’ mean age 37.9 ± 9 years in the test group, 37.7 ± 9 years in the control group). Occupants of the test group rated their overall health status and that of their children not significantly higher than occupants of the control group at both time points. Adult occupants of the test group reported dry eyes statistically significantly more frequently compared to the control group (19.4% vs. 12.5%). Inhabitants of energy-efficient, mechanically ventilated homes rated the quality of indoor air and climate significantly higher. Self-reported health improved more frequently in the mechanically ventilated new homes (p = 0.005). Almost no other significant differences between housing types and measuring time points were observed concerning health and wellbeing or housing satisfaction. Associations between vegetative symptoms (dizziness, nausea, headaches) and formaldehyde concentrations as well as between CO2 levels and perceived stale air were observed. However, both associations were independent of the type of ventilation. In summary, occupants of the

  18. Occupational exposure levels of static magnetic field during routine MRI examination in 3T MR system.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi-Sekino, Sachiko; Nakai, Toshiharu; Imai, Shinya; Izawa, Shuhei; Okuno, Tsutomu

    2014-01-01

    Occupational exposure to the high static magnetic fields (SMFs) during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations raises concerns of adverse health effects. In this study, personal exposure monitoring of the magnetic fields during routine examinations in two 3 T MRI systems was carried out. A three-axis Hall magnetometer was attached to a subject's chest during monitoring. Data acquisition started every time the subject entered the scanner room and ended when the subject exited the room. Four radiologic technologists from two different institutes participated in this study. The maximum exposed field ranged from 0 to 1250 mT and the average peak magnetic field (B) was 428 ± 231 mT (mean ± standard deviation (SD): number of samples (N) = 103). Then, the relationship between exposure levels and work duties was analyzed. The MRI examination of the head or neck showed the highest average peak B among four work categories. These results provide information of real exposure levels for 3 T MRI system operators and can also improve the current practical training advice for preventing extra occupational field exposure.

  19. Neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on a Huntington's disease rat model: effects on neurotrophic factors and neuronal density.

    PubMed

    Tasset, I; Medina, F J; Jimena, I; Agüera, E; Gascón, F; Feijóo, M; Sánchez-López, F; Luque, E; Peña, J; Drucker-Colín, R; Túnez, I

    2012-05-03

    There is evidence to suggest that the neuroprotective effect of exposure of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) may be due, at least in part, to the effect of these fields on neurotrophic factors levels and cell survival, leading to an improvement in behavior. This study was undertaken to investigate the neuroprotective effects of ELFEF in a rat model of 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP)-induced Huntington's disease. Behavior patterns were evaluated, and changes in neurotrophic factor, cell damage, and oxidative stress biomarker levels were monitored in Wistar rats. Rats were given 3NP over four consecutive days (20 mg/kg body weight), whereas ELFEF (60 Hz and 0.7 mT) was applied over 21 days, starting after the last injection of 3NP. Rats treated with 3NP exhibited significantly different behavior in the open field test (OFT) and the forced swim test (FST), and displayed significant differences in neurotrophic factor levels and oxidative stress biomarkers levels, together with a neuronal damage and diminished neuronal density, with respect neuronal controls. ELFEF improved neurological scores, enhanced neurotrophic factor levels, and reduced both oxidative damage and neuronal loss in 3NP-treated rats. ELFEF alleviates 3NP-induced brain injury and prevents loss of neurons in rat striatum, thus showing considerable potential as a therapeutic tool.

  20. Occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and the occurrence of brain tumors. An analysis of possible associations

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, R.S.; Dischinger, P.C.; Conde, J.; Farrell, K.P.

    1985-06-01

    To explore the association between occupation and the occurrence of brain tumor, an epidemiologic study was conducted using data from the death certificates of 951 adult white male Maryland residents who died of brain tumor during the period 1969 through 1982. Compared with the controls, men employed in electricity-related occupations, such as electrician, electric or electronic engineer, and utility company serviceman, were found to experience a significantly higher proportion of primary brain tumors. An increase in the odds ratio for brain tumor was found to be positively related to electromagnetic (EM) field exposure levels. Furthermore, the mean age at death was found to be significantly younger among cases in the presumed high EM-exposure group. These findings suggest that EM exposure may be associated with the pathogenesis of brain tumors, particularly in the promoting stage.

  1. Severe Cognitive Dysfunction and Occupational Extremely Low Frequency Magnetic Field Exposure among Elderly Mexican Americans

    PubMed Central

    Davanipour, Zoreh; Tseng, Chiu-Chen; Lee, Pey-Jiuan; Markides, Kyriakos S.; Sobel, Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Aims This report is the first study of the possible relationship between extremely low frequency (50–60 Hz, ELF) magnetic field (MF) exposure and severe cognitive dysfunction. Earlier studies investigated the relationships between MF occupational exposure and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or dementia. These studies had mixed results, depending upon whether the diagnosis of AD or dementia was performed by experts and upon the methodology used to classify MF exposure. Study Design Population-based case-control. Place and Duration of Study Neurology and Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, 2 years. Methodology The study population consisted of 3050 Mexican Americans, aged 65+, enrolled in Phase 1 of the Hispanic Established Population for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly (H-EPESE) study. Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) results, primary occupational history, and other data were collected. Severe cognitive dysfunction was defined as an MMSE score below 10. The MF exposure methodology developed and used in earlier studies was used. Results Univariate odds ratios (OR) were 3.4 (P< .03; 95% CI: 1.3–8.9) for high and 1.7 (P=.27; 95% CI: 0.7–4.1) for medium or high (M/H) MF occupations. In multivariate main effects models, the results were similar. When interaction terms were allowed in the models, the interactions between M/H or high occupational MF exposure and smoking history or age group were statistically significant, depending upon whether two (65–74, 75+) or three (65–74, 75–84, 85+) age groups were considered, respectively. When the analyses were limited to subjects aged 75+, the interactions between M/H or high MF occupations and a positive smoking history were statistically significant. Conclusion The results of this study indicate that working in an occupation with high or M/H MF exposure may increase the risk of severe cognitive dysfunction. Smoking and older age may increase the deleterious effect of MF

  2. Telomere measurement in individuals occupationally exposed to pesticide mixtures in tobacco fields.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Vívian Francília Silva; Simon, Daniel; Salvador, Mirian; Branco, Cátia dos Santos; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; da Silva, Fernanda Rabaioli; de Souza, Claudia Telles; da Silva, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Occupational exposure to pesticides in tobacco fields causes genetic damage in farmers. The aim of this study was to analyze tobacco farmers chronically exposed to low doses of pesticides and nicotine (present in the tobacco leaves) in relation to absolute telomere length (aTL), and explore the influence of lifestyle characteristics, oxidative stress, and inorganic element levels. DNA was isolated from peripheral blood samples from agricultural workers and non-exposed individuals, and aTL was measured by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis. Oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances [TBARS], which measures oxidative damage to lipids; and toxic equivalent antioxidant capacity [TEAC], which measures total equivalent antioxidant capacity) was evaluated in serum, and inorganic element content was analyzed in whole blood through particle-induced X-ray emission technique. It was found that exposure to pesticides and tobacco smoking had significant effects on aTL. Individuals occupationally exposed to complex mixtures of pesticides in tobacco fields and individuals who smoked had decreased aTL compared with the non-exposed group. TBARS and TEAC were significantly elevated in the exposed group. There were no significant differences in inorganic elements. There was no evidence of an influence of age, gender, consumption of alcoholic beverages, or intake of fruits and vegetables on aTL within the groups. In addition, years of work in the tobacco field in the exposed group did not influence any of the variables analyzed. Although further studies were needed, these results suggested differences in telomere maintenance in tobacco farmers compared with the control group, indicating that telomere length may be a good biomarker of occupational exposure.

  3. Assessment of occupational exposure to magnetic fields in high-voltage substations (154/34.5 kV).

    PubMed

    Helhel, S; Ozen, S

    2008-01-01

    This work proposes the survey of magnetic field measurements taken in 154/31.5 kV substations in the city of Antalya for occupational exposure assessment. For measurements, three substations have been taken into account, where four occupants are present for each 8 h of shift, which means 12 occupants are present during the day. Operator desks at three different substations read a lowest magnetic field of 0.3 microT at minimum loaded season and reached up to 1 microT at maximum loaded season, which means operators exposed to a magnetic field of > or = 0.3 microT 8 h d(-1). In switch gear regions, maximum magnetic field reading is 23 microT at minimum loaded season and reached up to 70 microT. Outdoor magnetic field measurement at circuit breaker region goes up to 62 microT with respect to operator heights.

  4. [Occupational exposure to 50 Hz magnetic fields in workers employed in various jobs].

    PubMed

    Gobba, F; Roccatto, L; Vandelli, Anna Maria; Besutti, G; Ghersi, R; Nicolini, O

    2004-01-01

    Information on occupational exposure to ELF magnetic fields (MF) in workers is largely insufficient, and is mostly based on results obtained in Scandinavian countries and North America. Accordingly, the collection of further data is needed, especially in workers exposed in other countries, including in Italy. One hundred and fifty workers (84 males and 66 females) employed in 28 different jobs in the Emilia-Romagna Region of Italy were examined. Individual exposure was measured using personal monitors worn on the hip in a belted pouch during three whole work-shifts (8 hours each) of a normal working week. A sampling interval of 10 seconds was adopted, resulting in the collection of more than 8600 measurements for each worker. The individual Time-Weighted Average (TWA) occupational exposure of workers was calculated as the arithmetic mean of all measurements during each work-shift. Environmental non-occupational exposure was also measured. The 50 degrees percentile of individual TWA in the whole group was 0.15 microT, and the 5 degrees - 95 degrees percentile was respectively 0.02-1.45 microT. Job-related exposure (expressed as the mean of the TWA measured in all workers engaged in that job) was highest in substation electric power plant workers (1.12 microT) and in sewing machine workers (0.84 microT), but was lower than 0.2 microT in more than the 70% of the examined jobs. Considering the geometric mean of individual TWA are 27 out of 28 the jobs inducing an exposure lower than 0.2 microT. The lowest exposure was observed in infant school teachers. A high variability was observed among different workers engaged in the same occupation, mainly in substation electric power plant workers, machine testers and grinders in the engineering industry and in sewing machine workers and quality control in garment production. A marked variability of the pattern of exposure during the work-shift was also observed The overall environmental (non-occupational) exposure was 0

  5. Incidence of cancer in persons with occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields in Denmark.

    PubMed Central

    Guénel, P; Raskmark, P; Andersen, J B; Lynge, E

    1993-01-01

    Several studies suggest that work in electrical occupations is associated with an increased risk of cancer, mainly leukaemia and brain tumours. These studies may, however, not be representative if there is a publication bias where mainly positive results are reported. To study an unselected population the incidence of cancer was followed up over a 17 year period (1970-87) in a cohort of 2.8 million Danes aged 20-64 years in 1970. Each person was classified by his or her industry and occupation in 1970. Before tabulation of the data on incidence of cancer, each industry-occupation group was coded for potential exposure to magnetic fields above the threshold 0.3 microT. Some 154,000 men were considered intermittently exposed and 18,000 continuously exposed. The numbers for women were 79,000 and 4000 respectively. Intermittent exposure was not associated with an increased risk of leukaemia, brain tumours, or melanoma. Men with continuous exposure, however, had an excess risk of leukaemia (observed (obs) 39, expected (exp) 23.80, obs/exp 1.64, 95% CI 1.20-2.24) with equal contributions from acute and other leukaemias. These men had no excess risk of brain tumours or melanoma. A risk for breast cancer was suggested in exposed men but not in women. The risk for leukaemia in continuously exposed men was mainly in electricians in installation works and iron foundry workers. Besides electromagnetic fields other exposures should be considered as possible aetiological agents. PMID:8398864

  6. Pulsed electromagnetic field (PEMF) prevents pro-oxidant effects of H2O2 in SK-N-BE(2) human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Falone, Stefano; Marchesi, Nicoletta; Osera, Cecilia; Fassina, Lorenzo; Comincini, Sergio; Amadio, Marialaura; Pascale, Alessia

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The redox milieu, together with reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation, may play a role in mediating some biological effects of extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF). Some of us have recently reported that a pulsed EMF (PEMF) improves the antioxidant response of a drug-sensitive human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cell line to pro-oxidants. Since drug resistance may affect cell sensitivity to redox-based treatments, we wanted to verify whether drug-resistant human neuroblastoma SK-N-BE(2) cells respond to a PEMF in a similar fashion. Materials and methods SK-N-BE(2) cells were exposed to repeated 2 mT, 75 Hz PEMF (15 min each, repeated 3 times over 5 days), and ROS production, Mn-dependent superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)-based antioxidant protection and viability were assessed after 10 min or 30 min 1 mM hydrogen peroxide. Sham controls were kept at the same time in identical cell culture incubators. Results The PEMF increased the MnSOD-based antioxidant protection and reduced the ROS production in response to a pro-oxidant challenge. Conclusions Our work might lay foundation for the development of non-invasive PEMF-based approaches aimed at elevating endogenous antioxidant properties in cellular or tissue models.

  7. Human health effects of EMFs: The cost of doing nothing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter MD, David O.

    2010-04-01

    Everyone is exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) from electricity (extremely low frequency, ELF), communication frequencies and wireless devices (radiofrequency, RF), as well as naturally occurring EMFs. Concern of health hazards from EMFs has increased as the use of mobile phones and other wireless devices has grown in all segments of the population, especially children. While there has been strong evidence for an association between leukemia and residential or occupational exposure to ELF EMFs for many years, the standards in existence are not sufficiently stringent to protect from an increased risk of cancer. ELF EMFs also increase risk of at least two types of neurodegenerative diseases. For RF EMFs, standards are set at levels designed to avoid tissue heating, in spite of many reports of biological effects at intensities too low to cause significant heating. Recent evidence demonstrates elevations in risk of brain cancer and acoustic neuroma only on the side of the head where individuals used their mobile phone. Individuals who begin exposure at younger ages are more vulnerable. These data indicate that the existing standards for radiofrequency exposure are not adequate. While there are many unanswered questions, the cost of doing nothing may result in an increasing number of people, many of them young, developing these diseases.

  8. Occupational exposure assessment on an FM mast: electric field and SAR values.

    PubMed

    Valič, Blaž; Kos, Bor; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Electric field strengths normally exceed the reference levels for occupational exposure in close vicinity to large frequency modulation (FM) transmitters. Thus, a detailed investigation on compliance with basic restrictions is needed before any administrative protection measures are applied. We prepared a detailed numerical model of a 20-kW FM transmitter on a 32-m mast. An electrically isolated anatomical human model was placed in 3 different positions inside the mast in the region where the values of the electric field were highest. The electric field strengths in this region were up to 700 V/m. The highest calculated whole-body specific absorption rate (SAR) was 0.48 W/kg, whereas the maximum 10-g average SAR in the head and trunk was 1.66 W/kg. The results show that the reference levels in the FM frequency range are very conservative for near field exposure. SAR values are not exceeded even for fields 10 times stronger than the reference levels.

  9. Accuracy and repeatability of an inertial measurement unit system for field-based occupational studies.

    PubMed

    Schall, Mark C; Fethke, Nathan B; Chen, Howard; Oyama, Sakiko; Douphrate, David I

    2016-04-01

    The accuracy and repeatability of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) system for directly measuring trunk angular displacement and upper arm elevation were evaluated over eight hours (i) in comparison to a gold standard, optical motion capture (OMC) system in a laboratory setting, and (ii) during a field-based assessment of dairy parlour work. Sample-to-sample root mean square differences between the IMU and OMC system ranged from 4.1° to 6.6° for the trunk and 7.2°-12.1° for the upper arm depending on the processing method. Estimates of mean angular displacement and angular displacement variation (difference between the 90th and 10th percentiles of angular displacement) were observed to change <4.5° on average in the laboratory and <1.5° on average in the field per eight hours of data collection. Results suggest the IMU system may serve as an acceptable instrument for directly measuring trunk and upper arm postures in field-based occupational exposure assessment studies with long sampling durations. Practitioner Summary: Few studies have evaluated inertial measurement unit (IMU) systems in the field or over long sampling durations. Results of this study indicate that the IMU system evaluated has reasonably good accuracy and repeatability for use in a field setting over a long sampling duration.

  10. Assessment of physiotherapists' occupational exposure to radiofrequency electromagnetic fields from shortwave and microwave diathermy devices: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Ghulam Sarwar; Farrow, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    We reviewed studies reporting the strength of radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) in physiotherapists' occupational environment. Studies from academic journals published from January 1990 to June 2010 were identified in nine online bibliographic databases. EMF strength was compared with occupational exposure limits (OELs) recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). In the reviewed studies, EMFs were measured at different distances (range 0.2 m to 6 m) from the console of diathermy devices, electrodes, and cables. For continuous shortwave diathermy (CSWD) (27.12 megahertz, MHz), measurements of EMFs at < 1 m, 1 m, 1.1-1.5 m, and 2 m reported the maximum E field strength as 8197%, 1639%, 295%, and 69%, respectively, and the maximum H field strength as 6250%, 681%, 213%, and 56%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limits for E and H fields for occupational exposure. For pulsed shortwave diathermy (PSWD) (27.12 MHz), EMF measurements at < 1 m, 1 m, and, 1.1-1.5 m showed the maximum E field intensity as 1639%, 175%, and 32%, and the maximum H field strength as 1175%, 968%, and 28%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limits for E and H fields for occupational exposure. For microwave diathermy (MWD) (2.45 gigahertz, GHz), the maximum power density measured at < 1 m, 1 m, 1.1-1.5 m, and 2 m was 200%, <30%, 0.76%, and 0.82%, respectively, of the ICNIRP limit for occupational exposure. RF EMF emissions measured from continuous and pulsed electrotherapeutic diathermy devices may well be higher than OELs at specific distances, i.e., at 1 m, which is currently designated to be a safe distance for physiotherapists. The minimum safe distance for physiotherapists should be revised to at least 2 m for CSWD and 1.5 m for PSWD. The reviewed studies did not provide evidence of exceeding the ICNIRP's reference levels for occupational exposure at 1 m from MWD devices.

  11. Field study of occupant comfort and office thermal environments in a hot, arid climate

    SciTech Connect

    Cena, K.; Dear, R.J. de

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents the main findings of ASHRAE research project RP-921, a field study of occupant comfort and office thermal environment in 22 air-conditioned office buildings in Kalgoorlie-Boulder, Western Australia, a location characterized by a hot and arid climate. A total of 935 subjects provided 1,229 sets of data for winter and summer, each accompanied by a full set of indoor climatic measurements with laboratory-grade instrumentation. Clothing insulation estimates for seated subjects (0.5 clo in summer and 0.7 in winter) were supplemented by the incremental effect of chairs (0.15 clo). Thermal neutrality, according to responses on the ASHRAE seven-point sensation scale, occurred at 20.3 C in winter and at 23.3 C in summer. Preferred temperature, defined as a minimum of subjects requesting temperature change, was 22.2 C for both seasons. Nearly 65% of the indoor measurements fell within the ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55a-1992 summer comfort zone and 85% in the winter. Over 85% of the occupants considered their thermal conditions acceptable. Subjects who expressed a below-average level of job satisfaction on a 15-question index were 50% more likely to express dissatisfaction with their thermal environment than subjects with above-average job satisfaction.

  12. Occupational exposure to magnetic fields and electric shocks and risk of ALS: the Swiss National Cohort.

    PubMed

    Huss, Anke; Spoerri, Adrian; Egger, Matthias; Kromhout, Hans; Vermeulen, Roel

    2015-03-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) has been associated with exposures in so-called 'electrical occupations'. It is unclear if this possible link may be explained by exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) or by electrical shocks. We evaluated ALS mortality in 2000-2008 and exposure to ELF-MF and electrical shocks in the Swiss National Cohort, using job exposure matrices for occupations at censuses 1990 and 2000. We compared 2.2 million workers with high or medium vs. low exposure to ELF-MF and electrical shocks using Cox proportional hazard models. Results showed that mortality from ALS was higher in people who had medium or high ELF-MF exposure in both censuses (HR 1.55 (95% CI 1.11-2.15)), but closer to unity for electrical shocks (HR 1.17 (95% CI 0.83-1.65)). When both exposures were included in the same model, the HR for ELF-MF changed little (HR 1.56), but the HR for electric shocks was attenuated to 0.97. In conclusion, there was an association between exposure to ELF-MF and mortality from ALS among workers with a higher likelihood of long-term exposure.

  13. Field experiments on occupant comfort and office thermal environments in a hot-humid climate

    SciTech Connect

    Dear, R.J. de; Fountain, M.E.

    1994-12-31

    This paper presents the main findings of ASHRAE research project RP-702, a field investigation of indoor climates and occupant comfort in 12 air-conditioned office buildings in Townsville, located in Australia`s tropical north. The project replicates an earlier ASHRAE investigation in San Francisco (RP-462). A total of 836 subjects provided 1,234 sets of questionnaire responses, each accompanied by a full set of physical indoor climatic measurements from laboratory-grade instrumentation. Clothing insulation estimates for seated subjects included the incremental effect of chairs. Thermal environmental results are compared with ASHRAE Standard 55-1992 prescriptions. Thermal neutrality, preference, and acceptability results are compared with laboratory-based models and standards. Gender and seasonal effects were minor, and many of the differences from the earlier San Francisco data were explicable in terms of clothing patterns. Most of the thermal dissatisfaction expressed within the Standard 55 comfort zone was associated with requests for higher air velocity.

  14. Effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field on expression levels of some antioxidant genes in human MCF-7 cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoudinasab, Hamideh; Sanie-Jahromi, Fatemeh; Saadat, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    In the past three decades, study on the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) has been of interest to scientists. Although the exact mechanism of its effect is not fully understood, free radical processes has been proposed as a possible mechanism. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of 50-Hz EMFs on the mRNA levels of seven antioxidant genes (CAT, SOD1, SOD2, GSTO1, GSTM3, MSGT1, and MSGT3) in human MCF-7 cells. The EMF exposure patterns were: 1) 5 min field-on/5 min filed-off, 2) 15 min field-on/15 min field-off, 3) 30 min field-on continuously. In all three exposure conditions we tried to have total exposure time of 30 minutes. Control cultures were located in the exposure apparatus when the power was off. The experiments were done at two field intensities; 0.25 mT and 0.50 mT. The RNA extraction was done at two times; immediately post exposure and two hours post exposure. The mRNA levels were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. MTT assay for three exposure conditions in the two field intensities represented no cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cells. Statistical comparison showed a significant difference between 0.25 mT and 0.50 mT intensities for "the 15 min field-on/15 min field-off condition" (Fisher's exact test, P=0.041), indicating that at 0.50 mT intensity field, the number of down-regulated and/or up-regulated genes increased compared with the other ones. However, there is no statistical significant difference between the field intensities for the two others EMF exposure conditions. PMID:28097161

  15. Effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field on expression levels of some antioxidant genes in human MCF-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudinasab, Hamideh; Sanie-Jahromi, Fatemeh; Saadat, Mostafa

    2016-06-01

    In the past three decades, study on the biological effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) has been of interest to scientists. Although the exact mechanism of its effect is not fully understood, free radical processes has been proposed as a possible mechanism. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of 50-Hz EMFs on the mRNA levels of seven antioxidant genes (CAT, SOD1, SOD2, GSTO1, GSTM3, MSGT1, and MSGT3) in human MCF-7 cells. The EMF exposure patterns were: 1) 5 min field-on/5 min filed-off, 2) 15 min field-on/15 min field-off, 3) 30 min field-on continuously. In all three exposure conditions we tried to have total exposure time of 30 minutes. Control cultures were located in the exposure apparatus when the power was off. The experiments were done at two field intensities; 0.25 mT and 0.50 mT. The RNA extraction was done at two times; immediately post exposure and two hours post exposure. The mRNA levels were determined using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. MTT assay for three exposure conditions in the two field intensities represented no cytotoxic effect on MCF-7 cells. Statistical comparison showed a significant difference between 0.25 mT and 0.50 mT intensities for "the 15 min field-on/15 min field-off condition" (Fisher's exact test, P=0.041), indicating that at 0.50 mT intensity field, the number of down-regulated and/or up-regulated genes increased compared with the other ones. However, there is no statistical significant difference between the field intensities for the two others EMF exposure conditions.

  16. TOPICAL REVIEW: Power frequency electromagnetic fields and health. Where's the evidence?5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preece, Alan W.; Hand, Jeff W.; Clarke, Robert N.; Stewart, Alice

    2000-09-01

    Twenty years ago concerns were raised that exposure to power frequency (or extremely low frequency (ELF)) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) may be associated with an increased risk of cancer or other health hazards. Subsequently no associations have been shown between laboratory magnetic field exposures and carcinogenesis in either animal or cellular models. Indeed, studies have demonstrated that magnetic fields are not associated with cancer. However, the puzzle remains that the results of some epidemiological studies may be interpreted as suggesting that living close to high-voltage transmission (HVT) lines appears to increase slightly the risk of childhood leukaemia. Alternatively, these results could result from small biases and errors in individual studies, which might not necessarily be the same in each study. The nature of the epidemiological studies (power-line, wire code, magnetic field or appliance based) appears to determine whether and how the EMFs associated with HVT lines might be a risk factor. It is possible that a simple association with either magnetic or electric field exposure may not be the whole answer, and an alternative mechanism is always a possibility. Although the interpretation of the available evidence by most expert bodies has led them to conclude that exposure to power frequency electric and magnetic fields is not a human health hazard, a working group under the auspices of the US National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) concluded that there was a possible low risk associated with certain exposures to ELF magnetic fields. NIEHS itself interpreted the finding as insufficient to warrant aggressive regulatory concern but stated that, because virtually everyone is routinely exposed to ELF EMFs, passive regulatory action is warranted, such as a continued emphasis on educating both the public and the regulated community on means aimed at reducing exposures. These analyses, conclusions and advice are not contradicted by

  17. The fuzzy comprehensive evaluation on occupational health hazards of electric field in substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xin; Wang, Jing; Gao, Yang; Chen, Tao

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, multilevel fuzzy analysis method is used to making a comprehensive evaluation on the health hazards of workers exposed to electric field in 500kV substation. The five different regions of 500kV substation is identified as the first level index, according to the specific measurement substation of each area to set up the second level index. The first level weight is established according to the proportion of the retention time of the workers in the different areas, and the weight of the second level is determined according to the proportion of the measuring points. Establishing five comment sets, and carrying out the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation according to the maximum membership principle, eventually come to the conclusion: although the measured data show that a small number of electric field intensity exposure value of 500kV substation beyond the requirements of the International Commission on non-ionizing radiation protection (ICNIRP) and the requirements of the People's Republic of China(PRC), but workers have very little contact time, therefore, it cannot be explained that there is a large occupational health hazard in 500kV substation. The multilevel fuzzy analysis method can be used to evaluate the health hazards of the electric field in the substation working environment well, it avoids the subjective and limitations of the traditional methods, and can be able to make a more accurate and objective judgment of the substation

  18. Effects of dietary green tea polyphenol supplementation on the health of workers exposed to high-voltage power lines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Zhang, Dan; Zhu, Baoyu; Zhang, He; Sun, Ye; Sun, Chengxun

    2016-09-01

    Although it has been several decades since the focus on the effect of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) of high-voltage power lines on human health, no consistent conclusion has been drawn. The present study aimed to investigate the change in oxidative stress after exposure to ELF-EMFs, and potential protective effects of green tea polyphenol supplementation (GTPS) on ELF-EMFs induced oxidative stress. A total of 867 subjects, including workers with or without exposure to ELF-EMFs of 110-420kV power lines, participated and were randomized into GTPS and placebo treatment groups. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage to DNA were assessed by urinary tests of 8-isoprostane and 8-OHdG. Significant increased urinary 8-isoprostane and 8-OHdG were observed in workers with ELF-EMFs exposure, which were diminished after 12 months of GTPS. No protective effects of GTPS on oxidative stress and oxidative damage to DNA were observed after three months of GTPS withdraw. We found a negative impact of high-voltage power lines on the health of workers. Long-term GTPS could be an efficient protection against the health issues induced by high-voltage power lines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Occupational Orientation: Health Occupations. Experimental Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These experimental curriculum materials for one of five clusters developed for the occupational program in Illinois include a series of learning activity packages (LAPs) designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of occupational choices available in the health occupations field. The 28 LAPs, each with a different occupation focus, are…

  20. Effect of non-ionizing electromagnetic field on the alteration of ovarian follicles in rats

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Seyed Shahin; Khaki, Amir Afshin; Ainehchi, Nava; Alihemmati, Alireza; Khatooni, Azam Asghari; Khaki, Arash; Asghari, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In recent years, there has been an increase in the attention paid to safety effects, environmental and society’s health, extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF), and radio frequency electromagnetic fields (RF-EMF). The aim of this research was to determine the effect of EMF on the alteration of ovarian follicles. Methods In this experimental study at Tabriz Medical University in 2015, we did EMF exposures and assessed the alteration of rats’ ovarian follicles. Thirty three-month old rats were selected randomly from laboratory animals, and, after their ages and weights were determined, they were divided randomly into three groups. The control group consisted of 10 rats without any treatment, and they were kept in normal conditions. The second group of rats was influenced by a magnetic field of 50 Hz for eight weeks (three weeks intrauterine and five weeks ectopic). The third group of rats was influenced by a magnetic field of 50 Hz for 13 weeks (three weeks intrauterine and ten weeks ectopic). Samples were fixed in 10% buffered formaldehyde and cleared with Xylol and embedded in paraffin. After sectioning and staining, samples were studied by optic microscopy. Finally, SPSS version 17, were used for data analysis. Results EMF radiation increased the harmful effects on the formation of ovarian follicles and oocytes implantation. Studies on the effects of electromagnetic fields on ovarian follicles have shown that the nuclei of the oocytes become smaller and change shape. There were significant, harmful changes in the groups affected by electromagnetic waves. Atresia of ovarian follicles was significantly significant in both study groups compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Conclusion Exposure to electromagnetic fields during embryonic development can cause morphological changes in oocytes and affect the differentiation of oocytes and folliculogenesis, resulting in decreased ovarian reserve leading to infertility or reduced

  1. [Bioeffects of electromagnetic fields--safety limits of each frequency band, especially less than radio one].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, M

    1996-01-01

    Since Wertheimer and Leeper reported in 1979 that children living near power distribution lines have as high as twice or three times the incidence of cancer, the relation of leukemia or cancer to extremely-low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) has been a subject of repeated argument. We cannot sum up the bioeffects of EMF in a few words, for these are attributed to frequency difference. This review discusses the bioeffects of EMF ranging from frequency of microwave to static magnetic field with main stress on the socalled non-thermal effects below radiofrequency band. Non-thermal effects are rather weak compared with those of high frequency band and have been treated as unknown matter for a long period. However, as the EMF energy has come to be increasingly used at high levels, we can now clearly detect the bioeffects of induced eddy currents. On the other hand, some findings about low level ELF electromagnetic field suspected as a cancer-promoting factor are mainly gained by epidemiological method. Cancer researchers concerned with recent powerline issues are coming up with many reports on oncological effects of very low-level (0.1 microT order) ELF electromagnetic fields. More data, however, should be collected to reach appropriate conclusion about the possibility of low level ELF electromagnetic fields have an effect of cancer promotion. As for the safety standards of static magnetic field it should be noted that in 1993 National Radiation Protection Board (UK) and International Radiation Protection Association published the highest values ever recommended. These announcements would agree with our assumption that biological processes require high flux density of ELF-EMF proportional to 1/f, where frequency and flux density are indicated with a logarithmic function.

  2. Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields and brain tumour risks in the INTEROCC study

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Michelle C; Benke, Geza; Bowman, Joseph D; Figuerola, Jordi; Fleming, Sarah; Hours, Martine; Kincl, Laurel; Krewski, Daniel; McLean, Dave; Parent, Marie-Elise; Richardson, Lesley; Sadetzki, Siegal; Schlaefer, Klaus; Schlehofer, Brigitte; Schüz, Joachim; Siemiatycki, Jack; van Tongeren, Martie; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Background Occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF) is a suspected risk factor for brain tumours, however the literature is inconsistent. Few studies have assessed whether ELF in different time windows of exposure may be associated with specific histologic types of brain tumours. This study examines the association between ELF and brain tumours in the large-scale INTEROCC study. Methods Cases of adult primary glioma and meningioma were recruited in seven countries (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, New Zealand, United Kingdom) between 2000 and 2004. Estimates of mean workday ELF exposure based on a job exposure matrix assigned. Estimates of cumulative exposure, average exposure, maximum exposure, and exposure duration were calculated for the lifetime, and 1–4, 5–9, and 10+ years prior to the diagnosis/reference date. Results There were 3,761 included brain tumour cases (1,939 glioma, 1,822 meningioma) and 5,404 population controls. There was no association between lifetime cumulative ELF exposure and glioma or meningioma risk. However, there were positive associations between cumulative ELF 1–4 years prior to the diagnosis/reference date and glioma (odds ratio (OR) ≥ 90th percentile vs < 25th percentile = 1.67, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.36–2.07, p < 0.0001 linear trend), and, somewhat weaker associations with meningioma (OR ≥ 90th percentile vs < 25th percentile = 1.23, 95% CI 0.97–1.57, p = 0.02 linear trend). Conclusions Results showed positive associations between ELF in the recent past and glioma. Impact Occupational ELF exposure may play a role in the later stages (promotion and progression) of brain tumourigenesis. PMID:24935666

  3. Occupational and Qualification Structures in the Field of Environmental Protection in the Metal and Chemical Industries in Italy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanzani, Claudio

    This report provides an initial analysis of the occupational and qualification structures in the field of environmental protection in the Italian metal and chemical industries. The first two chapters review the legislative background, situation in industry, and provision of environmental education and training. The third chapter presents results…

  4. Occupational and Qualification Structures in the Field of Environmental Protection in the Metal and Chemical Industries in the United Kingdom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    European Centre for the Development of Vocational Training, Berlin (Germany).

    A study analyzed the occupational structure and qualifications associated with the field of environmental protection in the metal and chemical industries in the United Kingdom. The analysis included nine case studies based on interviews with firms in the chemicals and metals sectors. Information was gathered within an analytical framework that…

  5. Occupational exposure in MR facilities due to movements in the static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Andreuccetti, Daniele; Biagi, Laura; Burriesci, Giancarlo; Cannatà, Vittorio; Contessa, Gian Marco; Falsaperla, Rosaria; Genovese, Elisabetta; Lodato, Rossella; Lopresto, Vanni; Merla, Caterina; Napolitano, Antonio; Pinto, Rosanna; Tiberi, Gianluigi; Tosetti, Michela; Zoppetti, Nicola

    2017-08-30

    The exposure of operators moving in the static field of magnetic resonance (MR) facilities was assessed through measurements of the magnetic flux density, which is experienced as variable in time because of the movement. Collected data were processed to allow the comparison with most recent and authoritative safety standards. Measurements of the experienced magnetic flux density B were performed using a probe worn by volunteers moving in MR environments. A total of 55 datasets were acquired nearby a 1.5T, 3T and 7T whole body scanners. Three different metrics were applied: the maximum intensity of B, to be compared with 2013/35/EU Directive exposure limit values for static fields; the maximum variation of the vector B on every 3s-interval, for comparison with the ICNIRP-2014 basic restriction aimed at preventing vertigo effects; two weighted peak indices (for "sensory" and "health" effects: SENS-WP, HLTH-WP), assessing compliance with ICNIRP-2014 and EU Directive recommendations intended to prevent stimulation effects. Peak values of |B| were greater than 2T in 9 of the 55 datasets. All the datasets at 1.5T and 3T were compliant with the limit for vertigo effects, whereas 6 datasets at 7T turned out to be non-compliant. At 7T, all 36 datasets were non-compliant for the SENS-WP index and 26 datasets even for the HLTH-WP one. Results demonstrate that compliance with EU Directive limits for static fields does not guarantee compliance with ICNIRP-2014 reference levels and clearly show that movements in the static field could be the key component of the occupational exposure to EMF in MR facilities. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL

    SciTech Connect

    Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

    1993-10-01

    An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

  7. Occupational exposure to electric fields and currents associated with 110 kV substation tasks.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena H; Kuisti, Harri A; Tarao, Hiroo; Elovaara, Jarmo A

    2012-07-01

    The main aim of this study was to investigate occupational exposure to electric fields, and current densities and contact currents associated with tasks at air-insulated 110 kV substations and analyze if the action value of EU Directive 2004/40/EC was exceeded. Four workers volunteered to simulate the following tasks: Task (A) maintenance of an operating device of a disconnector at ground or floor level, Task (B) maintenance of an operating device of a circuit breaker at ground or floor level, Task (C) breaker head maintenance from a man hoist, and Task (D) maintenance of an operating device of a circuit breaker from a service platform. The highest maximum average current density in the neck was 1.8 mA/m(2) (calculated internal electric field 9.0-18.0 mV/m) and the highest contact current was 79.4 µA. All measured values at substations were lower than the limit value (10 mA/m(2)) of the EU Directive 2004/40/EC and the 2010 basic restrictions (0.1 and 0.8 V/m for central nervous system tissues of the head, and all tissues of the head and body, respectively) of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Occupational and Qualification Structures in the Field of Environmental Protection in the Metal and Chemical Industries--Study on the Federal Republic of Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitschke, Christoph; And Others

    A study focused on new occupational and qualification structures in the field of environmental protection in the metal and chemical industries in the Federal Republic of Germany. A total of 22 interviews were conducted with representatives of 11 firms. The public debate on occupational requirements in the field of environmental protection and on…

  9. Occupational and Qualification Structures in the Field of Environmental Protection in the Metal and Chemical Industries--Study on the Federal Republic of Germany.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitschke, Christoph; And Others

    A study focused on new occupational and qualification structures in the field of environmental protection in the metal and chemical industries in the Federal Republic of Germany. A total of 22 interviews were conducted with representatives of 11 firms. The public debate on occupational requirements in the field of environmental protection and on…

  10. Long-term occupational exposure to organic solvents affects color vision, contrast sensitivity and visual fields.

    PubMed

    Costa, Thiago Leiros; Barboni, Mirella Telles Salgueiro; Moura, Ana Laura de Araújo; Bonci, Daniela Maria Oliveira; Gualtieri, Mirella; de Lima Silveira, Luiz Carlos; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the visual outcome of chronic occupational exposure to a mixture of organic solvents by measuring color discrimination, achromatic contrast sensitivity and visual fields in a group of gas station workers. We tested 25 workers (20 males) and 25 controls with no history of chronic exposure to solvents (10 males). All participants had normal ophthalmologic exams. Subjects had worked in gas stations on an average of 9.6 ± 6.2 years. Color vision was evaluated with the Lanthony D15d and Cambridge Colour Test (CCT). Visual field assessment consisted of white-on-white 24-2 automatic perimetry (Humphrey II-750i). Contrast sensitivity was measured for sinusoidal gratings of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 cycles per degree (cpd). Results from both groups were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test. The number of errors in the D15d was higher for workers relative to controls (p<0.01). Their CCT color discrimination thresholds were elevated compared to the control group along the protan, deutan and tritan confusion axes (p<0.01), and their ellipse area and ellipticity were higher (p<0.01). Genetic analysis of subjects with very elevated color discrimination thresholds excluded congenital causes for the visual losses. Automated perimetry thresholds showed elevation in the 9°, 15° and 21° of eccentricity (p<0.01) and in MD and PSD indexes (p<0.01). Contrast sensitivity losses were found for all spatial frequencies measured (p<0.01) except for 0.5 cpd. Significant correlation was found between previous working years and deutan axis thresholds (rho = 0.59; p<0.05), indexes of the Lanthony D15d (rho=0.52; p<0.05), perimetry results in the fovea (rho= -0.51; p<0.05) and at 3, 9 and 15 degrees of eccentricity (rho= -0.46; p<0.05). Extensive and diffuse visual changes were found, suggesting that specific occupational limits should be created.

  11. Long-Term Occupational Exposure to Organic Solvents Affects Color Vision, Contrast Sensitivity and Visual Fields

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Thiago Leiros; Barboni, Mirella Telles Salgueiro; Moura, Ana Laura de Araújo; Bonci, Daniela Maria Oliveira; Gualtieri, Mirella; de Lima Silveira, Luiz Carlos; Ventura, Dora Fix

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the visual outcome of chronic occupational exposure to a mixture of organic solvents by measuring color discrimination, achromatic contrast sensitivity and visual fields in a group of gas station workers. We tested 25 workers (20 males) and 25 controls with no history of chronic exposure to solvents (10 males). All participants had normal ophthalmologic exams. Subjects had worked in gas stations on an average of 9.6±6.2 years. Color vision was evaluated with the Lanthony D15d and Cambridge Colour Test (CCT). Visual field assessment consisted of white-on-white 24–2 automatic perimetry (Humphrey II-750i). Contrast sensitivity was measured for sinusoidal gratings of 0.2, 0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 cycles per degree (cpd). Results from both groups were compared using the Mann–Whitney U test. The number of errors in the D15d was higher for workers relative to controls (p<0.01). Their CCT color discrimination thresholds were elevated compared to the control group along the protan, deutan and tritan confusion axes (p<0.01), and their ellipse area and ellipticity were higher (p<0.01). Genetic analysis of subjects with very elevated color discrimination thresholds excluded congenital causes for the visual losses. Automated perimetry thresholds showed elevation in the 9°, 15° and 21° of eccentricity (p<0.01) and in MD and PSD indexes (p<0.01). Contrast sensitivity losses were found for all spatial frequencies measured (p<0.01) except for 0.5 cpd. Significant correlation was found between previous working years and deutan axis thresholds (rho = 0.59; p<0.05), indexes of the Lanthony D15d (rho = 0.52; p<0.05), perimetry results in the fovea (rho = −0.51; p<0.05) and at 3, 9 and 15 degrees of eccentricity (rho = −0.46; p<0.05). Extensive and diffuse visual changes were found, suggesting that specific occupational limits should be created. PMID:22916187

  12. Measured Field Performance and Energy Savings of Occupancy Sensors: Three Case Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Floyd, David B.; Parker, Danny S.; Sherwin, John R.

    A study determined the performance levels, energy savings, and occupant acceptance of occupancy sensors that were installed in a Florida small office building and two elementary schools. Performance data was collected in 15-minute intervals. Aggregate time-of-day lighting load profiles were compared before and after the installation and throughout…

  13. [Occupational health practice among law, evidence and ethics: a field study].

    PubMed

    Franco, G; Mora, E

    2010-01-01

    Quality in health care is defined as the degree to which health services increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with the law, the evidence and the ethical values. The paper aims at providing a framework in which the concept of quality is applied in the field of occupational health by analysing real-life decisions. The Italian law states that the practice must be evidence-based and respectful of the code of ethics, emphasizeing that the practice should be relevant, knowledge-based, sound and appropriate. Any dilemma should be dealt according to the ethical principles of beneficience, autonomy and justice. Both the law and the code require that the practice is based on the available evidence. Results show that decisions in selected cases can be made according the above mentioned criteria. CONCLUSION; Decisions made on the basis of a process founded on scientific evidence result in effective and high-quality outcomes respectful of both law and ethics.

  14. Field study of occupant comfort and office thermal environments in a cold climate

    SciTech Connect

    Donnini, G.; Nguyen, V.H.; Lai, D.H.C.; Haghighat, F.; Molina, J.; Lai, H.K.; Martello, C.; Chang, C.Y.

    1997-12-31

    This paper presents the findings of ASHRAE research project RP-821, a field study of occupant comfort and office thermal environments in 12 mechanically ventilated office buildings in southern Quebec. A total of 877 subjects were surveyed during hot and cold months. Each interview provided a set of responses to a questionnaire and a set of physical indoor climatic measurements. The incremental effect of chairs was included in the estimates of clo values. The observed temperature optima were somewhat consistent with the predictions of comfort models and standards abased on mid-latitude climate chamber experimental data. The Montreal subjects` thermal sensation and acceptability ratings were much less accepting of non-neutral temperatures than either the PPD index or ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55 predicted. There was a consistent request for higher air velocity, indicating that air movement guidelines may be too restrictive as set out by ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 55 and ISO 7730. Job satisfaction, general health status, and perceived levels of personal control were moderately correlated with overall generalized assessments of the workplace physical environment. Lighting levels and exposure to humidifiers outside the workplace had some relationship to specific environmental conditions occurring at the time of the interviews. There was little difference between the sexes in terms of thermal sensation, although there were significantly more frequent expressions of thermal dissatisfaction from the females in the sample, despite their thermal environment being no different from that of the males.

  15. Occupational Exposure to Magnetic Fields and Breast Cancer Among Women Textile Workers in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenjin; Ray, Roberta M.; Thomas, David B.; Yost, Michael; Davis, Scott; Breslow, Norman; Gao, Dao Li; Fitzgibbons, E. Dawn; Camp, Janice E.; Wong, Eva; Wernli, Karen J.; Checkoway, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to magnetic fields (MFs) is hypothesized to increase the risk of breast cancer by reducing production of melatonin by the pineal gland. A nested case-cohort study was conducted to investigate the association between occupational exposure to MFs and the risk of breast cancer within a cohort of 267,400 female textile workers in Shanghai, China. The study included 1,687 incident breast cancer cases diagnosed from 1989 to 2000 and 4,702 noncases selected from the cohort. Subjects’ complete work histories were linked to a job–exposure matrix developed specifically for the present study to estimate cumulative MF exposure. Hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated using Cox proportional hazards modeling that was adapted for the case-cohort design. Hazard ratios were estimated in relation to cumulative exposure during a woman's entire working years. No association was observed between cumulative exposure to MFs and overall risk of breast cancer. The hazard ratio for the highest compared with the lowest quartile of cumulative exposure was 1.03 (95% confidence interval: 0.87, 1.21). Similar null findings were observed when exposures were lagged and stratified by age at breast cancer diagnosis. The findings do not support the hypothesis that MF exposure increases the risk of breast cancer. PMID:24043439

  16. Occupational exposure to chemicals and sensory organs: a neglected research field.

    PubMed

    Gobba, Fabriziomaria

    2003-08-01

    The effect of industrial chemicals on the sensory perception of exposed workers has received scant attention from the medical community to date, and the scientific literature is mainly limited to some case-reports or isolated studies. Possible explanations for this include the complexity of sensory perception, and the lack of agreement among researchers on methods for testing large groups of subjects. Nevertheless, some published studies showed that vision, hearing and olfactory function can be affected by various industrial metals and solvents, and some data exist also for touch and taste. This review discusses the main industrial chemicals involved. The pathogenesis of the toxicity of chemicals to sensory perception may be related to an action on receptors, nerve fibers, and/or the brain; probably, different pathogenetic mechanisms are involved. One of the main problems in this research field is that most of the studies to date evaluated the effect of a single industrial chemical on a single sense: as an example, we know that styrene exposure can impair smell and also hearing and vision but we have little idea whether different senses are impaired in the same worker, or whether each impairment is independent. In addition, workers are frequently exposed to different chemicals: co-exposure may have no effect, or result in both an increase or a decrease of the effect, as was observed for hearing loss, but studies on this aspect are largely insufficient. Research shows that both occupational and environmental exposure to industrial chemicals can affect sense organs, and suggests that the decline of perception with age may be, at least partly, related to this exposure. Nevertheless, available evidence is incomplete, and is largely inadequate for an estimation of a "safe" threshold of exposure. Good quality further research in this field is needed. This is certainly complex and demands adequate resources, but is justified by the ultimate result: the possibility to

  17. Inhibition of Angiogenesis Mediated by Extremely Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields (ELF-MFs)

    PubMed Central

    Delle Monache, Simona; Angelucci, Adriano; Sanità, Patrizia; Iorio, Roberto; Bennato, Francesca; Mancini, Fabrizio; Gualtieri, Giancaterino; Colonna, Rosella Cardigno

    2013-01-01

    The formation of new blood vessels is an essential therapeutic target in many diseases such as cancer, ischemic diseases, and chronic inflammation. In this regard, extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) seem able to inhibit vessel growth when used in a specific window of amplitude. To investigate the mechanism of anti-angiogenic action of ELF-EMFs we tested the effect of a sinusoidal magnetic field (MF) of 2 mT intensity and frequency of 50 Hz on endothelial cell models HUVEC and MS-1 measuring cell status and proliferation, motility and tubule formation ability. MS-1 cells when injected in mice determined a rapid tumor-like growth that was significantly reduced in mice inoculated with MF-exposed cells. In particular, histological analysis of tumors derived from mice inoculated with MF-exposed MS-1 cells indicated a reduction of hemangioma size, of blood-filled spaces, and in hemorrhage. In parallel, in vitro proliferation of MS-1 treated with MF was significantly inhibited. We also found that the MF-exposure down-regulated the process of proliferation, migration and formation of tubule-like structures in HUVECs. Using western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis, we collected data about the possible influence of MF on the signalling pathway activated by the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In particular, MF exposure significantly reduced the expression and activation levels of VEGFR2, suggesting a direct or indirect influence of MF on VEGF receptors placed on cellular membrane. In conclusion MF reduced, in vitro and in vivo, the ability of endothelial cells to form new vessels, most probably affecting VEGF signal transduction pathway that was less responsive to activation. These findings could not only explain the mechanism of anti-angiogenic action exerted by MFs, but also promote the possible development of new therapeutic applications for treatment of those diseases where excessive angiogenesis is involved. PMID:24244477

  18. Inhibition of angiogenesis mediated by extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs).

    PubMed

    Delle Monache, Simona; Angelucci, Adriano; Sanità, Patrizia; Iorio, Roberto; Bennato, Francesca; Mancini, Fabrizio; Gualtieri, Giancaterino; Colonna, Rosella Cardigno

    2013-01-01

    The formation of new blood vessels is an essential therapeutic target in many diseases such as cancer, ischemic diseases, and chronic inflammation. In this regard, extremely low-frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMFs) seem able to inhibit vessel growth when used in a specific window of amplitude. To investigate the mechanism of anti-angiogenic action of ELF-EMFs we tested the effect of a sinusoidal magnetic field (MF) of 2 mT intensity and frequency of 50 Hz on endothelial cell models HUVEC and MS-1 measuring cell status and proliferation, motility and tubule formation ability. MS-1 cells when injected in mice determined a rapid tumor-like growth that was significantly reduced in mice inoculated with MF-exposed cells. In particular, histological analysis of tumors derived from mice inoculated with MF-exposed MS-1 cells indicated a reduction of hemangioma size, of blood-filled spaces, and in hemorrhage. In parallel, in vitro proliferation of MS-1 treated with MF was significantly inhibited. We also found that the MF-exposure down-regulated the process of proliferation, migration and formation of tubule-like structures in HUVECs. Using western blotting and immunofluorescence analysis, we collected data about the possible influence of MF on the signalling pathway activated by the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). In particular, MF exposure significantly reduced the expression and activation levels of VEGFR2, suggesting a direct or indirect influence of MF on VEGF receptors placed on cellular membrane. In conclusion MF reduced, in vitro and in vivo, the ability of endothelial cells to form new vessels, most probably affecting VEGF signal transduction pathway that was less responsive to activation. These findings could not only explain the mechanism of anti-angiogenic action exerted by MFs, but also promote the possible development of new therapeutic applications for treatment of those diseases where excessive angiogenesis is involved.

  19. Analysis of DNA fragmentation in mouse embryos exposed to an extremely low-frequency electromagnetic field.

    PubMed

    Borhani, Nasim; Rajaei, Farzad; Salehi, Zivar; Javadi, Amir

    2011-12-01

    Effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) on DNA damage in biological systems are still a matter of dispute. The aim of the present study was to investigate the possible effect of electromagnetic field exposure on DNA fragmentation in cells (blastomers) of mouse blastocysts. Eighty female NMRI mice were randomly divided into 2 groups of 40 animals each. The control group was left unexposed whereas the animals in the EMF-group were exposed to a 50-Hz EMF at 0.5 mT 4 h per day, 6 days a week for a duration of 2 weeks. After the 8(th) day of exposure, the female mice in both groups were superovulated (with injections of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin) and then mated overnight. At approximately 4 days after mating (102 h after the human chorionic gonadotropin treatment), blastocysts were obtained by flushing the uterus horns. The mean numbers of pregnant mice, blastocysts after flushing, blastomers within the blastocysts, and the DNA fragmentation index following staining in both groups were compared using statistical methods (SPSS, the Chi-square test, the Student's t-test and the Mann-Whitney U-test, P < 0.05). The results showed that the mean number of blastocysts after flushing was significantly decreased in the EMF-group compared to that of the control group (P < 0.03). The DNA fragmentation index was significantly increased in the EMF-group compared to control (10.53% vs. 7.14%; P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the mean numbers of blastomers and numbers of pregnant mice between the EMF-exposed and control group. Our findings indicate that the EMF exposure in preimplantation stage could have detrimental effects on female mouse fertility and embryo development by decreasing the number of blastocysts and increasing the blastocysts DNA fragmentation.

  20. Field Test Analysis and Reliability of the Fieldwork Evaluation for the Occupational Therapist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Richard G.; Crist, Patricia A. Hickerson

    1988-01-01

    The Fieldwork Evaluation was designed to measure the performance judgment and attitude of occupational therapy students on tasks related to the profession. This article discusses the history and reliability of the Fieldwork Evaluation. (JOW)

  1. A bibliometric analysis in the fields of preventive medicine, occupational and environmental medicine, epidemiology, and public health

    PubMed Central

    Soteriades, Elpidoforos S; Falagas, Matthew E

    2006-01-01

    Background Research in the fields of Preventive Medicine, Occupational/Environmental Medicine, Epidemiology and Public Health play an important role in the advancement of knowledge. In order to map the research production around the world we performed a bibliometric analysis in the above fields. Methods All articles published by different world regions in the above mentioned scientific fields and cited in the Journal Citation Reports (JCR) database of the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) during the period 1995 and 2003, were evaluated. The research production of different world regions was adjusted for: a) the gross domestic product in 1995 US dollars, and b) the population size of each region. Results A total of 48,861 articles were retrieved and categorized. The USA led the research production in all three subcategories. The percentage of articles published by USA researchers was 43%, 44% and 61% in the Preventive Medicine, Epidemiology, and Public Health subcategories, respectively. Canada and Western Europe shared the second position in the first two subcategories, while Oceania researchers ranked second in the field of Public Health. Conclusion USA researchers maintain a leadership position in the production of scientific articles in the fields of Preventive Medicine, Occupational/Environmental Medicine and Epidemiology, at a level similar to other scientific disciplines, while USA contribution to science in the field of Public Health is by all means outstanding. Less developed regions would need to support their researchers in the above fields in order to improve scientific production and advancement of knowledge in their countries. PMID:17173665

  2. Field Test Results of the MISOE [Management Information System for Occupational Education] Census Data System Fall Reports. CDS Document No. 8.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Management and Information System for Occupational Education, Winchester, MA.

    The document describes the process and presents the results of a field test of the Management Information System for Occupational Education (MISOE) Census Data System (CDS) Fall Reports. The data system was designed to collect and store basic census data (mandated State and Federal) for all occupational programs in Massachusetts and to meet all of…

  3. Occupational exposure to intermediate frequency and extremely low frequency magnetic fields among personnel working near electronic article surveillance systems.

    PubMed

    Roivainen, Päivi; Eskelinen, Tuomo; Jokela, Kari; Juutilainen, Jukka

    2014-05-01

    Cashiers are potentially exposed to intermediate frequency (IF) magnetic fields at their workplaces because of the electronic article surveillance (EAS) systems used in stores to protect merchandise against theft. This study aimed at investigating occupational exposure of cashiers to IF magnetic fields in Finnish stores. Exposure to extremely low frequency (ELF) magnetic fields was also evaluated because cashiers work near various devices operating with 50 Hz electric power. The peak magnetic flux density was measured for IF magnetic fields, and was found to vary from 0.2 to 4 µT at the cashier's seat. ELF magnetic fields from 0.03 to 4.5 µT were found at the cashier's seat. These values are much lower than exposure limits. However, according to the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) occupational reference levels for IF magnetic fields (141 µT for the peak field) were exceeded in some cases (maximum 189 µT) for short periods of time when cashiers walked through the EAS gates. As the ICNIRP reference levels do not define any minimum time for exposure, additional investigations are recommended to determine compliance with basic restrictions. Even if the basic restrictions are not exceeded, persons working near EAS devices represent an exceptional group of workers with respect to exposure to electromagnetic fields. This group could serve as a basis for epidemiological studies addressing possible health effects of IF magnetic fields. Compliance with the reference levels for IF fields was evaluated using both broadband measurement of peak fields and the ICNIRP summation rule for multiple frequencies. The latter was generally more conservative, and the difference between the two methods was large (>10-fold) for EAS systems using a 58 kHz signal with complex waveform. This indicates that the ICNIRP multiple frequency rule can be unnecessarily conservative when measuring complex waveforms. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Health-Economics Analyses Applied to ELF Electric and Magnetic Fields.

    PubMed

    Kandel, Shaiela; Swanson, John; Kheifets, Leeka

    2016-06-01

    Extremely low frequency electric and magnetic fields (ELF EMFs) are a common exposure for modern populations. The prevailing public-health protection paradigm is that quantitative exposure limits are based on the established acute effects, whereas the possible chronic effects are considered too uncertain for quantitative limits, but might justify precautionary measures. The choice of precautionary measures can be informed by a health-economics analysis (HEA). We consider four such analyses of precautionary measures that have been conducted at a national or state level in California, the Netherlands, the United Kingdom, and Israel. We describe the context of each analysis, examine how they deal with some of the more significant issues that arise, and present a comparison of the input parameters and assumptions used. The four HEAs are methodologically similar. The most significant qualitative choices that have to be made are what dose-response relationship to assume, what allowance if any to make for uncertainty, and, for a CBA only, what diseases to consider, and all four analyses made similar choices. These analyses suggest that, on the assumptions made, there are some low-cost measures, such as rephasing, that can be applied to transmission in some circumstances and that can be justifiable in cost-benefit terms, but that higher cost measures, such as undergrounding, become unjustifiable. Of the four HEAs, those in the United Kingdom and Israel were influential in determining the country's EMF policy. In California and Netherlands, the HEA may well have informed the debate, but the policy chosen did not stem directly from the HEA.

  5. Safety of high speed guided ground transportation systems: EMF exposure environments. Summary report. Final report, January-June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Goellner, D.; Inge, T.; Gillette, L.; Hankin, N.; Hostage, B.

    1993-08-01

    The paper presents an overview of American exposure assessments for electric and magnetic fields (EMF) in the frequency range from 0 to 3 kHz. The exposure information available is very limited for all but a few occupations and sources of EMF. Much of the exposure assessment done to date has been conducted in conjunction with epidemiological studies. Beyond the shortcomings of using some of the published epidemiology studies, there are some serious obstacles to conducting definitive extreme low frequency (ELF)-EMF exposure assessments. The lack of a clear definition of what constitutes effective dose hampers the measurement of exposure considerably. Generally, the average power frequency magnetic flux density has been assumed to be the exposure measure of significance, however other parameters of the magnetic field are likely to be relevant as well.

  6. Occupational exposure to magnetic fields in relation to mortality from brain cancer among electricity generation and transmission workers.

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, J M; McBride, D I; Sorahan, T; Paddle, G M; van Tongeren, M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether the risks of mortality from brain cancer are related to occupational exposure to magnetic fields. METHODS: A total of 112 cases of primary brain cancer (1972-91) were identified from a cohort of 84,018 male and female employees of the (then) Central Electricity Generating Board and its privatised successor companies. Individual cumulative occupational exposures to magnetic fields were estimated by linking available computerised job history data with magnetic field measurements collected over 675 person-workshifts. Estimated exposure histories of the case workers were compared with those of 654 control workers drawn from the cohort (nested case-control study), by means of conditional logistic regression. RESULTS: For exposure assessments based on arithmetic means, the risk of mortality from brain cancer for subjects with an estimated cumulative exposure to magnetic fields of 5.4-13.4 microT.y v subjects with lower exposures (0.0-5.3 microT.y) was 1.04 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.60 to 1.80). The corresponding relative risk in subjects with higher exposures (> or = 13.5 microT.y) was 0.95 (95% CI 0.54 to 1.69). There was no indication of a positive trend for cumulative exposure and risk of mortality from brain cancer either when the analysis used exposure assessments based on geometric means or when the analysis was restricted to exposures received within five years of the case diagnosis (or corresponding period for controls). CONCLUSIONS: Although the exposure categorisation was based solely on recent observations, the study findings do not support the hypothesis that the risk of brain cancer is associated with occupational exposure to magnetic fields. PMID:9072027

  7. Decision-Making Training for Occupational Choice and Early Turnover: A Field Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pazy, Asya; Ganzach, Yoav; Davidov, Yariv

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The study seeks to examine how a short intervention, aimed at enhancing occupational choice skills, influences turnover during the early stages of organizational membership. It seeks to explore two theoretical rationales for this effect: social exchange and self-determination. Design/methodology/approach: The study is a "constructive…

  8. Impact of mitochondrial electric field on modal occupancy in the Fröhlich model of cellular electromagnetism.

    PubMed

    Šrobár, Fedor

    2013-09-01

    Fröhlich model describes emission of electromagnetic field in the interior of biological cells by oscillating polar units, now mostly identified with microtubule filaments. Central element of this theory is the system of rate equations for the quantum occupancy numbers n i of collective oscillation modes. These equations describe both linear and nonlinear properties of the system; presence of the latter can lead to condensation of the incoming energy into the lowest frequency mode - a phenomenon deemed to be of major importance for cell's biochemistry, because the excited mode can engage in chemical reactions while the major part of the system remains near the equilibrium, not exposed to energetic stress. This paper explores, using a simple model, the influence of strong static electric field created by mitochondria flanking the microtubules on nonlinear interactions and, in turn, on occupancy numbers. The computed results show that simultaneous presence of both sufficient metabolic pumping and adequately elevated static electric field is necessary for the full unfolding of the hallmark properties of the Fröhlich model. It is suggested that cancer-related mitochondrial dysfunction leading to metabolic transformation has additional adverse effect mediated by diminution of static fields which in turn reduces the nonlinear processes in the Fröhlich systems, essential for energy condensation in the fundamental mode.

  9. Stimulation of neural differentiation in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields incorporated with MNPs.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Kyong; Lee, Dong Heon; Seo, Young-Kwon; Jung, Hyun; Park, Jung-Keug; Cho, Hyunjin

    2014-10-01

    Human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hBM-MSCs) have been investigated as a new cell-therapeutic solution due to their capacity that could differentiate into neural-like cells. Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) therapy has emerged as a novel technique, using mechanical stimulus to differentiate hBM-MSCs and significantly enhance neuronal differentiation to affect cellular and molecular reactions. Magnetic iron oxide (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs) have recently achieved widespread use for biomedical applications and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-labeled nanoparticles are used to increase their circulation time, aqueous solubility, biocompatibility, and nonspecific cellular uptake as well as to decrease immunogenicity. Many studies have used MNP-labeled cells for differentiation, but there have been no reports of MNP-labeled neural differentiation combined with EMFs. In this study, synthesized PEG-phospholipid encapsulated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles are used on hBM-MSCs to improve their intracellular uptake. The PEGylated nanoparticles were exposed to the cells under 50 Hz of EMFs to improve neural differentiation. First, we measured cell viability and intracellular iron content in hBM-MSCs after treatment with MNPs. Analysis was conducted by RT-PCR, and immunohistological analysis using neural cell type-specific genes and antibodies after exposure to 50 Hz electromagnetic fields. These results suggest that electromagnetic fields enhance neural differentiation in hBM-MSCs incorporated with MNPs and would be an effective method for differentiating neural cells.

  10. Maternal occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields and the risk of brain cancer in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Li, Peizhi; McLaughlin, John; Infante-Rivard, Claire

    2009-08-01

    To examine the contribution of maternal occupational exposure to extremely low frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF) shortly before and during pregnancy on the incidence of childhood brain tumors. A total of 548 incident cases and 760 healthy controls recruited between 1980 and 2002 from two Canadian provinces (Québec and Ontario) were included in this study, and their mothers were interviewed. Quantitative occupational ELF-MF exposure in microTesla units was estimated using individual exposure estimations or a job exposure matrix. We used three metrics to analyze exposure: cumulative, average, and maximum level attained. Using the average exposure metric measured before conception, an increased risk was observed for astroglial tumors (OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.0-2.4). During the entire pregnancy period, a significantly increased risk was observed for astroglial tumors as well as for all childhood brain tumors with the average metric (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 1.1-2.5 and OR = 1.5, 95% CI = 1.1-2.2, respectively). Based on job titles, a twofold risk increase was observed for astroglial tumors (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 0.8-6.3) and for all childhood brain tumors (OR = 2.3, 95% CI = 1.0-5.4) among sewing machine operators. Results are suggestive of a possible association between maternal occupational ELF-MF exposure and certain brain tumors in their offspring.

  11. Manipulation of magnetic phase separation and orbital occupancy in manganites by strain engineering and electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Bin; Song, Cheng; Pan, Feng; Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials (MOE) Team

    2015-03-01

    The modification of electronic phases in correlated oxides is one of the core issues of condensed matter. We report the reversible control of ferromagnetic phase transition in manganite films by ionic liquid gating, replicating the La1-xSrxMnO3 (LSMO) phase diagram. The formation and annihilation of an insulating and magnetically hard phase in the soft magnetic matrix, which randomly nucleates and grows across the film, is directly observed under different gate voltages (VG) . The realization of reversible metal-insulator transition in colossal magnetoresistance materials can lead to the development of four-state memories. The orbital occupancy and magnetic anisotropy of LSMO films are manipulated by VG in a reversible and quantitative manner. Positive and negative VG increases and reduces the occupancy of the orbital and magnetic anisotropy that were initially favored by strain (irrespective of tensile and compressive), respectively. This finding fills in the blank of electrical manipulation of four degrees of freedom in correlated system.

  12. Occupational Clusters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pottawattamie County School System, Council Bluffs, IA.

    The 15 occupational clusters (transportation, fine arts and humanities, communications and media, personal service occupations, construction, hospitality and recreation, health occupations, marine science occupations, consumer and homemaking-related occupations, agribusiness and natural resources, environment, public service, business and office…

  13. Health Occupations Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    Intended to assist the vocational teacher in designing and implementing a cluster program in health occupations, this guide suggests ideas for teaching the specific knowledge and skills that qualify students for entry-level employment in the health occupations field. The knowledge and skills are applicable to 12 occupations: dental assistant;…

  14. A randomized controlled trial comparing 2 interventions for visual field loss with standard occupational therapy during inpatient stroke rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Mödden, Claudia; Behrens, Marion; Damke, Iris; Eilers, Norbert; Kastrup, Andreas; Hildebrandt, Helmut

    2012-06-01

    Compensatory and restorative treatments have been developed to improve visual field defects after stroke. However, no controlled trials have compared these interventions with standard occupational therapy (OT). A total of 45 stroke participants with visual field defect admitted for inpatient rehabilitation were randomized to restorative computerized training (RT) using computer-based stimulation of border areas of their visual field defects or to a computer-based compensatory therapy (CT) teaching a visual search strategy. OT, in which different compensation strategies were used to train for activities of daily living, served as standard treatment for the active control group. Each treatment group received 15 single sessions of 30 minutes distributed over 3 weeks. The primary outcome measures were visual field expansion for RT, visual search performance for CT, and reading performance for both treatments. Visual conjunction search, alertness, and the Barthel Index were secondary outcomes. Compared with OT, CT resulted in a better visual search performance, and RT did not result in a larger expansion of the visual field. Intragroup pre-post comparisons demonstrated that CT improved all defined outcome parameters and RT several, whereas OT only improved one. CT improved functional deficits after visual field loss compared with standard OT and may be the intervention of choice during inpatient rehabilitation. A larger trial that includes lesion location in the analysis is recommended.

  15. A method for assessing occupational exposure to power-frequency magnetic fields for electricity generation and transmission workers.

    PubMed

    Renew, D C; Cook, R F; Ball, M C

    2003-09-01

    A new method for assessing both current and historical occupational exposures to magnetic fields has been developed and used in health studies involving a cohort of electricity generation and transmission workers in England and Wales. The exposure values are derived by calculation from engineering and operational data about the power stations rather than from measurements. They are provided for each of 11 job categories for each year of operation of each power station represented in the cohort. The engineering data are used to determine the average magnetic fields in specified areas of work within the power station and then applied to information about the time spent in these areas by each of the job categories. The operational data are used to adjust the exposures for each year according to the power station output for the year. Earlier methods used measurements or the advice of panels of experts to provide exposure scores for a number of job categories across all power stations and years. Such methods were not able to distinguish exposures from different power facilities or during the different years of their operation. Measurement surveys at 10 power stations of the magnetic fields in the work areas gave confidence that the calculations were realistic. Exposure measurements on 215 workers at three power stations were compared in job groups with the exposures predicted by the method. The Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.86 and the slope and intercept of the line of best fit were 0.87 and 0.07 microT respectively. The method gives a good prediction of measured exposure and is being used for studies of occupational exposure to magnetic fields and leukaemia, and of cardiovascular disease, and a reanalysis of brain cancer.

  16. Committee on Interagency Radiation Research and Policy Coordination (CIRRPC). Seventh annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Young, A.L.

    1991-06-30

    In 1990--91 CIRRPC`s program included efforts to improve interagency coordination on ionizing radiation risk assessments, a review of the reported health risks to humans from exposure to extremely low- frequency electric and magnetic fields (ELF/EMF), and increased coordination with national and international organizations such as NCRP and ICRP.

  17. Possible quantum mechanical mechanism for hepatocarcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Vega, G.; Godina-Nava, J. J.; Morales-Peñaloza, A.; Jiménez-García, M. N.

    2012-10-01

    We describe a method to study the effects of an extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) on the development of preneoplastic lesions in experimental hepatocarcinogenesis. The method uses the dual Lanczos transformation theory to diagonalize the Liouville superoperator that describe the evolution of a radical pair. We illustrate this procedure with a simple two level system.

  18. Difficulties in applying numerical simulations to an evaluation of occupational hazards caused by electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Zradziński, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the various physical mechanisms of interaction between a worker's body and the electromagnetic field at various frequencies, the principles of numerical simulations have been discussed for three areas of worker exposure: to low frequency magnetic field, to low and intermediate frequency electric field and to radiofrequency electromagnetic field. This paper presents the identified difficulties in applying numerical simulations to evaluate physical estimators of direct and indirect effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields at various frequencies. Exposure of workers operating a plastic sealer have been taken as an example scenario of electromagnetic field exposure at the workplace for discussion of those difficulties in applying numerical simulations. The following difficulties in reliable numerical simulations of workers' exposure to the electromagnetic field have been considered: workers' body models (posture, dimensions, shape and grounding conditions), working environment models (objects most influencing electromagnetic field distribution) and an analysis of parameters for which exposure limitations are specified in international guidelines and standards.

  19. Difficulties in applying numerical simulations to an evaluation of occupational hazards caused by electromagnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Zradziński, Patryk

    2015-01-01

    Due to the various physical mechanisms of interaction between a worker's body and the electromagnetic field at various frequencies, the principles of numerical simulations have been discussed for three areas of worker exposure: to low frequency magnetic field, to low and intermediate frequency electric field and to radiofrequency electromagnetic field. This paper presents the identified difficulties in applying numerical simulations to evaluate physical estimators of direct and indirect effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields at various frequencies. Exposure of workers operating a plastic sealer have been taken as an example scenario of electromagnetic field exposure at the workplace for discussion of those difficulties in applying numerical simulations. The following difficulties in reliable numerical simulations of workers’ exposure to the electromagnetic field have been considered: workers’ body models (posture, dimensions, shape and grounding conditions), working environment models (objects most influencing electromagnetic field distribution) and an analysis of parameters for which exposure limitations are specified in international guidelines and standards. PMID:26323781

  20. Examples of occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields at 110-kV gas-insulated substations (GISs).

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Pääkkönen, Rauno

    2015-02-01

    The objectives of the study were to present examples of occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields at gas-insulated substations (GISs) and to analyse the exposure according to the new European Directive 2013/35/EU. The aim was also to describe the details of the measurements of this study at GISs. Electric and magnetic fields were measured (45 measurements in total) at two GISs in the Tampere region of Finland. Inside the GISs, magnetic field values varied from 0.4 to 43.0 µT, and electric fields from 5 to 90 V m(-1). In the cable room of GIS B, the maximum value was 250 µT (very near the cables). The values did not exceed the low or high action levels of the new Directive 2013/35/EU. In conclusion, it can be stated that at 110-kV GISs, workers are not exposed to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) higher than the new European Directive 2013/35/EU.

  1. Development of a source-exposure matrix for occupational exposure assessment of electromagnetic fields in the INTEROCC study

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Javier; Bowman, Joseph D; Figuerola, Jordi; Moriña, David; Kincl, Laurel; Richardson, Lesley; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Introduction To estimate occupational exposures to electromagnetic fields (EMF) for the INTEROCC study, a database of source-based measurements extracted from published and unpublished literature resources had been previously constructed. The aim of the current work was to summarize these measurements into a source-exposure matrix (SEM), accounting for their quality and relevance. Methods A novel methodology for combining available measurements was developed, based on order statistics and log-normal distribution characteristics. Arithmetic and geometric means, and estimates of variability and maximum exposure were calculated by EMF source, frequency band and dosimetry type. Mean estimates were weighted by our confidence on the pooled measurements. Results The SEM contains confidence-weighted mean and maximum estimates for 312 EMF exposure sources (from 0 Hz to 300 GHz). Operator position geometric mean electric field levels for RF sources ranged between 0.8 V/m (plasma etcher) and 320 V/m (RF sealer), while magnetic fields ranged from 0.02 A/m (speed radar) to 0.6 A/m (microwave heating). For ELF sources, electric fields ranged between 0.2 V/m (electric forklift) and 11,700 V/m (HVTL-hotsticks), while magnetic fields ranged between 0.14 μT (visual display terminals) and 17 μT (TIG welding). Conclusion The methodology developed allowed the construction of the first EMF-SEM and may be used to summarize similar exposure data for other physical or chemical agents. PMID:27827378

  2. Occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields while working at switching and transforming stations of 110 kV.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena; Kuisti, Harri; Pääkkönen, Rauno; Vanhala, Pauli; Elovaara, Jarmo

    2011-06-01

    The aim of the study was to measure occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields during various work tasks at switching and transforming stations of 110 kV (in some situations 20 kV), and analyze if the action values of European Union Directive 2004/40/EC or reference values of International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) were exceeded. The electric (n = 765) and magnetic (n = 203) fields were measured during various work tasks. The average values of all measurements were 3.6 kV m(-1) and 28.6 μT. The maximum value of electric fields was 15.5 kV m(-1) at task 'maintenance of operating device of circuit breaker from service platform'. In one special work task close to shunt reactor cables (20 kV), the highest magnetic field was 710 μT. In general, the measured magnetic fields were below the reference values of ICNIRP.

  3. Occupational and public field exposure from communication, navigation, and radar systems used for air traffic control.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Wout; Goeminne, Francis; Vermeeren, Günter; Verloock, Leen; Martens, Luc

    2012-12-01

    Electromagnetic exposure (occupational and general public) to 14 types of air traffic control (ATC) systems is assessed. Measurement methods are proposed for in situ exposure assessment of these ATC systems. In total, 50 sites are investigated at 1,073 locations in the frequency range of 255 kHz to 24 GHz. For all installations, typical and maximal exposure values for workers and the general public are provided. Two of the 14 types of systems, Non-Directional Beacons (NDB) (up to 881.6 V m) and Doppler Very High Frequency (VHF) Omni-directional Range (DVOR) (up to 92.3 V m), exhibited levels requiring recommended minimum distances such that the ICNIRP reference levels are not exceeded. Cumulative exposure of all present radiofrequency (RF) sources is investigated, and it is concluded that the ATC source dominates the total exposure in its neighborhood.

  4. Aggregation efficiency of activated normal or fixed platelets in a simple shear field: effect of shear and fibrinogen occupancy.

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Z; Frojmovic, M M

    1994-01-01

    Shear rate can affect protein adsorption and platelet aggregation by regulating both the collision frequency and the capture efficiency (alpha). These effects were evaluated in well defined shear field in a micro-couette for shear rate G = 10 - 1000 s-1. The rate of protein binding was independent of G, shown for adsorption of albumin to latex beads and PAC1 to activated platelets. The initial aggregation rate for ADP-activated platelets in citrated platelet-rich plasma followed second order kinetics at the initial platelet concentrations between 20,000 and 60,000/microliters. alpha values, which dropped nearly fivefold for a 10-fold increase in G, were approximately proportional to G-1, contrary to a minor drop predicted by the theory that includes protein cross-bridging. Varying ADP concentration did not change alpha of maximally activated platelet subpopulations, suggesting that aggregation between unactivated and activated platelets is negligible. Directly blocking the unoccupied but activated GPIIb-IIIa receptors without affecting pre-bound Fg on "RGD"-activated, fixed platelets (AFP) by GRGDSP or Ro 43-5054 eliminated aggregation, suggesting that cross-bridging of GPIIb-IIIa on adjacent platelets by fibrinogen mediates aggregation. Alpha for AFP remained maximal (approximately 0.24) over 25-75% Fg occupancy, otherwise decreasing rapidly, with a half-maximum occurring at around 2% occupancy, suggesting that very few bound Fg were required to cause significant aggregation. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8075353

  5. In vitro electromagnetic stimulation to enhance cell proliferation in extracellular matrix constructs with and without metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Grant, Daniel N; Cozad, Matthew J; Grant, David A; White, Richard A; Grant, Sheila A

    2015-11-01

    Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) can induce beneficial effects including enhanced protein synthesis and cell proliferation on healing bone and skin wounds. This study investigated the effects of ELF-EMFs on acellular tissue constructs with and without gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to determine if cell proliferation could be increase and thus provide an enhanced mechanism for in vitro cell seeding on tissue engineered constructs. Different sized AuNPs, 20 and 100 nm, were conjugated to acellular porcine tissue, seeded with L929 murine fibroblasts and exposed to a continuous 12 gauss, 60 Hz electromagnetic field for 2 hours each day up to 10 days. Scanning electron microscopy and cell culture assays were performed to ascertain cell proliferation and viability before and after exposure. Results indicate the ELF-EMF stimulation significantly increased cell proliferation. The presence of AuNPs did not boost the stimulatory effects, but they did demonstrated higher rates of proliferation from day 3 to day 10. In addition, unstimulated 100 nm AuNPs constructs resulted in significant increases in proliferation as compared to unstimulated crosslinked constructs. In conclusion, ELF-EMF stimulation enhanced cellular proliferation and while the presence of AuNPs did not significantly enhance this effect, AuNPs resulted in increased proliferation rates from day 3 to day 10.

  6. Genotoxic hazard evaluation in welders occupationally exposed to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF).

    PubMed

    Dominici, Luca; Villarini, Milena; Fatigoni, Cristina; Monarca, Silvano; Moretti, Massimo

    2011-12-01

    Electric arc welding is known to involve considerable exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MF). A cytogenetic monitoring study was carried out in a group of welders to investigate the genotoxic risk of occupational exposure to ELF-MF. This study assessed individual occupational exposure to ELF-MF using a personal magnetic-field dosimeter, and the cytogenetic effects were examined by comparing micronuclei (MN) and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) frequencies in the lymphocytes of the exposed workers with those of non-exposed control subjects (blood donors) matched for age and smoking habit. Cytogenetic analyses were carried out on 21 workers enrolled from two different welding companies in Central Italy and compared to 21 controls. Some differences between the groups were observed on analysis of SCE and MN, whereas replication indices in the exposed were found not to differ from the controls. In particular, the exposed group showed a significantly higher frequency of MN (group mean±SEM: 6.10±0.39) compared to the control group (4.45±0.30). Moreover, the increase in MN is associated with a proportional increase in ELF-MF exposure levels with a dose-response relationship. A significant decrease in SCE frequency was observed in exposed subjects (3.73±0.21) compared to controls (4.89±0.12). The hypothesis of a correlation between genotoxic assays and ELF-MF exposure value was partially supported, especially as regards MN assay. Since these results are derived from a small-scale pilot study, a larger scale study should be undertaken.

  7. Occupational exposure assessment of magnetic fields generated by induction heating equipment—the role of spatial averaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kos, Bor; Valič, Blaž; Kotnik, Tadej; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-10-01

    Induction heating equipment is a source of strong and nonhomogeneous magnetic fields, which can exceed occupational reference levels. We investigated a case of an induction tempering tunnel furnace. Measurements of the emitted magnetic flux density (B) were performed during its operation and used to validate a numerical model of the furnace. This model was used to compute the values of B and the induced in situ electric field (E) for 15 different body positions relative to the source. For each body position, the computed B values were used to determine their maximum and average values, using six spatial averaging schemes (9-285 averaging points) and two averaging algorithms (arithmetic mean and quadratic mean). Maximum and average B values were compared to the ICNIRP reference level, and E values to the ICNIRP basic restriction. Our results show that in nonhomogeneous fields, the maximum B is an overly conservative predictor of overexposure, as it yields many false positives. The average B yielded fewer false positives, but as the number of averaging points increased, false negatives emerged. The most reliable averaging schemes were obtained for averaging over the torso with quadratic averaging, with no false negatives even for the maximum number of averaging points investigated.

  8. Occupational exposure assessment of magnetic fields generated by induction heating equipment-the role of spatial averaging.

    PubMed

    Kos, Bor; Valič, Blaž; Kotnik, Tadej; Gajšek, Peter

    2012-10-07

    Induction heating equipment is a source of strong and nonhomogeneous magnetic fields, which can exceed occupational reference levels. We investigated a case of an induction tempering tunnel furnace. Measurements of the emitted magnetic flux density (B) were performed during its operation and used to validate a numerical model of the furnace. This model was used to compute the values of B and the induced in situ electric field (E) for 15 different body positions relative to the source. For each body position, the computed B values were used to determine their maximum and average values, using six spatial averaging schemes (9-285 averaging points) and two averaging algorithms (arithmetic mean and quadratic mean). Maximum and average B values were compared to the ICNIRP reference level, and E values to the ICNIRP basic restriction. Our results show that in nonhomogeneous fields, the maximum B is an overly conservative predictor of overexposure, as it yields many false positives. The average B yielded fewer false positives, but as the number of averaging points increased, false negatives emerged. The most reliable averaging schemes were obtained for averaging over the torso with quadratic averaging, with no false negatives even for the maximum number of averaging points investigated.

  9. Case-control study of occupational exposure to electric shocks and magnetic fields and mortality from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in the US, 1991-1999.

    PubMed

    Vergara, Ximena; Mezei, Gabor; Kheifets, Leeka

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between occupational exposure to electric shocks (ES) and magnetic fields (MF) and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) using 1991-1999 US mortality data. For each of the 5886 included ALS deaths, 10 controls-matched on sex-, age-, year- and region-were selected from among other deaths. Usual occupation as reported on death certificates was linked to job-exposure matrices for ES and MF. Education and electric occupations were associated with moderately increased ALS risks (odds ratio (OR)=1.85, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.67, 2.04; OR=1.23, 95% CI=1.04, 1.47, respectively). For ES, ALS mortality OR were 0.73 (95% CI=0.67, 0.79) for high and 0.90 (95% CI=0.84, 0.97) for medium exposure compared with low exposure. For MF, ALS ORs were 1.09 (95% CI=1.00, 1.19) for high and 1.09 (95% CI=0.96, 1.23) for medium exposure as compared with low exposure. For electric occupations, ALS ORs were insensitive to adjustments for ES, MF or both. Consistent with previous publications, an association between electric occupations and ALS was observed. Findings do not support occupational exposure to ES or MF as an explanation.

  10. Development of a source-exposure matrix for occupational exposure assessment of electromagnetic fields in the INTEROCC study.

    PubMed

    Vila, Javier; Bowman, Joseph D; Figuerola, Jordi; Moriña, David; Kincl, Laurel; Richardson, Lesley; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2016-11-09

    To estimate occupational exposures to electromagnetic fields (EMF) for the INTEROCC study, a database of source-based measurements extracted from published and unpublished literature resources had been previously constructed. The aim of the current work was to summarize these measurements into a source-exposure matrix (SEM), accounting for their quality and relevance. A novel methodology for combining available measurements was developed, based on order statistics and log-normal distribution characteristics. Arithmetic and geometric means, and estimates of variability and maximum exposure were calculated by EMF source, frequency band and dosimetry type. The mean estimates were weighted by our confidence in the pooled measurements. The SEM contains confidence-weighted mean and maximum estimates for 312 EMF exposure sources (from 0 Hz to 300 GHz). Operator position geometric mean electric field levels for radiofrequency (RF) sources ranged between 0.8 V/m (plasma etcher) and 320 V/m (RF sealer), while magnetic fields ranged from 0.02 A/m (speed radar) to 0.6 A/m (microwave heating). For extremely low frequency sources, electric fields ranged between 0.2 V/m (electric forklift) and 11,700 V/m (high-voltage transmission line-hotsticks), whereas magnetic fields ranged between 0.14 μT (visual display terminals) and 17 μT (tungsten inert gas welding). The methodology developed allowed the construction of the first EMF-SEM and may be used to summarize similar exposure data for other physical or chemical agents.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 9 November 2016; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.60.

  11. Communications-Electronics Utilization Field, AFSCs 301X, 302X, 303X, 304X, 305X, 306X, 307X, 309X. Occupational Survey Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Air Force Occupational Measurement Center, Lackland AFB, TX.

    The report describes the first operational occupational survey of an officer utilization field comparing task performance across career ladders for 2,339 communications-electronics officers in the AFM 36-1 specialty description. The survey was conducted during September-December 1974. In September 1973, the Air Force Human Resources Laboratory, as…

  12. Occupational exposure to high frequency electromagnetic fields and its effect on human immune parameters.

    PubMed

    Tuschl, H; Neubauer, G; Garn, H; Duftschmid, K; Winker, N; Brusl, H

    1999-01-01

    The present study recorded a considerable excess of recommended exposure limits in the vicinity of shortwave diathermy devices used for medical treatment of patients. Different kinds of field probes were used to measure electric and magnetic field strength and the whole body exposure of medical personnel operating shortwave, decimeter wave and microwave units was calculated. To investigate the influence of chronic exposure on the immune system of operators, blood was sampled from physiotherapists working at the above mentioned devices. Eighteen exposed and thirteen control persons, matched by sex and age, were examined. Total leucocyte and lymphocyte counts were performed and leucocytic subpopulations determined by flow cytometry and monoclonal antibodies against surface antigens. In addition, to quantify subpopulations of immunocompetent cells, the activity of lymphocytes was measured. Lymphocytes were stimulated by mitogen phytohemagglutinin and their proliferation measured by a flow cytometric method. No statistically significant differences between the control and exposed persons were found. In both study groups all immune parameters were within normal ranges.

  13. [Experimental evaluation of the occupational exposure to static magnetic fields on a 3 T magnetic resonance scanner].

    PubMed

    Moro, Luca; Alabiso, Francesco; Parisoli, Francesco; Frigerio, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    The recent postponement until 31 October 2013 of the deadline for transposition of the EU Directive 2004/40/EC, concerning the minimum health requirementsfor the exposure of workers to the risks arising from electromagnetic fields between 0 and 300 GHz, keeps on suspending the Italian law which was aimed to implement the EU regulations on the occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields, including those generated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) units. Waiting for the revision of the exposure limits proposed by the EU Directive taking into account results from new studies and evolution of knowledge, the time-weighted values of static magnetic field proposed by the Italian Ministry of Health (D.M 02/08/91) still survive as limits for worker's exposure. The comparison between the proposed thresholds and the time required to position patients allows to calculate how long the MRI staff can stay at different values of static magnetic field, i.e. the maximum workload of each worker. In order to evaluate more accurately how many time the members of MRI staff are near the magnet bore and the real value of worker's exposure to the static magnetic field during the handling of patients, a teslameter Metrolab THM1176-PDA was used. Personal exposure measurements on the radiologists and the radiographers who worked on a 3 T GE Healthcare Discovery 750 MR were carried out during the positioning of self-sufficient and collaborative patients. The sensor was worn at the chest level on the side that was nearest to the magnet bore. Results show wide variations occurring between individual working procedures concerning the handling of patients, especially during the initial position phase. The mean values of the time spent by radiographers inside the magnet room (B > 0.5 mT) to place the patient and to take him outside at the end of the exam were respectively 220 and 127 seconds. The mean value of the time spent by radiologists was 162 seconds when they had to insert a peripheral

  14. A comparison of instrumentation methods to estimate thoracolumbar motion in field-based occupational studies.

    PubMed

    Schall, Mark C; Fethke, Nathan B; Chen, Howard; Gerr, Fred

    2015-05-01

    The performance of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) system for directly measuring thoracolumbar trunk motion was compared to that of the Lumbar Motion Monitor (LMM). Thirty-six male participants completed a simulated material handling task with both systems deployed simultaneously. Estimates of thoracolumbar trunk motion obtained with the IMU system were processed using five common methods for estimating trunk motion characteristics. Results of measurements obtained from IMUs secured to the sternum and pelvis had smaller root-mean-square differences and mean bias estimates in comparison to results obtained with the LMM than results of measurements obtained solely from a sternum mounted IMU. Fusion of IMU accelerometer measurements with IMU gyroscope and/or magnetometer measurements was observed to increase comparability to the LMM. Results suggest investigators should consider computing thoracolumbar trunk motion as a function of estimates from multiple IMUs using fusion algorithms rather than using a single accelerometer secured to the sternum in field-based studies.

  15. [Analysis of methods for measurement and assessment of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields in dielectric heating].

    PubMed

    Aniołczyk, Halina; Mamrot, Paweł; Mariańska, Magda

    2012-01-01

    High-frequency (HF) welders are the most common devices that make use of dielectric heating. They are a source of high-intensity electromagnetic fields (EMFs). Manual operation of those welders makes that the limbs are exposed to EMFs of extremely high intensity, far in excess of the currently admissible values. The aim of this study was to update knowledge of actual exposure of HF welder operators to EMF and to optimize the procedure of exposure assessment. Measurements of the EMF intensity in the vicinity of 10 dielectric welders at work posts of 12 operators were performed. EMF measurements were made using the reference method, extended by auxiliary measurement points to measure induced currents I(L) in the limbs. Induced current measurements were performed in 20 operators tending the same HF welder. the highest values of the electric (E) and magnetic (H) fields measured at work posts were for whole body: E, up to 350 V/m, and H, up to 1.00 A/m; and for limbs: E, up to 600 V/m and H, up to 3.30 A/m. The W exposure indicator in the primary vertical measurement points was almost as high as 60. I(L) values measured at the wrist exceeded 64 mA and were individual-operator-dependent. EMF exposure of 25% of HF welder operators exceeded the national admissible values and after taking into account the operators' hands, this figure rose to 50%. The measured value of I(L), representing a measure of internal exposure to EMF, should serve as the main criterion in deciding whether working conditions are admissible.

  16. Occupational Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Library ▸ Asthma Library ▸ Occupational asthma TTR Share | Occupational Asthma This article has been reviewed by Thanai Pongdee, MD, FAAAAI Occupational asthma has become the most common work-related lung ...

  17. Occupational and residential exposure to electromagnetic fields and risk of brain tumors in adults: a case-control study in Gironde, France.

    PubMed

    Baldi, Isabelle; Coureau, Gaëlle; Jaffré, Anne; Gruber, Anne; Ducamp, Stéphane; Provost, Dorothée; Lebailly, Pierre; Vital, Anne; Loiseau, Hugues; Salamon, Roger

    2011-09-15

    The etiology of brain tumors remains largely unknown. Among potential risk factors, exposure to electromagnetic fields is suspected. We analyzed the relationship between residential and occupational exposure to electromagnetic field and brain tumors in adults. A case-control study was carried out in southwestern France between May 1999 and April 2001. A total of 221 central nervous system tumors (105 gliomas, 67 meningiomas, 33 neurinomas and 16 others) and 442 individually age- and sex-matched controls selected from general population were included. Electromagnetic field exposure [extremely low frequency (ELF) and radiofrequency separately was assessed in occupational settings through expert judgement based on complete job calendar, and at home by assessing the distance to power lines with the help of a geographical information system. Confounders such as education, use of home pesticide, residency in a rural area and occupational exposure to chemicals were taken into account. Separate analyses were performed for gliomas, meningiomas and acoustic neurinomas. A nonsignificant increase in risk was found for occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields  [odds ratio (OR = 1.52, 0.92-2.51)]. This increase became significant for meningiomas, especially when considering ELF separately [OR = 3.02; 95 percent confidence interval (95% CI) =1.10-8.25]. The risk of meningioma was also higher in subjects living in the vicinity of power lines (<100 m), even if not significant (OR = 2.99, 95% CI 0.86-10.40). These data suggest that occupational or residential exposure to ELF may play a role in the occurrence of meningioma.

  18. Influence of Chronic Heat Acclimatization on Occupational Thermal Strain in Tropical Field Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Brearley, Matt B.; Norton, Ian; Rush, Daryl; Hutton, Michael; Smith, Steve; Ward, Linda; Fuentes, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether non-heat acclimatized (NHA) emergency responders endure greater physiological and perceptual strain than heat acclimatized (HA) counterparts in tropical field settings. Methods: Eight HA and eight NHA men urban search and rescue personnel had physiological and perceptual responses compared during the initial 4 hours shift of a simulated disaster in tropical conditions (ambient temperature 34.0 °C, 48% relative humidity, wet bulb globe temperature [WBGT] 31.4 °C). Results: From the 90th minute through to end of shift, HA (38.5 °C) sustained a significantly higher gastrointestinal temperature than NHA (38.1 °C) (mean difference 0.4 ± 0.2 °C, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.2 to 0.7 °C, P = 0.005) despite comparable heart rate (P = 0.30), respiratory rate (P = 0.88), and axilla skin temperature (P = 0.47). Overall, perception of body temperature was similar between cohorts (P = 0.87). Conclusions: The apparent tolerance of greater physiological strain by HA responders occurred in the absence of perceptual differences. PMID:27930487

  19. Occupational magnetic field exposures of garment workers: results of personal and survey measurements.

    PubMed

    Kelsh, Michael A; Bracken, T Dan; Sahl, Jack D; Shum, Mona; Ebi, Kristie L

    2003-07-01

    To explore the feasibility of performing an epidemiologic study of female breast cancer and magnetic field (MF) exposures, we chose to study garment workers, who reportedly have some of the highest MF exposures. We collected personal exposure (PE, n = 48) and survey measurements (n = 77) near commercial sewing machines at three garment facilities and conducted a pilot interview among 25 garment workers asking about exposure duration, activities, and machine characteristics. MF levels were higher for older machines with alternating current (AC) than newer machines with direct current (DC) motors. MF levels were comparable for both idling and sewing activities. Most interviewed workers could describe duration of exposure and machine type (automatic/manual), but not other machine characteristics. Measurements were lower than previously reported for garment workers but were higher than exposures to most women. A historical exposure assessment can be conducted by linking duration of exposure with reconstructed exposure measurements but may be limited by the accuracy of work history data. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Occupational asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Names Asthma - occupational exposure; Irritant-induced reactive airways disease Images Spirometry Respiratory system References Lemiere C, Vandenplas O. Occupational allergy and asthma. In: Adkinson NF Jr., Bochner ...

  1. Using occupancy modelling to compare environmental DNA to traditional field methods for regional-scale monitoring of an endangered aquatic species.

    PubMed

    Schmelzle, Molly C; Kinziger, Andrew P

    2016-07-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) monitoring approaches promise to greatly improve detection of rare, endangered and invasive species in comparison with traditional field approaches. Herein, eDNA approaches and traditional seining methods were applied at 29 research locations to compare method-specific estimates of detection and occupancy probabilities for endangered tidewater goby (Eucyclogobius newberryi). At each location, multiple paired seine hauls and water samples for eDNA analysis were taken, ranging from two to 23 samples per site, depending upon habitat size. Analysis using a multimethod occupancy modelling framework indicated that the probability of detection using eDNA was nearly double (0.74) the rate of detection for seining (0.39). The higher detection rates afforded by eDNA allowed determination of tidewater goby occupancy at two locations where they have not been previously detected and at one location considered to be locally extirpated. Additionally, eDNA concentration was positively related to tidewater goby catch per unit effort, suggesting eDNA could potentially be used as a proxy for local tidewater goby abundance. Compared to traditional field sampling, eDNA provided improved occupancy parameter estimates and can be applied to increase management efficiency across a broad spatial range and within a diversity of habitats. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Use of new field methods of semen analysis in the study of occupational hazards to reproduction: the example of ethylene dibromide

    SciTech Connect

    Schrader, S.M.; Ratcliffe, J.M.; Turner, T.W.; Hornung, R.W.

    1987-12-01

    Increasing attention has been paid to the use of semen analysis as an indicator of exposure to potential mutagenic and reproductive hazards. In the infertility clinic setting, semen evaluations include the measurement of sperm concentration, volume, pH, motility, velocity and morphology, the analysis of seminal plasma to evaluate accessory sex gland function and, in some cases, the in vitro evaluation of fertilization capacity and sperm-cervical mucus interaction. To date, however, the study of semen characteristics of occupationally exposed populations has been confined principally to the measurement of sperm concentration and sperm morphology. This has been largely due to the unavailability of portable equipment suitable for the measurement of other semen characteristics and the difficulty of obtaining fresh semen samples in the field setting. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health researchers have developed mobile laboratory facilities which enable us to evaluate fresh samples, in the field, for semen characteristics in addition to concentration and morphology. This paper describes the application of these methods using the example of our recent cross-sectional study of workers occupationally exposed to ethylene dibromide in the papaya fumigation industry. We discuss our findings in the context of the usefulness of semen analysis as an indicator of occupational hazards to male reproduction.

  3. A Source-based Measurement Database for Occupational Exposure Assessment of Electromagnetic Fields in the INTEROCC Study: A Literature Review Approach

    PubMed Central

    Vila, Javier; Bowman, Joseph D.; Richardson, Lesley; Kincl, Laurel; Conover, Dave L.; McLean, Dave; Mann, Simon; Vecchia, Paolo; van Tongeren, Martie; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: To date, occupational exposure assessment of electromagnetic fields (EMF) has relied on occupation-based measurements and exposure estimates. However, misclassification due to between-worker variability remains an unsolved challenge. A source-based approach, supported by detailed subject data on determinants of exposure, may allow for a more individualized exposure assessment. Detailed information on the use of occupational sources of exposure to EMF was collected as part of the INTERPHONE-INTEROCC study. To support a source-based exposure assessment effort within this study, this work aimed to construct a measurement database for the occupational sources of EMF exposure identified, assembling available measurements from the scientific literature. Methods: First, a comprehensive literature search was performed for published and unpublished documents containing exposure measurements for the EMF sources identified, a priori as well as from answers of study subjects. Then, the measurements identified were assessed for quality and relevance to the study objectives. Finally, the measurements selected and complementary information were compiled into an Occupational Exposure Measurement Database (OEMD). Results: Currently, the OEMD contains 1624 sets of measurements (>3000 entries) for 285 sources of EMF exposure, organized by frequency band (0 Hz to 300 GHz) and dosimetry type. Ninety-five documents were selected from the literature (almost 35% of them are unpublished technical reports), containing measurements which were considered informative and valid for our purpose. Measurement data and complementary information collected from these documents came from 16 different countries and cover the time period between 1974 and 2013. Conclusion: We have constructed a database with measurements and complementary information for the most common sources of exposure to EMF in the workplace, based on the responses to the INTERPHONE-INTEROCC study questionnaire. This

  4. Occupational Orientation: Industrial Oriented Occupations. Experimental Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These experimental curriculum materials, for one of five clusters developed for the occupational orientation program in Illinois, contain teacher references and a series of learning activity packages (LAPs) designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of occupational choices available in the industrial oriented occupations field. The 30…

  5. Occupational Orientation: Personal and Public Service Occupations. Experimental Curriculum Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Office of Education, Springfield.

    These experimental curriculum materials for one of five clusters developed for the occupational orientation program in Illinois include a series of learning activity packages (LAPs) designed to acquaint the student with the wide range of occupational choices available in the personal and public service occupations field. The 29 LAPS, each focusing…

  6. [Qualifications in the occupational field of rehabilitation and aid to the handicapped--presentation of a new concept for graduate study].

    PubMed

    Petzold, W; Isken, H

    1989-05-01

    Presented are the concept and initial course of post-graduate training open to graduates of the social sciences (i.e. holding a degree in social education, education, or social science), oriented on the occupational pattern of Rehabilitation Counsellor. The course has been set up in Bremen in cooperation with scientific institutions and rehabilitation facilities. Experience made with the first training course point to a need for specialist-based innovation in particular in the field of vocational rehabilitation.

  7. [Measurements of electromagnetic fields and evaluation of occupational exposure: PN-T-06580:2002 requirements and principles adopted in the European Union].

    PubMed

    Gryz, Krzysztof; Karpowicz, Jolanta

    2003-01-01

    Under the process of developing a uniform system of protection against excessive exposure to electromagnetic fields, Polish metrological standards have been amended as an inherent complement of the modified decree on maximum admissible strength (MAS) values, issued by the Minister of Labour and Social Policy. Two parts of standard PN-T-06580:2002 were established by the Chairman of the Polish Committee for Standardisation in 2002. Of the whole range of frequencies covered by legal regulations, it laid down the principles of evaluation of occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and radiation, providing precise definitions and rules for estimation actual dose and exposure factor in each case of exposure in real conditions. The standards also precise conditions, in which simplified principles of occupational exposure measurement and evaluation can be applied. Currently in the European countries, there are no general standards concerning methods of measuring and evaluating occupational exposure to 0-300 GHz electromagnetic fields. The provisions of numerous European (EN) and international (IEC) standards of a much narrower scope of application are similar to those formulated in standard PN-T-06580:2002.

  8. Reflections on a renaissance of occupation.

    PubMed

    Whiteford, G; Townsend, E; Hocking, C

    2000-02-01

    At the close of the 20th century, there is a renaissance of occupation in occupational therapy and occupational science. Kielhofner (1992) offers an intraprofessional explanation that the growing interest in occupation recaptures occupational therapy's lost identity. An extraprofessional explanation is that postmodern ideas and social practices have helped to create a societal context in which a renaissance of occupation is welcome. Postmodernism raises questions and awareness of power, diversity, temporality, and situatedness in which normative ideas of occupation as paid work can be challenged. Since occupation is of primary concern to occupational therapy and occupational science, the authors reflect on postmodernism and its influence on a renaissance of occupation in these two fields. These reflections consider what such a renaissance means for occupational therapists and occupational scientists in the 21st century.

  9. OUTLINE FOR THE PREPARATORY COURSE IN OCCUPATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS IN THE FIELD OF FOOD SERVICES (PREPARATION AND MANAGEMENT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alabama State Dept. of Education, Montgomery. Home Economics Service.

    TEACHERS MAY USE THIS EXPERIMENTAL OUTLINE IN PLANNING A PREPARATORY COURSE IN OCCUPATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS FOOD SERVICE FOR SECONDARY AND ADULT STUDENTS. IT WAS DEVELOPED BY VOCATIONAL HOME ECONOMICS SUPERVISORS AND TEACHERS. THE OBJECTIVES ARE TO HELP STUDENTS RECOGNIZE THE CONTRIBUTIONS AND SCOPE OF THE FOOD SERVICE INDUSTRY AND TO ACQUIRE…

  10. Occupational Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    When choosing a career, jobseekers often want to know which occupations offer the best prospects. Generally, occupations that have rapid job growth, many new jobs, or many job openings--and good wages--promise better opportunities. This paper shows how employment in particular occupations is projected to change from 2010 to 2020. It presents…

  11. [Market oriented occupational medicine].

    PubMed

    Rurik, Imre; Cseh, Károly

    2012-09-09

    The history and the recent state of occupational medicine in Hungary, and its relation with governmental labor organizations are analyzed. In the past 20 years, large "socialist" factories were replaced by smaller companies employing fewer workers. They have been forced to establish contract with occupational health providers. Many of them offer primary care services, whereas family physicians having a board examination in occupational medicine are allowed to work in this field as well. The market of occupational medicine is less regulated, and ethical rules are not always considered. Undercutting prices is a common practice. The recent system could be improved by some regulations which should be respected. There is no reason to make rough changes establishing a new market for profit oriented insurance companies, and to allow employees and employers to work without specification neglecting international agreements. Occupational medicine should be supervised again by the health authorities instead of economists who have quite different, short-term priorities.

  12. Occupational Consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Ramugondo, Elelwani L.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational consciousness refers to ongoing awareness of the dynamics of hegemony and recognition that dominant practices are sustained through what people do every day, with implications for personal and collective health. The emergence of the construct in post-apartheid South Africa signifies the country’s ongoing struggle with negotiating long-standing dynamics of power that were laid down during colonialism, and maintained under black majority rule. Consciousness, a key component of the new terminology, is framed from post-colonial perspectives – notably work by Biko and Fanon – and grounded in the philosophy of liberation, in order to draw attention to continuing unequal intersubjective relations that play out through human occupation. The paper also draws important links between occupational consciousness and other related constructs, namely occupational possibilities, occupational choice, occupational apartheid, and collective occupation. The use of the term ‘consciousness’ in sociology, with related or different meanings, is also explored. Occupational consciousness is then advanced as a critical notion that frames everyday doing as a potentially liberating response to oppressive social structures. This paper advances theorizing as a scholarly practice in occupational science, and could potentially expand inter or transdisciplinary work for critical conceptualizations of human occupation. PMID:26549984

  13. Occupational Consciousness.

    PubMed

    Ramugondo, Elelwani L

    2015-10-02

    Occupational consciousness refers to ongoing awareness of the dynamics of hegemony and recognition that dominant practices are sustained through what people do every day, with implications for personal and collective health. The emergence of the construct in post-apartheid South Africa signifies the country's ongoing struggle with negotiating long-standing dynamics of power that were laid down during colonialism, and maintained under black majority rule. Consciousness, a key component of the new terminology, is framed from post-colonial perspectives - notably work by Biko and Fanon - and grounded in the philosophy of liberation, in order to draw attention to continuing unequal intersubjective relations that play out through human occupation. The paper also draws important links between occupational consciousness and other related constructs, namely occupational possibilities, occupational choice, occupational apartheid, and collective occupation. The use of the term 'consciousness' in sociology, with related or different meanings, is also explored. Occupational consciousness is then advanced as a critical notion that frames everyday doing as a potentially liberating response to oppressive social structures. This paper advances theorizing as a scholarly practice in occupational science, and could potentially expand inter or transdisciplinary work for critical conceptualizations of human occupation.

  14. Subacute exposure to 50-Hz electromagnetic fields affect prenatal and neonatal mice's motor coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Lama; Ali, Hassan Al; Qassab, Narjis Al; Arab, Eman Al; Kamal, Amer

    2012-04-01

    In this study, we investigate the possible effect of ELF-EMFs on motor performance in mice (prenatal and neonatal exposed mice). The mice performance is evaluated after 5 days of subacute exposure. Immature mice have been chosen for this study because the immature rodent brain still has the capacity to undergo proliferation, differentiation, and reorganization. Results from the rotarod experiments demonstrated a pronounced deficit in the learning abilities of the prenatal exposed groups, but no pronounced effect was observed for the neonatal exposed group.

  15. Exposure to ELF- magnetic field promotes restoration of sensori-motor functions in adult rats with hemisection of thoracic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Das, Suman; Kumar, Suneel; Jain, Suman; Avelev, Valery D; Mathur, Rashmi

    2012-09-01

    Clinically effective modalities of treatment for spinal cord injury (SCI) still remain unsatisfactory and are largely invasive in nature. There are reports of accelerated regeneration in injured peripheral nerves by extremely low-frequency pulsed electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) in the rat. In the present study, the effect of (50 Hz), low-intensity (17.96 μT) magnetic field (MF) exposure of rats after-hemisection of T13 spinal cord (hSCI) was investigated on sensori-motor and locomotor functions. Rats were divided into hSCI (sham-exposed) and hSCI+MF (MF: 2 h/d X 6 weeks) groups. Besides their general conditions, locomotor function by Basso, Beattie, and Brenahan (BBB) score; motor responses to noxious stimuli by threshold of tail flick (TTF), simple vocalization (TSV), tail flick latency (TFL), and neuronal excitability by H-reflex were noted. It is found that, in the hSCI+MF group, a statistically significant improvement over the hSCI control group was noted in BBB score from post-SCI wk2 and TFL and TTF by post-hSCI wk1 and wk3, respectively. Correspondingly, TSV gradually restored by post-hSCI wk5.The threshold of H-reflex was reduced on ipsilateral side vs. contralateral side in hSCI and hSCI+MF group. A complete bladder control was dramatically restored on post-hSCI day4 (vs. day7 of hSCI group) and the survival rate was 100% in the hSCI+MF group (vs. 90% of hSCI group). The results of our study suggest that extremely low-frequency (50 Hz), low-intensity (17.96 μT) MF exposure for 2 h/d x 6wks promotes recovery of sensori-motor behavior including locomotion and bladder control both in terms of temporal pattern and magnitude in hemisection injury of (T13) spinal cord rats.

  16. Occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields during tasks at ground or floor level at 110 kV substations in Finland

    PubMed Central

    Korpinen, Leena; Pääkkönen, Rauno

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate occupational exposure to electric and magnetic fields during tasks at ground or floor level at 110 kV substations in Finland and to compare the measured values to Directive 2013/35/EU. Altogether, 347 electric field measurements and 100 magnetic field measurements were performed. The average value of all electric fields was 2.3 kV/m (maximum 6.4 kV/m) and that of magnetic fields was 5.8 µT (maximum 51.0 µT). It can be concluded that the electric and magnetic field exposure at ground or floor level is typically below the low action levels of Directive 2013/35/EU. The transposition of the directive will not create new needs to modify the work practice of the evaluated tasks, which can continue to be performed as before. However, for workers with medical implants, the exposure may be high enough to cause interference. PMID:27075421

  17. Occupational Therapists

    MedlinePlus

    ... nurses , and other types of therapists. They may work with patients who have chronic conditions, such as diabetes, or help rehabilitate a patient recovering from hip replacement surgery. Occupational therapists also oversee the work of occupational therapy assistants and aides . <- Summary Work ...

  18. Evaluation of chromosomal alteration in electrical workers occupationally exposed to low frequency of electro magnetic field (EMFs) in Coimbatore population, India.

    PubMed

    Balamuralikrishnan, Balasubramanian; Balachandar, Vellingiri; Kumar, Shanmugam Suresh; Stalin, Nattan; Varsha, Prakash; Devi, Subramaniam Mohana; Arun, Meyyazhagan; Manikantan, Pappuswamy; Venkatesan, Chinnakulandhai; Sasikala, Keshavarao; Dharwadkar, Shahnaz N

    2012-01-01

    Extremely low frequency electro magnetic fields (EMFs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. An increased number of chromosomal alterations in peripheral lymphocytes are correlated with elevated incidence of cancer. The aim of the present study was to assess occupationally induced chromosomal damage in EMF workers exposed to low levels of radiation. We used conventional metaphase chromosome aberration (CA) analysis and the micronucleus (MN) assay as biological indicators of non ionizing radiation exposure. In the present study totally 70 subjects were selected including 50 exposed and 20 controls. Informed written consent was obtained from all participants and the study was performed in accordance with the Declaration of Helsinki and the approval of the local ethical committee. A higher degree of CA and MN was observed in exposed subjects compared to controls, the frequency of CA being significantly enhanced with long years of exposure (P<0.05). Moreover increase in CA and MN with age was noted in both exposed subjects and controls, but was significantly greater in the former. The results of this study demonstrated that a significant induction of cytogenetic damage in peripheral lymphocytes of workers occupationally exposed to EMFs in electric transformer and distribution stations. In conclusion, our findings suggest that EMFs possess genotoxic capability, as measured by CA and MN assays; CA analysis appeared more sensitive than other cytogenetic end-points. It can be concluded that chronic occupational exposure to EMFs may lead to an increased risk of genetic damage among electrical workers.

  19. Methodology to define biological reference values in the environmental and occupational fields: the contribution of the Italian Society for Reference Values (SIVR).

    PubMed

    Aprea, Maria Cristina; Scapellato, Maria Luisa; Valsania, Maria Carmen; Perico, Andrea; Perbellini, Luigi; Ricossa, Maria Cristina; Pradella, Marco; Negri, Sara; Iavicoli, Ivo; Lovreglio, Piero; Salamon, Fabiola; Bettinelli, Maurizio; Apostoli, Pietro

    2017-04-21

    Biological reference values (RVs) explore the relationships between humans and their environment and habits. RVs are fundamental in the environmental field for assessing illnesses possibly associated with environmental pollution, and also in the occupational field, especially in the absence of established biological or environmental limits. The Italian Society for Reference Values (SIVR) determined to test criteria and procedures for the definition of RVs to be used in the environmental and occupational fields. The paper describes the SIVR methodology for defining RVs of xenobiotics and their metabolites. Aspects regarding the choice of population sample, the quality of analytical data, statistical analysis and control of variability factors are considered. The simultaneous interlaboratory circuits involved can be expected to increasingly improve the quality of the analytical data. Examples of RVs produced by SIVR are presented. In particular, levels of chromium, mercury, ethylenethiourea, 3,5,6-trichloro-2-pyridinol, 2,5-hexanedione, 1-hydroxypyrene and t,t-muconic acid measured in urine and expressed in micrograms/g creatinine (μg/g creat) or micrograms/L (μg/L) are reported. With the proposed procedure, SIVR intends to make its activities known to the scientific community in order to increase the number of laboratories involved in the definition of RVs for the Italian population. More research is needed to obtain further RVs in different biological matrices, such as hair, nails and exhaled breath. It is also necessary to update and improve the present reference values and broaden the portfolio of chemicals for which RVs are available. In the near future, SIVR intends to expand its scientific activity by using a multivariate approach for xenobiotics that may have a common origin, and to define RVs separately for children who may be exposed more than adults and be more vulnerable.

  20. Occupational Mental Health, Labor Accidents and Occupational Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naveillan, F. Pedro

    1973-01-01

    The article discusses the relationship between mental health and labor accidents as it pertains to accident prevention, treatment of accident victims, and their rehabilitation. It also comments briefly on mental health and occupational diseases and the scope of the field of occupational mental health from a Chilean perspective. (AG)

  1. Effects of Electromagnetic Stimulation on Cell Density and Neural Markers in Murine Enteric Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carreón-Rodríguez, A.; Belkind-Gerson, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Cañedo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-01

    Availability of adult stem cells from several organs like bone marrow, umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood has become a powerful therapeutic tool for many chronic diseases. Potential of adult stem cells for regeneration extents to other tissues among them the nervous system. However two obstacles should be resolved before such cells could be currently applied in clinical practice: a) slow growth rate and b) ability to form enough dense colonies in order to populate a specific injury or cellular deficiency. Many approaches have been explored as genetic differentiation programs, growth factors, and supplemented culture media, among others. Electromagnetic field stimulation of differentiation, proliferation, migration, and particularly on neurogenesis is little known. Since the biological effects of ELF-EMF are well documented, we hypothesize ELF-EMF could affect growth and maturation of stem cells derived of enteric tissue.

  2. Effects of Electromagnetic Stimulation on Cell Density and Neural Markers in Murine Enteric Cell Cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Carreon-Rodriguez, A.; Belkind-Gerson, J.; Serrano-Luna, G.; Canedo-Dorantes, L.

    2008-08-11

    Availability of adult stem cells from several organs like bone marrow, umbilical cord blood or peripheral blood has become a powerful therapeutic tool for many chronic diseases. Potential of adult stem cells for regeneration extents to other tissues among them the nervous system. However two obstacles should be resolved before such cells could be currently applied in clinical practice: a) slow growth rate and b) ability to form enough dense colonies in order to populate a specific injury or cellular deficiency. Many approaches have been explored as genetic differentiation programs, growth factors, and supplemented culture media, among others. Electromagnetic field stimulation of differentiation, proliferation, migration, and particularly on neurogenesis is little known. Since the biological effects of ELF-EMF are well documented, we hypothesize ELF-EMF could affect growth and maturation of stem cells derived of enteric tissue.

  3. Occupational Rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Grammer, Leslie C

    2016-05-01

    Occupational rhinitis (OR) involves nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, nasal itching, and/or sneezing resulting from workplace exposures. OR can have a significant negative effect on quality of life and productivity. OR can be divided into allergic or nonallergic subgroups based on the underlying pathogenesis. Certain occupational exposures place employees at greater risk for developing disease. Primary treatment is avoidance of implicated exposures. Antihistamines, saline rinses, and nasal steroids may be useful. OR can coexist with occupational asthma, and rhinitis symptoms have been reported to precede those of the lower respiratory tract. OR is has both medical and socioeconomic implications.

  4. Managing the Occupational Education Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, George

    This guide for occupational educators deals with laboratory and instructional management on an interdisciplinary basis within the broad field of occupational education. The principles discussed are intended to be applied at all levels and in all types of laboratories. The text suggests effective ways of organizing laboratories so that students can…

  5. Occupational Health

    MedlinePlus

    Occupational health problems occur at work or because of the kind of work you do. These problems can include ... by exposure to radiation Exposure to germs in health care settings Good job safety and prevention practices ...

  6. Musculoskeletal health and work ability in physically demanding occupations: study protocol for a prospective field study on construction and health care workers.

    PubMed

    Lunde, Lars-Kristian; Koch, Markus; Knardahl, Stein; Wærsted, Morten; Mathiassen, Svend Erik; Forsman, Mikael; Holtermann, Andreas; Veiersted, Kaj Bo

    2014-10-16

    Musculoskeletal disorders have a profound impact on individual health, sickness absence and early retirement, particularly in physically demanding occupations. Demographics are changing in the developed countries, towards increasing proportions of senior workers. These senior workers may have particular difficulties coping with physically demanding occupations while maintaining good health. Previous studies investigating the relationship between physical work demands and musculoskeletal disorders are mainly based on self-reported exposures and lack a prospective design. The aim of this paper is to describe the background and methods and discuss challenges for a field study examining physical demands in construction and health care work and their prospective associations with musculoskeletal disorders, work ability and sickness absence. This protocol describes a prospective cohort study on 1200 construction and health care workers. Participants will answer a baseline questionnaire concerning musculoskeletal complaints, general health, psychosocial and organizational factors at work, work demands, work ability and physical activity during leisure. A shorter questionnaire will be answered every 6th months for a total of two years, together with continuous sickness absence monitoring during this period. Analysis will prospectively consider associations between self-reported physical demands and musculoskeletal disorders, work ability and sickness absence. To obtain objective data on physical exposures, technical measurements will be collected from two subgroups of N = 300 (Group A) and N = 160 (Group B) during work and leisure. Both group A and B will be given a physical health examination, be tested for physical capacity and physical activity will be measured for four days. Additionally, muscle activity, ground reaction force, body positions and physical activity will be examined during one workday for Group B. Analysis of associations between objectively measured

  7. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Cambray-Gutiérrez, Julio César; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha

    2015-01-01

    The occupational asthma is the most common form of lung disease caused by factors that are attributed to a specific working environment in industrialized countries. It causes variable limitation of airflow and/or hyper-responsiveness of the airway due to contact with specific agents present in an atmosphere of work and not to stimuli found out of this place. It is recognized more and more frequently, and many agents are capable of causing occupational asthma by different pathophysiological mechanisms. More than 400 agents causing occupational asthma are known and every year new triggers are detected. Numerous factors contribute to the pathogenesis of occupational asthma induced chemically, including immunological, non-immunological mechanisms of epithelial damage, airway remodeling, oxidative stress, neurogenic inflammation as well as genetic factors. The most important risk factors for occupational asthma include: atopy, smoking and genetic factors. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, skin tests, immunological tests and functional studies. The fundamental treatment is removing the worker from exposure as soon as possible. The advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of occupational asthma will importantly influence in the prevention and the management of this disease.

  8. [Occupational exposure of welders to ultraviolet and "blue light" radiation emitted during TIG and MMA welding based on field measurements].

    PubMed

    Wolska, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to present the results of welders' occupational exposure to "blue light" and UV radiation carried out at industrial workstations during TIG and MMA welding. Measurements were performed at 13 workstations (TIG welding: 6; MMA welding: 7), at which different welding parameters and materials were used. The radiation level was measured using a wide-range radiometer and a set of detectors, whose spectral responses were adequately fit to particular hazard under study. The measurement points corresponded with the location of eye and hand. The highest values of eye irradiance were found for aluminum TIG welding. Effective irradiance of actinic UV was within the range E(s) = 7.79-37.6 W/m2; UVA total irradiance, E(UVA) = 18-53.1 W/m2 and effective blue-light irradiance E(B) = 35-67 W/m2. The maximum allowance time ranged from 1.7 to 75 s, which means that in some cases even unintentional very short eye exposure can exceed MPE. The influence of welded material and the type of electrode coating on the measured radiation level were evidenced. The exceeded value of MPE for photochemical hazard arising for the eyes and skin was found at all measured workstations. Welders should use appropriately the eye and face protective equipment and avoid direct staring at welding arc when starting an arc-welding operation. Besides, the lack of head and neck skin protection can induce acute and chronic harmful health effects. Therefore, an appropriate wear of personal protective equipment is essential for welders' health.

  9. Effects of extremely low-frequency magnetotherapy on proliferation of human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Pasi, Francesca; Sanna, Samuele; Paolini, Alessandro; Alquati, Marco; Lascialfari, Alessandro; Corti, Maurizio Enrico; Liberto, Riccardo Di; Cialdai, Francesca; Monici, Monica; Nano, Rosanna

    2016-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMFs) applied in magnetotherapy have frequency lower than 100 Hz and magnetic field intensity ranging from 0.1 to 20 mT. For many years, the use of magnetotherapy in clinics has been increasing because of its beneficial effects in many processes, e.g., skin diseases, inflammation and bone disorders. However, the understanding of the microscopic mechanisms governing such processes is still lacking and the results of the studies on the effects of ELF-EMFs are controversial because effects derive from different conditions and from intrinsic responsiveness of different cell types.In the present study, we studied the biological effects of 1.5 h exposure of human dermal fibroblasts to EMFs with frequencies of 5 and 50 Hz and intensity between 0.25 and 1.6 mT. Our data showed that the magnetic treatment did not produce changes in cell viability, but gave evidence of a sizeable decrease in proliferation at 24 h after treatment. In addition, immunofluorescence experiments displayed an increase in tubulin expression that could foreshadow changes in cell motility or morphology. The decrease in proliferation with unchanged viability and increase in tubulin expression could be consistent with the triggering of a transdifferentiation process after the exposure to ELF-EMFs.

  10. Achieving Quality in Occupational Health

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Donnell, Michele (Editor); Hoffler, G. Wyckliffe (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    The conference convened approximately 100 registered participants of invited guest speakers, NASA presenters, and a broad spectrum of the Occupational Health disciplines representing NASA Headquarters and all NASA Field Centers. Centered on the theme, "Achieving Quality in Occupational Health," conferees heard presentations from award winning occupational health program professionals within the Agency and from private industry; updates on ISO 9000 status, quality assurance, and information technologies; workshops on ergonomics and respiratory protection; an overview from the newly commissioned NASA Occupational Health Assessment Team; and a keynote speech on improving women's health. In addition, NASA occupational health specialists presented 24 poster sessions and oral deliveries on various aspects of current practice at their field centers.

  11. Cancer risks associated with occupational exposure to magnetic fields among electric utility workers in Ontario and Quebec, Canada, and France: 1970-1989.

    PubMed

    Thériault, G; Goldberg, M; Miller, A B; Armstrong, B; Guénel, P; Deadman, J; Imbernon, E; To, T; Chevalier, A; Cyr, D

    1994-03-15

    To determine whether occupational exposure to magnetic fields of 50-60 Hz was associated with cancer among electric utility workers, the authors used a case-control design nested within three cohorts of workers at electric utilities: Electricité de France--Gaz de France, 170,000 men; Ontario Hydro, 31,543 men; and Hydro-Québec, 21,749 men. During the observation period, 1970-1989, 4,151 new cases of cancer occurred. Each participant's cumulative exposure to magnetic fields was estimated based on measurements of current exposure of 2,066 workers performing tasks similar to those in the cohorts using personal dosimetry. Estimates were also made of past exposure based on knowledge of current loading, work practices, and usage. Workers who had more than the median cumulative exposure to magnetic fields (3.1 microtesla (microT)-years) had a higher risk for acute nonlymphoid leukemia (odds ratio (OR) = 2.41, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-5.44). The same observation holds for acute myeloid leukemia (OR = 3.15, 95% CI 1.20-8.27). There was also an elevated risk for mean exposure above 0.2 microT (acute nonlymphoid leukemia, OR = 2.36, 95% CI 1.00-5.58; acute myeloid leukemia, OR = 2.25, 95% CI 0.79-6.46). However, there were no clear dose-response trends with increasing exposure and no consistency among the three utilities. Men whose cumulative exposure to magnetic fields was above the 90th percentile (15.7 microT-years) had an elevated risk for brain cancer (OR = 1.95, 95% CI 0.76-5.00) that was not statistically significant. No association with magnetic fields was observed for any of the other 29 types of cancer studied, including skin melanoma, male breast cancer, and prostate cancer. Controlling for potential confounding factors did not change the results.

  12. Role Models in Aquatic Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Mabel C.

    1982-01-01

    Provided for each of 12 minority group role models in aquatic occupations are job responsibilities, educational requirements, comments on a typical day at the job, salary range, and recommendations for students wishing to enter the field described. (JN)

  13. Biomonitoring of 20 trace elements in blood and urine of occupationally exposed workers by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ivanenko, N B; Ivanenko, A A; Solovyev, N D; Zeimal', A E; Navolotskii, D V; Drobyshev, E J

    2013-11-15

    A sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method for the determination of Ag, Al, As, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cs, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, Se, Sr, Tl, U, V and Zn in whole blood and urine was designed. Microwave-assisted digestion with concentrated nitric acid was used for blood samples. Urine samples were analyzed after 1/50 (v/v) dilution with 5% (v/v) nitric acid. For beryllium the necessity of medium resolution mode (R=4000) was shown. Method validation was performed using blood and urine reference materials and by analyzing of spiked samples. For the designed method relative standard deviation (RSD) for the concentration range 0.01-1.0 μg/L was 5-10%. RSD did not exceed 3% when trace elements concentrations were above 1.0 μg/L. Method detection limits (3σ): Ag 0.7 ng/L, Al 16 ng/L, As 3.4 ng/L, Ba 0.02 ng/L, Be 1.5 ng/L, Cd 7.7 ng/L, Co 1.0 ng/L, Cr 2.8 ng/L, Cs 9.8 ng/L, Cu 27 ng/L, Fe 1.1 ng/L, Mn 1.8 ng/L, Ni 17 ng/L, Pb 13 ng/L, Se 0.07 ng/L, Sr 5.7 ng/L, Tl 0.2 ng/L, U 0.1 ng/L, V 0.7 ng/L and Zn 1.2 ng/L. A developed method was applied for trace element biomonitoring of occupationally exposed workers of a beryllium processing enterprise. For preliminary risk assessment technological surface dust had been analyzed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. Based upon results of 50 blood and 40 urine samples analyses occupational exposure evaluation was performed. Exposure risks were found not to exceed acceptable ranges. Possible health hazards were found for Be and also Al, Cr, Mn. Occupational health and safety recommendations for the biomonitored enterprise medical care unit were issued as a result of the current investigation.

  14. Occupational health in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bedrikow, B; Algranti, E; Buschinelli, J T; Morrone, L C

    1997-01-01

    Brazil is a recently industrialised country with marked contrasts in social and economic development. The availability of public/private services in its different regions also varies. Health indicators follow these trends. Occupational health is a vast new field, as in other developing countries. Occupational medicine is a required subject in graduation courses for physicians. Specialisation courses for university graduated professionals have more than 700 hours of lectures and train occupational health physicians, safety engineers and nursing staff. At the technical level, there are courses with up to 1300 hours for the training of safety inspectors. Until 1986 about 19,000 occupational health physicians, 18,000 safety engineers and 51,000 safety inspectors had been officially registered. Although in its infancy, postgraduation has attracted professionals at university level, through residence programmes as well as masters and doctors degrees, whereby at least a hundred good-quality research studies have been produced so far. Occupational health activities are controlled by law. Undertakings with higher risks and larger number of employees are required to hire specialised technical staff. In 1995 the Ministry of Labour demanded programmes of medical control of occupational health (PCMSO) for every worker as well as a programme of prevention of environmental hazards (PPRA). This was considered as a positive measure for the improvement of working conditions and health at work. Physicians specialising in occupational medicine are the professionals more often hired by the enterprises. Reference centres (CRSTs) for workers' health are connected to the State or City Health Secretariat primary health care units. They exist in more populated areas and are accepted by workers as the best way to accomplish the diagnosis of occupational diseases. There is important participation by the trade unions in the management of these reference centres. For 30 years now employers

  15. Occupational neurology.

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, R. G.

    1987-01-01

    The nervous system is vulnerable to the effects of certain chemicals and physical conditions found in the work environment. The activities of an occupational neurologist focus on the evaluation of patients with neurological disorders caused by occupational or environmental conditions. When one is making a differential diagnosis in patients with neurological disorders, the possibility of toxic exposure or encounters with physical factors in the workplace must not be overlooked. Central to an accurate clinical diagnosis is the patient's history. A diagnosis of an occupational or environmental neurological problem requires a careful assessment of the clinical abnormalities and confirmation of these disabilities by objective tests such as nerve conduction velocity, evoked potentials, electroencephalogram, neuropsychological batteries, or nerve biopsy. On the basis of information about hazards in the workplace, safety standards and environmental and biological monitoring can be implemented in the workplace to reduce the risks of undue injury. Clinical manifestations of headache, memory disturbance, and peripheral neuropathy are commonly encountered presentations of the effects of occupational hazards. Physicians in everyday clinical practice must be aware of the signs and symptoms associated with exposure to possible neurotoxins and work methods. Occupational and environmental circumstances must be explored when evaluating patients with neurologic disorders. PMID:3577214

  16. Occupational rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Sublett, J Wesley; Bernstein, David I

    2011-11-01

    Work-related rhinitis, which includes work-exacerbated rhinitis and occupational rhinoconjunctivitis (OR), is two to three times more common than occupational asthma. High molecular weight proteins and low molecular weight chemicals have been implicated as causes of OR. The diagnosis of work-related rhinitis is established based on occupational history and documentation of immunoglobulin E (IgE) mediated sensitization to the causative agent if possible. Management of work-related rhinitis is similar to that of other causes of rhinitis and includes elimination or reduction of exposure to causative agents combined with pharmacotherapy. If allergens are commercially available, allergen immunotherapy can be considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Occupational exposure to electric fields and induced currents associated with 400 kV substation tasks from different service platforms.

    PubMed

    Korpinen, Leena H; Elovaara, Jarmo A; Kuisti, Harri A

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the occupational exposure to electric fields, average current densities, and average total contact currents at 400 kV substation tasks from different service platforms (main transformer inspection, maintenance of operating device of disconnector, maintenance of operating device of circuit breaker). The average values are calculated over measured periods (about 2.5 min). In many work tasks, the maximum electric field strengths exceeded the action values proposed in the EU Directive 2004/40/EC, but the average electric fields (0.2-24.5 kV/m) were at least 40% lower than the maximum values. The average current densities were 0.1-2.3 mA/m² and the average total contact currents 2.0-143.2 µA, that is, clearly less than the limit values of the EU Directive. The average values of the currents in head and contact currents were 16-68% lower than the maximum values when we compared the average value from all cases in the same substation. In the future it is important to pay attention to the fact that the action and limit values of the EU Directive differ significantly. It is also important to take into account that generally, the workers' exposure to the electric fields, current densities, and total contact currents are obviously lower if we use the average values from a certain measured time period (e.g., 2.5 min) than in the case where exposure is defined with only the help of the maximum values. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Occupational exposure of healthcare and research staff to static magnetic stray fields from 1.5–7 Tesla MRI scanners is associated with reporting of transient symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Schaap, Kristel; Christopher-de Vries, Yvette; Mason, Catherine K; de Vocht, Frank; Portengen, Lützen; Kromhout, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Limited data is available about incidence of acute transient symptoms associated with occupational exposure to static magnetic stray fields from MRI scanners. We aimed to assess the incidence of these symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with MRI scanners, and their association with static magnetic field exposure. Methods We performed an observational study among 361 employees of 14 clinical and research MRI facilities in The Netherlands. Each participant completed a diary during one or more work shifts inside and/or outside the MRI facility, reporting work activities and symptoms (from a list of potentially MRI-related symptoms, complemented with unrelated symptoms) experienced during a working day. We analysed 633 diaries. Exposure categories were defined by strength and type of MRI scanner, using non-MRI shifts as the reference category for statistical analysis. Non-MRI shifts originated from MRI staff who also participated on MRI days, as well as CT radiographers who never worked with MRI. Results Varying per exposure category, symptoms were reported during 16–39% of the MRI work shifts. We observed a positive association between scanner strength and reported symptoms among healthcare and research staff working with closed-bore MRI scanners of 1.5 Tesla (T) and higher (1.5 T OR=1.88; 3.0 T OR=2.14; 7.0 T OR=4.17). This finding was mainly driven by reporting of vertigo and metallic taste. Conclusions The results suggest an exposure-response association between exposure to strong static magnetic fields (and associated motion-induced time-varying magnetic fields) and reporting of transient symptoms on the same day of exposure. Trial registration number 11-032/C PMID:24714654

  19. Occupational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, William R.

    Although fiscal support for occupational programs in California Community Colleges is provided primarily by state and local district taxes, about ten percent of the total support is provided through federal sources. Federal regulations under the Vocational Education Act (VEA) require the recipients of federal funds to provide consultative,…

  20. Occupational cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Guidotti, T.L.; Goldsmith, D.F.

    1986-09-01

    When cancer is possibly related to occupation, the family physician's task is to put the matter in perspective by educating the patient and carefully documenting the appearance of the tumor and the patient's work history. Occasionally, physicians are the first to recognize new associations between chemicals and cancer and can help to bring hazards under control.

  1. The ‘Hothaps’ programme for assessing climate change impacts on occupational health and productivity: an invitation to carry out field studies

    PubMed Central

    Kjellstrom, Tord; Gabrysch, Sabine; Lemke, Bruno; Dear, Keith

    2009-01-01

    , quantitative studies of impacts on health and productivity, and assessments of local impacts of climate change taking into account different applications of preventative interventions. Fundraising for the global programme is in progress and has enabled local field studies to start in 2009. Local funding support is also of great value and is being sought by several interested scientific partners. The Hothaps team welcomes independent use of the study protocols, but would be grateful for information about any planned, ongoing or completed studies of this type. Coordinated implementation of the protocols in multi-centre studies is also welcome. Eventually, the results of the Hothaps field studies will be used in global assessments of climate change-induced heat exposure increase in workplaces and its impacts on occupational health and productivity. These results will also be of value for the next assessment by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) in 2013. PMID:20052425

  2. Occupational Activities of Nonacademic and Academic Pedagogues Working in the Field of Childhood Education--An Investigation of Differences and Predictor Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smidt, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Nonacademic and academic pedagogues working in childhood education are involved in multiple occupational activities. Theoretical frameworks focussing on career development and processes of professionalisation may provide hints about differences in the occupational activities of nonacademic and academic pedagogues as well as with regard to how…

  3. Occupational Activities of Nonacademic and Academic Pedagogues Working in the Field of Childhood Education--An Investigation of Differences and Predictor Variables

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smidt, Wilfried

    2016-01-01

    Nonacademic and academic pedagogues working in childhood education are involved in multiple occupational activities. Theoretical frameworks focussing on career development and processes of professionalisation may provide hints about differences in the occupational activities of nonacademic and academic pedagogues as well as with regard to how…

  4. Performance of species occurrence estimators when basic assumptions are not met: a test using field data where true occupancy status is known

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, David A. W.; Bailey, Larissa L.; Grant, Evan H. Campbell; McClintock, Brett T.; Weir, Linda A.; Simons, Theodore R.

    2015-01-01

    Our results demonstrate that even small probabilities of misidentification and among-site detection heterogeneity can have severe effects on estimator reliability if ignored. We challenge researchers to place greater attention on both heterogeneity and false positives when designing and analysing occupancy studies. We provide 9 specific recommendations for the design, implementation and analysis of occupancy studies to better meet this challenge.

  5. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Grzybowski, S.

    1976-01-01

    Occupational asthma is probably much more common than is generally realized. Though many causes have been described, undoubtedly many more are yet to be recognized. One of the diagnostic difficulties lies in the fact that in most forms of this disease a late asthmatic reaction occurs in the evening rather than at work. The pathogenetic mechanisms differ in various forms of occupational asthma. In some, an immunologic mechanism is likely; in others, a "pharmacologic" action of the offending agent is implicated. Asthma due to inhalation of dusts of western red cedar, isocyanates, detergent enzymes and textiles is considered in detail. Periodic examination of workers at risk is of value for early diagnosis and prevention of irrversible airway obstruction. PMID:766943

  6. Occupational Safety and Health Curriculum Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourley, Frank A., Jr., Comp.

    With the enactment of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970, the need for manpower development in the field of industrial safety and hygiene has resulted in the development of a broad based program in Occupational Safety and Health. The manual provides information to administrators and instructors on a program of study in this field for…

  7. When theory and observation collide: Can non-ionizing radiation cause cancer?

    PubMed

    Havas, Magda

    2017-02-01

    This paper attempts to resolve the debate about whether non-ionizing radiation (NIR) can cause cancer-a debate that has been ongoing for decades. The rationale, put forward mostly by physicists and accepted by many health agencies, is that, "since NIR does not have enough energy to dislodge electrons, it is unable to cause cancer." This argument is based on a flawed assumption and uses the model of ionizing radiation (IR) to explain NIR, which is inappropriate. Evidence of free-radical damage has been repeatedly documented among humans, animals, plants and microorganisms for both extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic fields (EMF) and for radio frequency (RF) radiation, neither of which is ionizing. While IR directly damages DNA, NIR interferes with the oxidative repair mechanisms resulting in oxidative stress, damage to cellular components including DNA, and damage to cellular processes leading to cancer. Furthermore, free-radical damage explains the increased cancer risks associated with mobile phone use, occupational exposure to NIR (ELF EMF and RFR), and residential exposure to power lines and RF transmitters including mobile phones, cell phone base stations, broadcast antennas, and radar installations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Participation and occupation in occupational therapy models of practice: A discussion of possibilities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Larsson-Lund, Maria; Nyman, Anneli

    2017-11-01

    Occupation has been the focus in occupational therapy practice to greater or lesser degrees from a historical viewpoint. This evokes a need to discuss whether concepts that are added to our field will enhance or blur our focus on occupation. To explore how the concept of participation in the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is related to the concept of occupation by reviewing and comparing its use in three models of practice within occupational therapy. The aim was also to generate discussion on possibilities and challenges concerning the relationship of participation and occupation. The models reviewed were The Model of Human Occupation (MOHO), the Canadian Model of Occupational Performance and Engagement (CMOP-E) and the Occupational Therapy Intervention Process Model (OTIPM). The concept of participation was related to occupation in different ways in these models. Based on the review some challenges and considerations for occupational therapy were generated. Relating the concept of participation from the ICF to the concept of occupation in models of practice can be challenging. At the same time, relating the concepts can be a resource to develop occupational therapy and the understanding of occupational issues in society.

  9. A Guide to Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheu, Janey M. Y.; And Others

    This guide is intended to familiarize secondary students with the variety of occupational opportunities in the health field. It may be used in one of three ways--as a health career reference for guidance counselors, career counselors, teachers, and students; as a guide to introduce students to the health field; or as a text for career education.…

  10. New developments in occupational dermatology.

    PubMed

    Diepgen, Thomas L

    2016-09-01

    Occupational skin diseases according to BK No. 5101 - "severe or recurrent skin diseases which have forced the person to discontinue all occupational activities that caused or could cause the development, worsening, or recurrence of the disease" - is the most commonly reported notifiable occupational diseases in Germany. Following the optimization of measures of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention, today most individuals affected are able to continue their profession. With the revision of the German ordinance on occupational diseases (BKV) in January 2015, skin cancer caused by UV irradiation was added to the list of occupational diseases. The new occupational disease (BK) 5103 is defined as "squamous cell carcinoma or multiple actinic keratoses of the skin caused by natural UV irradiation". In this context, "multiple" signifies the occurrence of either more than five individual actinic keratosis lesions over the course of 12 months or the presence of field cancerization of > 4 cm(2) . In the following review, important aspects of this new occupational disease will be highlighted and discussed.

  11. Occupational cancer: experience in Ontario.

    PubMed Central

    Chovil, A. C.; McCracken, W. J.; Dowd, E. C.; Stewart, C.; Burton, D. F.; Dyer, D. W.

    1981-01-01

    This paper reviews the experience of the Workmen's Compensation Board of Ontario in identifying cases of cancer that could be attributed to occupational hazards. Worker's claims for compensation are allowed if there is reasonable medical evidence that their cancer was caused by exposure to risk factors associated with their occupation. Details of the types of cancer associated with specific carcinogens or fields of employment are discussed. About 50% of the cases were related to exposure in particular industrial operations that functioned for relatively brief periods. The number of deaths from cancer identified as being caused by occupational factors is compared with the total for cancer from all causes in Ontario during the period 1971 through 1975. Although all workers eligible for compensation may not have been identified, the data suggest that less than 1% of cancer is presently caused by occupational factors. PMID:6460552

  12. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  13. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Newman Taylor, A. J.

    1988-01-01

    Occupational asthma is important both as a potentially curable and preventable cause of asthma and as a model of adult onset asthma. It is induced by sensitization to a specific agent inhaled at work; for many of its causes, including inhaled proteins and the low molecular weight chemicals acid anhydrides and reactive dyes, it is probably IgE dependent. The risk of developing specific IgE and associated asthma is markedly increased in cigarette smokers, probably as a consequence of non-specific damage to the respiratory mucosa. Asthma caused by several agents, which include some of its most frequent causes, isocyanates, colophony and plicatic acid (Western Red Cedar) persists in some 50% of cases for years, and possibly indefinitely, after avoidance of exposure. The development of chronic symptomatic asthma seems particularly to occur in those with longer duration of symptomatic exposure. PMID:3074282

  14. Image processing occupancy sensor

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, Larry J.

    2016-09-27

    A system and method of detecting occupants in a building automation system environment using image based occupancy detection and position determinations. In one example, the system includes an image processing occupancy sensor that detects the number and position of occupants within a space that has controllable building elements such as lighting and ventilation diffusers. Based on the position and location of the occupants, the system can finely control the elements to optimize conditions for the occupants, optimize energy usage, among other advantages.

  15. Occupational Structures and Profiles in Italy in the Field of Environmental Protection in the Public Service Sector with Reference to Air Pollution Control. CEDEFOP Panorama. National Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannocci, Virgilio; And Others

    A study examined the knowledge and job skills required of persons employed in air pollution control (APC)-related occupations in Italy's public service sector. First, Italian legislation on APC and the functions/powers of Italy's public agencies responsible for APC were reviewed. The organization/operation of the public structures involved in…

  16. The occupational health of Santa Claus.

    PubMed

    Straube, Sebastian; Fan, Xiangning

    2015-01-01

    Previous publications in the field of Santa studies have not focused on health and safety issues arising from Santa's workplace activities. However, it should be acknowledged that unique occupational hazards exist for Santa Claus. Major occupational health issues affecting Santa are discussed, along with suggestions for future research directions.

  17. Principal Approaches to Understanding Occupation and Occupational Science Found in the Chilean Journal of Occupational Therapy (2001–2012)

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Silvia; Tapia, María Jesús; Rueda, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Background The progression of occupational science in Chile is documented in the main scientific publication of the field, the Chilean Journal of Occupational Therapy (RChTO). Objective Identify approaches to understanding and applying occupation and occupational science as elucidated in the RChTO. Methodology A systematic qualitative review of the journal (2001–2012) identified articles elucidating an approach to understanding and application operationally defined as references to specific authors, theories, models/paradigms, definitions, and other fields that support approaches to O/OS. Results The study identified two main approaches. The first considers occupation/occupational science from a practical perspective or as a means to explain human behavior; the second considers occupation/occupational science as an object of study. Each approach is further divided into categories. Conclusion This study provides a novel perspective on regional use of occupational science concepts. These findings contribute to our understanding of this science in context and to recognition of the cultural relevance of these scientific concepts.

  18. Guide for Occupational Exploration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment and Training Administration (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Intended for use with or without counseling help, this occupational exploration guide is organized around 12 interest areas, 66 work groups, and 348 subgroups of occupational titles. The interest areas (an expansion of John Holland's six occupational categories) represent the broad interest requirements of occupations as well as the vocational…

  19. Occupant Protection Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, Genie; Somers, Jeff; Granderson, Brad; Gernhardt, Mike; Currie, Nancy; Lawrence, Chuck

    2010-01-01

    Topics include occupant protection overview with a focus on crew protection during dynamic phases of flight; occupant protection collaboration; modeling occupant protection; occupant protection considerations; project approach encompassing analysis tools, injury criteria, and testing program development; injury criteria update methodology, unique effects of pressure suits and other factors; and a summary.

  20. Health Occupations Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willett, Lynn H.

    A survey was conducted to determine the need for health occupations personnel in the Moraine Valley Community College district, specifically to: (1) describe present employment for selected health occupations; (2) project health occupation employment to 1974; (3) identify the supply of applicants for the selected occupations; and (4) identify…

  1. Occupational Therapy Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of occupational therapy assistant, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 16 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general as well as those specific to the occupation of occupational therapy assistant. The…

  2. Occupations of Indonesian Graduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmier, Leslie

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of 1978 occupational patterns of college graduates in Indonesia considers occupation type, government employment, pay level, degree, discipline, relevance of education to employment, and concentration of academic majors in certain occupations. No occupation was the preserve of any one subject. (MSE)

  3. Relationship with People as the Underlying Dimension for Roe's Classification of Occupations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meir, Elchanan I.; Hadadi, Amalia

    1974-01-01

    One hundred eleven subjects were asked to indicate how much relationship with people is involved in 48 occupational titles. The results support Roe's classification of occupations: differences within occupational fields were found to be smaller than differences between occupational fields (F=8.53, p less than .01). (Author)

  4. Curriculum Guide for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem. Div. of Community Colleges and Career Education.

    Developed by teachers and representatives of the health service industries, this curriculum guide outlines the basic skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level competencies in the health field or for entrance into a post-high school or university programs. Section 1, Occupational and Instructional Data, provides manpower data and an analysis…

  5. Grocery Store Occupations: First Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Faith; Moore, Barbara

    The field tested first grade instructional unit is geared to the occupations and duties of meat cutter, shelf stocker, and cashier and is useful in the social studies, art, and mathematics areas. The unit takes approximately 10 hours teaching time, and involves whole class, small group, and individual work. A list of required materials is…

  6. Curriculum Guide for Health Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Board of Education, Salem. Div. of Community Colleges and Career Education.

    Developed by teachers and representatives of the health service industries, this curriculum guide outlines the basic skills and knowledge necessary for entry-level competencies in the health field or for entrance into a post-high school or university programs. Section 1, Occupational and Instructional Data, provides manpower data and an analysis…

  7. Development and Field-Testing of a Study Protocol, including a Web-Based Occupant Survey Tool, for Use in Intervention Studies of Indoor Environmental Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Mendell, Mark; Eliseeva, Ekaterina; Spears, Michael; Fisk, William J.

    2009-06-01

    We developed and pilot-tested an overall protocol for intervention studies to evaluate the effects of indoor environmental changes in office buildings on the health symptoms and comfort of occupants. The protocol includes a web-based survey to assess the occupant's responses, as well as specific features of study design and analysis. The pilot study, carried out on two similar floors in a single building, compared two types of ventilation system filter media. With support from the building's Facilities staff, the implementation of the filter change intervention went well. While the web-based survey tool worked well also, low overall response rates (21-34percent among the three work groups included) limited our ability to evaluate the filter intervention., The total number of questionnaires returned was low even though we extended the study from eight to ten weeks. Because another simultaneous study we conducted elsewhere using the same survey had a high response rate (>70percent), we conclude that the low response here resulted from issues specific to this pilot, including unexpected restrictions by some employing agencies on communication with occupants.

  8. Using OES Occupation Profiles in a Job Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Using occupation profiles, jobseekers can see which industries employ the most workers in a particular field, which geographical areas have high concentrations of those jobs, and how wages differ by industry and geographical area. This article gives an overview of the data in the Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) occupation profiles. It…

  9. Theories of Occupational Choice: A Critical Assessment of Selected Viewpoints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hotchkiss, Lawrence; And Others

    Five theoretical perspectives related to occupational choice were assessed. These were (1) Super's career development perspective, (2) Holland's typology of occupational choice, (3) status-attainment research in the field of sociology, (4) economic theory of individual willingness to work in different occupations, and (5) a model of decision…

  10. The Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health

    PubMed Central

    Rom, William N.

    1980-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, established at the University of Utah in 1977, has developed innovative training programs in occupational and environmental health, and an administrative structure that may assist other universities as they develop multidisciplinary programs in the field of occupational health and safety. PMID:7415181

  11. Exploring Manufacturing Occupations. Student's Manual. The Manufacturing Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairleigh Dickinson Univ., Rutherford, NJ.

    This student manual and the accompanying instructor's guide (CE 010 376) are directed toward exploring manufacturing occupations. It is designed to help the student explore the various career, occupational, and job related fields found within the manufacturing occupations. Four sections are included. An overview of career education and…

  12. Occupational exposure in MRI

    PubMed Central

    Mcrobbie, D W

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews occupational exposure in clinical MRI; it specifically considers units of exposure, basic physical interactions, health effects, guideline limits, dosimetry, results of exposure surveys, calculation of induced fields and the status of the European Physical Agents Directive. Electromagnetic field exposure in MRI from the static field B0, imaging gradients and radiofrequency transmission fields induces electric fields and currents in tissue, which are responsible for various acute sensory effects. The underlying theory and its application to the formulation of incident and induced field limits are presented. The recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Bundesministerium für Arbeit und Soziales and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers limits for incident field exposure are interpreted in a manner applicable to MRI. Field measurements show that exposure from movement within the B0 fringe field can exceed ICNIRP reference levels within 0.5 m of the bore entrance. Rate of change of field dB/dt from the imaging gradients is unlikely to exceed the new limits, although incident field limits can be exceeded for radiofrequency (RF) exposure within 0.2–0.5 m of the bore entrance. Dosimetric surveys of routine clinical practice show that staff are exposed to peak values of 42±24% of B0, with time-averaged exposures of 5.2±2.8 mT for magnets in the range 0.6–4 T. Exposure to time-varying fields arising from movement within the B0 fringe resulted in peak dB/dt of approximately 2 T s−1. Modelling of induced electric fields from the imaging gradients shows that ICNIRP-induced field limits are unlikely to be exceeded in most situations; however, movement through the static field may still present a problem. The likely application of the limits is discussed with respect to the reformulation of the European Union (EU) directive and its possible implications for MRI. PMID:22457400

  13. Multi-scale occupancy approach to estimate Toxoplasma gondii prevalence and detection probability in tissues: an application and guide for field sampling.

    PubMed

    Elmore, Stacey A; Huyvaert, Kathryn P; Bailey, Larissa L; Iqbal, Asma; Su, Chunlei; Dixon, Brent R; Alisauskas, Ray T; Gajadhar, Alvin A; Jenkins, Emily J

    2016-08-01

    Increasingly, birds are recognised as important hosts for the ubiquitous parasite Toxoplasma gondii, although little experimental evidence exists to determine which tissues should be tested to maximise the detection probability of T. gondii. Also, Arctic-nesting geese are suspected to be important sources of T. gondii in terrestrial Arctic ecosystems, but the parasite has not previously been reported in the tissues of these geese. Using a domestic goose model, we applied a multi-scale occupancy framework to demonstrate that the probability of detection of T. gondii was highest in the brain (0.689, 95% confidence interval=0.486, 0.839) and the heart (0.809, 95% confidence interval=0.693, 0.888). Inoculated geese had an estimated T. gondii infection probability of 0.849, (95% confidence interval=0.643, 0.946), highlighting uncertainty in the system, even under experimental conditions. Guided by these results, we tested the brains and hearts of wild Ross's Geese (Chen rossii, n=50) and Lesser Snow Geese (Chen caerulescens, n=50) from Karrak Lake, Nunavut, Canada. We detected 51 suspected positive tissue samples from 33 wild geese using real-time PCR with melt-curve analysis. The wild goose prevalence estimates generated by our multi-scale occupancy analysis were higher than the naïve estimates of prevalence, indicating that multiple PCR repetitions on the same organs and testing more than one organ could improve T. gondii detection. Genetic characterisation revealed Type III T. gondii alleles in six wild geese and Sarcocystis spp. in 25 samples. Our study demonstrates that Arctic nesting geese are capable of harbouring T. gondii in their tissues and could transport the parasite from their southern overwintering grounds into the Arctic region. We demonstrate how a multi-scale occupancy framework can be used in a domestic animal model to guide resource-limited sample collection and tissue analysis in wildlife. Secondly, we confirm the value of traditional occupancy in

  14. Occupational skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Diepgen, Thomas L

    2012-05-01

    Occupational skin diseases are the most commonly reported notifiable occupational diseases. In Germany, 23 596 out of a total of 71 263 reported occupational diseases in 2010 were classified as occupational skin diseases (BK No. 5101: "severe or recurrent skin diseases which have forced the person to discontinue all occupational activities that caused or could cause the development, worsening, or recurrence of the disease"). Contact dermatitis (allergic, irritant) of the hands is the most common skin disease and atopic skin diathesis is often an important co-factor. The number of work-related skin diseases is many times higher than the number of notified occupational dermatoses. This CME article explains the legal framework of occupational diseases, the tasks and obligations of the legal statutory work insurance. Typical allergens and irritants of high risk professions are also presented as are the important steps from diagnosis to compensation. Early prevention of occupational skin diseases is very important to avoid severe chronic hand eczema. Therefore the "dermatologist's report" is crucial. Other occupational dermatoses (outside of BK 5101) are briefly mentioned. In recent years the number of notifications of occupational skin cancer due to occupational UV-irradiation has increased. According to recent epidemiological findings, there is a significant and consistent positive association between occupational UV-irradiation and squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, an important criterion for a new occupational disease is fulfilled. © The Authors • Journal compilation © Blackwell Verlag GmbH, Berlin.

  15. Illinois Occupational Skill Standards: Occupational Therapy Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Occupational Skill Standards and Credentialing Council, Carbondale.

    This document, which is intended to serve as a guide for work force preparation program providers, details the Illinois occupational skill standards for programs preparing students for employment in jobs in occupational therapy. Agency partners involved in this project include: the Illinois State board of Education, Illinois Community College…

  16. Occupational Clusters. Occupational Investigation Guide. First Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This occupational investigation guide contains learning activities for instruction in fifteen occupational clusters: (1) agribusiness and natural resources, (2) business and office, (3) communications and media, (4) construction, (5) consumer and homemaking, (6) environment, (7) fine arts and humanities, (8) health, (9) hospitality and recreation,…

  17. Electricity Occupations Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Education Research Center, Champaign, IL.

    The first of four main sections of the electrical occupations curriculum guide is an introduction which describes the design and use of the guide and which provides five pages of suggested curriculum resources. Section two contains job descriptions for 18 electrical occupations. For each occupation the guide explains industry's expectations of the…

  18. Occupational Status and Suicide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lampert, Dominique I.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Examined relationship between occupational status and suicide in California males since 1925. Findings show an inverse relationship between occupational status and suicide for all age groups. Over time, male suicide rates have increased, particularly for employed males over 65, employed males aged 14 to 24, and males in low-status occupations.…

  19. Manual on Occupational Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermann, Graham D.

    This manual on occupational analysis, developed in Australia, is organized in three sections. The first section provides a framework for occupational analysis (OA) and a discussion of possible outputs from an OA from each of three phases: (1) determining the nature and scope of the occupational area; (2) developing a competencies list; and (3)…

  20. Agricultural Occupations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Floyd J.; Henderson, Billie

    This agricultural occupations handbook was developed from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) and the U.S. Departments of Health, Education, and Welfare, and Labor publication, Vocational Education and Occupations. It includes the U.S. Office of Education coding for the instructional area of agriculture and the cluster coding for the…

  1. Occupation and thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H; Della Valle, Curt T; Friesen, Melissa C

    2014-05-01

    Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text 'occupation' 'job' 'employment' or 'work' and 'thyroid cancer'. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarised the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender-stratified results are reported. The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and healthcare occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis.

  2. Agricultural Occupations Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Floyd J.; Henderson, Billie

    This agricultural occupations handbook was developed from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles (DOT) and the U.S. Departments of Health, Education, and Welfare, and Labor publication, Vocational Education and Occupations. It includes the U.S. Office of Education coding for the instructional area of agriculture and the cluster coding for the…

  3. Chronic cough due to occupational factors

    PubMed Central

    Groneberg, David A; Nowak, Dennis; Wussow, Anke; Fischer, Axel

    2006-01-01

    Within the large variety of subtypes of chronic cough, either defined by their clinical or pathogenetic causes, occupational chronic cough may be regarded as one of the most preventable forms of the disease. Next to obstructive airway diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which are sometimes concomitant with chronic cough, this chronic airway disease gains importance in the field of occupational medicine since classic fiber-related occupational airway diseases will decrease in the future. Apart from acute accidents and incidental exposures which may lead to an acute form of cough, there are numerous sources for the development of chronic cough within the workplace. Over the last years, a large number of studies has focused on occupational causes of respiratory diseases and it has emerged that chronic cough is one of the most prevalent work-related airway diseases. Best-known examples of occupations related to the development of cough are coal miners, hard-rock miners, tunnel workers, or concrete manufacturing workers. As chronic cough is often based on a variety of non-occupational factors such as tobacco smoke, a distinct separation into either occupational or personally -evoked can be difficult. However, revealing the occupational contribution to chronic cough and to the symptom cough in general, which is the commonest cause for the consultation of a physician, can significantly lead to a reduction of the socioeconomic burden of the disease. PMID:16722562

  4. [Prevention of HIV transmission (vertical, occupational and non-occupational)].

    PubMed

    Azkune, Harkaitz; Ibarguren, Maialen; Camino, Xabier; Iribarren, José Antonio

    2011-10-01

    In these almost thirty years since the epidemic of HIV infection strategies have been developed to decrease the transmission risk when a non-infected person comes into contact with HIV. One of the key landmarks was the use zidovudine was shown to reduce the risk of HIV infection by vertical transmission from 25% to 8% when given from the second trimester of pregnancy, during partum and for several weeks in the newborn. These strategies have been subsequently perfected until achieving vertical transmission rates less than 1%. Almost at the same time, strategies have been developed in an attempt to reduce the risk of transmission of infection after occupational accidents and, in the last few years prophylaxis after non-occupational exposure has been a field of particular concern. Even in this past year several experiments on pre-exposure prophylaxis have been published, which are generating an intense debate on is applicability. In this article, we analyse the state of the art in the prevention of vertical transmission and occupational and non-occupational prophylaxis, from a perspective of applying this in the developed world. We also review the published data on pre-exposure prophylaxis.

  5. Occupational rhinitis: an update.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Whitney W; Grammer, Leslie C

    2015-01-01

    Occupational rhinitis is characterized by nasal congestion, rhinorrhea, nasal itching, and/or sneezing that occur secondary to exposures in the workplace. This disease can be classified into allergic or nonallergic subgroups based upon the underlying disease pathogenesis as well as the type of causative agent. While the true prevalence of occupational rhinitis is unknown, there are certain professions and occupational exposures that place workers at a higher risk for developing the disease. Additionally, occupational rhinitis can be associated with occupational asthma and upper airway symptoms may precede those of the lower respiratory tract. Taken together, occupational rhinitis is an important disease for study given its medical as well as socioeconomic implications. This review will focus on the classification of occupational rhinitis as well the prevalence, diagnosis, and treatment strategies.

  6. History of ergonomics and occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Gainer, Rochelle D

    2008-01-01

    Ergonomics is commonly known as "the scientific study of human work" [14, p. 3] and "the application of scientific information concerning human beings to the design of objects, systems, and environments" (p. 4). The American Occupational Therapy Association defines occupational therapy as "skilled treatment that helps individuals achieve independence in all facets of their lives. It gives people the 'skills for the job of living' necessary for independent and satisfying lives [1]." Both professions share common backgrounds. Occupational therapy has been involved in health care and ergonomics is looking for its place in the health care field.

  7. Listing Occupational Carcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Siemiatycki, Jack; Richardson, Lesley; Straif, Kurt; Latreille, Benoit; Lakhani, Ramzan; Campbell, Sally; Rousseau, Marie-Claude; Boffetta, Paolo

    2004-01-01

    The occupational environment has been a most fruitful one for investigating the etiology of human cancer. Many recognized human carcinogens are occupational carcinogens. There is a large volume of epidemiologic and experimental data concerning cancer risks in different work environments. It is important to synthesize this information for both scientific and public health purposes. Various organizations and individuals have published lists of occupational carcinogens. However, such lists have been limited by unclear criteria for which recognized carcinogens should be considered occupational carcinogens, and by inconsistent and incomplete information on the occupations and industries in which the carcinogenic substances may be found and on their target sites of cancer. Based largely on the evaluations published by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and augmented with additional information, the present article represents an attempt to summarize, in tabular form, current knowledge on occupational carcinogens, the occupations and industries in which they are found, and their target organs. We have considered 28 agents as definite occupational carcinogens, 27 agents as probable occupational carcinogens, and 113 agents as possible occupational carcinogens. These tables should be useful for regulatory or preventive purposes and for scientific purposes in research priority setting and in understanding carcinogenesis. PMID:15531427

  8. [OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH RISK ASSESSMENT AND MANAGEMENT IN WORKERS IN IMPROVEMENT OF NATIONAL POLICY IN OCCUPATIONAL HYGIENE AND SAFETY].

    PubMed

    Shur, P Z; Zaĭtseva, N V; Alekseev, V B; Shliapnikov, D M

    2015-01-01

    In accordance with the international documents in the field of occupational safety and hygiene, the assessment and minimization of occupational risks is a key instrument for the health maintenance of workers. One of the main ways to achieve it is the minimization of occupational risks. Correspondingly, the instrument for the implementation of this method is the methodology of analysis of occupational risks. In Russian Federation there were the preconditions for the formation of the system for the assessment and management of occupational risks. As the target of the national (state) policy in the field of occupational safety in accordance with ILO Conventions it can be offered the prevention of accidents and injuries to health arising from work or related with it, minimizing the causes of hazards inherent in the working environment, as far as it is reasonably and practically feasible. Global trend ofusing the methodology of the assessment and management of occupational risks to life and health of citizens requires the improvement of national policies in the field of occupational hygiene and safety. Achieving an acceptable level of occupational risk in the formation of national policy in the field of occupational hygiene and safety can be considered as one of the main tasks.

  9. Berlin in Motion: Interprofessional teaching and learning for students in the fields of medicine, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and nursing (INTER-M-E-P-P)

    PubMed Central

    Bohrer, Annerose; Heinze, Cornelia; Höppner, Heidi; Behrend, Ronja; Czakert, Judith; Hitzblech, Tanja; Kaufmann, Ina; Maaz, Asja; Räbiger, Jutta; Peters, Harm

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The Berlin project "Interprofessional teaching and learning in medicine, occupational therapy, physiotherapy and nursing" (INTER-M-E-P-P) pursues the goal of developing and testing interprofessional courses in an exemplary manner, and then implement these into their regular study programs. Method: Under the direction of a steering committee of the participating institutions, professions and status groups, interprofessional courses were designed, carried out and evaluated. Specific to this project are the participation of students in the steering committee, and the accompanying of external supervision. The evaluation integrates the perspectives of all project participants, and combines quantitative and qualitative methods. Results: INTER-M-E-P-P established cooperative structures between the participating universities and programs. Three courses were designed, taught and evaluated in an interprofessional manner. The various curricula, organizational patterns and locations of the study paths led to a great need for resources in regard to planning and implementation. This process can be made difficult by any stereotypes or preconceptions inherent to those doing the planning; however, under external supervision, the individual professional viewpoints can still be broadened and enriched. Conclusion: A sustainable implementation of interprofessional education into the curricula of health science study programs is currently complicated by barriers such as different geographical locations and differing university regulations concerning study and testing. Implementation will require long-term support at the university as well as at political levels. PMID:27280145

  10. The current status of occupational health in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueyan; Li, Tao

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to summarize the major health problems among Chinese workers, the strategies and measures for occupational hazards control, the network and organizations of occupational health administration, and the achievements and current challenges of occupational health in China. Results The situation of occupational health was found to be still serious in China. Enterprises with occupational hazards were widely distributed, the exposed population and cases of occupational diseases were numerous, and occupational risks were being transferred from the city to the countryside and from developed areas to developing ones. New emerging problems coexisted with traditional occupational hazards. Besides, a lack of occupational health services for migrant workers could be a major problem for a long time. Conclusions It is necessary to improve the fields related to occupational health, such as the supervision and administration of small- and medium-scale enterprises, research into key techniques for the prevention and control of occupational hazards, systems for the diagnosis and reporting of occupational diseases, and the training of health professionals. PMID:21432554

  11. Inference for occupancy and occupancy dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connell, Allan F.; Bailey, Larissa L.; O'Connell, Allan F.; Nichols, James D.; Karanth, K. Ullas

    2011-01-01

    This chapter deals with the estimation of occupancy as a state variable to assess the status of, and track changes in, species distributions when sampling with camera traps. Much of the recent interest in occupancy estimation and modeling originated from the models developed by MacKenzie et al. (2002, 2003), although similar methods were developed independently (Azuma et al. 1990; Bayley and Petersen 2001; Nichols and Karanth, 2002; Tyre et al. 2003), all of which deal with species occurrence information and imperfect detection. Less than a decade after these publications, the modeling and estimation of species occurrence and occupancy dynamics have increased significantly. Special features of scientific journals have explored innovative uses of detection–nondetection data with occupancy models (Vojta 2005), and an entire volume has synthesized the use and application of occupancy estimation methods (MacKenzie et al. 2006). Reviews of the topical concepts, philosophical considerations, and various sampling designs that can be used for occupancy estimation are now readily available for a range of audiences (MacKenzie and Royle 2005; MacKenzie et al. 2006; Bailey et al. 2007; Royle and Dorazio 2008; Conroy and Carroll 2009; Kendall and White 2009; Hines et al. 2010; Link and Barker 2010). As a result, it would be pointless here to recast all that these publications have so eloquently articulated, but that said, a review of any scientific topic requires sufficient context and relevant background information, especially when relatively new methodologies and techniques such as occupancy estimation and camera traps are involved. This is especially critical in a digital age where new information is published at warp speed, making it increasingly difficult to stay abreast of theoretical advances and research developments.

  12. Estimation of an Occupational Choice Model when Occupations Are Misclassified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops an empirical occupational choice model that corrects for misclassification in occupational choices and measurement error in occupation-specific work experience. The model is used to estimate the extent of measurement error in occupation data and quantify the bias that results from ignoring measurement error in occupation codes…

  13. Estimation of an Occupational Choice Model when Occupations Are Misclassified

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Paul

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops an empirical occupational choice model that corrects for misclassification in occupational choices and measurement error in occupation-specific work experience. The model is used to estimate the extent of measurement error in occupation data and quantify the bias that results from ignoring measurement error in occupation codes…

  14. INFECTION AS OCCUPATIONAL RISK,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The percentage of the job-connected infectious diseases of the total number of occupational diseases has been subject to only minor fluctuations...since 1949. Of the occupational infections of medical personnel, tuberculosis and infectious hepatitis are the most important; among diseases that can be...importance in the recognition of an infectious disease as an occupational disease. The article discusses the sources of infection, the manner of

  15. Occupational cancer in Italy.

    PubMed Central

    Merler, E; Vineis, P; Alhaique, D; Miligi, L

    1999-01-01

    This article is a discussion of occupational cancer in Italy. The introduction provides the necessary context of Italian industrialization and occupational health regulation. This is followed by a review of Italian epidemiologic studies of occupational cancer risks considered in terms of relative measures of risk and attributable risk of carcinogenic agents or exposure circumstances. We attempt to establish the number of workers exposed to carcinogens in Italy and the intensity of their exposures. Finally, the Italian system of compensation for occupational cancer is discussed. Several cohort and case-control studies have addressed the issue of occupational risks, mostly among male workers. The results of these studies suggest that the growing incidence of and mortality by mesothelioma is explained by the widespread and intense exposure to asbestos in some Italian industrial settings. A high attributable risk of lung tumors among male populations in industrial areas of northern Italy is explained by occupational exposures. However, insufficient data are available for clear definition of the extent and intensity of occupational exposure to carcinogenic substances. In Italy, we must prioritize and maximize resources in occupational cancer epidemiology and revitalize the role of national institutions. Recent legislation has established new regulations on the handling of carcinogenic substances in industrial settings, a new list of occupational diseases, and a national registry of mesothelioma linked to asbestos exposure. These legislative changes are expected to have positive effects. PMID:10350509

  16. Image Processing Occupancy Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    2016-07-14

    The Image Processing Occupancy Sensor, or IPOS, is a novel sensor technology developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The sensor is based on low-cost embedded microprocessors widely used by the smartphone industry and leverages mature open-source computer vision software libraries. Compared to traditional passive infrared and ultrasonic-based motion sensors currently used for occupancy detection, IPOS has shown the potential for improved accuracy and a richer set of feedback signals for occupant-optimized lighting, daylighting, temperature setback, ventilation control, and other occupancy and location-based uses. Unlike traditional passive infrared (PIR) or ultrasonic occupancy sensors, which infer occupancy based only on motion, IPOS uses digital image-based analysis to detect and classify various aspects of occupancy, including the presence of occupants regardless of motion, their number, location, and activity levels of occupants, as well as the illuminance properties of the monitored space. The IPOS software leverages the recent availability of low-cost embedded computing platforms, computer vision software libraries, and camera elements.

  17. American Occupational Therapy Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... AOTA Education Summit AOTA/NBCOT National Student Conclave School Based Specialty Conference Member Appreciation Celebration Older Driver Safety Awareness Week Occupational Therapy Month Mental Health Specialty ...

  18. About Occupational Therapy

    MedlinePlus

    ... to improve your documentation. Children & Youth Health & Wellness Mental Health Productive Aging Rehabilitation & Disability Work & Industry Manage Your Practice Evidence-Based Practice & Research Ethics Occupational Therapy Assistants ...

  19. Working conditions of occupational therapists in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Abu Tariah, Hashem Salman; Abu-Dahab, Sana M N; Hamed, Razan T; AlHeresh, Rawan A; Yousef, Huda Abed Arahim

    2011-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the working conditions and factors related to job satisfaction among Jordanian occupational therapists. A self-administered survey consisting of several questions about the participants' jobs was developed for this study. The inclusion criteria included occupational therapists who worked in the field of occupational therapy (OT) in Jordan and who had at least six months of experience. The survey was distributed to 120 occupational therapists in different OT settings. One hundred and one occupational therapists from different hospitals, centres, schools and universities responded to the survey. Salaries of the participants were low in comparison with the salaries of the rest of healthcare practitioners in Jordan. Chi-square analysis revealed significant relationship between participants' perceived job satisfaction and the administration of the setting, and between the choice of studying OT and the salary that the participant makes. Most occupational therapists in Jordan are young, have modest experience and work in general OT services in government-owned facilities or paediatric centres. A sense of dissatisfaction was obvious among the participants. Further studies are needed to explore reasons of work satisfaction and dissatisfaction among occupational therapists in Jordan.

  20. Occupational therapy intervention with children survivors of war.

    PubMed

    Simó-Algado, Salvador; Mehta, Nina; Kronenberg, Franciscus; Cockburn, Lynn; Kirsh, Bonnie

    2002-10-01

    A preventive occupational therapy program with children surviving the Kosovo conflict is examined. The objective of the program was to facilitate the emotional expression of traumatic experiences in order to prevent the development of future psychological problems. The intervention was based on a community-centred approach with spirituality as a central focus of the intervention. The Model of Human Occupational and the Occupational Performance Process Model were utilized to guide the identification and intervention of occupational performance issues. The children's return from a land of war to a land of children demonstrates the potential of occupational therapy intervention in this field. With increasing awareness of populations facing social and political challenges, there is a growing importance of the concept of occupational justice and the need to work against occupational apartheid.

  1. Teacher's Guide to Occupational Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This guide is specifically designed to accompany materials developed for occupational orientation (particularly in Illinois) in the following five cluster areas: Applied biological and agricultural occupations; personal and public service occupations; health occupations; business, marketing, and management occupations; and industrial oriented…

  2. Welding. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP), which is one of a series of OCAPs developed to identify the skills that Ohio employers deem necessary to entering a given occupation/occupational area, lists the occupational, academic, and employability skills required of individuals entering the occupation of welder. The introduction explains…

  3. Teacher's Guide to Occupational Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Evaluation Systems, Inc., Amherst, MA.

    This guide is specifically designed to accompany materials developed for occupational orientation (particularly in Illinois) in the following five cluster areas: Applied biological and agricultural occupations; personal and public service occupations; health occupations; business, marketing, and management occupations; and industrial oriented…

  4. Occupational fatalities in Jordan.

    PubMed

    Al-Abdallat, Emad M; Oqailan, Ahmad Mohammad A; Al Ali, Rayyan; Hudaib, Arwa A; Salameh, Ghada A M

    2015-01-01

    Occupational fatalities are a worldwide problem. Certain occupations pose a greater risk than others. Recent statistics on global occupational injuries and diseases that might lead to temporary or permanent disability and even worse might lead to death, are staggering. The purpose of this study was to estimate the death rates from occupational injuries in Jordan over a period of four years; to estimate occupational fatality rate that results from accidental injuries and identify the most risky concurrent occupations with the type of injuries, the age and nationality of the victims. A total of 88 work related fatalities were admitted to three hospitals in Amman through 2008-2012 and were examined by a forensic (occupational) physician at the time. They were categorized according to, age, nationality, occupation, type of injury and were all tested for toxic substances. The occupation with the most fatalities was construction (44%); falling from a height was the commonest type of accident (44%) and head injuries were the leading injury type (21.6%); 9.1% of the deaths were positive for alcohol. Moreover, 22.7% of deaths were between ages of 25-29. Consequently, the mean occupational fatality rate was 2 per 100.000 workers during 2008-2012. Constructions and other types of occupations are more extensive problems than what is usually anticipated, especially when safety precautions are not effective or implemented. They may cause injuries and death, which will have a socioeconomic burden on families, society, governments and industries. Not to mention the grief that is associated with the death of a worker at his work site to all concerned parties. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  5. Occupation and Thyroid Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aschebrook-Kilfoy, Briseis; Ward, Mary H.; Valle, Curt T. Della; Friesen, Melissa C.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Numerous occupational and environmental exposures have been shown to disrupt thyroid hormones, but much less is known about their relationships with thyroid cancer. Here we review the epidemiology studies of occupations and occupational exposures and thyroid cancer incidence to provide insight into preventable risk factors for thyroid cancer. Methods The published literature was searched using the Web of Knowledge database for all articles through August 2013 that had in their text “occupation” “job” ”employment” or “work” and “thyroid cancer”. After excluding 10 mortality studies and 4 studies with less than 5 exposed incident cases, we summarized the findings of 30 articles that examined thyroid cancer incidence in relation to occupations or occupational exposure. The studies were grouped by exposure/occupation category, study design, and exposure assessment approach. Where available, gender stratified results are reported. Results The most studied (19 of 30 studies) and the most consistent associations were observed for radiation-exposed workers and health care occupations. Suggestive, but inconsistent, associations were observed in studies of pesticide-exposed workers and agricultural occupations. Findings for other exposures and occupation groups were largely null. The majority of studies had few exposed cases and assessed exposure based on occupation or industry category, self-report, or generic (population-based) job exposure matrices. Conclusion The suggestive, but inconsistent findings for many of the occupational exposures reviewed here indicate that more studies with larger numbers of cases and better exposure assessment are necessary, particularly for exposures known to disrupt thyroid homeostasis. PMID:24604144

  6. Aggregate Exposure and Cumulative Risk Assessment--Integrating Occupational and Non-occupational Risk Factors.

    PubMed

    Lentz, T J; Dotson, G S; Williams, P R D; Maier, A; Gadagbui, B; Pandalai, S P; Lamba, A; Hearl, F; Mumtaz, M

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure limits have traditionally focused on preventing morbidity and mortality arising from inhalation exposures to individual chemical stressors in the workplace. While central to occupational risk assessment, occupational exposure limits have limited application as a refined disease prevention tool because they do not account for all of the complexities of the work and non-occupational environments and are based on varying health endpoints. To be of greater utility, occupational exposure limits and other risk management tools could integrate broader consideration of risks from multiple exposure pathways and routes (aggregate risk) as well as the combined risk from exposure to both chemical and non-chemical stressors, within and beyond the workplace, including the possibility that such exposures may cause interactions or modify the toxic effects observed (cumulative risk). Although still at a rudimentary stage in many cases, a variety of methods and tools have been developed or are being used in allied risk assessment fields to incorporate such considerations in the risk assessment process. These approaches, which are collectively referred to as cumulative risk assessment, have potential to be adapted or modified for occupational scenarios and provide a tangible path forward for occupational risk assessment. Accounting for complex exposures in the workplace and the broader risks faced by the individual also requires a more complete consideration of the composite effects of occupational and non-occupational risk factors to fully assess and manage worker health problems. Barriers to integrating these different factors remain, but new and ongoing community-based and worker health-related initiatives may provide mechanisms for identifying and integrating risk from aggregate exposures and cumulative risks from all relevant sources, be they occupational or non-occupational.

  7. Aggregate Exposure and Cumulative Risk Assessment—Integrating Occupational and Non-occupational Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Lentz, T. J.; Dotson, G. S.; Williams, P. R.D.; Maier, A.; Gadagbui, B.; Pandalai, S. P.; Lamba, A.; Hearl, F.; Mumtaz, M.

    2015-01-01

    Occupational exposure limits have traditionally focused on preventing morbidity and mortality arising from inhalation exposures to individual chemical stressors in the workplace. While central to occupational risk assessment, occupational exposure limits have limited application as a refined disease prevention tool because they do not account for all of the complexities of the work and non-occupational environments and are based on varying health endpoints. To be of greater utility, occupational exposure limits and other risk management tools could integrate broader consideration of risks from multiple exposure pathways and routes (aggregate risk) as well as the combined risk from exposure to both chemical and non-chemical stressors, within and beyond the workplace, including the possibility that such exposures may cause interactions or modify the toxic effects observed (cumulative risk). Although still at a rudimentary stage in many cases, a variety of methods and tools have been developed or are being used in allied risk assessment fields to incorporate such considerations in the risk assessment process. These approaches, which are collectively referred to as cumulative risk assessment, have potential to be adapted or modified for occupational scenarios and provide a tangible path forward for occupational risk assessment. Accounting for complex exposures in the workplace and the broader risks faced by the individual also requires a more complete consideration of the composite effects of occupational and non-occupational risk factors to fully assess and manage worker health problems. Barriers to integrating these different factors remain, but new and ongoing community-based and worker health-related initiatives may provide mechanisms for identifying and integrating risk from aggregate exposures and cumulative risks from all relevant sources, be they occupational or non-occupational. PMID:26583907

  8. OCCUPATION EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GRIEST, JEANNE; MORSCH, WILLIAM C.

    THE OCCUPATIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS ANALYSIS (OERA) SYSTEM IS A RESEARCH EFFORT DESIGNED TO DEVELOP A FEASIBLE METHOD OF PROJECTING VOCATIONAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS THAT WILL SATISFY LABOR MARKET NEEDS. THE OUTPUTS OF THE OERA WILL BE ANNUAL PROJECTIONS OF EMPLOYMENT DEMANDS IN OCCUPATIONS CLASSIFIED BY VOCATIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS. THESE…

  9. Counselling for Occupational Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nwamuo, P. A.; Ugonna, C. E.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to ascertain the general attitude which senior secondary school students display towards counselling for occupational development while determining gender difference in students' attitude towards occupational information. It is also aimed at discovering whether these students seek vocational guidance in their choice of…

  10. Occupational asthma: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, L J; Balmes, J R

    2000-01-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in the developed world at the present time. In this review, the epidemiology, pathogenesis/mechanisms, clinical presentations, management, and prevention of occupational asthma are discussed. The population attributable risk of asthma due to occupational exposures is considerable. Current understanding of the mechanisms by which many agents cause occupational asthma is limited, especially for low-molecular-weight sensitizers and irritants. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is generally established on the basis of a suggestive history of a temporal association between exposure and the onset of symptoms and objective evidence that these symptoms are related to airflow limitation. Early diagnosis, elimination of exposure to the responsible agent, and early use of inhaled steroids may play important roles in the prevention of long-term persistence of asthma. Persistent occupational asthma is often associated with substantial disability and consequent impacts on income and quality of life. Prevention of new cases is the best approach to reducing the burden of asthma attributable to occupational exposures. Future research needs are identified. PMID:10931788

  11. Occupations, U. S. A.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geneva Area City Schools, OH.

    The booklet divides job titles, selected from the Dictionary of Occupational Titles, into 15 career clusters: agribusiness and natural resources, business and office education, communication and media, construction, consumer and home economics, fine arts and humanities, health occupations, hospitality and recreation, manufacturing, marine science,…

  12. Testosterone and Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Archival data on 4,462 military veterans linked higher levels of serum testosterone to lower-status occupations. A structural equation model was supported in which higher testosterone, mediated through lower intellectual ability, greater antisocial behavior, and lower education, leads away from white-collar occupations. Contains 49 references.…

  13. The Heath Occupational Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, William E.

    1990-01-01

    Career development programs must identify occupational needs of adults. A model based on Maslow's hierarchy develops occupational questions related to individual motivations (physiology, safety, love, esteem, and self-actualization). Individual needs are then compared with characteristics and benefits of proposed jobs, companies, or careers. (SK)

  14. Testosterone and Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Archival data on 4,462 military veterans linked higher levels of serum testosterone to lower-status occupations. A structural equation model was supported in which higher testosterone, mediated through lower intellectual ability, greater antisocial behavior, and lower education, leads away from white-collar occupations. Contains 49 references.…

  15. Bricklayer. Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cap, Orest; Cap, Ihor; Semenovych, Viktor

    This analysis covers tasks performed by a bricklayer, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as bricklayer-mason, brick and stone mason, and mason. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To facilitate understanding the…

  16. Leadership and Occupational Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred E.; Scott, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    In a leadership position, it is important to understand what stress is and how it affects others. In an occupational setting, stressors vary according to personality types, gender, and occupational rank. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the foundations of stress and to explore how personality characteristics influence stress.…

  17. Leadership and Occupational Stress

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stickle, Fred E.; Scott, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    In a leadership position, it is important to understand what stress is and how it affects others. In an occupational setting, stressors vary according to personality types, gender, and occupational rank. The purpose of this manuscript is to review the foundations of stress and to explore how personality characteristics influence stress.…

  18. Occupational Information Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharf, Richard S.

    This three-part book provides an overview of 500 occupations. The book is organized into three parts. Part I introduces the following seven occupational classification systems, along with their manuals and dictionaries: an observational classification system, Roe's Classification System, Holland's Classification System, the Standard Occupational…

  19. Occupational Health Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Medical Training Inst., Bethesda, MD.

    This manual is designed to be used for "Administrative Aspects of Occupational Medicine," one of two officer correspondence courses offered by the Naval Medical Training Institute. Part one comprises guidelines for setting up occupational health clinics, covering the areas of staffing, layout, equipment, other services, and records…

  20. Cabinetmaker. Occupational Analysis Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinien, Chris; Boutin, France

    This document contains the analysis of the occupation of cabinetmaker, or joiner, that is accepted by the Canadian Council of Directors as the national standard for the occupation. The front matter preceding the analysis includes exploration of the development of the analysis, structure of the analysis, validation method, scope of the cabinetmaker…

  1. Going to an Occupational Therapist

    MedlinePlus

    ... and do things on his own. What Is Occupational Therapy? Everyone has an occupation or job. A kid's ... is to grow , learn, do schoolwork, and play. Occupational therapy (or OT) helps kids who have a physical, ...

  2. [Occupational selection in industrial medicine].

    PubMed

    Izmerov, N F

    2006-01-01

    The article deals with contemporary state of occupational selection (educational, social and psychologic, medical) in Russia, its importance in industrial medicine and connection with ethic problems. The author defined topical directions in research of occupational selection and occupational fitness examination.

  3. Perspectives in Occupational Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Mathias, C. G. Toby; Maibach, Howard I.

    1982-01-01

    Because large surface areas of the skin are exposed directly to the environment, skin is an organ particularly vulnerable to occupationally induced disease. Statistics show that, excluding accidental injury, nearly half of all occupational illnesses occur in this organ; a fourth of all workers suffering from occupational skin disease lose an average of 10 to 12 workdays. The constant evolution of new industrial chemicals and methods of manufacture continue to bring new skin hazards and disease into the workplace. Occupational health physicians and practitioners, who usually have minimal training in dermatology, must diagnose and treat unfamiliar diseases in a setting of even less familiar, often overwhelming, technology. A thorough understanding of cutaneous defense mechanisms, clinical patterns of occupational skin disease and methods for establishing accurate diagnoses is essential. PMID:6219498

  4. Occupational Infection in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeon-Soon; Jeong, Jae Sim

    2010-01-01

    Occupational infection is a human disease caused by work-associated exposure to microbial agents through human and environmental contact. According to the literature, occupational infection was the third leading cause of occupational disease (861 cases, 8.0%), and health care, agricultural, forestry, and fishery workers were risk groups in Korea. In addition, most high-risk groups have not been protected by workers' compensation, which could lead to underestimation of the exact spectrum and magnitude of the problem, and may also result in a lack of development and implementation of occupational infection management. Through a review of national guidelines and documentations on prevention and control of occupational infection, a management strategy would promote adherence to worker safety regulations if it is explicit with regard to the agent and mode of infection in each of the high-risk groups. PMID:21258592

  5. [Need for occupational and environmental allergology in occupational health - the 45th Japanese society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy Annual Meeting 2014 in Fukuoka].

    PubMed

    Kishikawa, Reiko; Oshikawa, Chie

    2014-12-01

    The 45th Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy (OEA) Annual Meeting 2014 was held in Fukuoka city in conjunction with a technical course for occupational health physicians to learn occupational and environmental diseases more deeply. Allergic reaction due to low concentrations of chemical and biological materials is important in toxicological diseases due to highly concentrated chemical materials in the field of occupational and environmental medicine. In this paper we describe the activities of the OEA, which was established in 1970 and has completely cured patients with severe occupational asthma, such as the regional Konjac asthma in Gunma prefecture and Sea Squirt asthma in Hiroshima prefecture. Regard for the occupational environment will prevent the onset and/or exacerbation of allergic occupational disease in individual employees with allergy. Occupational cancer of the bile duct and asbestosis are also current, serious issues that should be resolved as soon as possible. It is desirable for the occupational health physician to have a large stock of knowledge about toxicological and allergic diseases in various occupational settings to maintain the health and safety of workers.

  6. Study on a model for future occupational health: proposal for an occupational health service model in Japan.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Toshiaki

    2006-10-01

    The Study Model for Future Occupational Health (funded by a research grant from the Ministry of Health, Welfare and Labor) is a joint research project involving various organizations and agencies undertaken from 2002 to 2004. Society has undergone a dramatic transformation due to technological developments and internationalization. At the same time a low birth rate and an aging population have resulted in an increase in both the percentage of workers experiencing strong anxiety and stress in relation to their jobs and the working environment and the number of suicides. As a natural consequence, occupational health services are now expected to provide EAP, consulting and other functions that were formerly considered outside the realm of occupational health. In consideration of this background, the present study propose the following issues to provide a model for future occupational health services that meet the conditions presently confronted by each worker. 1. How to provide occupational health services and occupational physicians' services: 1) a basic time of 20 minutes of occupational health services per year should be allotted to each worker and to all workers; 2) the obligatory regulations should be revised to expand the obligation from businesses each with 50 or more employees under the present laws to businesses each with 30 or more employees. 2. Providers of occupational health services and occupational physicians' services: (1) reinforcement of outside occupational health agencies; (2) fostering occupational health consultant firms; (3) development of an institute of occupational safety and health; (4) support of activities by authorized occupational physicians in the field; (5) expanding of joint selection of occupational physicians including subsidy increase and the extension of a period of subsidy to five hears; (6) licensing of new entry into occupational health undertaking. 3. Introduction of new report system: (1) establishment of the obligation to

  7. The Occupations of Literacy: Occupational Therapy's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frolek Clark, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, student proficiency in reading and writing is very low and requires ongoing focus from state and local agencies. With almost 25% of occupational therapists working in early intervention and school settings (AOTA, 2015), their role of facilitating literacy (e.g., reading, writing, speaking and listening) is critical. Occupational…

  8. The Occupations of Literacy: Occupational Therapy's Role

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frolek Clark, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    Nationally, student proficiency in reading and writing is very low and requires ongoing focus from state and local agencies. With almost 25% of occupational therapists working in early intervention and school settings (AOTA, 2015), their role of facilitating literacy (e.g., reading, writing, speaking and listening) is critical. Occupational…

  9. Occupations: Military--Civilian Occupational Source Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armed Forces Vocational Testing Group, Universal City, TX.

    Information on enlisted military occupations is offered in the source book to arrive at a comprehensive statement of job tasks in the military service and their similarities to jobs in civilian life. Basic information about five areas of the U.S. military services (Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard) focuses on their military…

  10. Burnout in occupational therapists.

    PubMed

    Rogers, J C; Dodson, S C

    1988-12-01

    Burnout is a job-related condition involving feelings of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. The Maslach Burnout Inventory (Maslach & Jackson, 1981a) is the instrument most widely used to measure job-related stress in human service professions, such as occupational therapy. This study explored the application of the Maslach Burnout Inventory for use with occupational therapists. The subjects were 99 registered occupational therapists residing in the southeastern United States. Mean scores lower than the aggregate occupational norms provided by the test's authors on the Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization subscales supported the need to develop specific norms for occupational therapists. Results of this study indicate that use of the aggregate norms would underestimate the level of experienced burnout. Correlational analyses delineated significant relationships between age and Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization, education and Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization, years of work as an occupational therapist and Depersonalization and Personal Accomplishment, years in the present position and Personal Accomplishment (intensity only), hours of direct patient contact and Emotional Exhaustion (intensity only), and hours of direct patient contact and Depersonalization (frequency only). These correlates of burnout furnish clues for understanding the development of work-related stress in occupational therapists.

  11. Occupational cancer in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiqun; Osman, John

    2012-01-01

    Although only a relatively small proportion of cancer is attributable to occupational exposure to carcinogenic agents, the estimated number of deaths due to occupational cancer is high when compared to other deaths due to work-related ill health and injury. However, risk from occupational exposure to carcinogens can be minimised through proportionate but effective risk management. The Health and Safety Executive (HSE) is the regulator of workplace health and safety in Great Britain. As part of its aim to reduce ill health arising from failures to control properly exposure to hazards at work, HSE commissioned the research presented elsewhere in this supplement to enable it to identify priorities for preventing occupational cancer. The research has shown that occupational cancer remains a key health issue and that low-level exposure of a large number of workers to carcinogens is important. The finding that a small number of carcinogens have been responsible for the majority of the burden of occupational cancer provides key evidence in the development of priorities for significant reduction of occupational cancer. Although the research presented in this supplement reflects the consequences of past exposures to carcinogens, occupational cancer remains a problem. The potential for exposure to the agents considered in this research is still present in the workplace and the findings are relevant to prevention of future disease. In this article, the principle approaches for risk reduction are described. It provides supporting information on some of the initiatives already being undertaken, or those being put in place, to reduce occupational cancer in Great Britain. The need also for systematic collection of exposure information and the importance of raising awareness and changing behaviours are discussed. PMID:22710673

  12. [Clinico-occupational history in neurology and scope of occupational neurology].

    PubMed

    Motis-Dolader, J C

    The occupational environment generates a large amount of illness which involves several specialities, including neurology. However, there is little awareness--or little training--in this field as in most medical specialities, since in the basic tool of a doctor's work, the clinical history, importance is sometimes given to aspects such as sex, race etc. and data referring to the patient's occupation and the risks this may imply for his health are considered to matter less. The creation of a new working party within the Sociedad Española de Neurología, that of Neurología del Trabajo (Occupational Neurology) aims to correct these deficiencies, and to make colleagues aware of the importance of assessing the occupational hazards of patients and attempt to relate them to the clinical picture which presents. In order to do this we must first mark out our field of action, the commonest diseases and the administrative route used for claiming for these conditions. Then we will have to evaluate our relationship with other professional colleagues in the field of occupational health and finally consider the tasks of training, investigation and promotion of occupational health.

  13. Occupational health in Yugoslavia.

    PubMed

    Krstev, Srmena; Perunicic, Bogoljub; Vidakovic, Aleksandar

    2002-01-01

    Occupational health in Yugoslavia was once well organized in accordance with WHO declarations and ILO conventions and recommendations. Since the 1990s, the system has been disrupted by destruction of the former Yugoslavia, wars, refugees, changes in the economy, and NATO bombardment. Economic trends, main industries, and employment and unemployment conditions in Yugoslavia are presented. The organization of occupational health services, their tasks, and prevailing problems are discussed. Occupational diseases and relevant research and educational opportunities are described. The authors conclude by suggesting approaches to improving worker's health in the future.

  14. [Occupational asthma in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2015-05-10

    Occupational asthma belongs to communicable diseases, which should be reported in Hungary. During a 24-year period between January 1990 and December 2013, 180 occupational asthma cases were reported in Hungary (52 cases between 1990 and 1995, 83 cases between 1996 and 2000, 40 cases between 2001 and 2006, and 5 cases between 2007 and 2013). These data are unusual, because according to the official report of the National Korányi Pulmonology Institute in Budapest, at least 14,000 new adult asthma cases were reported in every year between 2000 and 2012 in Hungary. Also, international data indicate that at least 2% of adult patients with asthma have occupational asthma and at least 50 out of 1 million employees develop occupational asthma in each year. In 2003, 631 new occupational asthma patients were reported in the United Kingdom, but only 7 cases in Hungary. Because it is unlikely that the occupational environment in Hungary is much better than anywhere else in the world, it seems that not all new occupational asthma cases are reported in Hungary. Of the 180 reported cases in Hungary, 55 were bakers or other workers in flour mills. There were 11 metal-workers, 10 health care assistants, 9 workers dealing with textiles (tailors, dressmakers, workers in textile industry) and 9 employees worked upon leather and animal fur. According to international data, the most unsafe profession is the animal keeper in scientific laboratories, but only 4 of them were reported as having occupational asthma during the studied 24 years in Hungary. Interestingly, 3 museologists with newly-diagnosed occupational asthma were reported in 2003, but not such cases occurred before or after that year. In this paper the Hungarian literature of occupational asthma is summarized, followed by a review on the classification, pathomechanism, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, diagnostics and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Epidemiological data of adult asthma in Hungary and data from

  15. Synthetic biology and occupational risk.

    PubMed

    Howard, John; Murashov, Vladimir; Schulte, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Synthetic biology is an emerging interdisciplinary field of biotechnology that involves applying the principles of engineering and chemical design to biological systems. Biosafety professionals have done an excellent job in addressing research laboratory safety as synthetic biology and gene editing have emerged from the larger field of biotechnology. Despite these efforts, risks posed by synthetic biology are of increasing concern as research procedures scale up to industrial processes in the larger bioeconomy. A greater number and variety of workers will be exposed to commercial synthetic biology risks in the future, including risks to a variety of workers from the use of lentiviral vectors as gene transfer devices. There is a need to review and enhance current protection measures in the field of synthetic biology, whether in experimental laboratories where new advances are being researched, in health care settings where treatments using viral vectors as gene delivery systems are increasingly being used, or in the industrial bioeconomy. Enhanced worker protection measures should include increased injury and illness surveillance of the synthetic biology workforce; proactive risk assessment and management of synthetic biology products; research on the relative effectiveness of extrinsic and intrinsic biocontainment methods; specific safety guidance for synthetic biology industrial processes; determination of appropriate medical mitigation measures for lentiviral vector exposure incidents; and greater awareness and involvement in synthetic biology safety by the general occupational safety and health community as well as by government occupational safety and health research and regulatory agencies.

  16. Occupational Health in Lebanon: Overview and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Nuwayhid

    1995-10-01

    This paper discusses the challenges facing the field of occupational health in Lebanon following 15 years of war. It examines the opportunities for advancing this field and for bringing Lebanese standards up to par with international ones. Challenges include the minor contribution of industry to the overall economy, its perception as nonhazardous, the lack of standards and enforcement, the scarcity of data, and the obscurity of occupational health on the national agenda. Opportunities, on the other hand, have arisen from the need to rebuild the infrastructure and revive tourism, public awareness of the potential hazards of industries in densely populated areas, international pressure, and the return of professionals in occupational health. The safety and salubriousness of workplaces are perceived as minor concerns in Lebanon, yet desire for economic recovery may prove to be an incentive for increased action on this issue. Three potential approaches for action are presented.

  17. Gainful Employment in Home Economics; Phase I, An Assessment of the Occupational Opportunities in the State of Florida Utilizing Knowledge and Skills Derived from the Field of Home Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridley, Agnes Fenster

    The first phase of this three-phase study focused on identifying occupations (job titles), projecting employment and employment opportunities, determining employment qualifications, and identifying clusters of technical occupations and attendant competencies. Data were obtained from 814 questionnaires completed during 483 interviews conducted with…

  18. [Occupational health and the Prevention of Occupational Hazards Act].

    PubMed

    Carlos Cárcoba, A

    1996-01-01

    A description is given of the main problems currently involved in matters concerning the prevention of occupational hazards, the basic contents of the recently passed Prevention of Occupational Hazards Act (Ley 31/1995), and the challenges that this law pose for the unions, employers, public administration, professionals in prevention and insurance companies for matters concerning occupational hazards and occupational illnesses.

  19. Occupational Orientation: A Necessary Step in Educational and Vocational Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul E.; Walker, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    Students who have participated in career exploration programs have often been undecided at the end of the program. The phase of the process where they must make an occupational choice is called occupational orientation. After this step plans can be developed for educational preparation for entry into the chosen field. (KP)

  20. Insurance: An Evaluation Report for the Occupational Exploration Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Altschuld, James W.; And Others

    The evaluation report is one of seven produced for the Occupational Exploration Program (OEP), a series of simulated occupational experiences designed for junior high school students. Describing the pilot testing of the simulation dealing with the insurance field, the report contains sections describing the simulation context, evaluation…

  1. Software for the occupational health and safety integrated management system

    SciTech Connect

    Vătăsescu, Mihaela

    2015-03-10

    This paper intends to present the design and the production of a software for the Occupational Health and Safety Integrated Management System with the view to a rapid drawing up of the system documents in the field of occupational health and safety.

  2. Occupational Orientation: A Necessary Step in Educational and Vocational Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemp, Paul E.; Walker, Robert W.

    1973-01-01

    Students who have participated in career exploration programs have often been undecided at the end of the program. The phase of the process where they must make an occupational choice is called occupational orientation. After this step plans can be developed for educational preparation for entry into the chosen field. (KP)

  3. Dispositional Resistance to Change and Occupational Interests and Choices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oreg, Shaul; Nevo, Ofra; Metzer, Hila; Leder, Naftali; Castro, Dotan

    2009-01-01

    Through two field studies, we examine the role that individuals' orientation toward change has in determining their occupational choices and interests. In Study 1, 139 job applicants' dispositional resistance to change (RTC) scores were associated with occupational choice, such that individuals applying for investigative and enterprising jobs…

  4. [Biological effects of non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation].

    PubMed

    Fedorowski, A; Steciwko, A

    1998-01-01

    Since the mid 1970's, when Adey discovered that extremely-low-frequency electromagnetic field (ELF EMF) may affect the calcium ions efflux from various cells, bioeffects of non-ionizing radiation (NIR) have become the subject of growing interest and numerous research projects. At present, the fact that NIR exerts both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on different physiological cellular parameters is rather unquestionable. At the same time, some epidemiological studies suggest that exposure to EMF is potentially harmful even if its intensity is very low. It has been proved that thermal factors are not responsible for these effects, therefore nowadays, they are called 'non-thermal effects'. Our paper deals with three different aspects of biological effects of non-ionizing radiation, bioelectromagnetism, electromagnetobiology and electromagnetic bioinformation. Firstly, we describe how EMF and photons can be produced within a living cell, how biological cycles are controlled, and what are the features of endogenous electromagnetic radiation. Secondly, we discuss various facets of external EMF interactions with living matter, focusing on extremely-low-frequencies, radio- and microwaves. Possible mechanisms of these interactions are also mentioned. Finally, we present a short overview of current theories which explain how electromagnetic couplings may control an open and dissipative structure, namely the living organism. The theory of electromagnetic bioinformation seems to explain how different physiological processes are triggered and controlled, as well as how long-range interactions may possibly occur within the complex biological system. The review points out that the presented research data must be assessed very carefully since its evaluation is crucial to set the proper limits of EMF exposure, both occupational and environmental. The study of biological effects of non-ioinizing radiation may also contribute to the development of new diagnostic and therapeutic

  5. Occupational Health—Or Occupational Sickness?

    PubMed Central

    Dukszta, Jan

    1978-01-01

    The current emphasis on occupational health and safety has been on curative practice as opposed to preventive measures. Business accumulates profit; if required by law, it treats those diseases or handicapped workers who have suffered due to unsafe, unhealthy working conditions. The illness of the worker often becomes a side effect of production, patched up after the fact. Such a problem oriented approach is insufficient. Ontario's occupational health legislation is ambiguous. Workers' rights are insecure. Experience in Saskatchewan has proven that well defined legislation against hazardous working conditions does not disrupt production. This article offers a progressive alternative to promote and maintain the highest degree of physical and social wellbeing of individual workers and groups in the workplace.

  6. [Measures of occupational exposure to time-varying low frequency magnetic fields of non-uniform spatial distribution in the light of international guidelines and electrodynamic exposure effects in the human body].

    PubMed

    Karpowicz, Jolanta; Zradziński, Patryk; Gryz, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    The aim of study was to analyze by computer simulations the electrodynamic effects of magnetic field (MF) on workers, to harmonize the principles of occupational hazards assessment with international guidelines. Simulations involved 50 Hz MF of various spatial distributions, representing workers' exposure in enterprises. Homogeneous models of sigma = 0.2 S/m conductivity and dimensions of body parts - palm, head and trunk - were located at 50 cm ("hand-distance") or 5 cm (adjacent) from the source (circle conductor of 20 cm or 200 cm in diameter). Parameters of magnetic flux density (B(i)) affecting the models were the exposure measures, and the induced electric field strength (E(in)) was the measure of MF exposure effects. The ratio E(in)/B(i) in the analyzed cases ranged from 2.59 to 479 (V/m)/T. The strongest correlation (p < 0.001) between B(i) and E(in) was found for parameters characterizing MF at the surface of body models. Parameters characterizing the averaged value of the field affecting models (measures of non-uniform field exposure following ICNIRP guidelines), were less correlated with exposure effects (p < 0.005). E(in)(trunk)/E(in) (palm) estimated from E(in) calculations was 3.81-4.56 but estimated from parameters representing B(i) measurement accounted for 3.96-9.74. It is justified to accept 3.96-9.74 times higher exposure to limb than that to trunk. This supports the regulation of labor law in Poland, which provides that the ceiling value for limb exposure to MF below 800 kHz is fivefold higher than that of the trunk. High uncertainty in assessing the effects of non-uniform fields exposure, resulting from a strong dependence of the E(in)/B(i) ratio on the conditions of exposure and its applied measures, requires special caution when defining the permissible MF levels and the principles of exposure assessment at workplace.

  7. Re-examining concepts of occupation and occupation-based models: occupational therapy and community development.

    PubMed

    Leclair, Leanne L

    2010-02-01

    A growing body of literature supports the role of occupational therapists in community development. Using a community development approach, occupational therapists respond to community-identified occupational needs. They work to build local resources and capacities and self-sustaining programs that foster change within the community and potentially beyond. The purpose of this paper is to highlight some key issues related to occupational therapy practice in community development. The definitions and classifications of occupation focus primarily on the individual and fail to elaborate on the shared occupations of a community. As well, occupation-based models of practice are not easily applied to occupational therapy practice in community development. In order for occupational therapy to articulate its role in community development, greater heed needs to be given to the definition and categorization of occupation, occupation-based models of practice, and their application to communities.

  8. Occupational Analysis and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shears, Arthur E.

    1985-01-01

    A form of occupational analysis called DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) and its advantages in course development and performance assessment are discussed and specific suggestions on conducting a DACUM session are provided. (CT)

  9. Occupational Therapy (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... various needs improve their cognitive, physical, sensory, and motor skills and enhance their self-esteem and sense of ... Occupational therapists might: help kids work on fine motor skills so they can grasp and release toys and ...

  10. Occupancy in continuous habitat

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Efford, Murray G.; Dawson, Deanna K.

    2012-01-01

    The probability that a site has at least one individual of a species ('occupancy') has come to be widely used as a state variable for animal population monitoring. The available statistical theory for estimation when detection is imperfect applies particularly to habitat patches or islands, although it is also used for arbitrary plots in continuous habitat. The probability that such a plot is occupied depends on plot size and home-range characteristics (size, shape and dispersion) as well as population density. Plot size is critical to the definition of occupancy as a state variable, but clear advice on plot size is missing from the literature on the design of occupancy studies. We describe models for the effects of varying plot size and home-range size on expected occupancy. Temporal, spatial, and species variation in average home-range size is to be expected, but information on home ranges is difficult to retrieve from species presence/absence data collected in occupancy studies. The effect of variable home-range size is negligible when plots are very large (>100 x area of home range), but large plots pose practical problems. At the other extreme, sampling of 'point' plots with cameras or other passive detectors allows the true 'proportion of area occupied' to be estimated. However, this measure equally reflects home-range size and density, and is of doubtful value for population monitoring or cross-species comparisons. Plot size is ill-defined and variable in occupancy studies that detect animals at unknown distances, the commonest example being unlimited-radius point counts of song birds. We also find that plot size is ill-defined in recent treatments of "multi-scale" occupancy; the respective scales are better interpreted as temporal (instantaneous and asymptotic) rather than spatial. Occupancy is an inadequate metric for population monitoring when it is confounded with home-range size or detection distance.

  11. Occupational cancer epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Boffetta, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Occupational cancer epidemiology has led to the identification of more than 40 agents, groups of agents, and exposure circumstances which cause cancer in humans. This evidence has been followed by preventive and control measures. There are four areas where occupational cancer epidemiology may contribute important results in the future: surveillance of workers exposed to carcinogens, identification of new carcinogens and target organs, study of interactions, and research on special exposure circumstances.

  12. "Homosexual occupations" in Mesoamerica?

    PubMed

    Murray, S O

    1991-01-01

    Data gathered among self-identified homosexual men in Guatemala City and Mexico City call into question the intrinsic connection between homosexuality and occupational choice posited by Whitam and Mathy (1986). Concentrations of homosexual men in some occupations can be explained as effects of discrimination and of the normal transmission through personal networks of information about job opportunities, and does not require recourse to any innate drive for homosexual men to be actors, hairdressers or interior decorators.

  13. Occupational cancer in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    González, C A; Agudo, A

    1999-01-01

    The knowledge of specific problems of occupational cancer in Spain is scarce. The environment of the workplace has improved over the last few years after a long period distinguished by bad working conditions, incomplete legislation, and insufficient safety measures and control. It has been estimated that 3,083,479 workers (25.4% of employees) were exposed to carcinogens. The most common occupational exposures to carcinogenic agents were solar radiation, environmental tobacco smoke, silica, and wood dust. The highest number of employees were exposed to silica crystalline (404,729), diesel engine exhaust (274,321), rubber products (99,804), benzene (89,932), ethylene dibromide (81,336), agents used in furniture and cabinet making (72,068), and formaldehyde (71,189). The percentage of total cancer deaths attributed to occupational exposure was 4% (6% in men, 0.9% in women). Compared with other European countries, the incidence of lung cancer and leukemia in Spain are one of the lowest, but it is rapidly increasing. The incidence of urinary bladder and larynx cancer, on the contrary, are one of the highest. Few studies on occupational cancer have been conducted in Spain. The main problems are the availability of death certificates and the quality of the information on occupation in mortality of statistics. It is necessary to improve methods of assessment of exposures using expert hygienists and biologic markers of exposure and diseases. Reduction of cancer by limiting or avoiding exposure to known occupational carcinogens is still necessary. PMID:10350510

  14. Occupational therapists' perception of the concept of occupational balance.

    PubMed

    Yazdani, Farzaneh; Harb, Alia; Rassafiani, Mehdi; Nobakht, Laya; Yazdani, Nastaran

    2017-05-10

    Occupational balance is one of the concepts used by occupational therapists with no consensus on its definition. Literature demonstrates different perspectives when this concept is applied in practice and in its link to other concepts such as health and well-being. This study aims to explore how the concept of occupational balance is perceived and practised by occupational therapy practitioners. A qualitative methodology was employed. Fourteen occupational therapists volunteered for the study. Nine occupational therapy practitioners were interviewed individually and five attended a focus group. Thematic analysis was applied to analyze the data. Six themes were identified as follows: (1) occupational balance: what it is; (2) how occupational balance is formed; (3) occupational balance and well-being (4); subjective and objective representations of occupational balance (5); what disrupts/affects occupational balance; and (6) occupational balance/imbalance and occupational therapy practice. Both objective and subjective experiences of occupational balance need to be considered in order to make an informed decision in practice. The right occupational balance for each individual should be based on his/her values but with consideration of the principal of no harm to others.

  15. Orientation to Public Service Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Div. of Vocational Education.

    Prepared as a tool for implementing a career education program, the guide is designed to help high school students and teachers explore career options available in the public services field. The eight major occupational groups covered in units are: (1) government agency management, (2) social and economic services, (3) educational services, (4)…

  16. Occupational Stereotyping. The Mandate-Condition-Need.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woal, S. Theodore

    A review of the present situation of occupational stereotyping introducing this document suggests that the legal mandate and implementation on the federal, state, and local levels apparently have not been followed by establishments serving the educational field, nor by educational institutions themselves. From a discussion of studies done on…

  17. Racial Discrimination in Occupations; Perceived and Actual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Castellano B.; Turner, Barbara F.

    1981-01-01

    A study of perceived discrimination by race and by sex for each of 21 occupations was compared with actual percentages of Blacks in each field. The study suggested that: (1) perception of opportunity corresponded to actual structure of opportunity; and (2) both a change in the social structure and individual belief systems is needed to further…

  18. Directory of Achievement Tests for Occupational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyd, Joseph L., Jr.; Shimberg, Benjamin

    This directory was compiled to assist vocational teachers and researchers in locating tests in various occupational fields. Test data was gathered from publishers, directors of vocational programs, union officials, and members of the American Vocational Association. Selection of the instruments depended on their availability and standardization,…

  19. Career Education for Adults: Occupational Information Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auburn Univ., AL. Dept. of Vocational and Adult Education.

    An outgrowth of State-sponsored institutes conducted by Auburn University, Alabama, to produce career education teaching modules for adults, the occupational knowledge module is one of five field-tested curriculum guides adopted from findings of the nationally oriented Adult Performance Level Study conducted at the University of Texas. (Basic to…

  20. Careers Canada. Volume 3, Mechanical Repair Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Manpower and Immigration, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This pamphlet, published by the Canadian Department of Manpower and Immigration, is the third of a Careers-Canada series and describes careers in mechanical repair occupations. The pamphlet is divided into eight major sections: (1) history and importance; (2) fields of work; (3) nature of work (this section is subdivided into automotive repair…

  1. Population Health and Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Braveman, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners play an important role in improving the health of populations through the development of occupational therapy interventions at the population level and through advocacy to address occupational participation and the multiple determinants of health. This article defines and explores population health as a concept and describes the appropriateness of occupational therapy practice in population health. Support of population health practice as evidenced in the official documents of the American Occupational Therapy Association and the relevance of population health for occupational therapy as a profession are reviewed. Recommendations and directions for the future are included related to celebration of the achievements of occupational therapy practitioners in the area of population health, changes to the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework and educational accreditation standards, and the importance of supporting, recognizing, rewarding, and valuing occupational therapy practitioners who assume roles in which direct care is not their primary function. Copyright © 2016 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  2. A tool to enhance occupational therapy reasoning from ICF perspective: The Hasselt Occupational Performance Profile (H-OPP).

    PubMed

    Ghysels, R; Vanroye, E; Westhovens, M; Spooren, A

    2017-03-01

    In order to enhance occupational therapy reasoning in clinical practice, different elements such as client-centred approach, evidence-based care and interdisciplinary work should be taken into account, but is a challenge. To describe the development of the digital Hasselt Occupational Performance Profile (H-OPP(©)) that enhances occupational therapy reasoning from ICF perspective. A participative qualitative design was used to create the H-OPP(©) in an iterative way in which occupational therapy lectures, ICF experts, students and occupational therapists in the field were involved. After linking occupational therapy terminology to the ICF, different stages of the H-OPP were identified and elaborated with main features: generating an occupational performance profile based on inventarization of problems and possibilities, formulating an occupational performance diagnosis and enabling to create an intervention plan. In all stages, both the perspectives of the client and the occupational therapist were taken into account. To increase practical use, the tool was further elaborated and digitalized. The H-OPP(©) is a digital coach that guides and facilitates professional reasoning in (novice) occupational therapists. It augments involvement of the client system. Furthermore, it enhances interdisciplinary communication and evidence-based care.

  3. Occupational rehabilitation in Hong Kong: current status and future needs.

    PubMed

    Kwok, H K H; Szeto, G P Y; Cheng, A S K; Siu, H; Chan, C C H

    2011-03-01

    This paper reviews the development of occupational rehabilitation in Hong Kong, both in terms of the science as well as the service for injured workers. Besides, it also reviews the existing Employees' Compensation Ordinance for work injury to illustrate how the policy could influence the success and development of the discipline. Five experienced occupational rehabilitation providers, including 1 occupational medicine specialist, 3 occupational therapists, and 1 physiotherapist critically reviewed the past and current development of occupational rehabilitation in Hong Kong as well as the local contextual factors, which could influence its future development. Since the enactment of the Employees' Compensation Ordinance in the 1950s, there have been progressive improvements in the field of occupational rehabilitation in Hong Kong. Services in the early years were mostly based on the biomedical model, where doctors and patients tended to focus on clinical symptoms and physical pathology when making clinical decisions. Since then, remarkable academic achievements have been made in the field locally, from the validation of clinical instruments for assessment of work capacity, assessment of employment readiness to the evaluation of efficacy of interventional programs for injured workers focusing on work related outcomes. However, there has been a relatively lack of progress in the development of related policies and implementation of related programs for occupational rehabilitation. There is no built in linkage between rehabilitation, compensation and prevention in the current system in Hong Kong, and there is no rehabilitation policy specific to those workers with occupational diseases and injuries. There are still deficiencies in the development and provision of occupational rehabilitation services in Hong Kong. Incorporation of requirements for occupational rehabilitation at the legislation and policy levels should be seriously considered in the future. Besides, the

  4. Creating a Future for Occupational Health.

    PubMed

    Peckham, Trevor K; Baker, Marissa G; Camp, Janice E; Kaufman, Joel D; Seixas, Noah S

    2017-01-01

    Economic, social, technical, and political drivers are fundamentally changing the nature of work and work environments, with profound implications for the field of occupational health. Nevertheless, researchers and practitioners entering the field are largely being trained to assess and control exposures using approaches developed under old models of work and risks. A speaker series and symposium were organized to broadly explore current challenges and future directions for the occupational health field. Broad themes identified throughout these discussions are characterized and discussed to highlight important future directions of occupational health. Despite the relatively diverse group of presenters and topics addressed, some important cross-cutting themes emerged. Changes in work organization and the resulting insecurity and precarious employment arrangements change the nature of risk to a large fraction of the workforce. Workforce demographics are changing, and economic disparities among working groups are growing. Globalization exacerbates the 'race to the bottom' for cheap labor, poor regulatory oversight, and limited labor rights. Largely, as a result of these phenomena, the historical distinction between work and non-work exposures has become largely artificial and less useful in understanding risks and developing effective public health intervention models. Additional changes related to climate change, governmental and regulatory limitations, and inadequate surveillance systems challenge and frustrate occupational health progress, while new biomedical and information technologies expand the opportunities for understanding and intervening to improve worker health. The ideas and evidences discussed during this project suggest that occupational health training, professional practice, and research evolve towards a more holistic, public health-oriented model of worker health. This will require engagement with a wide network of stakeholders. Research and

  5. Occupant-to-occupant contact injury in motor vehicle crashes.

    PubMed

    Viano, David C; Parenteau, Chantal S

    2017-10-03

    This is a descriptive study of the frequency and risk of occupant-to-occupant contact injury by crash type and occupant age. It focused on rear impacts because of a recent Senate inquiry. 1994-2013 NASS-CDS data were used to investigate the effects of occupant-to-occupant contact on the risk of serious-to-fatal injury (Abbreviated Injury Scale [AIS] 3+) by crash type and age group. NASS-CDS in-depth cases were analyzed to identify crash circumstances for AIS 3+ occupant-to-occupant contact injury in rear crashes. Serious injury (AIS 3+) due to occupant-to-occupant contact was uncommon. It represented only 0.84% of all AIS 3+ injury for all age groups. The overall risk of AIS 3+ occupant-to-occupant contact injury was 0.042 ± 0.007%. The highest incidence was in side impacts (69.8%) followed by rollovers (22.9%). Occupant-to-occupant contact injury risk was lower in rear impacts than in other crash types, at 0.0078 ± 0.0054%. The highest risk of AIS 3+ injury with occupant-to-occupant was for the <9-year-old age group when compared to other age groups for all crash types. The risk was 0.051 ± 0.026%, representing 2.69% of all AIS 3+ injury in the <9-year-old age group. Only 4.2% of AIS 3+ occupant-to-occupant contact injury occurred to children <9 years old in rear impacts. The corresponding injury risk was lowest in rear impacts, at 0.014 ± 0.014%%, when compared to other crash types. The analysis of in-depth NASS-CDS cases of occupant-to-occupant contact injury in children< 9 years old involved in rear impacts identified very severe collisions in older model vehicles with deformation of the occupant compartment and yielding front seats as main factors for the contact injury. Front seat occupants injuring rear-seated children was not identified in the in-depth NASS-CDS cases. AIS 3+ occupant-to-occupant contact injury occurs primarily in side impacts and rollovers. Most contact injury is to adults (89.4% incidence). Occupant-to-occupant contact injury to

  6. Perceptions and Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Faculty towards the Scholarship of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordinetz, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    Occupational therapy educators have been encouraged to engage in the scholarship of teaching as a form of best practice in education. Despite professional documents and encouragement by leaders in the field of occupational therapy, there is very little known about occupational therapy educators' perceptions, attitudes, and engagement in the…

  7. Perspectives of Occupational Therapists on the Challenges of Early Intervention Practice: A Pilot Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowyer, Patricia; Moore, Cary C.; Tiongco, Cynthia G.; Tkach, Melanie M.; Thom, Carly

    2017-01-01

    Occupational therapists in the field of early intervention (EI) are challenged with limited opportunities for communication and collaboration with colleagues and other EI team members. One hundred and two occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants with early intervention experience completed a descriptive survey. Questions on the…

  8. Changes in Occupational Characteristics in the Next Decade: Their Implications for Planning in Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lecht, Leonard A.; And Others

    The study seeks to expand the occupational information available to educators by relating job openings data to information about the earnings of persons employed in different occupations, their educational attainment, and the opportunities individual fields are expected to offer for women and nonwhites. The data refer to 123 occupations including…

  9. Perceptions and Attitudes of Occupational Therapy Faculty towards the Scholarship of Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ordinetz, Sue Ann

    2009-01-01

    Occupational therapy educators have been encouraged to engage in the scholarship of teaching as a form of best practice in education. Despite professional documents and encouragement by leaders in the field of occupational therapy, there is very little known about occupational therapy educators' perceptions, attitudes, and engagement in the…

  10. Occupationally Acquired American Cutaneous Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Felinto de Brito, Maria Edileuza; Andrade, Maria Sandra; de Almeida, Éricka Lima; Medeiros, Ângela Cristina Rapela; Werkhäuser, Roberto Pereira; de Araújo, Ana Isabele Freitas; Brandão-Filho, Sinval Pinto; Paiva de Almeida, Alzira Maria; Gomes Rodrigues, Eduardo Henrique

    2012-01-01

    We report two occupationally acquired cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL): one accidental laboratory autoinoculation by contaminated needlestick while handling an ACL lesion sample, and one acquired during field studies on bird biology. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays of patient lesions were positive for Leishmania, subgenus Viannia. One isolate was obtained by culture (from patient 2 biopsy samples) and characterized as Leishmania (Viannia) naiffi through an indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with species-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and by multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE). Patients were successfully treated with N-methyl-glucamine. These two cases highlight the potential risks of laboratory and field work and the need to comply with strict biosafety procedures in daily routines. The swab collection method, coupled with PCR detection, has greatly improved ACL laboratory diagnosis. PMID:23227369

  11. [Somnology and occupational safety].

    PubMed

    Dorokhov, V B

    2013-01-01

    Somnology has saved up enough great volume of objective knowledge of negative effects of a lack of the sleep, the raised drowsiness and sleep pathologies for health of people and occupational safety to formulate this knowledge in the accessible form for a society and acceptance by the state of acts and the organizational actions preventing these negative effects. The necessity of the salvation of these problems has led to occurrence of a new area of occupational sleep medicine, which problem is the analysis of influence of physiological mechanisms ofa sleep and functioning circadian systems on efficiency of professional activity and health of people. For a designation of the various items causing infringements of professional work use the term fatique. It is believed that fatigue development is connected with three major factors: deficiency of a sleep - defined by duration of previous wakefulness and a sleep, time-of-day and at last, task-related factors. Within the limits of approaches developed the occupational sleep medicine had been formulated the Fatigue Risk Management System. In the Russian literature there is a lack of the information on influence of mechanisms of a sleep on occupational safety, therefore the review will be interesting to a wide range of the experts dealing with the analysis of the human factor, health and an occupational safety

  12. Occupational medicine and the construction of "difficult reputations".

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Tee L

    2008-01-01

    The creation of "difficult reputations" is a collective act of disparagement often undertaken to diminish the influence of the target individual or group for political reasons. This process can be observed in efforts to discredit the field of occupational medicine and the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine (ACOEM) by revising its history. Examples are given from Draper's 'The Company Doctor: Risk, Responsibility, and Corporate Professionalism' and LaDou, in which new sources of historical information do not support the allegations or impressions conveyed. This tendency is inimical to progress in occupational health in general and may be highly destructive to the field if not recognized and discouraged.

  13. Occupational Asthma in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoo Sang

    2010-01-01

    Occupational asthma (OA) is the leading occupational respiratory disease. Cases compensated as OA by the Korea Workers' Compensation and Welfare Service (COMWEL) (218 cases), cases reported by a surveillance system (286 cases), case reports by related scientific journals and cases confirmed by the Occupational Safety and Health Research Institute (OSHRI) over 15 yr from 1992 to 2006 were analyzed. Annual mean incidence rate was 1.6 by compensation and 3.5 by surveillance system, respectively. The trend appeared to increase according to the surveillance system. Incidence was very low compared with other countries. The most frequently reported causative agent was isocyanate followed by reactive dye in dyeing factories. Other chemicals, metals and dust were also found as causative agents. OA was underreported according to compensation and surveillance system data. In conclusion, a more effective surveillance system is needed to evaluate OA causes and distribution, and to effectively prevent newly developing OA. PMID:21258586

  14. Occupational Cohort Time Scales

    PubMed Central

    Roth, H. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study explores how highly correlated time variables (occupational cohort time scales) contribute to confounding and ambiguity of interpretation. Methods: Occupational cohort time scales were identified and organized through simple equations of three time scales (relational triads) and the connections between these triads (time scale web). The behavior of the time scales was examined when constraints were imposed on variable ranges and interrelationships. Results: Constraints on a time scale in a triad create high correlations between the other two time scales. These correlations combine with the connections between relational triads to produce association paths. High correlation between time scales leads to ambiguity of interpretation. Conclusions: Understanding the properties of occupational cohort time scales, their relational triads, and the time scale web is helpful in understanding the origins of otherwise obscure confounding bias and ambiguity of interpretation. PMID:25647318

  15. Mapping the literature of occupational therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, K L

    1999-01-01

    Occupational therapy, formally organized in the United States in 1917, is considered an allied health field. Mapping occupational therapy literature is part of a bibliometric project of the Medical Library Association's Nursing and Allied Health Resources Section's project for mapping the literature of allied health. Three core journals were selected from the years 1995 and 1996 and a determination was made of the extent to which the cited journal references were covered by standard indexing sources. Using Bradford's Law of Scattering three zones were created, each containing approximately one-third of the cited journal references. The results showed that three journals made up the first zone, 117 journals the second, and 657 the third. The most cited journal was the American Journal of Occupational Therapy. In the second zone, journals from twelve disciplines were identified. While MEDLINE provided the best overall indexing, the Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) was the only database that indexed the three most cited journals plus nine of the currently active titles in occupational therapy. MEDLINE could improve its coverage of occupational therapy by indexing the journals of the British, Canadian, and Australian national associations. PMID:10427431

  16. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  17. Allergy and Occupation

    PubMed Central

    Lees, R. E. M.

    1982-01-01

    The skin and the respiratory tract are susceptible to sensitization by a wide range of substances encountered in the occupational environment. The responses of these two anatomical sites are discussed with particular attention to late and dual asthmatic reactions, which may cause diagnostic problems for the unwary. There are few data on the incidence and prevalence of occupational allergic reactions, but some estimated frequencies are given. Tables list the major industrial skin and respiratory sensitizing agents. The importance of a detailed history is stressed, as is the role of the family physician in identifying and documenting agents capable of sensitizing exposed workers. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2 PMID:21286199

  18. [Occupational allergies to bromelain].

    PubMed

    van Kampen, V; Merget, R; Brüning, T

    2007-03-01

    The protease bromelain originating from the pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus) finds frequent use in industry. Exposure to enzyme dusts has long been known to cause occupational allergies. The present paper reviews the results of the evaluation of literature data concerning occupational airway sensitization due to bromelain. Cases of specific airway sensitization caused by bromelain could be shown clearly by the presented studies. Since the symptoms, results of skin prick tests, detection of specific IgE antibodies and results of specific bronchoprovocation tests are consistent, an immunological mechanism can be assumed.

  19. Occupational Sleep Medicine.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Philip; Drake, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    Sleep and circadian rhythms significantly impact almost all aspects of human behavior and are therefore relevant to occupational sleep medicine, which is focused predominantly around workplace productivity, safety, and health. In this article, 5 main factors that influence occupational functioning are reviewed: (1) sleep deprivation, (2) disordered sleep, (3) circadian rhythms, (4) common medical illnesses that affect sleep and sleepiness, and (5) medications that affect sleep and sleepiness. Consequences of disturbed sleep and sleepiness are also reviewed, including cognitive, emotional, and psychomotor functioning and drowsy driving. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. [Recognition of occupational cancers: review of existing methods and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Vandentorren, Stéphanie; Salmi, L Rachid; Brochard, Patrick

    2005-09-01

    Occupational risk factors represent a significant part of cancer causes and are involved in all type of cancers. Nonetheless, the frequency of these cancers is largely under-estimated. Parallel to the epidemiological approach (collective), the concept of occupational cancer is often linked (at the individual level) to the compensation of occupational diseases. To give rise to a financial compensation, the occupational origin of the exposition has to be established for a given cancer. Whatever the method used to explore an occupational cause, the approach is that of an imputation. The aim of this work is to synthesize and describe the main principles of recognition of occupational cancers, to discuss the limits of available methods and to consider the research needed to improve these methods. In France, the recognition of a cancer's occupational origin consists in tables of occupational diseases that are based on presumption of causality. These tables consist in medical, technical and administrative conditions that are necessary and sufficient for the recognition of an occupational disease and its financial compensation. Whenever causality presumption does not apply, imputation is based on case analyses run by experts within regional committees of occupational diseases recognition that lack reproducibility. They do not allow statistical quantization and do not always take into account the weight of associated factors. Nonetheless, reliability and validity of the expertise could be reinforced by the use of formal consensus techniques. This process could ideally lead to the generation of decision-making algorithms that could guide the user towards the decision of imputing or not the cancer to an occupational exposure. This would be adapted to the build-up of new tables. The imputation process would be better represented by statistical methods based on the use of Bayes' theorem. The application of these methods to occupational cancers is promising but remains limited

  1. Noninvasive assessment of cytokines in occupational respiratory diseases.

    PubMed

    Akpinar-Elci, Muge; Yucesoy, Berran; Elci, Omur Cinar; Weissman, David N

    2007-06-01

    A major goal in studying occupational respiratory diseases is to show relationships between occupational exposures and health outcomes. Due to the nature of these diseases, accurate, practical, and objective measurement techniques are needed in field investigations. Pulmonary function tests, such as spirometry, are important objective health outcome measures. However, they reflect the functional changes of the lung, often in relatively late stages, which may be irreversible. Direct monitoring of airways inflammations, in response to occupational exposures, are receiving an increasing attention since they may pick up inflammatory changes before the injury becomes irreversible. Invasive approaches such as bronchoalveolar lavage and bronchial biopsies have been used to assess airways inflammation: but these methods are not practical for use in occupational field investigations. Thus, much work has focused on the development of noninvasive methods for monitoring inflammation in occupational respiratory diseases. The three recent most commonly used noninvasive techniques in occupational respiratory diseases investigations are induced sputum, exhaled breath condensate, and nasal lavage. In this review, we discuss the practical application of these techniques, patents and cytokines measured with them. Since variation of cytokine genes contribute to the inflammatory processes, we briefly discuss the genetic polymorphisms on the expression of occupational respiratory diseases. Details of genetic polymorphism were beyond the focus of this review. Our primary focus was cytokines measured with these three noninvasive techniques in occupational respiratory investigations.

  2. [Taiwan occupational health nursing: practices, policies and future trends].

    PubMed

    Chang, Pei-Jen

    2014-06-01

    The steady evolution of domestic industries and the continued expansion of the workforce have outdated Taiwan's traditional model of occupational health nursing, which focuses on preventing work-related diseases and ensuring workplace safety. Professional-competency evaluations, now widely used within the medical and other professional communities to confirm that individuals have mastered relevant knowledge and skills, are a fixture in service quality management and related strategies. Occupational health nurses have a critical role in promoting and ensuring the quality of occupational-health related services. A multifaceted strategy is needed to update the domestic model of occupational health nursing. This strategy should include: 1) Set professional standards and create standard teaching materials for national occupational health nurses; 2) Enhance the professional efficacy of nurses in this field; 3) Survey the relevant role functions and education/training needs of occupational health nurses; 4) Develop relevant elective courses; and 5) Format courses/curricula for e-learning and for multimedia platforms. Furthermore, after implementation of this strategy, the model should be evaluated in terms of the knowledge and skills acquired by occupational health nurses. It is hoped that by reflecting local needs and experiences this new model will update the field of occupational health nursing to meet the needs of the current and future workplace in Taiwan and increase nursing knowledge and skills in order to foster and sustain healthy workplace environments.

  3. Effects of Electromagnetic Radiation Exposure on Stress-Related Behaviors and Stress Hormones in Male Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Tavakoli, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated that electromagnetic waves, as the one of the most important physical factors, may alter cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors, depending on the frequency and energy. Moreover, non-ionizing radiation of low energy waves e.g. very low frequency waves could alter this phenomenon via alterations in neurotransmitters and neurohormones. In this study, short, medium, and long-term exposure to the extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) (1 and 5 Hz radiation) on behavioral, hormonal, and metabolic changes in male Wistar rats (250 g) were studied. In addition, changes in plasma concentrations for two main stress hormones, noradrenaline and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were evaluated. ELF-EMF exposure did not alter body weight, and food and water intake. Plasma glucose level was increased and decreased in the groups which exposed to the 5 and 1Hz wave, respectively. Plasma ACTH concentration increased in both using frequencies, whereas nor-adrenaline concentration showed overall reduction. At last, numbers of rearing, sniffing, locomotor activity was increased in group receiving 5 Hz wave over the time. In conclusions, these data showed that the effects of 1 and 5 Hz on the hormonal, metabolic and stress-like behaviors may be different. Moreover, the influence of waves on stress system is depending on time of exposure. PMID:25489427

  4. Effects of electromagnetic radiation exposure on stress-related behaviors and stress hormones in male wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Mahdavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sahraei, Hedayat; Yaghmaei, Parichehreh; Tavakoli, Hassan

    2014-11-01

    Studies have demonstrated that electromagnetic waves, as the one of the most important physical factors, may alter cognitive and non-cognitive behaviors, depending on the frequency and energy. Moreover, non-ionizing radiation of low energy waves e.g. very low frequency waves could alter this phenomenon via alterations in neurotransmitters and neurohormones. In this study, short, medium, and long-term exposure to the extremely low frequency electromagnetic field (ELF-EMF) (1 and 5 Hz radiation) on behavioral, hormonal, and metabolic changes in male Wistar rats (250 g) were studied. In addition, changes in plasma concentrations for two main stress hormones, noradrenaline and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were evaluated. ELF-EMF exposure did not alter body weight, and food and water intake. Plasma glucose level was increased and decreased in the groups which exposed to the 5 and 1Hz wave, respectively. Plasma ACTH concentration increased in both using frequencies, whereas nor-adrenaline concentration showed overall reduction. At last, numbers of rearing, sniffing, locomotor activity was increased in group receiving 5 Hz wave over the time. In conclusions, these data showed that the effects of 1 and 5 Hz on the hormonal, metabolic and stress-like behaviors may be different. Moreover, the influence of waves on stress system is depending on time of exposure.

  5. Identifying Occupationally Specific Affective Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from two groups of cosmetology instructors (n=15) and two groups of machinist instructors (n=17) validated the Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis instrument as capable of identifying affective behaviors viewed as important to success in a given occupation. (SK)

  6. Identifying Occupationally Specific Affective Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from two groups of cosmetology instructors (n=15) and two groups of machinist instructors (n=17) validated the Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis instrument as capable of identifying affective behaviors viewed as important to success in a given occupation. (SK)

  7. British Communicator Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy

    Occupations and organizations within the British press and broadcasting systems are examined in this paper. Its sections summarize recent British research on media communicators and discuss characteristics of craft unions and other media organizations; the historical development of the British press; the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and…

  8. Occupational Clothing Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Annette J.

    Designed to provide individualized, hands-on experience for secondary or postsecondary students in gainful homemaking programs, this occupational clothing curriculum contains eight learning modules. The following topics are covered in the modules: plant production for the needle trades (needle trade structure and operation, terminology, history,…

  9. Cluster Guide. Accounting Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaverton School District 48, OR.

    Based on a recent task inventory of key occupations in the accounting cluster taken in the Portland, Oregon, area, this curriculum guide is intended to assist administrators and teachers in the design and implementation of high school accounting cluster programs. The guide is divided into four major sections: program organization and…

  10. Diversified Occupations II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noto, Jody

    This curriculum guide consists of materials for use in presenting the second year of a two-year course in diversified occupations that is designed to teach job search and job-holding skills to disadvantaged and English as a second language (ESL) students. Addressed in the 24 units included in the course are the following topics: the purposes of…

  11. Occupational Diseases in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun A

    2010-01-01

    Korea has industrialized since the 1970s. Pneumoconiosis in coal miners was the most common occupational disease in the 1970s to 1980s. With the industrialization, the use of many chemicals have increased since the 1970s. As a consequence, there were outbreaks of occupational diseases caused by poisonous chemicals, such as heavy metal poisoning, solvent poisoning and occupational asthma in the late 1980s and early 1990s with civil movement for democracy. Many actions have been taken for prevention by the government, employers and employees or unions. In the 1990s most chemical related diseases and pneumoconiosis have rapidly decreased due to improving work environment. In the late 1990s, cerebro-cardiovascular diseases related to job stress or work overloads have abruptly increased especially after the economic crisis in 1998. After the year 2000, musculoskeletal disorders became a major problem especially in assembly lines in the manufacturing industry and they were expanded to the service industry. Mental diseases related to job stress have increased. Infectious diseases increased in health care workers and afforestation workers. Occupational cancers are increasing because of their long latency, although the use of carcinogenic substances are reduced, limited, and even banned. PMID:21258589

  12. Occupational Burnout among Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Mary; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Outlines stages of occupational burnout (enthusiasm, stagnation, frustration, apathy) and begins empirical assessment of burnout syndrome among librarians and other information professionals. Results of pilot survey conducted at one-day conference on reference service using two measures (Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals, projective…

  13. Pharmacist. Occupational Simulation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsley, Nancy

    This career exploration instructional booklet on the pharmacist's occupation is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). Based on a job analysis and utilizing a programed instructional format, the following content is included: A brief description of two real…

  14. Occupational Burnout among Librarians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haack, Mary; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Outlines stages of occupational burnout (enthusiasm, stagnation, frustration, apathy) and begins empirical assessment of burnout syndrome among librarians and other information professionals. Results of pilot survey conducted at one-day conference on reference service using two measures (Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals, projective…

  15. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  16. Health Occupations Cluster.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walraven, Catherine; And Others

    These instructional materials consist of a series of curriculum worksheets that cover tasks to be mastered by students in health occupations cluster programs. Covered in the curriculum worksheets are diagnostic procedures; observing/recording/reporting/planning; safety; nutrition/elimination; hygiene/personal care/comfort;…

  17. Occupational Literacy Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rush, R. Timothy; And Others

    Intended for teachers of adult basic education as well as teachers in job retraining programs, this book focuses on the development of written and oral language competencies required in occupational and training settings. The first four chapters offer a concise synthesis of recent research on adult learning and on workplace literacy for ten…

  18. Occupational Standards: International Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliveira, Joao, Ed.

    These nine papers from a conference of the International Research Network for Training and Development focus on occupational classification, standards, and certification. "Introduction" (Joao Oliveria) presents synopses with highlights from the papers. Part I offers an overview of recent developments in the United States in…

  19. Evaluating Occupational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, James P.

    1987-01-01

    Stresses the importance of evaluating occupational programs on a regular basis. Offers a brief explanation of the approaches to program evaluation taken at the Dallas County Community College District (TX), South Puget Sound Community College (WA), and Triton College (IL). Offers a list of references on program evaluation. (CBC)

  20. Marketing Occupations. Cluster Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem.

    This cluster guide, which is designed to show teachers what specific knowledge and skills qualify high school students for entry-level employment (or postsecondary training) in marketing occupations, is organized into three sections: (1) cluster organization and implementation, (2) instructional emphasis areas, and (3) assessment. The first…

  1. British Communicator Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunstall, Jeremy

    Occupations and organizations within the British press and broadcasting systems are examined in this paper. Its sections summarize recent British research on media communicators and discuss characteristics of craft unions and other media organizations; the historical development of the British press; the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) and…

  2. Pharmacist. Occupational Simulation Kit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsley, Nancy

    This career exploration instructional booklet on the pharmacist's occupation is one of several resulting from the rural southwestern Colorado CEPAC Project (Career Education Process of Attitude Change). Based on a job analysis and utilizing a programed instructional format, the following content is included: A brief description of two real…

  3. TARDEC Occupant Protection Seat

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-28

    Office of the Assistant Sec etary of the Army Installations, E ergy and Enviro ment DoD Executive Agent TARDEC Occupant Protection Seat...design worked exactly as intended. No issues were observed with the roller or EA wire. • The ability for this design to provide protection for two

  4. Occupation and lymphoid neoplasms.

    PubMed Central

    La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; D'Avanzo, B.; Franceschi, S.

    1989-01-01

    The relationship between occupation and exposure to a number of occupational agents and lymphoid neoplasms was investigated in a case-control study of 69 cases of Hodgkin's disease, 153 non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, 110 multiple myelomas and 396 controls admitted for acute diseases to a network of teaching and general hospitals in the greater Milan area. Among the cases, there was a significant excess of individuals ever occupied in agriculture and food processing: the multivariate relative risks (RR) were 2.1 (95% confidence interval, CI = 1.0-3.8) for Hodgkin's disease, 1.9 (95% CI = 1.2-3.0) for non-Hodgkin's lymphomas and 2.0 (95% CI = 1.1-3.5) for multiple myeloma. Significant trends for duration of exposure to herbicides were observed for lymphomas, but the association was stronger for overall occupation in agriculture than with the specific question of herbicide use. History of occupation in the chemical industry was more frequent among Hodgkin's disease (RR = 4.3, 95% CI = 1.4-10.2), and a significant trend in risk was observed between duration of exposure to benzene and other solvents and multiple myeloma. No significant relation was found between any of the lymphoid neoplasms considered and rubber, dye, painting, printing, tanning leather, photography, pharmaceuticals, wood, coal/gas and nuclear industries. PMID:2789947

  5. Occupational Clothing Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fraser, Annette J.

    Designed to provide individualized, hands-on experience for secondary or postsecondary students in gainful homemaking programs, this occupational clothing curriculum contains eight learning modules. The following topics are covered in the modules: plant production for the needle trades (needle trade structure and operation, terminology, history,…

  6. Children's Occupational Outlook Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Linda; Wolfgang, Toni

    This handbook, based on the U.S. Department of Labor's "Occupational Outlook Handbook," is a book for children describing the work people do for their self-worth as well as for income to pay their bills. The guide describes 196 jobs, organized within the following job clusters: (1) executive, administrative, and managerial; (2) professional…

  7. Occupation and adult gliomas.

    PubMed

    Carozza, S E; Wrensch, M; Miike, R; Newman, B; Olshan, A F; Savitz, D A; Yost, M; Lee, M

    2000-11-01

    Lifetime job histories from a population-based, case-control study of gliomas diagnosed among adults in the San Francisco Bay area between August 1991 and April 1994 were evaluated to assess occupational risk factors. Occupational data for 476 cases and 462 controls were analyzed, with adjustment for age, gender, education, and race. Imprecise increased risks were observed for physicians and surgeons (odds ratio (OR) = 3.5, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7, 17.6), artists (OR = 1.9, 95% CI: 0.5, 6.5), foundry and smelter workers (OR = 2.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 13.1), petroleum and gas workers (OR = 4.9, 95% CI: 0.6, 42.2), and painters (OR = 1.6, 95% CI: 0.5, 4.9). Legal and social service workers, shippers, janitors, motor vehicle operators, and aircraft operators had increased odds ratios only with longer duration of employment. Physicians and surgeons, foundry and smelter workers, petroleum and gas workers, and painters showed increased risk for both astrocytic and nonastrocytic tumors. Artists and firemen had increased risk for astrocytic tumors only, while messengers, textile workers, aircraft operators, and vehicle manufacturing workers showed increased risk only for nonastrocytic tumors. Despite study limitations, including small numbers for many of the occupational groups, a high percentage of proxy respondents among cases, and lack of specific exposure information, associations were observed for several occupations previously reported to be at higher risk for brain tumors generally and gliomas specifically.

  8. Occupancy estimation and the closure assumption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rota, Christopher T.; Fletcher, Robert J.; Dorazio, Robert M.; Betts, Matthew G.

    2009-01-01

    1. Recent advances in occupancy estimation that adjust for imperfect detection have provided substantial improvements over traditional approaches and are receiving considerable use in applied ecology. To estimate and adjust for detectability, occupancy modelling requires multiple surveys at a site and requires the assumption of 'closure' between surveys, i.e. no changes in occupancy between surveys. Violations of this assumption could bias parameter estimates; however, little work has assessed model sensitivity to violations of this assumption or how commonly such violations occur in nature. 2. We apply a modelling procedure that can test for closure to two avian point-count data sets in Montana and New Hampshire, USA, that exemplify time-scales at which closure is often assumed. These data sets illustrate different sampling designs that allow testing for closure but are currently rarely employed in field investigations. Using a simulation study, we then evaluate the sensitivity of parameter estimates to changes in site occupancy and evaluate a power analysis developed for sampling designs that is aimed at limiting the likelihood of closure. 3. Application of our approach to point-count data indicates that habitats may frequently be open to changes in site occupancy at time-scales typical of many occupancy investigations, with 71% and 100% of species investigated in Montana and New Hampshire respectively, showing violation of closure across time periods of 3 weeks and 8 days respectively. 4. Simulations suggest that models assuming closure are sensitive to changes in occupancy. Power analyses further suggest that the modelling procedure we apply can effectively test for closure. 5. Synthesis and applications. Our demonstration that sites may be open to changes in site occupancy over time-scales typical of many occupancy investigations, combined with the sensitivity of models to violations of the closure assumption, highlights the importance of properly addressing

  9. Occupational cancer in Britain

    PubMed Central

    Van Tongeren, Martie; Jimenez, Araceli S; Hutchings, Sally J; MacCalman, Laura; Rushton, Lesley; Cherrie, John W

    2012-01-01

    To estimate the current occupational cancer burden due to past exposures in Britain, estimates of the number of exposed workers at different levels are required, as well as risk estimates of cancer due to the exposures. This paper describes the methods and results for estimating the historical exposures. All occupational carcinogens or exposure circumstances classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as definite or probable human carcinogens and potentially to be found in British workplaces over the past 20–40 years were included in this study. Estimates of the number of people exposed by industrial sector were based predominantly on two sources of data, the CARcinogen EXposure (CAREX) database and the UK Labour Force Survey. Where possible, multiple and overlapping exposures were taken into account. Dose–response risk estimates were generally not available in the epidemiological literature for the cancer–exposure pairs in this study, and none of the sources available for obtaining the numbers exposed provided data by different levels of exposure. Industrial sectors were therefore assigned using expert judgement to ‘higher'- and ‘lower'-exposure groups based on the similarity of exposure to the population in the key epidemiological studies from which risk estimates had been selected. Estimates of historical exposure prevalence were obtained for 41 carcinogens or occupational circumstances. These include exposures to chemicals and metals, combustion products, other mixtures or groups of chemicals, mineral and biological dusts, physical agents and work patterns, as well as occupations and industries that have been associated with increased risk of cancer, but for which the causative agents are unknown. There were more than half a million workers exposed to each of six carcinogens (radon, solar radiation, crystalline silica, mineral oils, non-arsenical insecticides and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin); other agents to which a large

  10. Defining Occupational Illnesses and Injuries

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    This technical report will discuss the definitions of occupational illnesses and injuries as established by the Occupational Safety and Health...Administration (OSHA). A systematic method for classifying an occupational event as either an illness or an injury will be presented. The Air Force is...required to collect occupational injury and illness data, to analyze collected data, and to establish preventive programs based upon any identified unsafe

  11. Military Occupational Health Surveillance Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-06-01

    Responses were received from 37 HSC medical treatment facilities (100%) regarding their occupational health surveillance programs. The occupational ...personnel determined to be potentially exposed to occupational or job- related hazards, medical surveillance programs are limited, if available at all. An...exposed to occupational or job-related hazards would require more adequate staffing to provide the services. Identification of personnel at risk could be

  12. Data security in occupational health.

    PubMed

    Damrongsak, Mantana; Brown, Kathleen C

    2008-10-01

    Occupational health nurses are increasingly using computer systems in the delivery of efficient, high-quality occupational health services. However, potential breaches in data security are posing more risks to these data systems. The purpose of this article is to address concerns related to data security in occupational health nursing. Occupational health nurses must protect the personal health information of employees by proactively developing methods to ensure data security.

  13. A Psychological Classification of Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, John L.; And Others

    This occupational classification for practical and theoretical use in vocational guidance, occupational research, vocational education, and social science rests upon a theory of personality types and includes 431 common occupations which comprise about 95 percent of the United States labor force. Each of the classification's six main classes…

  14. Masonry. Occupational Competency Analysis Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Vocational Instructional Materials Lab.

    This Occupational Competency Analysis Profile (OCAP) for masonry occupations contains a competency list verified by expert workers and developed through a modified DACUM (Developing a Curriculum) involving business, industry, labor, and community agency representatives from Ohio. This OCAP identifies the occupational, academic, and employability…

  15. Occupational health nursing practice through the Human Caring lens.

    PubMed

    Noel, Dianne L

    2010-01-01

    Many health care and academic centers have adopted Watson's Theory of Human Caring as their guiding principle; the theory is also used in other disciplines, such as library science. Human caring theory offers occupational health nurses as structure that not only defines a focus for practice, but also provides a basis for moral and philosophical practice analyses. In particular, nurses may find this theory useful in confirming the definition of "caring" and reconsidering what nursing is all about. More importantly, consideration and application of this theory may lead to research on its applicability to the field of occupational health nursing. This article presents the science and philosophy of human caring, specifically Watson's Theory of Human Caring. Two case studies are presented that demonstrate how the theory could be used to evaluate occupational health nursing practice. To demonstrate its possible relevance as an occupational health nursing framework, an analysis of and comparison to existing occupational health nursing guidelines are detailed and discussed.

  16. Occupational therapy in operation outreach.

    PubMed

    Stout, J D; Atkins, J; Hamann, C

    1989-01-01

    A mobile outreach program is presented here as a response to the rapidly expanding demand for occupational therapy services in the field of developmental disabilties. Histroical overview of Operation Outreach will include discussion of societal trends influencing the program as well as factual information specific to the Indiana University (IU) experience. Demand for increased productivity and efficiency with cost containment led to IU's modified truck, housing a complete mobile adapted equipment laboratory, for convenient on-site evaluations and service of Wheelchair and custom designed posistioning equipment. Operation Outreach was designed for the developmental disabled to help address the needs of the whole person in his own enviornment, to enhance wellness, and to improve quality of life.

  17. White paper on occupational regulation.

    PubMed

    Rops, Mickie S

    2004-12-01

    There are many ways that occupations are regulated, with the degree of regulation usually depending on the amount of harm to the public that lack of regulation could bring. Strict regulations, such as mandatory licensure, are established through state law and maintained by a state board. Less strict regulations, such as voluntary credentialing, may be requirements by employers or third-party payers. This white paper reviews the possible approaches ASET could take toward regulation of the practice of electroneurodiagnostic technology: maintain position of neutrality, advocate for no statutory regulation of END, advocate for statutory regulation of END, or advocate for voluntary credentialing. The routes taken by other allied health fields are outlined, with exploration of the advantages and disadvantages of each option, as well as what would be required of ASET in terms of time and other resources to achieve each option. The appendix is a summary of entry requirements of several healthcare professions.

  18. Occupational Conversion Index; Enlisted/Officer/Civilian.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-03-01

    This index is a compilation of DoD officer and enlisted occupational specialties and Civil Service ’white collar’ and ’blue collar’ occupations under...two similar occupational grouping structures. The first structure contains enlisted occupations, certain occupations in the General Schedule (GS...and a few wage board occupations. This index is intended to serve as an occupational coding structure, designed to group similar occupations from one

  19. Clarifying the Construct of Occupational Engagement for Occupational Therapy Practice.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Jennifer; Davis, Jane A

    2017-04-01

    Occupational engagement (OE) has been presented as a core construct in occupational therapy; however, its broad conceptualization and confounding definitions are problematic. Clarifying the construct of OE would help occupational therapists to explicate the nature of their practice. The purpose of this study was to explore occupational therapists' perspectives of the construct of OE. Qualitative descriptive methodology was used to collect data using semistructured interviews with nine practicing occupational therapists in the Greater Toronto Area. Qualitative content analysis, using an inductive approach, was employed to uncover emerging categories. Participants spoke about transitioning from therapeutic engagement to OE with a client by following a client's path of choice. The essential elements and influencers of OE were highlighted, and the relationship between OE and occupational performance was discussed. The findings provide an initial understanding of essential elements necessary to enable clients to initiate engagement in therapy and then, subsequently, in occupations of their choice.

  20. Neurodegenerative diseases: occupational occurrence and potential risk factors, 1982 through 1991.

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, P A; Burnett, C A; Boeniger, M F; Johnson, J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify potential occupational risk factors, this study examined the occupational occurrence of various neurodegenerative diseases. METHODS: Death certificates from 27 states in the National Occupational Mortality Surveillance System were evaluated for 1982 to 1991. Proportionate mortality ratios were calculated by occupation for presenile dementia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and motor neuron disease. RESULTS: Excess mortality was observed for all four categories in the following occupational categories: teachers; medical personnel; machinists and machine operators; scientists; writers/designers/entertainers; and support and clerical workers. Clusters of three neurodegenerative diseases were also found in occupations involving pesticides, solvents, and electromagnetic fields and in legal, library, social, and religious work. Early death from motor neuron disease was found for firefighters, janitors, military personnel, teachers, excavation machine operators, and veterinarians, among others. CONCLUSIONS: Neurodegenerative disease occurs more frequently in some occupations than in others, and this distribution, which may indicate occupational risk factors, should be further investigated. PMID:8806381

  1. Health Occupations. Education for Employment Task Lists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lake County Area Vocational Center, Grayslake, IL.

    The duties and tasks found in these task lists form the basis of instructional content for secondary, postsecondary, and adult occupational training programs for health occupations. The health occupations are divided into five clusters. The clusters and occupations are: health occupations, nursing occupations (home health aide, geriatric aide,…

  2. Graduate education in occupational hygiene: a rational framework.

    PubMed

    Vincent, James H

    2005-11-01

    Occupational hygiene has been an important part of occupational health since it first emerged after World War II as the science and art that deals with the anticipation, recognition, evaluation and control of human exposures to hazards in the working environment. A need exists for well-qualified professionals who can not only respond to hazards that are currently known and understood, but also to ones that are not yet known or understood. For this, graduate-level academic programs in occupational hygiene must go beyond the training of skills and imparting of facts. Rather they must provide the education that enables the development of critical faculties, allowing future self-learning and the study of new scenarios not yet anticipated. Ideally, occupational hygiene should be taught firstly in the interdisciplinary context of the whole of occupational health (including occupational medicine, occupational health nursing, occupational safety and ergonomics) and secondly in relation to the wider field of public health (including epidemiology and biostatistics). In addition, modern occupational hygiene education also needs to embrace the management and social sciences. The Education and Research Centers (ERCs) sponsored in the United States by the National Institute of Occupational Health (NIOSH) have refined this approach and provided a useful model for all occupational hygiene education, identifying the need for both masters and doctoral-level endeavor. Other countries might usefully consider integrating existing academic programs in order to emulate the NIOSH approach, perhaps through internal and external partnerships. In terms of content, such education needs to be carried out within a framework that places human exposure to hazardous agents at the center of the anticipation-recognition-evaluation-control rationale. Such a framework also places occupational hygiene in the context of the other occupational and environmental health disciplines. Finally it has to be

  3. Occupational cancer in France: epidemiology, toxicology, prevention, and compensation.

    PubMed Central

    Aubrun, J C; Binet, S; Bozec, C; Brochard, P; Dimerman, S; Fontaine, B; Guénel, P; Luce, D; Martinet, Y; Moulin, J J; Mur, J M; Pietruszynski, M; Vallayer, C

    1999-01-01

    This article is a description of the current situation in France with regard to occupational cancer: research, prevention, and occupation. Toxicologic experiments are carried out using (italic)in vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) tests, particularly using transgenic mice. Several epidemiologic studies have been conducted over the last decades: population-based case-control studies; mortality studies and cancer incidence studies carried out in historical cohorts of workers employed in the industry; and case-control studies nested in occupational cohorts. French ethical aspects of toxicologic and epidemiologic studies are described. The results thus obtained are used to establish regulations for the prevention and the compensation of cancers attributable to occupational exposure. This French regulation for prevention of occupational cancer involves several partners: (italic)a(/italic)) the states authorities, including labor inspectors, responsible for preparing and implementing the labor legislation and for supervising its application, particularly in the fields of occupational health and safety and working conditions; (italic)b(/italic)) the Social Security Organisation for the analysis of present or potential occupational risks based on tests, visits in plants, complaints or requests from various sources, and statistics. These activities are performed within the framework of the general French policy for the prevention of occupational cancer. This organization includes the National Institute for Research and Safety, particularly involved in research in the various fields of occupational risks--animal toxicology, biologic monitoring, exposure measurements epidemiology, psychology, ergonomy, electronic systems and machineries, exposure to chemicals, noise, heat, vibration, and lighting; and (italic)c(/italic)) companies where the regulation defines the role of the plant manager, the occupational physician, and the Health, Safety and Working Conditions

  4. Occupational exposure in Portugal in 1999.

    PubMed

    Alves, J G; Martins, M B; Amaral, E M

    2001-01-01

    This study reports the occupational radiation doses for external exposure received in 1999 by the radiation workers monitored by the Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety Department (DPRSN) in Portugal. Occupational exposures arise from conventional industry, research laboratories, the health or medical sector, and mining. There are no nuclear power plants in the country. There are two dosimetry systems running simultaneously at DPRSN, one based on film dosimetry and the other on thermoluminescence dosimetry (TLD). In 1999, 8400 persons were monitored, 3100 with film and 5300 with TLD and the data presented in this report were obtained by using both technologies. The annual mean effective doses received from external radiation in the different fields of activity and the distribution of the annual effective dose by dose intervals are presented. The collective annual dose by field of activity is estimated and the contribution to the total annual collective dose is determined.

  5. [Positive occupational health psychology: an introduction].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Arnold B; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo

    2012-02-01

    This article introduces the monographic section on Positive Occupational Health Psychology (POHP), presenting eight theoretical and empirical papers about diverse topics. Traditionally, research on occupational health has mainly been focused on causes of diseases and on identifying and preventing work factors related to worker's impaired health. However, this biased view may not provide a complete understanding of the mechanisms that lead to employee well-being and performance. We discuss the differences of POHP with similar constructs, and review reasons for its importance in the development of this field. Overall, the studies included in the monographic section show the usefulness of focusing on positive constructs, and present ideas and questions that we hope may help to further our progress in the field of POHP.

  6. Occupational health in Cuba.

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, M R

    1981-01-01

    Health and safety regulation, training, and research were practically non-existent in Cuba before the Revolution in 1959. Since that time important advances have been made. Specialized inspectors, occupational physicians, and other such personnel are now trained in Cuba. An Occupational Health Institute, founded in 1976, provides training and specialized technical services, and conducts research. In 1978, a far reaching "Work Safety and Health Law" was enacted which defines the rights and responsibility of government agencies, workplace administrators, unions, and workers. Comprehensive control of toxic substances in workplaces, still at an early stage, is likely to increase in light of the new law, the growing availability of qualified personnel, and the mounting concern of public health authorities with the increasingly "developed" health profile of the population. PMID:7212141

  7. Occupational musculoskeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Peate, W F

    1994-06-01

    Musculoskeletal disorders of the workplace include the acute, cumulative and chronic injuries or illnesses of the soft tissues which are caused by mechanical stress, strain, sprain, vibration, inflammation, or irritation. The successful management of occupational musculoskeletal disorders must account for workplace conditions (ergonomics and work practices), psychosocial factors, diagnostic uncertainties, and the need for active modalities (exercises and a progressive increase in activities of daily living), rather than passive (bed rest and traction). Although most occupational musculoskeletal disorders respond to conservative measures such as ice or heat, protective devices such as, neutral splints for carpal tunnel syndrome, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and progressive strengthening, resolution may take months. Prevention is often more important than treatment, and may entail workplace revisions and special worker training. Worker selection programs--strength testing, pre-placement radiographs, and inquiries about prior low back pain--have poor predictive value.

  8. Occupational asthma in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Research into occupational asthma (OA) in Japan has been led by the Japanese Society of Occupational and Environmental Allergy. The first report about allergic OA identified konjac asthma. After that, many kinds of OA have been reported. Cases of some types of OA, such as konjac asthma and sea squirt asthma, have been dramatically reduced by the efforts of medical personnel. Recently, with the development of new technologies, chemical antigen-induced asthma has increased in Japan. Due to advances in anti-asthma medication, control by medical treatment tends to be emphasized and the search for causative antigens seems to be neglected. Furthermore, we do not have a Japanese guideline for diagnosis and management of OA. This article discusses the current state of OA in Japan. PMID:22872819

  9. Occupational Contact Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Occupational contact dermatitis accounts for 90% of all cases of work-related cutaneous disorders. It can be divided into irritant contact dermatitis, which occurs in 80% of cases, and allergic contact dermatitis. In most cases, both types will present as eczematous lesions on exposed parts of the body, notably the hands. Accurate diagnosis relies on meticulous history taking, thorough physical examination, careful reading of Material Safety Data Sheets to distinguish between irritants and allergens, and comprehensive patch testing to confirm or rule out allergic sensitization. This article reviews the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of occupational contact dermatitis and provides diagnostic guidelines and a rational approach to management of these often frustrating cases. PMID:20525126

  10. Occupation and gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Raj, A; Mayberry, J; Podas, T

    2003-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality. There are several risk factors, with occupation emerging as one of these. There is considerable evidence that occupations in coal and tin mining, metal processing, particularly steel and iron, and rubber manufacturing industries lead to an increased risk of gastric cancer. Other "dusty" occupations—for example, wood processing, or work in high temperature environments have also been implicated but the evidence is not strong. The mechanism of pathogenesis of gastric cancer is unclear and the identification of causative agents can be difficult. Dust is thought to be a contributor to the pathological process, but well known carcinogens such as N-nitroso compounds have been detected in some environments. Further research on responsible agents is necessary and screening for detection of precursor gastric cancer lesions at the workplace merits consideration. PMID:12782770

  11. Occupational Structures and Profiles in the Federal Republic of Germany in the Field of Environmental Protection in the Public Service Sector with Reference to Air Pollution Control. CEDEFOP Panorama. National Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitschke, Christoph; Funderich, Kirk

    A study examined the knowledge and job skills required of persons employed in air pollution control-related occupations in Germany's public service sector. In all, 18 persons from 11 offices in 10 public institutions were interviewed. In seven cases, two people from the same institution (one performing managerial duties and the other directly…

  12. IEQ and the impact on building occupants

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Satish; Fisk, William J.

    2002-08-01

    Research into indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and its effects on health, comfort and performance of occupants is becoming increasingly essential. Facility managers are interested in IEQ's close relationship to energy use. Employers hope to enhance employee comfort and productivity, reduce absenteeism and health-care costs, and reduce risk of litigation. The rising interest in this field has placed additional pressure on the research community for practical guidelines on creating a safe, healthy and comfortable indoor environment.

  13. [The emergence of positive occupational health psychology].

    PubMed

    Bakker, Arnold B; Rodríguez-Muñoz, Alfredo; Derks, Daantje

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the emerging concept of Positive Occupational Health Psychology (POHP). We discuss the usefulness of focusing on positive constructs in order to understand the path to health and well-being at work. We describe research findings on several POHP topics, including engagement, psychological capital, and job crafting. Additionally, we review the first positive interventions in this field and conclude by identifying some specific questions for future research.

  14. Occupational Health in Mountainous Kyrgyzstan.

    PubMed

    Dzhusupov, Kenesh O; Colosio, Claudio; Tabibi, Ramin; Sulaimanova, Cholpon T

    2015-01-01

    In the period of transition from a centralized economy to the market economy, occupational health services in Kyrgyzstan have survived through dramatic, detrimental changes. It is common for occupational health regulations to be ignored and for basic occupational health services across many industrial enterprises and farms to be neglected. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the present situation and challenges facing occupational health services in Kyrgyzstan. The transition from centralized to the market economy in Kyrgyzstan has led to increased layoffs of workers and unemployment. These threats are followed by increased workload, and the health and safety of workers becomes of little concern. Private employers ignore occupational health and safety; consequently, there is under-reporting of occupational diseases and accidents. The majority of enterprises, especially those of small or medium size, are unsanitary, and the health status of workers remains largely unknown. The low official rates of occupational diseases are the result of data being deliberately hidden; lack of coverage of working personnel by medical checkups; incompetent management; and the poor quality of staff, facilities, and equipment. Because Kyrgyzstan is a mountainous country, the main environmental and occupational factor of enterprises is hypoxia. Occupational health specialists have greatly contributed to the development of occupational medicine in the mountains through science and practice. The enforcement of existing strong occupational health legislation and increased financing of occupational health services are needed. The maintenance of credible health monitoring and effective health services for workers, re-establishment of medical services and sanitary-hygienic laboratories in industrial enterprises, and support for scientific investigations on occupational risk assessment will increase the role of occupational health services in improving the health of the working population

  15. Human occupancy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    1994-10-01

    In the area of security and surveillance technologies, the problem of the arrival in Canada of illegal and undesirable ship and truck cargo loads is steadily increasing. As the volumes of cargo arrivals increase so do the Immigration and Customs problems related to the determination of the validity of those cargo contents. Of special concern to Immigration Control Authorities around the world is the emerging and increasing trend of illegal smuggling of human beings hidden inside of shipping containers. Beginning in 1992, Immigration Control Authorities in Canada observed an escalation of alien people smuggling through the use of cargo shipping containers arriving in the Port of Montreal. This paper will present to the audience the recently completed Immigration Canada Human Occupancy Detection project by explaining the design, development and testing of human occupancy detectors. The devices are designed to electronically detect the presence of persons hiding inside of shipping containers, without the requirement of opening the container doors. The human occupancy detection concepts are based upon the presence of carbon dioxide or other human waste characteristics commonly found inside of shipping containers.

  16. Occupational cancer in Germany.

    PubMed Central

    Brüske-Hohlfeld, I

    1999-01-01

    As in probably mostly all other European countries, the incidence of occupational cancer in Germany increased steadily after World War II. In 1994 about 1,600 cases of occupational cancer were compensated--more than ever before. More than half of these cases were lung cancer, most caused either by asbestos (n=545) or by ionizing radiation ((italic)n(/italic)=306). Other frequent target organs of asbestos were the pleura and the peritoneum with 495 cases of mesotheliomas. Asbestos was the single most important risk factor for occupational cancer, causing more than 1000 deaths per year. All other malignant diseases, such as bladder cancer, leukemia, angiosarcoma of the liver, adenocarcinoma of the nose or nasal sinuses, and skin cancer, were comparatively rare. Although primary exposure to ionizing radiation in uranium ore mining occurred in the 1950s and attributable lung cancers seem to be on the decline, this is not true for asbestos, where the peak incidence in lung cancer and mesothelioma has not been reached yet. Images Figure 2 PMID:10350508

  17. Occupational Medicine and Hygiene: applied research in Italy.

    PubMed

    Copello, F; Garbarino, S; Messineo, A; Campagna, M; Durando, P

    2015-08-05

    The goal of Occupational Medicine and Hygiene is that of ensuring safety, health and well-being at workplaces, mainly assessing and preventing existing occupational risks. Scientific research in this field can provide useful arguments and further evidence upon which effective, efficient and sustainable policies and preventive measures have to be chosen and applied by the occupational physician in work-life. This paper summarizes four original studies, conducted in different professional settings across Italy, focusing on critical items, such as stress and violence, biological risks and sleep hygiene. The knowledge obtained can be useful to orientate proper preventive programs aimed at improving workplace health.

  18. Promoting Translational Research Among Movement Science, Occupational Science, and Occupational Therapy.

    PubMed

    Sainburg, Robert L; Liew, Sook-Lei; Frey, Scott H; Clark, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Integration of research in the fields of neural control of movement and biomechanics (collectively referred to as movement science) with the field of human occupation directly benefits both areas of study. Specifically, incorporating many of the quantitative scientific methods and analyses employed in movement science can help accelerate the development of rehabilitation-relevant research in occupational therapy (OT) and occupational science (OS). Reciprocally, OT and OS, which focus on the performance of everyday activities (occupations) to promote health and well-being, provide theoretical frameworks to guide research on the performance of actions in the context of social, psychological, and environmental factors. Given both fields' mutual interest in the study of movement as it relates to health and disease, the authors posit that combining OS and OT theories and principles with the theories and methods in movement science may lead to new, impactful, and clinically relevant knowledge. The first step is to ensure that individuals with OS or OT backgrounds are academically prepared to pursue advanced study in movement science. In this article, the authors propose 2 strategies to address this need.

  19. Occupational contact allergy to monomeric isocyanates.

    PubMed

    Aalto-Korte, Kristiina; Suuronen, Katri; Kuuliala, Outi; Henriks-Eckerman, Maj-Len; Jolanki, Riitta

    2012-08-01

    The monomeric isocyanates diphenylmethane diisocyanate (MDI), 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI), isophorone diisocyanate (IPDI) and 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI) are used in polyurethane products and sometimes cause contact allergy. To describe patients with isocyanate contact allergy in an occupational dermatology clinic. Test files were screened for allergic reactions to isocyanates and 4,4'-diaminodiphenylmethane (MDA). Patients with allergic reactions to some of the allergens were analysed for occupation, exposure, concomitant reactions to other allergens, and diagnosis. Over a period of almost 13 years, 54 patients reacted to isocyanates (9 to IPDI, 12 to MDI, 6 to TDI, and 1 to HDI) or MDA (44 patients). The motor vehicle, electronics and paint industries, and painting and construction work, were among the most significant occupational fields. An in-house polymeric MDI (PMDI) test substance was superior to commercial MDI preparations. About half of the occupational cases related to MDI products were diagnosed by testing MDA. The most prominent cause of IPDI allergy comprised polyurethane paint hardeners. Some of the IPDI reactions could be explained by cross-allergy to isophoronediamine in epoxy products. Specific exposure to MDA was difficult to trace. MDA and PMDI test substances were significant in the diagnosis of MDI contact allergy. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  20. [Certified occupational physician system of Japan Society for Occupational Health].

    PubMed

    Ogami, Akira; Higashi, Toshiaki

    2013-10-01

    Certified Occupational Physician System (COPS) of Japan Society for Occupational Health has been in existence for 21 years, since 1992. UOEH has supported this system as a secretary general. In this report, we review the 2012 revision of COPS. With the new title of Certified Associate Occupational Physician (CAOP), this revision was established to produce well-educated and experienced occupational physicians. The title of COP is not competitive but independent to other titles such as occupational physician, medical advisor in industrial health or industrial health consultant. In addition, the aim of COPS is not the replacement to these existing systems. Furthermore, the COP should be active in industrial and occupational health, and should cooperate with existing systems through the sharing of experience and knowledge.